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OCTOB E R 2016

MARIECLAIRE.CO.UK

Skin SOS RESCUE,

What he’s not saying about sex

defend

& BOOST yours now

Britney’s back

G l o b a l ca m p a i g n

# No t S o r r y

Help us send every girl to school

Why it’s time to stop people pleasing

Fashion

special

90 pages of gorgeous looks


www.chanel.com

CHANEL


PHOTOGRAPH BY DREW WHEELER. HAIR AND MAKE-UP BY ADELE SANDERSON. TRISH WEARS SHIRT, ROBERTO CAVALLI AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

Editor’s letter

13

‘I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school. All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.’ When Malala Yousafzai spoke those words, she was speaking for millions of girls around the world (62 million if we’re being precise), who are denied an education. Of all the many issues we have covered at Marie Claire over the past 27 years, this is the one I feel most passionately about. Not only because the young girls who are my daughter’s age would be given a way out of grinding poverty, sexual exploitation and worse, but also because of how empowering education is – the self-belief it engenders, the confidence it gives a child to hope and dream, and ultimately build communities and countries that will serve them better. So, I’m delighted that this month we’re partnering with L’Occitane to raise £300k for education projects in Malala’s home country, Pakistan, as well as Cambodia and Burkina Faso. It’s really simple to help us – all you need to do is buy one of our special ‘Light up my future’ candles (£8 in L’Occitane stores or online at loccitane.co.uk). Easy, right? For more information, and to see the difference it will make, turn to page 106 (and please get on board with our social media campaign #sharethelight, too). Another project that I am beyond excited about this month is the launch of Fabled by Marie Claire, our brand new online beauty emporium (Fabled.com) and flagship store in central London. It’s a completely new way to shop for all your favourite premium and niche beauty brands, and have them delivered straight to your door in a one-hour slot (6.30am-11pm), seven days a week. You’ll find lots of fantastic advice from the Marie Claire beauty experts online and in-store, too. Plus, this month we’re offering readers a 15 per cent discount, as we’d love for you to be the first to try it. It would be great to hear what you think about Fabled by Marie Claire, and also our new look, which you may have noticed we’re sporting right now. ‘Modern femininity’ has been our inspiration for what we think is a fresh, new interpretation of Marie Claire. I hope you like it.

TRISH HALPIN Editor in Chief @trishhalpin


TABLE OF

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112 C OVER STORIE S

2 71

45 Fashion special Ninety pages of gorgeous looks

106 Global campaign Help us send every girl to school

132 Men What he’s not saying about sex

139 #NotSorry Why it’s time to stop people-pleasing

230 Britney’s back

230

She’s done it again

271 Skin SOS Rescue, defend and boost yours now

47 Trends: knits, goth and texture 53 The one: Prada’s setting sail 55 Escape your style rut 61 My style 9-5 Beste and Merve Manastir of Manu Atelier

62 Hot list

66

66 Style edit: coats 74 Fashion details 76 #Curve 78 Marie Claire goes shopping 82 Accessories special 330 Finishing touches Cool-girl add-ons

FEAT URE S 112 An education The stars supporting our education campaign

127 Newsfeed

82

FA SHION FIR ST


LONGCHAMP.COM


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142 When Gigi met Tommy The Hadid-Hilfiger collaboration

149 Is it time you tried the career blend? RIP the nine-to-five

153 What it feels like…

196

To choose between your partner and your parents

154 Life stories Photographer Annie Leibovitz

163 Reporter 303 All in your mind? How your mood affects your health

311 Deluxe

208

Food, interiors and more

320 Travel Discover Costa Rica

327 On location Inspo from Palm Springs and Marrakech

SHOE S FIR ST 177 Trends 183 A tale of two tones Behind the scenes at Chanel

163

186 All the news in shoes 189 Work AW16’s trickiest trends

FA SHION 196 Come undone Nudes and nonchalant cuts

208 Puff piece Size up this season’s coats

220 The history girls Fashion’s medieval moment

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BEAU T Y 245 Beauty news The cat-eye gets a bold twist

246 Lisa O Loves 249 Hair buzz The hot cross bun

250

250 Power player Natalie Portman’s beauty secrets

26 The edit

265

Glow-getting highlighters

263 Beauty rules Model and actress Lily James

265 Mapping your fragrance

295

Trace your scent back to its roots

EVERY MONTH 13 Editor’s letter 36 MC HQ 160 How to subscribe

Photograph by David Roemer. Styled by Jayne Pickering. Hair by Lorenzo Martin at The Wall Group. Make-up by Mary Phillips at Something Artists. Britney wears jacket, Burberry. Recreate Britney’s make-up with Flawless Foundation Perfectly Satin 24H R Makeup, £29; Beautiful Color Bronzing Duo, £27; Beautiful Color Bold Illuminating Liquid Highlighter, £26; Beautiful Color Natural Eye Brow Pencil in Natural Beige, £17; Beautiful Color Eye Shadow in Smolder and Truffle, £18 each; Beautiful Color Smoky Eyes Pencil in Espresso, £17; Grand Entrance Mascara, £22; Beautiful Color Moisturising Lipstick in Pale Petal, £21, all Elizabeth Arden


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ART

ART EDITOR Maria Bancroft ASSOCIATE ART EDITOR Elizabeth Villabona ACTING ASSOCIATE ART EDITOR Lexi Henderson

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DEPUTY PICTURE EDITOR Sarah Shillaker

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FAS H I O N H U B

HEAD OF PRODUCTION Nicola Moyne DEPUTY HEAD OF PRODUCTION Sophie Davis CHIEF SUB-EDITOR Claire Hearn SUB-EDITO R Léa Teuscher DEPUTY ART EDITOR Bryony MacQueen

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DIGITAL EDITOR Hannah Lyons Powell DIGITAL DEPUTY EDITOR Holly Rains DIGITAL BEAUTY EDITOR Natalie Lukaitis MULTI-MEDIA EDITOR Sunil Makan DIGITAL EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Lucy Abbersteen VIDEOGRAPHER Andrea Moro

Bag, £1 ,9 0 0 ,

D io r

(12 MONTHLY ISSUES, INC P&P): UK £43.20. Priority mail: EUROPE (3-5 days) €117; NORTH AMERICA (5-7 days) $229; REST OF THE WORLD (5-7 days) £148. Direct entry USA (5-12 days) $113. Cheques payable to Time Inc. (UK) Ltd. For enquiries and orders, please email help@magazinesdirect.com. Alternatively, from the UK, call 0330 333 1113 or from overseas, call +44 330 333 1113 (lines open Monday-Friday GMT 8.30am5.30pm, excluding bank holidays). To obtain back issues, call 01733 385170 or go to mags-uk.com/timeinc. Marie Claire is a registered trademark. Copyright © 2014 Marie Claire Album, Paris. Prices quoted in this issue are correct at time of going to press. Distribution by Marketforce (UK) Ltd, Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU (020 3148 3333); printed in Great Britain by Wyndeham Bicester; repro by Rhapsody Limited; cover printed at Wyndeham Peterborough. Sole agents: Australia and New Zealand, Gordon & Gotch (Asia) Ltd; South Africa, Central News Agency Ltd. Marie Claire (main issue 0955-0178; compact size 17438306) is published monthly by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU, England. The 2014 US annual subscription price is $113. Airfreight and mailing in the USA by agent named Air Business Ltd, c/o Worldnet Shipping Inc, 156-15, 146th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434, USA. Periodicals postage paid at Jamaica NY 11434. US Postmaster: send address changes to Marie Claire, Air Business Ltd, c/o Worldnet Shipping Inc, 156-15, 146th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434, USA. Subscription records are maintained at Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU, England. Air Business Ltd is acting as our mailing agent. Marie Claire is sold subject to these conditions: that it shall not, without written consent of the Publishers first given, be lent, resold, hired out or otherwise disposed of by way of Trade at more than the recommended selling price shown on the cover (selling price in Eire subject to VAT), and that it shall not be lent, resold, hired out or otherwise disposed of in a mutilated condition or in any unauthorised cover by way of Trade or annexed to or as part of any publication or advertising, literary or pictorial matter whatsoever. Marie Claire cannot accept responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts and photographs. We reserve the right to publish and edit any letters. This issue is on sale 1 September 2016

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Marie Claire International STRATEGY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Laurence Hembert EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Jean de Boisdeffre INTERNATIONAL DEPUTY & FINANCE DIRECTOR Félix Droissart INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Nicia Rodwell EDITORIAL STRATEGY ADVISOR Florence du Luart INTERNATIONAL CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER Séverine Harzo INTERNATIONAL CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER Ludovic Lecomte INTERNATIONAL FASHION & BEAUTY CHIEF EDITOR Sylvie Halic INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR Véronique Depery INTERNATIONAL DEPUTY COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR Elisabeth Barbier SYNDICATION DIRECTOR Thierry Lamarre BRANDED PRODUCTS DIRECTOR Fabrice Taupin

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MARKETING & PROMOTIONS

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AG E NCY I NVESTM E NT

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INTERNATIONAL FASHION DIRECTOR Hannah Freeman 020 3148 7582 HEAD OF UK FASHION, WATCHES & JEWELLERY Charlotte Pennington 020 3148 7574 HEAD OF BEAUTY Sally Mote 020 3148 7578 ADVERTISING BUSINESS MANAGER Helen Martis 020 3148 7573

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ADVERTISING


HUGOBOSS.COM


Meet the team PHOEBE SING

#OBJECTSOFDESIRE Are you following @marieclaireuk yet?

MARIE CLAIRE’S

Go behind the scenes in the fa s h i o n

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

c u p b o a rd a n d s e e wh a t ’s l a n d e d o n

Te l l u s w h a t y o u d o …

‘ I’ m th e c re a tive d ire c to r, s o I o ve rs e e and cre at e t he vi sual a e s th e tic o f th e ma g a zin e . ’

t h e b e a u t y d e s k ; # o b j e c t s o fd e s i re is your new hashtag addiction.

How many middle-of-the-night panics did you

Try sle epi ng w i t h j et - l a g in LA k n o win g yo u a re shooting B r i t ney S pea rs th e n ex t d a y !’ W h a t a r e y o u m o s t p r o u d o f ? ‘ Th e a c c e s s o rie s shoot o n page 8 2 – w e s h o t in th is c ra zy h o te l right o n Hy de Par k w i th o n e o f my fa vo u rite photogr apher s. I t w as a lo t o f fu n . ’ W h a t i s t h e r e t o o m u ch o f o n I n s t a g r a m ?

‘Long c apt i ons and hea p s o f h a s h ta g s – le t the vis ual do t he t al ki n g . ’ Give us your three fantasy dinner party guests…

BEAUTY TUTORIALS H OW TO : # C O N TO U R C a n y o u c o n t o u r? ( Ye s . Yo u . Can!) Join @natlukaitis, our digital beauty editor (she has a n I l l a m a s q u a Lo n d o n S ch o o l o f M a k e - u p A rt a c c o l a d e u n d e r h e r b e l t , F Y I ) fo r a v i d e o m a s t e rc l a s s i n g e t t i n g c o n t o u ri n g ri g h t .

Marie Claire HQ Never miss a beat: discover all the behind-the-scenes Help stars like

action, plus cool stuff and special events on our social feeds

Izzy Bizu spread the word ab out our campaign to give every girl an education. Follow #sharethelight, and buy our special L’Occitane candle, £8, at loccitane.co.uk.

F

JOIN THE CAMPAIGN

‘Mélan i e L aur ent , I t hi nk s h e ’s e n ch a n tin g . Willia m Egglest on, I l ov e hi s pho to s o f o rd in a ry s u b je c t matter, and E l ena Fer r a n te – I ju s t fin is h e d th e N eapol i t an novel s w hi ch we re b rillia n t. ’ B r e a k f a s t o n a w e e k d a y i s … ‘ Oa ts , c o c o n u t milk , blueber r i es, honey and b e e p o lle n if I’ m ru n d o wn . ’ M o s t - w o r n i t e m i n y o u r w a r d r o b e ? ‘ My Fila T-shirt. I w i sh i t w as offic e -a p p ro p ria te s o I could w ear i t mor e.’ I f m o n e y w a s n o o b j e c t … ‘ I’ d ta k e mys e lf a n d my closest f r i ends out to a b e a u tifu l is la n d somewher e and make s o me me mo rie s . ’

PHOTOGRAPHS BY ISAAC MARLEY MORGAN, DREW WHEELER

h a v e w h i l e r e d e s i g n i n g t h i s i s s u e ? ‘ A fa ir fe w.

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BOOK LIV G O I N G LIVE The clue’s in the title ��� liv e action from MC H Q. Don’t miss Niom i Sm art, author of Eat Smar t, who joins us on 6 Septem ber to whip up som e Nutribu llet recipes from her new b ook.

FOLLOW MARIE CLAIRE ON INSTAGRAM, TWITTER AND FACEBOOK @MARIECLAIREUK AND CHECK OUT MARIECLAIRE.CO.UK

E


fall in new york is... taking the front row seat.

katespade.co.uk covent garden | sloane square westfield london | regent street


45

RAG & B ON E

Fashion first

PHOTOGRAPH BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS

HOT RIGHT NOW... Knit hits Join the wool pack in winter’s swathe of totally lust-worthy knitwear

Special additions The devil’s in the (designer) details. Cue the key accessories to covet

Style reboots Dressing on autopilot? Catwalk-inspired ideas to update your look


Fashion first

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BALE NCIAGA

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COMPILED BY LUCIA DEBIEUX. PHOTOGRAPHS BY IMAXTREE, JASON LLOYD-EVANS. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

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Knits

Great yarns + stylish accessories = super cosy winter cool 01 Bag, £1,100, Pierre Hardy 02 Hat, £30, Pepe Jeans 03 Trousers, £175, Filippa K 0 4 E a r r i n g s , £ 4 1 0 , B a l l y 05 Watch, £295, GC Watches 06 Sweater, £55, Finery London 07 Skirt, £89, Gestuz 08 Shoes, £380, Mansur Gavriel 09 Bag, £29.99, Zara 10 Boots, £195, Whistles 11 Top, £79, COS 12 Dress, about £345, Tibi


49 Fashion first

Goth

Master the Dark Arts with luxe leather and lashings of lace – black magic, optional

01 Necklace, £42.99, Gemporia 02 Bra, £43, and briefs, £26, both Triumph 03 Shoes, £70, Aldo 04 Shoes, £42, Office 05 Blouse, £35, V by Very at Very.co.uk 06 Skirt, £49.99, H&M Studio 07 Bag, £450, Hill & Friends 08 Watch, £225, Larsson & Jennings 09 Dress, £320, Three Floor Fashion 10 Jacket, £2,345, Alexander McQueen

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ISABEL MARANT

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ISABEL MARANT

COMPILED BY LUCIA DEBIEUX. PHOTOGRAPHS BY IMAXTREE, JASON LLOYD-EVANS. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

PREEN

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MIU MIU

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Texture From brocade to bejewelled, the devil’s in the detail right now

01 Bag, £1,240, Miu Miu 02 Belt, £25, Topshop 03 Chain, £30, and pendant, £55, both Pandora 04 Blazer, £95, River Island 05 Boots, £115, Dune 06 Trousers, £40, ASOS 07 Pyjama top, £510, For Restless Sleepers 08 Skirt, £295, Kate Spade New York 09 Earrings, £290, Marni 10 Dress, £239, Baum und Pferdgarten 11 Shoes, £145, Essentiel Antwerp

STYLED BY LUCIA DEBIEUX. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

GUCCI

10


HAIR BY TERRI CAPON AT STELLA CREATIVE ARTISTS USING ORIBE. MAKE-UP BY MARTINA LATTANZI AT ONE REPRESENTS USING LANCÔME AND BUTTER LONDON.

Styling by DES LEWIS Photograph by ISAAC MARLEY MORGAN

Traverse the sea of global trends in a SAILOR-chic white cap and weather-worn CHECKS. It’s time to set sail, SARTORIALLY speaking

H a t , £ 2 2 5 , co a t , £ 3 , 7 1 5, a nd b us t i er, £ 5 9 0, a l l P r a d a

Fashion first

THE ONE

Hello, sailor

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visit www.marc-cain.com


55 Fashion first

Escape your style rut There’s a thin line between ‘signature style’ and predictable dresser. Time you switched things up? Here’s how…

your style icon is Pernille Teisbaek S leek , s i mp l e a nd fem i n i n e , b u t v o i d o f any colour. Granted, a monochrome palette is ea s y t o mi x an d m a t ch b ut i t ca n q ui ck l y b e co me mo no t o no us.

which means you’re a minimalist 03

01

STYLE TIP Team t his her o r ed coat wit h a whit e shir t and black t r o user combo for an edgier o ffice loo k.

MAX MARA

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J JS LEE

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so try adding pops of colour

CELINE

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0 1 S hi rt, £37 0 , Se a N e w York 0 2 Sh oe s, £ 69.99, Mango 03 Coat , £ 195, & Ot her St o r ies 04 B ag, £ 195 , Ru sse l l & Brom l e y 0 5 Earri n gs, £ 150, B y Malene B ir ger 06 S kir t , £ 335, R ejina P yo

EMILIA WICKSTEAD

Keep y ou r c l e an si l h ou e tte , bu t r efr es h you r sty l e wi th a st an dou t hi t o f bl ock -c ol ou re d se parate s.


56 your style icon is Caroline de Maigret B oyi sh bl aze rs an d l ai d-back trou se rs are you r st ap l e s. Bu t ad d i n g a tou ch of n e w-se ason f e m i n i n i ty i s e asy.

which means you’re a tomboy 02

01

We a r a t uni c d r es s o v er t a ilo re d t r o us er s , a s s een at Céline, or layer a corset over a shirt for serious style tyle y points. p

CELINE

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your style icon is Alicia Vikander B usy pr int s and embellishment ar e yo ur t hing. Just dit ch t he dr esses t o keep t hings fr esh.

05

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GUCCI

ELLERY

03 3 02

so try suiting up P r emi um p ri n te d su i ts are y ou r go-to ri gh t n ow. P l a y w i t h pre tty p atte rn s, th e n add y ou r adornment s 0 1 S hi r t , £2 6 8, an d m atch i n g trou se rs, £29 8, bot h Dr ake’s Lo ndo n fo r J Cr ew 02 Sweat er, £ 3 8, AS O S 0 3 Ri n g , £50 .9 9, G e m p ori a.c om 04 B ag, £ 140, U t er qüe 05 S andals, £ 60, Office

05

which means you’re a romantic

01

ETRO

01 £ 5 To £4 9, p, 06 45 Fin £29 Tr , J o e r y . 5 0 ou se L , se ph on Ma d rs , £ 05 on rks 35 Sh 03 & S , M o e To p e n ar s, p, ks £3 £8 cer & 80 9, 02 Sp , D H E en or obb arr ce at s ing e r ym 04 s, ur Co rs e

t,

so try the e layered vibe e


Fashion first

58

your style icon is Rihanna

COMPILED BY ABISOYE ODUGBESAN. PHOTOGRAPHS BY GETTY IMAGES REX FEATURES, IMAXTREE, JASON LLOYD-EVANS. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

Co mfo r t is key and ho o dies ar e your B F F. B ut designer s offer ed up dir ect io nal r ebo o t s fo r ur ban casuals t his season.

02

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EMILIO O PUCCI UCCI

which means you’re a street star

0 03

so try luxe elevated sportswear S wap yo ur t r acksuit bo t t o ms for a pair o f stirrup leggings for an inst ant upgrade. Q

PUMA X FENTY

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VERSACE S CE

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0 1 Tro us er s , £ 3 9, U r b a n Ou tf i tte rs 02 Coat, £6 6 0, To ry Bur ch 0 03 B ag, £2 8 0 , D i es el 0 4 B o o t s , £2 3 9, M arc Cai n 0 5 D re ss, £1 15 5 0, 0 , 2ndday dday

S STYLE TIIP A spor p t y dr e ess is just j as comfy com as t r ack pan pant p t s. Te Team wit h an nkle boo bo ot s f o r a b e t ake. e. biker

LACOSTE

V VETEMENTS S

1


N E W PA N D O R A LO C K E T S S T Y L E D B Y YO U Express your unique style with hand-finished lockets made from sterling silver. Make your locket personal by adding your favourite sparkling elements. Discover more at pandora.net and be inspired by #TheLookOfYou


‘WHEN WE GET DRESSED, our clothes need to make us feel somewhere between Batman and Nan Kempner [the late New York socialite],’ says Merve. ‘We both have a more masculine style but also love feminine, yet classic outfits.’ ‘DAD IS OUR INSPIRATION. He has been creating handbags for over 50 years. We co-founded our bag company to showcase his craftsmanship,’ says Merve. ‘Each piece of Manu Atelier is created by hand from the finest leathers.’ ‘EVERY WOMEN NEEDS A GREAT BAG,’ says Beste. ‘A unique, modern style brings an outfit together. Our hero bag is the “Pristine”– it’s a compact shape, yet fits in all you need.’ ‘WE’RE ALWAYS ON THE LOOK OUT FOR NEW BRANDS,’ adds Beste. ‘I’m obsessed with luxury denim label Re/Done. A pair of jeans and a masculine shirt in a soft colour will always make me feel fab.’ ‘JOSEPH AND JIL SANDER ARE OUR GO-TOS FOR WORKWEAR,’ says Merve. ‘You can pick up fail-safe staples like silk shirts and cigarette trousers.’ ‘RIGHT NOW, I CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT… a midi heel or a great flat,’ says Beste. ‘And my phone!’ ‘WE’RE BASED IN ISTANBUL. Work is busy, but we make time to explore vintage shops,’ says Merve. ‘I love hunting out other leather accessories and cute blouses.’

Merve (far left) wears Three Graces London blouse and trousers. Beste (left) wears Kenzo at Stylebop.com sweatshirt and skirt Top : Mer ve an d B est e’s on -the- go e ssent ials i n c l ude a p h one and ‘Pristine’ bag

STYLED BY ABISOYE ODUGBESAN. PHOTOGRAPHS BY PHILL TAYLOR. HAIR AND MAKE-UP BY RACHEL SINGER CLARK USING YSL BEAUTY AND L’OREAL PROFESSIONNEL HAIRCARE. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

9 to 5

My style Beste and Merve Manastir of Manu Atelier reveal their sartorial secrets 05 01 02 04 03

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0 1 Wa t ch, £ 2 5 9, E mp o ri o A rm an i 02 Trai n e rs, £48 , Con ver se at Schuh 03 S kir t , £ 395, MiH Jeans 04 S uper Cedar E D P, £ 90 fo r 5 0m l , B y r ed o 0 5 J a cke t, £95 , & Oth e r Stori e s 0 6 ‘Pri sti ne’ bag, £ 595, Manu At elier 07 Dr ess, £ 45, Dor ot hy Per kins 08 Jeans, £2 3 9 , S a nd r o 0 9 S hi r t, £7 4 .9 5, Part Two 10 Ph on e c ase , £ 90 , S t ella McCar t ney 11 S ho es, £ 150, Miist a at Ver yexclusive.co .uk

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HOT LIST

Our edit of the new high-street drops

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1 B a g, £ 9 5, & Oth e r Stori e s 2 Sh i rt, £ 3 6, Next 3 Dr ess, £ 75, AS O S 4 S kir t , £ 150, War ehouse 5 B o o t s , £ 5 9 .9 9 , M an go 6 Earri n gs (di f f e re nt st yles), £ 55 per pair, B imba y Lo la 7 B ag, £ 29.99, Zar a 8 Top , £ 79 .9 9 , H&M Stu di o 9 S an d al s, £ 89, F iner y Londo n 10 Tr o user s, £ 250, Whist les

COMPILED BY GRACE SMITHAM. PHOTOGRAPHS BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

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with

A new brand available exclusively at


Styled by DES LEWIS Photographs by MARIYA PEPELANOVA

Style edit From faux fur to future-proof puffas and camel capes, the latest coats have AW16 all wrapped up


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HOT FUZZ Opposite page: coat, £995, Topshop U n i q u e ; s w ea t er, £ 1 8 5 , I r i s & I nk a t Th e o u t n e t . co m; earrings, £40, Rachel J a c k s o n L o n d o n ; r i ng s , f ro m t op , £ 7 2, AP C ; £2 0 0 , R a chel B o s t o n

CLASSIC CUT T h i s p a g e : co a t , £9 1 0 , E d el i ne Lee; swe a t e r, £ 7 9 , C O S ; ro ll- n e ck t o p , £ 3 5, Ho b b s ; d r es s , £ 8 9 9 , L e o n Ma x; s ho es , £450, Marques’ Almeida


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RETURN OF THE MAC A b ove : c oat, £5 8 5, Te i j a; j ack e t, £16 , Pri m ark ; sh i rt, £19 8 , J.Crew; top (just seen), £32 5 , M arqu e s’ A l m e i da; trou se rs, £3 9 .9 9, H&M Stu di o; b oots (j u st se e n ), £1 7 0, Ku rt G e i ge r; e arri n gs, £49 0 , A l l i son Bryan Je we l l e ry

GREAT LENGTHS Ri gh t: c oat, £1 5 0, AS O S Wh i te ; c ardi g an (j u st se e n ), £11 5 , Pal m e r/ / Hardi n g; rol l -n e ck top , £10 5 , Re l ate d A pp are l ; j u m p su i t, £37 5, By M al e n e Bi rge r; b oots, £42 0 , Jose p h ; e arri n gs, as b e f ore


MODEL ARMY C o a t , £ 5 1 2 , P i nk o ; t o p , £3 9 5 , O s ma n; d re s s, £ 2 3 9 , a nd b o o t s, £ 6 3 0 , b o t h Sandro


#MBFW


PUFFA PERFECTION C o a t , £ 1 5 0, Wa r eho us e; d r ess, £ 5 5, R i v er I s l a nd

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CAPE CRUSADER Above: cape, £ 250, J.Cr ew; jumpsuit , £ 75, Pr een Edit ion at Debenhams; sho es, £ 185, B imba y Lola; ear r ings, £ 40, Rachel Jackso n Londo n; r ing, £ 100, Co r nelia Webb

MASCULINE EDGE Left : co at , £ 495, To psho p U nique; jacket , £ 133, Ar ies; shir t , £ 20, Next ; t r o user s, £ 49.99, H&M St udio; ear r ings, £ 40 , R achel Jackso n Londo n

HAIR BY JAMIE McCORMICK. MAKE-UP BY JULIE JACOBS USING CHANEL LE ROUGE COLLECTION NO 1 AND CHANEL LE LIFT V-FLASH. MODEL: CARINA L AT M + P MODELS

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GUCCI

£1,710 Miu Miu

twist – Miu Miu’s ‘M I U Lady’ bag is smoothtalking its way on to our newseason wish list.

LUST ITEM

with a vintage

LO E W E

Get on board the good ship fashion with a new take on nautical. Gucci steered towards jackets with b old details, while Prada updated the classic blazer with quirky corsets. Team with

Fashion D E TA I L S

cropped jeans for a casual look. Ahoy!

Hot id ideas and d ch hic h ic looks for an Instaglam w ardrobe gl

PRADA

Luxe velvet

KENZO MIU MIU

I N T H E N AV Y

From ladylike lilac to punchy purple, perk up your autumn look with a shot of colour.

LADIES IN L AV E N D E R

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ASH LEY WILLIAMS

HEAD TURNER

M ango £89.99

Bur ber r y £1,595

Hair accesssories are back for AW16, but forget H ssubtle slid es – we’re talking full-on crowning gl i glories. As hley Williams gives us a heads-up.

COMPILED BY GRACE SMITHAM. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

Red Her r ing at D ebenhams £45


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‘C l e a n l i n e s a r e t he c u l o t t e s ’ B F. Team with stripes for a timeless look. ’ S l eevel ess bl azer, £ 55, Ri ver I sl an d ; T-shi rt, shoes, ri ngs and bag, Cal l i e’s own; cul ottes, £ 35, S i mpl y B e; neckl ace, £ 150, El i zabeth & James Dre s s , £3 5, AS OS Cu rve

‘Over siz ed shir t + kick flares = perfect.’ Shirt, £145, Marina Ri nal di ; j eans, £ 49.99, Vi ol eta by M ango; shoes , £ 25, J D Wi l l i ams; earri ngs, £ 169, S usan Capl an; bag, Cal l i e’s own

Jacke t, £7 5, J D Wi l l i am s

B a g , £ 455 , Tor y B ur ch

#C U

Top, £59, Elv i

‘Classic white shirts are big news right now. Choose one with a detailed collar.’ Shi r t , £ 2 8 , Ev a n s; d r es s , £30 , D P C u r v e ; e a r r i n g ( l eft), £9 5 , J ane Kø e n i g ; e a r r i n g (right), £9 7 , C o r n e l i a We b b

E V R

Shoes, £585 , Casadei

Our resident columnist Callie Thorpe is getting super-excited about this season’s hot new looks Autumn/winter has it all going on. As a plus-size woman, trends can sometimes feel unattainable, but the high street has lots of stylish, wearable go-tos right now. I’m loving this pinafore (left), which is perfect with a white shirt for work or at the weekend with a roll-neck and chunky boots for a casual 90s vibe. The duster jacket (top left) is now one of my staples – I love it with leather leggings. And denim is always high on my new-season hit list. These culottes (above right) are a quick way to update capsule pieces, or if you really want to up the ante, fray the hems on your jeans. Have fun!

Top, £32, Junar ose

Skir t , £19.99 , New Look

STILL LIFES STYLED BY LUCIA DEBIEUX. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

‘Wa n t t o a d d d r a ma t o y ou r wa rd r o b e? Thi s o r i ent a l in s p ir ed j a ck et t i ck s a l l th e boxes. Dusters are flattering and can be worn any time.’ J acke t , £ 6 0 , R i v e r I sl a nd; vest and ring, Callie’s own; earrings, £ 2 1 0 , Al i gh i e r i ; c u f f , £ 4 1 0 , J es s i e H a r r i s; n e ck l a c e , £1 9 , El i z a b e t h & Ja me s


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1

IT’S ON THE CARDS Artist Marc Q ui nn ha s l ent hi s vi vi d or chi d design to Di or ’s chi c c a r dhol der s . Ta l k a b ou t a perennial f a vour i te… £ 250, di or.c om

marie claire

GOES SHOPPING Introducing the we-want-it-nows

2

MODERN MUSE

Jo h n Lew i s i s l a u n c h i n g

3

i ts f i rst l u x u ry rea d y- to -

wea r l a b e l , M o d e rn Ra ri ty. Think cool, sleek ta kes on everyday staples in all at great prices. Bonus.

Vie w t exts, c alls and calories burned w hile changing the

Co a t , £3 6 0 ; sweater, £7 5 ; to p, £7 5 a n d t ro u se rs £9 0 , a l l j o h n l ew i s.co m

scr e e n to match yo u r mood – this is se r iously sty lish ne w -g en technology. ‘Acce ss Bradshaw Sm ar t watch’, from

4

£ 329, Michael Kors

SPECIAL ADDITIONS

Hit Marc C ai n’s new acc e s s o rie s

range for cut e t ot es and e mb e llis h e d

5

extras. These Cinderella -es q ue f l a ts

CHECK LIST

t ake f ancy footwear to the nex t l evel .

I t ’s a l l a b o u t c h e c ks

£ 155, marc - cain.com

r i g ht n ow a n d t h i s

ve rsa t i l e m o n o l o o k

f ro m N ext t i c ks a l l t h e right boxes. Jacket, £5 0 ; t ro u se rs, £3 0 ; s h i rt , £2 0 ; l o a fe rs, £4 2 , a n d s u n g l a sses, £4 5 , a l l n ext .co.u k

COMPILED BY HANNAH MOORE

W AT C H A N D Y E A R N

p re m i u m fa b r i cs. O h , a n d


The bags. The jewels. The shoes. The swagger. Introducing our edit of new-season designer details to covet

A C C E S S O R I E S Styled by DES LEWIS Photographs by ISAAC MARLEY MORGAN


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Opposite page: Sleeveless jacket, £2,250, trousers, £1,700, earring, £400, and bags, £4,200 each, all Louis Vuitton This page: Top, £650, skirt, from a selection, and necklace, £425, all Loewe; boots, £995, Nicholas Kirkwood; bag (hanging on mirror), £1,965, JW Anderson; earrings, £240, Alighieri


Accessories

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02 03

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01 Top, £337, Tibi; hairslide, from a selection, Ana Khouri 02 Clockwise from top: bracelet, about £424, Annelise Michelson; earring, £280, Alighieri; choker, from a selection, Ana Khouri; ring, £79, Swarovski; cuff, £990, Charlotte Chesnais 03 Shoes, from a selection, Dolce & Gabbana 04 Bag, £550, Aspinal of London; shoes, £375, Paul Smith 05 Clutch, £300, Kate Spade New York; key ring, stylist’s own 06 Bag, £1,330, Longchamp 07 Jacket, £12,100, and brooch, £700, both Chanel


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Jacket, £2,134, top (worn underneath), £1,670, and trousers, £1,086, all Proenza Schouler; bag, £450, Coach


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01 Hooded sweater, £1,195, skirt (just seen), £565, and boots, £1,015, all Balenciaga 02 Bag, £285, MICHAEL Michael Kors 03 Clutch, £595, Dries Van Noten at Liberty 04 Hair pins, clockwise from top, £245, £245 and £215, all Alexander McQueen 05 Boots, from £750, Dior 06 Shoes, £540, Sportmax 07 Bag, £495, Christopher Kane


Love

Made with h

Perfectly handcrafted with 57 facets just like a real ideal-cut diamond. Discover DiamonďŹ re yourself. www.diamonďŹ re.com


Top, £500, sleeves (sold separately), £540, skirt, £1,660, boots, £1,000, and bag, £1,680, all Marni; earrings (in model’s right ear), £550 (for set of three), Dior; earring (in model’s left ear), £86, Jenny Sweetnam

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01 Blazer, £1,940, belt, £345, shoes, £610, sunglasses, £235, and bag, £1,420, all Saint Laurent; tights, £10, Calzedonia; earring (just seen), from a selection, Repossi 02 Boots, £630, Ralph Lauren Collection 03 Jacket, £1,745, shirt (just seen, worn underneath), £415, and bag, £2,020, all Miu Miu 04 Bags, from top: £1,285, Proenza Schouler; £1,495, Salvatore Ferragamo 05 Boots, about £1,260, Givenchy By Riccardo Tisci 06 Bag, £450, Emporio Armani 07 Shoes, £325, Toga Pulla


THOMASSABO.COM

CONTACT: +44 (0) 20 77 20 97 25 UK@THOMASSABO.COM


JONRICHARD.COM

JE W E LS D ESIG NED WITH TRUE EL EG A NCE THE LUSTRE COLLECTION


Dress, £1,050, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi; bra, £12, and briefs, £9, both American Apparel; boots, £1,995, Marc Jacobs; ring, £116, Pamela Love

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01

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01 Dress, about £1,862, earrings, about £407, and bag (strap seen), about £1,523, all Céline 02 Bag, £650, Coach 03 Jacket, £1,195, Joseph; skirt, £390, Sportmax; boots, £2,105, Chloé; earring, from a selection, Ana Khouri 04 Bag, £2,105, Roberto Cavalli 05 Top, £337, Tibi; socks, £60, and shoes, £510, both Gucci; ring, £245, Anissa Kermiche 06 Necklace, £480, Tod’s 07 Shoes, £645, Christian Louboutin

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HAIR BY NICK IRWIN AT THE LONDON STYLE AGENCY USING UNITE. MAKE-UP BY PHOEBE WALTERS USING MAC. MODEL: CASSEY CHANEL AT WILHELMINA INTERNATIONAL

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Top, £700, skirt, £990, tights, £680, boots, £1,070, bag, £1,330, with agenda charm, £380, and key charm, £195, all Prada


BRACELET. STERLING SILVER AND ZIRCONIA

SIFJAKOBS.COM

SIF JAKOBS JEWELLERY

SIF JAKOBS JEWELLERY


So this season Flaunt your figure in autumn’s most-wanted trends at Evans, the experts in styling your shape. Everything is available in store and at evans.co.uk in sizes 14-32

L e f t: top, £ 28, j e an s, £ 3 2, sh oes, £ 2 6, e arri ngs, £ 5 , ri n g, £ 7 .50 Ri g h t: dre ss, £ 40, bl ou se , £ 4 0, and j e we l l e ry, as b e f or e, al l b y Ev ans

Denim Pair boyfriends with a smock top (perfect if you’re an apple shape) and musthave leopard loafers – you’ll live in these shoes this autumn. Roll up your sleeves and jeans for the finishing touch. Alternatively, give denim a modern-feminine makeover with this cute pinafore and frilly blouse – a clever option if you usually shy away from sleeveless dresses. The pinafore flatters apple and pear shapes.


Promotion C o a t ( co mi ng s o o n) , £ 7 5, T-s hi r t , £ 7, a nd t r o u se rs, £ 28 , a l l b y E v a ns

Military If you only invest in one coat this season, make it military. Go smart/casual with a simple tee and high-waisted trousers to define your waist – a great way to flaunt your figure especially if you’re hourglass. Stick with the mannish vibe and keep your jewellery simple.


Nineties Nail the 90s look in one of the season’s key buys, the bomber. Layering keeps the theme going but a shirt around your waist retains definition, while ditsy florals bring a surprise feminine twist. Chunky black boots are a given.

*TERMS AND CONDITIONS APPLY. VISIT EVANS.CO.UK/AWARDSTERMS

Jacket , £ 38, check shir t , £ 22, pinafor e, £ 40, st r ipe T- shir t , £ 26, boo t s, £ 46, and ear r ings, £ 4, all by Evans


Promotion

Hot metal There’s a shimmering look for everyone. Pair the pleated, silver cover-up with a velvet cami for a laid-back but glam night-out style. If you usually shy away from camisoles, this cover-up will stop you feeling exposed. Or, get on board with metallics for day in this tee, then keep jewellery simple – hoops will do the trick.

L e f t: c ove r-u p , £ 42 , c am i sol e , £ 2 5, j eans, £ 3 0, e arri n gs, £ 7.50 Ri gh t: top, £ 3 0, and e arri n g s, as befor e, al l b y Evans

Win the chance to be a star If you or someone you know deserves recognition, we want to know about it. Visit evans.co.uk/awards to nominate now.* There are four categories to choose from: #IamStyle, #IamActive, #IamInspiring and #IamBeauty. Enter by Saturday 10 September 2016 and you could win a £250 Evans voucher, the chance to star in the next Evans campaign, a one-year subscription to Marie Claire and two VIP tickets to the #IamMe Awards in London on Wednesday 21 September.


A staggering 62 million girls around the world are denied an education. Join our campaign to transform their lives

Li ght up h er future

It’s difficult to believe that in 2016 less than a third of children who attend school around the world are girls. Think of all that wasted potential. Being denied an education strips girls of the choice to decide their own futures, express their creativity, and perhaps most importantly, empower themselves by earning their own wage instead of being reliant upon men. Every day, millions of girls are taken out of school and forced into domestic work or marriage, where they risk isolation and abuse. But education is vital: an educated girl is less likely to marry and to have children while she is still a child; she is more likely to be literate, healthy and survive into adulthood; ultimately, she is more likely to reinvest her income back into her family, community and country. That’s why this month we’re launching an international education campaign with Marie Claire France, Italy and the Czech Republic. In partnership with our own International Marie Claire charity Toutes à L’école (Everyone in School), the global

beauty brand L’Occitane and education charity Plan International, we’re aiming – with your assistance – to raise £300,000 to help girls across the world to overcome the barriers to education. Help us by buying our exclusive L’Occitane candle for £8, the profits from which will be used to fund schools for girls. ‘For children everywhere, education provides the key to making something of their lives, regardless of where they’ve come from,’ says Secretary of State for Education Justine Greening, who is supporting our appeal. ‘When children can grow up and fulfil their potential, their countries can, too. A huge amount has been achieved globally, but we’ve got to keep going until every child, whoever they are and wherever they are, has the chance of a good education. Dedicated teachers helped to create my future, and I know they are the key to unlocking the future of children everywhere.’ Read on to find out more about the girls your money will be supporting.


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Cambodia

#SHARETHELIGHT

The Happy Chandara school, located in Phnom Penh in Cambodia, offers highquality education to girls from the poorest backgrounds with the aim of bringing them freedom and dignity. It was founded ten years ago by the former editor of Marie Claire France, Tina Kieffer, as part of her Toutes à L’école charity, after she adopted a little girl from Cambodia. Kieffer was struck by the lack of available education for girls in the country, which made them dependent on men and vulnerable to sexual exploitation.

Opened in 2006 with 92 young students, the Happy Chandra school now provides education for 1,200 girls, inspiring them to dream big.


View our AW16 style edit video at marieclaire.co.uk and enjoy an exclusive 20% discount www.phase-eight.com


Campaign

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The poor conditions (including a lack of toilets) of government schools in Pakistan, such as this one in Muzaffargarh district, are major factors in preventing girls from going to school. Parents are often reluctant for daughters to attend, preferring them to stay at home doing domestic work. Making the journey on foot can also be dangerous for girls on their own. Plan International is helping to rebuild, clean up and reopen 150 schools as part of their Back To School campaign.

Plan International runs groups to encourage mothers to promote education for their daughters (above). The message is spread via digital media and radio.


110 Campaign

#SHARETHELIGHT

Burkina Faso

WORDS BY ANDREA THOMPSON

The L’Occitane Foundation, the beauty brand’s charitable arm, supports many education projects, including this one in Burkina Faso, where the company harvests shea butter. The foundation runs literacy programmes, grants financial resources and offers entrepreneurial support for women. The idea is to empower girls and women through education and develop enterprises that drive them towards economic emancipation, so they are no longer reliant on men. Q

L I G H T U P YO U N G L I V E S

Through education, we can transform girls’ lives, fight for gender equality and eradicate long-term poverty. Show your support by buying this special Marie Claire L’Occitane candle. All profits from every £8 candle bought will go to support the Toutes à L’école, Plan International and L’Occitane projects. Get on board: social #sharethelight and buy a candle at l’occitane.co.uk


I

FA K E N O T H I N G n the beginning were the gemstones, and the gemstones became our family’s

encourage women around the world to be at one with nature - to fake nothing.

world. Welcome to Gemporia and our quest to restore genuine gemstone

This issue we showcase Tanzanite. This beautiful gemstone is found in just

jewellery as the most sought after of personal possessions. Our journey is

a single location on earth, under the foothills of Mt. Kilimanjaro. Named after its

drawing others to believe in the miracle of genuine gemstones as passionately

country of origin, Tanzania, it is now one of the most sought after natural coloured

as we do. Our mission inspires greater hope and purpose for the remotest of

gemstones in the world. We so truly believe that you are spiritually naked when

gemstone communities. We denounce the fakes and mass-produced synthetics

dressed without a gemstone, designs start from just ÂŁ79.

WKDW KDYH LQOWUDWHG FRQIXVHG DQG RRGHG WKH MHZHOOHU\ PDUNHW IRU WKH ODVW few generations. Gemporia jewellery is crafted for the body, mind and soul. We

USE CODE “MARIE06� AT GEMPORIA.COM

DIRECT SOURCE

A CUT ABOVE

HAND CRAFTING

A BRIGHTER FUTURE

Working closely with gem communities around the world

We passionately cut natures treasures into beautiful gems

Using traditional skills to create breathtaking jewellery

Providing education in Africa & India, transforming 9,500 lives


Supporting our #sharethelight campaign for girls in education, seven stars reflect on the people and places that inspired them to think big

Photographs by DREW WHEELER

An education

Izzy Bizu Singer BIMM London

‘This is where I first started writing music. I met my guitarist here and my amazing singing teacher Anna, who I still work with now. I went to theatre school first, but I just wanted to sing all the time. There were so many great singers at BIMM [British and Irish Modern Music Institute] and we all used to gig around pubs in London. It was a great crowd, but at that time I was just finding myself, so I’d mostly watch. I had a hilarious teacher called Will who taught me performance techniques and brought me out of my shell, so I could move on to open-mic nights. I was spotted by Emeli Sandé, who gave me advice and bought me pizza.’ Izzy Bizu’s debut album A Moment Of Madness is out on 2 September


‘I spent four years at Kingston doing an art foundation course and then a degree in womenswear. When I arrived I wanted to be a fine artist, but then I met this wonderfully inspiring teacher called Sheila. She was so stylish and used to show me all of these old pictures of herself in the 70s. I didn’t have a background in fashion, but it was Sheila who convinced me to go into it. Kingston was where I learned to be a little more fearless and express my opinions, as well as picking up practical skills and ideas which still influence my design today. This is where I learned what I was all about.’ S o p h i eh u l me. co m

Sophie Hulme Fashion designer Kingston University, London

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#SHARETHELIGHT


Gemma Chan Actress Drama Centre London, Central Saint Martins

‘I studied law at Oxford university before spending two years at Drama Centre London at Central Saint Martins. I’d heard it was the toughest, most brutal training and that’s what I wanted. I spent so much time sobbing in the toilets because you do get broken down; they don’t pamper you. It definitely gave me discipline and I was encouraged to play characters that were very unlike myself. I had a wonderful teacher called John Beschizza and he used to say, “We don’t want waxed fruit, we want real fruit salad.” He wanted to strip away any artificiality and for us to give a real and truthful performance, which is something that really stuck with me. It was such a great environment where you could explore and be completely playful without the pressure of the outside world.’ Chan stars in series two of Humans, coming to Channel 4 this autumn


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Laura Whitmore Presenter MTV, London

‘[The MTV studio] is one of my favourite places and my first real memory of living in London [is here]. For me, it wasn’t just about a new job, it was a new life. This is where I went from being this petrified young girl from Ireland queuing to compete in ‘Pick Me MTV’ to having my own desk and working there every day. The first person I interviewed was Chace Crawford from Gossip Girl and I remember thinking, “I have no idea what I’m doing.” It was overwhelming and I was a bit rough around the edges, but I had to learn by jumping in at the deep end.’ Whitmore is one of Plan International’s Because I Am A Girl ambassadors, and works to raise awareness about girls’ education around the world. She has sponsored a girl in the Philippines for seven years, and travelled to meet her for the first time last year


www. parttwo.com


Edith Bowman DJ and presenter Hampstead Heath ‘Education is about learning about yourself as much as anything else, and this is what the Heath has been for me. It’s where I go to get headspace – listen to new music, go for a walk to get inspiration or sit and work out where I want to go with interviews. I come from a fishing village in Scotland and when I came down to London it took me a long time to be settled. It was the Heath that grounded me. Every girl deserves an education, because if you’re not afraid of hard work and putting in the hours you can achieve anything.’ Bowman’s podcast, Soundtracking, is available from edithbowman.com

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Emily Berrington Actress Guildhall School of Music & Drama ‘Growing up, I didn’t think acting was considered a proper career. When I left school, I studied geography at King’s College London, then I went on to work at the House of Commons for Labour Party MP Siobhain McDonagh. While I was there I thought, “If I’m not afraid to work in the competitive world of politics, why am I frightened of trying to be an actor?” I auditioned for drama school and got a place at Guildhall the following year. I discovered the power of my own voice and was encouraged to have a real sense of self-worth. I’m now on the audition panel so I get to sit on the other side of the table and help people succeed.’ B e r r i n gton s ta rs in s eri es t w o o f Hu m an s , c o mi n g to C ha n n el 4 th is a u t u mn


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Aisling Bea Actress and comedian Soho Theatre, London ‘As a student at drama school I learned my craft by repeating what I knew over and over again. But as a stand-up I learned from the community of comedians around me – Sara Pascoe, Celia Pacquola, Katherine Ryan. I have so many fond memories of gigging here at the Soho Theatre. We’d all meet up in the bar afterwards and give each other ideas and feedback. I really believe one woman learning helps three women behind her progress. If I could drill one thing into the next generation, it’s that women aren’t in competition with each other – we are stronger together.’ Q Bea star s in ser ies thr ee of The Fall, coming to BBC 2 this autumn

Help us fight for girls’ edu cation around the world by logging on to Lo ccitane.co.uk to buy our special candle. Twitter @marieclaireu k and

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WORLD IN PICTURES

Fit for front-line action In Israel, female soldiers fight alongside their male counterparts, and it’s about to happen in the UK, too

When women soldiers in the British Army start taking on front-line roles from November, they’ll be following in the footsteps of countries like Israel, where women do compulsory national service and have served in combat positions since 1985. Two thirds of the Israeli Army’s Caracal Battalion (pictured) are women. Their main mission is to routinely patrol Israel’s border with Egypt to intercept infiltrators and smugglers from the Sinai desert. Pictured from top: female soldiers take part in a training session in Ben Shemen Forest, near the city of Modi’in; a solider of the battalion regroups after a 20km march in the Negev desert, marking the end of her two-year conscription training.

WORLD IN NUMBERS GLOBAL LIFE EXPECTANCY* Mon aco - 89.47 years


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N E WS OPINION

‘Fashion gave me freedom’

INTERVIEW BY SUSAN McCLELLAND. VISIT TALARAASSI.COM FASHION IS FREEDOM BY TALA RAASSI (£8.99, BLINK PUBLISHING)

Tala Raassi was subjected to 40 lashes in prison for wearing a miniskirt in Iran. Now fighting for female empowerment, she speaks exclusively to Marie Claire

When the whip came down on my back, cutting open my skin, I screamed. But it was less about the extreme pain and more about the anger, hurt and sadness I felt at being treated like a criminal. I was 16 – a curious teenage girl who had tried to express myself through fashion, just like countless others in the world. I didn’t deserve to be treated so badly. Up to that point, I had been a normal Iranian living in the capital of Tehran. In private, I adored European-style clothing, music and make-up, which I’d get from relatives living abroad. But my public persona was heavily censored. These things are Top left and above: Tala Raassi growing up in Iran, where Western illegal in Iran, which is fundamentalist Muslim, and where clothes were banned in public, but worn at home. Centre: At her girls over the age of nine must wear headscarves in public. design studio in New York, wher e she cr eat es her swimwear lin e That night, 18 years ago, I had left home for my sweet sixteen birthday party wearing a coat and a hijab, but when I arrived one of the most notorious prisons in the country. What I had at my friend’s house, I removed them to reveal my miniskirt. thought would be a slap-on-the-wrist misdemeanour, turned I was dancing to pop music with my friends when Iran’s into nearly a week in prison and a sentence of 40 lashes. revolutionary police, the Basij, which monitors the country’s I was chained to my best friend the entire time. We couldn’t strict Islamic morality laws, suddenly barged through the front even go to the bathroom in private. It was the pivotal week in my life. Far from making me door, shouting. There were so many of them, all dressed in want to give up my love of fashion, it hardened my resolve to khaki, but I escaped with my friend through a back door. The next hour was one that would change the direction of pursue a career that could give women the sense of freedom my life. I remember my heart racing as I sprinted through the and expression I had felt in those few minutes that day.  Several months later, motivated by what had happened to streets of Tehran desperate to get away, realising as I looked me, my family and I moved to Dubai, and down that I was still in my miniskirt then the US. Living in a Western country, and high heels, with my hair blowing ‘The chase finally came I saw how much choice women have and about my face – all strictly against the law in public. I was terrified that I was to an end when I felt the how free they are to wear what they want without fear. Having grown up in a society committing a criminal act, but I also barrel of his gun against where dreams are impossible, I wanted to felt a strange sense of liberation; the inspire other girls to follow theirs. crisp December air on my legs, arms the back of my head’ I had to break many rules along the way and running through my hair. For a few but, finally, in 2009, I launched my swimsuit collection, Tala moments I felt invincible, empowered, and alive. The chase finally came to an end when an officer caught up Raassi, which is now sold around the world. As a designer, with me and I felt the barrel of his gun at the back of my head. I try to empower women with my designs. In Colombia, where I was charged with a number of crimes, including association my factory is located, the women creating my swimwear with the opposite sex without the hijab and listening and collections use their wages to educate their families. Today, I’m working on expanding my ‘fashion is freedom’ dancing to Western music. My friend and I were handcuffed together and taken to the Vozara Detention Centre in Tehran, message to illustrate just how much it can mean to women.

Japan – 85 years Australia – 82 .23 years Fran ce – 81.68 years UK - 80.65 years


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N E WS

WONDER WOMAN

My m otivation ‘ G irls w ho a r e c omput er lit e ra t e a r e g i v en a f ut u re – a n d a n eq ua l f oot i ng i n t h e n e w di g i t a l l a nds c a p e . We s t r a t eg i c a l l y i dent i f y b o t h t he br i g ht es t a nd t h e m o s t a t - r i s k g i r l s – t he n ext g ener a t i on of l ea ders . U n l o ck i n g t h e i r p o t e n t i a l is t h e k ey t o br ea k i ng t h e c y c l e of pov er t y. ’

M y h i g h l i g ht ‘At C ode C l ub, I t ea ch t h e g i r l s how t o ma k e co m put er g a mes t hr oug h writ in g a nd c r a ck i ng c ode , wh ich i s r ew a r di ng . Thi s a rm s t hem w i t h v a l ua bl e t o o ls t o i mpr ov e t hei r l i ve s lo n g- t er m. Thous a nds o f j obs a r e bei ng cre a t ed i n t he s c i enc e, t e chnol og y, eng i neer i n g a n d ma t hema t i c s (ST E M) industries across Africa. But g e nder di s c r i mi na t i on a n d a l a ck of a c c es s t o t e ch n ol og y mea n g i r l s are k e p t o ut of t he w or k f or c e .’

My inspiration ‘ Th e g i r l s ’ s mi l es , i n s pite o f w ha t t hey ha v e been t h ro u gh, i ns pi r e me t o s e e t h e pos i t i v e s i de of l i fe.’ Code Club is run by Shining Ho p e f or C om m u n ities wi t h Th e i r w orld ; th eirw orld . o rg. 

TALKING POINT

The boredom trap

Despite our multiple screens and ever-connected lifestyles, millennials are officially generation bored. But what is this doing to our health? When it comes to ennui, two thirds of those born after 1980 say they’re ‘bored of life’*– hence our addiction to smartphones and ‘second screening’. But experts believe this may be exasperating the problem. ‘Boredom [sets in] when we’re searching for stimulation, but can’t find it,’ explains Dr Sandi Mann, author of The Upside Of Downtime and psychology lecturer at UCLAN. ‘It can be a distressing emotion – some evidence suggests it places stress on the brain, and is linked to anxiety, depression or Alzheimer’s. It causes us to make bad decisions, such as unhealthy eating, gambling or drug-taking.’ In fact, ‘frequently bored’ teens are up to 50 per cent** more likely to dabble with drugs. But here’s the big reveal: boredom isn’t necessarily about having nothing to do. If you’re experiencing boredom in 2016, chances are the (mostly online) activities filling your schedule don’t stimulate you.

‘Scrolling and swiping are fast-paced, passive activities – we’re not using our brains very much, so we feel dissatisfied,’ says Dr Mann. ‘That’s when we start second-screening – watching TV and scrolling the net at the same time. But that makes things worse, because we’re even less focused.’ Toronto-based Boredom Lab founder Dr John Eastwood agrees. ‘Boredom is like quicksand,’ he says. ‘The more we thrash, the quicker we’ll sink.’ But we don’t need to quit technology altogether; we just need to understand how boredom manifests itself. ‘What one person finds frustrating makes another feel calm and creative,’ says Dr Mann. She suggests using the University of West Florida’s Boredom Prone Scale to analyse your susceptibility and response to boredom; focusing on one activity at a time. And, if all else fails, reading a damn good book. Q

USA - 79 years China - 75.44 years Russia - 67.42 years South Africa - 49.99 years *ACCORDING TO GEOBA.SE

ADDITIONAL WORDS BY CORINNE REDFERN. PHOTOGRAPHS BY REUTERS, THE LICENING PROJECT. *2016 STUDY BY MARIA CASINO. **NATIONAL CENTER ON ADDICTION AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE (CASA) AT COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Do r o t h y At i e n o , 2 8 , tea ch e s c o d i n g a t t he Ki b e r a S ch o o l f o r G i r ls , i n Ke n y a ’s K i b e r a , t he l a r ge st sl u m i n Af r i c a


sex and love lives of the

M o d e r n m a l e Sex, dating, relationships, being a good dad… the rule book is changing for men. Here’s what they’d like you to know about how it’s working for them


Dossier

133 BY ANDREW DICKENS When it comes to sex, straight men have had things our way for a while. Physically, culturally and legally, a penis has been an advantage for thousands of years. For young men today, however, the rules have changed. Sexual fluidity and increased gender equality, not to mention ever-evolving technology and its knock-on effects on everything from porn to dating, mean our experiences are a world away from the ones our fathers had (not that we’d ever ask them). For some men, such as Joe, 28, a single marketing consultant from London and a frequent Tinder user, women’s new-found sexual expression is a great thing. ‘Things feel equal,’ he admits. ‘I’m pleasantly surprised by how often women will initiate things. I like that women communicate what they want, especially in bed. For me, and a lot of men I know, the desire to please is a top priority.’ This new line of communication means many women are happy to ask for what they want – no matter how extreme – sometimes via text before they’ve even had a first date. ‘I once slept with a girl who had a rape fantasy,’ says Joe. ‘She asked me to slap her in the face. I said no, not because I was afraid of any false assault claims or anything, but because it didn’t sit well with me or turn me on. But the great thing about pre-meet texting and sexting is you don’t get many surprises. There’s written evidence if someone wants rougher sex or has an unusual kink. It’s a handy precursor that makes it easier to find somebody you’re sexually compatible with.’ Yet not all men are so comfortable with the new parameters of modern dating, with around 30 per cent admitting to faking orgasms. ‘I’m seeing more men with libido issues because of increased pressures,’ says Sarah Alpert, psychosexual and relationship therapist at Samedaydoctor.org. ‘One patient saw me for premature ejaculation because he couldn’t last more than 45 minutes. It was his female partner who told him he had a problem.’ Modern sexual competition is fierce, and it’s not just from other men. Women’s sexuality is significantly

more fluid than men’s, with one study by London School of Economics and Political Science revealing that women are three times more likely to shift their sexual orientation or identify as bisexual than men. There’s also been a demise in interaction in bars and public places, thanks to our ‘eyes down’ smartphone dependency. ‘I can’t remember the last time I chatted to a girl in a pub,’ admits Kieran, 31, a physiotherapist from Belfast. ‘The minute anyone is left alone – while queuing at the bar or waiting for friends – they dig out their phone, and if they’re single they’re scrolling for possibilities on Tinder. I miss those random interactions and conversations. My pals and I have an agreement: mates until eight. Even if we were up for meeting girls, we put our phones away and chat until 8pm. After that it’s anyone’s game. About a year ago, I found a Tinder match while I was on a night out and after ten minutes of messaging, I realised the girl I was chatting to was in the same pub. We found each other, had a great night and – despite me moving town – are still together.’ One in five UK relationships start online and there are over 1,400 dating sites in Britain alone. So the pool of choice is wider than ever – sometimes with unpredictable consequences. ‘I realise this is unlikely, but my most memorable online dating experience was also a close shave,’ says Lewis, 28, a programmer from Cambridge. ‘I got chatting with this gorgeous girl who was funny, smart, but also looked familiar. It was during a rare British sunny spell, so I asked if she wanted to go on a picnic. A couple of bottles of prosecco later, after a long chat about our backgrounds, we worked out that we were related. It was close enough to make us both feel icky at the thought of having sex. On the plus side, I now have a new relative who I get on well with, and a cracking dating anecdote.’ If there’s one thing we can credit Tinder with it’s the endless supply of new adventures. For Anuar, 27, a trainee architect from London, a chance Tinder swipe landed him an unexpected date with a successful female TV presenter. ‘She told me she worked in media and you can never take dating profile pictures at face value, so I had no idea who she was until a girl interrupted our first-date meal to ask for a selfie with her. I won’t lie, the novelty was exciting, but I found the whole scenario really intimidating because she was so successful. There wasn’t a second date.’ The new dating landscape may be more dynamic than ever before, but it hasn’t got any easier.

‘I got chatting to a girl on Tinder – turns out we were related’


Dossier

@ FAT H E R _ O F _ D A U G H T E R S

@ TO M F L E TC H E R

135 @ TO M F L E TC H E R

@ PA PA _ P U K K A

RISE OF THE

Instadads @ PA PA _ P U K K A

Move over, Mumsnet, there’s a new wave of cool dads taking over Instagram and they’re redefining fatherhood for a new gen of men

TOM FLETCHER’S NEW CHILDREN’S BOOK THE CHRISTMASAURUS (£12.99, PENGUIN) IS OUT ON 6 OCTOBER

@ FAT H E R _ O F _ D A U G H T E R S

@ TOMFLETCHER

@ FATHER_OF_DAUGHTERS

@ PAPA_PUKKA

1 .3 M F O L L O W E R S

56,500 FOLLOWERS

3,863 FOLLOWERS

Who? Tom Fletcher, 31 Dad to Buzz, 2, and Buddy, 7 months ‘Having grown up in a band [McFly] I’ve been blogging since the days of MySpace, so when I became a dad, it never occurred to me that I wouldn’t share this part of my life, too. The response has been amazing. My wife was asked recently, “How’s mummy getting on with two babies?” The assumption is that she’s the full-time carer. But we’ve always been 50/50. I hate the assumption that when Dad is in charge, he’s just babysitting. I’m campaigning to get more babychanging facilities in male toilets – I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve had to change a nappy on my lap or the floor because the changing area is in the ladies’. Women, especially mums, get more criticism online. My wife was body-shamed for posting a selfie three weeks after giving birth [somebody said she “still had a tummy”], which was spiteful, and I’m realising how judgmental people can be. Comments like, “That’s the wrong car seat” crop up. But overwhelmingly, the feedback is incredible. I think it’s important for men to know it’s cool to express this huge part of your life rather than living up to a “blokey” stereotype. This is real life.’

Who? Simon Hooper, 33 Dad to Anya, 9; Marnie, 6, and twins Delilah and Ottilie, 8 months ‘When I look back at photographs of my own childhood, my dad is never in them – he was always the one taking the photos and getting on with things in the background. Thankfully, dads are more visible now. When my twin girls arrived in February, I could have gone on sharing the usual stuff on Instagram, like cars and architecture, but after seeing my wife blog about parenting (@mother_of_ daughters) I realised dads also need a voice. That Homer Simpson, handsoff dad cliché doesn’t exist, not in my circle of friends anyway. I wanted to show what real fatherhood looks like, not the sugar-coated version. And it’s nice to have a space to talk about stuff, like which baby carrier is best. Men need support networks, too. The world is changing fast, and more men are – and should be – taking up shared parental leave because they want to see their children grow up, not just be the absent breadwinner. By showing this reality on social media, I’m hoping it will make it seem a more viable option for parents everywhere. Parenting is a team job. It’s about time we talked about it.’

Who? Matt Farquharson, 39 Dad to Mae, 3 ‘Fatherhood is a peculiar experience. All the trappings of your twenties fall away and you have to focus on this totally ungrateful and demanding human who has no respect for anyone else’s time, needs or sleep. But the pay-off is that you get a cuddle around your shin that fills you with so much love you just don’t care. That’s what I wanted to capture with my Instagram feed – giving men a portal to say, “God, this is hard sometimes.” It’s a nod of reassurance. Go back a generation and men talking about their children was almost seen as a weakness. But men are more wellrounded now. My wife (@mother_ pukka) is a blogger, but there’s a huge difference in the way men and women communicate. Women have lengthy discussions about sleep training and weaning. I just want to share pictures of my girl doing ridiculous things, and that’s why Instagram works. And the dadding community is growing. There’s a dad’s breakfast club in my area and I’ve noticed a huge rise in dad bloggers. I’m not surprised. You have this tiny, hilarious version of yourself who amazes you every day. Who wouldn’t want to share that?’


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‘What I learned about being a man from my wife’

‘In truth, I’ve only just started to feel like a man. This is shameful given that I’m 35. When my dad was my age, he’d been married for 14 years, fathered three children and built my bedroom brick by brick himself. He was a real man, not like me with my soft hands and stupid job in journalism. ‘But things have changed. I have a wife and kid now, and that sort of thing forces a boy to grow up. A lot of my newfound manliness is embarrassingly rooted in gender stereotypes – there’s still lawn mowing and furniture assembly and a constant crushing sense of financial responsibility that keeps me awake at night – but, thankfully, much of it isn’t. Being a man means dealing with problems, and there’s no doubt my wife has helped with that. I’ve always reacted to stuff in an annoyingly male way, by bottling it up and waiting for the inevitable stress-related aortic aneurysm to take me out. But by witnessing how my wife deals with similar issues – by confronting them head-on and talking them through – and seeing how much better off she is for doing it, I’ve started to copy her. And it works. It helps to be emotionally open. Who knew? ‘I’ve become less selfish thanks to her, too. The old me – the dumb boy version – wanted to do everything by himself, refusing all help, even if it drove him into the ground. But you can’t do that in a marriage. There’s nowhere to hide, and there’s always a teetering pile of bigger priorities that can’t be ignored. The only way you can get through it is by sharing everything – the highs as well as the lows. You split the work and share the burden, and the knowledge that someone has your back helps you through it all. My wife makes me feel like part of a team. As someone who works at home alone all day, this is a new sensation. An OK one, too. ‘We live together. We run a household together. We do the same job, so we’re each other’s closest sounding boards. Hand on heart, in every aspect of my life, I can honestly call my wife my partner. And you know who else calls people partner? That’s right: cowboys. My wife has turned me into a cowboy. What could possibly be more manly than that?’ Q

‘We live together. We run a household together. We do the same job. Hand on heart, I can honestly call my wife my partner’

ANDREW DICKENS IS A WRITER FOR SHORTLIST. ADDITIONAL WORDS BY TRACY RAMSDEN. PHOTOGRAPHS BY GETTY IMAGES, IMAXTREE, INSTAGRAM

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AM I

I

Identity

139

“ SAYING WHAT

really think people or what

WANT

to hear?

Afraid of offending others, writer Dolly Alderton has found that she’s increasingly self-censoring her opinions. But is her extreme people-pleasing doing more harm than good? I’ve been on Twitter for seven and a half years. I’ve seen world events unfurl – elections, natural disasters, terrorist attacks, referendums. And as the years go by, in the collective cacophony of opinions, I censor myself more and more. My enthusiasm for weighing in on debates has been zapped. The jokes I make have been diluted. I consider every person I might offend (is this tweet too generalising of hairdressers? Or cheese? Or dachshunds?) Pausing before each post, it’s like I’m prioritising what people (read: distant Facebook friends, anonymous Twitter followers) want to hear over what I want to say. I can feel the core of myself slipping away, and with every bit of my personality I trade in for something more appealing, I lose a bit of integrity. ‘This kind of self-censorship stems from our innate desire for approval,’

explains behavioural psychologist Jo Hemmings. ‘Women are natural peoplepleasers – we’re hardwired to be more empathetic, so we tend to moderate our behaviour more than men do. Men only have 10-12 examples of body language, whereas women have over 50, so we are more likely to recognise verbal and non-verbal gestures and respond accordingly. We have had to fight harder to have a voice, so there’s an element of self-protection when using that voice.’ It is certainly true that the female longing for universal approval begins in childhood. ‘Every time you were naughty, you made a mental note that being angry or being messy isn’t OK,’ explains Jamie Catto, creative mentor and author of Insanely Gifted: Turn Your Demons Into Creative Rocket Fuel (£12.99, Canongate Books), who is vehemently anti self-editing. ‘We are all born with

creativity, flamboyance and curiosity, which is shut down bit by bit until we get to adulthood, when we are so selfedited that we are operating at 20 per cent of what we started with.’ Hemmings adds, ‘As babies, we are emotionally responsive to positive feedback – a smile gets a good reaction, so we smile more. As adults, peoplepleasers traditionally respond to situations in two ways: nod along in agreement of the status quo to avoid confrontation, or stay quiet and opt out of the conversation altogether.’ You only have to scroll through Twitter to see that women are scrutinised twice as much as men. A recent study found that nearly half of the women who took part had experienced online trolling, with a staggering 76 per cent of those under 30. On social media, one bad photo could make you the victim


‘I stayed on the Tube for three extra stops so that I didn’t interrupt and offend the drunk homeless man spouting a monologue at me.’

DOLLY’S PEOPLE-PLEASING

of bullying, and a feminist expression could mean you become the target of rape threats. No wonder we often feel subconsciously silenced. It’s a mentality that can seep into real life, too – it certainly has for me and my friends. One of their boyfriends has an intimidating mother who misheard her name when they first met and now calls her Anna instead of her actual name, Hannah. But Hannah was so desperate for her approval that she didn’t correct her. Now, six months on and after numerous meetings, she still forces her boyfriend to call her Anna in front of his mother. We often wonder what name she’ll put on the Order of Service if the pair of them ever get married. ‘We’re far too appropriate,’ says Catto. ‘Whoever fell in love with someone for being appropriate? You really need to weigh up whether appropriateness is worth the exhaustion of wearing inauthentic masks. When you behave in this way, three quarters of the time it’s actually toxic to both you and the person you’re dealing with because it blocks intimacy.’ But if there’s one person you’re obliged to please, it’s your boss, right? A friend of mine who works in events once kept her mouth shut when her male boss suggested they use white female models dressed in saris with bindis to hand out flyers for a Bollywood party, even though she found it offensive. It all went wrong – and she had to face the fallout, knowing her

morals had been compromised because she didn’t want to offend her boss. A recent survey revealed that 51 per cent of employees are not friends with their boss, and why should you be? One editor I work with, who has my utmost respect, has an expression she uses: ‘Loyalty is for dogs.’ Perhaps the key to impressing someone in a position of authority is to say what you really think. Hemmings explains that it’s all about context: ‘Women have the upper hand, as they can read a situation better than men – they’re naturally more sensitive to their surroundings. It’s about assessing cause and effect, and whether being honest is right for the moment. While it might be good to have a heated political debate in the pub with friends, the boardroom is not the place.’ Catto has some valuable advice on representing a more real version of yourself to the world: ‘Get comfortable with the answer “no”’, he says. ‘Both giving and receiving, and not taking it personally. Redefine the word as an arrow pointing in an unexpected direction that you didn’t realise you needed to go in, rather than a roadblock. Lighten up about rejection in all ways.’ Much of this stems from harnessing your so-called negative qualities, instead of pretending they don’t exist. Catto advises, ‘Encourage a relationship with the parts of yourself you deem no good. They’re full of untapped skills, so give them new jobs.’ Perhaps for the control freak, it would be pursuing a career in which precision is required. For the show-off, it could be finding a new way to channel that extrovertism – be it joining a theatre group or writing something that gets your voice heard. Hemmings takes a less extreme stance and believes that there is merit – to a degree – in saying what people want

to hear: ‘Providing we don’t become someone we’re not, it’s OK to want to make others happy. In the current climate of global uncertainty, agreement and co-operation often seem preferable to conflict. But it is equally important to be true to your own feelings when it matters or we could store up anxiety, stress and resentment for the future.’ The keyword here is integrity. And to achieve that, you need to behave in a way that reflects the core of who you truly are. The hard bit is discovering parts of yourself that even you don’t like. But denying them will only lead to an inner collapse. As Catto explains, by hiding our negative traits, they don’t go away, we just turn them on ourselves. ‘We can’t fully get rid of these DOLLY’S PEOPLE-PLEASING

‘Our creativity and flamboyance gets shut down bit by bit’

Identity

140

‘One night, I baked until 4am making birthday macarons for a bloke at work who I barely knew.’

characteristics. And because we work so hard on making sure no one else ever discovers they’re there, the only place left for them to go is inside. So we end up with a legion of nasty characters taking up residence in our heads and giving us a rich, compelling, daily inner dialogue that is hard to ignore.’ Not only does this exhaust us, but it also chips away at our self-esteem. It’s important to remember that you can’t please all the people all of the time. The best piece of advice I was ever given came from one of my writing heroes, Caitlin Moran. Shortly after I got my first column for a national newspaper supplement, I was crippled by the fear of what people thought of my opinions. ‘Think of someone you really admire – one of your inspirations,’ she told me. ‘Every time you create a piece of work, do so as if you’re saying it to them. Write it to make them laugh or to make them think. If you believe they’d be pleased with it, then you’ve done a good job, darling.’ It’s definitely something worth remembering. Q


when

Gigi Tommy met

He’s the father of preppy American style; she’s the super with an online following twice the size of Portugal’s population. Now Tommy Hilfiger and Gigi Hadid are joining forces for her first foray into design. Lucy Pavia hits New York for an exclusive chat…


‘I had to make every piece wearable, and think about my fans’ and friends’ styles – those are the girls who inspire me, so I designed with them in mind’

‘If you want to be the captain, you can be the fucking captain!’ says Gigi Hadid, giving one slender leg an enthusiastic slap. We’re sitting in a New York hotel room discussing the ‘girl power sailor’ theme of her very first design gig – a 36-piece capsule collection with Tommy Hilfiger. She’s wearing two of the items as we speak: a pair of high-waisted, indigo-denim flares with tiny anchors on the buttons, and a viscose navy-and-white striped top, the long sleeves stretched over her manicured hands like fingerless gloves. ‘We even made a captain’s hat, too!’ she adds with a grin. The rest of the collection (hat included) is hanging on a rail just outside the door. There’s a round-neck navy sweater with a large anchor and rope motif printed on it – pleasingly 80s – a belted military coat with a ‘Hilfiger-Hadid’ badge on the lapel, and the sort of oversized cream fisherman’s sweater you could bury yourself in on a particularly cold morning. Gone are the days when supermodels were lofty clothes horses, who earned their crust solely on catwalks and in campaigns. In the past few years, LA-born Hadid (and her pal Kendall Jenner, who she met in 2014) have redefined the role, opening themselves up to their huge online following and trading as much on their personalities and ‘girls before bros’ friendships as their looks. These days, the modelling just feels like the base layer. ‘Kendall never tries too hard,’ Hadid says of her best friend now. ‘She never looks uncomfortable in what she’s wearing.

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‘Kendall never tries too hard. She never looks uncomfortable in what she’s wearing’

I think that’s why we get along so well, because even outside of our style that’s our personalities, we’re just very easy-going.’ For Hadid, designing her own collection was more a question of when rather than if, and Hilfiger felt like the obvious choice. The Hadid and Hilfiger families have been friends since the model was little (Hadid’s mum, Yolanda, found her own fame as one of the Real Housewives Of Beverly Hills), and she and her sister Bella led the runway charge for his beach-themed SS16 show last year in swimsuits and primarycoloured bucket hats. Hilfiger recalls witnessing Hadid morph from family friend into one of the most in-demand supermodels. ‘I’d known her family for a long time and when she was first put forward, I was like, “Are you crazy? Of course we should do something together, she’s beautiful!” We put her on the runway and she received more photographs than anyone ever, so that was very interesting.’ The idea of designing ‘a few pieces’ together quickly swelled to an entire collection. ‘She came in with tear sheets and ideas, and sent some pictures – Pinterest photos,’ says Hilfiger. ‘And she was wearing some stylish clothes herself – an oversized bomber, a pair of really cool sneakers... very nonchalant.’ Scheduled one-hour design sessions at Hilfiger HQ


easily stretched to seven or eight hours. ‘I would just draw, or start patching things, and then I’d think, “Oh shit, I have to actually ask them if I can do this,”’ says Hadid. ‘Then I’d turn around and they’d tell me, “We love it!” So I’d go, “Alright, cool. I’m just gonna keep doing this.”’ And while Hadid brought her many mood boards of fresh ideas to the table, Hilfiger – with his 30 years of design experience – provided the guidance. ‘We never butted heads in our design process, which is good,’ recalls Hadid. ‘And he also gave me so much freedom. He was more like the supervisor, and I wanted to make him proud.’ Perhaps in keeping with the new, media-savvy see-it-buy-it generation of which Hadid is a part, for the first time ever the Tommy x Gigi collection – along with the Tommy Hilfiger main line – will be available to buy on the day it’s unveiled to the press and public, rather than six months later. ‘We’ve been talking about doing it for a very long time,’ says Hilfiger. ‘And it got to the point where we said we should just do it.’ Hadid says she’ll be ordering the lot. ‘If [people] don’t see me wearing the collection on the street when it comes out, there’s a problem. I had to make every piece wearable, and think about my fans’ and friends’ styles... those are the girls who inspire me, so I tried to design with every one of them in mind.’ Q Tommy x Gigi collection hits stores on 10 September (tommy.com; 020 3144 0900)

Tommy on Gigi I f t hey w e r e n ’ t a su p e r mo d el/de s igne r, the y’d be ...

If the y w e r e a su p e r h e r o ...

‘In th e movies.’

‘Sh e ’d be Won d e r Wom an.’

M o s t l i ke l y t o b e se e n we a ring...

L ea s t l i ke l y t o b e se e n we a ring...

Mo s t s ur pr i si n g t h i n g a b o ut the m is ...

‘Hi gh -wai ste d j eans.’

‘A m i x -an d-m atch o ut fit .’

‘How d own -to-e art h she is.’

Gigi on Tommy ‘A coo l t eacher who e ever veryone yo ne llikes.’ ikes. ‘He’d be Capt ain Amer ica!’ a! ’

‘A sweat er.’

‘A t r acksuit .’

‘He’s always in a goo o o d mo od!’ o d!’

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS

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@ work

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A CAREER FOR LIFE, A FAT PAY cheque and getting the keys to the corner office are no longer the end-goal. With job security and promotions well out of reach (millennials are the first generation to earn less in their twenties than their parents did), a generation of resilient young women are flipping these challenges into opportunities, bouncing back from failure and saying, ‘screw the worklife balance’ (it looks pretty exhausting, anyway). Instead they are embracing what experts have branded the ‘career blend’. The slippery corporate ladder has been replaced by the career lattice – working a four-day week in advertising but running a film company on the side, or doing flexi hours from home for a digital agency while building a tech startup at the same time. This new way of working encourages personal development and collaboration along horizontal paths instead of through traditional hierarchy. The appeal is freedom. Research shows that 66 per cent of millennials want to change career within a year or less, so they are constantly sizing up new opportunities. They are a generation of professional nomads looking for the next challenge, making an asset out of the market’s uncertainty and learning new skills that accelerate their prospects. For Bethan Harris, 30, it was the realisation upon her return to the UK, after having spent three years with a creative agency in Australia, that her work was no longer working for her. ‘I wanted to focus on projects that I believed in and the rigid nine-to-five workday model couldn’t accommodate that,’ she explains. ‘So I joined Forum For The Future, a non-profit sustainability organisation, where I am assigned freelance projects based on my individual skills and interests. I work remotely, so I have based myself in San Francisco and India to combine work with travel

I s

i t

t i m e t r i e d

y o u

t h e

career blend? No job titles, yearly career changes and knocking off at 3pm because you’ve hit the wall… Tracy Ramsden talks to women disrupting the nine-to-five and influencing the way we’ll work for years to come


@ work

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‘Young people don’t want jobs, they want working relationships. Hypercompetitiveness is over’ the freedom to work in a way that suits them and you will always get the best out of them,’ says Jules Cross, 32, who works in culture and development (no job title – ‘it’s too limiting’) for communications agency Life Size Media. Here, 90 per cent of the workforce is contracted to four days a week, but when and how that work is undertaken is entirely down to the individual. The company is based at the east London workspace Second Home, open-plan to trigger ‘creative collisions’, with top chefs cooking lunch and evening yoga

classes. ‘The boundaries between work and home have been torn down, in a good way,’ adds Cross. ‘If I hit a wall with work at 3pm and I know I’ve given all I can that day, I would rather clock off and go to a yoga class or spend time on my ceramics business. I actually find it to be quite meditative – my best work ideas come to me when I switch off.’ For employers, it comes down to trust, says Cross: ‘You need the right self-starting team to begin with. If you give them more autonomy to make the small decisions – will I work in a café this morning or in the office? – they will be better at making the bigger decisions that improve the business. It’s a valuebased system.’ The key to making it work is communication which, thanks to technology, has never been easier. ‘We have a big Monday meeting where we go through what everyone is working on, what was on the agenda last week and what needs to be achieved this week, so there is accountability. We also have peer one-to-ones instead of appraisals, during which everyone has the chance to voice concerns or ask for support. Not treating staff like schoolchildren leads to happier, more productive teams and more enriched individuals.’ One campaign by Timewise, a company that helps businesses to attract and develop the best talent through flexible working, aims to rebrand part-time work with its Hire Me My Way campaign. As CEO Karen Mattison explains, ‘How often do you hear the apology “just” before the phrase “part-time”? It is a huge assumption that flexible working is largely the domain of women with children. In the UK in 2015, we had the highest-ever number of men working part-time – it’s a lifestyle choice. More than half of employees in the UK now work with some form of flexibility, but only 8.7 per cent of quality jobs are advertised with part-time options – which means that more than half

the population have less than one in ten jobs they can apply for. The aim of our campaign aims to unite talented people with forwardthinking businesses, such as Kellogg’s and Diageo, who are realising the benefits of part-time employees.’ Of course, some people prefer a routine and distinction between work and home, so the nine-to-five model works perfectly for them. But

‘It is a huge assumption that flexible working is largely the domain of women with children’ they are becoming a minority. What people are looking for in the main is a more bespoke HR model for individual employees that nurtures growth and creativity. ‘I’m working with brands such as Unilever and Marks & Spencer to design new models and reframe the future of the way we work,’ adds Harris. ‘By 2025, millennials will form 75 per cent of the global workforce. Employers can’t afford to ignore us.’ Q MEET MARIE CLAIRE’S FUTURE SHAPERS

In next month’s issue, we’ll be revealing the ten winners of our Future Shapers awards. We’ve joined forces with Neutrogena, who, like Marie Claire, want to celebrate the women who are changing the way we live and work, who push boundaries and challenge the status quo. You can also join our #PassItOn campaign on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram @marieclaireuk to share your stories on career success, resilience and bouncing back.

PHOTOGRAPH BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS

and activism. I choose my own hours because the emphasis is on output rather than time spent at a desk. That means for two days a week I can focus on my activism, galvanising young people to talk about politics in a post-Brexit Britain.’ Harris is part of a generation of students who graduated into a recession. ‘As a response, we’ve had to treat ourselves as brands and think, “How do I present my skills?”’ she explains. ‘I don’t want a shiny job title. I want my work to speak for itself; to say something about my beliefs and bring along new opportunities. Young people today aren’t looking for jobs, they’re looking for working relationships. It’s why, in June, 75 per cent of young people voted to stay in the EU. We want to feel connected, to work together. That era of hypercompetitiveness is over and that’s a great thing for women.’ The ethos behind the career blend is collaboration and sharing – skills, ideas, workspaces. This explains the popularity of co-working hubs such as WeWork, where 40 per cent of members are women, mostly entrepreneurs, and 70 per cent of members collaborate. ‘Give people


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What it feels like…

to choose between your partner and your parents

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One writer reveals how family and faith tore her relationship apart Sam and I had been together for four months when I returned home from university for the summer and announced excitedly to my family that I had met someone. ‘Is he Jewish?’ my father asked, uncharacteristically stern. ‘Catholic,’ I said, and he bristled, unable to meet my eye. My joy came crashing down. I’d never thought about it before. I’d attended a Jewish school and so all my boyfriends to date had been Jewish. We’d never discussed an alternative. Sam and I had been friends for months after meeting at university in Birmingham. Then one night in his flat, for the first time in my life, I made the first move. Before we knew it, it was 6am. ‘This isn’t a one-night thing,’ he assured me. But I already knew. Six months into our relationship, I began to feel like an outcast whenever I went home to London to visit my family. The heady thrill of falling in love with Sam was replaced by a lowlevel dread whenever I wasn’t with him. I felt trapped in two half-lives and I became an expert at skirting the subject. Many of my Jewish friends didn’t take the relationship seriously: ‘I’m glad you’re happy but, obviously, it can’t go anywhere,’ was the common, cutting response; they wouldn’t acknowledge any alternative or that I might want one. Eventually, I shunned synagogue altogether, seeking solace in the arms of my forbidden boyfriend. ‘They’re just a bit funny about boyfriends,’ I told Sam when he asked if he could meet my parents. I’d already visited his family several times who, despite being Catholic, had never questioned my religion except out of interest.

Meanwhile, my father laid out his disapproval: ‘Judaism is our heritage,’ he explained. ‘It’s our responsibility to continue the faith.’ He made it very clear that he wanted me to end it with Sam. My mother didn’t feel as strongly, but it made little difference. The layers of guilt built up, especially when my unaware grandpa asked me if I’d ‘been fishing lately’, which was his endearing way of asking if I’d ‘caught’

‘It was hard to understand how my heritage had slammed the doors in the face of our future ’ a boyfriend yet. My mother eventually told me she had to stand by my father, who in turn felt he had to lie to his parents about me dating outside of the faith. I found it increasingly hard to reassure Sam that everything was fine. ‘I dreamt about our wedding last night,’ he told me one morning, before detailing the cathedral he imagined we’d get married in. But I knew that would never happen. When I changed the subject, Sam asked what was wrong and I couldn’t pretend any more. We sat on my bed and I explained my parents’ position. ‘But, they’ve never met me…’ he kept repeating. Sam and I had often talked about our faiths and what it meant to be Jewish or Catholic. It was hard to understand how my heritage had slammed the doors in the face of our future. The following summer, over a year and a half into our relationship, I went back to London for three months, but

I already felt miles away from Sam. He’d told me he wouldn’t end it, but he couldn’t commit so much of himself to someone he could lose at a moment’s notice. Our goodbye was strained. Shortly after my homecoming, my father made it clear it was time I met someone else; someone Jewish. I didn’t agree, but I was tired of lying to all the people I loved; of watching my friends’ relationships, unburdened and realistic. The conversation with Sam was painfully brief. ‘What do you want me to say?’ he muttered when I told him it was over. ‘I still love you,’ I said firmly. ‘I know,’ he said. That was it. I hung up feeling shell-shocked. For the next few weeks, panic would build at unexpected moments. The first time I bumped into Sam again back at university I felt sick. We exchanged awkward small talk but kept our distance. Seeing him from afar was like looking at a stranger. That was more hurtful than finding out, eight months later, he had a new girlfriend. I missed him. My relationship with my father repaired slowly. I still had moments of resentment, but I didn’t want to lose anyone else I loved. He hadn’t intended to hurt me, he just came from a different culture and I could forgive that. My faith took a big hit, though, and it now plays a much smaller role in my life. Sam was the guinea pig who bore the brunt of my father’s anger, but dad has since relaxed to the point where I have dated a couple of non-Jewish men. Sometimes I scroll through Sam’s Facebook and wonder if things would have been different if he hadn’t been my first love.

Confession

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Words by MICHELLE DAVIES

Life stories

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ANNIE

LEIBOVITZ


On a shoot with fellow photographer Ron Galella, one of the first paparazzo, in 1989

Clockwise from opposite page, bottom: with businessman Malcolm Forbes on a Vanity Fair shoot in 1989; behind the lens in 1975; at 23, Leibovitz was chief photographer at Rolling Stone

Leibovitz with Jerry Hall in 1982

She’s shot actors, presidents, even the Queen. We celebrate the 40-year career of the world’s most famous photographer With opposition to America’s invasion of Vietnam growing by the day, 5 April 1969 saw thousands gather in the centre of San Francisco for a peaceful protest. Nineteen-year-old art student Annie Leibovitz was in the thick of it, taking photographs, when she stumbled across Beatnik poet and activist Allen Ginsberg smoking a joint. It was a fleeting interlude that produced a striking, monochrome image – one that, in a matter of months, would change her life. ‘I had a boyfriend who was a stringer [freelancer] for Time [magazine] and he said, “Why don’t you take your pictures to Rolling Stone?”’ she recalled. ‘I took them and they liked them.’ Rolling Stone, then a fold-up journal operating out of the Bay area, paid Annie $25 (£18) to publish the Ginsberg image – then offered her a job that would begin her career as one of the world’s most sought-after portrait photographers. Now celebrating her fourth decade in the industry as she turns 67 in October, Leibovitz has photographed everyone from President Obama and the Queen to Kim and Kanye. She is responsible for some of the most iconic magazine covers of all time, including for Vanity Fair, a pregnant and naked Demi Moore, and Bruce Jenner becoming Caitlyn, and for Rolling Stone, a foetal-like John Lennon curled up against Yoko Ono – an image made more poignant by the fact he was assassinated four hours after she took it. ‘Her photography is heroic and owes more to the pageant and bluster of 18th-century paintings than the truth we usually seek from photography,’ says Lucy Davies, The Telegraph art and photography critic, who when interviewing Leibovitz observed, ‘[Her] portfolio could serve as a record of our times.’ Born Anna-Lou Leibovitz in Waterbury, Connecticut, on 2 October 1949, the third of six siblings, her father Samuel was a Lieutenant Colonel in the US Air Force and

her mother Marilyn was a modern-dance teacher. Leibovitz developed an interest in painting at high school and went on to study fine art at the San Francisco Art Institute, supplementing her degree course with a photography evening class. Shy and a conspicuous 6ft tall, she found taking pictures emboldened her in a way painting couldn’t. ‘I would do things with a camera I wouldn’t do normally if I was just by myself,’ she explained. ‘I started walking around the Bay area looking for imagery. It was like having a friend, like having someone to go out with and look at the world.’ Leibovitz’s first cover subject for Rolling Stone was John Lennon, in January 1971. Within a year, aged 23, she became its chief photographer, working alongside leading writers such as Hunter S Thompson and Tom Wolfe. Ironically though, taking portraits didn’t come easily. ‘No one ever sat for the cover of Rolling Stone – they were just little grab pictures, pickup pictures. The subject would show up and say, “What do you want me to do?” I reluctantly had to give some direction,’ she said. ‘Then I thought, “Well, gee – if they’re going to sit in that chair they might as well sit in a bathtub full of milk.” I started to get more creative, more conceptual.’ (That particular idea eventually became the iconic cover shot of Whoopi Goldberg.) In 1975, Mick Jagger asked her to document the Rolling Stones as on-tour photographer, but Jann Wenner,


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her editor-in-chief tried to talk her out of it. ‘My advice was don’t go,’ he would later say. ‘I’ve [had] many friends who go on tour and come back drug addicts.’ His fear turned out to be realised: after six months on the road, Leibovitz was addicted to cocaine. She said, ‘I was very naive. I brought my tennis racket with me. I thought that maybe as we went from city to city I would take tennis lessons. I didn’t know what I was getting myself into.’ It would be another eight years before Leibovitz beat her secret addiction while she continued working at Rolling Stone. While she was at the magazine, her most memorable cover was the Lennon and Yoko one taken on the day he died. In 2005, it was voted best cover of the past 40 years by the American Society of Magazine Editors. ‘Suddenly, that photograph has a story,’ Leibovitz told an audience at the Cannes Lions Festival in 2013. ‘You’re looking at it and thinking it’s their last kiss, or they’re saying goodbye.’ In 1983, finally sober following a bout of therapy, she opted for a change and moved to Vanity Fair, where she still works today. There she developed a reputation for perfectionism and stubbornness – her first editor, Tina Brown, said she reportedly made one subject pose for 16 hours. ‘She puts weeks, even months of research into each sitting – because of that, her images have a depth which other photographers fail to achieve,’ says Davies. ‘I’ve met several artists who think they are on a par with the people they photograph or paint, but she’s not like that at all.’ It was Leibovitz’s August 1991 ‘culture-jolting’ (as one commentator put it) cover of Demi Moore that made her a household name. Some critics deemed it pornographic, but it taught women to embrace and be proud of their pregnant bodies. ‘It did seem to give a bit more permission to feel sexy, attractive when you’re pregnant,’ Moore later said. ‘But I really didn’t expect for the response to be what it was. I was shocked.’ Other stars would find themselves similarly steamrollered by reactions to Leibovitz’s interpretation of them, including Miley Cyrus, who as a 15-year-old Disney star was pictured on a 2008 Vanity Fair cover draped only in a satin sheet. Controversy also overshadowed Leibovitz’s 2007 photo shoot with the Queen, when the BBC reported the monarch had stormed out of the shoot because Leibovitz had asked her to remove her tiara. The latter part was true – ‘I suggested a less dressy look might be better,’ said Leibovitz – but the footage aired of the Queen was actually taken on her way to meet the photographer, not leaving. The BBC later apologised. By Leibovitz’s own admission, she became so immersed in her photography – in the 80s she also expanded into

Abo ve: t he Queen poses fo r her po r t r ait in 2007. Right : t he Obamas’ 2009 family pho t o gr aph

‘Her portfolio could serve as a record for our times’ On t our wit h Mick Jagger in 197 5


C lock w i s e fr o m b el o w: p r ep a r i ng her s ho w i n 2 0 0 6 ; s na p p i n g R o b er t D e N i r o i n 2 0 0 4; a s t he s ub j ect o f a p h o t o fo r o nce; w i t h he r d a ug ht er S a r a h, To m Ha n k s a nd R i t a Wi l s on

‘Leibovitz’s images have a depth other photographers fail to achieve’

work for brands like American Express – that there was little time for anyone else. Aside from a fling with a rabbi while living on an Israeli kibbutz in her teens, there appears to have been no significant other throughout her twenties and thirties. However, in 1988, then 39 and living in New York, Leibovitz began a relationship with the writer, activist and intellectual Susan Sontag after being sent to photograph her for a book. ‘She came into my life when I was looking for some direction,’ said Leibovitz, who revealed Sontag had told her at their first meeting, ‘You’re good, but you can be better.’ ‘The fact she was even interested in me or my work was so flattering.’ While they didn’t live together, Leibovitz told The San Francisco Chronicle that it was ‘a relationship in all its dimensions’. In 2001, at 52, Leibovitz had a daughter called Sarah, via a sperm donor. ‘You’re working hard and before you know it, you’re 50 and you’re, ‘Oh my God, I forgot to have children,”’ was her answer to why she’d left it so late. Twins Susan and Samuelle followed in 2005, born to a surrogate. It was Sontag who encouraged Leibovitz to begin collating her renowned Women exhibition, which showed in London earlier this year. Starting in 1991, with subjects including Hillary Clinton and Joni Mitchell, it has expanded yearly and now includes Lena Dunham, Caitlyn Jenner and Aung San Suu Kyi. Sontag also encouraged Leibovitz to go to Sarajevo

during the Bosnian War – among the images she took was a baby born without anaesthetic in the middle of a siege. Following Sontag’s death in 2004 from leukaemia, Leibovitz produced some of her most extraordinary work – deathbed images of Sontag and of her father, who died around the same time. However, the work was again controversial, with Sontag’s son David Rieff saying his mother had been ‘humiliated posthumously by being “memorialised” that way in those carnival images of celebrity death.’ Sontag’s death hit Leibovitz hard and signalled the start of what she’s called ‘tough times’. In 2009, she was sued by a company called Art Capital Group over an unpaid $24m (£18m) loan. Despite reportedly commanding a day rate of up to $250,000 (£187k) on top of a seven-figure salary, Leibovitz was said to have unchecked spending habits and had spent a fortune renovating her 10,200 sq ft home. She was threatened with bankruptcy as well as the forced sale of her archive, worth an estimated $50m (£37m), that she’d put up as collateral. She staved off going bust with the help of a new financing deal, but admits retirement is now a long way off. Still, there will never be a shortage of famous faces willing to pose for her. Amy Schumer, shot by Leibovitz for the 2016 Pirelli calendar, said of the experience, ‘It was one of the most meaningful moments of my life.’ Current Vanity Fair editor Graydon Carter shares the sentiment that much of Leibovitz’s success lies in her never thinking she is above the person she’s shooting: ‘An editor’s job is to make the writer or photographer believe the assignment they are working on is the most important thing they will ever do. With Leibovitz, you don’t have to – she thinks it anyway.’ Q

PHOTOGRAPHS BY GETTY IMAGES, IDS IMAGES, TONY CENICOLA/NYT/REDUX/EYEVINE, SPLASH

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PHOTOGRAPH BY DANIEL JACKSON FOR DIOR

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Dior MUSE and star of Tim Burton’s new blockbuster,

ELLA PURNELL has her (beautiful) eyes fixed on STARDOM


GIRL OF THE MOMENT

Ella Purnell You’ve also laun ch ed a c h a r i ty. . . ‘It’s called Educate2Eradicate

Yo u ’ ve d ef i n i te l y g ot t h e T i m B u r to n l o o k . . . ‘Big eyes

are my thing. There was a time when everyone thought I was using special effects, and I had to convince them it really is me!’

INTERVIEW BY HOLLIE BROTHERTON. PHOTOGRAPH BY DANIEL JACKSON FOR DIOR. STYLING BY ROBBIE SPENCER. MAKE-UP BY ARIANNA CAMPA. HAIR BY SHON. NAILS BY JENNIE NIPPARD. PRODUCTION: BRACHFELD. ELLA PURNELL WEARS CLOTHING AND ACCESSORIES FROM DIOR CRUISE 2017 COLLECTION

How did you ge t i nto a ct i n g? ‘I was a shy kid, so

and it works against forced marriage and FGM. I’ve been working on it with Arifa Nasim for six months; I believe in the influence one person can have.’

W h a t ’s T i m B u r to n l i ke to wor k w i th? ‘Hilarious!

I started auditioning to boost my confidence. It all started with a Toffifee advert when I was nine. I went on to perform in Oliver in the West End, then I was cast in Never Let Me Go when I was 12.’

We were all like big kids, playing hide-and-seek in the hotel. Tim would bring in water guns one day and a giant carrot the next. I love him and Helena Bonham Carter; I had posters of them on my wall, but took them down when I got the part!’

Wh ere you played a yo u n g Ke i ra K n i g ht l ey. . .

Wh o e l se d o you a d m i re? ‘I spent four days

‘To sit down with someone who is so amazing and say “Teach me how to be you” is fun. You have to learn every little gesture. The first time I met [Keira], I was totally star-struck. But my mum still teaches her yoga – they’re really good friends.’

bonding with Margot Robbie when we worked on Tarzan. I played the younger version of her character and it was a collaborative process. I also admire Chloë Grace Moretz. She’s so sweet, she always remembers my birthday.’

Wh at’s been th e m ost fun you’ve h ad d u r i n g f i l m i n g? ‘The best thing about working

on Maleficent was using the stunt wires to fly through the air. When I read the script for Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children, they asked if I’d be OK in a harness. I was like, “Guys, I’m a pro”. They let me do tricks and everything.’

M i s s P e r e g r i n e ’s H o m e F o r P e c u l i a r Children hits cinemas on 30 September

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FILM 01 Café Socie ty * * * Kristen Stewart and Jesse Eisenberg head Woody Allen’s latest movie, a sweet 30s Hollywood romance. Shot by Vittorio Storaro, it’s a work of sumptuous beauty. 02 Captain Fa ntastic * * * * V i g g o M o r te n se n p l a ys a n u n co nve nt i o n a l fa t h e r – a c ro ss b e t we e n B e a r G r y l l s a n d B o b Dy l a n – i n t h i s h e a r t- to u c h i n g fa m i l y- i n - t h e -w i l d d ra m a . 03 Wa r O n Eve r yo n e * * * T h e G u a rd ’s John Michael McDonagh re turns with this offbeat b u d d y- co m e d y sta r r i n g A l exan d e r S ka rsg å rd a n d M i c h a e l Pe ñ a a s c ro o ke d co p s. Fu n nywe i rd a n d f u n ny-h a - h a . 0 4 L i ttl e Men * * * * A Brooklyn-based coming-of-age tale about two b oys w h o b e com e f r i e n d s a s t h e i r p a re nts (o n e of t h e m a n exce l l e nt G re g K i n n e a r ) c l a s h ove r bu s in e ss. Poig n a nt a n d p e rfe c t l y m a d e. 01 04 01

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WORDS BY HOLLIE BROTHERTON, JAMES MOTTRAM AND LUCY PAVIA. PHOTOGRAPHS BY REX FEATURES

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D AT I N G I N T H E A G E O F B R I D G E T J O N E S

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How meeting ‘the one’ got digital

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H e l e n F i e l d i n g ’ s novel Bridget Jones’s Diary is p u b l i s h e d .

Match.com reaches 2 million members.

R e n é e Z e l l w e g e r is B r i d g e t J o n e s in t he f i rst film adapt at ion.

Proxidating uses Bluetooth to find nearby singles (ear ly Tinder ).

Bridget Jones: The E d g e Of R e a s o n opens in cinemas.

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Facebook goes global – and with it, poking...

Ti n de r l au n ch e s.

Bridget Jones: Mad A b o u t Th e B o y , t he thir d no vel in t he f ran chise, is p u b l i s h e d .

Happn, Bumble a n d J S w i p e launch. Th e o n l i n e d a t i n g i n d u s t r y is n o w w o r t h £ 2 billion.

Bridget Jones’s Baby hits cinemas.

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WEAR JEANS, CHANGE LIVES SIGN UP FOR YOUR FREE FUNDRAISING PACK TODAY JEANSFORGENES.ORG

1 in 25 children is born with a genetic disorder. Join Charlotte De Carle and wear your jeans on Friday 23 September. By wearing your jeans and making a donation you will make a real difference to these children’s lives. Jeans for Genes ® and ™, © 2016 Genetic Disorders UK. Registered Charity Number 1141583.

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By Aga Lesiewicz ( £ 12.99, M a c m i l l a n ) Anna’s seemingly p e r f e c t l i f e st arts t o unravel a f t e r a c h a n c e meeting with a stranger, who she thinks is to blame for a terrible crime that h a p p e n e d that day (dun dun duuuun!)

Time to swap your boy-meets-girl for a gripping thriller

Stevie Won der ‘As a kid, the first song I heard on the radio was I Just Called To Say I Love You. I was learning to play the piano and sat down at the keys, pecking out the melody.’

WORDS BY HOLLIE BROTHERTON AND LUCY PAVIA. PHOTOGRAPHS BY REX FEATURES, GETTY, ALAMY

REBOUND

B y Cor r ie Jackso n ( £ 7.99, Twent y7) Cr ime meet s co ut ur e in t his gr ipping st or y o f a jo ur nalist det er mined t o uncover t he killer o f a t eenage model fo und br ut ally mur der ed at Londo n Fashio n Week.

made him fall in love with music

B Y E - B Y E C H I C K L I T, H E L L O C R I M E

the inspirational artists who

Reporter

A HOUSE WITHOUT WINDOWS

THE WONDER

One Republic

Th e Beach Boys ‘ My mum liked gospel music and my dad loved Top Of The Pops, so anything cool I came across was self-discovery. The Beach Boys’ Greatest Hits was the first album I owned.’

By Nadia Hashimi (£12.99, William Morrow) A woman falsely accused of murdering her husband is sent to jail, but with assistance from a human rights lawyer she slowly uncovers the truth.

BREAKING DEAD

MY LIFE IN MUSIC

By Emma Donoghue ( £13.99, Picado r ) The aut ho r o f R o o m i s back with the story of a girl who mystifies her whole village when she s t o p s e a t i n g b u t st ays a l i v e . Th e y so o n find they could have a murder case on their hands.

frontman Ryan Tedder reveals

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Cyborgs or crowns – this autumn it’s an even split

Beastie Boys ‘They remind me of a time when I was dying to leave Oklahoma. At 13, I was like, “I’ve got to get to New York or LA, anywhere but here.” That’s when I started writing songs.’

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01 H u m a n s (Channel 4)

Pete r Gabriel ‘My uncle is a musician and he lived in London when I started high school. He’d send me CDs you couldn’t buy in the US, like a Peter Gabriel album, which changed my whole l i fe. ’

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Oasis ‘I own every Oasis record, but think (What’s The Story) Morning Glory? is their best album and Cast No Shadow is my jam. They got me into so many other bands – Doves, Elbow and The Stone Roses.’ Cam’Ron ‘In 2002, I was living with a friend who ran the hottest club in New York. Leonardo DiCaprio and JT were always there. I still listen to Hey Ma to take me back to that time.’

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The smart, understated robot series is back for a second season, and we cannot wait. Start polishing those eerily smooth head movements now. 02 Westwor l d (Sky Atlantic)

A lawless theme park set in the future, where humans mingle with cyborgs is the setting for HBO’s new drama starring rri g Anthony Hopkins and Evan Rachel Wood. Disneyland it ain’t. 02

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Co ld play ‘After college, I bought a second-hand car and inside was a burned copy of their first album. When Shiver came on, I was like, “This is so good.” That made me buy the second album.’

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Va m pire Weeken d ‘Definitely my favourite band of the last decade. If you’re hanging out by my pool on a Saturday, they’ll be playing on repeat. If I could be in another band, it wo u l d b e t h e i rs. ’

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One Republic’s new single, Kids, is out now, and the album will be out next month

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ITV’s huge autumn crowd-pleaser stars Jenna Coleman in her biggest role since Doctor Who as a young Queen Victoria. We heartily support the casting of the rather dishy Tom Hughes as Prince Albert, too. 04 Th e C row n  1HWÁL[ 

1HWÁL[KDV VSODVKHG RXWPLOOLRQ RQ WKLV ODYLVKGUDPD about the early years of Queen Elizabeth II (Claire Foy). ([Doctor Who star Matt Smith is brilliant as Prince Philip.

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Promotion

Autumn reads As the days get shorter, what could be better than cosying up with a great book? These are our top five new releases

Late Summer In The Vineyard by Jo Thomas (£7.99, Headline Review) A heart-warming tale set in rural France, we follow Emmy as she begins a new life working for a winemaker in Petit Frere. Perfect escapism.

First Comes Love by Emily Giffin (£7.99, Hodder Paperbacks) Sisters Meredith and Josie have a tricky relationship and very different lives. Meredith is sensible; Josie is free-spirited. But is either really happy with her lot? The House On Sunset Lake by Tasmina Perry (£16.99, Headline Review) Travel to the Deep South without leaving your sofa and enter the world of Jim Johnson, a man facing up to tragic events. Unputdownable.

Undertow by Elizabeth Heathcote (£12.99, Quercus) Second wife of Tom and stepmother to his three children, Carmen has a perfect life – until a secret from the past threatens to pull her under. Buckle up for this gripping psychological thriller.

WIN THE BOOKS OF THE MONTH To celebrate our partnership with Bookends, over the next few months Marie Claire readers will have the chance to win copies of the Bookends’ Books of the Month. Simply go to marieclaire.co.uk/bookends to find out more. And if your literary appetite is asking for more, visit the Bookends website at welcometobookends.co.uk for author Q&As, reading group guides and insights behind some of the bestselling women’s fiction. Follow the Bookends reading community at facebook.com/WelcomeToBookends or on Twitter @TeamBookends.

Mr Gandy’s Grand Tour by Alan Titchmarsh (£18.99, Hodder & Stoughton) Our favourite TV gardener (sorry, Monty Don) tells a story to melt your heart. Tragedy leads Timothy Gandy to finally realise a lifetime’s ambition.


171 Left : Cast a behind t he camer a on t he set o f En Mo i. B elo w: Scr een sir en So phia Lor e n; Woo dy Allen dir ect ing A n n ie Ha l l

MY WORLD

Be lo w : fl ea - ma r k et f ind s a t Po r t e d e C l i g na nco ur t Les P uces , P a r i s ; C a st a ’s b i g - s cr een in sp o M o ni ca Vi t t i

Laetitia Casta The model and actress talks Japan, red manis and her directorial debut

INTERVIEW BY HOLLIE BROTHERTON. PHOTOGRAPHS BY ROBERT HARDING, GETTY IMAGES, CAMERA PRESS, REX FEATURES

When you’ve been photographed a s muc h as I h ave , you’re so used

to seeing your image that it doesn’t feel like you any more, but the work of somebody else. I became a model when I was 14 and an actress at 19. The two grew together. Walking for Victoria’s Secret was fun, but I quickly lost interest. La ra Sto n e i s t h e o n l y m o d e l w h o I f i n d i nterest i n g . She’s

so beautiful and she has something fragile about her, too. I could always see she had huge potential, which is why I cast her in my first short film, En Moi. She knows what it is to create in front of the camera. F i l m s a re m o re my t h i n g t h a n mus ic. I’m inspired by actresses

like Monica Vitti and Sophia Loren and love anything by David Lynch or Woody Allen, like Mulholland Drive

or Annie Hall. I recently collaborated with Cointreau to create En Moi. It was my directorial debut and shown in Cannes this summer.

Clignancourt Les Puces – it’s expensive but it has amazing furniture.

I do n’ t fol l ow w h a t’s on th e cat wal k , I like to do my own thing.

and there are so many people on the street, but nobody touches you. When I was in Kyoto, I stayed in a hotel made entirely from wood, even the bath. It was crazy, but very special.

But I love what Nina Ricci is doing and I think Riccardo Tisci is [hugely] talented. I couldn’t live without my Levi’s and I always wear a high waist. I like oversized men’s shirts by any classic Italian brand, too. I wear a D i or or C h a n el red n a i l po l i sh eve ry d a y. I prefer minimal

make-up. I use mascara and lipstick, but I mostly keep it simple with natural face creams. I al ways v i s i t H &M w h e n I’ m i n Lo n do n . I find all the best items

that aren’t stocked at home. In Paris, I like to visit markets like Porte de

Ja p a n i s my fa vou r i te p l a ce i n th e wor l d . It’s delicate and perfect,

H on estl y? Exe rc i se i s a p a i n i n th e a ss , but you just have to do it.

At 11am I’ll lift weights and go running, but the first thing I do every morning is wake up and think, ‘I want to have a good day today.’ My biggest tip for success is just to be yourself and you can’t go wrong. Laetitia Casta is the face of Cointreau’s #DreamDareCreate campaign. For more information, visit the website at cointreau.com


A brilliant new way to buy beauty!

Lisa Oxenham, beauty director You’re going to love fabled.com because… ‘It’s the easiest way to stock up on your trusty staples, even if you live in the country, like me.’ My Fabled edit: ‘My No 1 bronzer is Bobbi Brown Shimmer Brick (01). It makes me look more awake (even if I’m shattered!). And I love a spritz of Marc Jacobs Decadence (02). It’s gorgeous.’

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We’re thrilled to introduce Fabled by Marie Claire, an amazing new shopping destination created for you with all the knowledge of our experts plus a second-to-none delivery service. And right now, there’s a fantastic 15% off THE WAY YOU DISCOVER and buy skincare, fragrance and cosmetics is about to be completely transformed. We’re so excited to launch our stylish new online beauty store, Fabled by Marie Claire, featuring all the greatest brands along with new-in and niche discoveries. Expect to find an impressive beauty selection, plus the best advice from the editors at Marie Claire to help you shop. We’ll be adding addictive news updates all the time to keep you permanently in the know and on-trend. Plus, your purchases will be available in one-hour delivery slots, making the whole service super-convenient for busy lifestyles. And the excitement doesn’t end there, as we’re offering you a 15 per cent discount when you shop at fabled.com until 21 October 2016.* So go on, what are you waiting for? Sam Dean, Editor, Fabled by Marie Claire

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Charlotte Clark, beauty writer You’re going to love fabled.com because… ‘The Fabled edits are the place to find inspiration for a new look and to discover the skincare secrets we all swear by.’ My Fabled edit: ‘When I need to go from the office to a date in a rush, I swipe on NARS Audacious Lipstick in Annabella (04), a sultry red. Then NARS Audacious Mascara (05) gives me lashes worth fluttering.’


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*THIS VOUCHER CODE CANNOT BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH ANY OTHER VOUCHER OFFERS AND IS ONLY FOR USE ON FABLED.COM. SERVICE AVAILABLE IN CERTAIN PARTS OF ENGLAND AND WALES. DELIVERY TIMES MAY VARY IN CERTAIN PARTS OF ENGLAND AND WALES. NEXT-DAY DELIVERY IS SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY AND DELIVERY CHARGE MAY APPLY. ALL ITEMS ARE SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PLEASE SEE TERMS & CONDITIONS AT FABLED.COM FOR FULL DETAILS

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Anita Bhagwandas, senior beauty editor You’re going to love fabled.com because… ‘Nowhere else has that mix of your regular products with more under-the-radar brands, all in one place.’ My Fabled edit: ‘Perricone MD Serum Prep (03) applies so easily and helps to prepare my skin for my moisturiser and make-up. Think of it as underwear for your face. And right now, I’m wearing divine Flower Market (06) from Maison Martin Margiela’s Replica scents range.’

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WHAT YOU’LL GET WHEN YOU SHOP AT FABLED.COM

The best brands in beauty, from premium and well-known to new-in and niche Trends, tricks and picks from our dedicated editor, Sam Dean, and those in the know at Marie Claire Deliveries designed around you – one-hour slots, 7 days a week, 6am-11.30pm 15% off when you shop at fabled.com until 21 October 2016. Enter discount code VOU386589261 at the checkout*


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Shoesfirst HOT RIGHT NOW... Meet the sole sisters hotfooting it off the catwalk and into your wardrobe

Block heels and slingback s: up close and personal w it h Chanel’s t w o-t one super shoe

PRADA

PHOTOGRAPH BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS

Dust off your thigh boots: industry pro Tabitha Simmons walks us through her style solutions for tricksy trends


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Shoes first

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Sole sisters

DRIES VAN NOTEN

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pom-poms: meet the new hot steppers, and take a walk through the AW16 shoe scene

TOPSHOP UNIQUE

3.1 PHILLIP LIM

Velvet, buckles and

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0 1 B o o t s , £6 0 0, A l be rt a Fe rre tti 0 2 B oots, £1,350, S alvat or e Fer r agamo 03 Sho es, £ 525, Jimmy C ho o 0 4 S a nd a l s , £ 1 7 9, A sh 0 5 B oots, £6 5 0, Ru sse l l & B r omley 06 S ho es, £ 159, Hobbs 07 B o o t s, £ 420, 3.1 1 Philli Phillip Li Lim 0 8 S an dal s, £38 2 , Lo r iblu 09 Sho es, £ 49,Topsho p

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MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA

buckle up

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01 Shoes, £525, Nicholas Kirkwood 02 Shoes, £80, Vagabond 03 B oots, £1,060, Giuseppe Zanotti 04 S andals, £570, Chrisssie e Morris 05 B oots, £50, River Island 06 B oots, £680, Giorgio Armani 07 Shoes, £695, Michael Kors 08 S andals, £585, Chloé oé

mono toe

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Promotion

Desk to dance floor Covetable, sexy-yet-comfy shoes that work around the clock? Your prayers have just been answered…

FROM BOARDROOM

Ecco soft leather feels utterly comfortable, while a 75mm heel is chic yet wearable

TO BAR

‘Grow’ the innovative heel – it gives you an extra 15mm so you’re ready to hit the bar in sultry style

THERE’S AN AUTUMN SHOE REVOLUTION going on, and it’s courtesy of Scandi brand Ecco and their groundbreaking new Shape collection. Designed to look as good as they feel, the heels let you meet the demands of everyday life. Simple and stylish by day, each design has a foot bed that lowers the heel of the foot 15mm within the shank. Come cocktail hour, the 75mm heel can be magically ‘grown’, giving you the perfect height to party in. ‘No modern woman wants to be held back by her footwear, but it’s important to look and feel great too, which is why we designed this truly innovative heel,’ explains Niki Tæstensen, Lead Designer/Head of the Ecco Concept Lab. Nothing says party like a spot of hot metal, so these silver snakeskin heels are perfect. All designs are crafted from the softest leather to provide optimum comfort and timeless style. The beautiful shoes and leather goods in the new Ecco Shape collection are inspired by extraordinary women who need their accessories to keep up with their lives. Basically, you.

FIND OUT MORE See the entire Ecco Shape collection, including chic ankle boots and sexy snakeskin heels, and find out more about the brand’s Women Shape The World Campaign at eccoshoesuk.com/shape.


Modern Vagabonds Edition 6

JA N E M O S E L E Y # M O D E R N VAG A B O N D


a t e li e

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Gol d leaf ribb on

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A tale of two tones

Granny shoes are back, but how did they get so cool? Jess Wood goes behind the scenes at Chanel to find out

I’ve tottered about in heels, padded around in ballet pumps, struggled to run for the bus in flatforms, and tried (and mainly failed) to embrace the masculine joys of a brogue. But in my 15 years in fashion, my conclusion is this: the ideal shoe for feeling jaunty while still being able to negotiate normal life is a low block heel. It’s had a renaissance recently, thanks in part to Alessandro Michele with his awkward, specs-wearing new Gucci girl in her 4cm stack-heeled loafers. For the past few seasons, every brand, from Topshop to ASOS, has been producing sweet mid-height heels. This tidal wave of comfiness was kickstarted by Karl Lagerfeld. For Chanel’s AW15 show, he dusted down

the first two-tone shoe Coco Chanel ever designed – in 1957, a lower-heeled era – and brought it back to life. A slingback in beige Greek goatskin with a narrow almond toe in contrasting black grosgrain, the heel stands at a neat 6.6cm. It sparked #twotone mania, appearing on the feet of more streetstyle stars than you could count. Blonde Salad blogger Chiara Ferragni wears hers with vintage denim flares. Russian fashionista Miroslava Duma wears hers with a matching Chanel skirt suit. So what is it about this slingback that makes it Fabulous, Not Frumpy? And have I found my perfect granny-chic shoe? Chanel shoes are made in a factory just outside Milan, in Parabiago. I manage to secure an invite to see the magic cobblers in action – the first time a journalist has ever been allowed to visit. Chanel bought


Roveda, a historic Italian bootmaker, in 2000. From the outside, it looks just like any other low-rise factory block, common in the region responsible for most of the world’s luxury shoes and leather goods. But walking in, I’m greeted by black and white photos of Gabrielle Chanel, galleries of framed shoe sketches by Karl Lagerfeld and Laurence Dacade (the Chanel shoe designer who always sketches feet with painted toenails) and phrases like ‘Make shoes, not war’ printed on the walls. As CEO Didier Bonnin leads me into the magic kingdom of the factory floor, he tells me that although shoes have the longest production cycle in fashion, the aim at Roveda is ‘to work miracles. If a designer wants something impossible with two days’ notice, it is our job to make it happen.’ He explains why shoes are the fashion industry’s most technically complicated area. The foot contains 26 bones and over 100 ligaments, and increases 5 per cent in size during the day. The average Roveda shoe contains around 40 components (as opposed to a pencil skirt, which may have six pieces) and goes through 180 processes. Once finished, no alterations can be made – unlike a piece of clothing – so it needs to be checked at every stage. Each shoe is produced in 17 sizes and two width fittings, compared to clothing, where six sizes is normal. When Gabrielle Chanel invented the original style, the idea of a two-tone shoe was unheard of – up until then, they were all one colour and were meant to match the outfit. She chose neutral shades of beige and contrasting black to create a shoe that could be worn from morning to night, with all kinds of outfits and for all occasions. She also chose beige to make legs look longer, and the black tip to shorten the foot and make it appear neater. The shoemaker Massaro helped her come up with the elasticated slingback, and she settled on a 6.6cm squared heel for optimum comfort. Soon dubbed ‘the new Cinderella slipper’, fans included Romy Schneider and Brigitte Bardot. When Lagerfeld decided to bring it out of the archive, there was no sketch, as Gabrielle Chanel didn’t draw her designs. Roveda’s development team made a new last (a 3D resin model of the shape of the shoe) from an original

Th e Rove da fact or y: Je ss ge ts th e keys t o th e m ag i c sho e kingdom

version and tweaked it – making the toe slightly rounder and higher up the foot for its comeback on the AW15 catwalk. The series of processes involved in making the final shoe is mind-boggling. All the types of leather used are put through a torturous quality-control process before a design can go into production. Quality control is a normal part of the fashion industry, but even by luxury standards, the demands made of a Chanel shoe are exceptional. Technicians in white lab coats beaver away amongst machines, putting pieces of leather into ovens and blasting them with light that mimics the sun (to emulate the climate of the Middle East, where many Chanel customers live, Bonnin explains). They’re put into ‘climate chambers’ to check the leather doesn’t interact in the heat with any metal parts that will be used in the shoe; they’re studied under microscopes to check the colour fastness, and put through 20,000 cycles of pressure by a machine to check how they wear. Once the leather pieces have been cut, they go through endless stations to be stitched and hammered by different craftsmen, until the shoe is assembled, NOW & THEN Ri g h t: Man Repeller b l ogg e r L e an dr a M e di n e . Be l ow : Rom y Sch n e i der

moulded on to the last and attached to the heel. Everywhere I look, there are racks of beige and black shoes in various stages of completion. The double-C logo is stamped on to the goatskin insole from giant ribbons of gold leaf. I watch as a lady inserts the insole into a shoe, pushing it into the toe and smoothing it with infinite care to check there are no wrinkles or creases. Another steadyhanded lady drills a hole on the outside of the heel, picks up a tiny gold pin with the double C on the end from a box filled with rows of them, and inserts it into the hole using special tweezers. The edges of the shoe are trimmed and then the slingback undergoes one final check-up – it’s put into an X-ray machine, where a radiologist examines it for any internal pins or nails sticking anywhere they shouldn’t. Each shoe is blow-dried, LA celeb-style, to remove any specks before being steamed. When I finally get to hijack a pair and slip them on to my impatient feet it’s with a newfound appreciation. Specifically designed to flatter by Gabrielle Chanel, and with around 20 new colour and leather combinations proposed, these granny shoes are definitely the right side of glam. Q

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JESS WOOD, SIAN PARRY, GETTY IMAGES, CHANEL

Shoes first

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GUCCI

Meet Mayfair-based former banker Jennifer Chamandi, whose debut shoe collection is totally on point

What made you leave finance to design shoes? ‘When I was eight, I wore my mum’s shoes, telling her I could revise better in heels. This love never left me.’ Tell us about your collection. ‘My stilettos are inspired by geometric abstract art and reflect my mind for numbers. Each can be worn with or without the strap.’ Which celebrity do you dream of dressing? ‘Amal Clooney, for her grace and intelligence.’ Exclusively at brownsfashion.com

All the news in

S

O E S STYLE MAP

01 From a s el ect i on

02 £2 3 5

Pick up some global glamour from artisan hotspots around the world. These brands are each imbued with distinctive local style

01 W h o? B r o t h e r V e l l i e s From South Africa, Kenya and Morocco What? Handcrafted traditional A f ri c an sandals wit h a NYC t wist .

HEART AND DESIGN To celebrate its tenth birthday, Toms has collaborated with NYFW pro Prabal Gurung (below) to create these graphic espadrilles (left). Sales will support the Shikshya Foundation, which provides relief and education in Nepal.

02 W h o ? A v e c M o d ér a t i o n From Italy W h a t ? Faux-fur footwear – animal lovers, rejoice!

03 £2 6 5

03 W h o ? S u e c o m m a B o n n i e From South Korea What? An Asian fashionista fave – t h i n k s e q u i n ne d t r a i n e r s a n d pearl-encrusted Chelsea boots. 04 £1 5 0

05 £7 3 8

04 W h o ? C h a t e l l e s F r o m France W h a t ? Parisian- c h i c f l a t s you can customise – a d d i n i t i a l s o r tassels to your favourite design. 05 W h o ? S a n a y i 3 1 3 From Turkey What? Babouche slippers with bold e m b r o i d e r y and f r i n g i n g .

£42

WORDS BY JESS WOOD, HOLLIE BROTHERTON. STILL LIFES BY IMAXTREE, NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

£ 575


Is it possible to pull off a thigh boot when you’re not Kim K? Can you actually wear socks with sandals over the age of eight? We challenge ultra-chic shoe designer Tabitha Simmons to show and tell

THIGH BOOTS ‘M y v e r s i o n a r e a r o m a n t i c t wist o n t h e t r e n d , i n v e l v e t rather than leather, with rounded toes. I love the idea of putting them with something unexpected, like this neat, buttoned-up Coach outfit that has a bit of a western vibe. Think about long boots as a cool new take on tights. For evening, I’d wear them with something soft, like a long chiffon dress, to stop them looking trashy.’ Sh i r t , £ 6 9 5, a n d s k i r t , £ 6 2 5 , b o t h C o a c h ; ‘A sh l y n ’ b o o t s , £ 7 7 5, Ta b i t ha S im m o ns fo r R o k s a nd a

When it comes to making shoes look good, English-born, New York-based Tabitha Simmons is a triple threat – she’s a footwear designer and a stylist with much-admired personal chic. Her collection, launched seven years ago, has become a favourite among fashion insiders for its delicate style and Italian-made quality. Olivia Palermo loves the Harmony boot, Kate Moss loves the Issa and everyone adores the ‘Ginger’, a multistrap Mary-Jane that Simmons remakes every season. ‘My own collection is embarrassingly large,’ she says. ‘I don’t go crazy with clothes, but shoes are a different story. You put a new pair with an old dress and it looks new again.’ Her personal archive includes everything from collectable Balenciaga ‘Lego’ boots to towering Alexander McQueen platforms. ‘Shoes give you pleasure, because you can look down and see them!’ So, Tabitha, how would you wear…

SOCKS & HEELS ‘This trend is all over the catwalks, but I must admit, it is way outside my personal comfort zone! I wanted to make it as grown-up as possible, rather than too cute and young, so I’ve put fine black socks with a sharp trouser suit. The masculinity of it cuts through the c u ten e s s o f t h e s o c k s . I f y o u ’ r e g o i n g t o t r y t his tre n d, y o u n e e d t o m a k e sure they definitely look like socks – I’ve rolled these down to show some a n k l e . T h e s e sho es w o u l d a l s o wo r k w i t h a s e x y , black lace dress.’

B l az er, blouse and t r o user s, a l l S i m m o n s ’ o w n ; so c k s , fr o m a select ion, W o l f o r d ; sho es, fr o m a select ion, D o l c e & G a b b a n a

Shoes first

HOW TO WORK AW 1 6 ’S T R I C K I E ST SHOE TRENDS

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Shoes first

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LOAFERS

‘I l i k e m i x i n g p r i n t w i t h p r i n t – you shouldn’t be afraid of it. But I do try to keep th e m t h e s a m e s o r t o f s c a l e . Th e d r a g o n f l y p a t t e r n o n th e se s hoes is a s i m i l a r s i z e t o the d i t s y p r i n t on my Balenciaga dress, so it w o r k s . I a l s o k e e p t he lo o k vaguely tonal – it all visually bl e n d s i n t o o n e , as t h e g r e e n s in t he sho es m i x w i t h t h e g r e e n i n t h e fr o ck. ’ D r e s s , Simmons’ own; ‘Ellyn’ shoes, £665, Tabitha Simmons

HIKING BOOTS ‘ T h i s i s w h a t I ’ d w e a r at t h e weekend, hanging out with my kids. At the moment I’m into wide, cropped jeans, but with these boots you r e a l l y n e e d a s k i n n y pair. Mine finish just at the top of the boot – if they’re too long or short, it looks m e s s y . T o s t o p i t a l l being too plain and casual, I’m wearing a shirt with a pretty top-stitched collar – I’d a l s o put a p u s s y - b o w b l o u s e under this jumper.’Q Sw eat er, shir t a n d j e a n s , a l l Simmons ’ o w n ; ‘B e x l e y ’ b o o t s , £495, T a b i t h a S i m m o n s

COMPILED BY JESS WOOD. PHOTOGRAPHS BY BRYAN DERBALLA. HAIR BY AVIAN KING AT BRIDGE ARTISTS. MAKE-UP BY ALLIE SMITH AT SARAH LAIRD

PRINTED SHOES

‘I l o v e t hem – I d o n ’ t k n o w if it’s because they remind me of school, or what! This pair ar e a h i g h e r , s e x i e r t a k e o n t h e st andar d st yle – p r e p p y , b u t a b i t naughty. I’ve put them with a floaty Chloé dress t o t o n e i t d o w n a n d a dd a casual edge. I’d also wear them with an A-line s k i r t o r a b l a c k t u x e do st yle s u i t f o r e v e n i n g . ’ Dre s s , £2,995, C h l o é; loafers, £ 390, H i l f i g e r Co llect ion


# START W I T H THE S H O E S d u ne lo nd o n.c o m


F I O R E L L I .C O M


STYLED BY ANNA FOSTER. PHOTOGRAPH BY DREW WHEELER. NAVY WOOL GILET, £203, CHALAYAN; GOLD-PLATED EARRING, £121, JENNY SWEETMAN

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Fashion october

New-mood nonchalance,

powerhouse proportions

and your medieval muse.

Oh, and then there’s Britney…


undone

Nudes, directional cuts and subtle exposure. The new cool-girl mood is worn with nonchalance

Styled by ANNA FOSTER Photographs by DREW WHEELER

Come


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T h i s p a g e : wh i te c otton c ard i g an , £ 1,790, Chanel; whit e woo l and met al- z ip skir t , £ 1,510, S a l v a t o r e Fe rrag am o. O p p osi te p a g e : n e oprene jacket , £ 340, and black wo o l t r ico t ine t r ouser s, £ 320, both Em p ori o A rm an i ; wh i te c otton and met al t o p (wor n under jacket ), £ 435, To ga


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T h i s p a g e : sl e e ve l e ss m oh ai r swe a t er (just seen), about £ 720, and co t t o n d eni m an d c ry st al -stu d d e d sh i rt, abou t £480, bo t h No.21. Oppo sit e p a g e : wo o l jacket , £ 3 , 4 0 0, an d si l k an d m e t al -zi p top , £ 1,050, bot h Chr ist ian Dio r ; viscose t r o user s, £ 9 2 5, L oe we ; ste rl i n g si l v e r ri n g , £ 34 0 , Char lo t t e Chesnais at Dover S t r eet Mar ket


T his page: felted wool dress, £910, and leather shoes, £440, both Mulberry; 18ct-gold earrings, £3,350, Delfina Delettrez. Opposite page: black wool jacket, £1,815, and cotton denim corset, £625, both Prada; black wool body, £137, Frame; black silk and rayon skirt, about £1,100, Haider Ackermann; met allic leather shoes, £450, Jil S ander; earring, model’s own

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T h i s p a g e : mer ino wo o l j ump suit , a b o ut £ 1 , 2 8 2 , Co urrèg es . O p p o s it e p a g e : silk and visco se dr ess, £ 3,50 0 , a nd lea t her t ro users, £ 2 , 4 0 0, b o t h Lo uis Vuit t o n

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T h i s p a g e : na vy wool g i l e t (worn at f ron t), £ 20 3 , Chalayan; navy cashmer e wo o l t r ouser s, £ 275, Max Mar a; yello w g o l d - p l a t ed ea r r i ng , £ 12 1 , Je n n y Swe e tn am ; 1 8 c t ye l l ow- gold ear r ing (wor n as r ing), £ 915, Shihar a at Do ver S t r eet Mar ket . O p p o s i t e p a g e : c o t t o n s h i r t , £ 41 0 , Cre atu re s O f Th e Wind; pinst r ipe cot t o n shir t (wo r n under neat h), £ 225, Alex ander Lew i s ; cr êp e, w ool an d si l k -m i x sk i rt, £ 7 2 5, Gu c c i; silk velvet and leat her bo o t s (just seen), £ 420, 3.1 Phillip Lim


HAIR BY ROGER CHO USING KIEHL’S SINCE 1851 NEW SMOOTHING OIL-INFUSED LEAVE-IN CONCENTRATE. MAKE-UP BY YAE PASCOE. MODEL: ESTELLA BRONS AT NEXT. SET DESIGNER: LUCY SANDERSON


207 Thi s p a g e : p o l y am i de of f -th e -sh ou l d e r d re ss, £ 120, polyest er body (wor n under neat h), £ 110, woo l wr ap (wor n a s a s k i r t ), f rom a se l e c ti on , an d wool l e gg i n gs (just seen), £ 210, all Acne; st er ling silver ear r ing, £ 195, C ha r l o t t e C hes nai s. O p p osi te p a g e : wool b ral e t, £ 245 , Pr ingle; silk shir t , £ 455, Paul S mit h; wo o l and co t t o n t r o user s, £ 1 , 2 9 0, Vi ct ori a Be ck h am ; l e ath e r sh oe s, £ 42 5 , Ruper t S ander son; 18ct - go ld ear r ings, £ 890, Delfina Delet t r ez


Styled by APRIL HUGHES Photographs by ALEXANDER NEUMANN

Puff piece

Rise of the oversize: it’s the most inflated coat story of the season. Go big or go home


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T h i s p a g e : c otton an d n yl on c oat, £1,1 9 4 , A n ne So fie Madsen; wo o l and nylon bomber (wo r n under neat h), £ 8 2, Lut z Hu e l l e ; c ash m e re wool swe ate r, £729, and cashmer e wo o l sweat pant s (just seen), £ 638, bo t h M i cha el Kors Col l e c ti on ; l e ath e r, ru bb e r an d elast ic bo o t s, £ 394, Ro debjer. Oppo sit e page: silk and duck d o w n j ack e t, £ 3 , 2 5 0, vi sc ose top, £65 0 , and gold- plat ed br ass ear r ings, £ 650, all Lo uis Vuit t on


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T h i s p a g e : n av y c otton an d c an v as c oat , £ 1,845 , pur ple wo o l sweat er, £ 395, and black s i l k v e l ve t sk i p an ts (j u st se e n ), f rom a select ion, all B alenciaga. Opposit e page: co t t o n coat, £70 0 , an d c otton d e n i m trou se rs , £ 495, bot h Mar ques’ Almeida; nylon jacket (wor n un d e rn e ath c oat), abou t £92 .4 0 , Stussy; mer ino woo l sweat er (just seen), £ 339, B ehno


T h i s p a g e a nd opp osi te : m u l ti -c ol ou re d p ol yam i de and duck down coat , £ 1,780, Emilio Pucci; black- and- whit e co t t o n a nd p o l y kn i t h ood e d swe atsh i rt, abou t £ 4 3 , St ussy; whit e visco se and polyest er shir t (wo r n under neat h), fr o m a s el ect i o n, O ff -Wh i te c / o Vi rgi l A bl oh ; bl ack qu i l ted nylon shor t s, £ 375, S t e l l a M c C a r t n e y ; b l a ck - a n d - w h i t e n y l o n l eg g i ng s ( w o rn u n d e rn e ath ), f rom a se l e c ti on , Emilio Pucci; leat her and r ubber sho es, £ 398, C o m m o n P r o j e c t s


This page: maroon cotton and canvas jacket, £965, and blue cotton twill trousers, £550, both Moncler Grenoble; blue wool shirt (just seen), £626, Vers ace. Opposite p a g e : cotton denim and duck down coat, £ 524, Adam Selman; nylon jacket (worn underneath). £ 395, Carven; leather top (just seen), £ 623, Behno; wool polo neck, £ 206, Creatures Of Comfort; leather trousers, £ 960, Carven; leather, rubber and elastic boots, £394, Rodebjer


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T h i s p a g e and opposite: nylon coat, £ 1,180, Stella McCartney; cotton and polyurethane jacket (worn underneath), £ 750, and wool trousers, £ 492, both Acne Studios; polyester and elast ane polo neck, £ 115, Alex ander Lewis; leather, rubber and elastic boots, £ 394, R o debjer


HAIR BY SABRINA SZINAY AT THE WALL GROUP USING CLOUD NINE. MAKE-UP BY TADAYOSHI HONDA AT FACTORY DOWNTOWN USING DIOR BEAUTY. MODEL: AGNES SOKOLOWSKA AT MAJOR MODEL MANAGEMENT NEW YORK. PRODUCTION BY HELENE FONTON. CASTING BY BERT MARTIROSYAN

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T h i s p a g e : ny l on an d d u ck d own sc arf , £ 6 9 8, nylon coat , £ 898, and nylo n t r o user s, £ 598, all D K NY; co t t o n a nd s p a nd ex pol o n e ck , £ 13 5 , M r. L ark i n ; l e ath er, r ubber and elast ic bo o t s, £ 394, Ro debjer. Oppo sit e page: na v y a nd g re y wool an d n yl on c oat, £ 7 9 0 , an d navy woo l t r ouser s, £ 380, bot h Jacquemus; bo o t s, as befor e


AW16’s catwalk crusade was positively medieval. Don rich, embellished brocades and let the banquet commence

The

history

girls


T h i s p a g e : cot t o n and silk velvet dr ess, £ 938, suede and leat her boo t s, fr om a select io n, a nd wo o l a nd d ia ma nt é s ca rf, £456, all Pr een by Tho r nt on B r egaz z i; 14ct - gold, pear l and diamo nd ea rring s, £5 8 5 , M iz uki; silv er a nd diamond ring, £828, Gaelle Khouri. Opposite p a g e : wool and Swarovski cryst al jacket, met al, Swarovski cryst al and s at i n c ollar, cot t o n shir t and wo o l t r ouser s (just seen), all fr o m a select ion, Do lc e & G a b b a na ; ea rring s, a s b efo re

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Styling by TIFFANY FRASER STEELE Photographs by JASPER ABELS


222 C o t t o n j ac qu ard j u m p su i t, ÂŁ 2,4 5 0 , an d e mbellished leat her gloves, fr o m a select ion, bot h Delpoz o


Wool cape, £1,660 , and met al bracelet, £125 , both S alvator e Fe rrag am o ; c rê p e d e ch in e b lo u se (wo rn under neat h), £ 380, S o nia Rykiel at Net - a- po r t er.com; br ass, 18 ct ro se-g o ld , S wa ro v ski cry st a l a nd co s t ume pear l r ing (o n model’s r ight hand), £ 235, and br ass and 18ct r o se-g o ld ring (mid d le fing er o n mo d el’s left ha nd ), £ 155, bo t h Mawi; 18ct r o se- gold, diamo nd and pear l r ing (index fi n g er o n mo d el’s left ha nd ), £2 , 5 0 0 , Anno us hk a


S il k d res s, £1 7 , 4 0 5, a nd s i lk velvet scar f, £ 160, bo t h Ro ber t o Cavalli; r ings o n model’s ri gh t ha nd , fro m l eft : g ol d- pl at e d and st er ling silver r ing, £ 225, Alex Mo nr oe; go ld- plat ed and s o li d s ilv e r cl aw ri ng , £8 5 , Tes s a Met calfe; r ings o n mo del’s left hand, fr o m left : gold- plat ed, st er ling s il v er an d p ea rl ri ng , £1 2 6 , A le x Mo nr oe; 18ct r ose- gold, diamo nd and pear l r ing, £ 2,500, Anno ushk a


225 S i l k b r o ca de an d si l k ch i f f on dre ss, £2,890, wo o l t ight s, £ 535, silk velvet and met al boo t s ( j us t s een), £66 5 , si l k v e l ve t sh ou l de r p i e c e , £ 805 , denim co r set , £280, leat her belt , £ 280, leat her bo o k cha r m, £ 1 4 0, m e t al k e y ch arm s, £18 0 e ach, and Plexiglas key char m, £ 195, all Pr ada; 22ct - go ld, v i t r eo us en am e l an d p i n k tou rm al i n e ri n g (i ndex finger ), £ 3,950, Alice Cicolini at Net - a- po r t er.com; 2 2 ct - g o l d , v i tre ou s e n am e l an d g re e n tou rm aline r ing, £ 4,500 , Alice Cico lini


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T h i s p a g e : si l k g e orge tte c rê pe dre ss, an d silk velvet and leat her bo o t s, bo t h fr om a select ion, and cr y s t a l e arri n gs, £1 9 0, al l Erde m . Op p osi te p a g e : wo o l and jacquar d dr ess, £ 5,910, and suede s ho es , £ 66 0, b oth G u c c i ; 1 4 c t y e l l ow-gol d, pear l and diamo nd ear r ings, £ 585, Miz uki; br ass and S w a r o v s ki c ryst al brac e l e t, £5 7 0, gol d-pl at ed br ass and S war o vski cr yst al r ing (o n mo del’s r ight ha nd ) , £ 3 2 0, an d b rass ri n g (on m ode l ’s l e f t hand), £ 220, all Gucci at Net - a- por t er.com


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HAIR BY EARL SIMMS AT CAREN USING WINDLE & MOODIE. MAKE-UP BY ANGELA DAVIS DEACON USING PAULA’S CHOICE. MODELS: SHARNEE GATES AT SELECT, ANNA JACKSON AT STORM MODEL MANAGEMENT, SOFIE THEOBALD AT THE HIVE MANAGEMENT. SET DESIGN: ALUN DAVIES AT ONE REPRESENTS

T h i s p a g e : s i l k v el ve t c oat, £7,2 5 0 , wool c ard i g an , £ 1,010, cot t o n shor t s, £ 725, and velvet , co t t o n and leat her boo t s, £1 , 0 2 5 , a l l M i u M i u ; 1 8 c t-g ol d, d i am on d, si l k an d p e a r l necklace, £ 4,785, Car o lina B ucci Opposit e p a g e : woo l and silk ja c q ua r d d r es s , £ 1 , 99 5, Bu rb e rry; gol d-pl ate d b rass and Swar o vski cr yst al br acelet s, £ 273 each, Ca&Lou


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Photographs by DAVID ROEMER Styled by JAYNE PICKERING

stronger than Following a three-year stint in Vegas, Britney Spears has risen back to the top of her game – with a new album to prove it. In her only UK interview, she tells Louise Gannon why trusting her own instincts is paying off

yesterday


Jack e t, Bu rb e rry; pan ts, Do lce & Gabbana; r ing, Delfina Delet t r ez


A heatwave may be burning through the City of Angels, slowing the frantic pace of the gym-fit hikers and melting Frappuccinos left, right and centre, but it turns out to be the ideal day to meet Britney Spears. Her new single – Make Me – dropped online hours before our interview. By the time she woke up, the buzz on the track she co-wrote was deafening, and she was the number one downloaded artist on iTunes. ‘Can I scream?’ she asks, excitedly. ‘I mean, you put something out there. You have literally no idea what to expect. All I knew was that I loved it, I took my time on it, I was proud of it, but it could all still blow up in my face. And then I got the best reaction I could possibly imagine. I’m not just happy. I’m like, “Yes! Yes! Yes! Yes! Yes!”’ It’s good to see Britney happy. The small-town girl from Kentwood, Louisiana, who got her first break as a Disney Mouseketeer at the age of 11 and went on to be the biggest pop star on the planet when she was still in her teens, has had a life that has sometimes felt like a roller-coaster ride. The first time I interviewed her she was 18 and at the dizzying height of fame. It was 1998, and her debut hit, Baby One More Time – released when she was just 16 – had sold 10 million copies (it remains one of the biggest selling singles to date). ‘I try to act tough but I’m not,’ she said at the time. ‘I do want all of this but it’s not always easy.’ Two years later, when we caught up at her third album launch in New York, she was still trying to navigate the swirling seas of celebrity. ‘Sometimes I feel just completely overwhelmed,’ she admitted. ‘I have lots of incredible in my life, but no normal.’ Today, she is clearly in the best place she has been for years. All the rush and frenzy that accompanied previous interview situations (on tours and at multimillion-dollar music launches) has disappeared. She arrives with a small, friendly group of her management team and chooses – for the main part – to hang out with everyone rather than shut herself away in her dressing room. She is relaxed enough to show off her ditzy, funny, self-deprecating side. Almost choking on a super-hot wasabi cracker, she blurts out: ‘And seriously. I’m the one who asked for these!’ A little later she makes a very non-celebrity confession. ‘I had a really bad date,’ she reveals. ‘I mean, it was really bad. I’ve been single for ages (she split from TV producer Charlie Ebersol 21 months ago) and had a date with a guy I liked. I was getting anxious, worrying he wouldn’t like me. In the evening I got on the scales and I had literally lost six pounds.’ I tell her that sounds completely impossible and she laughs: ‘I know, right? But it’s true. I couldn’t eat. I got all worked up, something crazy must have happened with my metabolism but honest to God I lost six pounds.’ She covers her face with her hands and continues: ‘This is so embarrassing. We went to the movies, but I could tell right away it wasn’t working. It was sort of awkward. So after the movie I came home and that was it. It just

didn’t work.’ Perhaps he was nervous or intimidated by her celebrity status, I suggest. She shoots me a look like she knows that’s just what people say and she’s not buying it. ‘No,’ she says. ‘He just wasn’t into me. I liked him. He knew that. But he definitely didn’t feel the same. It happens to everybody. Being famous doesn’t make you any different. It’s pretty hard to date in LA, it’s hard to find men who are kind and who have a little substance. I grew up with southern men who have a little more time. I miss southern men.’ The Britney in front of me is a far cry from the girl a decade or so ago who tried so hard to be the perfect pop star with the perfect life – from the truckloads of Grammy and MTV awards to the celebrity hook-ups and the constant travelling. At 34, she is finally in the place where she always hoped – but never quite believed – she would be. Settled, successful and financially secure. Five years ago she jumped off the merry-goround of world tours and endless campaigns to prepare for her show in Vegas – Britney: Piece Of Me – which opened in 2013 and confounded all expectations – $50m (about £37.6m) worth of tickets were sold within the first eight months and last year it was named best show on the strip. She also settled into a new home in Los Angeles with her boys (from her two-year marriage to dancer Kevin Federline) – Sean Preston, 11, and Jayden, ten. Today – and for the next 12 months – her work/life balance is six weeks on and six weeks off, and when she is performing, the trip home is an easy 40-minute plane ride. Order has clearly allowed her to be herself. Every day Britney puts up un-airbrushed goofy photographs on Instagram, randomly flitting from photos of her eating spaghetti with her boys to images of plants and animals. It’s a reaction to decades of living through the lens; an attempt, she admits, to redress a balance in her life. Growing up in the South, which still retains many of those old-fashioned Gone With The Wind values, girls are expected to be polite, pretty and charming at all times. ‘Southern girls can be very hard on themselves because you are expected to be a certain way, you are expected to please people,’ she explains. ‘And then I moved to Los Angeles when I was very young. I was so under scrutiny. If a hair was out of place, I’d be so anxious. I would get very anxious about so many things. ‘I can’t even properly explain how it’s happened, but becoming a mother and being with my boys has made me so much more accepting of myself,’ she says. ‘I’m their mom, whatever. That has been a really big thing for me over these last few years. My boys don’t care if everything isn’t perfect, they don’t judge me. If anything, when I’m all dressed up they aren’t happy because it usually means I’m going to work. I’ve been through a lot and I’ve got to this point where I’m feeling good about being single. The best relationship I’ve ever had is with my boys. Maybe I’ll start dating again when I’m 60, but right now I really don’t need anyone else.’


‘I care more about feeling sexy than looking sexy. That all comes from within’

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C l o ck w i s e f rom top l e f t: T-sh i rt, M osch i n o; e ar r ing, B r it ney’s own; jacket ,B ur ber r y; blouse, To me; pant s, D o l ce & G a b b an a; j ack e t an d p an ts, b oth as befor e; r ing, Delfina Delet t r ez ; blouse and pant s, bot h as befor e


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T h i s p a g e : T-sh i rt an d d re ss, b oth Mosch i n o; ear r ing, B r it ney’s o wn. Opposit e p a g e : jacket , B ur ber r y


‘What I do know now is that I don’t believe in happy ever after. I just believe in happy right now’

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Jack e t, Bu rbe rry; pan ts, D ol c e & Gabbana; r ing, Delfina Delet t r ez ; T- Shir t and dr ess (j u st se e n ), both Mosch i n o; b ody, Vict or ia’s S ecr et ; cho ker (just seen), Eddie B o r go


HAIR BY LORENZO MARTIN AT THE WALL GROUP. MAKE-UP BY MARY PHILLIPS AT SOMETHING ARTISTS USING TOM FORD. SET DESIGN: NICHOLAS FAIELLA. PRODUCTION BY AVENUE 53, LOS ANGELES

It’s a great time for a comeback. In a musical landscape crammed with female artists from Adele to Taylor Swift, the original pop princess has proved she can, once more, rocket back to the top with a global hit single and an album that is part old-school Britney blended with a slow, mellow, beat. A killer cocktail honed, she says, ‘from trusting my own instincts about music I want to hear’. But her success has never just been about the music. There’s her stint on The X Factor US and her phenomenally lucrative perfume collaborations. Her latest, Private Show – released in conjunction with a very sexy video – is her twentieth scent release, and she remains the biggest celebrity perfume endorser. To her core fans (largely women aged over 25 and gay men) Britney is the ultimate survivor who proves you can succeed, fail and rise again like a phoenix from the ashes to be bigger, better, stronger and more fabulous than ever before. As an artist her contribution has often been overlooked, considering she has co-written most of the songs on this album (and 29 of her other hits). Even as a teenager she knew exactly what the core of ‘brand Britney’ was. The director of Baby One More Time, Nigel Dick admits it was her idea to wear a schoolgirl outfit in the video after he’d styled her in jeans and a T-shirt. ‘Even at 16, she knew exactly what was right,’ he says. ‘And every piece of the wardrobe she then chose came from Kmart – not one piece cost more than $17. On that level, it’s real. That probably, in retrospect, is a part of its charm.’ Today, she still knows exactly what she wants. Michael Jackson’s Smooth Criminal is on its eighth repeat as she checks the screens to look at her images, making quick decisions on what poses, angles and outfits she thinks work. This is the Britney who pointblank refused to rush her ninth studio album. ‘I wanted to get it right,’ she says. ‘I wanted to feel that it came from me. I’ve written more on this album than any other album. I wanted to put out a piece of me.’ And then, there is the other side of Britney – the one who several hours into the day leans over to me to say: ‘You have to excuse me if I get distracted; I’m now getting into mommy mode. I’m just thinking of pickup times, who is coming over for a play date. Every day I split into work, home, work, home.’ We talk about how transformational these past three years have been for her home life. She has put down roots and created her own space. ‘You have no idea,’ she nods. ‘I actually know where I am. I love my home. It’s very clean and modern with lots of outdoor space. My bedroom is white and violet and very relaxing.’ You can see as she talks how important it is for her to be completely immersed in her sons’ everyday activities, how much the woman who has every whim attended to gets from nurturing her boys. ‘I sit and do drawings with Jayden – he’s really good at it and I’m horrible,’ she says. ‘I do his homework with

him, too, which I love. Jayden lets me help him, but Sean Preston never will. He’s such a smarty-pants and thinks he’s so much more clever than me. I let him think that, but he is actually pretty cool. We talk a lot about music. He’s introduced me to some great people like Calvin Harris and Skrillex. If you listen, kids can teach you so much.’ I ask if her boys have been to see her in Vegas, halfexpecting her to say no. On stage she is, to put it bluntly, a whip-wielding sex goddess barely hiding her curves in tiny leotards that leave nothing to the imagination. She laughs: ‘Of course my kids have seen my show,’ she says. ‘They think it’s amazing. They completely understand that the person I am on stage is an act and it’s not Mom. When I’m home it’s like: “Hey, can we go to the park?” I don’t think they think I’m in any way special. They just think that’s my job.’ We talk about her body and how she’s in the best shape of her life. On set, the food is super-healthy – lots of avocados, cherries and dehydrated crispy beans. She exercises every day and eats small, regular healthy meals but the real secret, she says, is her new lifestyle. ‘You do an intense dance show for three years in Vegas and you get into shape, plus I do lots of yoga, I swim and I work out.’ I tell her it’s ironic that she looks like this at the point she’s sworn off men. She laughs and says: ‘Well I still feel sexy, but that’s a good thing. I care more about feeling sexy than looking sexy. That all comes from within.’ Every week she has one ‘cheat’ day which generally involves chocolate brownies and strawberry ice cream. Her sister Jamie Lynn – a regular visitor on her cheat day – has been known to try to shove as many brownies into her big sister as possible, claiming ‘it’s just not fair’ she’s looking this good. Britney laughs. ‘She’s always trying to get me to eat. I never ate sushi until a year or so ago. I thought the idea of raw fish was horrible. Then we had a day in a hotel in Vegas and she ordered up every single bit of sushi they had and we sat there just eating everything. Now I’m totally hooked.’ There are moments with Britney that are pure comedy. She tells me how her boys’ favourite meal is mac ’n’ cheese. I ask her secret and she looks at me, her eyes twinkle and she deadpans: ‘I have a private chef.’ This cheeky sense of humour is the biggest revelation of the day for me and the truest indicator of how content she is. In the past, it was like she was never sure enough of herself to truly let her guard down. A very long time ago, she told me that all she wanted in life was a family, a husband and ‘the happy ever after with the white picket fence’. I ask her how she feels about this now. She laughs: ‘Maybe I might get married again when I’m a lot older and maybe there will be more kids, but maybe not. What I do know now is that I don’t believe in the happy ever after. I just believe in happy right now. And I’m very grateful for that.’ Q The single Make Me is out now


All that glitters Swarovski crystal offers the ultimate touch of glamour, and thanks to the Swarovski Seal you can be sure you’re getting the real deal every time ime FASHION’S BIGGEST NAMES KNOW THAT ONE sure-fire way to bring a little magic to their designs is to adorn them with Swarovski crystals. And whatever you’re buying, always look for the Swarovski Seal – ‘Crystals from Swarovski’ – to know you’re buying authentic crystal from the legendary brand. Every seal tag and sticker has a unique 16-digit code which you can verify at swarovski.com/crystals. Since 1895, Swarovski has created the world’s finest crystals, in the widest range of colours, forms and sizes, and all produced in a sustainable way. Celebrated luxury brands including Roberto Cavalli, Kenzo, Cadenzza and so many more – including London shoe geniuses Gina and jeweller Dyrberg/ Kern (pictured right and far right) – have all embellished their designs using Swarovski crystals. To shop or browse more stunning items, visit gina.com and dyrbergkern.com.

‘The Swarovski Seal means you’re buying authentic crystal from the legendary brand’

CRYSTAL ROCKS Renowned for its exceptional sculptured footwear and handbags, Gina remains the only British designer label producing luxury footwear in London today. Synonymous with the last word in glamour, visit their revamped store on Sloane Street for an indulgent experience. Look for stunning, eyecatching crystals across sharp heels and a liberal application of stones over statement platforms.


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UN I Q U E LY Y OU Copenhagen jeweller Dyrberg/Kern has launched a new range of Compliments rings for the ultimate expression of personalisation. Choose different bands with 60 different ‘toppings’ to create something truly unique. Then you can keep changing to match your mood or outfit!


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PROENZA SCHOULER

PHOTOGRAPH BY EVAN SCHREIBER

M O O D Big-screen darling Natalie Portman shares her pro hacks to A-list looks, we delve into the (wonderfully scented) world of fragrance farming, and how to get your winter glow on with illuminators you’ll love


Beauty Listen up – your facial oil should be working much harder. Try Elemis Superfood Facial Oil, £45, available at Fabled.com, which is rich in flaxseed oil and boosts plumpness; Aveda Tulsara Radiant Oleation Oil, £38, contains jojoba seed and almond oil for radiance, and Votary Super Seed Facial Oil, £70, which boasts 21 natural oils, is like 12 hours’ sleep in a b ottle.

DIOR

The biggest lipstick collection to have ever landed contains over 100 shades (er, major). Each one is long-wearing, densely pigmented and comes in six different finishes. Now that’s what you call lip service.

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MC LOVES… U R B A N D E C AY VICE LIPSTICKS, £15 EACH

S U P E R FA C E O I L S

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Lancôme Grandiôse L i n e r , £ 23

FINE LINES

Fabled by Marie Claire Imagine all the best premium and niche beauty products in one online shop – plus expert advice and hourly delivery slots. Meet Fabled by Marie Claire, our new luxury beauty destination. Visit Fabled.com to find out more.

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COMPILED BY ANITA BHAGWANDAS. PHOTOGRAPH BY IMAXTREE. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

N E W S A N A T O M Y O F… C H A N E L N O 5 L’ E AU, £68 FOR 50ML

Perfumer Olivier Polge dissected every note of the original and muchloved No5 (made in 1928) and has reimagined the scent with a whole new host of incredible ingredients. We are totally obsessed!

P o l g e a d d e d lemon, mandarin and orange t o t h e o r i g i n a l perfume t o create a n o t i c e a b l e f r e s h n e s s . He a i m e d t o reinvent the classic scent f o r a n e w g e n e r a t i o n by also d e c r e a s i n g t h e m o r e old-fashioned vanilla notes. The super-minimal glass b o t t l e e m u la te s t h e o r i g i n a l , b u t t h e liquid i n s i d e i s c l e a r e r ( r a t h e r t h a n t h e a m b e r t one of the original No5) to echo its watery namesake. The scent’s key ingredients were grown in France by the M u l f a m i l y , who C h a n e l h a s partnered with since 1987.

Your traditional eyeliner flick has been reinvented. At Dior, a mega-matte flick was applied under the eye, rather than on the lid. Recreate it by starting with Tom Ford Eye Primer Duo, £35, to mattify. Then, slick La n cô m e Grandiôse Liner, £23, below the eye. The handle can be bent to 35 degrees – the optimal angle for controlled application (who knew?). Finish with elongating Burberry Cat Lashes Mascara, £24. B ur ber r y Cat Lashes Mascar a, £ 24

Tom Ford Eye Primer Duo, £ 35


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‘My hands suffer when cycling , but thes e gloves protect them from the sun

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a n d g i ve m e a decent grip.’ ‘Sm e l l s as Pa ris ia n an d co o l as y o u ’d ex p e ct – a woody , h e ad y fl o ral .’

03 ‘ This repl eni she s t he skin’s lost lipids ov er night f or a baby-soft complexion come mor ning. ’

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‘A c le v e r new l ot i on t h a t g iv e s y ou b ounc y, y o uthfu l s k i n. I t ’s pric e y, b u t ea s i l y l a st s t h re e mont hs . ’

‘ No one likes redn ess ar ound t heir nose, so I apply Smashb ox’s genius pencil t o cancel it ou t . ’ ‘Mi x t his pow er f ul gr een tea p o w der w it h water t o cr eat e a f r ot hy, c re amy mask. ’

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Loves

Our beauty and style director’s hot picks for the month ahead ‘I l o ve th e grap h i c de s ign o f th i s b o d y was h j u s t as m u ch as i ts uplifting s ce n t.’ 08

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‘ Want nat ur al l ashes f or day and v amped- up eyes f or ev ening? Wit h a t w ist of t he cl ever di al, you can hav e b ot h . ’

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compression f it to enable quicker p ost-workout re covery.’

‘The hard water where I live dries out my skin. This cleanses brilliantly with minimal rinsing required.’

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01 Zadig & Volt aire This Is Her! E D P, £38 for 100ml. 02 Origins Rituali Tea Matcha Madness Face Mask, £30. 03 Harbinger Pro Gloves, £16.95. 04 Malin + Goetz Recovery Treatment Oil, £62. 05 Smashbox Color Correcting Stick in Get Less Red, £18. 06 Clinique Lash Power Full Flutter Mascara, £20. 07 Kaffe Fassett On Point Body Wash, £10. 08 La Mer The Cleansing Micellar Water, £65 (available at Fabled.com). 09 Proskins Active ZigZag Leggings, £34.95. 10 La Prairie Skin Caviar Luxe Essence, £164

STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

‘ Thes e leggings are


ROSIE HUNTINGTON-WHITELEY

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01 Phyto Phytoelixir Cleansing Care Cream, £16.50 02 Christophe Robin Purifying Hair Finish Lotion With Sage Vinegar, £36 03 Charles Worthington Moisture Seal Hair Oil, £6.99 04 Wella Professionals Oil Reflections Luminous Smoothing Oil, £15.50 05 Shu Uemura Art Of Hair Essence Absolue Nourishing Cleansing Milk, £32 06 John Frieda Luxurious Volume Perfectly Full Mousse, £5.99

HAIR BUZZ

The hot cross bun Raise the barre on the classic ballet up-do with this cool update

PHOTOGRAPH BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS

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Neat and functional, buns conjure up images of ballet dancers and high-school gym class, but this criss-cross version offers an interesting new twist (literally). While buns were seen everywhere this season from Dior to Marchesa and Loewe to Valentino, we can’t get enough of this quirky version spied backstage at Esteban Cortazar, where hair maestro Peter Gray reinvented the traditional up-do with playful elastic. To recreate the look, blow-dry hair with mousse to add hold, then brush back into a sleek pony. Twist the length into a low bun and secure with grips, then finish by making an ‘X’ with two pieces of elastic and pin in place.

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Words by CHARLOTTE CLARK


Power player Smoky eyes, a bold lip and HD-ready skin – actress

NATALIE PORTMAN lets us in on her beauty secrets Interview by LUCY PAVIA Photographs by ALIQUE

‘I’ll never get bored of this view,’ says Natalie Portman, sweeping a slender arm across the Paris skyline. We’re standing by the shuttered windows of a suite on the top floor of Le Bristol (the gilded Parisian hotel with its own resident cats) and Portman is pointing out the dome of the SacreCoeur above the rooftops in the distance. She and her French choreographer husband, Benjamin Millepied, made Paris their home two years ago, and it seems to suit her better than LA somehow – all petite and neat as she is in her Left Bank uniform of pale-blue shirt, black cigarette trousers and Dior heels. Today, Portman has her beauty ambassador hat on and we’re talking about power make-up. After a 22-year

career in Hollywood – from Star Wars princess to Black Swan prima ballerina – she’s navigated miles of red carpet without a single mascara smudge. Add to this her role as a face of Dior beauty (and the fact that as a mother to five-year-old Aleph, she’s probably perfected the art of doing her makeup in five minutes in a car mirror), and it’s fair to say she knows a bit about beauty. ‘There was a time when I thought exterior didn’t matter and you just needed to be comfortable,’ she says. ‘But now I think when I take care of myself, [it’s because] I care about how I’m presenting myself to the world.’ From her favourite going-out look to less-is-more eyebrow maintenance, we talk through her beauty rules.


HI-DEF details ‘I do, but p eople ask me if I’m tired!’ jokes Por tman when asked if she ever leaves the hou s e without make -up. ‘I like to lo ok natural but a better version of the real natural.’ Her default running- out-the do or lo ok is a tou ch of matte lipstick with a little undereye concealer and mas cara . ‘From working with make-up ar tists I’m better now than I was before, but I still don’t have a very steady hand,’ she says. Po r tma n says the arrival NATALIE PORTMAN IN THE NEW ROUGE DIOR CAMPAIGN SHOT BY ALIQUE FOR PARFUMS CHRISTIAN DIOR. MAKE-UP BY PETER PHILIPS, CREATIVE AND IMAGE DIRECTOR OF DIOR MAKE-UP, USING ROUGE DIOR

of HD cameras has b een a bit o f a game- changer. ‘I feel like with HD you want less [make-up] b ecaus e you can s ee everything . It’s really upsetting – I actually feel like HD should really b e only for spor ts. Everything else looks nicer in regu lar.’

Previous page, from left: Nars Matte Eyeshadow in Sophia, £18; Dior Rouge Dior in Red Smile, £26.50; Dior Rouge Dior in Premiere, £26.50; Dior All-In-Brow 3D, £42.50; MAC Modern Twist Kajal Liner in Cat’s Meow, £14

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SMOKIN’ eyes ‘Ma ke -up lets you play different roles – you shift during the day, whether you’re at work or with your girlfriends, or with your par tner or your kids,’ says Por tman .

NATALIE PORTMAN IN THE NEW ROUGE DIOR CAMPAIGN SHOT BY ALIQUE FOR PARFUMS CHRISTIAN DIOR. MAKE-UP BY PETER PHILIPS, CREATIVE AND IMAGE DIRECTOR OF DIOR MAKE-UP, USING ROUGE DIOR

If she’s going out at night , Por tman tends to up the drama with a smoky eye.

Next page, from left: Clinique Skinny Stick in Slimming Black, £15.50; Laura Mercier Caviar Stick Eye Colour in Smoke, £23; Tom Ford Cream Color for Eyes in Caviar, £30; Dior 5 Couleurs Designer in Amber Design, £43; Bobbi Brown Long-Wear Cream Shadow in Stone Pink, £19.50

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SHADES OF SEDUCTION Set pulses racing with glorious colour like no other. Choose 100% human hair from the masters of luxury hair extensions and let nothing stand in your way.

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SMOKIN’ eyes ‘I like using a light brown on the lid and a da rker line around that . That’s usually ab out as far as I can go on my own . I’m not very gifted, but I can handle that .’ And she’s actually pretty laiss ez -faire with thos e famou sly p e r fect brows. ‘S ometimes when I’m working , they ’ll us e an eyeb row p encil on me, but I don’t in my day-to - day life.’ S o, she tends to leave them alone? ‘Yes, although , I mean , if I left them really alone, I’d have a unibrow.’

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GLAM go-tos Por tman has enjoyed s ome dramatic make-up transformations over the course of her NATALIE PORTMAN IN THE NEW ROUGE DIOR CAMPAIGN SHOT BY ALIQUE FOR PARFUMS CHRISTIAN DIOR. MAKE-UP BY PETER PHILIPS, CREATIVE AND IMAGE DIRECTOR OF DIOR MAKE-UP, USING ROUGE DIOR

career: ‘For Star Wars: Episode I, that Japanes e Kab u ki lo ok – the red lip and the white face – really in formed my character,’ she says. ‘ Then there was V For Vende tta . . . shaving my head felt b old !’ Her real-life routine is a little more subtle: ‘It’s always an eye or a lip. A red lip feels very glamorous, like you can put on one item o f make -up and your whole [out fi t] lo oks fancy,’ She has the o dd manicure: ‘I like a deep -red

Next page, from left: Dior Contour Couture Colour Voluptuous Care in Red Smile, £19; Nars Lip Liner Pencil in Jungle Red, £16.50; Dior Vernis 954 Red Glove, £19; Dior Rouge Dior in Matte, £26.50; Ciaté London Paint Pot in The Glossip, £9

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GLAM go-tos shade,’ but finds them a little constraining b ecaus e, ‘You can’t us e your hands to read a b o ok.’ Pe rhaps her next career move shou ld b e to invent a sp ecial hands-free page -turner for manicures? ‘Exactly! To track your eye movements and tell when yo u’re ready for the next page.’ Dior make -up’s creative and image director Peter Philips has als o pass ed on a few o f his b est lipstick tricks. ‘Peter showed me how to us e lipstick as cream blusher, which is a nice tip b ecaus e it’s always go o d to have one t h i n g i n you r p o cket you c a n u s e f or every thing .’

Q

The ne w Rouge Dior campaign launches on 1 September 2016

NATALIE PORTMAN IN THE NEW ROUGE DIOR CAMPAIGN SHOT BY ALIQUE FOR PARFUMS CHRISTIAN DIOR. MAKE-UP BY PETER PHILIPS, CREATIVE AND IMAGE DIRECTOR OF DIOR MAKE-UP, USING ROUGE DIOR. STILL LIFE PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAVID ABRAHAMS

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1 Laura Mercier Lovers Illumination Face Illuminator in Devotion, £32 Transport yourself to California with one sweep of this highimpact luminising powder. 2 Cover FX Custom Enhancing Drops in Sunkissed, £34 (available at Fabled.com) This bespoke bronzing liquid can be worn alone or mixed in with your moisturiser for a gorgeous all-over glow. 3 Topshop Chameleon Highlighter in Tiger’s Eye, £12.50 Strobe your way to enviable bone structure – no brushes required, just dab and go. 4 Tom Ford Shimmer Shot in Lust For Life, £32 If you’re looking a bit peaky after a big night out, mix this into your foundation to bring skin back from the brink. 5 Illamasqua Beyond Powder in Epic, £32 Next holiday depressingly distant? Use this to accent your cheekbones and Cupid’s bow for a pretty golden sheen. 6 Suqqu Treatment Primer, £40 (available at Harrods.com) The pink pigments in this radiance-boosting primer counteract the skin-sapping effects of cool autumn light. 7 Bobbi Brown Highlighting Powder in Pink Glow, £34 A sparkle-free powder that elevates cheekbones and reinstates your summer flush. 8, 9 & 10 Dior Light & Contour in Soft Contour, £32 Take the guesswork out of contouring with this clever dual-toned highlighting and sculpting stick. Kim, who?

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the edit

Get set, glow Need an instant skin pick-me-up? Raise your radiance game this autumn with these high-achieving highlighters – no sun required Words and styling by CHARLOTTE CLARK Photograph by DAVID ABRAHAMS


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Happy hair

Protect your hair from thinning and loss with the Plantur 39 collection HORMONES HAVE A LOT TO ANSWER FOR, including the one beauty woe affecting many of us that we so rarely speak about. Hair loss. Oestrogen – the female hormone – is responsible for keeping hair in its ‘growing’ phase. So when hormone levels drop, your hair may look thinner at the roots and in overall volume. Enter Plantur 39 shampoos, tonics and conditioners. The two hero shampoos (one for fine, brittle hair; the other for coloured and stressed hair) contain a special Phyto-Caffeine Complex that penetrates into the root to support the production of healthy hair. The Phyto-Caffeine Complex stays up to 24 hours, providing the energy your roots need – that’s why you should use a Plantur 39 shampoo every day. Don’t worry if you’re more of an every-other-day sort of girl, though. The Plantur 39 Phyto-Caffeine Tonic was created for women who want to reduce hair loss, but who don’t need or want to wash their hair every day. In addition to caffeine, it contains niacin, zinc salts and bio-active substances to support stronger hair. Finally, there are the conditioners – the Plantur 39 Conditioner for coloured and stressed hair and the Plantur 39 Conditioner for fine, brittle hair – both of which contain a buffer that protects the active ingredients in the tonic and shampoos from being rinsed out. All of this, while giving your hair beautiful shine and condition. We love it.

FIND OUT MORE For more information, go to plantur39.co.uk. You can buy the range of Plantur 39 products at selected Boots, leading supermarkets, pharmacies and online at amazon.co.uk.


BEAUTY RULES

The actress loves candles, does her own stage make-up and – spoiler alert – is not a natural blonde

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INTERVIEW BY SUZANNE SCOTT. PHOTOGRAPHS BY GETTY IMAGES, PIXELEYES, ALAMY. LILY JAMES IS THE FACE OF MY BURBERRY BLACK. KATE SOMERVILLE IS AVAILABLE AT KATESOMERVILLE.COM

08

I like a sign ature sce nt and love

that my friends can smell something and go, ‘Oh! That’s Lily!’ For me it’s Burberry My Burberry Black. There’s something really seductive and sexy about it but it’s effortless and fresh, too. Wearing it feels almost tactile. S cented can dles are everywhere

around my house. My boyfriend [actor Matt Smith] gave me a gorgeous Jo Malone London three-wick candle for Christmas, and I smashed it! I couldn’t throw it out so I had to be inventive. I scooped out the wax into teacups and stuck matches in the middle for wicks. I had to salvage it, it was expensive! When I was in Downton Abbey and

War And Peace, I couldn’t wear much make-up, but it was actually quite liberating. I used to hate being on camera without make-up – I remember shooting with Patrick Demarchelier once and he decided that I would only

wear a little bit of foundation while everyone else had a full face. But I felt like I needed more than them! Now, I quite enjoy being fresh-faced. At t h e m o m ent I’ m on sta g e in

Romeo & Juliet. I do my own make-up. I use Burberry Face Contour Pen under my cheeks and into my eye sockets, and blend everything in with my fingers. The production is set in the 50s, so I go really dark with my brows and wear a big brown wig. But I cry everything off in the second half. I used to do my m ake-up on th e Tube and bus all the time. Annoyingly,

I don’t think I can get away with it anymore – someone is bound to take a photo of me. Now I have to get up five minutes earlier, sadly. Not a lot of people kn ow that I’m a brunette, and spent the first 23 years of my life really dark. I went

blonde for my first film job. I was all for it, because people would ask me why I changed my hair and I could say, ‘I’m in film!’ I thought, ‘This is great, everyone will know I’m an actor.’ But, since then, every director wants me blonde and my hair pays the price. I’ve always had long hair, but recently I’ve had to cut it to chin length to get rid of the damage. As a tee n a g e r I had terrible skin. It

was so bad I had to go on Roaccutane [a drug that treats acne]. It really affects your confidence. I’ve been on quite a journey with it, which is why I take such good care of my skin now. I cleanse and tone with Kate Somerville and Elemis, and use Elemis Pro-Collagen Marine Cream. I protect my face with Clinique City Block and I use Kate Somerville’s sun protection. It contains a touch of shimmer, which means my boyfriend won’t borrow it. Otherwise he’d use the whole bottle!

01 Kate Somerville ExfoliKate Cleanser, about £27. 02 Burberry Face Contour Pen in Medium, £25. 03 Jo Malone London Pomegranate Noir Deluxe Candle, £115. 04 Clinique Super City Block SPF40, £18. 05 Elemis Soothing Apricot Toner, £22.50. 06 Kate Somerville Body Glow Sunscreen SPF20, about £32. 07 Kérastase Elixir Ultime, £37. 08 Elemis Pro-Collagen Marine Cream, £80. 09 Burberry My Burberry Black EDP, £92 for 90ml

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MAPPING YOUR

Words by ANITA BHAGWANDAS

f r a g r a n c e Signature scents are determined by brand, bottle and bouquet. But what about

Perfumes. We spritz them on with wild abandon. And though we might be able to pick out a floral jasmine note or a hint of basil, where those particular ingredients come from and how they are produced is probably not on our radar, even though they have a huge effect on the quality of the fragrance. A flower in one region will smell entirely different to one grown even ten miles away, let alone halfway around the world. As authenticity and provenance become a bigger trend in perfumery (and the beauty industry as a whole), knowing what goes into your fragrance and where it originates from is becoming an increasingly important deciding factor at the perfume counter. Leading the charge for top-quality ingredients is Louis Vuitton, which is re-entering the fragrance market after a notable absence (the last Louis Vuitton scent came out in 1946). Its exclusive new collection of seven scents is one of the most hotly anticipated launches of the year and location of the ingredients used to create the iconic fashion house’s collection has been key. Vuitton’s master perfumer, Jacques Cavallier Belletrud, spent months travelling the globe, finding inspiration for the seven scents. But when it came to bottling the brand’s history and heritage, Grasse, on the French Riviera, was non-negotiable. Widely known for its superior-quality flowers, fertile soil and optimal weather, the region is the birthplace of European perfumery and is still the main hub of luxury scent production. ‘For perfumes, you need to have the finest fresh flowers to extract the most high-

F r om t op, cent r e: R o se Des Vent s, Tur bulences, Cont r e Mo i, Mat iér e No ir e, Mille Feux, Apogée, Dans Le Peau, £ 180 each for 100ml

where your fragrance is farmed? We discover the roots of premium perfumes

calibre scent. That’s why we used flowers from Grasse – their quality is always the best, without question,’ explains Belletrud. One key ingredient is the May rose (also known as the rose de Mai or rosa centifolia), found in Vuitton’s Rose Des Vents EDP. It is famous in the Grasse region and perfumery world for its delicate, powdery scent. It’s also one of the most highly sought-after perfume ingredients because its flowering period tends to be two to three weeks in May. Finito. This means it has to be picked and processed in a very short amount of time. It takes 12 tons of flowers to produce just 1kg of May rose absolute (concentrate) and precisely how the oil

is extracted matters, too; that’s the case for every raw ingredient that goes into a perfume. Belletrud explains: ‘Two years before joining Louis Vuitton, I started to use a carbon dioxide extraction method to take scent from flowers and turn it into a liquid. It’s an unusual technique – slower and gentler than the usual large-scale, heated method of extraction.’ The result of doing it more slowly means that the liquid forms at a very low temperature, so you save all the fragile scent molecules within the flower. ‘When I first joined Louis Vuitton, I asked permission to use this method and then for exclusivity for this technique, because I know it’s the best.’

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THE ROSE AND ITS REGIONS

Vuitton isn’t the only premium brand looking for superior ingredients. Bulgarian rose otto comes from the Rose Valley, south of the Balkan mountains. The flowers tend to smell richer and deeper because of the hot climate and rich soil in the region, and they’re the mainstay of L’Artisan Parfumeur Arcana Rosa by Daphné Bugey EDP, which has wonderfully dark rose notes. ‘This tends to have cheaper labour costs, so it’s a little cheaper than the May rose,’ says perfumer Azzi Glasser. Molton Brown’s captivating Rosa Absolute EDT – another rose-abundant scent – uses a red rose from the northern Italian region of Lombardia, near Milan. This fertile region produces roses that are distinguishable by their depth of colour and uniquely clean scent.

smell indolic – or slightly like mothballs. That tends to be the kind grown in India or more humid places. But the European jasmine has a much lighter quality to it,’ says Glasser, who used the flower in her scent The Perfumer’s Story by Azzi S&X Rankin EDP. Another find, even more local, is the English bluebell, used exclusively in Union’s Gothic Bluebell EDP (roullierwhite.com). Grown on a private estate in Kent, these bluebells are individually hand-picked, so that the plants are not damaged in any way. HERBAL REMEDIES

Herbs and woods vary vastly in different locales, too. In Jo Malone London’s Basil & Neroli cologne, two types of basil are used from different locations, because of the distinct qualities they offer. Basil Grand Vert is sourced from Egypt and produces

a fresher, aromatic oil that smells crisp and more ‘green’ (an industry term for grass-like and clean). The other basil used is Basil Verbena, sourced from Madagascar, and the citrusy quality to this variety adds a hint of freshness to the scent. Similarly, in the quest for the best, the oud wood (agarwood) extract in Ex Idolo Thirty Three (roullierwhite. com), originates from Myanmar – widely known as one of the highest grades of oud wood because of the cleanliness of the air in the region. ‘The best ouds are found in south-east Asia,’ explains Glasser. ‘They can fetch over $100,000 [about £76,000] a kilogram.’ So when you’re stumping up the cash for a luxury scent, be assured your money is being spent on far more than just a fancy bottle – it’s also paying for an olfactory journey across the globe and back. Q

WHITE-HOT PERENNIALS

Think of your ‘sexiest’ perfume (and we mean what you’d find sexy rather than anyone else). Chances are, it probably contains some fairly unassuming white flowers, like tuberose – the core note in Alexander McQueen EDP. The exact tuberose in the decadent McQueen scent came from the plantation fields in Madurai in South India. Smaller sustainable farms like these tend to have more specific knowledge of the flower and how the soil and changing weather affect it, as opposed to a big commercial field, where the emphasis is on quantity over quality. Glasser confirms that sourcing the tuberose from the right region is key. ‘Tuberose is hard to look after, but it grows best in climates that are rainy and very hot, such as India and Mexico,’ she says. Likewise, the ylang ylang found in Perris Monte Carlo Ylang Ylang Nosy Be EDP comes from the island Nosy Be off Madagascar, known for having the finest ylang ylang flowers in the world. It often grows wild on the island – a native plant is a sure sign you’re getting the best ingredients – and it thrives in the island’s humidity. Despite its exotic connotations, the most prized varieties of another white flower, jasmine, is actually grown closer to home. ‘Some varieties of jasmine can

Clockwise from top centre: Union Gothic Bluebell E DP, £125 for 100ml; L’Artisan Parfumeur Arcana Ros a by Daphne Bugey E D P, £140 for 75ml; The Perfumer’s Story by Azzi S&X Rankin E DP, £95 for 30ml (available at Harveynichols.com); Alexander McQueen McQueen E D P, £75 for 50ml; Perris Monte Carlo Ylang Ylang Nosy Be E D P, £105 for 100ml; Molton Brown Ros a Absolute E DT, £ 39 for 50ml (available at Fabled.com); Ex Idolo Thirty Three E D P, £90 for 30ml; Jo Malone London B asil & Neroli Cologne, £86 for 100ml

STOCKIST: LOUIS VUITTON.CO.UK, 17-20 LOUIS VUITTON, NEW BOND STREET, LONDON W1S 2RB. PHOTOGRAPHS BY PIXELEYES

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The new skin

superstars

If you care about what you put into your body, let these expert face masks help you look as healthy on the outside, too

*IN PARTICIPATING UK STORES EXCLUDING OUTLET STORES. ONE PER CUSTOMER WHILE STOCKS LAST. © 2016 COPYRIGHT IS OWNED OR LICENSED TO THE BODY SHOP INTERNATIONAL PLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. ABSOLUTELY NO REPRODUCTION WITHOUT THE PERMISSION OF THE OWNERS. ® REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF THE BODY SHOP INTERNATIONAL PLC

Visit The Body Shop to

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Promotion WANT THE HEALTHY GLOW YOU GET FROM a facial, but in your own home? You need a new supercharged mask, £15, from The Body Shop. Each one contains 100 per cent vegetarian ingredients – the Himalayan Charcoal, British Rose and Amazonian Acai are even 100 per cent vegan! To ensure you’re just as healthy on the inside, The Body Shop has teamed up with Niomi Smart to create superfood smoothies inspired by ingredients in the new masks. Discover them at thebodyshop.com/beauty-recipes.

GLOWING SKIN IN A JAR

‘It’s glowing skin in a jar’ Vanda Serrador, expert facialist for The Body Shop

Help tackle impurities with the Himalayan Charcoal Purifying Glow Mask – a firm favourite. It has bamboo charcoal, antioxidant Japanese green tea and tea tree oil from Kenya, and helps draw out sebum and dirt from the skin leaving it feeling soft and looking radiant. Vanda Serrador, expert facialist for The Body Shop, advises, ‘Use it once or twice a week to help remove impurities. It’s glowing skin in a jar’. Also in the range is British Rose Fresh Plumping Mask, a gel formula for thirsty skin. The Ethiopian Honey Deep Nourishing Mask has the texture of real honey and helps to smooth skin and reduce the appearance of fine lines. To help minimise the appearance of pores and fight pigmentation, apply the Chinese Ginseng & Rice Clarifying Polishing Mask, a creamy exfoliant. Or give fatigued-looking skin an instant boost with the Amazonian Acai Energising Radiance Mask.

THE MULTI-MASKING SECRET Beauty addicts are buzzing about multi-masking, where you use different masks on different areas, depending on your needs. Long day at work? Brush Himalayan Charcoal Purifying Glow Mask on to the T-zone, smother cheeks in British Rose Fresh Plumping Mask and apply Chinese Ginseng & Rice Clarifying Polishing Mask to your chin. Rinse after 5-10 minutes. The new collection from The Body Shop won’t overload your skin, so you can use them a few times a week, alone or to multi-mask. Gorgeous!

DO YOU #DARETOMASK

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STYLED BY SOPHIE QURESHI. PHOTOGRAPHS BY OLIVIA FRØLICH AT ONE REPRESENTS. MODEL: HELOISE GIRAUD AT VIVA MODEL MANAGEMENT LONDON. HAIR BY CHRIS SWEENEY USING BUMBLE AND BUMBLE. MAKE-UP BY SONIA DEVENEY AT ONE REPRESENTS USING KIEHL’S SKINCARE. NAILS BY AMA QUASHIE AT CLM HAIR AND MAKE-UP USING DIOR NAIL GLOW AND CAPTURE TOTALE NURTURING HAND REPAIR CREAM. PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANT: MATHIAS RIBE. TOP, EUDON CHOI

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s Skin o s

From the LATEST skincare-tribe trends

to game-changing INNOVATIONS

and new-gen regimes, here’s your cheat

sheet to the BEST complexion ever


Naturally Beautiful Results

It’s a simple equation. Healthy skin equals beautiful skin. Here is a little healthy advice: eat well, live well & take care of you, right down to your skin. Containing naturally active oatmeal, AVEENO® Daily Moisturising Lotion is clinically proven to lock in moisture and improve the condition of dry skin from day 1, for a difference you can feel day after day. Simply beautiful.

*AVEENO® Daily Moisturising Lotion. Beaut.ie product trial Sept 2013, 91 Irish women UK/AV/16-6408


s Skin o s

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C ON TENT S

277 What’s your skincare tribe?

Minimalist, free spirit, classicist – meet the products to match your #currentmood

284 Clear the air Protect your skin from pollution for your best complexion ever Fast-acting products that won’t make you wait for real results

S OPH I E QU R E SH I, Acting beauty & style director

296 Are you selfie harming? Never mind Snapchat, these are the phone filters that’ll save your face IRL

298 Rising skin stars Upgrade your routine with these genius new power products

301 Number crunching Easy on the ingredients – the new wave of skincare is going back to basics

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Right now in the Marie Claire office, complexions are divided. There are those who’ve just got back from a late summer holiday and have what I call ‘smug skin’ (glowy, rested, a smidge of sun-kissed colour). And then there are those of us who haven’t, and are looking somewhat lacklustre. If you’re in the latter camp, this SOS skin supplement is just what you need to turn things around. On p284, find out how pollution could be compromising your complexion – and what to do about it, if upping sticks to the countryside isn’t an option. Those of us who are welded to our smartphones should flick to p296 to read Are you selfie harming? (We hate to break it to you, but your mobile could be giving you wrinkles...) It’s not all doom and gloom, though – for visible improvements now, turn straight to p295 and take your pick from the new nowait wonders. And if you’ve got a specific skin issue we haven’t covered, head to the SOS Skin Clinic on marieclaire.co.uk, our new video series where we ask readers to trial a new skincare regime and be searingly honest about the results. All this is bound to leave you with a serious product wishlist, and there’s no better place to source your skincare haul than at Fabled by Marie Claire (Fabled.com), our new online beauty store. As well as all the best beauty brands, you’ll also find weekly SOS Skin Edits with the latest launches and expert know-how to fix any complexion quandary. Who’s got smug skin now?

295

295 Instant skin transformers


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Skin SOS

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What’s your skincare tribe? Style cliques dominate the #shelfie scene, says Anita Bhagwandas. Meet the hot new beauty tribes and their insta-worthy products You sleep in a sleek, Danishdesigned bed, use vegan lip balm and keep a copy of Kinfolk magazine, your rose-gold iPhone and a pot of apothecarystyle night cream on your bedside table. Sound familiar? OK, so it’s probably not you. But, still, chances are that your seemingly random lifestyle, interior and fashion choices are synchronised to signal that you are part of a tribe – and that includes your curated, bespoke skincare edit, too. In the past, our skincare choices revolved around price and efficacy, but these days what our skincare products look like is also vital. So vital. And yes, as usual, some of this is down to social media and our insatiable desire to ‘share’ what were once private choices. Unlike a glimpse of a compact on the bus, our skincare always remained hidden – until now. The #shelfie generation has changed all that, says Victoria Buchanan, trends analyst at The Future Laboratory. ‘We’re not embarrassed by our skincare any more… Our generation wants to have their face washes and creams out on the counter, and social media is driving this change.’ With that in mind, we’ve devised a new way to curate your skincare arsenal, according to the key tribes. Hopefully you’ll discover a few shareable favourites to adorn your face (and home) with as a result. Filters at the ready…

The minimalist YOUR THING You love everything to be pared-back and cool, but not clinical (think Scandi style with a warm twist). You shop at COS, & Other Stories and Alexander Wang for clothes. At home, white spaces are welcome; clutter and chintz are not. When it comes to beauty, subtle scents and cool packaging win big. YOUR TRIBE ARSENAL 01 Neutrogena Hydro Boost Water Gel, £12.99. 02 Ch an te c ai l l e Blanc Gar denia B r ight ening Esse n c e , £ 15 7 . 03 S kin Laundr y Gent le Foam i n g Wash , £ 18. 04 S us anne Kaufmann Enzyme Peel, £ 42. 05 Indeed Labs Hydraluron Serum, £ 24.99 (B oots.com). 06 & Other Stori e s D ou bl e D u t y Eye Make- U p R emo ver, £ 5 . 0 7 N atu ra Bi ssé Diamond Whit e G l owi n g M ask , £ 6 6. 08 Olay To t al Effect s 7 i n 1 Fe ath e rwe i ght Moist ur iser S P F15, £ 14 .9 9 . 09 Cl i n i q ue Take The Day Off Ey e Mak e u p Re m over St ick, £ 16 01

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Forget everything you have been told about moisturising. Neutrogena Hydro Boost® Water Gel Time to rethink moisturisation. A busy lifestyle can be tough on both you and your skin. Thanks to Hydro Boost’s continuous hydration, your skin can now bounce back no matter what you put it through. Containing a Hyaluronic Gel Matrix, Hydro Boost’s new water-gel instantly locks in intense hydration and continuously releases it as and when your skin needs it. Your skin is so hydrated and supple, that it bounces back. Pretty smart right?

See what’s possible

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only at Boots

Order by 8pm and collect free from 12pm tomorrow at a store near you. Available at larger Boots stores. See www.boots.com/ordertodaycollecttomorrow for full terms and conditions about the Order & Collect service. Mon – Sat, Geographical exclusions apply. Subject to availability. UK/NG/16-7292


Skin SOS

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The kookster YOUR THING A true trendsetter, you’re all over quirky brands and niche products. This fashion-forward gang wears vintage, Vivienne Westwood and Rick Owens (high-street brands are eschewed for one-off pieces – whatever the cost). Taxidermy and a mash-up of eclectic pieces you’ve collected travelling adorn your pad. Everything has to have an edge, so when it comes to skincare, you won’t scare at a placenta night serum. YOUR TRIBE ARSENAL 01 N I O D Superoxide Dismut ase S accharide Mist, £34 (Victoriahealth.com). 02 Benefit Firm It Up! Eye Serum, £ 28.50. 03 H&M Witch Hazel and Willowherb Soothing Facial Mask, £ 1.99. 04 Gold Collagen Defence, £ 14.95. 05 Sunday Riley Tidal Brightening Enzyme Water Cream, £ 60. 06 M Z Skin Rest & Revive Restorative Placent a & Stem Cell Night Serum, £ 195 (Harrods.com). 07 Prismologie Jade & Vetiver Hand Exfoliant, £ 30 (Fabled.com). 08 Erborian B amboo Waterlock Mask, £ 44. 09 The Afro Hair & Skin Co. Flow Perfectly B alanced Facial Oil, £19.50

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The classicist YOUR THING You do your research before you buy anything − it has to be high quality and look premium. Your style is sophisticated and your prep-perfect outfits combine the upper end of high-street brands with a few choice designer pieces – think Zara, Rag & Bone and J Crew. Naturally, your home is just as well-dressed. In fact, price isn’t an issue for any of your purchases, especially skincare because you see it as an investment. You’ll happily splurge to get results.

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YOUR TRIBE ARSENAL 0 1 To m Fo r d R a d i a nt Moi stu re Sou f f l é , £ 7 0 . 0 2 S ens a i C el l ul a r Perf orm an c e Wri n k l e R e p a i r E y e C r ea m, £ 1 2 0 . 03 L’Oc c i t an e D iv ine S ér um, £ 7 6 . 0 4 Sh i se i d o Bio - Per fo r ma nce Li ft D y n am i c Cre am , £ 9 0 . 0 5 La M er The M oi stu ri zi n g Sof t L oti on , £ 1 7 0 . 0 6 C l a r i ns E xt r a-Fi rm i n g Mask , £ 46 . 0 7 E l emi s B i o t ec S k i n En e rgi si n g N i gh t C re a m, £ 8 5 . 0 8 G i v ench y L e Soi n N o ir S ér um, £ 1 2 1 ( H ou se of f rase r.c om )

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YOUR THING Wild flowers, alternative festivals and natural remedies all hold a special place in your heart. Anthropologie and vintage stores are your go-to for fashion and home purchases, and you loathe anything gaudy, pink or too cutesy. You care about your body and the environment, so organic, eco-friendly skincare products – perfectly packaged in apothecary-style bottles – are a must. Q YOUR TRIBE ARSENAL 0 1 Ta t a H a r p er N o ur i s hin g O i l Cl e an se r, £ 5 4 . 0 2 O r i g i ns R i t ua l i Te a M atch a Mad n e ss R e v it al i z i ng Po w d er F a c e M ask , £ 3 0 . 0 3 Hones t C a l mi ng F a ce Cre am , £ 5 5 . 0 4 M ay Li nd s t r o m The J asm i n e Garde n B o t a ni ca l M i s t , £ 4 8 . 0 5 Rod i n Ol i o L u sso F a c e O i l , £ 1 0 5 . 0 6 The Esté e Ed i t by Esté e Lauder Mega Chlorella Algae Cleansing B ar, £17 (Selfridges.com). 07 Diptyque Infused Face Oil, £48. 08 Decléor Aromessence Néroli Hy d ra t i ng O i l S er um, £ 4 5 . 0 9 A rge n tu m A p o t h e ca r y La Po t i o n I n f i n i e , £ 14 7 . 1 0 A e s o p Lucent F a ci a l Con c e n trate , £ 7 7 . 11 F r es h Vi t a mi n Ne c t ar Vib ra ncy - B o o s t i ng F a ce M ask , £ 5 2

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY GETTY IMAGES, INSTAGRAM/ALL4.LOVE/DNR-TAXIDERMY/TALISA_SUTTON, JASON LLOYD-EVANS. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

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Styled by SOPHIE QURESHI Photographs by OLIVIA FRØLICH

Clear the Exfoliating, hitting the gym and sun-swerving: they’re tried and tested complexion boosters. But should pollution be topping your skincare agenda?

BLOUSE, EUDON CHOI

air


TOP, SIMONE ROCHA

Here’s a crazy stat: it’s predicted that by 2030, 92.2 per cent of Brits will be living in an urban area. And let’s not sugar-coat this – we’ll be breathing some seriously grubby air. While 14 years might sound ages away, pollution levels are already rising dramatically. Bahrain, India and Iran are among the most polluted places on earth (Scandi countries fare well for their smog levels, if you’re thinking about moving), but in 2014, the EU started legal action

Words by SUZANNE SCOTT

against the UK for being persistently over safe limits for pollution – particularly for nitrogen dioxide, which is mostly found in traffic exhaust fumes. Besides impacting our health (respiratory problems and heart disease are among the more serious consequences), skin suffers, too. Chronic dehydration, flaky skin, pigmentation and inflammation are just a few of the signs that pollution is having a negative impact. Here’s our guide to pollution-proofing your skin.


pores and stresses the skin’s protective barrier. For a deeper clean, use Clarisonic Mia Fit, £155. It oscillates 300 times per second and removes 99 per cent of PM2.5. A deep-cleansing facial that uses massage to improve circulation and eliminate toxins is key, too (Cowshed and Clarisonic’s Anti-Ageing Facial, £90 for 75 minutes, is an MC favourite). It isn’t just clogged pores you need to address, though. A recent study in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology (2016) also linked pollution to unwanted pigmentation. An exfoliating peel can help to normalise melanin production – try Kiehl’s Nightly Refining Micro-Peel Concentrate, £40, which uses quinoa husks to exfoliate and gives the same results as a glycolic peel, minus the downtime.

TOP, STYLIST’S OWN

Traffic dodge… You might want to rethink your commute: traffic pollution has emerged as the single most toxic substance for skin. Short of travelling to the office with a bag over your head, you can’t avoid polluted air, but you can limit damage. Dr Adam Geyer, consultant dermatologist for Kiehl’s, says, ‘You wash your hands as soon as you get home, so apply the same principle to your face. Don’t allow grime to sit on your skin until bedtime.’ You won’t need to perform your full routine, but do use a thorough cleanser like Simple Kind To Skin Hydrating Cleansing Oil, £6.99. PM2.5 – droplets of dust, exhaust fumes and cigarette smoke that measure less than two-and-a-half microns (ie miniscule) – are a particular challenge. PM2.5 becomes trapped in your skin’s sebum, clogs


287

BODY, AMERICAN APPAREL

‘Thoroughly cleanse as soon as you get in’


DRESS, ORLA KIELY

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TOP, & OTHER STORIES; RING, ANITA KO AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

Up your antioxidants... Your daily dose of pollution may also be exacerbating any existing skin problems. ‘Pollutants put an oxidative strain on our system, which our bodies respond to by mounting an immune response,’ explains Dr Geyer. ‘This can manifest as worsening eczema, psoriasis or other underlying inflammatory conditions. For others, it might trigger breakouts or rosacea.’ But that’s not all: continued contact with free radicals found in pollution breaks down the collagen and elastin our skin relies on to look healthy and plump. Eating a diet rich in natural antioxidants helps, but you should also be applying them topically. Kiehl’s new Apothecary Preparations, £90, is a new-gen serum, tailor-made to your skin concerns. To counteract urban aggressors, ask to have a

vitamin C booster added – this potent antioxidant fights the free-radical damage that causes the majority of our skin woes. Layer Philosophy Take A Deep Breath Oil-Free Oxygenating Gel Cream, £29.50, over the top – its antioxidant, anti-pollutant plant extracts make it the next best thing to a country weekend for city skin. Or, for added UV protection, try Elizabeth Arden Prevage City Smart Broad Spectrum SPF 50 Hydrating Shield, £55, which contains a DNA Enzyme Complex to repair pollution damage, plus a generous dose of the superantioxidant idebenone. Lastly, treat your skin weekly to a fiveminute Kiehl’s Cilantro & Orange Extract Pollutant Defending Masque, £28. The antioxidant-rich coriander and citrus extracts mop up free radicals before they can wreak havoc.


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‘Air indoors can be up to five times more polluted than out’

Reinforce your barrier... Over 50 per cent of people in the UK describe their skin as sensitive, and pollution could be largely to blame. Poor air quality leads to inflammation, which weakens your skin’s barrier, resulting in a dry, flaky and irritated complexion. Cleanse with Balance Me’s Collagen Boost Restore And Replenish Cream Cleanser, £18 (available at Fabled.com). It contains a peptide complex to give collagen production a jump-start, plus hyaluronic acid and amino acids to nudge skin cell turnover and reinforce the skin. Lipids such as ceramides, cholesterols and fatty acids (as strange as they sound) are also essential for a healthy skin barrier. SkinCeuticals Triple Lipid Restore 2:4:2, £123, replaces lipids lost through pollution exposure with a blend of two per cent pure ceramides, four per cent cholesterol and two per cent fatty acids. Layer it over your usual serum (we rate Bare Minerals SkinLongevity Serum, £45) and top with an SPF like Nivea Q10 Plus Anti-Wrinkle Energising Day Cream SPF15, £9.99, or Eucerin Aquaporin Active with SPF 25, £16.50. Q

G E T

P O L L U T I O N - S A V V Y

BLOUSE, EUDON CHOI

1 Download the app CityAir to find low-pollution routes to work. (Available on iTunes and Android.) 2 Foods like sa lm on, a voc a d o a nd m a c ke re l c o n t a i n o m e g a f a t t y a c i d s t h a t s t re n g t h e n t h e s k i n ’s na tur a l pr otecti ve ba r r i er. Tha t k e e p s t h e g o o d s t u f f i n, a n d t h e b a d s t u f f o u t. 3 Dine on a ntiox id a nt s. C ons ul t the O RAC s c a l e ( G o o g l e i t ) t o f i n d o u t w h i ch f ru i t s a n d v e g g i e s h a v e t h e mos t p ollution- b us ti ng uni ts . The ones w i th da rk e r s k i n s – l i k e k a l e a n d b l u e b e rri e s – t e n d t o t o p t h e l i s t .

MODEL: HELOISE GIRAUD AT VIVA MODEL MANAGEMENT LONDON. HAIR BY CHRIS SWEENEY USING BUMBLE AND BUMBLE. MAKE-UP BY SONIA DEVENEY AT ONE REPRESENTS USING KIEHL’S SKINCARE. NAILS BY AMA QUASHIE AT CLM HAIR AND MAKE-UP USING DIOR NAIL GLOW AND CAPTURE TOTALE NURTURING HAND REPAIR CREAM. PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANT: MATHIAS RIBE. *US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

Use inside information... New research* shows that the air inside can be up to five times more polluted than the air outside. Terrifying much? The problem has arisen from modern homes, which are designed to be airtight to preserve heat and reduce fuel costs. In an airtight home that’s poorly ventilated, volatile compounds from your carpets and soft furnishings – for example, formaldehyde in MDF and plywood, and phthalates from plastics (not to mention carbon dioxide build-up from the simple act of breathing) – become trapped. Experts at the Mackintosh Environmental Architecture Research Unit at the Glasgow School of Art have linked poor ventilation to ill health, aggravating everything from irritated skin to central nervous system damage. But it’s easily remedied: sleep with a window open if it’s safe to do so, and use the trickle vents that most modern windows come equipped with. They’ll encourage air flow without making the temperature inside plummet.


Blueberry Musk T H E S C E N T O F S E N S UA L I T Y

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Prevage City Smart Hydrating Shield SPF50 helps protect your skin from the effects of pollution, which include dullness, wrinkles, irritation and inflammation


Promotion

Shield in the city *‘SKIN AGING AND ITS TREATMENT’, L. BAUMAN, JOURNAL OF PATHOLOGY, 2007 **BASED ON A 12-WEEK US CONSUMER STUDY OF 110 WOMEN BETWEEN THE AGES OF 25-55

Stop pollution in its tracks with the new skincare icon from Elizabeth Arden Prevage

MOST OF US CONSIDER OURSELVES pretty sun-savvy when it comes to looking after our skin, but do you know how much damage pollution is really doing to your complexion? A recent study shows that 80 per cent of all signs of skin ageing are due to pollution, UV rays and smoke.* That’s why Elizabeth Arden has enlisted leading scientists, chemists and dermatologists to create a one-of-a-kind invisible skin shield.

Pollution can cause up to 20% more pigmentation The new Prevage City Smart Hydrating Shield SPF50 has an innovative DNA Enzyme Complex to strengthen your skin, a host of antioxidants – including potent idebenone – help stop free-radical damage in its tracks, plus a 100 per cent mineral broad spectrum UVA and UVB sunscreen of SPF50 means City Smart ticks the sun-protection box. Impressive stuff.

Prevage has been a leader in protecting skin from environmental damage for over 10 years – so you can be sure you’re in safe hands. New Prevage City Smart Hydrating Shield SPF50 uses breakthrough technology to tackle the issue of skin ageing through pollution, shielding it from future damage while repairing existing problems. Studies have shown that women who spend years living in urban areas have 20 per cent more age spots and more pronounced wrinkles than those in rural areas. In new tests, 83 per cent of women felt their skin appeared more even after using Prevage City Smart Hydrating Shield SPF50 for 12 weeks.** And who doesn’t want their skin to look more even? As the next level in environmental protection, regardless of your age, skin type or concern, make this wonder shield the last step in your skincare regime. It has a universal tint to work with all skin tones and make-up, and a handy pump, so it’s super easy to use. Prevage City Smart Hydrating Shield SPF50, £55, is available now from department stores nationwide and at elizabetharden.co.uk.

TRY IT FOR FREE Visit Elizabeth Arden counters nationwide to find out more, and receive a deluxe sample of the Prevage City Smart Hydrating Shield SPF50 (while stocks last).

Pollution particles can be up to 20 times smaller than a human pore –outsmart the city with this shield


More and more women are waking up to GOLD COLLAGEN

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*Includes vitamin C, which contributes to normal collagen formation for the normal function of cartilage and skin. Includes vitamin E and copper, which contribute to the protection of cells from oxidative stress. Includes zinc, which contributes to the maintenance of normal skin, hair and nails, and biotin, which contributes to the maintenance of normal skin and hair. Offer valid on PURE GOLD COLLAGEN® 10 day programme from 14/09/2016 - 11/10/2016, while stock last.


It used to be that to see any real results from your skincare, you had to play the waiting game. But in an age of same-day delivery and on-demand TV, who’s got the patience? We don’t just want a purely cosmetic fix, either – we want actual results that we can see now (OK, we’ll wait 24 hours if we really have to). Thankfully, the new breed of sophisticated skincare promises just that. These hardworking, fast-acting products have long-term advantages, yes, but they also deliver visible, viable skincare benefits in a flash. That’s instant gratification, guaranteed.

INSTANT SKIN 01

BALMAIN

Meet the products that can change your complexion (and your day) in minutes

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TRANSFORMERS MARNI

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J.W ANDERSON

WORDS BY GEORGIA DAY. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

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1 Chanel Le Lift V-Flash, £67 Desk duties drain your face, so Chanel’s fatigue-fighting gel with vitamin-packed anti-ageing actives is a godsend. Apply en route to drinks for a lifted look.

2 Bobbi Brown Instant Confidence Stick, £26 (available at Fabled.com) Like an eraser for fine lines, this portable dynamo has just upped our selfie-game by blurring imperfections with light-diffusing powders.

3 REN Flash HydroBoost, £34 This clever emulsion uses hyaluronic acid and carobseed peptides to pump H2O around the skin cells, making your complexion plump and peachy, pronto.

4 ESPA Instant Facial, £58 A silky elixir that combines the action of a serum, an oil and an essence to flood skin with free radicalfighting antioxidants. Ideal for a fast-track glow.

5 Murad Eye Lift Firming Treatment, £45 Firming polymers and botanical extracts tighten the eye contours, while encapsulated hyaluronic acid spheres act like fillers in a bottle. Marvel at the results in under 10 minutes.

6 Sanctuary Spa 1 Minute Flash Facial, £17 This radiance-boosting cleanser washes away tiredness in just 60 seconds (we counted), thanks to its brightening vitamin C. Swap fine lines and open pores for a perky glow.

7 Sisley Double Tenseur, £111 Late nights = lacklustre skin, but this smooth fluid is an AM saviour. Oatseed extract creates a stretchy 3D mesh, so one application is all it takes for slack skin to bounce back.

8 La Roche-Posay Effaclar Duo (+) Unifiant, £16.50 This hero boasts the same anti-inflammatory power as the original; it takes down breakouts in 24 hours and provides natural camouflage in the meantime. Genius.

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Are you selfie harming?

IF YOU THOUGHT THE WORST THING ABOUT selfies was the narcissism, think again. Far from being an innocent modern-day habit, they could be ageing your skin. At the Facial Aesthetic Conference Exhibition in June, Dr Simon Zokaie, medical director of Linia Skin Clinic in London, revealed some news that might convince smartphone addicts to ditch their devices – blue light emitted from mobile phones may lead to more wrinkles. So, what exactly is blue light and why is it harmful? All forms of light travel in waves – of differing lengths and amounts of energy. Blue light falls into the category of High-Energy Visible light (or HEV) and has short waves, which produce lots of energy. It’s not always bad for skin, though – if you’ve ever suffered from acne, you’ll know that blue light LED devices are brilliant for killing spot-causing bacteria. However, they emit a specific type of blue-turquoise light, which has longer, less energetic wavelengths. In contrast, the

blue light from our phones sits at the blue-violet end of the spectrum, which is where our taste for tech becomes a problem. Although research into the effect of smartphone light is still in the early stages, a recent study* suggests that HEV light generates the same amount of free radicals in the skin as UVA and UVB combined. ‘People who take a lot of selfies or look at their phones and computer screens all the time should worry,’ says Dr Zokaie. ‘The impact on skin is likely to mimic symptoms of premature ageing from UV, such as change in texture, mottled pigmentation and wrinkles.’ Unfortunately, traditional sunscreen filters won’t block smartphone light, because it has a different wavelength. So, until special filters are developed, Dr Zokaie says antioxidants are your best defence. ‘We believe HEV light causes oxidative stress, so antioxidants are key to limit the production of damaging free radicals,’ he explains. In the meantime, we’ll be rethinking our FaceTime usage…

FIGHT THE LIGHT Originally designed to stop blue light disrupting sleep patterns, Wavewall Sleep Anti-Blue Light Screen Protector, £7.99, blocks it from your skin, too.

Up your antioxidant ante with a serum, as it’s more effective than moisturiser. We rate Perricone M D Pre:Empt Series Skin Perfecting Serum, £54.

Turn off your phone. Perhaps the last taboo in an age of 24/7 connection, but pressing Power Off is a sure-fire way to limit exposure.

Dr Sebagh Supreme Day Cream, £145, contains a fractionated melanin compound, which studies suggest can help absorb H EV light.

WORDS BY GEORGIA DAY. PHOTOGRAPHS BY GETTY IMAGES. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES. *SOURCE: LIPOSHIELD

Everyone loves a filter fix, but our Insta-obsession could be accelerating the ageing process


The lip balm that makes you smile. 100% natural eos lip balm is paraben-free and packed with shea butter and jojoba oil to keep your lips looking and feeling soft, smooth and perfectly moisturised every day. Find your favourite eos avour at major retailers and pharmacies. evolutionofsmooth.com

95% Organic 100% Natural CertiďŹ ed organic by Oregon Tilth


Skin SOS

M U LT I - M A S K I N G H I T S

298 We’re a little bit over #multimasking selfies, but we’d still recommend a different mask for different areas (dry cheeks won’t thank you for the same treatment as an oily T-zone). So make like a mixologist with these skin shots.

FOREHEAD The Body Shop Amazonian Acai Mask, £15. The antioxidants make this the ideal antidote to a furrowed brow. CHEEKS & CHIN L’Or éal Paris Pure Clay Pur it y Mask, £7.99. Lo aded wit h clar ifying kao lin clay, t his is like a vacuum cleaner for pores. CHEEKS S kinceut icals Phyt o Cor r ect ive Masque, £55. This is perfect for central-heating season, thanks to the soothing thyme and cucumber.

OVERNIGHT SUCCESS

Rising SKIN STARS

Take your daily routine to the next level with the latest breakthrough skincare buys TOTALLY TAILORED While make-up for darker skin has become more widely available, skincare has always assumed a one-for-all approach. That could be about to change, thanks to a new range created by dermatologist Dr Barbara Sturm with actress Angela Bassett. From tackling hyper-pigmentation and dullness (the darker your complexion, the thicker your stratum corneum, which means a deeper layer of dead skin cells), it’s one groundbreaking move.

TIMEKEEPER Why stop at one anti-ageing powerhouse when you can have two? CaudalÍe Resveratrol Lift Face Lifting S oft Cream, £42, combines two superstar ingredients in one product: micro hyaluronic acid and vine resveratrol. While particles of water-binding hyaluronic acid (HA) replenish produce more HA by itself, resveratrol improves collagen for a more lifted look. The gorgeously whipped, weightless texture is a (very welcome) added b onus.

PROTEIN POWER

moisture and make your skin

Dr B ar bar a S t ur m Hyalur onic S er um, £ 230

If we told you there’s a protein (Nrf2) in your skin that keeps ageing at bay, you’d want to know more, wouldn’t you? So did Estée Lauder’s scientists, who have been exploring how to raise its levels. The result is Revitalizing Supreme+ Global Anti-Aging Cell Power Creme, £68, which uses an exclusive moringa extract containing anti-stress chemicals that boost Nrf2 production by 76 per cent. We’re hooked on the smell, too.

YIGAL AZROUËL

Words by GEORGIA DAY

PHOTOGRAPH BY IMAXTREE. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

Keen to use retinol, but nervous about the flaking? Cue Pestle & Mortar Superstar Retinol Night Oil, £63. Just as effective, b u t wi t h a c o l d - p re s s e d oil formula (a gentle extraction process t h a t d o e s n ’ t k i l l valuable nutrients), it’s ultra-moisturising a n d h a s a l l t h e wri n k l e - re d u c i n g , s k i n - b ri g h t e n i n g b e n e fi t s o f re t i n o l . G e n i u s .


Pioneering beauty from within for over 20 years Advanced nutrition for

skin, hair & nails Advance your daily regime with Perfectil® Original, the UK’s No.1 Triple-Active™ formula to support normal skin1, hair2 and nails3. The Perfectil® Plus range provides the benefits of the original, plus more. New Perfectil® Platinum Collagen is a great tasting liquid beauty supplement available for Hair or Skin. Perfectil® –because true radiance starts from within.

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From , Superdrug, Holland & Barrett, supermarkets, chemists, Harrods, health stores & www.perfectil.com Stockists may vary. *UK’s No1 beauty supplement brand for skin, hair and nails. Nielsen GB ScanTrack Total Coverage Unit Sales 52 w/e 26 March 2016. 1. Includes biotin which contributes to the maintenance of normal skin. 2. Includes zinc which contributes to the maintenance of normal hair. 3. Includes selenium which contributes to the maintenance of normal nails.

Plus Nails

New Platinum Collagen Drink


10 9 If yo u r s ki n i s p ro n e to

S i mpl e Ki nd To S ki n Hydrati ng Cl eansi ng Oi l , £6. 99, cont ains just nine ingr edient s but is dev ast at ingly ef fect iv e – ev en on w at er pr oof mascar a.

ov er r ea c ti n g, th e care fu l l y h o n e d C h ane l La Solution 10 de C h a n e l, £5 8 , i s i d e al fo r s tavi n g

off an e p i d e rm al tan tru m .

6

Eau Thermal e Avène

3 S. W. B a si c s Exf o l i a n t , £2 4 ( a b e a ut i f ul w or l d. c o. uk ) i s co m p o s e d o f t h ree k i t chen- c a bi net e s s e n ti al s

Tol érance Extrême Emul si on , £13. 50, soot hes an ir r it able complexion w it h six ingr edient s but no pr eser v at iv es. And t he clev er packag ing keeps t he f or mula st er ile.

– o a t f l our, a l mond f l our an d s e a s al t.

4 Number crunching

M ix a t ea s poon w i t h w a t er an d b u ff o v e r sk i n t o unea r t h a l a t e n t gl o w.

Inst ead of a long list of unpr onounceables, Clean Beauty Co. Fuss-Free Moisturiser, £20 (cleanbeaut yco. com) , cont ains just f our ing r edient s. And (t r ue t o minimalist

Words by SOPHIE QURESHI

et hos) you can use it t op t o t oe.

Say goodbye to lengthy ingredients lists. The new mood in skincare says less is more The received wisdom

in skincare is that if you want a product to deliver the goods – be that to purge pores, soften lines, or nix pigmentation – you need a complex formulation, boasting a multitude of different ingredients. But the latest movement in skincare begs to differ. A host of brands are pioneering a new minimalist approach to formulation, with ingredients lists that barely hit double figures. The advantage? When you cut out all the unnecessary extras, you limit the chance of irritating skin and doing more harm than good. ‘Lots of skincare products contain “filler” ingredients, ones that are there for the formula and not for your skin,’ says Adina Grigore, founder of niche Brooklyn brand S.W. Basics, whose products contain a maximum of five ingredients. ‘Often these fillers

are included to make the product look and feel a certain way – for example, emulsifiers, thickeners and plasticizers. At the very least, these ingredients do nothing for your skin. But in many cases, they can be sensitising, aggravating and even dangerous.’ It isn’t just boutique natural brands that are eschewing an everything-but-the-kitchen-sink philosophy, though – beauty’s big players are stripping back too. Last year, Chanel released a deliberately simple moisturiser, celebrating the fact it contains just ten ingredients, and others have since followed suit. Avène has just launched a new pared-back range that contains no more than seven ingredients apiece. With formulations as streamlined as this, you can be sure that every single ingredient has really earned its spot.

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in your

mind ? Feeling #TotesEmosh can make you physically ill. Here’s how getting your head straight can transform your health

If you keep getting headaches or eczema breakouts, your first thought might be to head to the pharmacy. But perhaps next time, try looking at your mental health first. A growing bank of research suggests that common conditions from IBS to acne, may be triggered by our state of mind. Here, Charlotte Haigh MacNeil reveals how to see your physical ailments through a holistic lens.

SKIN BREAKOUTS If spots or eczema break out when you’re up against a deadline, this should act as a sign to slow down before you get ill, says leading psychodermatologist Dr Anthony Bewley. ‘Emotional stress can trigger a skin condition,’ he says. Why? ‘If your emotions are up and down it causes the pituitary gland to chuck out stress hormones that cause hormonal changes linked to skin conditions,’ says Dr Bewley. ‘Stress can also cause the blood vessels in your skin to dilate, and this brings other pro-inflammatory cells to the area.’ If it continues to happen, it may result in rosacea, psoriasis or acne.

Wh at th e pros prescribe Work it out ‘Exercise is one of the best stressbusters and has a positive effect on your skin,’ says

Dr Bewley. Exercising daily can reduce a women’s risk of psoriasis by 30 per cent. Aim for 30 minutes of moderate activity every day. Have a regular routin e In times of pressure, knowing what you’re doing will help you feel calmer, more in control and keep stress chemicals in check, says Dr Bewley. ‘During an outbreak, go to bed and get up at roughly the same time each day. Eat at regular intervals and up your fruit and vegetable intake – they have an anti-inflammatory effect on your body.’ P u t yo u r m i n d a t rest ‘Skin conditions can cause distress if they change your appearance, even if they’re mild, and that can create a vicious cycle, so see your doctor to rule out anything serious if you’re really worried or experiencing discomfort,’ says Dr Bewley.

GUT TROUBLES The gut contains more neurons than your spinal cord. In fact, new research has shown that the community of bacteria that live in your gut actually communicates with your brain. Yes, really! ‘Gut microbes have a running dialogue with our brains through signals including hormones and neurotransmitters,’ says

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Dr Emeran Mayer, author of The Mind-Gut Connection (£18.99, Harper Wave). If you’ve always been prone to anxiety and are a worrier, you’re more likely to suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), especially if it was triggered by childhood events. ‘About 60 per cent of patients with IBS report early life stress,’ says Dr Mayer. Research suggests this may be because childhood stress could affect the balance of your gut bacteria.

Wh at th e pros prescribe Take it easy It may be tempting to thrash out your stress at the gym, but skip that circuit class. ‘Light to moderate activity is best,’ says gastroenterologist professor Peter Whorwell. ‘Walking, swimming or yoga are all ideal – vigorous exercise, such as running, can aggravate symptoms by putting stress on your system.’ Try hypn oth erapy One recent study carried out by Whorwell found gut-centred hypnotherapy eased pain in 67 per cent of IBS patients and halved their anxiety and depression. Boost your gut bugs Research from UCLA suggests a bug-rich diet could help ease anxiety and IBS. Try fermented foods like kefir (a cultured, dairy product) and sauerkraut, all teeming with probiotics and prebiotics. Don’t fancy digging into those? Try a probiotic supplement from a health shop. ‘Different strains work for different people so try one for a month, then switch if you see no difference,’ says Whorwell.

who’d stopped ovulating and having periods. When they were given therapy to ease stress, 80 per cent began ovulating again. Stress worsens PMS and plays a role in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) because it can encourage the body to pump out more testosterone, which worsens symptoms such as insulin resistance and irregular periods. According to Dr Christiane Northrup, top US gynaecologist and author of Women’s Bodies, Women’s Wisdom (£25, Piatkus), even the way you feel about your body and your periods could have an effect. ‘Many of us were given negative messages about periods growing up, and end up dreading them,’ she says. ‘Those feelings can play a role in PMS to PCOS.’

Wh at th e pros prescribe Kn ow your own body ‘Get in tune with your cycle,’ says Dr Northrup. ‘See PMS as a sign from your body that you need to rest. When you have your period, rest and cocoon yourself as much as you can.’ Try m agn esium ‘It’s a muscle relaxant and can help you feel less stressed,’ says Dr Northrup. ‘Try soaking in a bath with Epsom salts, which are rich in magnesium and are absorbed through the skin.’ Balan ce your diet A high-GI diet (one that is high in sugar and processed white carbs) can cause raised insulin levels, which in turn can stimulate the ovaries to produce more testosterone in PCOS, affecting mood and aggravating PMS, says Dr Northrup. Switch to slow-releasing wholegrain foods, such as oats.

RECURRING HEADACHES Studies suggest that sensitive types, who have a lower resilience to stress, are more likely to develop chronic headaches and migraines – and childhood difficulties, such as emotional abuse or bullying, may predispose you too. Stress triggers the release of chemicals that cause the blood vessels in your brain to dilate, which can lead to migraines and headaches, and may reduce levels of your body’s natural painkillers.

Wh at th e pros prescribe Eat regularly an d stay hydrated ‘When you’re stressed and busy, you are more likely to skip meals, which can trigger a migraine,’ says consultant neurologist Dr Nicholas Silver. One study found that when women drank at least 1.5 litres of water daily, they experienced less frequent and less intense headaches. Cu t o u t ca f fe i n e a n d p a i n k i l l e rs These trigger rebound headaches, says Dr Silver. So quit the tablets and wean yourself off coffee, tea, green tea and even chocolate. Be warned – you’ll probably feel worse for a few days. But it will be worth it in the longer term. Treat yourself to a m assage Research has found they help cut the frequency of chronic headaches.

GYNAE GRIPES If your mind is in a bad place, it can have an impact on your menstrual cycle, affecting gynaecological health and in turn fertility. Research from America’s Emory University looked at women with high levels of cortisol

JOINT PAIN Long-term pressure can affect the brain’s ability to produce dopamine and other pain-busting chemicals, and research has shown people with anxiety disorders are more likely to experience chronic pain.

Wh at th e pros prescribe Don’t ign ore it Studies show the inflammation involved in pain can lead to changes in the brain that may worsen anxiety and depression, says Vicky Vlachonis, osteopath to the stars and author of The Body Doesn’t Lie (£16.99, Harper One), ‘Pain is your body’s way of trying to tell you something, so work out what that is for you. Aching backs and shoulders can be a sign you’re sitting and typing too much, so take notice and build a walk into your commute or lunch hour.’ Sign up to th at yoga class Yoga can help with both pain and your mood, according to research. But make sure your teacher knows about your aches so they can advise you on postures to adapt or avoid. Take tim e out to m editate ‘Research shows that taking 12 minutes to lie down and listen to your breath each day can lead to changes in your brain,’ says Vlachonis. ‘Do it in the morning and you’ll feel calmer and more positive all day, which will impact on your health.’ See your doctor If chronic pain is making your life difficult, speak to your GP who will be able to rule out any serious arthritic problems or recommend a trained physiotherapist or osteopath. Q

PHOTOGRAPH BY EVAN SCHREIBER

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You look amazing In need of a confidence boost? We all are sometimes. Step this way‌


*WITH CONTINUED USE AS DIRECTED FOR THREE WEEKS. PHOTOGRAPH BY: JACK BELLI/THELICENSINGPROJECT.COM

Promotion

EVERYONE DESERVES TO FEEL AMAZING and there are so many ways to make sure you do. Whether it comes from standing up a little straighter, having a word with yourself when doubts creep in at work or getting a surge of endorphins from a 20-minute jog, there are loads of ways to boost your confidence every day. The team at Marie Claire have their own tricks and tips for nailing it (see right), but one sure-fire way to be the best ‘you’ is to flash a smile – studies have shown it boosts confidence and relaxes those around you. With that in mind, you’ll want to know you’ve got dazzling pearly whites that are up to the job. That’s where Colgate’s Max White Toothbrush + Whitening Pen comes in. Most whitening products only treat surface stains, but this wonder tool contains hydrogen peroxide, which is the same professional product dentists use. This unique ingredient reacts with surface stains caused by food and drink, as well as significantly whitening below the enamel to reverse years of yellowing, for noticeable whitening results. The great news is the product starts working immediately to whiten your teeth and in the long term can expect to whiten your teeth by up to three shades.*

SECRET WEAPON The toothbrush comes with a built-in whitening pen, so it’s not only easy to use, but compact, too. Adding a dazzling smile to your daily routine just doesn’t get simpler. First, brush with your favourite Colgate Toothpaste. Next, whiten by applying the pen directly on to your teeth. There’s no waiting or rinsing, so it’s easy to fit into your morning routine, even on a work day. Store the pen within the brush when you’re finished, and go.

FIND OUT MORE Start boosting your confidence today. Visit colgate.co.uk/Max-White-Expert for more information.

‘You’ll see results instantly’ The Marie Claire good confidence guide SIÂN PARRY, PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR ‘I always feel better when I’ve had a manicure. I feel undone with chipped nails, so always have a classic red half-moon shellac mani. People do notice your hands, but more importantly they cheer me up when I look down.’

CAROLINE GARLAND, EDITOR’S PA ‘When I need to feel confident, I sling on a pair of heels – as high as I can manage. They literally make me walk tall and I feel powerful and ready to take on anything!’

HANNAH LYONS POWELL, DIGITAL EDITOR ‘Full disclosure: I have a “more is more” approach to perfume. There really is no quicker way of feeling ready to go out or for a meeting than spritzing on my favourite fragrance. I keep a bottle on my desk and a mini in my handbag.’


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PHOTOGRAPH BY SUSANNA VENTO (SUSANNAVENTO.FI)

Green day

The botanical takeover your pad needs, Scandi lifestyle secrets that will boost your creativity, plus a sizzling sojourn through lush Costa Rica


GET WRAPPING

Our wraps are Super Soft so they’re easier to fold & hold fillings better. Wrap up whatever you fancy.


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RECIPE

313 Prep and cooking time 1 hour, plus resting time Makes 12-16 pierogi For the dough 350g plain flour 150g salted butter, softened 2 tbsp rapeseed oil 100ml ice-cold water 1 beaten egg yolk, to glaze

COMPILED BY LUCY PAVIA, HOLLIE BROTHERTON. PHOTOGRAPHS BY LAURA EDWARDS

For the filling 200g minced pork 50g pine nuts, toasted 1 egg Salt and white pepper, to taste Tip the flour into a bowl and add the butter and oil. Work the mixture together using your hands for a few minutes, then add the water a little at a time. Start kneading until it comes together into a smooth ball. Knead for a further three to four minutes then place the dough in a food bag and put in the fridge for at least 30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 200°C (gas mark 6) and lightly grease a baking tray. To make the filling, combine the pork mince, pine nuts, egg and seasoning together in a bowl using your hands. Roll out the dough as thinly as possible on a floured surface, cut into circles and fill with the pork and pine-nut mixture. Pinch into shape. Place on the baking tray and brush with a beaten egg yolk to glaze. Bake in the oven for 30 minutes.

Crispy-baked pierogi stuffed with pork and pine nuts Dip a toe into Polish cooking with these crumbly dumplings. Serve with beetroot borscht or any other broth

PRISON REFORM These former jails are now super-stylish hangouts The Lib erty Hotel , B oston Iron i c al l y named, given it s ori g i n s. The at r ium is o ne of th e m os t st r iking places i n th e c i ty t o have a cockt ail.

Four S easons I stanbul at S ul tanahmet 100 year s ago , t his beaut iful gar den was an exer cise yar d fo r pr iso ner s.

The Courthouse Hotel , London Now you can sip a st r awber r y caipir o sk a in t he s ame cells wher e t he infamous Kr ay t wins wer e held.

Polska: New Polish Cooking by Zuza Za k (£25, Qua drille)

C link 7 8 , London Bu i l t around t he o ld c ou rth ou se wher e The Clash stood trial. Check ou t th e i r £5 co ckt ails.

L anghol men Hotel , S tockhol m B o o k yo ur self int o a ‘r o mant ic cell’ and o r der up a lat e mor ning br unch. No jo kes about ‘por r idge’ allow ed .


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meridian: nuts about nuts


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LIFESTYLE ENVY

Get hygge with it ‘Hygge’ is the latest lifestyle trend to come out of Scandinavia, but what exactly is it? We asked Norwegian food writer Signe Johansen to translate Describe hygge…

‘It’s an old Danish-Norwegian word. In Denmark, it’s pronounced “houga”, but in Norway it’s more like “higar” – there is no literal translation, it’s really a feeling of contentment.’

WORDS BY LUCY PAVIA. PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALAMY, ISTOCK BY GETTY, BETH KIRBY

Why is it catching on here?

‘I think people are realising that with modern life, we’re all so digitally wired and busy. The Nordic way is more about balance. We work shorter hours, so have more time for leisure activities. We live well, and hygge is central to that.’ food is key to hygge, a huge table is important, even if that means there’s no room for a sofa!’

What’s the most hygge thing I could do right now?

‘Nature is key, so getting outside and turning off your phone is a big one. In Nordic countries we have a very short summer, so we make the most of it. But we don’t hibernate in winter, either – we embrace the cold.’

What’s a hygge way to entertain?

‘Keeping things simple and fresh – big smörgåsbords of fresh salmon, hot smoked trout or pickled prawns. We also have something called “fika”, which means getting together for coffee and cake. In lots of Swedish offices, employees have a time every day where they all stop for fika or “collective restoration”, which actually helps boost creativity.’

What about when we’re not outside? How can we make our house hygge?

‘Inside, we like to be as close to nature as possible, so we prefer stone tiles and wooden floors to carpet. Also, as having your friends over to share

And what about drinking?

‘Hygge isn’t about clean living – it’s about conviviality, so alcohol is part of that. In Norway, we often have a shot before dinner. After that everyone relaxes!’

How To Hygge: The Secrets Of Nordi c Li vi ng by Signe Johansen (£14.99, Bluebird) is out 20 October.

URBA N FORAGI NG Pro-forager John Rensten shares his top tips for finding free edibles in the city Common sorrel ‘Th i s l ow-g rowi n g, l e af y C p l an a nt t hr i v e s i n l on g g rass th at h asn ’t be e n ove err l y ma n age d. Its stron g l e m on y t aste ma kes k es i t p e rf e c t to c ook wi th f i sh , ad d to s ala a l a d s , fr y wi th pot atoe s an d b ac on , or u us e t o ma k e a sorre l an d sp i n ach t art.’

Rose hips ‘Ther e ar e so many var iet ies in t he cit y t hat it ’s possible t o pick t hem from August through to December. A classic r osehip syr up is packed wit h ant ioxidant s – make it wit h about 80 per cent less sugar t han r ecommended and it ’ll t ast e quit e t r opical.’

Elderberries ‘ P r et t y m u ch e ve ry L on don p a rk ha s el d er t r ees . D on ’t n i b b l e on th e m ra w ( t hey ca n hur t y o ur stom ach ) – I l i k e to c o llect , co o k up a nd us e th e m i n an e l d e r a n d cl o v e co r d i a l , o r s t e e p th e m i n app l e c id e r t o ma k e a s w eet -t asti n g v i n e g ar.’

3 OF THE BEST...

ITALIAN PUDDINGS

1

Tiramisu at Casa di Stefano, London

The Edi bl e Ci ty: A Year Of Wi l d Food by John Renst en (£12.99, B oxt r ee) is out 8 Sept ember.

2

Limoncello profiteroles at Sotto Sotto, Bath

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Cannoli ice-cream sandwich at Mason & Company, London


Rustic cool

Bring the harvest home with natural textures, woodland prints and muted, natural colours

On table: Harvest Weave coaster, £4 for four, Hedgerow ceramic candle, £7, white Ripple mug, £3, Harvest pasta bowl (on plates), £4, white Ripple dinner plates, £3.50 each, Harvest Weave placemat, £6 for two, and Harvest Collection apron, £8, all Sainsbury’s


Promotion It’s undoubtedly that time when we feel the lure of staying in with friends and family, rather than wanting to head to a restaurant or park. Embrace the season and create a relaxed look in your home with the new Harvest collection from Sainsbury’s – think woodland prints on fabrics, rustic wooden furniture and splashes of warm mustard tones contrasting pale greys. Stack plates and bowls where everyone can see them and… relax. Whether you have a cottage in the Cotswolds or a flat in the city, you can get the British countryside look at your dinner table. Autumn never looked so inviting.

From top: Harvest embossed potpourri bowl, £12, Harvest dinner plate, £4, white Ripple dinner plate, £3.50, white Ripple side plate, £3, and Harvest Weave coasters, £4 for four, all Sainsbury’s

The new Harvest homeware collection is available at selected Sainsbury’s stores from 11 September. To see more of the new collections and to find your nearest store, visit sainsburyshome.co.uk


THE PRO HACKS Napkin ho lder, £ 6.99, H& M

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Evelina Kravaev Söderberg

Want ever evolving ar t ? Hang a wir e frame on a wall to pin photos to.

Head of de s i g n at H & M ‘Copper art-deco objects and dark coloured walls will give your room a stylish update.’

B ox , £ 12.99, H&M

Cand les t ick, £ 6.99, H & M

Lizzie Evans

NO RSE COD E Create modern Scandi style with plants and wooden objects set against a muted palette

Founder and di r e c t o r o f If e e l s m u g . c o m ‘I ’ m a b i g f a n o f plants and birds, s o I’m l o v i n g t h e se n e w pr int s from Rifle Paper Co.’

Pr int s, fr om £ 20.75, R ifle Paper Co at Ifeelsmug.co m

BE INSPIRED BY… C a c t i a nd plants are chic, e c o - f ri end l y and easy to lo o k a f t e r.

Padella, Borough Market, London Make a striking st atement by arranging r et r o pr int s in black fr ames in a r o w.

COMPILED BY CAROLINE GARLAND

The Old Parsonage, Oxford Dar k auber gine walls co mplet ely r efr esh t his 17t h- cent ur y building.


ESCAPE TO

COSTA

Par adise found: The view of Playa Espadilla No r t e fr om t he Ar enas Del Mar r eso r t (above); get up ear ly and yo u can have t he s ands t o your self (left )


Manuel Ant o nio Nat ional Par k (left ) has co r al r eefs and r ainfor est s. Yo u get a go o d view of t he Ar enal vo lcano fr o m t he Nayar a Spr ings r esor t (below)

R I C A Flamboyant nature, surfer beaches, great coffee and adrenaline thrills – Nigel Tisdall discovers why this Central American gem is a must-go

‘Everyone thought it was just another green hill,’ explains our guide, Ana, as she points to the looming grey hulk of the Arenal volcano. ‘Although people did go up there because the ground was warm...’ Then, on 29 July 1968, the northern flanks of the Cordillera de Tilarán range suddenly erupted, creating the 5,358ft peak that is one of Costa Rica’s most visited attractions. If you asked a child to draw a volcano, it would most likely look like Arenal – a perfect triangle, capped with a jaunty quiff of white smoke. This beast has been quiet since 2010 but is still ‘active’, although that doesn’t seem to bother the many resorts and visitor attractions that have sprung up around its ashen slopes. Some have brazen names like Erupciones Inn, others capitalise on the hot springs the eruption created. After a day of high-adrenaline activities and encounters with nature, there’s nothing quite like relaxing in a 43°C pool with a tico sour (the country’s answer to the caipirinha) from the swim-up bar. Costa Rica is one of those places where everyone’s busy doing things. Zip lining is particularly popular – there are over 300 places to do it in a country only slightly bigger than Denmark. At the Ecoglide park in Arenal, you can whizz along 13 aerial cables and face your

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fears on a scream-inducing Tarzan Swing. Another must-do is a two-mile trail around the enchanting Mistico Arenal Hanging Bridges Park, at times suspended 150ft above the forest floor. But it’s not just about swaying and praying – with a good guide (and in Costa Rica it pays to get one) you’ll meet all sorts of wildlife – from wild pigs looking for fallen guavas to the venomous coral snake and squadrons of parakeets jingling overhead. Costa Rica is a carnival of biodiversity thanks to its location on an isthmus where two continents meet, with both a Pacific and a Caribbean coast and a heap of densely forested mountains in-between. One thing to be ready for is crazy tropical heat, along with high humidity (expect a bad-hair holiday), and of course there can be no rainforest without you know what. The country has numerous microclimates, so sooner or later you hit everything, but December to May is considered the best time to go. Another plus is the high quality of hotels, which is why Costa Rica is such a favourite for the adventurous honeymooner. At the adults-only Nayara Springs resort in Arenal all the suites come with a four-poster bed, wrap-around balcony and private plunge pool. There’s complimentary yoga and a spa with treatments using volcanic mud, coffee and chocolate, plus a terrific AsianPeruvian restaurant serving dishes like marlin and shitake gyoza (dumplings) and divine mango, lemongrass and ginger cocktails with a frosting of crushed Rice Krispies (it works!). The food is enticing. Yes, there’s a lot of gallo pinto (rice and beans), but also ample fresh fish and tropical fruits. One of the best dishes I taste is a pineapple gazpacho spiced with chilli, served on the private beach at the Arenas Del Mar resort on the Pacific Coast. Overlooking the mile-long Playa Espadilla Norte with waves that draw a daily crew of surfers, this is a clifftop oasis set amid the tourist strip bordering the Manuel Antonio National Park. Costa Rica has 27 national parks and a quarter of its land is protected. Manuel Antonio is the smallest and way too crowded, but there’s no denying you can see many of the strange and perplexing creatures the country is famous for here. On a guided tour with the hyper-enthusiastic Mauricio, we see squirrel monkeys, the Jesus Christ

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‘For the definitive Costa Rican adventure, go white-water rafting’ Fr om t op: Go back t o nat ur e at t he Pacuar e Lodge eco ho t el; a suspension br idge fo r t hr ill seeker s; spo t a slo t h; r elax by t he po o l at t he Ar enas Del Mar luxur y r esor t


B ook now British Airways (ba.com) flies from Gatwick to S an José twice a week, from £590 return in October. S ans a (flys ans a. com) operates internal flights. For pack ages, visit audleytravel. com, cost aricaspecialists.co.uk and rainbowtours.co.uk. Stay at Hotel Grano de Oro (hotelgranodeoro.com), Nayara Springs (nayarasprings.com), Arenas Del Mar (arenasdelmar. com), Hacienda Alt aGracia (aubergeresorts.com) and Pacuare Lodge (pacuarelodge.com). For more information pick up C osta Rica (£16.99, Lonely Planet) and go to visitcost arica.com.

lizard (so named because it walks on water), long-nosed bats and three-toed sloths. Mauricio carries a high-powered birdwatcher’s scope on a tripod so we can admire such creatures in glorious close up, and if you give him a smartphone he puts the two together to take mind-blowing shots that will make everyone back home think you’re a wildlife pro. Later, on a night walk in the rainforest, another guide ingeniously shines a torch through his binoculars so it becomes a spotlight. Such touches are typical of how Costa Ricans have got tourism cracked. English is also widely spoken, US dollars are accepted, and the country is safe and welcoming. Hotels are committed to sustainability and there’s a ban on swimming with dolphins and whales. Travelling around is straightforward, either self-driving or using transfers, with small planes the best way to cover

PHOTOGRAPH BY NIGEL TISDALL

F ro m t o p : H a ci end a Al t aGrac i a h as t h e l a r g es t s p a i n C entral A m e ri c a; s t u n ni ng w i l d l i fe; t he pe ac e f u l P a c ua r e Lo d g e; r o l l i ng d own th e ri v e r

long distances. Last April saw the launch of a direct flight from London to San José, and while the capital looks dishevelled and has appalling traffic there are some gems – notably the Central Market and the 19th-century National Theatre, built in the heyday of the coffee boom. Costa Rica’s ‘golden bean’ is easily the best souvenir to bring home, and there are plenty of chances to visit coffee farms to learn about the effort that goes into making our daily caffeine fix. The farm I visit is at 4,000ft, and close to Costa Rica’s highest mountain – Cerro Chirripó. Growing coffee is clearly not easy money, but the cup I’m given, made with mountain water, is the best I’ve tasted in years – and the beans are just £11 a kilo. If you like riding, hiking or mountain biking, the rich farmland around nearby San Isidro de El General is perfect. All these activities, as well as flying over the fincas in a microlight plane, can be done at Hacienda AltaGracia, a luxurious hillside estate with over 40 horses kept in palatial stables and the largest spa in Central America. Alternatively, for the definitive Costa Rican adventure, go white-water rafting. The scenic Pacuare river has numerous Class I-IV rapids, which you can tackle in six-passenger, 14ft-long inflatable rafts. You can ride this river on a day trip from San José, but it’s much better to spread it over two nights with a break at Pacuare Lodge, a hideaway eco-hotel with 18 suites buried in the trees. Paddle hard through the raging waters, then relax as the raft glides serenely downriver, passing waterfalls as toucans and butterflies flap by. Another honeymoon favourite, this top-class lodge has a sweet riverside spa where the therapists wear wellies and, as there’s no mains electricity, all the rooms are lit with candles. Lying here in a hammock under the stars, it’s easy to see why Costa Rica is number one on the Happy Planet Index. This plucky little nation was the first democracy in Central America, and in 1949 the country disbanded its army and put the money into education and healthcare. It has a goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2021, and its positive outlook is summed up in the oftenused expression ‘pura  vida’ – best translated as ‘full of life’. Whether you head here to be active or slothful, this spirited country hits the spot. Q


STAY AT… Ace Hotel (acehotel.com; left), a restored 60s motel with 180 rooms, which b oasts vintage art, retro record players and the cool crowd sipping caipirinhas by the pool. Whitewashed walls offset the desert backdrop and the in-house roadside diner stays true to its roots. Double rooms cost from £209.

MUST DO…

On location

Palm Springs

Hir e a moped and cr uise t he highw ay t o Joshua Tr ee Nat ional Par k (lef t ) and Salv at ion Mount ain f or epic v iew s. Then hit Cat hedr al C it y’s ‘ desig n hood’ f or v int ag e f ur nishing s at Hedge (hedgepalmspr ings. com) and eclect ic ar t at Spaces (modern-spaces.net).

Discover a retro Californian dream in the sunshine state’s hippest hideout. Cocktails, essential 01

I’M HUNGRY…

COMPILED BY ABISOYE ODUGBESAN. PHOTOGRAPHS BY ISTOCK BY GETTY IMAGES. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

04

Eat b ru n ch at Ace Hot el’s King’s Highway – the wate rm e l o n and jicama salad (ab ove) is delicious; h e ad to Th e Chop House (ch o p h o u s e palmspr ings. co m ) fo r l obst er and Lo n d o n Fo g cockt ails; o r check out chic bistro Miro’s (m i ro s palmspr ings. co m ) fo r al fresco dining .

WHAT TO PACK… 02 03

05 06

07

01 A e sop Ri n d Con c e n trate B ody B alm, £ 25 fo r 120ml 02 Hat, £260, Filu Design at Matchesfashion.com 03 S andals, £24 5 , A l v aro 0 4 B ag, £25 0 , Whist les 05 Dr ess, £ 59, U r ban O u tf i tte rs 0 6 Bi k i n i top, £135, and bot t o ms, £ 81, bo t h Pr ism 0 7 Su n gl asse s, £21 7, D ol c e & Gabbana

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, er 5 ay b £3 id em Y Fr pt NL Se s O 30 ket c Ti [ Friday 30 September ]

DISCOVER THE LIVINGETC HOUSE TOURS

The Tours run from 10am4pm. Tickets cost £35 per person. Book your place at housetohome.co.uk/ livingetc housetours2016

Enjoy a day at Livingetc’s pick of London homes

T

his September, join the Livingetc team for the fifth annual Livingetc House Tours – this is your chance to take a look round some of the magazine’s favourite homes in the capital. The Livingetc House Tours 2016 will give you exclusive access to some fabulous homes in southwest London, from Battersea to Wandsworth. Once inside the houses, you’ll be able to walk around at leisure, absorbing plenty of inspirational ideas for styling your own space. As soon as you’ve booked your place, you’ll be sent a map highlighting the participating homes, a guide to finding the easiest way of travelling between them, plus detailed information about each of the properties, which span a range of cool, modern design styles. Livingetc House Tours is specifically tailored to keep travel between the properties as quick and simple as possible, whether you use public transport, prefer to cycle or come by car. Tickets are strictly limited, so book now for an inspiring day out for you and your friends.

SPONSORED BY

Go to housetohome.co.uk/livingetchousetours2016


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STAY AT… La M amounia (mamounia. com) , a luxe hot el w it h 209 unique, M or occan-t hemed r ooms ov er looking t he exot ic w alled gar dens. A st ylish oasis, t her e’s an out door and indoor pool (ab ov e) , opulent spa and f our r est aur ant s. D ouble r ooms cost f r om £310.

On location

Marrakech

Marie Claire’s fashion team hits Morocco for souks, sun and style inspiration

I’M HUNGRY… Escape the sun at Le Jardin (l e j ardin. ma) and or der o rgan i c couscous salads an d ar omat ic t agines (ri gh t). For dinner, head to tu cked-aw ay Le Tobsil fo r ve get ar ian mezes and fl aky pastille , eat en t o a soundt r ack by l o cal musicians.

MUST DO…

03

WHAT TO PACK… 01 02

Be captivated by the colour at b otanical Jardin de Majorelle (jardinmajorelle.com, ab ove), then hit the Medina, city souks and Jemaa El-Fna square to shop for fashion finds and Moroccan homewares. As night falls in the square, the vibe switches to party.

COMPILED BY LUCIA DEBIEUX. PHOTOGRAPH BY ISTOCK BY GETTY IMAGES. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

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01 Dress, £140, Comptoir des Cotonniers 02 S andals, £360, Ancient Greek S andals 03 Bikini top, £30, and bottoms, £20, both Figleaves.com 04 Shirt, £335, Kate Moss for Equipment 05 Shorts, £45, Levi’s 06 Aerin Tangier Vanille E DP, £92 for 50ml 07 Watch, £165, Sk agen 08 Belt bag, £245, Tory Burch 09 Iles Formula Discovery Pack, £19.50


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Photographs by ISAAC MARLEY MORGAN

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Styled by GRACE SMITHAM 01

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It’s all about

Cool girls Lead the way with fashion-forward extras 1 Shirt, £345, and trousers, £795, both Joseph; shoes, £185, Bimba y Lola. 2 Jacket, £2,135, Rosie Assoulin; sunglasses, £290, Acne. 3 Shirt, £350, Marques’ Almeida; earrings, £12.99, Mango. 4 Jacket, as before; sunglasses, as before; bag, from a selection, Acne. 5 Dress, £1,832, and bag, £833, both Céline

HAIR BY TERRI CAPON AT STELLA CREATIVE ARTISTS USING ORIBE. MAKE-UP BY MARTINA LATTANZI AT ONE REPRESENTS USING LANCÔME AND BUTTER LONDON. MODEL: VIOLET GOULD AT THE HIVE MANAGEMENT

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Marie claire october 2016 uk