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THE PROJECTS Winter Park Shawl

34

Maria Leigh

Dillon Scarf

35

Emily Ringelman

Timber Trail Hat

36

Katya Frankel

Spirit Lake Shawl

32

Pearl Street Mitts

42

Stefanie Bold

37

Reservoir Ridge Cowl

Jessica Anderson

Manitou Springs Set

South Platte Cowl

Jesie Ostermiller

City Park Hat

44

Joni Coniglio

40

Breckenridge Sweater

Thea Colman

Durango Socks

43

Tanis Gray

38

45

Emma Welford

41

Edora Cowl

Sarah Jordan

46

Yoko Johnston

Grasslands Tee

46

Julia Farwell-Clay

Loveland Cowl

48

Laura Reinbach

Happy Jack Cowl

49

Laura Reinbach

Spruce Creek Scarf

50

Catrina Frost

Nederland Vest

51

Amy Palmer

Vail Cardigan

52

Heather Zoppetti

Eastern Plains Cowl

53

Tanis Gray

Rist Canyon Beanie

FOR BABY

54

Meghan Huber

Bingham Hill Cowl

Red Feather Sweater

55

Daniela Nii

Cover: Timber Trail Hat, page 36

contents knitscene handmade 2016 www.knitscene.com

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Karen Gietzen

56

Cheyenne Mountain Monkey Set

58

Jessica Anderson

Silverthorne Baby Blanket

60

Emily Ringelman

Front Range Raglan Kristen TenDyke

61


THE SHOPS

THE MAKERS

20

Julia Reddy

Purl Soho

12

Fancy Tiger Crafts

13

fibre space

14

Fringe Supply Co.

15

Churchmouse Yarns & Teas

16

Tolt Yarn and Wool

18

12

Karen Templer

20

Woodfolkknits

Christina Fagan

21

Sh*t That I Knit

Vickie Howell

22

Knit Crochet Craft

Stephanie Dosen

24

Tiny Owl Knits

Jacqueline Fink

26

Little Dandelion

THE DYERS Sincere Sheep

62

Julia Farwell-Clay

YOTH Yarns

63

FEATURES

Catrina Frost

Pigeonroof Studios

28 On Short-Rows: Four Methods

64

Leslie Petrovski

Green Mountain Spinnery

Bristol Ivy

68 The Ins and Outs of Grafting

65

Thea Colman

Brown Sheep Company

Joni Coniglio

102 Blocking for a Professional Finish

66

Amy Palmer

62

Sheryl Thies

106 Book Excerpt: Highland Knits

DEPARTMENTS 06 Editor’s Note 08 Materials Product Review Yarn Review Book Talk: American Spun

112 Behind the Scenes

knitscene handmade 2016

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contents


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12 SCHOOL STREET • BATH, ME HALCYONYARN.COM • 800.341.0282

NOW FEATURING JO SHARP YARNS & PATTERNS Earthy, elegant accessories, handknit in luxury yarns by Jo Sharp. Rib Twist Cowl (above) in Silkroad DK Tweed Two Tone Moss Cowl (left) in Silkroad Aran Tweed


beginner: basi c sti tches easy: movi ng past scarves intermediate: pretty confi dent advanced: chal l enge mysel f

interweave press

level of difficulty

editorial content strategist Lisa Shroyer editors Hannah Baker, Amy Palmer managing editor Rachel Koon assistant editors Louisa Demmitt, Sara Dudek senior project editor Joni Coniglio technical editors Tracey Davidson, Karen Frisa, Larissa Gibson, Lori Gayle, Robin Melanson

knitting gauge

copy editor Amanda Borowski

To check gauge, cast on thirty to forty stitches using recommended needle size. Work in pattern stitch until piece measures at least 4" from cast-on edge. Remove swatch from needles or bind off loosely and lay swatch on flat surface. Place a ruler over swatch and count number of stitches across and number of rows down (including fractions of stitches and rows) in 4". Repeat two or three times on different areas of swatch to confirm measurements. If you have more stitches and rows than called for in instructions, use larger needles; if you have fewer, use smaller needles. Repeat until gauge is correct.

creative services

proofreader Nancy Arndt

designer Bekah Thrasher art director Debbie Long photography projects Nathan Rega, Harper Point Photography Matt Graves departments Ann Swanson, George Boe photostyling Katie Himmelberg hair & makeup Janie Rocek illustrations Alex Capshaw-Taylor, Gayle Ford, Kathie Kelleher, Kit Kinseth

reading charts

advertising advertising manager Diane Kocal

Unless otherwise indicated, read charts from the bottom up. On right-side rows, read charts from right to left. On wrong-side rows, read charts from left to right. When knitting in the round, read charts from right to left for all rounds.

diane.kocal@fwcommunity.com advertising manager Sally Finnegan sally.fi nnegan@fwcommunity.com ad traffi cker Mary Lutz classifi ed advertising Jenn Rein

learn it • abbreviations beg BO CO dec g inc k k1f&b kwise m mm p p1f&b pm psso p2sso pwise rem rep rev St st rnd(s) RS sl st(s) St st tbl tog WS * () []

beginning; begin; begins bind off cast on decrease(s); decreasing gram(s) increase(s); increasing knit knit into front and back knitwise marker(s) millimeter(s) purl purl into front and back place marker pass slipped stitch over pass two slipped stitches over purlwise remain(s); remaining repeat(s); repeating reverse stockinette stitch round(s) right side slip stitch(es) stockinette stitch through back loop together wrong side repeat starting point (i.e., repeat from *) alternate measurements and/or instructions instructions that are to be worked as a group a specified number of times

Need More Help? Visit www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for a complete glossary of stitches.

marketing manager, eCommerce Melissa Gugelman

F+W, A Content + eCommerce Company CEO Thomas F. X. Beusse CFO/COO James L. Ogle President Sara Domville Senior Vice President, Operations Phil Graham Vice President, Communications Stacie Berger ®

Knitscene (ISSN 2328-286X print and 2328-2940 online) is published quarterly by F+W Media, Inc., 4868 Innovation Dr., Fort Collins, CO 80525. (800) 272-2193. Application to Mail at Periodicals Postage Prices is Pending at Fort Collins, CO, and additional mailing offices. All contents of this issue of Knitscene are © 2016 by F+W Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited, except by permission of the publisher. Subscription rate is $32/one year in the U.S., $36/ one year in Canada, and $39/one year in international countries (surface delivery). U.S. funds only. Subscription services: knitscene@emailcustomerservice.com, (800) 839-4544 U.S. and Canada, (386) 246-0105 international, P.O. Box 433289, Palm Coast, FL 32143. Projects and information are for inspiration and personal use only. We’ve made every effort to ensure the accuracy of the contents of this publication. However, human errors do occur. If you have questions regarding a pattern in this issue, please visit us online at www.knittingdaily.com/errata. Knitscene does not recommend, approve, or endorse any of the advertisers, products, services, or views advertised in Knitscene. Nor does Knitscene evaluate the advertisers’ claims in any way. You should, therefore, use your own judgment in evaluating the advertisers, products, services, and views advertised in Knitscene. Postmaster: Please send address changes to: Knitscene, P.O. Box 433289, Palm Coast, FL 32143.

Visit the Knitscene website at www.knitscene.com. call Diane Kocal at (317) 482-0120 or email diane.kocal@fwcommunity.com; call Sally Finnegan at (513) 403-9565 or email sally.finnegan@fwcommunity.com; or visit www.interweave.com. For retail sales of magazines and Interweave books, call (800) 289-0963 or email sales@fwcommunity.com. For editorial inquiries, call (800) 272-2193, email knitscene@interweave.com, or write to 4868 Innovation Dr., Fort Collins, CO 80525-5576. For advertising information,

4868 Innovation Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525-5576 (866) 949-1646

Enjoy our other fine fiber magazines Interweave Knits, Interweave Crochet, knit.wear, PieceWork, Handwoven, Spin.Off, Knitting Traditions, Love of Knitting, Love of Crochet

Visit us on the Web

www.knittingdaily.com • www.fwcommunity.com


Pattern #232 Children's Tunic www.knittingpureandsimple.com

Nothing gives you the freedom of expression like our Nature Spun yarn. Texture and color are yours to manipulate with this soft, 100% wool yarn in a broad palette of 80 colors, all of which are offered in four weights. Find your inspiration with Brown Sheep today!

www.brownsheep.com

Brown Sheep Company, Inc. Find our hand-dyed yarns and ďŹ bers in a shop near you. www.anzula.com

MITCHELL, NEBRASKA

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Wh y

do we create? Why do we choose to build and make with our hands over buying ready-made items to save our time and effort? Anything and everything we could possibly need is available for sale in large, warehouse-like stores, or on the Internet. Why then do we choose to use our personal time for slow, precise projects that require so much attention? You, Knitter, already know the very simple answer to these questions: We create because it feels good. It makes us feel whole and fulfi lled, from the process through the fi nal product. Creating is human nature, and without it, something is missing. This brand-new special issue of knitscene is all about the handmade life and the folks who subscribe to creative lifestyles in the realm of knitting. We visited with some of the makers of this creative world, who tell us what it means to them to be creators in the New Media Age (page 20). We interviewed modern craft shops to fi nd out what it’s like to be a community resource for an inventive public (page 12), and indie dyers and yarn producers who are on the cutting edge of what is hot in the industry right now (page 62). The projects in handmade are presented in one big story (“The Projects,” page 32) and are accessory-heavy, with projects for women, men, and babies. We are excited to present three exclusive colorways created for knitscene, used in the Manitou Springs hat, cowl, and mitts set (page 38); the Happy Jack Cowl (page 49); and the Bingham Hill Cowl (page 55). All three will be sold as kits very soon at www.interweavestore.com/knitting. We also selected technical articles to help you succeed in completing the projects, from short-row shaping (page 28) to invisible grafting (page 68) to blocking your project for a quality fi nish (page 102). While I am absolutely thrilled and honored to take over as editor of knitscene, this particular issue wouldn’t have been possible without massive team contribution amidst multiple staffi ng changes at Interweave. I want to thank the knitting team for all the energy they have poured into this special issue, especially my good friend, and former assistant editor, Louisa Demmitt, who created the concept for handmade and who worked incredibly hard to make it marvelous both before and after her shift to the Interweave video and education team. I sincerely hope that you fi nd inspiration and empowerment to create your life in handmade, the knitscene issues to come, and all around you.

Connect wit h the knitscene te am and our other knittin g titles at www.knittin gdaily.com.

Happy creating, nt Photography

Poi Photo credit: Harper

Interweave Knits editor

super awesome model editor

designer

photographer’s r ’s’ aassistant ssis ss ista tant nt

h er photographer

stylist

ha i & mak akeu e p hair makeup

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www.knitscene.com m

the team!

assistant editor


spinnery.com

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MATERIALS

Knitting Whimsy Practical and beautiful finds perfect for the stylish and savvy knitter.

Every knitter knows that sometimes your needles get a little unorganized, which makes it hard to find a specific size. The needle gauges from Retromantic Fripperies can help: these handcrafted gauges are so beautiful you will want to leave them out for eveyone to admire. These lovely tools can unlock your creativity while helping you keep track of your needles. www.retromanticfripperies.com

The “Check� Your Gauge Cloth by Cocoknits is the knitting tool you never knew you needed. With the pattern woven in one-inch squares, you can use this cloth to check the gauge on your beginning swatch, match garment measurements while blocking, and even protect your knitting from a hot iron. The cloth measures 48"x 48" (perfect for your larger projects) and is 100% cotton. www.cocoknits.com

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The incredible hand-crafted Knitting Project Bags by Bird Leg Bags are perfect for storing small- to medium-sized projects. Vickie and Danny Knestaut, based out of Greensburg, Pensylvania, craft these bags with fun fabrics and strong interfacing so they can stay upright as you work and withstand the sharpest of knitting needles. www.birdlegbegs.com


Yarn Fresh yarns from indie dyers keep knitters busy!

STITCH SPROUTS YELLOWSTONE (80% wool, 20% silk; 285 yd [260 m]/100 g): shown in Forest Fire. This beautiful 3-ply mixture of wool and silk is perfect for almost any project. Try this yarn the next time you are playing with lace or cables. Yellowstone comes in nine bright and lively colors, making it great for colorwork as well. www.stitchsprouts.com

ANCIENT ARTS FIBRE CRAFTS (75% superwash extra fine merino wool, 25% silk; 437 yds [400 m]/100 g): shown in Electric Sheep, Seafoam, and Peachy Keen. Ancient Arts Fibre Crafts turns yarn dyeing into an art form. Known for their many tones and color combinations, Ancient Arts approaches their dyeing process as if they were painting with watercolors, giving each yarn a unique and artful appearance. Each skein tells a story. What story will you tell with these three new and exciting colors? Hand dyed in Canada, made in Italy. www.ancientartsfibre.com

JAGGERSPUN ZEPHYR WOOL-SILK LACE (50% wool, 50% silk; 1120 yd [1024 m]/ 100g): shown in Lilac. JaggerSpun Yarn has a strong family history of spinning yarn in southern Maine since the 1880s. Their yarn has been spun in the same factory for over 100 years. Zephyr Wool-Silk combines merino wool and Chinese tussah silk, making it truly unique. With about fifty colors to choose from, this lace weight yarn is perfect for your next lace project. www.jaggeryarn.com

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BOOK TALK

American Spun 20 classic projects exploring homegrown yarn By Anna Sudo Reviewed by Louisa Demmitt

1

American Spun is all about stories. The story of the yarn you’re making a project with, the story of the project, and the joint history the two end up sharing. You learn about the farmers, their farms and animals, how they got started, and why they do what they do. It is filled with beautiful pictures and patterns that complement and show off the yarns from which they are made. Author Anna Sudo explains that knowing where your yarn comes from, like knowing where your food comes from, forges a strong relationship between you and what’s in your hands. The people who “grow” these yarns have a respect and reverence for their animals that shines through in their finished products. As the author says, “When you knit with a yarn that is hand-dyed or handspun, you can see the hand of another maker in your work.” This book has accessories and garments, as well as some home décor. Darton, a triangle shawl (at right) made from Mountain Meadow Wool Cody, features straightforward lace and adds texture and warmth to any outfit. (All of the wool in this yarn comes from the American West, and the company is based in Buffalo, Wyoming.) With the Harriman embroidered brim hat (page 11), you can learn about embroidery on knits while creating perfectly decadent and cozy head wear. Using Woolful Mercantile yarns in blends of Shetland, mohair, and merino, you get a look into the workings of A Wing and A Prayer Farm in Shaftsbury, Vermont. In this book, you get to be an armchair traveler, learning about how and why people make their own yarns across the United States. With American Spun, Anna encourages you to slow down and appreciate all of the hands that have already worked on your yarn before you start knitting with it. In a time of premade consumption, we can easily lose sight of how much time and effort goes into what we consider “raw materials”—yarn has already been on some amazing adventures by the time we ooh and aah over it on a shop shelf!

1 2 3 4 5

Darton triangle shawl Rondout cardigan Yarn production Harriman embroidered brim hat Mountain Meadow Wool sheep in Buffalo, Wyoming

All photos courtesy of One Peace Books. Please contact publisher for individual photo credits.

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s p e h o t Sh

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These passionate people have made it their life’s work to create great spaces for crafty people.

PURL SOHO New York Yo City’s Purl Soho is co-owned by sisters Joelle Hoverson and Jennifer Hoverson Jahnke, and good friend Page Marchese Norman. Editors and stylists in past lifetimes, they bring to Purl Soho a passion for pure, natural fibers and exceptional design. www.purlsoho.com

Q

What W is it like to make it your life’s work to curate craft products and bring them to a passionate audience?

A

It’s amazing! Everything we do starts It with a love for beautiful materials and a deep respect for needlecraft traditions. It is a daily challenge and reward to bring our own voice to the history of crafting, and we love nothing more than when we’re an hour into a discussion on which color yellow to use or which way to bind a quilt. We also appreciate daily that our job brings us into relationship with kindred and passionate spirits—both our employees and our customers!

Q A

How have the Internet and social media H driven or impacted your work? They have completely transformed it. T Because we sell materials, share free patterns and tutorials, post inspiring photos, and editorialize about our processes and our inspirations, all online, people who may never step foot in New York City know exactly who we are. It’s a wonderful feeling to be a part of a global craft community!

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What does it mean to be a yarn-shop W owner in the digital age? It means working hard! We try to be curators that our customers trust. Unlike a big retailer who may sell everything under the sun, our customers know that products from Purl Soho are special and that they’re chosen with love. The digital age has also pushed us in the direction of selling exclusive Purl Soho brand products such as yarn, fabric, kits, and patterns. Creating our own products is a wonderful way for us to express our unique point of view and to have on hand the materials we’ve always dreamed of.

Q A

What do you love most about the W industry?

Photo credit: John Dolan

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Photo credit: Purl Soho

We love our customers and our community. W We get so much inspiration from both: fresh ideas, new techniques, and creative energy. We can’t imagine life without them!

Q A

What do you want your customers to W take away from your work? We want to spark true joy in people’s lives. W We believe that starting with beautiful natural materials brings a level of respect to whatever you’re making, and that needlecrafts are as elevated an artistic endeavor as anything else. For us, and for many of our customers, true joy comes from this communion with exquisite materials, an appreciation of needlecraft’s history, and most fundamentally, creative self-expression. s

Photo credit: Purl Soho

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FANCY TIGER CRAFT CRAFTS Fancy Tiger Crafts is an inn innovative shop in Denver, Colorado, that specializes in craft supplies and classes for the modern crafter. Owners Jaime Jennings and Amber Corcoran truly believe that making things by hand makes people feel better, and that if more people made things, the world would be a better place. Their vision is to inspire people to reach their crafting potential through modern and sustainable supplies and quality instruction. Jaime and Amber met in Galveston, Texas, in the early 2000s and became fast friends. Jaime started Fancy Tiger in 2006 and then invited Amber to partner with

her in 2008. In addition to a retail shop in Denver and an online shop, they also produce and design crafting kits, sewing and knitting patterns, and even have their own yarn line. www.fancytigercrafts.com

Q

What is it like to make it your life’s work Wh W to curate craft products and bring them to a passionate audience?

A

It’s been a dream come true! It is amazing It’ to believe so strongly in your work and to be able to share it with people. There are, of course, many parts to our work, and some of them are not so fun, but the positives always outweigh the negatives. After ten years of running a successful and busy retail store,

Photo credit: Fancy Tiger Craft

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we still find time to knit and sew almost every day, and it is still our favorite way to unwind and decompress.

Q A

How have the Internet and social media Ho driven or impacted your work? They have been crucial in our ability to grow Th our business and brand outside of the Denver community. When we started we were a tiny shop with a strong base of local customers. Over the years, we have slowly grown to include an online store, online classes, and a wholesale line of our own knitting, sewing, and quilting patterns and kits. I think a lot of this growth was made possible through our blog and social media. These outlets also let us connect with a larger community of crafters—we can be inspired by people’s projects and source new products to carry, thanks to social media.

Q A

What does it mean to be a yarn-shop W owner in the digital age? I tthink it means being flexible and able to grow and change in new ways. There are always new tools and apps that we can use to improve the way we do business and connect with our customers.

Q A

What W h do you love most about the industry?

Photo credit: Fancy Tiger Craft

We love the close-knit and supportive W community! It seems like everyone, from designers to shop owners to customers, is excited and inspired by what we’re all doing instead of being competitive. We love being able to connect with crafters here in Denver as well as all over the world.

5 QA

What W h do you want your customers to take away from your work? We hope to inspire people to be their best W creative selves: to take risks and challenges while always remembering why we’re doing this in the first place. s

1 Purl Soho co-owners Joelle, Jennifer, and Page 2 Yarn on display at Purl Soho’s NYC shop 3 Purl Soho’s front window in winter 4 Fancy Tiger co-owners Jaime and Amber in handknit sweaters knit with Brooklyn Tweed Shelter 5 Handpainted lettering on the wall at Fancy Tiger Crafts by local artist Eric Johnson

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Danielle Romanetti is the owner of the fibre space shop and has been knitting since the age of six or so. Originally from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Danielle created Knit-a-Gogo Inc. in October 2006, which offered knitting classes and events in the D.C. metro area. In July 2009, Danielle moved to the next natural step: a full-service yarn shop, called fibre space, in Alexandria, Virginia. www.fibrespace.com

Q

Wh is it like to make it your life’s work What W to curate craft products and bring them to a passionate audience?

A

While I was an avid knitter before opening W the store, more than anything, I wanted to run my own retail business! It has been incredibly liberating to work for myself. I am also inspired daily by my customers and their projects. There really isn’t anything I would rather be doing than this.

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1 Danielle, owner of fibre space 2 The fibre space store front

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Q A

How Ho ow have the Internet and social media driven or impacted your work?

FIBRE SPACE

Wee were fortunate to open the shop after W Ravelry was started. Having this free online community for our industry is everything. The growth of Instagram also has helped us to show our product and inspirations. Because everything that we do is so visual, this platform is the perfect method for communicating with existing and potential customers and for our community to show us what they’ve done with our products.

Q A

Wh does it mean to be a yarn-shop What W owner in the digital age?

Everything Ev verything is constantly changing. Where one platform was working well for us five years ago, it may be obsolete now. We also feel increasing pressure to sell online or have a full catalog of our yarn online. I continue to resist selling online. We are first and foremost a community for the local knitter and crocheter. This is more than a transaction through a Web store. We like

Photo credits 1& 2: Alumbra Photography

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to have a conversation with our customer, assist them in making decisions, and really show them all of the options. I want to keep focusing on what we do well: creating community and providing an amazing lineup of unique products. What Wh hat do you love most about the industry? I llove lo ove to see so many small businesses really take off in the yarn world. It is inspiring to know that small and indie businesses actually dominate in our industry! This can’t be said for too many other industries. What Wh hat do you want your customers to take away from your work? I hope h that my customers can see the careful planning and extensive work that have gone into this shop—into everything from our inventory plan to our classes to our events. This is not only my passion but it is also my job. I love it immensely, but it is definitely work! s


FRINGE SUPPLY CO. Karen Templer is a former graphic designer, author, and Web developer who has been blogging about knitting since late 2011 (www.fringeassociation.com) and launched Fringe Supply Co. at the end of 2012. She and her husband moved from Berkeley to Nashville, Tennessee, in the summer of 2014, where Fringe has been thriving ever since. www.fringesupplyco.com

Q

What W is it like to make it your life’s work to curate craft products and bring them to a passionate audience?

A

It’s a dream come true. I’m very blessed to It get to do what I do every day. It also means so much to me to be able to have an impact on other lives. The products I make help create jobs here in the United States with good wages and working conditions. And the non-Fringe goods I sell come from other small makers whose businesses I admire, and being able to support them in return, is incredibly gratifying.

Q A

How have the Internet and social media Ho driven or impacted your work? The Internet has everything to do with Th my very existence. If my only option were to open a brick-and-mortar store, I’d be restricted to selling what the people in my geographic area are looking for, which would be problematic, since my goods target a pretty specific customer and aesthetic. Being an online business, I’m free to make and gather the things I find compelling and then seek out like-minded customers wherever they may be. Likewise, my customers find me through my blog or my Instagram feed rather than passing by on the street. So it’s an entirely different ballgame, for sure.

Q A

Wh does it mean to be a yarn-shop What W owner in the digital age? Running any sort of small business in Ru this age requires you to be good at lots of things that might not have mattered in the past—photography, written communication, conveying a personality through an online

presence. Fortunately, I’m more comfortable in writing than I am in person.

Q A

What do you love most about the Wh industry? There’s an incredible spirit of collaboraTh tion, even amid the competition. You see competitors collaborating all the time—a yarn-company owner designing a pattern for a yarn store that sells their own competing yarn, etc. I think we pretty much all want to grow the audience and raise the profile and perception of knitting, and working together is a great way to accomplish that. I’ve made such amazing friendships through working with others in this business.

Q A

Wh do you want your customers to What W take away from your work? That high-quality, ethically made, beautiful, Th long-lasting tools and accessories are worth investing in—that they make the whole process more pleasing on so many levels. s

Photo credits 3 & 4 : Karen Templer

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Photo credit: Kathy Cadigan

3 Fringe Supply Co. shelving wall 4 Karen tries to keep the space looking more like a shop than a warehouse. 5 Karen Templer, owner of Fringe Supply Co.

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CHURCHMOUSE YARN YARNS & TEAS Kit Hutchin opened Churchmouse Yarns & Teas in September 2000 on Bainbridge Island, just west of downtown Seattle. For the next ten years, Kit and her staff served a growing number of local, national, and international visitors to the shop who appreciated knitting, crocheting, stitching, and the comfort of everyday teas. In 2010, her husband, John, closed his own business to join his wife full time. He came on board to build Churchmouse’s website channel. In the same year, Churchmouse Yarns & Teas began publishing the knitting and crochet patterns Kit and her team had been designing to help visitors to the shop. Jared Flood of Brooklyn Tweed shot beautiful

photos for each one. Today, more than eighty Churchmouse Classics, Wee Ones, At Home, and Classroom patterns are sold in more than 700 yarn shops across North America and around the world. www.churchmouseyarns.com

Q

What is it like to make it your life’s work Wh to curate craft products and bring them to a passionate audience?

A

One of the best things about this busiOn ness is the people I meet: customers, staff, teachers, fellow shop owners, sales reps. The knitting world just seems to self-select good, smart women and men. Our amazing staff loves fiber, loves customers, and loves helping people make beautiful things with their hands. Being a part of that community—and actually supporting it with great ideas, well-edited

Photo credits 1 & 2: Jared Flood

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products, tried-and-true patterns, and a patient staff that genuinely cares about your success.

Q A

How have the Internet and social media Ho driven or impacted your work? We wanted to bring the Bainbridge Island store experience and the sense of community to more and more people, and technology allows us to reach people almost anywhere, and certainly anytime. It took us several years to create a digital platform that we felt was right. I didn’t want to add just another website to the overloaded online mix. I wanted our site to be a welcoming, calming, and inspiring experience. As for social media, we brought in a part-time employee in 2011 to start and manage a group on Ravelry. Today, she is a key team member in building and improving churchmouseyarns.com. Another parttimer, a longtime team member, handles our community connections on social media, responding to comments, shooting photos, planning content, organizing moderators, and implementing strategies.

Q A

What does it mean to be a yarn-shop Wh owner in the digital age? Though some yarn shops are online-only, Th our shop on Bainbridge Island is our flagship, our heart and soul. Our online presence builds on that. But we see how we can reach people who might be too far away to ever visit, and bring them into our supportive community with today’s digital opportunities.

2Q

What do you love most about the Wh industry?

Photo credit: Keither Brofsky

1 Churchmouse wrap counter 2 Churchmouse store 3 Kit Hutchin, owner of Churchmouse Yarns & Teas

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A

Running a small business takes hard work Ru and d dedication. If we were making widgets, we probably would be doing something else by now. But we’re making knitters. We’re helping knitters make beautiful things. We’re showing them how to do things better. That’s worth doing.

Q A

What do you want your customers to Wh take away from your work? In a word: success. We want them to be successful. Oh, and happy. I guess that’s two words! s


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PHOTO CREDITS: JOE HANCOCK

Lark Cardigan


TOLT YARN AND WOOL By Karen Templer Carnation, Washington’s Main Street is just a few blocks long, or as Tolt Yarn and Wool proprietor Anna Dianich puts it, it runs “from the bridge to the strawberry fields.” There’s a realty company, a mercantile, an Ace Hardware, a tattoo parlor, a bar, and a Mexican restaurant. Until eighteen months ago, there was also a big, beautiful, empty building next door to the Ace. Anna was one of the Crafty Aunties, a group of crafters who got together each week to knit and crochet, laugh and cry, and help each other out in countless ways. There seemed to be a lot of women who were hungry for that, and Anna wanted to create a place that was all about providing just that sort of community to the whole town, so she began picturing a yarn store in that empty old building. When Tolt Yarn and Wool held its grand opening on November 9, 2013, the town had never seen anything like it—people were lined up down the street waiting for the doors to open. Anna had envisioned a local shop for her little town, but while planning and building it, she had amassed a significant online following. Her Pinterest boards and Instagram photos foretold a

1 Antique and hand-built wood fixtures

beautifully designed and stocked shop—the kind many of us dream of. For the opening, people came from nearby Seattle and farther afield to see it, and they’ve been doing so ever since. I asked Anna what was most unexpected about the reality of owning a yarn store. She said that in addition to the interest from beyond Carnation’s boundaries, she was surprised to realize that she needed to extend herself beyond those boundaries, in a couple of ways. One way is the behindthe-scenes travel that comes with the job, including trade shows and other special events around the country. And the other is the financial necessity of that outside interest. Despite its warm embrace and support, Carnation is simply too tiny to keep the store afloat on its own. For that reason and by popular demand, Anna created an online store that features her favorite yarns— chiefly farm yarns with traceable origins. Anna learned to knit after college at an area yarn store and later inherited her grandmother’s spinning wheel. She fell in love with wool and with traditional, rustic yarns, and she had dreamed of sheep, if not yet of a yarn store. “I’m a hobby farmer,” she says, but sheep are her passion; she loves talking with and supporting farmers. “That’s why I love carry-

2 Carnation Tree Farm

ing brands like Imperial, Cestari, and Twirl,” she said. Now she’s in the process of creating her own yarn. One day, when passing a field of sheep she’d passed many times before, she spotted the farmer, Jeff Rogers, and stopped the car. Jeff and his wife, Katya, raise sheep for meat. Anna asked what happens to the fleece from the sheep, which are a cross between the Clun Forest and Bluefaced Leicester breeds, and before long they’d struck a deal to spin it into yarn. Anna had had her own sheep’s fleece spun before and tagged with the Tolt brand, but the Rogers’ fleece will amount to about 400 skeins— “Our first real yarn line,” she says. Meanwhile, her goal of creating a crafty community space for the town of Carnation (formerly known as Tolt) has definitely been met. On the night I visited the store in the spring of 2014, she was eager to introduce me to Tami, who comes to the shop every day to knit—the embodiment of Anna’s dream coming to fruition. People ask Anna if she shouldn’t have a store in Seattle instead of outside of it, but that’s not for her: “Here, I don’t have to commute. My kids can walk to the shop after school. It’s perfect.” s www.toltyarnandwool.com Karen Templar is the owner of Fringe Supply Co. See page 15 for full bio.

3 Tif Fussell wraps up a purchase.

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3 Photo credit: Anna Dianich

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a fresh

look at a

CLASSIC TECHNIQUE slip stitch is one of the simplest and most versatile knitting techniques, but it’s often overlooked. The Art of Slip-Stitch Knitting is a modern and thorough take on this technique that delivers beautiful colorwork and gorgeous textures—with minimal effort. Sixteen original projects for cardigans, pullovers, hats, bags, scarves, and more showcase the versatility of slip stitch by using it as an allover pattern or accent. Whether you’re new to this exciting stitch or looking to go beyond the basics, The Art of SlipStitch Knitting is your new essential guide. AVAILABLE NOW AT INTERWEAVESTORE.COM

ISBN 978-1-62033-756-1 • US $26.99/CAN $29.99 • 176 pages


These self-made de creatives creati are stars on social media websites like Instagram and Ravelry, and each has her own totally unique crafty style and persona.

Photo credit: Julia Reddy

s r e e k t h Ma

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JULIA REDDY Woodfolkknits Julia Reddy is an artist, gardener, and knitter. She lives in an old farmhouse in Prince Edward Island, Canada, with her partner, Jamie; three cats; a dog; and some elusive critters. Julia is happiest surrounded by trees and is in the process of starting a small-scale farm with Jamie.

Q A

What does it mean to you to be a maker? W Wh To be a maker is to be an artist. It is the innate desire to be self-reliant, to create meaning and worth in our daily lives, and to share with others. I create meaning in our lives by knitting unique garments and household items, by filling our home with the smell of freshly baked bread, and by growing our herbs and trees from tiny little seeds. Being a maker is asking yourself, “Can I make or grow this?” as opposed to “Where can I buy this?”

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What got you started in this field? W Wh My sister Meaghan and I created our Etsy shop “Ways of Wood Folk” while we were students at the University of Toronto (U of T). We wanted a creative outlet for our knitting and a way we could share our love for Icelandic wool and design. We were in a class in the rare book library at U of T, and our professor showed us the book Ways of Wood Folk by William J. Long. Meaghan suggested we use the name, and it stuck. I feel like it definitely captures our wild, woodland spirits.

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Where does your inspiration come from? Wh

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Absolutely everywhere: nature, various art Ab movements, my family and friends, music, history, and literature. I love medieval textiles and woodcuts, late nineteenth-century children’s book illustrators, fairy and folk tales, botanical illustrations, illuminated manuscripts, Celtic and Norse metalwork, and vintage knitting.

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How do you maintain a creative life? Ho My mind never really shuts down the M creative process. I am always thinking of something new that I want to do or try. It’s really important to me to continue to learn something every day, no matter how small. I often am pursuing knowledge about how I can create a more self-reliant lifestyle for my family, whether it's in small-scale farming, making garments, or just being joyful in the making process. Books are also a necessity in our house. I love flipping through arthistory books or vintage knitting patterns to stimulate the creative juices.

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How have you made a public persona Ho out of craft? I sstarted an Instagram account Woodfolkk when I moved from Toronto to Prince Edward Island last year. I was kind of lost and thought it might help give me some creative direction and motivation by sharing my work and seeing the work of others.

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What do you want people to get from Wh your work? There is beauty and joy in the handmade Th that can’t be found in the mass-produced. That anyone and everyone can create, and that using our hands and minds brings us a little bit closer to who we really are. s


always enjoyed doing. I can’t sit still, so I’m glad I’ve found something productive to do with my hands when I have to.

CHRISTINA FAGAN Sh*t Th Thatt I Knit Christina Fagan is the founder and chief knitting officer of Sh*t That I Knit (STIK). She learned how to knit as a ten-year-old while spending her summers on Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia, Canada. STIK started as a silly blog in college, but turned into something real in February 2015 when her side business turned into a full-fledged business. A luxury knitwear line based out of Boston, Massachusetts, STIK comprises thirty-five knitters who are all in their twenties and thirties and “love to knit sh*t.”

Q A

What does it mean to you to be a maker? W I llove lo making things with my hands, and being able to sit down with some random materials and end with a finished product is pretty cool. Being a “maker” is such a trendy thing these days with the DIY movement, but I’m so happy that it’s something I’ve Photo credit: Hive Studio

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W Wh What got you started in this field? My mom taught me how to knit when I M was ten, and it’s always been a passion of mine. I also have something of an eye as to what people want, so I’ve always focused on making pieces that are on trend. I think that combination has propelled me into the knitwear field.

Q A

Where does your inspiration come from? W Wh I rreally just like to make things that I want to wear. You could say I am pretty preppy, and I like classic lines and chunky knits. I also like seeing the way other knitwear designers are taking risks, and that pushes me to try new things: bigger pom-poms, brighter colors, new lines, etc. At the end of the day, I really like to design things that I want to wear, but I think my taste changes all of the time.

own business means dealing with a lot of day-to-day sh*t that is not so creative at all. I am the most energized when I get together with the “STIK Clique,” as they are all much better knitters than I am, and they inspire me to try new things and to set aside time to knit for fun. I also like to switch it up—I take a ceramics class where I can throw bowls for hours and just let my brain wander.

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How have you made a public persona Ho out of a craft? Through Instagram, I’ve been able to create Th a voice for the brand that reaches thousands of followers. I’ve been able to formulate an authentic story around the craft of knitting, and that has proven to be interesting enough for people to follow along over the last year. I do a lot of public relations outreach, and I partner with lots of bloggers to find new audiences.

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Wh do you want people to get from What W your work?

It’s not always easy! In the past year, one It’ might think that I’ve been swimming in creative bliss, when in reality running your

Two things: I want people to smile when Tw they hear about our brand, and I want them to love the products that we make. I hear a lot of feedback from our customers that they get stopped on the street when they’re wearing one of our hats. s

1 Forest watercolor in pen and ink 2 Headed to market with knitted goods 3 Lopi mitts accompanied by a woodland gnome watercolor

4 Trowbridge Beanie in Spruce Green 5 Trowbridge Beanie in Bright Blue 6 Founder Christina Fagan in a Bliss Band in Red

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How do you maintain a creative life? Ho

5 6 Photo credit: Galen Mooney

Photo credit: Elizabeth Courts

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Knit Crochet Craft

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What does it mean to you to be a maker? W Wh

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What got you started in this field? W Wh When I first got into knitting I started two W “Stitch ’n’ Bitch” groups in hopes of creating a community around this craft that I loved. The logo and tagline for the groups caught the attention of a television producer who then reached out to see if I knew anyone who might be interested in hosting a knitting TV series. A month later I landed the gig as the host of DIY Network’s Knitty Gritty. Where does your inspiration come from? W Wh I ffi find life—for better or worse—to be a series of extraordinary experiences. Whether it be a moment with my kids, continued partnership with my husband, music I discover, film/books/television that I devour, the pop culture that surrounds us, fashion, or art, I try to pull from all of that and channel it into making. It almost never directly translates, but still feels like an ebb and flow of ideas between the outer world and the inside of my head.

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How do you maintain a creative life? Ho I’m fortunate enough to have a career that demands creativity. Still, it takes a con-

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How have you made a public persona Ho out of a craft? Ab Above A being a designer, broadcaster, and author, I consider my career role in the arts and crafts community to be one of an encourager—an evangelist for being creative. Once the gift of Knitty Gritty happened, I immediately pitched books, products, appearances—anything that I could to honor the path I was now on. That was twelve years ago, and I’ve continued to build on it. Part of having a persona is using it to create community. I try to nurture that community every day.

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What W h do you want people to get from your work? Ac Accessibility. A I want them to feel like they can come to me for fresh, cool projects and ideas that are totally doable, even in today’s busy world. I want them to feel great making and wearing one of my designs, without the pressure of an overwhelming amount of work. I want them to know that I have their proverbial creative back! s 1 2 3 4

Vickie Howell Granny Grande Hat for Interweave Crochet Original wall-hanging Coyote Kid Sweater from Wee Garter Stitch (Sixth & Spring Books)

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Photo credit: Interweave, Dan Howell

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Q A

Photo credit: Interweave, Vickie Howell

Cr Creating C things with my hands, being creative, and encouraging others to find that expressive outlet within themselves feels like breathing to me. Being a maker—of projects, ideas, community, whatever—is a large part of what defines me as a person.

Photo credit: Harper Point Photography

Knitting author, designer, instructor, and speaker Vickie Howell has had a memorable presence on TV for more than ten years, as host of the DIY Network’s Knitty Gritty and PBS’s Knitting Daily TV with Vickie Howell. Most recently her efforts have included a YouTube channel, Totally Doable D.I.Y. with Vickie Howell; her “Ask Me Monday” live Facebook stream; a Monetize Your Craft online course through CreativeLive; and her podcast, CRAFT*ish, which debuted in April. Find her as @vickiehowell on almost all social media except Pinterest, where she is @iamvickiehowell.

certed effort to nurture creativity amongst deadlines and social-media number expectations. As part of that effort, I launched a podcast called CRAFT*ish in which I share conversations with other “creative types” about living creatively. This nourishes me with shared ideas and experiences, and (I hope) in turn gives something to the listeners that will inspire them to give themselves some creative space.

Photo credit: John Eley

VICKIE HOWELL


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CREATE CUSTOM KNITTING PATTERNS TO SHARE AND SELL! Whether you’re looking to share a project with a close friend or your growing online customer base, The Beginner’s Guide to Writing Knitting Patterns is the comprehensive guide that can help you translate your project into a set of instructions that any knitter can follow. Knitting expert and author Kate Atherley’s one-stop guide includes everything you need to know on everything from pattern writing basics, to schematics and charts, and more!

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STEPHANIE DOSEN Tiny O Ti Owll Knits K Tiny Owl Knits patterns are designed by musician and artist Stephanie Dosen. She lives at the foothills of the Rocky Mountains with her hefty yarn stash riddled with gnomes. Her book Woodland Knits was named by editors at amazon.com as the top craft book of 2014. Find Stephanie’s patterns and videos at www.tinyowlknits.com.

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What does it mean to you to be a maker? Wh I’m pretty obsessive when it comes to making things. When I get a good idea, it can be the reason I get up in the morning and the reason I stay up all night. Being a maker means you are at the forefront of your own evolution. It means you will stay up all night cracking the code to make your vision come to life.

Q A

What got you started in this field? Wh

wanted to be made into birds, bears, shawls, and hats with ears. I started making things up, and thankfully the magical women at the shop taught me how to write the patterns. It was around then that I moved to London and away from my knitting friends. We used Ravelry to keep in touch about knitterly things, and I posted my patterns there. From there it was just a lot of latenight needle clicking!

Q A

Where does your inspiration come from? Wh I’m inspired by everything from stainedglass l lamps to hiking boots. All animals inspire me, little books, candle nights, and fairy lamps. Gnomes and toad houses, seasons, flowers, and fairy tales. I take a little book with me and write down my ideas all the time. Sometimes it’s a bit of old needlepoint at a flea market or a raccoon tail. I also love sculpting things, so sometimes I will see a knickknack and want to knit it. The idea that yarn can become anything really excites me—sticks and strings can become socks and wings.

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I got go a job at a yarn store in 2003 and was immediately in love with fiber arts. I was surrounded by huge walls of fiber that

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Ho do you maintain a creative life? How I th think it has a lot to do with not giving up and not being too hard on yourself when an idea doesn’t fly. It’s a numbers game. Not everything will be a masterpiece, so it’s about not letting fear stop you from starting that next project. I know a lot of people who want to make things, but they are afraid. I always say, Be afraid of bears or jumping out of airplanes, but never be afraid of your knitting!

Q A

How have you made a public persona out of craft? I di didn’t really intend to ever even put my face with my knitting. I guess it just sort of happened over time because I had to model my own designs. I liked the idea of designing under a company name so I could sort of stay in the background. But then the sweaters didn’t fit the owl.

Q A

What do you want people to get from Wh your work? My favorite thing about knitting is that feeling when you see an amazing pattern and you know you have to make it NOW! It’s like, you get up, no matter what you are doing, and start running around looking for yarn that will work. You can't even wait to get started. You are so excited and giddy and totally positive that knitting this pattern will somehow transform your life. Not knitting it is not an option. You feel totally alive. I want to make that happen for people. s

Photo credit: Simon Raymonde

3 Photo credit: Simon Raymonde

1 Oh my bear! by Tiny Owl Knits 2 Fairy castles by Tiny Owl Knits 3 Twig by Tiny Owl Knits

Photo credit: Lizzie Carter

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Learn to

Weave simple, stylish projects

on a simple loom ry e • Pin Loo m • Tap est AV E • Rig id He ddl NEW! HOW TO WE

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• Rigid heddle • Pin loom • Free-form tapestry

HANDWOVEN

Find patterns, techniques, and inspiration in this issue jam-packed with weaving ideas.

Projects

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7 SCARVES to Weave

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Projects for the Family from 3 Artists

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A SPECIAL ISSUE OF

The first magazine for weaving:

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Includes 28 Projects Gear Guides Profiles How-to Tutorials Yarn Reviews

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JACQUELINE FINK Little Dandelion li Jacqui Fink is a fiber artist based in Sydney, Australia, who works with high-grade and naturally colored merino wool from Australia and New Zealand. Jacqui’s focus is on creating installations and textiles extreme in both their scale and the physical challenge they represent for one pair of hands. Each piece is as much a feat of endurance as it is a loving creative expression.

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Wh does it mean to you to be a What W maker? My work is as much my salvation as it is my M vocation. I could not now envisage living my life in any other way. The very humble and time-honored notion of “making” is as fundamental to my well-being as breathing. I am grateful that I have found my place in the creative sphere and revel in the mysterious exchange that I experience with the universe.

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What got you started in this field? Wh My mum taught me how to knit as a child, but I never committed to learning the language of knitting, so my skills remained very basic. Fast-forward to the early years of my adulthood. With a law degree under my belt, I found myself completely disillusioned with my chosen career. Life as a lawyer just did not suit. I left the law to work in my husband’s high-end fashion retail business. By the time I was thirty-five I realized I needed to dig myself out of the hole I had inadvertently dug for myself. At that age, I knew myself well enough to know that I need to work creatively with my hands in some way. That same year, my mum was diagnosed with a terminal lung disease. In the days following my mum’s transplant, I found myself occupying a very heightened and surreal state. It was during this time that I had a vision that transformed my life. While I was asleep, a big loud booming voice said to me, “You have to knit, and it needs to be big.” The command was as

Photo credit: Paul Westlake

1 terrifying as it was profound, and it woke me from my sleep. But I had asked for guidance from the universe for so long that I didn’t dare question my vision. By the end of 2011, I had amassed a small collection of throws and blankets that I felt were commercially ready to bring to the market, so I did just that when I launched Little Dandelion in April 2012.

Q A

Where does your inspiration come from? W Wh

Photo credit: Jacqui Fink

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It ccomes from the divine. An idea will come to me as a picture through my subconscious. I will make the piece in my imagination first and problem solve as I go. When I feel like the piece is well resolved in my mind, I will then go about making it. This process can take a few short weeks or months. At other times, I can live with an idea for a couple of years before I have the right context in which to give it life. Overall, I am inspired by the beauty of wool, natural fibers, texture, and scale.


Photo credit: Brooke Holm

4 Photo credit: Sharyn Cairns

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Photo credit: Sharyn Cairns

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How do you maintain a creative life? H Ho Li Living L a creative life is purely a way of being for me. It’s not a choice, and the maintenance of it is not really an issue. However, trying to make a living out of a creative practice is a huge commitment of time and energy. It is by no means a soft option: courage, faith in your creative ability, and a large capacity for hard work are essential.

Q A

How have you made a public persona Ho out of craft? Whatever the nature of a maker’s output, W there will be an audience attracted to it. Social media has given makers like me an incredible global platform from which we can find that audience. In my experience, this has allowed me to build a relationship with them based on a mutual love and appreciation for all things handmade. From the beginning, I have been very open about my story and the hardships it

has entailed. It’s just who I am: heart on my sleeve and very comfortable discussing the trickier aspects of life with anyone at any time. The critical factor is that my story could be anyone’s, and I have received countless emails from other women recognizing something of themselves in it. People have connected with it like I could never have imagined. Simply by being vulnerable and sharing my journey, others have been encouraged to make changes in their own lives, and that’s pure gold.

Q A

What do you want people to get from W your work? Ih hope they experience immense comfort and joy. Every piece I make, whether it is a large-scale bespoke wall hanging or a throw, is an extension of me and is imbued with a great deal of love and care. I also hope that my work challenges the often rigidly held notions of what constitutes art. Many relegate knitting and wool to “craft”

1 Knitted and Knotted Wall Hanging, 2015, private commission 2 Extreme Beanie and Extreme Tutu 3 Solace No. 1 created for Sea Art: an aesthetic convergence with Lara Hutton 4 Extreme Knitting Workshop, New York 2015 5 Mushroom Stool created for Sea Art exhibit

and, as a result, assign to it a different value, and I think that is not only a shame but also a misnomer. Hopefully the pendulum is swinging toward a broader and more inclusive view on this count. s 2016 knitscene handmade

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TECHNIQUES

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Short-rows, in essence, are partial rows of knitting. You can use short-rows to add height in places where you need or want it and to turn corners and create curves in your knitting (which is a predominantly linear and angular art form). We all created them accidentally in our first days of knitting, when we forgot which direction we were going and went back the way we had come without completing the row. Now, as then, a spot appears where the extra height causes a gap between the twice-worked stitches and the unworked stitches. In this article, I describe a few techniques for closing that gap to create the best visual presentation.

GERMAN SHORT-ROWS German short-rows are a new variation on short-rows, one that has become popular in recent years. Through an ingenious manipulation of the fabric, both a slipped stitch and a lifted stitch are created at the same time. Therefore, German short-rows create about as little looseness as shadow wraps (see page 31), and they result in seamless-looking, smooth fabric.

How to Work German Short-Rows:

1. Knit or Purl row: At the end of the partial row, turn the work. Slip one purlwise from the left needle to the right needle (Figure 1). Bring the working yarn up and over the top of the right needle and gently tug. Doing so will distort the slipped stitch, shortening the loop of the stitch itself and wrapping the two parts of the stitch over the top of the needle, making it look as though there are two stitches sitting very close to each other on the needle (Figure 2). When you encounter this double stitch on a subsequent row, work the two legs of the stitch together as if they were one stitch (Figure 3). Figure 4 shows a finished swatch.

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WRAP-AND-TURN SHORT-ROWS Probably the most common short-row technique is wrapping and turning. It involves wrapping a loop of working yarn around the stitch adjacent to the partial row. When you come back to that stitch later, the wrap is worked together with the wrapped stitch so that the wrap sits on the wrong side of the work. Because wraps add some extra yarn to the fabric, they can create loose spots in your knitting. I reserve wrap-and-turn for projects such as knitted lace that have open fabric in which the extra looseness won’t be noticeable.

How to Wrap-and-Turn:

1. Knit row: At the end of a partial row, slip the next stitch purlwise with the yarn in back (Figure 5). Bring the yarn to the front between the needles and return the stitch to the left needle

(Figure 6). Turn the work and orient the yarn as needed for the next row (to the back of the work for a knit row, to the front for a purl row) (Figure 7). When you encounter the wrap on a subsequent knit row, insert the right-hand needle into the wrap, then into the knit stitch, and knit them together (Figure 8).

2. Purl row: With the yarn in front, slip the next stitch purlwise (Figure 9). Bring the yarn to the back between the needles and return the stitch to the left needle (Figure 10). Turn the work and orient the yarn as needed for the next row (Figure 11). When you encounter the wrap on a subsequent purl row, pick up the wrap and place it on the left needle, and purl the stitch and the wrap together (Figure 12). Figure 13 shows a finished swatch.

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JAPANESE SHORT-ROWS

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Japanese short-rows are my favorite short-row variation because they can be used on a plain fabric without adding any looseness. They involve both lifting and slipping: instead of creating a loop of yarn, you place a locking stitch marker on the working yarn at the turning edge of the partial row, then use that stitch marker to pull a loop out of the working fabric when you’re ready to complete the short-row. You also slip the first stitch at the beginning of the next partial row, which snugs up any looseness there. Because Japanese short-rows pull yarn from within the fabric itself, you don’t loosen your fabric.

How to Work Japanese Short-Rows:

1. Knit or Purl row: Place the stitch marker around the working yarn at the end of the partial row (Figure 14). Turn the work, slip one purlwise, then work the next stitch, making sure the stitch marker is between the slipped stitch and the stitch just worked (Figure 15). When you encounter the stitch marker on a subsequent row, pull the stitch marker and place the resulting loop of yarn on the left needle (Figure 16). Remove the stitch marker and work the stitch and the loop together (Figure 17). Figure 18 shows a finished swatch.

Similar techniques: Sunday short-rows, unslipped Japanese short-rows. The former uses pieces of scrap yarn instead of stitch markers to help pull the loops onto the needle; the latter doesn’t slip the first stitch after turning.

Want to learn even more about

SHORT-ROWS?

If you’ve ever knitted a sweater or socks, chances are you’ve knit short-rows for shoulder and heel shaping. Even if you haven’t used short-rows for shaping, you can easily learn how with Nancie Wiseman’s workshop video. Nancie shows exactly how to knit short-rows, which she describes simply as “half-way-down” knitting.

get this

DVD www.bit.ly/ Short-Row-DVD

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SHADOW WRAPS Shadow wraps are, in my opinion, the least visible short-rows from the front. They’re created differently from other short-rows. Although there is lifting, it occurs within the structure of a stitch that has already been created. This approach limits the looseness shadow wraps add to the fabric. Even though you add about a stitch’s worth of yarn, it is locked into place by how the wrap is created. Therefore, no looseness spills into the fabric around it.

How to Work Shadow Wraps:

1. Knit row: At the end of a partial row, insert the tip of the right needle from back to front into the top of the stitch in the row below the next stitch on the left needle. Place the stitch on the left needle and knit into it (Figure 19). Transfer the stitch from the right needle to the left needle without twisting it. You now have two stitches sprouting from a single stitch (Figure 20). Turn the work and complete the next row. When you encounter the double stitch on a subsequent knit row, knit the two parts of the stitch together (Figure 21).

2. Purl row: At the end of a partial row, slip the next stitch purlwise to the right needle, then insert the tip of the left needle up through the purl bump in the row below the slipped stitch (Figure 22) and purl it (Figure 23). Transfer the double stitch to the left needle (Figure 24). Turn the work and complete the next row. When you encounter the double stitch on a subsequent purl row, purl the two parts of the stitch together (Figure 25). Figure 26 shows a finished swatch. These four short-row techniques are just a few of those available. Be sure to experiment to see which technique works for the kind of fabric you like to produce. I hope this tutorial will help you find the perfect technique for you! s Bristol Ivy is a knitting designer and teacher from Portland, Maine. Her work focuses on the intersection of classic tailoring and innovative technique. Find out more about her and her work at www.bristolivy.com.

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s t c e j o r P S e h t

Knit current quick accessories and thoughtful garments for yourself and the people in your life.

Photography by Harper Point Photography

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WINTER PARK SHAWL Maria Leigh Worked from corner to edge, the wide scape of stockinette stitch allows a handpaint to flow and morph. Knit-on “pennants� grace the edges of this no-frills shawl. Yarn Artyarns Merino Cloud

Pattern page 79

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DILLON SCARF Emily Ringelman Openwork and garter stitch always look appealing in a chunky yarn. The Dillon Scarf is made in Amano Puyu, a soft alpaca in a neutral color that even the most rugged nonknitter can’t resist. Yarn Amano Puyu, distributed by Berroco Pattern page 95

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TIMBER TRAIL HAT Katya Frankel Simple geometric colorwork, contrast ribbing, and a two-tone pom-pom comprise this funky hat. The luxurious fibers of Yarn and Soul Superfine make this beautiful hat a pleasure to knit and wear. Yarn Yarn and Soul Superfine 400

Pattern page 83

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SPIRIT LAKE SHAWL Jessica Anderson Made from the top down, this simple crescent shawl features a diamond lace pattern and picots at the edge. The main focus of this shawl is the long-striping yarn, which makes this a whimsical and exciting knit from beginning to end. Yarn Knitcircus Yarns Greatest of Ease Pattern page 78

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MANITOU SPRINGS SET Jesie Ostermiller The cable-stitch pattern of this design beautifully highlights the Lorna’s Laces Haymarket swirling upward against a solid background. The 1x1 cable can be easily executed without a cable needle and will significantly speed up your progress once you master the technique. The result is a squishy fabric that makes this set super warm and cozy, and the pattern includes two color options! Yarn Lorna’s Laces Haymarket

Pattern page 84

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CITY PARK HAT Thea Colman This elegant lace motif shines in a subtle neutral color. The contrast ribbing and matching pom-pom make a hat that can be worn fall through spring. Yarn Green Mountain Spinnery Sylvan Spirit DK Pattern page 82

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DURANGO SOCKS Sarah Jordan Snaking traveling stitches pop off the bright Wildfoote Luxury Sock Yarn. Classically made from the cuff down, the twisted stitches keep this project interesting to the tip of the toes! Yarn Brown Sheep Company Wildfoote Luxury Sock

Pattern page 86

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PEARL STREET MITTS Stefanie Bold The sturdy linen stitch used in these mitts mimics a woven fabric. This is a great stitch pattern to use when working with a handpainted yarn because it creates a faux colorwork effect. Yarn Ancient Arts Fibre Crafts 100% BFL Wool Lace

Pattern page 82

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RESERVOIR RIDGE COWL Tanis Gray Freia’s on-trend ombré yarn shines in this cozy cowl. A textured stitch pattern is worked flat, and the ends are grafted to make an eye-catching gradient loop. Yarn Freia Fine Handpaints Ombré Super Bulky Pattern page 94

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SOUTH PLATTE COWL Joni Coniglio A rippling lace pattern combined with the trickling blue tones of The Fiber Seed’s Sprout yarn create a flowing water effect. The cowl is worked back and forth and then seamlessly grafted in pattern, creating an infinite loop of color. Yarn The Fiber Seed Sprout

Pattern page 88

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BRECKENRIDGE SWEATER Emma Welford The solid fibers of Beaverslide's Dry Goods yarn provides a weighted layer for the winter. A cable and garter motif runs up the front and back of this handsome shawl-collar raglan. Yarn Beaverslide Dry Goods 3-ply Heavy Fisherman Weight

Pattern page 76

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EDORA COWL Yoko Johnston An unexpected and unusual shape make the Edora Cowl a star accessory. Whether single or double looped, this cowl gracefully falls around the face without bunching at the back of the neck. The openwork and bobble fringe showcase decadent Road to China Lace. Yarn The Fibre Company Road to China Lace, distributed by Kelbourne Woolens

Pattern page 89

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GRASSLANDS TEE (AT RIGHT) Julia Farwell-Clay A simple lace motif graces the neckline and hip of this knit. Clever seamless construction makes this sweet, year-round top simple to knit and easy to wear. Knit in the round from the bottom up, the sleeve caps are picked up at the armhole, where short-rows are worked for shaping. Yarn Sincere Sheep Equity Sport Pattern page 72


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LOVELAND COWL Laura Reinbach Everyone loves a set of mini-skeins and reversible cowls! This cowl is made in one piece; the fabric is folded in half after knitting, and the ends are grafted to make a doublesided cowl without double-knitting. Find two color combinations in the pattern! Yarns Wonderland Yarns Cheshire Cat and Cheshire Cat mini-skeins

Pattern page 93

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HAPPY JACK COWL Laura Reinbach Why fuss with a scarf when you can throw on a cowl and forget about it? Whether worn in a single loop or doubled for extra warmth, the Happy Jack Cowl’s interesting stitch pattern pops in the vibrant colors of SweetGeorgia Yarn. Yarn SweetGeorgia Yarns Superwash Worsted Pattern page 91

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SPRUCE CREEK SCARF Catrina Frost Worked with a geometric stitch pattern that creates a reversible fabric, this simple unisex knit showcases the tonal semisolid colors of YOTH Yarns.

Yarn YOTH Yarns Big Sister Pattern page 95

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NEDERLAND VEST Amy Palmer Working this piece in the round from the bottom up without waist shaping allows the body of the vest to knit up quickly. The high crewneck and fitted armholes make this vest a versatile unisex piece that looks smart for the office or casual for the weekend.

Yarn Solitude Wool Romney Pattern page 74

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VAIL CARDIGAN Heather Zoppetti This sweater is playful, sweet, girly, carefree and is worked from the top down in tonal Anzula Vera. The main focus of this cardigan is the flowing ruffle, which is picked up and knit from the edges and bottom of the sweater. Yarn Anzula Vera and Anzula Breeze

Pattern page 75

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EASTERN PLAINS COWL Tanis Gray Made in giant, squishy Dream in Color Mammoth yarn, the repetitive and intuitive zigzag stitch of this large cowl makes the knitting easy and fun. Yarn Dream in Color Mammoth

Pattern page 92

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RIST CANYON BEANIE Meghan Huber The classic men’s hat gets a modern update with a variation in the ribbing. The resulting fabric has textural interest but is subtle enough for even the pickiest guy. Yarn Harrisville Designs WATERshed

Pattern page 87

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BINGHAM HILL COWL Daniela Nii The explosion of color found in this knitscene handmade –exclusive colorway is complemented by the undulating stitch pattern in this feminine cowl. Yarn Pigeonroof Studios American Sock

Pattern page 90

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Photography by Matt Graves


RED FEATHER SWEATER Karen Gietzen A simple top-down pullover for your little one. The ease of the design begs to showcase a colorful handpaint such as Great Lakes Yarn Co. Divine DK. Yarn Great Lakes Yarn Co. Divine DK

Pattern page 98

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CHEYENNE MOUNTAIN MONKEY SET Jessica Anderson This pattern includes two playful items to keep your little one cozy on chilly nights. The onesie will keep little legs and feet warm all night thanks to the long buttoned bottom. The little monkey hat can be worn anytime for an added bit of cuteness throughout the day. Yarn Spud & ChloĂŤ Sweater, distributed by Blue Sky Alpacas

Pattern page 97

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SILVERTHORNE BABY BLANKET Emily Ringelman Two colors and two textures break up the large sections of stockinette and double moss stitch. The colorful, durable, and washable Ewe Ewe Wooly will ensure this blanket can stand up to years of playing, sleeping, and washing. Yarn Ewe Ewe Yarns Wooly Worsted Washable

Pattern page 99

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FRONT RANGE RAGLAN Kristen TenDyke Bottom-up, simple, and seamless, this sweater is a fast knit for a little one. If you are making this little cardigan for soon-arriving baby, work buttonholes on both sides and sew up the unnecessary buttonholes after the little one arrives. Yarn Green Mountain Spinnery Cotton Comfort Pattern page 100

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s r t h e Dye

These independent yarn dyers give us the unique, high-quality fibers knitters crave.

SINCERE SHEEP by Julia Farwell-Clay At yarn events and wool festivals, people often stop in front of Brooke Sinnes’ colorful booth, awed by the array of soft smoky hues and beautifully knitted samples. They read the sign with the name of her brand, Sincere Sheep. Then they quickly make a predictable joke: “Is there such a thing as an insincere sheep?” Knitting away at her sock, Brooke smiles and explains. Living in Napa Valley, California, Brooke has long been interested in shrinking the footprint of the things she uses. About the same time that the “locavore” and slow-food movements were gaining momentum in the mainstream, Brooke was running a parallel course, collecting fleeces from Northern California shepherds, having the fleeces milled locally, and paying the farmers at a much better rate than they had been getting from shipping their annual clips to the distant wool pool. Knitters at the time were mostly obsessed with the quality of “soft” in their yarn, and merino from Peru and Australia was what they wanted. Interest in

American wool and in keeping our spinning mills open has risen in our consciousness in the last few years, and Brooke has been waiting. Central to her yarn philosophy is the understanding that wool is an agricultural product; Brooke promotes the idea of her yarn as a record of the year in the life of the sheep, possessing “terroir” that can be appreciated in the same way as wine, or coffee, or any other artisanal crop. Brooke dyes her yarn naturally and organically using leaves, roots, and flowers. The dyes she employs—including madder, cochineal, and certified organic indigo— also manifest a unique record of that year’s weather and soil conditions as they come to her to be incorporated into her laborintensive process. Many of her colors require multiple steps, with layering of colors and processes to reach their final result, and Brooke wouldn’t have it any other way. s

1 A rainbow of yarn set up for a trunk show 2 Hundreds of pounds of Cormo yarn on cones 3 Cochineal and Indigo magic in the dyepot 4 Dried marigolds measured out for the dyebath

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www.sinceresheep.com Julia Farwell-Clay lives near Boston, Massachusetts, with her husband and son. www.juliafarwellclay.com

Photo credits: Brooke Sinnes

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by Catrina Frost Caviar, wild rice, shitake, spring water, cacao—these may sound like the makings of a decadent lunch, but they are in fact a few of the rich, vibrant colors offered in YOTH's “Raw” and “Fresh” color palettes. YOTH—which stands for “Yarn on the House”—was founded by big sister Veronika Jobe and little brother Danny Burda in October of 2013. After leaving a profession that no longer excited her, Veronika decided to follow a new passion and create her own brand of hand-dyed yarn. In a multifaceted industry of designers, producers, and fiber sources, yarn was the constant that drew all these together. In March 2014, YOTH presented Raw, its first line of twelve neutral colors, at Tolt Yarn and Wool in Carnation, Washington (see page 18). In September 2014, they began working with the Saco River Dyehouse in Maine. Although the yarn is no longer hand-dyed, the YOTH family still personally packages and ships each order from their headquarters in Woodinville, Washington. This intimate connection to their customers is very important to YOTH and is something they seek to hold onto as they grow. One of YOTH’s unique attributes is that their yarn lines are based on neutral, unisex colors. Each palette centers on three key colors and provides them in four gradient shades that blend and coordinate harmoniously. The Raw palette features charcoals, navies, and browns, while the Fresh palette features blues and greens. Each delectable color is available in cleverly named Big Sister (DK) and Little Brother (fingering) weights. Both are made with a luxurious superwash merino, cashmere, and nylon yarn base. In November 2015, the company launched a new Juicy color palette and also welcomed the addition of a brand-new yarn base made of 100% Rambouillet wool sourced locally in the United States This new yarn base is available in all of their Raw palette colors and is offered in Mother (lace) and Father (worsted) weights, named to pay homage to the mother and father who are an essential part of YOTH's success. Each member of the family plays an important role in helping YOTH supply joy in skein form. All are eager to jump in, roll up their sleeves, and get their hands dirty helping wherever they are needed.

Despite becoming successful in such a short period of time, Danny and Veronika remain humble and truly grateful for every achievement and the support of family, friends, and customers. When asked about the most rewarding part of YOTH yarns, Veronika responded, “Meeting, helping, inspiring, and nurturing the growth of the knitting community that surrounds us. We sell happiness in a skein.” s

Photo credits: YOTH

YOTH YARNS

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www.yothyarns.com Catrina Frost is a Pacific Northwest knitter, spinner, designer, and fiber enthusiast. Follow her on Instagram as @simplycatrina.

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1 Big Sister yarn, DK weight MCN blend 2 Father Cables hat modeled by Daniel (Little Brother) and Janey, Daniel’s fiancée 3 The Raw and Fresh palettes together 4 The Juicy palette

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All photos by Krista McCurdy unless otherwise noted.

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PIGEONROOF STUDIOS by Leslie Petrovski t ki Hand-dyers are typically closed-mouthed about their processes, seeing their formulas as the secret sauce to their success. But not Krista McCurdy. The thirtyfour-year-old founder and colorist behind Pigeonroof Studios shares everything from the brand names of her acid dyes (Jacquard Products, Dharma Acid Dyes, and Cushing Perfection Wool Dyes) to specific techniques (an idiosyncratic kettle-dyeing method that uses dye powder straight up). Why the openness? Confidence, in part. A printmaking graduate of the California College of the Arts, Krista had been layering color and ink for years before she started dousing yarn with Kool-Aid during the knitting boom in the 2000s. Rather than working from a color wheel or photos, she dyes from sheer instinct, trusting her intuitive color sense—something she thinks other dyers can’t replicate. “What color I put down next while dyeing just comes out of my head, but that’s also from long experience of working with color, not to mention the familiarity with the dyes and how they behave,” she explains. “Nothing really compares to fully knowing your tools.” Her process is also unique. Though she took a couple of textile classes in college, Krista is largely self-taught. She created her dyeing technique on her own, starting with those early experiments with the flavored drink mix, then moving on to acid dyes. Admittedly challenged by numbers, she intentionally developed processes to avoid mathematical calculations. She

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doesn’t weigh her colorants or premix her dyes, preferring instead to work in small batches—two skeins for her complex tonals (her GLOW colorways), two-skein dyelots for her multis (such as her best seller Electric Rose), and six-skein lots for her semisolid hues. Her recipes tend to look more like lists of colors and diagrams than step-by-step instructions with specific measurements. She developed her popular GLOW series of tonal yarns through a multiyear experiment in dyeing one-off colors she called the Luminosity Project, an attempt to layer colors to create luminous semisolid skeins. Eventually, Krista reached the point where she could document the laborious, timeconsuming processes required to achieve these complex, lustrous skeins. It takes her more than an hour and ten steps to dye Emerald Isle, a striated St.Patty’s–Day green whose shades run from a piney forest to bright lichen. Krista has dyed many weights of yarn, but these days has settled on three fingering-weight bases she rotates depending on what she’s dyeing: American Sock, a 100% U.S.-grown and spun superwash; High Twist Sock, a 100% merino superwash; and Silky High Twist Sock, an 80% superwash merino/20% silk blend. She also sells miniskein sets in 240-yard six-packs of different colors and shades. s

www.pigeonroofstudios.com Leslie Petrovski is a freelance writer and knitter who lives in Denver with her husband, kitty, and too much yarn. www.nakeidknits.com. 1 GLOW colorway Spice Market 2 Krista in studio 3 Lazy Daisy

4 GLOW colorway Baltic 5 Rubine gradient

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Photo credit: Green Mountain Spinnery

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GREEN MOUNTAIN SPINNERY

Photo credit: Thea Colman

1 Alpaca Elegance yarn in Hibiscus 2 Bobbins of steamed yarn, yet to be skeined 3 Yarn being plied on one of the vintage machines

by Thea Colman Just off the highway in Putney, Vermont, sits the Green Mountain Spinnery. On my first visit I was surprised to find them housed in a small weathered one-story building. Given the impact that they have had on my knitting world over the years, I’d imagined something bigger. Because fitting all that they’ve done for our industry into that tiny space seemed impossible. But the more I learned about Green Mountain Spinnery, the more I came to see that it’s not only possible but actually quite appropriate. Since 1981, when four friends were inspired to start a community-owned business that would make a difference in the wool industry, their focus has been on the land, the people, the wool, and the yarns. That tiny building is packed to the rafters, and every square foot of it has a purpose. As pioneers in the movement to save our wool, they had to find equipment, seek out knowledgeable people in a shrinking industry, and constantly learn about fiber

and sales and production through trial and error—at times wondering if they’d ever break even. They did it, not for profit or glamour, but because they knew it was important. And today, when you walk into that small building, it’s obvious that is where the heart of the company still lies. It smells like sheep and grease and heaven, and it’s loud, and it’s crowded, and it’s continuing, all of it—in no small part thanks to the tireless efforts of everyone who’s worked so hard in that small building off the highway. Everything they’ve built and every yarn they’ve spun has been thoughtfully and intentionally added to the mix with an eye to sustainability and tradition. They work to keep not only themselves, but also other producers on the map. Even if you haven’t knit with the Spinnery’s own yarns, maybe you’ve had a GMS fiber on your needles without knowing it; they also spin for both small farms and a few names who sell yarns online and in shops, such as Tolt, Jill Draper, and Julie Asselin.

The current line of Green Mountain Spinnery products shows the full range of what they’ve learned in the past thirty-four years. From the simple, undyed beauty of their Organic and Greenspun yarns, to the mixed fibers and fun shades of their bulky Capricorn, to the stunning shades of tweed in both Weekend Wool and Mewesic, and right back to the soft heathered beauty of their ever-popular Mountain Mohair, they have proven exactly what they’re capable of, regardless of how much room in which they do it. And as both a designer and as a knitter, I’m just so grateful that they are up there doing it. s

www.spinnery.com After leaving a career in advertising to raise her daughters, Thea Colman combined her love of knitting and design with a longtime interest in cocktails to create a perfect second career. Find her online at www.babycocktails.com and on Instagram at @theacolman.

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BROWN SHEEP COMPANY by Amy Palmer The Brown Sheep Company mill is nestled near Scotts Bluff National Monument, on prairie lands shadowed by towering cliffs. This land has been in owner Peggy Wells’s family for more than one hundred years— her great-grandfather purchased the acreage in 1910. For half a century, the family farmed the land and raised a small flock of sheep, a legacy that has led to the creation of one of the most recognizable American yarn brands on the market. Changes in the agricultural markets in the 1970s forced Peggy’s father to find new uses for the land. When Peggy requested an Ashford spinning wheel for Christmas in 1974, she inadvertently set the family on its present course. After watching his daughter

at work, her father also took to spinning, and in 1978, he followed that up with a loom for weaving the wool from his flock. A few years later, he purchased his first set of used mill equipment from a defunct mill in Georgia and set up the Brown Sheep offices in Mitchell, Nebraska. Peggy moved to Fort Collins, Colorado, and worked as a custom fashion designer with a strong investment in natural fibers. In 1998, she and her husband, Robert, moved their family back to Mitchell to take over the running of the mill, expanding their idea of “family” to include the mill employees. Today, about thirty men and women work for the company, some of whom have been “in the family” for more than twenty years. In 2004, as the machinery her father had purchased was living out the last of its days, Peggy made the decision to purchase new equipment. When the state-of-the-art equipment was introduced, the increased

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production efficiencies allowed Brown Sheep to expand to manufacture thirteen yarn lines at the mill, all worsted spun and all containing fibers sourced from the United States. Much of the wool comes from ranches in Colorado and Wyoming. The fiber is scoured and carded at an outside facility before arriving at the Nebraska mill. The fibers are then blended, spun, bobbined, coned, plied, and steamed to set the twist. The newly minted yarn is then sent to the dye vats. After dyeing, the yarn moves to a radial dryer, a fast and ecologically friendly method of drying the yarn. The finished yarn is sold wholesale to yarn shops around the country and increasingly around the globe. The focus of Brown Sheep has always been to provide quality yarn, while helping the handknitting industry grow as well. The company has supplied yarn to 4-H groups, encouraging the next generation to take to yarn crafts, and it has been a constant supporter of the burgeoning Scotts Bluff Valley Fiber Arts Fair. At the same time, the company has expanded to working with the apparel industry, including such high-profile companies as Ralph Lauren. Although the company is steeped in tradition, Peggy and her Brown Sheep family constantly look to the future. s

www.brownsheep.com

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Amy Palmer is the media director for Berroco and the former editor of knitscene.

1 An on-site yarn shop carries all Brown Sheep’s yarns. 2 Balls of yarn awaiting labeling 3 Peggy (at right) labels skeins. 4 Welcome to Brown Sheep Co.! All photos by Amy Palmer

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resource guide

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Patternworks.com | 1-800-438-5464 Featured: 803397 Mossery Cardigan Pattern

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A

TECHNIQUES

The Ins + Outs of

Grafting fting Joni Coniglio

B

Grafting (or Kitchener stitch, as it is also called) is a seaming technique that has more uses than many knitters realize. While most tutorials describe it as a technique for closing up the toes of socks, grafting can be used on any seam where live stitches are joined and you don’t want the bulky seam that results from a three-needle bindoff. For example, you can use grafting to join two halves of a scarf where each half has been worked from the cast-on to the center; to join two short ends of a knitted rectangle to form a cowl; or to reattach a part of a garment (such as the lower portion of a sleeve or sweater body) that has been removed and altered in some way. And grafting doesn’t need to be limited to stockinette stitch or even a single color. It can be used on almost any stitch pattern, from ribbing and seed stitch to cables, lace, and colorwork. Because grafting is a seaming technique that mimics the structure of the knitted fabric—the way the stitches interlock—it is the most invisible joining method. But it can be somewhat trickier to master than other seaming methods. Not only does it involve working with live stitches, but the grafted row must also be adapted to the particular stitch pattern of the pieces that are being joined, which requires a certain amount of knowledge and skill. This is especially true as the stitch patterns become more complex. In order to fully understand how grafting works, it’s essential to understand how knitted fabric is created. The more you know about stitch structure and how grafting relates to it, the better you will be able to graft any type of seam you encounter.

STOCKINETTE STITCH STRUCTURE During the knitting process, new loops of yarn are drawn through existing loops (A). Because of the serpentine structure of

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knitted stitches, there are actually two sets of loops on every knitted row: one that runs along the top of the row (these are the loops that sit on the needle) and another set that runs along the bottom of the row (the loops formed by the running threads between stitches) (B). Each new row of loops is drawn through the top loops of the previous row, and the top loops of each row interlock with the bottom loops of the row above it. In illustration C, one row in the center has been highlighted. Notice that each loop below the highlighted row is situated between two bottom loops in the row above the highlighted row; the top and bottom loops don't align vertically. If we follow the path the highlighted yarn takes through the loops below and above it, beginning at the right-hand side, we can see that the yarn passes through the right half of a top loop of a stitch in the row below, then through the left half of a bottom loop in the row above, then through the right half of the next bottom loop on the same row, then finally through the left half of the same top loop in the row below as before. This sequence of four passes is the same for every stitch. (We’ll come back to these four passes later when we talk about top-tobottom grafting.) When you graft, you use a tapestry needle and a strand of yarn to follow the same path that one row takes through the loops below and above it, while simultaneously joining the live loops on the front needle to the live loops on the back needle. Because each knitted row has two sets of loops, it is possible to join either the top loops of one row to the top loops of another row, or the top loops of one row to the bottom loops of another row, depending on the construction of the piece that is being grafted. With a pattern such as stockinette stitch, there is no noticeable difference between the two. The difference will be much more apparent when grafting a pattern such as 1x1 rib that contains a mixture of knit and purl stitches across a row.

top loop

bottom loop

C

Laid out flat

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Top-to-top

Top-to-bottom

BN

BN

FN

FN

On the needles Top-to-top

Top-to-bottom BN

BN

FN

FN

Direction of knitting

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4 top loops

X

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KNITTING DIRECTION When you graft the toes of socks, you join the first half of the round to the second half of the same round, which means that you are joining the tops of stitches on the front needle to the tops of stitches on the back needle. This type of grafting is called topto-top grafting. The same type of grafting can be used for shoulder seams, where the last row of the front is grafted to the last row of the back. The other type of grafting, top-to-bottom, more closely resembles knitted fabric that is worked all in one piece. When you graft live stitches to a provisional cast-on, you are joining the top loops of the stitches on the front needle to the bottom loops of the cast-on row (it is the bottom loops that are placed on the needle when you undo the waste yarn from a provisional cast-on). Thus, the direction of knitting on both the front and back needle is the same (D). This isn’t the case with top-to-top grafting, where the stitches on the back needle are actually oriented upside-down in relation to the stitches on the front needle. Not only that, but the pattern on the back needle will also shift to the left a half-stitch in relation to the pattern on the front needle. This change in knitting direction and pattern shift from piece to piece in top-to-top grafting isn’t too noticeable with stitch patterns such as stockinette stitch or garter stitch, which look the same whether they are viewed right-side-up or upside-down, and where there is no change in the pattern from side-to-side. But a rib pattern isn’t so versatile. Not only will it have a different appearance when viewed upside-down, but

its strong vertical lines will make the halfstitch shift at the grafting line very obvious. We’ll talk more about this pattern shift a little later. But first, there is another aspect of grafting that is affected by knitting direction: the number of loops that must be on the needle before the stitches are grafted.

needle. But this is okay. Unlike top-to-top grafting, you don't need to have the same number of stitches on each needle when grafting top-to-bottom. Now, we’ll look at the impact that a change in knitting direction will have on the stitch pattern.

NUMBER OF LOOPS ON THE NEEDLE

TOP-TO-TOP GRAFTING

As we have seen, there are two sets of loops on every knitted row: one that runs along the top of the row and another that runs along the bottom of the row. While the two sets of loops may look similar, they are each configured a little differently. For example, if we compare the two sets of loops in illustration E, we can see that there are four top loops but only three bottom loops. Because the bottom loops fall between the top loops, there will always be one fewer loop on the bottom row than on the top row. There is also a half loop at each end of the bottom row. The half loops can be very useful when grafting stitches top-to-bottom. Not only do they help to anchor the first and last grafted stitch, ensuring that the edges will be nice and smooth, they also make it easier to align the stitch patterns vertically. On the provisional cast-on row, one of these half loops is formed when the yarn is drawn up to work the following row. The other half loop must be created by threading the cast-on tail onto a tapestry needle and wrapping the tail around the knitting needle, then through an edge stitch to the wrong side of the work. Adding the second half loop will create an extra stitch on the

Illustration F shows the relationship between the loops on the back needle and the loops on the front needle during top-totop grafting. The x’s indicate the loops that sit on the needles. Both needles have the same number of stitches, and all the loops on the back needle are shifted over a half stitch to the left so that the loops on the front needle will be situated between loops on the back needle. Grafting can actually be thought of as creating two separate pattern rows: one on the front needle and one on the back needle (even though the grafted row is a single row). For example, illustration G shows how knit stitches are created when stitches are grafted on the front needle with the right side facing. For each grafted knit stitch, the yarn goes purlwise, then knitwise through a loop on the needle. The chart shows this in two dimensions, with a rectangle representing each loop on the needle. The letters P (for purlwise) and K (for knitwise) represent the path the grafting yarn (shown by the arrows) takes through each loop. Illustration H shows the grafted knit stitches on the back needle, as viewed from the right side. The chart shows the grafting steps as they’d be worked with the right side facing. However, because the stitches on the back

Top-to-top (stockinette stitch) F

G

H

BN X

X

X

X

4

3

2

1

4

3

2

1

X

X

X

X

BN graft

FN graft FN

K

P

K

P

K

P

K

P

K

P

K

P

K

P

K

P

Direction of knitting loop on Front Needle (FN)

K

Knitwise

P

Purlwise

loop on Back Needle (BN)

2016 knitscene handmade

69


Top-to-top (cont.)

needle are created with the wrong side facing, the grafting steps must be reversed (going knitwise, then purlwise into each loop) to create purl stitches on the wrong side (just as when knitting stockinette stitch, you knit on right-side rows and purl on wrong-side rows) (I). Illustration J shows the grafting for both needles combined into one grafted row. The purple portion shows where the rows overlap.

I

P

K

P

K

P

K

P

K

K

P

K

P

K

P

K

TOP-TO-BOTTOM GRAFTING

P

J BN

P grafted row

K

P

K

P

K

P

K

K

P

K

P

K

P

K

BN P

FN

FN

Top-to-bottom K X

X

X

X

X

½

3

2

1

½

4

3

2

1

X

X

X

X

BN BN

FN FN

1 loop on BN

1 loop on FN

½ loop on BN

Top-to-bottom (stockinette stitch) L

GRAFTING 1X1 RIB TOP-TO-TOP

BN

grafted row FN

70

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In top-to-bottom grafting, the structure of the knitted fabric is followed more closely than in top-to-top grafting. As a result, the loops on the front and back needles need to be set up in the same way as the loops above and below the highlighted row in illustration C from our discussion of knitting structure, with a half loop at each end of the back needle stitches (K). As before, the x’s indicate the loops that sit on the needle (notice that there are five x’s on the back needle and only four x’s on the front needle). In the chart, the rectangles that represent the loops on the back needle are drawn with a dotted line to differentiate them from the loops on the front needle. The grafting yarn will follow the same path as the highlighted row in illustration C, with four passes for each stitch (L): 1. Purlwise through the right half of the loop on the front needle. 2. Purlwise through the left half of a loop (or first half loop) on the back needle. 3. Knitwise through the right half of the next loop (or last half loop) on the back needle. 4. Knitwise through the left half of the same loop on the front needle as before. These four steps are repeated for every stitch from the beginning to the end. The stitches are removed from the needle after Steps 2 and 4, and remain on the needle after Steps 1 and 3.

K

P

K

P

K

P

K

P

BN

K

P

K

P

K

P

K

P

FN

We have seen that when stitches are grafted top-to-top in stockinette stich, we are actually creating knit stitches on the front needle with the right side facing (by going through each loop purlwise, then knitwise), and creating purl stitches on the back needle with the wrong side facing (by going


Top-to-top (k1,p1 rib) M K

P

P

K

K

P

P

BN

K

BN

P

K

K

P

P

K

K

FN

P

grafted row K

P

P

K

K

P

P

K

P

K

K

P

P

K

K

FN

BN FN

P

Top-to-bottom (k1,p1 rib) N

BN

grafted row

P

K

K

P

P

K

K

P

BN

P

K

K

P

P

K

K

P

FN

FN

Top-to-bottom (with first and last working rows) O

K

K K

P

P

K

K

P

BN

P

P

K

K

P

FN

First WS row on BN

K

P

K

P

P

K

K

P

P

K

K

P

BN

P

K

K

P

P

K

K

P

P

K

FN

Last RS row on FN

Last RS row on FN

through each loop knitwise, then purlwise). Grafting 1x1 rib top-to-top is simply a matter of creating knit and purl stitches on both needles (M). In the charts, the grafted purl stitches (as viewed from the right side) are shaded to differentiate them from the knit stitches. The charts make it easy to see at a glance how the grafting steps relate to the stitch pattern. The other thing that becomes

Grafted Row

P

Seed Stitch

Grafted Row

First WS row on BN

1×1 Rib

clear when looking at the charts is the jog in the pattern between the stitches on the front and back needles.

GRAFTING 1X1 RIB TOP-TO-BOTTOM There are two ways in which grafting rib top-to-bottom differs from grafting rib top-

to-top, and both of these differences involve the back needle. We’ve already seen that, when stitches are grafted top-to-bottom, there should be one more stitch on the back needle than on the front needle after both half loops (one at each end) have been added (K). When stitches are grafted top-to-top, there are no half loops to consider, so the number of stitches on both needles will be the same. The other difference is where the transitions between knit and purl stitches occur on each needle. Looking again at the chart for grafting stockinette stitch top-to-top (J), we can see that the grafting steps alternate across each needle. Compare this to the chart for grafting 1x1 rib top-to-top (M), which shows that there are two of the same grafting steps at each transition between a knit and purl stitch (or a purl and knit stitch). The chart clearly shows the jog that occurs when grafting 1x1 rib top-to-top because the stitches (but, more importantly, the transitions) on each needle are offset by a half stitch. In top-to-bottom grafting, the transitions between knit and purl stitches on the provisional cast-on row occur in the center of each loop because these loops are the strands between stitches on the needle. In other words, if you draw an imaginary line between a knit and purl stitch on the last row worked down to the cast-on row, the line would go through the center of a bottom loop, making each loop half-knit/half-purl, or vice versa. When these loops are placed on the back needle and configured as shown in illustration K, the transitions will align vertically with those on the front needle, as can be seen in the chart for grafting 1x1 rib top-to-bottom (N). The charts in illustration O show how the grafting relates to the first pattern row worked on the back needle above the provisional cast-on row and the last pattern row worked on the front needle. The four passes for each grafted stitch stay within the vertical transitions, without any jog. The knit and purl stitches that are created on each needle are independent from one another and can be mixed and matched according to the pattern that is being grafted. If you want to see how this works in practice, we’ve included grafting charts with several of the projects in this issue. s

Joni Coniglio is senior project editor of Interweave Knits and knitscene. 2016 knitscene handmade

71


The Projects

GR ASSL A NDS TEE Julia Far w e ll - Clay page 4 6

Body

(0, 0, 0, 2, 2) sts at beg of foll 0 (0, 0, 0, 2, 2)

With smaller cir needle, CO 182 (198, 214, 230,

rows—72 (78, 84, 90, 94, 102) sts rem. Work 1

246, 270) sts. Place marker (pm) and join in the

WS row. Dec row (RS) P2tog, purl to last 2 sts,

rnd. Next rnd *P1, [k2, p2] 22 (24, 26, 28, 30, 33)

ssp—2 sts dec’d. Rep Dec row every RS row 2

times, k2, pm for side; rep from * once more.

(2, 3, 4, 4, 6) more times—66 (72, 76, 80, 84, 88)

Work 4 more rnds in rib. Next rnd P1, [k2, p2]

sts rem. Work even until armhole measures 5½

3 times, pm for chart, *k2, p2; rep from * to 14

(5½, 6, 6½, 7, 7¾)", ending with a WS row.

sts before side m, k2, pm for chart, [p2, k2]

Shape neck: Next row (RS) P20 (22, 22, 23, 23,

3 times, sl m, p1, [k2, p2] 3 times, pm for chart,

24) and place these sts on holder for right back,

*k2, p2; rep from * to 14 sts before side m, k2,

BO 26 (28, 32, 34, 38, 40) sts, purl to end—20

pm for chart and new beg of rnd (do not finish

(22, 22, 23, 23, 24) sts rem for left back. Left

rnd). Change to larger cir needle. Next rnd

back: Work 1 WS row. Next row (RS) BO 2 sts,

*Work Side Panel chart over 25 sts, sl m, purl to

purl to end—18 (20, 20, 21, 21, 22) sts rem.

m; rep from * once more. Cont in patt until

Work 1 WS row. Dec row (RS) P2tog, purl to

piece measures 3¾" from CO, rep rows as

end—1 st dec’d. Rep Dec row every RS row

noted on chart. Shape waist: Dec rnd *Work

once more—16 (18, 18, 19, 19, 20) sts rem. Work

chart to m, sl m, p1, ssp, purl to 3 sts before m,

1 WS row. Shape shoulder using short-rows

p2tog, p1; rep from * once more—4 sts dec’d.

as foll: Short-row 1 (RS) P10 (12, 12, 12, 12, 14), wrap

Rep Dec rnd every 24th rnd 3 more times—166

(9, 9, 11, 11, 13) sts, work to chart m, remove m,

next st, turn. Short-row 2 (WS) Knit to end. Short-row 3 P6 (6, 6, 7, 7, 6), wrap next st, turn. Short-row 4 Knit to end. Next row (RS) Purl to end, working wraps tog with wrapped sts. Place sts on holder. Right back: Return 20 (22, 22, 23, 23, 24) right back

(182, 198, 214, 230, 254) sts rem. Work even through Row 56 of chart, then rep Rows 57–64 as needed until piece measures 16" from CO, ending with Row 64, then work Rows 65–67 once. Divide for front and back: Next rnd Work to 3 (4, 4, 5, 5, 6) sts before side m, BO 7

Sincere Sheep Equity Sport

purl to chart m, remove m, work to 3 (4, 4, 5, 5,

sts to needle and, with RS facing, rejoin yarn.

Sizes 31½ (34¾, 37¾, 40¾, 43¾, 48½)"

6) sts before side m and place last 76 (82, 90,

Purl 1 RS row. Next row (WS) BO 2 sts, knit to

bust circumference; shown in size 34¾"; modeled with ¾" of positive ease Yarn Sincere Sheep Equity Sport (100% rambouillet wool; 200 yd [183 m]/56 g): • Mrs. Fisher, 5 (5, 6, 6, 6, 7) skeins Gauge 21 sts and 33 rnds = 4" in rev St st on larger needle

96, 104, 114) sts worked on holder for front,

end—18 (20, 20, 21, 21, 22) sts rem. Dec row

BO 7 (9, 9, 11, 11, 13) sts, work to chart m,

(RS) Purl to last 2 sts, ssp—1 st dec’d. Rep Dec

remove m, purl to chart m, remove m, work to

row every RS row once more—16 (18, 18, 19,

end—76 (82, 90, 96, 104, 114) sts rem for back.

19, 20) sts rem. Work 2 rows even. Shape

Back

shoulder using short-rows as foll: Short-row 1 (WS) K10 (12, 12, 12, 12, 14), wrap

Shape armholes: Beg with a WS row, BO 2 (2, 3, 3, 3, 4) sts at beg of next 2 rows, then BO 0

next st, turn. Short-row 2 (RS) Purl to end.

Tools • Size 6 (4 mm): 24" circular (cir) needle and set of double-pointed needles (dpn) • Size 5 (3.75 mm): 16" and 24" cir needle and set of dpn • Markers (m) • Removable m • Stitch holders • Tapestry needle

6½ (6¾, 7½, 8, 8¾, 9¼)" 3 (3½, 3½, 3½, 3½, 3¾)" 4 (4¼, 4¼, 4½, 4¾, 5)" ½" 6½ (6½, 7, 7½, 8, 8¾)"

10¾ (11½, 12¼, 13, 13¾, 14½)"

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms you don’t know. 31½ (34¾, 37¾, 40¾, 43¾, 48½)"

Notes The body of this pullover is worked in the round

body 16¼"

from the lower edge to the underarm, then the front and back are worked separately back and forth. After the shoulders are joined, sleeve stitches are picked up and the sleeve cap is shaped using short-rows. The sleeve is then worked in the round from the top down.

72

www.knitscene.com

34¾ (37¾, 40¾, 43¾, 46¾, 51½)"


Front

Short-row 3 K6 (6, 6, 7, 7, 6), wrap next st, turn. Short-row 4 Purl to end. Next row (WS) Knit to end, working wraps tog with wrapped sts. Place sts on holder.

23

p on RS; k on WS

21

Front

yo

19

Return 76 (82, 90, 96, 104, 114) front sts to

k2tog

17

needle and, with RS facing, rejoin yarn. Pm 32

15

ssk

(35, 39, 42, 46, 51) sts from each edge for front chart. Next row (RS) BO 2 (2, 3, 3, 3, 4) sts, purl

11 9

sssk

sts), sl m, purl to end—75 (81, 88, 94, 102, 111) work in patt to end—73 (79, 85, 91, 99, 107) sts

13

k3tog

to m, work Front chart over 12 sts (inc’d to 13 sts rem. Next row (WS) BO 2 (2, 3, 3, 3, 4) sts,

M

7

M1

5

pattern repeat

3

rem. BO 0 (0, 0, 0, 2, 2) sts at beg of next 0 (0, 0, M

0, 2, 2) rows—73 (79, 85, 91, 95, 103) sts rem.

1

12 sts to 13 sts

Dec row (RS) P2tog, work in patt to last 2 sts, ssp—2 sts dec’d. Rep Dec row every RS row 2

Side Panel

(2, 3, 4, 4, 6) more times—67 (73, 77, 81, 85, 89)

67

sts rem. Work even through Row 26 of chart. Shape neck: Next row (RS) P24 (26, 27, 29, 30,

65

32) and place these sts on holder for left front,

63

BO 19 (21, 23, 23, 25, 25) sts, purl to end—24

61

work as needed

(26, 27, 29, 30, 32) sts rem for right front. Right

59

front: Work 1 WS row. At beg of RS rows, BO 2

57

(2, 3, 3, 3, 4) sts once, then BO 2 sts once—20

55

(22, 22, 24, 25, 26) sts rem. Work 1 WS row.

53

Dec row (RS) P2tog, purl to end—1 st dec’d.

51

Rep Dec row every RS row 3 (3, 3, 4, 5, 5) more

49

times—16 (18, 18, 19, 19, 20) sts rem. Work even until armhole measures 6½ (6½, 7, 7½, 8,

47

work 3 times

8¾)", ending with a WS row. Shape shoulder

45

using short-rows as foll: Short-row 1 (RS) P10 (12, 12, 12, 12, 14), wrap

43 41

next st, turn.

Short-row 2 (WS) Knit to end. Short-row 3 P6 (6, 6, 7, 7, 6), wrap next st, turn. Short-row 4 Knit to end. Next row (RS) Purl to end, working wraps tog with wrapped sts. Place sts on holder. Left front: Return 24 (26, 27, 29, 30, 32) sts to

39 37 35 33

work 3 times

31 29

needle and, with RS facing, rejoin yarn. Work 1

27

RS row. At beg of WS rows, BO 2 (2, 3, 3, 3, 4)

25

sts once, then BO 2 sts once—20 (22, 22, 24,

23

25, 26) sts rem. Dec row (RS) Purl to last 2 sts,

21

ssp—1 st dec’d. Rep Dec row every RS row 3 (3, 3, 4, 5, 5) more times—16 (18, 18, 19, 19, 20)

19

work 3 times

sts rem. Work even until armhole measures 6½

17

(6½, 7, 7½, 8, 8¾)", ending with a RS row.

15

Shape shoulder using short-rows as foll:

13

Short-row 1 (WS) K10 (12, 12, 12, 12, 14), wrap

11

next st, turn.

Short-row 2 (RS) Purl to end. Short-row 3 K6 (6, 6, 7, 7, 6), wrap next st, turn. Short-row 4 Purl to end. Next row (WS) Knit to end, working wraps tog

9 7 5

work 3 times

3 1

with wrapped sts. With WS tog, join shoulders using three-needle BO.

The Projects

25

k on RS; p on WS

25 sts

2016 knitscene handmade

73


rnd. Work in Seeded Rib (see Stitches) until

Working along armhole opening, place

piece measures 16 (16, 16½, 16½, 17, 17)" from

removable m 1¼ (1¼, 1½, 1½, 1¾, 1¾)" before

CO, ending with Rnd 1. Divide for front and

(m1) and after (m2) shoulder join. Pm at beg

back: Next rnd Work 63 (71, 79, 85, 93, 99) sts

(m3) and end (m4) of first underarm BO. With

in patt as established, BO 8 (8, 8, 9, 9, 9) sts,

smaller dpn and beg at m1, pick up and knit 14

work in patt to last 4 (4, 4, 5, 5, 5) sts and place

(14, 16, 16, 18, 18) sts between m1 and m2, 23

59 (67, 75, 81, 89, 95) sts just worked on holder

(24, 25, 26, 27, 29) sts between m2 and m3, 7

for front, BO 8 (8, 8, 9, 9, 9) sts—59 (67, 75, 81,

(9, 9, 11, 11, 11) sts between m3 and m4 (pm

89, 95) sts rem for back. Beg working back and

after center underarm st), and 23 (24, 25, 26,

forth in rows.

27, 29) sts between m4 and m1—67 (71, 75, 79, 83, 87) sts total. Remove m3 and m4. Change

Back

to larger dpn. Shape cap using short-rows as

Shape armholes: Next row (RS) K2 (including

foll:

st rem on right needle after BO), k2tog, knit to

Short-row 1 (RS) P14 (14, 16, 16, 18, 18), wrap

last 4 sts, ssk, k2—57 (65, 73, 79, 87, 93) sts rem. Next row (WS) P1, k2, *p1, k1; rep from *

next st, turn.

Short-row 2 (WS) K14 (14, 16, 16, 18, 18), wrap

to last 4 sts, p1, k2, p1. Dec row (RS) K2, k2tog,

next st, turn. Short-row 3 Purl to wrapped st, purl wrapped st

knit to last 4 sts, ssk, k2—2 sts dec’d. Working

without working wrap, p1, wrap next st, turn.

Short-row 4 Knit to wrapped st, knit wrapped st

NEDERL A ND VEST A my Pa lm e r

rep Dec row every RS row 2 (2, 2, 3, 3, 3) more times—51 (59, 67, 71, 79, 85) sts rem. Work even until armhole measures 7 (7½, 8, 8, 8½,

page 51

without working wrap, k1, wrap next st,

Seeded Rib patt back and forth as established,

9)", ending with a WS row. Shape shoulders: BO 6 (8, 10, 10, 12, 12) sts at beg of next 2 rows,

turn.

then BO 6 (8, 9, 10, 12, 13) sts at beg of foll

Rep last 2 short-rows 7 (8, 8, 9, 10, 11) more S o l i t u d e Wo o l Ro m n e y

times—10 (10, 11, 11, 10, 10) sts before

2 rows—27 (27, 29, 31, 31, 35) sts rem. Place sts on holder.

underarm m.

Short-row 5 (RS) Purl to wrapped st, p2tog

Sizes 35¾ (40, 44¼, 48, 52¼, 55½)" bust

Front

Rep Short-rows 5 and 6 four more times—57

circumference; shown in size 35¾", modeled with 4¾" of positive ease Yarn Solitude Wool Romney (100% Romney wool; 130 yd [121 m]/141 g): • summer green 4 (5, 6, 6, 7, 8) skeins Gauge 15 sts and 21 rnds = 4" in Seeded Rib

k2—2 sts dec’d. Next row (WS) K1, p2, *k1, p1;

(61, 65, 69, 73, 77) sts rem. Next row (RS) Purl

Tools

rep from * to last 4 sts, k1, p2, k1.

to 2 sts before underarm m, p2tog—56 (60, 64,

• Size 8 (5 mm): 16" and 32" circular (cir) needle • Markers • Stitch holders • Tapestry needle

turn—1 st dec’d.

Shor t-row 6 ( WS) K nit to wrapped st, ssk (wrapped st and next st), wrap next st, turn—1 st dec’d.

68, 72, 76) sts rem. Change to smaller dpn. Work 5 rnds in k2, p2 rib. BO all sts in patt.

Finishing

Return 59 (67, 75, 81, 89, 95) held front sts to needle and, with RS facing, rejoin yarn.

Sizes 35¾ (40, 44¼)" only: Dec row (RS) K2, k2tog, knit to last 4 sts, ssk,

7¼ (7¼, 7¾, 8¼, 8¼, 9¼)"

Neckband: With smaller cir needle and RS See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms

sts along back neck slope, 23 (27, 31, 33, 37, 41)

you don’t know.

sts along BO sts, 8 sts along back neck slope, 1 st in shoulder join, 24 (24, 27, 28, 31, 36) sts

Notes

along front neck slope, 19 (19, 21, 21, 23, 25) sts

This vest is worked in the round from the lower

along BO sts, 24 (24, 27, 28, 31, 36) sts along

edge to the underarm, then the fronts and

front neck slope, and 1 st in shoulder join—108

back are worked separately back and forth.

(112, 124, 128, 140, 156) sts total. Pm and join in the rnd. Next rnd K1, *p2, k2; rep from * to

Stitches

last 3 sts, p2, k1. Work 4 more rnds in rib.

Seeded Rib: (even number of sts)

BO all sts in patt. Weave in ends. Block.

s

Julia Farwell-Clay recently moved with her family to the west of Boston and is now dreaming of a garden for her new old house. See more at www.juliafarwellclay.com and on Ravelry as juliafc.

74

www.knitscene.com

Rnd 1 Knit. Rnd 2 *K1, p1; rep from * to end. Rep Rnds 1 and 2 for patt.

Body With longer cir needle, CO 134 (150, 166, 180, 196, 208) sts. Place marker (pm) and join in the

3¼ (4¼, 5, 5¼, 6½, 6¾)" ¾"

16 (16, 16½, 16½, 17, 17)"

facing, beg at right shoulder, pick up and knit 8

5¼ (5¼, 5¼, 4¾, 4¾, 4¾)"

(wrapped st and next st), wrap next st,

7 (7½, 8, 8, 8½, 9)"

The Projects

Sleeves

body

35¾ (40, 44¼, 48, 52¼, 55½)"


Sizes 48 (52¼, 55½)" only:

rep from * to last 4 sts, p1, k2, p1.

All sizes:

The Projects

• Size 7 (4.5 mm): 40" cir needle • Markers (m) • Stitch holders • Cable needle (cn) • Tapestry needle

Dec row (RS) K2, k2tog, knit to last 4 sts, ssk, k2—2 sts dec’d. Next row (WS) P1, k2, *p1, k1;

Cont in Seeded Rib patt as established, rep Dec row every RS row 3 (3, 3, 4, 4, 4) more

See www.knittingdaily.com/Glossary for

times—51 (59, 67, 71, 79, 85) sts rem. Work

terms you don’t know.

even until armhole measures 2½ (3, 3½, 4, 4½,

Notes

5)", ending with a WS row. Shape neck: Next row (RS) K22 (26, 28, 30, 32, 34), place next 7

This cardigan is worked back and forth in rows

(7, 11, 11, 15, 17) sts on holder for neck, place

from the top down. The sleeves are worked

rem 22 (26, 28, 30, 32, 34) sts on separate

in the round from the top down.

holder for right front—22 (26, 28, 30, 32, 34) sts

Circular needles are used to accommodate the

rem for left front. Left front: Work 1 WS row

large number of stitches.

even in patt. Dec row (RS) K2, k2tog, knit to

Stitches

end—1 st dec’d. Rep Dec row every RS row 9 (9, 8, 9, 7, 8) more times—12 (16, 19, 20, 24, 25)

I-cord Bind-off: CO 3 sts onto left needle. *K2,

sts rem. Work even until armhole measures 7

k2tog tbl, transfer 3 sts from right needle to

(7½, 8, 8, 8½, 9)", ending with a WS row. Shape shoulder: At beg of RS rows, BO 6 (8,

VAIL CARDIGA N

left needle; rep from * until all sts have been bound off.

Heather Zoppet ti

10, 10, 12, 12) sts once, then BO 6 (8, 9, 10, 12,

page 5 2

13) sts once—no sts rem. Right front: Return

Applied I-cord: With dpn holding sts, *pick

22 (26, 28, 30, 32, 34) held right front sts to

up and knit 1 st, slide sts to other end of dpn,

needle and, with RS facing, rejoin yarn. Beg

k2, k2tog tbl; rep from * to end. A n z u l a Ve r a

with a RS row, work 2 rows even in patt. Dec

Yoke

row (RS) Knit to last 4 sts, ssk, k2—1 st dec’d. Rep Dec row every RS row 9 (9, 8, 9, 7, 8) more

Sizes 31½ (34, 39, 41, 46, 51, 53½)" bust

With MC and smaller cir needle, CO 2 (3, 3, 3,

times—12 (16, 19, 20, 24, 25) sts rem. Work

2, 3, 3) sts for front, place marker (pm), CO 14

shoulder, pick up and knit 23 (23, 23, 21, 21,

circumference, including a 2¼ (2, 2½, 2, 2, 2, 2¼)" gap at center front; shown in size 34", modeled with 3" of positive ease Yarn Anzula Vera (65% silk, 35% linen; 365 yd [334 m]/115 g): • lenore (MC), 3 (3, 4, 5, 5, 6, 6) skeins Anzula Breeze (65% silk, 35% linen; 750 yd [686 m]/114 g): • gravity (CC), 1 skein Gauge 26 sts and 35 rows = 4" in St st with MC on smaller needle

21) sts evenly along left front neck, k7 (7, 11,

Tools

sl m, RLI; rep from * once more, work to

11, 15, 17) front sts from holder, pick up and

• Size 5 (3.75 mm): 24" circular (cir) needle and set of double-pointed needles (dpn)

end—4 sts inc’d. Rep armhole inc row every

even until armhole measures 7 (7½, 8, 8, 8½, 9)", ending with a RS row. Shape shoulder: At beg of WS rows, BO 6 (8, 10, 10, 12, 12) sts once, then BO 6 (8, 9, 10, 12, 13) sts once—no sts rem.

Finishing Sew shoulder seams. Neck edging: With shorter cir needle and RS facing, beg at left

knit 23 (23, 23, 21, 21, 21) sts along right front

(20, 20, 24, 22, 26, 22) sts for sleeve, pm, CO 30 (32, 36, 40, 50, 60, 60) sts for back, pm, CO 14 (20, 20, 24, 22, 26, 22) sts for sleeve, pm, CO 2 (3, 3, 3, 2, 3, 3) sts for front—62 (78, 82, 94, 98, 118, 110) sts total. Do not join. Purl 1 WS row. Cont in St st. Note: Armhole, sleeve, and front neck shaping happen at the same time; read the foll section all the way through before proceeding. Shape armholes as foll: Armhole inc row (RS) *Work to m, LLI, sl m, work to m,

RS row 30 (32, 39, 41, 42, 45, 46) more times,

neck, k27 (27, 29, 31, 31, 35) back neck sts from 4½ (5, 5½, 6¼, 7¾, 9¼, 9¼)"

holder—80 (80, 86, 84, 88, 94) sts total. Do CO 2 sts onto left needle. BO all sts as foll: *K1, k2tog (1 CO st with 1 picked-up st), sl 2 sts back to left needle; rep from * to end. Armhole edging: With shorter cir needle and RS facing, beg at center of underarm, pick up and knit 88 (94, 100, 101, 107, 113) sts evenly around armhole edge. BO all sts as for neck edging. Weave in ends. Block to measurements.

s

Amy Palmer is the media director at Berroco

1 (1½, 1½, 1¾, 1¾, 2, 1¾)" 7¾ (8¾, 9¼, 9½, 9¾, 10½, 10¾)"

not turn. Using the backward-loop method,

1"

9½ (10¾, 12, 14½, 15¾, 17, 18¼)" 15¾ (17, 19½, 20½, 23, 25½, 26¾)" 13½"

body

6¾ (7½, 8½, 9¼, 10½, 11¾, 12¼)"

2¾"

and former editor of knitscene magazine. 33 (35½, 40¼, 42¾, 47¾, 52½, 55)"

2016 knitscene handmade

75


Cable 2

2 2

Shape lower edge using short-rows as foll: 2 2

2 2

2

The Projects

15

Short-row 1 (RS) Work to last 3 sts, wrap next st,

13

turn. Short-row 2 (WS) Work to last 3 sts, wrap next

11 9 7 5

st, turn. Short-row 3 Work to 3 sts before wrapped st, wrap next st, turn.

3

Rep last short-row 3 more times.

1

Short-row 7 Work to 5 sts before wrapped st,

6-st rep

wrap next st, turn. Rep last short-row 7 more times.

k on RS; p on WS 2

k1f&b

Short-row 15 Work to 10 sts before wrapped st, wrap next st, turn. Rep last short-row 5 more times.

pattern repeat sl 3 sts onto cn, hold in back, k3, k3 from cn

Short-row 21 Work to 15 sts before wrapped st, wrap next st, turn. Rep last short-row 3 more times. Next row (RS) Work to end, working wraps tog with wrapped

sl 3 sts onto cn, hold in front, k3, k3 from cn

sts. Next row Work to end, working rem wraps. Using the I-cord method (see Stitches), BO all sts, but do not BO 3 I-cord sts. Transfer 3 sts to

BRECK ENRIDGE SWE ATER

then every 4th row 1 (2, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0) time(s).

one dpn. I-cord edging: Cont from lower edge

Work 3 (3, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1) row(s) even. At the same

and picking up 1 st for each row or st, work

time, shape sleeves as foll: Sleeve inc row (RS)

applied I-cord (see Stitches) up right front,

*Work to m, sl m, RLI, work to m, LLI, sl m; rep

around neck, and down left front—3 I-cord sts

from * once more, work to end—4 sts inc’d.

rem. BO all sts. Sew end of I-cord to beg of

Rep sleeve inc row every RS row 6 (4, 8, 18, 23,

I-cord.

Beaverslide Dry Goods 3-Ply Heavy Fisherman Weight

15, 11, 9, 10, 8) times. Work 3 rows even. Also at the same time, shape front neck as foll: Work 10 (12, 8, 8, 4, 4, 4) rows even. Neck inc row

Sleeves

(RS) K1, RLI, work to last st, LLI, k1—2 sts

7, 7, 10) sts along underarm, k54 (62, 68, 84, 88,

inc’d. Rep neck inc row every 12 (14, 10, 10, 6,

96, 98) sleeve sts, pick up and knit 4 (4, 5, 5, 7,

6, 6)th row 3 (1, 7, 1, 10, 5, 6) more time(s), then

7, 10) sts along underarm—62 (70, 78, 94, 102,

every 10 (12, 0, 8, 4, 4, 4)th row 2 (4, 0, 8, 5, 14,

110, 118) sts total. Pm and join in the rnd. Work

13) times. Work 1 WS row—282 (314, 354, 402,

in St st for 1". Using the I-cord method, BO all

434, 482, 490) sts when all shaping is

sts. Sew end of I-cord to beg of I-cord.

Sizes 37½ (41¼, 45, 49, 53)" chest circumference; shown in size 41¼", modeled with 3¼" of positive ease Yarn Beaverslide Dry Goods 3-Ply Heavy Fisherman Weight (100% merino; 160 yd [146 m]/113 g): • lichen frost, 10 (11, 13, 14, 15) skeins Gauge 12½ sts and 21 rnds = 4" in St st; 13½ sts and 23 rnds = 4 " in cable patt

Em m a We l f or d page 4 5

24, 29) more times, then every 4th row 13 (16, With MC, smaller dpn, and RS facing, beg at center of underarm, pick up and knit 4 (4, 5, 5,

Tools

complete: 94 (102, 116, 124, 136, 152, 154) sts for back, 40 (44, 51, 55, 61, 69, 70) sts for each

Finishing

front, 54 (62, 68, 84, 88, 96, 98) sts for each

Ruffle: With CC, larger cir needle, and RS

sleeve. Divide for body and sleeves: Next

facing, working along WS of I-cord (where

row (RS) Knit to m, remove m, place 54 (62, 68,

I-cord joins body), beg at left front neck edge,

84, 88, 96, 98) sleeve sts on holder, remove m,

pick up and knit 1 st for each I-cord row along

using the backward-loop method, CO 8 (8, 10,

left front, lower body, and right front, ending at

10, 14, 14, 20) sts, k94 (102, 116, 124, 136, 152,

right front neck edge. Next row (WS) P1f&b in

154) back sts, remove m, place 54 (62, 68, 84,

each st—st count is doubled. Work in St st until

88, 96, 98) sleeve sts on holder, remove m,

ruffle measures 2¾", ending with a RS row. Knit

CO 8 (8, 10, 10, 14, 14, 20) sts, knit to end—

3 rows. With RS facing, loosely BO all sts. Weave

190 (206, 238, 254, 286, 318, 334) sts for body.

in ends. Block sweater to measurements.

Body

Heather Zoppetti, author of Unexpected

Notes

Work even until piece measures 6" from

Cables (Interweave, 2015) and Everyday Lace (Interweave, 2014), lives and works in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, with her husband and yarn collection. She is the owner of Stitch Sprouts and can be found online at www.stitchsprouts.com and www .hzoppettidesigns.com.

The body and sleeves of this pul lover are

underarm, ending with a WS row. Next row (RS) K77 (85, 101, 109, 125, 141, 149), pm, work Cable chart over 36 sts, pm, knit to end. Cont in patt through end of chart—214 (230, 262, 278, 310, 342, 358) sts. Work even until piece measures 13" from underarm, ending with a WS row.

76

www.knitscene.com

s

• Size 10 (6 mm): 16" and 32–47" circular (cir) needles, depending on size you are making • Markers (m) • Cable needle (cn) • Stitch holders • Tapestry needle • Four 1" buttons See knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms you don’t know.

worked in the round from the bottom up to the yoke, then the pieces are joined for working the circular yoke. When working the yoke shaping, change to shorter circular needle when necessary.


st at sides, and ending 4 sts before end of rnd 4¾ (5¼, 5¼, 5¼, 5¾)"

4¾ (4¾, 5¼, 6, 6¼)"

2½ (2½, 2½, 2½, 3)"

16 (18, 19¼, 20½, 21¾)"

9½ (9½, 10¼, 10¼, 11)"

9 (9¾, 10, 10¾, 11¼)"

on last rnd and removing all m. Set aside. Do not break yarn.

Sleeves With shorter cir needle, CO 30 (30, 32, 32, 34) sts. Pm and join in the rnd. Work in k1, p1 rib

½ 18

½ (19

,

, 20

20

½

) 1½ ,2

for 2". Knit 1 rnd. Inc rnd K2, M1L, knit to last

body

"

2 sts, M1R, k2—2 sts inc’d. Rep Inc rnd every 6 17 (17, 17¼, 17¼, 17¾)"

(6, 6, 5, 5)th rnd 9 (12, 13, 15, 16) more times— 50 (56, 60, 64, 68) sts. Work even until piece measures 18½ (19½, 20, 20½, 21½)" from CO. Place first and last 4 sts on holder, removing m—42 (48, 52, 56, 60) sts rem. Break yarn.

37½ (41¼, 45, 49, 53)"

Set aside.

Yoke Joining rnd Place next 8 body sts on holder, pm

Cable

for new beg of rnd, using working yarn from 31

body, k42 (48, 52, 56, 60) sleeve sts, pm, k3 (6,

29

9, 2, 4), work in chart patt as established over

27 25

48 (48, 48, 70, 72) sts, k3 (6, 9, 2, 4), place next 8 body sts on holder, pm, k42 (48, 52, 56, 60) sleeve sts, pm, k3 (6, 9, 2, 4), work in chart patt

23 21 19

32-row rep

as established over 48 (48, 48, 70, 72) sts, k3 (6, 9, 2, 4)—192 (216, 236, 260, 280) sts total: 54 (60, 66, 74, 80) sts each for back and front, 42

17

(48, 52, 56, 60) sts for each sleeve. Next rnd

15

*Knit to m, sl m, k2, p1 (4, 7, 0, 2), work in chart

13

patt as established over 48 (48, 48, 70, 72) sts,

11 9

p1 (4, 7, 0, 2), k2, sl m; rep from * once more. Work in patt as established, knitting all sleeve sts and 2 body sts next to sleeve and

7 5

maintaining cable patt and garter st (for all sizes except 49") on remainder of front and

3

back, until piece measures 2" from joining rnd,

1 set-up

ending with an even-numbered chart rnd and

12-st rep

a knit rnd of garter st. Note: When working neck shaping and raglan decs, maintain cable patt and purled garter st (for all sizes except

k on RS; p on WS

sl 1 st onto cn, hold in front, k1, k1 from cn

49") on rem front and back sts. If you do not

pattern repeat

front placket: Next rnd Knit to m, sl m, k2,

p on RS; k on WS

have enough sts to complete a cable cross, work the extra st(s) as they appear. Shape

sl 1 st onto cn, hold in back, k1, k1 from cn

work in patt to 2 sts before m, k2, sl m, knit to m, sl m, k2, work in patt over 20 (23, 26, 30, 33) sts, BO 10 sts, work in patt over 20 (23, 26, 30, 33) sts (including last st from BO), k2—182

The cable chart is worked both in rounds and

over 48 (48, 48, 72, 72) sts, pm, k7 (10, 13, 5, 8)*,

(206, 226, 250, 270) sts rem. Break yarn and

back and forth in rows. When working in

pm for side, rep from * to * once more. Next rnd

reattach at left side of BO sts, ready to work a

rounds, work every row as a right-side row.

*P7 (10, 13, 5, 8), sl m, work chart to m, sl m, p7

WS row. Beg working back and forth in rows

(10, 13, 5, 8), sl m; rep from * once more. Cont in

(see Notes). Next row (WS) Work in patt to

Body

patt as established, working in chart patt

2 sts before m, p2, sl m, purl to m, sl m, p2,

With longer cir needle, CO 124 (136, 148, 164,

between m on front and back and working

work in patt to 2 sts before m, p2, sl m, purl to

176) sts. Place marker (pm) and join in the rnd.

garter st at sides, until piece measures 17 (17,

m, sl m, p2, work in patt to end. Next row (RS)

Work in k1, p1 rib for 2". Next rnd *K7 (10, 13, 5,

17¼, 17¼, 17¾)" from CO, ending with an

Work in patt to 2 sts before m, k2, sl m, knit to

8), pm, beg with Set-up rnd work Cable chart

odd-numbered rnd of chart, a purl rnd of garter

m, sl m, k2, work in patt to 2 sts before m, k2,

2016 knitscene handmade

77

The Projects

8¼ (8¼, 9, 10, 11¼)"


The Projects

sl m, knit to m, sl m, k2, work in patt to end.

Work 1 RS row even in rib patt. Buttonhole row

Shawl

Cont in patt as established until piece

(WS) Work 3 sts in rib patt, work 2-st one-row

CO 3 sts. Knit 6 rows; do not turn after last

measures 3¾ (3½, 3¼, 3¼, 3¼)" from joining

buttonhole, work 6 sts in rib patt, work 2-st

row. Rotate work and pick up and knit 3 sts

rnd, ending with a WS row. Dec row (RS)

one-row buttonhole, work in rib patt to end.

down selvedge (1 st for each garter ridge), then

*Work in patt to 3 sts before m, k2tog, k1, sl m,

Work 5 rows in rib patt. Rep Buttonhole row

rotate work and pick up and knit 3 sts along

k1, ssk, knit to 3 sts before m, k2tog, k1, sl m,

once more. Work 4 rows in rib patt. BO all sts

CO edge—9 sts.

k1, ssk; rep from * once more, work in patt to

in patt. Graft underarm seams using Kitchener

end—8 sts dec’d. Rep Dec row every RS row 8

st. Overlap buttonhole band over button band

(9, 11, 13, 14) more times—110 (126, 130, 138,

and seam both to bottom of placket opening.

150) sts rem: 13 (15, 16, 18, 20) sts for each

Sew on buttons. Weave in ends.

Row 1 (WS) K3, p3, k3. Row 2 (RS) K3, [yo, k1] 3 times, k3—12 sts. Row 3 K3, *p1, p1tbl; rep from * to last 3 sts, k3. Row 4 Knit. Row 5 K3, purl to last 3 sts, k3. Row 6 K3, [yo, k1] 6 times, k3—18 sts. Rows 7 and 8 Rep Rows 3 and 4. Row 9 K3, purl to last 3 sts, k3. Row 10 Knit. Row 11 Rep Row 9. Row 12 K3, [yo, k1] 12 times, k3—30 sts. Rows 13–16 Rep Rows 7–10. Row 17 Knit. Row 18 K3, *yo, k2tog; rep from * to last 3 sts, k3. Row 19 K3, *k1, k1tbl; rep from * to last 3 sts, k3. Row 20 Knit. Rows 21–23 Rep Rows 9–11. Row 24 K3, [yo, k1] 24 times, k3—54 sts. Row 25 Rep Row 3. Rows 26–35 Rep Rows 10 and 11 five times. Row 36 Rep Row 10. Row 37 Knit. Row 38 K3, *yo, k2tog; rep from * to last 3 sts, k3. Row 39 Rep Row 3. Rows 40 and 41 Rep Rows 38 and 39. Row 42 Rep Row 38. Row 43 Rep Row 19. Row 44 Knit. Rows 45–47 Rep Rows 9–11. Row 48 K3, [yo, k1] 48 times, k3—102 sts. Row 49 Rep Row 3. Rows 50–73 Rep Rows 10 and 11 twelve times. Row 74 Rep Row 10. Row 75 Knit. Rows 76–79 Rep Rows 38 and 39 two times. Row 80 Rep Row 38. Row 81 Rep Row 19. Rows 82–95 Rep Rows 10 and 11 seven times. Row 96 K3, [yo, k1] 96 times, k3—198 sts. Row 97 Rep Row 3. Rows 98–105 Rep Rows 10 and 11 four times. Row 106 Rep Row 10. Row 107 Knit. Rows 108–111 Rep Rows 38 and 39 two times. Row 112 Rep Row 38. Row 113 Rep Row 19. Row 114–129 Rep Rows 10 and 11 eight times. Row 130 K3, [yo, k8] 24 times, k3—222 sts. Row 131 K3, *p8, p1tbl; rep from * to last 3 sts,

s

front, 24 (28, 28, 28, 30) sts for each sleeve, 36 (40, 42, 46, 50) sts for back. Work 1 WS row even. Dec row (RS) K1, ssk, *work in patt to

Emma Welford can be found online at www.emmawelford.com.

3 sts before m, k2tog, k1, sl m, k1, ssk, knit to 3 sts before m, k2tog, k1, sl m, k1, ssk; rep from * once more, work in patt to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1—10 sts dec’d. Next row (WS) *Work in patt to 2 sts before m, p2, sl m, purl to m, sl m, p2; rep from * once more, work in patt to end. Dec row (RS) *Work in patt to 3 sts before m, k2tog, k1, sl m, k1, ssk, knit to 3 sts before m, k2tog, k1, sl m, k1, ssk; rep from * once more, work in patt to end—8 sts dec’d. Next row (WS) *Work in patt to 2 sts before m, p2, sl m, purl to m, sl m, p2; rep from * once more, work in patt to end. Rep last 4 rows 1 (2, 2, 2, 2) more time(s)—74 (72, 76, 84, 96) sts rem: 16 (16, 16, 16, 18) sts for each sleeve, 7 (6, 7, 9, 11) sts for each front, 28 (28, 30, 34, 38) sts for back. Shape neck using short-rows as foll: Short-row 1 (RS) Work in patt to last 8 (7, 8, 10, 12) sts, wrap next st, turn. Short-row 2 (WS) Work in patt to last 8 (7, 8, 10, 12) sts, wrap next st, turn.

Short-rows 3 and 4 Work in patt to 4 sts before

SPIRIT L AK E SHAW L Jessica Anderson page 37

wrapped st, wrap next st, turn. Next row (RS) Work to end, working wraps tog with wrapped sts. BO all sts pwise on WS, working rem wraps tog with wrapped sts.

Finishing Block to measurements. Collar: With longer

K n i t c i r c u s Ya r n s G r e a t e s t o f E a s e

Size 59" wide and 18" deep Yarn Knitcircus Yarns Greatest of Ease

opening, 74 (72, 76, 84, 96) sts along top

(80% superwash merino, 20% nylon; 600 yd [549 m]/150 g): • I am a princess and this is my tiara, 1 ball Gauge 18 sts and 32 rows = 4" in St st

BO edge, and 20 (21, 22, 23, 24) sts along left

Tools

edge of neck opening—114 (114, 120, 130, 144)

• Size 5 (3.75 mm): 32" circular (cir) needle • Tapestry needle

cir needle and RS facing, beg at bottom right corner of neck opening, pick up and knit 20 (21, 22, 23, 24) sts along right edge of placket

sts total. Next row (WS) *P1, k1; rep from * to end. Shape collar using short-rows as foll:

Short-row 1 (RS) *P1, k1; rep from * to last 24 (24, 26, 30, 32) sts, wrap next st, turn.

See knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms you don’t know.

Short-row 2 (WS) Work in rib patt to last 25 (25, 27, 31, 33) sts, wrap next st, turn. Short-rows 3 and 4 Work in rib patt to 4 sts before wrapped st, wrap next st, turn.

Short-rows 5 and 6 Work in rib patt to end, working wraps tog with wrapped sts.

78

www.knitscene.com

Notes This semi-circular shawl is worked back and forth in rows from the top down. A circular needle is used to accommodate the large number of stitches.

k3. Next row (RS) K3, work Diamond Lace chart to last 3 sts, k3. Cont in patt as established until


Lace Diamonds 7

p on RS; k on WS

5

yo 3

k2tog on RS; p2tog on WS

1

ssk (last edging st and 1 body st), turn

10-st rep 2

k1f&b bind off 1 st

k on RS; p on WS

st rem on right needle after last BO st

k2tog on RS; p2tog on WS

pattern repeat

ssk on RS; ssp on WS

Waterfall p3tog on WS 5

yo on WS, k3tog, sl st back to left needle, (k1tbl, k1, k1tbl) in same st

3

WINTER PARK SHAWL

1

3-st to 4-st to 3-st rep

Maria Leigh page 3 4

pattern repeat

Pennant 17 15

Artyarns Merino Cloud 13

Rows 1–8 of chart have been worked 3 times.

Next row (RS) Knit. Next row (WS) K3, purl to last 3 sts, k3. Knit 2 rows. Next row (RS) *K1,

BO all sts, using the picot method as foll:

merino wool, 20% cashmere; 436 yd [399 m]/100 g): • #2334 blue, 2 skeins Gauge 20 sts and 30 rows = 4" in St st

*Using the cable method, CO 3 sts, BO 6 sts,

Tools

transfer rem st from BO to left needle; rep from

• Size 5 (3.75 mm): 32" circular (cir) needle • Markers (m) • Tapestry needle

k1f&b; rep from * to end—333 sts. [Purl 1 row, knit 1 row] 4 times. Purl 1 row. Next row (RS)

* to end.

11

Size 69" wide and 27" tall Yarn Artyarns Merino Cloud (80% extrafine

9 7 5 3 1

13 sts to 5 sts to 13 sts

Edging

Finishing Weave in ends. Block to measurements, pinning each picot point to open up the edging.

s

Jessica Anderson enjoys designing fun and quirky knitting patterns. Read more about her knitting, designing, and family adventures on her blog at www.allinadays fun.blogspot.com. Find her on Ravelry as MonkeyButtBabies.

33

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms 31

you don’t know. 29

Notes

27

This triangular shawl is worked from side to

25

side in one piece, beginning at the left side

23

corner. After the full height of the shawl is

21

reached at the center point, the edge is fin19

ished with a knitted-on edging.

17

Row 20 of the Increase chart is worked as fol-

15

lows: BO 9 sts (there will be 1 st on your right needle), yo, k1, p1, k1f&b—6 sts rem.

13

Work similar rows on other charts in a simi-

11

lar manner.

9

A circular needle is used to accommodate the

7

large number of stitches.

5 3

Shawl 1

CO 4 sts. Work Rows 1–37 of Increase chart—22 sts. Next row (RS) Work Pennant

6 sts to 13 sts

2016 knitscene handmade

79

The Projects

k on RS; p on WS


chart over 13 sts (dec’d to 5 sts), place marker

Increase

k on RS; p on WS

(pm), work Waterfall chart over 6 sts (inc’d to

The Projects

8 sts), pm, knit to last st, k1f&b—17 sts rem.

Next row (WS) Purl to m, sl m, work Waterfall chart to m, sl m, work Pennant chart to end. Cont in patt, inc 1 st at end of every RS row, through Row 18 of Pennant chart, then rep Rows 1–18 of Pennant chart 14 more times— 157 sts. Next row (RS) BO 9 sts, yo, k1, p1, k1,

2

36

2 2 2

k2tog on RS; p2tog on WS

30 2

ssk (last edging st and 1 body st), turn

28 2

26 2

2

24 2

22

sts rem. Next row Purl to m, remove m, k2, p3.

20 * 18 16

patt through Row 18 of chart, then rep Rows 1–18 of chart 15 more times—6 sts rem. Work

14

Rows 19–34 of chart—13 sts rem. BO all sts.

12

s

10 8

Finishing

6

Weave in ends. Block. 4

80

www.knitscene.com

2 1 (WS)

* Work as given in Notes

k1f&b bind off 1 st

2

Next row Work Row 1 of Edging chart over 6 sts, turn. Next row Work in patt to end. Cont in

Canada. Find her on Ravelry as amigurumikr and online at www.marialeigh.net.

yo

32

sl m, k6, remove m, knit to last st, k1f&b—150

Maria Leigh lives in Athens, Ontario,

p on RS; k on WS

34

st rem on right needle after last BO st pattern repeat


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The Projects

Mitts

23 sts rem. Beg and ending with Rnd 1, work

Using the long-tail method, CO 59 (63) sts.

in Tweed patt until thumb measures 1 (1¼)"

Place marker (pm) and join in the rnd. Work

from pick-up rnd. Break yarn, leaving a 20"

in Tweed patt (see Stitches) until piece

tail. Using the sewn method, BO all sts.

measures 4" from CO, ending with Rnd 2. Thumb gusset:

Finishing

Rnd 1 K1, sl 1, M1R, k1, *sl 1, k1; rep from * to

Weave in ends. Block.

s

end—1 st inc’d.

Rnd 2 Sl 1, k2, sl 1, *k1, sl 1; rep from * to end. Rnd 3 K1, sl 1, k1, M1L, k1, *sl 1, k1; rep from * to end—1 st inc’d.

Rnd 4 Sl 1, *k1, sl 1; rep from * to end. Rnds 5–8 Rep Rnds 1–4—63 (67) sts. Rnd 9 [K1, sl 1] 2 times, pm, M1R, k1, *sl 1, k1; rep

Stefanie Bold lives and knits in Germany. She also sews almost all of her clothes, enjoys spinning fine yarns out of soft fibers, and can be found on Ravelry as stebo79.

from * to end—1 st inc’d. Rnd 10 [Sl 1, k1] 2 times, sl m, *k1, sl 1; rep from * to end. Rnd 11 [K1, sl 1] 2 times, sl m, k1, M1L, k1, *sl 1,

PE ARL STREET MIT TS Stefanie Bold page 4 2

k1; rep from * to end—1 st inc’d. Rnd 12 [Sl 1, k1] 2 times, sl m, sl 1, *k1, sl 1; rep from * to end. Rnd 13 [K1, sl 1] 2 times, sl m, M1R, k1, *sl 1, k1; rep from * to end—1 st inc’d. Rnds 14–16 Rep Rnds 10–12—67 (71) sts. Rnd 17 *K1, sl 1; rep from * to m, remove m, k1,

Ancie nt Arts Fibre Crafts

sl 1, pm, M1R, k1, **sl 1, k1; rep from ** to

Sizes 7 (7½)" hand circumference, shown in

end—1 st inc’d. Rnd 18 *Sl 1, k1; rep from * to m, sl m, **k1, sl 1;

size 7½"

Yarn Ancient Arts Fibre Crafts 100% Bluefaced Leicester Wool Lace (100% superwash wool; 437 yd [400 m]/ 100 g): • prairie flower, 1 skein Gauge 34 sts and 64 rnds = 4" in Tweed patt

Tools

rep from ** to end. Rnd 19 *K1, sl 1; rep from * to m, sl m, k1, M1L, k1, **sl 1, k1; rep from ** to end—1 st inc’d. Rnd 20 Sl 1, *k1, sl 1; rep from * to end. Rnd 21 *K1, sl 1; rep from * to m, sl m, M1R, k1, **sl 1, k1; rep from ** to end—1 st inc’d. Rnd 22 *Sl 1, k1; rep from * to m, sl m, **k1, sl 1; rep from ** to end.

CIT Y PARK HAT T h e a C o lm a n

• Size 2½ (3 mm): set of double-pointed needles (dpn) • Markers (m) • Stitch holder • Tapestry needle

Rnd 23 *K1, sl 1; rep from * to m, sl m, k1, M1L,

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms

thumb (removing gusset m), use the back-

you don’t know.

ward-loop method to CO 1 st, *sl 1, k1; rep

9" tall; shown in size 20¼"

from * to end—59 (63) sts rem. Hand: Beg

Yarn Green Mountain Spinnery Sylvan Spirit

Notes

with Rnd 2, work in Tweed patt until hand

These mitts are worked in the round from the

measures 2¾" above held thumb sts. Break

page 4 0

k1, **sl 1, k1; rep from ** to end—1 st inc’d.

Rnd 24 Sl 1, *k1, sl 1; rep from * to end. Rnds 25–40 Rep Rnds 17–24 two times—79 (83) sts. Next rnd K1, sl 1, place next 21 sts on holder for

Green Mountain Spinnery Sylvan Spirit DK

Sizes 20¼ (21¾)" head circumference and

Thumb

DK (50% fine American wool, 50% tencel; 180 yd [165 m]/58 g): • #7562 citrine (MC), 1 skein • #7790 sterling (CC), 1 skein Gauge 22 sts and 29 rnds = 4" in charted patt on larger needle

Stitches

Return 21 held thumb sts to dpn and, with RS

Tools

Tweed Pattern: (odd number of sts)

facing, rejoin yarn. Next rnd K1, *sl 1, k1; rep

Rnd 1 K1, *sl 1 (see Notes), k1; rep from * to end. Rnd 2 Sl 1, *k1, sl 1; rep from * to end.

from * to end, then pick up and knit 4 sts from

Rep Rnds 1 and 2 for patt.

*Sl 1, k1; rep from * to last 5 sts, sl 1, sl next 2

• Size 4 (3.5 mm): 16" circular (cir) needle • Size 6 (4 mm): 16" cir needle and set of double-pointed needles (dpn) • Marker (m) • Tapestry needle

cuff up; both mitts are identical and can be

yarn, leaving a 20" tail. Using the sewn

worn on either hand.

method, BO all sts.

Slip stitches purlwise with yarn in front.

gap—25 sts. Pm and join in the rnd. Next rnd sts as if to k2tog, k1, pass 2 sl sts over, sl 1—

82

www.knitscene.com


end. Rnd 4 *With CC, k2, with MC, k2; rep from * to

15

end, remove m, sl 2 pwise wyb, replace m.

13

Rep Rnds 1–4 for patt.

11 9

Hat

7

Brim: With CC and smaller cir needle, CO 112

5

(128, 144) sts. Do not join or turn. Break yarn.

3

Slide sts to opposite end of needle. Next row

1

(RS) With MC, *k2, p2; rep from * to end. Place

8-st rep

marker and join in the rnd. Cont in rib patt until piece measures 1¾ (1¾, 2)" from CO. Change to larger cir needle. Work in Check-

knit

ered Diamond patt (see Stitches) until piece

purl

measures about 6½ (7, 7½)" from CO, ending with Rnd 4 of patt. Next rnd *With CC, k2, with

k2tog

MC, k6; rep from * to end, remove m, sl 1 pwise

ssk yo

TIMBER TR AIL H AT

pattern repeat

K a t ya Fr a n ke l page 3 6

wyb, replace m. Shape crown: Work Rnds 1–15 of Crown chart (don't shift m at end of rnds), changing to dpn when necessary—7 (8, 9) sts rem. Break yarn and draw tail through rem sts. Pull tight to gather sts and fasten off on WS.

Ya r n a n d S o u l S u p e r f i n e 40 0

Notes

Finishing Sew CO closed. Weave in ends. Block. With

Sizes 17¼ (19¾, 22¼)" circumference and

MC and CC held tog, make 3" pompom and attach to top of hat.

(128) sts. Place marker and join in the rnd. Work

8¾ (9¼, 9¾)" tall; shown in size 19¾". Yarn Yarn and Soul Superfine 400 (100% superfine alpaca; 400 yd [366 m]/ 100 g): • #3075 smoke (MC), 1 skein • #3094 emerald (CC), 1 skein Yarn distributed by Classic Elite Gauge 26 sts and 28 rnds = 4" in Checkered Diamond patt on larger needle

in k1, p1 rib for 2". Next rnd [K13 (14), k2tog]

Tools

15

8 times—112 (120) sts rem. Break CC. Change

• Size 1 (2.25 mm): 16" circular (cir) needle • Size 2½ (3 mm): 16" cir needle and set of double-pointed needles (dpn) • Marker (m) • Tapestry needle

13

This hat is worked in the round from the bottom up.

Stitches S2kp2: Sl 2 sts as if to k2tog, k1, pass 2 sl sts over—2 sts dec’d.

Hat Brim: With CC and smaller needle, CO 120

to larger cir needle and MC. Work Rnds 1–16 of Lace chart 2 times, then work Rnds 1–12 once more. Shape crown: Note: Change to dpn when necessary. Dec rnd *K1, s2kp2 (see

s

Katya Frankel is a knitwear designer known for her inventive, yet classic, designs for women and children. Find more of her work at www.katyafrankel.com.

Crown

11 9 7 5

Stitches), p1, s2kp2; rep from * to end—56 (60) sts rem. Next rnd *K2, p1, k1; rep from * to end.

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms

Dec rnd *K1, s2kp2; rep from * to end—28 (30) sts rem. Next rnd Knit. Dec rnd [K2tog] 14 (15) times—14 (15) sts rem. Next rnd Knit. Break

you don’t know.

yarn and draw tail through rem sts. Pull tight

This hat is worked in the round from the bot-

Finishing Weave in ends. Block. With CC, make 3" pompom and attach to top of hat.

s

Notes

and can be found at www.babycocktails .blogspot.com.

with MC, knit

Stitches

with CC, knit

Checkered Diamond Pattern: (multiple of

with CC, k2tog

8 sts)

Rnd 1 *With CC, k2, with MC, k6; rep from * to

Thea Colman is babycocktails on Ravelry

1

16-st to 1-st rep

tom up.

to gather sts and fasten off on WS.

3

end.

with CC, ssk pattern repeat

Rnd 2 *With CC, k2, with MC, k6; rep from * to end, remove m, sl 2 pwise wyb, replace m. 2016 knitscene handmade

83

The Projects

Rnd 3 *With CC, k2, with MC, k2; rep from * to

Lace


The Projects

Hat

Tools

With MC and cir needle, CO 108 (116) sts.

• Size 4 (3.5 mm): set of double-pointed needles (dpn) • Size 6 (4 mm): set of dpn • Marker (m) • Cable needle (cn) • Waste yarn for thumb • Tapestry needle

Place marker (pm) and join in the rnd. Work in k2, p2 rib for 1". Next rnd Knit, inc 7 (11) sts evenly spaced—115 (127) sts. Next rnd With CC, knit. Set-up rnd *With CC, k1, with MC, k3; rep from * to last 3 sts, with CC, k1, with MC, k2. Work Left Cable chart until piece measures 5¾ (6¼)" from CO, ending with Row 4 of chart, and working Row 3 as foll: Row 3 Work in patt to last st, work 1/1 LT using

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms you don’t know.

last st of rnd and first st of next rnd, pm for beg of rnd between 2 sts of LT. Shape crown: Note: Change to dpn when

Notes These mittens are worked in the round from the

necessary. Dec rnd *Sl 1 CC st onto cn, hold in

cuff to the tip with waste yarn thumbs. The

front, with MC, k1, transfer st from cn to left

stripes swirl in opposite directions on each

needle, with CC, ssk, with MC, k1; rep from *

mitten.

to last 3 sts, sl 1 CC st onto cn, hold in front,

MA NI TOU SPRINGS SET J e s i e O s t e r m ill e r page 3 8

with MC, k1, transfer st from cn to left needle,

Stitches

with CC, ssk—86 (95) sts rem. Next rnd *With

1/1 LT: Sl 1 st onto cn, hold in front, with MC,

MC, k1, 1/1 LT; rep from * to last 2 sts, with

k1, with CC, k1 from cn.

MC, k1, work 1/1 LT using last st of rnd and

1/1 RT: Sl 1 st onto cn, hold in back, with CC,

first st of next rnd, pm for beg of rnd between

k1, with MC, k1 from cn.

2 sts of LT. Next rnd *With MC, k1, 1/1 LT; rep from * to last st, with MC, k1. Dec rnd *Sl 1 CC

Left Mitten

st onto cn, hold in front, with MC, k1, transfer

With MC and smaller needles, CO 44 (48) sts.

st from cn to left needle, with CC, ssk; rep from

Place marker (pm) and join in the rnd. Work in

* to last 2 sts, sl 1 CC st onto cn, hold in front,

k2, p2 rib for 3". Change to larger needles.

Sizes 17 (18¾)" circumference and 7½ (8)"

with MC, k1, remove m, transfer st from cn to

tall; shown in size 17" (green MC) and 18¾" (natural MC) on page 00 Yarn Lorna’s Laces Haymarket (100% wool; 215 yd [197 m]/ 100 g): • knitscene verdigris (green; MC) or natural (MC), 1 skein • knitscene columbine blossom (pink/ yellow; CC) or #64 gold hill (olive/rust; CC), 1 skein Gauge 27 sts and 24 rnds = 4" in cable patt

left needle, with CC, ssk, pm for new beg of

Next rnd Knit, inc 7 (11) sts evenly spaced—51 (59) sts. Next rnd With CC, knit. Set-up rnd

Tools

through rem sts. Pull tight to gather sts and

• Size 6 (4 mm): 16" circular (cir) needle and set of double-pointed needles (dpn) • Marker (m) • Cable needle (cn) • Tapestry needle

fasten off on WS.

Finishing

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms

Sizes 7½ (8¾)" hand circumference and

L o r n a’s L a c e s H a y m a r k e t

HAT

you don’t know.

rnd—57 (63) sts rem. Next rnd *1/1 LT; rep from * to last st, work 1/1 LT using last st of rnd and first st of next rnd, pm for beg of rnd between 2 sts of LT. Next rnd *1/1 LT; rep from * to end. Break MC and cont with CC only. Dec

Left Cable

rnd *Ssk; rep from * to last st, k1—29 (32) sts

3*

rem. Next rnd Knit. Dec rnd *Ssk; rep from * to

1

last 3 (0) sts, [sssk] 1 (0) time—14 (16) sts rem.

* Work as given in directions

Next rnd Knit. Break yarn and draw tail

Right Cable

Weave in ends. Block to measurements.

MITTENS

3* 1

* Work as given in directions

10½" long; shown in size 7½"

Yarn Lorna’s Laces Haymarket Notes This hat is worked in the round from the bottom up.

Stitches 1/1 LT: Sl 1 st onto cn, hold in front, with MC, k1, with CC, k1 from cn.

84

www.knitscene.com

(100% wool; 215 yd [197 m]/ 100 g): • knitscene verdigris (green; MC), 1 skein • knitscene columbine blossom (pink/ yellow; CC), 1 skein Gauge 27 sts and 24 rnds = 4" in cable patt on larger needles

with MC, knit pattern repeat 1/1 LT (see Stitches) 1/1 RT (see Stitches)


9 (13) sts evenly spaced—53 (61) sts. Next rnd

3 sts, with CC, k1, with MC, k2. Work Left

With CC, knit. Set-up rnd *With MC, k3, with

• Cable needle (cn) • Tapestry needle

Cable chart until piece measures 5" from CO,

CC, k1; rep from * to last st, with MC, k1. Work

ending with Row 4 of chart, and working Row

Right Cable chart until piece measures 5" from

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms

3 as foll:

CO, ending with Row 4 of chart, and working

you don’t know.

Row 3 Work in patt to last st, work 1/1 LT using last st of rnd and first st of next rnd, pm for beg of rnd between 2 sts of LT. Thumb placement: Next rnd Work in patt to

Row 3 as foll:

Stitches

last 9 sts, with waste yarn, [k2, 1/1 LT] 2

Row 3 Work in patt to last st, work 1/1 RT using last st of rnd and first st of next rnd, pm for beg of rnd between 2 sts of RT. Thumb placement: Next rnd With MC, k1,

times, transfer 8 waste yarn sts to left needle,

with waste yarn, k1, 1/1 RT, k2, 1/1 RT, k1,

Cowl

[with MC, k3, with CC, k1] 2 times, with MC,

transfer 8 waste yarn sts to left needle, with

With MC and smaller needle, CO 128 sts. Place

k1. Work Rows 2–4 of chart, then rep Rows 1–4

MC, k1, with CC, k1, with MC, k3, with CC,

marker (pm) and join in the rnd. Work in k2, p2

of chart until piece measures 9½" from CO,

k1, with MC, k3, *1/1 RT, with MC, k2; rep

rib for 1¼". Change to larger needle. Next rnd

ending with Row 4 of chart. Shape tip: Dec

from * to last 3 sts, 1/1 RT, with MC, k1. Work

Knit, inc 15 sts evenly spaced—143 sts. Next

rnd *Sl 1 CC st onto cn, hold in front, with MC, k1, transfer st from cn to left needle, with CC, ssk, with MC, k1; rep from * to last 3 sts, sl 1 CC st onto cn, hold in front, with MC, k1, transfer st from cn to left needle, with CC, ssk—38 (44) sts rem. Next rnd *With MC, k1,

Rows 2–4 of chart, then rep Rows 1–4 of chart

rnd With CC, knit. Set-up rnd *With CC, k1,

until piece measures 9½" from CO, ending

with MC, k3; rep from * to last 3 sts, with CC,

with Row 4 of chart. Shape tip: Dec rnd *With

k1, with MC, k2. Work Left Cable chart until

MC, k1, sl 1 MC st to right needle, sl 1 MC st

piece measures 8" from CO, ending with Row 4

onto cn, hold in back, transfer first sl st to left

of chart, and working Row 3 as foll:

needle, with CC, k2tog, with MC, k1 from cn;

Row 3 Work in patt to last st, work 1/1 LT using last st of rnd and first st of next rnd, pm for beg of rnd between 2 sts of LT.

1/1 LT; rep from * to last 2 sts, with MC, k1,

rep from * to last st, with MC, k1—40 (46) sts

work 1/1 LT using last st of rnd and first st of

rem. Next rnd *1/1 RT, with MC, k1; rep from *

next rnd, pm for beg of rnd between 2 sts of

to last st, work 1/1 RT using last st of rnd and

LT. Next rnd *With MC, k1, 1/1 LT; rep from * to

first st of next rnd, pm for beg of rnd between

last st, with MC, k1. Dec rnd *Sl 1 CC st onto

2 sts of RT. Next rnd *With MC, k1, 1/1 RT; rep

1/1 LT: Sl 1 st onto cn, hold in front, with MC, k1, with CC, k1 from cn.

Next rnd With CC, knit. Break CC. Next rnd With MC, knit, dec 15 sts evenly spaced— 128 sts rem. Change to smaller needle. Work in k2, p2 rib until piece measures 9½" from CO. BO all sts in patt.

cn, hold in front, with MC, k1, transfer st from

from * to end. Dec rnd *Sl 1 MC st to right

cn to left needle, with CC, ssk; rep from * to

needle, sl 1 MC st onto cn, hold in back,

last 2 sts, sl 1 CC st onto cn, hold in front, with

transfer first sl st to left needle, with CC,

MC, k1, remove m, transfer st from cn to left

k2tog, with MC, k1 from cn; rep from * to last

Finishing

needle, with CC, ssk, pm for new beg of

st, work 1/1 RT using last st of rnd and first st

Weave in ends. Block to measurements.

rnd—25 (29) sts rem. Next rnd *1/1 LT; rep

of next rnd, pm for beg of rnd between 2 sts of

from * to last st, work 1/1 LT using last st of

RT—27 (31) sts rem. Next rnd *1/1 RT; rep from

rnd and first st of next rnd, pm for beg of rnd

* to end. Break MC. Dec rnd With CC, *k2tog;

between 2 sts of LT. Break MC. Dec rnd With

rep from * to last st, k1—14 (16) sts rem. Break

CC, *ssk; rep from * to end—13 (15) sts rem.

yarn and draw tail through rem sts. Pull tight

Break yarn and draw tail through rem sts. Pull

to gather sts and fasten off on WS.

tight to gather sts and fasten off on WS.

Thumb Thumb

Work as for left mitten.

Remove waste yarn from thumb sts, placing 8 lower sts onto one dpn and 8 upper sts onto

Finishing

another dpn—16 sts total. Join MC to upper

Weave in ends. Block.

dpn. Next rnd *K8, pick up and knit 2 sts in gap between dpn; rep from * once more—20 sts. Rearrange sts onto 3 dpn. Next rnd Knit. Next

rnd [K8, k2tog] 2 times—18 sts rem. Work in St st until piece measures 2½" from base of thumb. Dec rnd [K2tog, k1] 6 times—12 sts rem. Next rnd Knit. Dec rnd [K2tog] 6 times—6 sts rem. Break yarn and draw tail through rem sts. Pull tight to gather sts and fasten off on WS.

COWL Size 23¾" circumference and 9½" tall Yarn Lorna’s Laces Haymarket (100% wool; 215 yd [197 m]/ 100 g): • knitscene verdigris (green; MC), 1 skein • knitscene columbine blossom (pink/ yellow; CC), 1 skein Gauge 24 sts and 21 rnds = 4" in cable patt on larger needle

Right Mitten

Tools

With MC and smaller needles, CO 44 (48) sts.

• Size 6 (4 mm): 16–20" circular (cir) needle • Size 8 (5 mm): 16–20" cir needle • Marker (m)

Pm and join in the rnd. Work in k2, p2 rib for 3". Change to larger needles. Next rnd Knit, inc

s

Jesie Ostermiller is a designer living in Logan, Utah, with her husband, two small boys, and a very sizable yarn stash. Find her on Ravelry as knittyjo.

way : te c olor (CC) Alterna old hill (MC), g l ra tu a n

The Projects

*With CC, k1, with MC, k3; rep from * to last


The Projects

CO. Leg: Set-up rnd K28 (32, 36), p5 (7, 9),

19) sts along side of heel flap, k9 (10, 11) heel

[(k1tbl) 2 times, p6] 2 times, [k1tbl] 2 times,

sts—76 (86, 96) sts total. Pm and join in the

purl to end. Next rnd K28 (32, 36), beg and

rnd.

ending as indicated for your size, work Cable

Rnd 1 Knit to 3 sts before m, k2tog, k1, sl m, work

chart over 28 (32, 36) sts. Cont in patt through

instep sts in patt, sl m, k1, ssk, knit to

Row 18 of chart, then work Rows 1–18 of chart

end—2 sts dec’d. Rnd 2 Knit to m, sl m, work instep sts in patt,

2 more times—piece measures about 6" from CO. Heel flap: Note: Heel flap is worked back and forth over first 28 (32, 36) sts of rnd; last 28 (32, 36) sts will be worked later for instep.

72) sts rem. Next rnd Remove beg-of-rnd m,

Remove beg-of-rnd m.

knit to m, sl m, work instep sts in patt (do not

Row 1 (RS) [Sl 1 kwise wyb, k1] 14 (16, 18) times, turn.

S a r a h Jor d a n page 41

finish rnd); this is new beg of rnd. Foot: Work even until foot measures 6½ (7, 7½)" from back

Row 2 (WS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, p27 (31, 35), turn. Rep last 2 rows 13 (15, 17) more times. Turn

of heel, or 2" less than desired finished length.

heel:

sts before m, k2tog, k1; rep from * once

Short-row 1 (RS) Sl 1 kwise wyb, k16 (18, 20),

more—4 sts dec’d. Rep Dec rnd every other

Toe: Next rnd Knit. Dec rnd *K1, ssk, knit to 3

rnd 9 more times—16 (24, 32) sts rem. Next rnd

ssk, k1, turn.

DUR A NGO SOCK S

sl m, knit to end. Rep last 2 rnds 9 (10, 11) more times—56 (64,

Short-row 2 (WS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, p7, p2tog, p1,

Knit. Break yarn, leaving a 10" tail.

turn.

Short-row 3 Sl 1 kwise wyb, knit to 1 st before

Finishing With tail threaded on a tapestry needle, graft

gap, ssk, k1, turn.

Short-row 4 Sl 1 pwise wyf, purl to 1 st before

sts using Kitchener st. Weave in ends. Block.

s

gap, p2tog, p1, turn. Rep last 2 short-rows 3 (4, 5) more times—18 B r o w n S h e e p C o m p a ny W i l d f o o t e L u x u r y S o c k

(20, 22) heel sts rem. Shape gusset: Next rnd K18 (20, 22) heel sts, pick up and knit 15 (17, 19)

Sizes 6½ (7½, 8½)" foot circumference and

sts along side of heel flap, pm, work 28 (32, 36)

8½ (9, 9½)" long from back of heel to tip of toe; shown in size 7½" Yarn Brown Sheep Company Wildfoote Luxury Sock (75% washable wool, 25% nylon; 215 yd [197 m]/50 g): • #SY45 goldenrod, 2 skeins (see Notes) Gauge 32 sts and 44 rnds = 4" in St st

instep sts in patt, pm, pick up and knit 15 (17,

Sarah Jordan is a recovering sock addict living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She blogs at www.paknitwit.blogspot.com and can be found on Ravelry as PAKnitWit.

Cable 17

Tools

15

• Size 1 (2.25 mm) needles • Markers (m) • Cable needle (cn) • Tapestry needle

13 11 9 7

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms

5

you don’t know.

3 1

Notes These socks are worked from the cuff down in

end 8½"

end 7½"

28 (32, 36) sts

end 6½"

beg 6½"

the round. The largest size socks use all of two skeins of yarn. Consider purchasing an extra skein as insurance.

k1tbl

Socks Cuff: CO 56 (64, 72) sts. Place marker (pm) and join in the rnd. Next rnd P1 (0, 1), [k1tbl] 2 (1, 2) time(s), p2, *[k1tbl] 2 times, p2; rep from * to last 3 (1, 3) st(s), [k1tbl] 2 (1, 2) time(s), p1 (0, 1). Rep last rnd until piece measures 1" from

86

www.knitscene.com

purl sl 1 st onto cn, hold in back, k1tbl, p1 from cn sl 1 st onto cn, hold in front, p1, k1tbl from cn

beg 7½"

beg 8½"


(100% wool; 110 yd [101 m]/50 g): • granite, 2 skeins Gauge 22 sts and 25 rnds = 4" in rib patt

Rows 1–21 of Crown chart, changing to dpn

Tools

sts and fasten off on WS.

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms you don’t know.

Notes This hat is worked in the round from the bot-

The Projects

• Size 6 (4 mm): 16" circular (cir) needle and set of double-pointed needles (dpn) • Marker (m) • Tapestry needle

when necessary—16 sts rem. Break yarn and draw tail through rem sts. Pull tight to gather

s

Finishing Weave in ends. Block.

Meghan Huber lives in Salem, Massachusetts. When she’s not working as an engineer, she can be found knitting with her fiancé at her favorite LYS, Circle of Stitches. Visit her website at www.newengland knitting.com.

tom up.

Crown

Hat

21

With cir needle, CO 104 sts. Place marker (pm)

RIST CA N YON BE A NIE M e g h a n H ub e r page 5 4

19

and join in the rnd. Next rnd *K1, p1, k2, p1, [k1,

17

p1] 3 times, k5, p1, [k1, p1] 3 times, k2, p1; rep

15

from * 3 more times. Rep last rnd until piece

13

measures 5¼" from CO. Shape crown: Work

11 9

Ha r r i s v i l l e D e s i g n s WA T E R s h e d

knit

ssk

purl

no stitch

k2tog

pattern repeat

7 5 3

Size 19" circumference and 8½" high Yarn Harrisville Designs WATERshed

1

26-st to 4-st rep

2016 knitscene handmade

87


P K P

The Projects

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Wavy Eyelet

FN P K

pattern repeat

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yo

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ssk

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k on WS

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k2tog K

k on RS; p on WS

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35

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33

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31

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29

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27

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25

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23

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K

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19

P K P P

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BN

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FN

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BN back needle

K

FN front needle

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work 4 times

K P K P K P K

FN

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Sequence E K

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BN

K

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FN

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FN

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BN

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Grafting

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FN

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Sequence D

Notes

P

Sequence C K

Sequence B

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms you don’t know.

K

P

K

pattern repeat

P

• Size 3 (3.25 mm) needles • Size E/4 (3.5 mm) crochet hook • Waste yarn for provisional CO • Stitch holder • Tapestry needle

Sequence A

P purlwise

K

Tools

K knitwise

P

wash merino wool, 10% nylon; 480 yd [439 m]/135 g): • #HD043 polar vortex, 2 skeins Gauge 24 sts and 31 rows = 4" in charted patt

K

1

13-st rep

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P

3

T he Fiber Seed Sprout

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5

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7

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9

page 4 4

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11

Joni Coniglio

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SOUTH PL AT TE COWL

Size 55¾" circumference and 9½" wide Yarn The Fiber Seed Sprout (90% super-

K

K

17

This cowl is worked back and forth in rows, then the ends are grafted together in pattern.

Finishing

Alternate skeins of yarn every two rounds to

Weave in ends, except CO and grafting tails.

right. Thread grafting yarn onto a tapestry

blend the hand-dyed yarn. Always pick up

Block to measurements. Remove waste yarn

needle and graft sts in patt foll chart or written

the new color from under the color just used.

from provisional CO and place 59 sts onto

directions. Note: In the written instructions

needle, then create an extra st on same needle

the sequences appear first, followed by the

Cowl

as foll: with CO tail threaded on a tapestry

order in which the sequences are worked.

Using the crochet chain provisional method,

needle, wrap tail over needle from WS to RS

CO 59 sts, leaving a 6" tail. Work Rows 1–36 of

and then through an edge st to WS of

Sequence A (knit st on front needle, purl st on back needle)

Wavy Eyelet chart 11 times (see Notes), then

work—60 sts. Return 59 held sts to 2nd

Step 1 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on

work Rows 1–34 once more. Break working

needle. Hold needles parallel with WS tog and

yarn, leaving a 55" tail for grafting. Break 2nd

60 CO sts in back, making sure cowl isn’t

front needle, leave st on needle. Step 2 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on

skein of yarn. Place sts on holder.

twisted and both needle points face to the

88

www.knitscene.com

back needle, remove st from needle.


Step 3 Insert tapestry needle pwise into next st

Bobble Fringe: With RS facing and using the

Step 4 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on

The Projects

backward-loop method, CO 5 sts, turn; work

on back needle, leave st on needle.

[k1, yo, k1, yo, k1] into first st, turn; k5, turn;

front needle, remove st from needle.

sl 2 pwise wyf, p3tog, p2sso, BO 5 sts—1 st

Sequence B (knit st on front needle, knit st on back needle)

rem on right needle (this st counts as first

Step 1 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on

in instructions).

worked st of next WS row and is not included

front needle, leave st on needle.

Cowl

Step 2 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on

With 2 strands of yarn held tog (see Notes) and

back needle, remove st from needle.

Step 3 Insert tapestry needle kwise into next st

using the crochet chain provisional method, CO 39 sts. Next row (RS) K1, p1, *k1tbl, p1; rep

on back needle, leave st on needle.

Step 4 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on

from * to last st, k1. Next row (WS) K2, *p1tbl,

front needle, remove st from needle.

k1; rep from * to last st, k1. Rep last 2 rows

Sequence C (yo on front needle, knit st on back needle)

until piece measures 7" from CO, ending with

Step 1 Skip front needle step. Step 2 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on

Row 1 (RS) K1, M1L, p1, work Knot st over 3 sts

a WS row. Inc section 1:

back needle, remove st from needle.

Step 3 Insert tapestry needle kwise into next st on back needle, leave st on needle.

(see Stitches), *p1, k1tbl; rep from * to last

EDOR A COWL Yo ko Jo hn s t o n

Step 4 Skip front needle step.

page 4 6

Sequence D (ssk on front needle, knit st on back needle)

work Bobble Fringe (see Stitches)—41 sts. Row 2 (WS) Not counting first st already on right needle, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to end. Row 3 K1, M1L, [work Knot st over 3 sts, p1] 2 times, *k1tbl, p1; rep from * to last 8 sts,

Step 1 Using tapestry needle, [sl 1 st on front

work Knot st over 3 sts, p1, work Knot st over T h e F i b r e C o m p a ny Ro a d t o C h i n a L a c e

needle kwise] 2 times, return 2 sts to front needle in new positions, then insert tapestry needle pwise (back to front) into 2 sts on front needle, leave sts on needle.

Step 2 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on back needle, remove st from needle.

Step 3 Insert tapestry needle kwise into next st on back needle, leave st on needle. Step 4 Insert tapestry needle kwise (front to back) into 2 sts on front needle, remove sts from needle.

Sequence E (k2tog on front needle, knit st on back needle)

Size 16" wide at widest point and 49" circumference, relaxed after blocking Yarn The Fibre Company Road to China Lace (65% baby alpaca, 15% silk, 10% cashmere, 10% camel; 656 yd [600 m]/100 g): • grey pearl, 2 skeins Yarn distributed by Kelbourne Woolens Gauge 18 sts and 20 rows = 4" in charted patt with two strands held tog, blocked Tools

Step 1 Insert tapestry needle pwise into 2 sts on front needle, leave sts on needle.

Step 2 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on back needle, remove st from needle.

• Size 7 (4.5 mm) needles • Size G/7 (4.5 mm) crochet hook • Stitch holder • Waste yarn for provisional CO • Tapestry needle

Step 3 Insert tapestry needle kwise into next st on back needle, leave st on needle. Step 4 Insert tapestry needle kwise into 2 sts on

This cowl is worked back and forth in rows, then the ends are grafted together. Work with two strands of yarn held together throughout.

times, work Sequence B once, work

Stitches

Sequence A 3 times, removing st from back

s

k1tbl, p1, M1R, k1—45 sts. Row 6 *K1, p1tbl; rep from * to last st, k1. Row 7 K1, M1L, k1tbl, p1, [work Knot st over 3 sts, p1] 3 times, *k1tbl, p1; rep from * to last 14 sts, [work Knot st over 3 sts, p1] 3 times, k1tbl, M1R, k1—47 sts. Row 8 K2, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to last st, k1. Row 9 K1, M1L, p1, [work Knot st over 3 sts, p1] 4 times, *k1tbl, p1; rep from * to last 17 sts, [work Knot st over 3 sts, p1] 4 times, M1R, k1, work Bobble Fringe—49 sts. Row 10 *P1tbl, k1; rep from * to end. Row 11 K1, M1L, [work Knot st over 3 sts, p1] over 3 sts, p1] 4 times, work Knot st over

*work Sequence B once, work Sequence C

work Sequence C once; rep from * 3 more

11 sts, [work Knot st over 3 sts, p1] 2 times,

5 times, [k1tbl, p1] 4 times, [work Knot st

Notes

Sequence E once, work Sequence B 8 times,

3 sts, p1] 2 times, *k1tbl, p1; rep from * to last

don’t know.

Graft in patt: Work Sequence A 3 times, once, work Sequence D once, work

3 sts, M1R, k1—43 sts. Row 4 K2, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to last st, k1. Row 5 K1, M1L, p1, k1tbl, p1, [work Knot st over

See knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms you

front needle, remove sts from needle.

needle on Step 3 of last rep. Weave in ends.

6 sts, p1, work Knot st over 3 sts, p1, M1R, k1,

Knot Stitch: (worked over 3 sts) With tip of right needle, pass 3rd st on left

Joni Coniglio is the senior project editor for

needle over first and 2nd sts, then work first

knitscene and Interweave Knits.

and 2nd sts as k1tbl, yo, k1tbl.

3 sts, M1R, k1—51 sts. Row 12 K2, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to last st, k1. Row 13 K1, M1L, p1, k1tbl, p1, [work Knot st over 3 sts, p1] 5 times, [k1tbl, p1] 2 times, [work Knot st over 3 sts, p1] 5 times, k1tbl, p1, M1R, k1—53 sts. Row 14 *K1, p1tbl; rep from * to last st, k1. Row 15 K1, M1L, k1tbl, p1, *work Knot st over 3 sts, p1; rep from * to last 2 sts, k1tbl, M1R, k1—55 sts. Row 16 K2, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to last st, k1. Inc section 2: Row 1 (RS) K1, M1L, p1, *work Knot st over 3 sts, 2016 knitscene handmade

89


Twisted Mesh

Rep Rows 3–10 three more times, then work

The Projects

7

Rows 3–6 once more—53 sts rem. Dec

5

section 2: Row 1 (RS) K2tog, p1, k1tbl, p1, [work Knot st

3 1

4-st rep

k on RS; p on WS p on RS; k on WS

over 3 sts, p1] 5 times, [k1tbl, p1] 2 times, [work Knot st over 3 sts, p1] 5 times, k1tbl, p1, ssk—51 sts rem. Row 2 K2, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to last st, k1. Row 3 K2tog, [work Knot st over 3 sts, p1] 5 times, [k1tbl, p1] 4 times, [work Knot st

k1tbl on RS; p1tbl on WS bobble fringe (see Stitches) st on right needle after bobble fringe pattern repeat knot stitch (see Stitches) p1; rep from * to last st, M1R, k1, work Bobble Fringe—2 sts inc’d. Row 2 (WS) *P1tbl, k1; rep from * to end. Row 3 K1, M1L, *work Knot st over 3 sts, p1; rep from * to last 4 sts, work Knot st over 3 sts, M1R, k1—2 sts inc’d.

Row 4 K2, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to last st, k1. Row 5 K1, M1L, p1, k1tbl, p1, *work Knot st over 3 sts, p1; rep from * to last 3 sts, k1tbl, p1,

over 3 sts, p1] 4 times, work Knot st over 3 sts, ssk—49 sts rem. Row 4 K1, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to end. Row 5 K2tog, p1, [work Knot st over 3 sts, p1] 4 times, [k1tbl, p1] 6 times, [work Knot st over 3 sts, p1] 4 times, ssk, work Bobble Fringe—47 sts rem. Row 6 K1, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to last st, k1. Row 7 K2tog, k1tbl, p1, [work Knot st over 3 sts, p1] 3 times, [k1tbl, p1] 8 times, [work Knot st over 3 sts, p1] 3 times, k1tbl, ssk—45 sts rem.

Row 8 K1, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to end. Row 9 K2tog, p1, k1tbl, p1, [work Knot st over

Pigeonroof Studios American Sock

ssk—43 sts rem.

3 sts, p1; rep from * to last 2 sts, k1tbl, M1R,

p1, work Knot st over 3 sts, ssk—41 sts rem. Row 12 K1, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to end. Row 13 K2tog, p1, work Knot st over 3 sts, p1,

[k1tbl, p1] 12 times, work Knot st over 3 sts,

Rep Rows 1–8 three more times, then work

*k1tbl, p1; rep from * to last 6 sts, work Knot

Rows 1–4 once more—91 sts. Body: Work

st over 3 sts, p1, ssk, work Bobble Fringe—

Rows 1–8 of Twisted Mesh chart 11 times, working Bobble Fringe at end of each Row 5 as shown, then work Rows 1 and 2 of chart once more. Dec section 1: Row 1 (RS) K2tog, *work Knot st over 3 sts, p1; rep from * to last 5 sts, work Knot st over

39 sts rem. Row 14 K1, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to last st, k1. Next row (RS) K1, p1, *k1tbl, p1; rep from * to last st, k1. Next row (WS) K2, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to last st, k1. Rep last 2 rows until

Size 55¾" circumference and 8" wide Yarn Pigeonroof Studios American Sock (100% superwash merino wool; 400 yd [366 m]/125 g): • confetti, 2 skeins Gauge 23 sts and 52 rnds = 4" in patt on larger needle

Tools • Size 6 (4 mm): 32" circular (cir) needle • Size 5 (3.75 mm): 32" cir needle • Marker (m) • Tapestry needle

ribbed section measures 7", ending with a RS row. Next row (WS) Purl. Place sts on holder.

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms

Break yarn, leaving a 36" tail for grafting.

you don’t know.

from * to last 2 sts, ssk, work Bobble Fringe—

Finishing

Notes

2 sts dec’d.

Block piece to 19½" wide at widest point (not

This cowl is worked in the round.

3 sts, ssk—89 sts rem.

Row 2 (WS) K1, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to end. Row 3 K2tog, p1, *work Knot st over 3 sts, p1; rep

Row 4 K1, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to last st, k1. Row 5 K2tog, k1tbl, p1, *work Knot st over 3 sts,

including fringe) and 52" long; piece will relax to about 16" wide and 49" long after blocking.

Stitches

p1; rep from * to last 3 sts, k1tbl, ssk—2 sts

Remove waste yarn from provisional CO and

Welted Stitch: Sl 1 kwise wyb. Tilting fabric

dec’d.

place 39 sts onto needle. Place 39 held sts on

toward you to see WS, foll st column of sl st

2nd needle. Hold needles parallel with WS tog

down to first purl bump 4 rnds below. With

and both needle points facing to the right.

right needle, pick up this purl bump from the

Row 6 K1, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to end. Row 7 K2tog, p1, k1tbl, p1, *work Knot st over 3 sts, p1; rep from * to last 4 sts, k1tbl, p1,

Thread grafting tail onto a tapestry needle and

ssk—2 sts dec’d.

graft sts using Kitchener st. Weave in ends.

Row 8 K2, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to last st, k1. Row 9 K2tog, *work Knot st over 3 sts, p1; rep from * to last 5 sts, work Knot st over 3 sts, ssk—2 sts dec’d.

Row 10 K1, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to end.

90

page 5 5

Knot st over 3 sts, p1] 2 times, k1tbl, p1,

Row 10 K2, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to last st, k1. Row 11 K2tog, [work Knot st over 3 sts, p1] 2 times,

Row 8 K2, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to last st, k1.

D a n i e l a N ii

3 sts, p1] 2 times, [k1tbl, p1] 10 times, [work

M1R, k1—2 sts inc’d. Row 6 K1, *p1tbl, k1; rep from * to end. Row 7 K1, M1L, k1tbl, p1, *work Knot st over k1—2 sts inc’d.

BINGHA M HILL COWL

www.knitscene.com

s

top down. Insert left needle from left to right into picked-up st and sl st on right needle and knit these 2 sts tog tbl (as for ssk)—1 welted st.

Yoko Johnston is a Japanese knitter living in Australia with her husband and two children. Besides knitting, she teaches Japanese and plays table tennis.

Cowl With smaller cir needle and using the knitted method, CO 320 sts. Place marker (pm) and


Gauge 22½ sts and 23½ rows = 4" in Drop

purl 1 rnd] 2 times. Change to larger cir needle.

St Cable patt

Knit 1 rnd. Body:

Tools

Rnds 1–4 [K10, p10] 16 times. Rnd 5 [K10, work 10 welted sts (see Stitches)]

• Size 7 (4.5 mm) needles • Size G/7 (4.5 mm) crochet hook • Waste yarn for provisional CO • Cable needle (cn) • Stitch holder • Tapestry needle

16 times. Rnds 6–8 Knit. Rnds 9–22 Rep Rnds 1–8 once, then work Rnds 1–6 once. Rnds 23–26 [P10, k10] 16 times. Rnd 27 [Work 10 welted sts, k10] 16 times. Rnds 28–30 Knit. Rnds 31–44 Rep Rnds 23–30 once, then work Rnds 23–28 once. Rep Rnds 1–44 once more. Top edging: Change to smaller cir needle. [Purl 1 rnd, knit

Weave in ends. Block edges lightly.

s

A prolific designer, Daniela Nii blogs at www.nikkis-studio.com and can be found as NikkisStudio on Ravelry. She lives in Broomfield, Colorado.

P

P

K

P

K

BN

K

P

K

P

K

P

K

P

K

P

FN

work 38 times

K knitwise P purlwise

This cowl is worked back and forth in rows, then

pattern repeat

the ends are grafted together in pattern.

Stitches Row 1 (RS) Knit. Row 2 (WS) K2, purl to last 2 sts, k2. Row 3 K3, *k1, wrapping yarn 2 times around needle; rep from * to last 3 sts, k3. Row 4 K2, p1, *sl 3 sts onto cn (letting extra

Sequence A

Sequence B

P

K

BN

K

P

BN

K

P

FN

K

P

FN

loops drop), hold in front, p3 (letting extra

Sequence A (knit st on front needle, purl st on back needle)

loops drop), p3 from cn; rep from * to last

Step 1 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on

3 sts, p1, k2.

front needle, leave st on needle. Step 2 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on

Rep Rows 1–6 for patt.

back needle, remove st from needle. Step 3 Insert tapestry needle pwise into next st

Cowl

on back needle, leave st on needle. Step 4 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on front needle, remove st from needle.

of Drop Stitch Cable patt (see Stitches)

Sequence B (knit st on front needle, knit st on back needle)

46 times, then work Rows 1–4 once more.

Step 1 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on

Break yarn, leaving a 36" tail for grafting. Place sts on holder.

front needle, leave st on needle. Step 2 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on

Finishing

back needle, remove st from needle. Step 3 Insert tapestry needle kwise into next st

Weave in ends, except CO and grafting tails. Block to measurements. Remove waste yarn from provisional CO and place 42 sts onto

on back needle, leave st on needle. Step 4 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on front needle, remove st from needle.

needle, then create an extra st on same needle

Graft in patt: Work Sequence A 2 times. Work

as foll: with CO tail threaded on a tapestry

Sequence B 38 times. Work Sequence A

needle, wrap tail over needle from WS to RS

2 times, removing st from back needle on Step

and then through an edge st to WS of

3 of last rep. Weave in ends.

s

work—43 sts. Return 42 held sts to 2nd needle. Hold needles parallel with WS tog

Laura Reinbach is a native Floridian who

|and 43 CO sts in back, making sure cowl isn’t

now resides in a small town in Maine with her husband and four boys. Although she may complain of the cold from time to time, she is very grateful to wear her knitted items most of the year, and she really enjoys the creative outlet designing knitwear provides. Find her online at www .LauraReinbach.com.

twisted and both needle points face to the S w e e t G e o r g i a Ya r n s S u p e r w a s h Wo r s t e d

K

BN back needle

CO 42 sts, leaving a 6" tail. Work Rows 1–6

page 4 9

K

Notes

Using the crochet chain provisional method,

L a ur a R e in b a c h

P

FN front needle

Row 5 Rep Row 1. Row 6 Rep Row 2.

HAPPY JACK COWL

K

you don’t know.

Drop Stitch Cable Pattern: (multiple of 6 sts)

Finishing

P

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms

1 rnd] 2 times. BO all sts as foll: K1, *k1, knit 2 sts on right needle tog tbl; rep from * to end.

Grafting

right. Thread grafting yarn onto a tapestry needle and graft sts in patt foll chart or

Size 48" circumference and 7½" wide Yarn SweetGeorgia Yarns Superwash

written instructions. Note: In the written

Worsted (100% superwash merino wool; 200 yd [182 m]/115 g): • turmeric, 2 skeins

followed by the order in which the sequences

instructions, the sequences appear first, are worked.

2016 knitscene handmade

91

The Projects

join in the rnd. Bottom edging: [Knit 1 rnd,


Step 4 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on

See knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms you don’t know.

front needle, remove st from needle.

The Projects

Notes

Sequence B (knit st on front needle, knit st on back needle)

This cowl is worked back and forth in rows, then

Step 1 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on

the ends are grafted together in pattern.

front needle, leave st on needle. Step 2 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on

Cowl

back needle, remove st from needle. Step 3 Insert tapestry needle kwise into next st

Using the crochet chain provisional method, CO 46 sts, leaving a 6" tail. Work Rows 1–40 of

on back needle, leave st on needle. Step 4 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on

Zigzag chart 5 times, then work Rows 1–38

front needle, remove st from needle.

once more. Break yarn, leaving a 64" tail for grafting. Place sts on holder.

Sequence C (purl st on front needle, purl st on back needle)

Finishing

Step 1 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on

Weave in ends, except CO and grafting tails.

front needle, leave st on needle.

Block to measurements. Remove waste yarn from provisional CO and place 46 sts onto

EASTERN PL AINS COWL Ta n i s Gr a y page 5 3

needle, then create an extra st on same needle

k on RS; p on WS

as foll: with CO tail threaded on a tapestry needle, wrap tail over needle from WS to RS

p on RS; k on WS

and then through an edge st to WS of

pattern repeat

work—47 sts. Return 46 held sts to 2nd needle. Hold needles parallel with WS tog and 47 CO sts in back, making sure cowl isn’t

Dream in Color Mammoth

Zigzag

twisted and both needle points face to the right. Thread grafting yarn onto a tapestry

39

Size 64" circumference and 14½" wide Yarn Dream in Color Mammoth (100% extra

needle and graft sts in patt foll chart or written

fine US grown wool; 125 yd [114 m]/100 g): • #805 Joshua tree, 4 skeins Gauge 12½ sts and 15 rows = 4" in charted patt

the sequences appear first, followed by the

Tools • Size 11 (8 mm) needles • Size L/11 (8 mm) crochet hook • Waste yarn for provisional CO • Stitch holder • Tapestry needle

37

directions. Note: In the written instructions,

35 33

order in which the sequences are worked.

31

Sequence A (knit st on front needle, purl st on back needle)

29 27

Step 1 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on

25

front needle, leave st on needle.

23

Step 2 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on

21

back needle, remove st from needle.

19

Step 3 Insert tapestry needle pwise into next st

17

on back needle, leave st on needle.

15 13

K knitwise

Sequence A

Sequence B

11

Sequence C

9

P purlwise FN front needle

P

K

BN

K

P

BN

P

K

BN

K

P

FN

K

P

FN

P

K

FN

7 5

BN back needle

3 1

pattern repeat 14-st rep

Grafting P

K

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FN

work 3 times

92

www.knitscene.com


back needle, remove st from needle.

Step 3 Insert tapestry needle pwise into next st on back needle, leave st on needle.

Step 4 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on

Colorwork 83 81 79 77

Tools

front needle, remove st from needle. Graft in patt: Work Sequence A 2 times, *work Sequence B once, work Sequence C 7 times, [work Sequence B once, work Sequence C once] 3 times; rep from * 2 more times, then work Sequence A 2 times, removing st from back needle on Step 3 of last rep. Weave in ends.

• Version 1: #14 cats in the coffee (browns; CC1–CC5), 1 set of 5 skeins • Version 2: #25 mimsy (purples; CC1– CC5), 1 set of 5 skeins Gauge 27 sts and 36 rnds = 4" in St st

s

Tanis Gray lives in the Washington, D.C., metro area with her mechanical-engineer husband and young son. When not knitting, she can be found digging in the garden, taking photos, making a mess in the kitchen, or at her sewing machine. She is the author of seven knitting books. See what she’s up to at www.tanisknits.com.

The Projects

Step 2 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on

75

• Size 3 (3.25 mm): 24" circular (cir) needle • Spare 24" cir needle, same size or smaller than main needle • Marker (m) • Tapestry needle

73 71 69 67 65

Notes

63

This cowl is worked in the round, then the ends

61

are grafted together using Kitchener stitch.

59

The chart is worked using the stranded method. 57

Always pick up the first color over the sec-

55

ond and pick up the second color from under the first; this will prevent tangling. Keep

53

floats loose. For floats longer than 5 stitches,

51

twist yarns together on wrong side of work.

49

Break yarn at each color change.

47

If necessary, use a larger needle for the charted

45

rounds to maintain gauge.

43 41

Cowl

39

With CC1 and using a provisional method, CO 156 sts. Place marker and join in the rnd. Knit

37

6 rnds. With CC2 (see Notes), knit 7 rnds. With

35

CC3, knit 7 rnds. With CC4, knit 7 rnds. With

33

CC5, knit 13 rnds. With CC4, knit 7 rnds. With

31

CC3, knit 7 rnds. With CC2, knit 7 rnds. With

29

CC1, knit 7 rnds. With MC, knit 7 rnds. Purl

27

1 rnd for turning ridge. Work Rnds 1–83 of 25

Colorwork chart. With MC, purl 1 rnd for

23

turning ridge. Knit 6 rnds. Break yarn, leaving

21

a 3½-yd tail for grafting.

19

LOVEL A ND COWL L a ur a R e in b a c h page 4 8

Finishing

17

Place sts on waste yarn holder. Block. Weave

15

in all ends except for grafting tail. Return sts

13

to needle. Remove waste yarn from provisional

11

CO and place 156 CO sts onto spare cir needle. 9

Fold cowl at turning ridges with WS tog. With

7

tail threaded on a tapestry needle, graft sts using Kitchener st.

5

s

3

Wo n d e r l a n d Ya r n s C h e s h i r e C a t

Size 23" circumference and 9¼" high Yarn Wonderland Yarns Cheshire Cat (100% superwash merino; 512 yd [468 m]/113 g): • #00 white rabbit (MC), 1 skein • Wonderland Yarns Cheshire Cat Miniskein pack (100% superwash merino; 128 yd (117 m)/28 g per skein; 5 skeins per pack):

Laura Reinbach is a native Floridian who now resides in a small town in Maine with her husband and four boys. Although she may complain of the cold from time to time, she is very grateful to wear her knitted items most of the year, and she really enjoys the creative outlet designing knitwear provides. Find her at www .LauraReinbach.com.

1

12-st rep

MC

CC4

CC1

CC5

CC2

pattern repeat

CC3

2016 knitscene handmade

93


FN

BN

once more. Break yarn, leaving a 45" tail for

P

from provisional CO and place 22 CO sts onto

K

needle, then create an extra st on same needle

P

as foll: with CO tail threaded on a tapestry

P K P K

P

Block to measurements. Remove waste yarn

P

K

Weave in ends, except CO and grafting tails.

K

P

Finishing

P

The Projects

K

grafting. Place sts on holder.

K

K

needle, wrap tail over needle from WS to RS K

K

and then through an edge st to WS of

P

23

K

21

Tools

P

19

• Size 15 (10 mm) needles • Size L/11 (8 mm) crochet hook • Waste yarn for provisional CO • Stitch holder • Tapestry needle

K

17

K

15

P

P

13

K

11

P

9

See knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms you

7

K

don’t know.

P

5

K

3

Notes

1

Grafting

a point in the color sequence of the new skein that matches the ending color of the

K

the ends are grafted together in pattern. When joining a new skein, make sure to choose

P

22 sts

P

K

This cowl is worked back and forth in rows, then

P P K P K P K K P P K K P P K P K P K P

K P K

25

K

27

29

P

Bulky (100% wool; 87 yd [79 m]/150 g): • ice queen, 3 skeins Gauge 8½ sts and 12½ rows = 4" in charted patt

K

31

P

Size 68" circumference and 10" wide Yarn Freia Fine Handpaints Ombré Super

K

33

K

P

35

Freia Fine Handpaints Ombré Super Bulky

P

P

K

Puzzle

P

K

page 4 3

K

P

p on RS; k on WS

P

Ta n i s Gr a y

P

k on RS; p on WS

K

K

K

RESERVOIR RIDGE COWL

P

directions. Note: In the written instructions,

P

K

and graft sts in patt foll chart or written

K

P

Thread grafting yarn onto a tapestry needle

P

K

and both needle points face to the right.

K

sts in back, making sure cowl isn’t twisted

P

P

Hold needles parallel with WS tog and 23 CO

K

P

work—23 sts. Return 22 held sts to 2nd needle.

previous skein. The colors at the ends may not match when the cowl is grafted. K knitwise

Cowl Using the crochet chain provisional method, CO 22 sts, leaving a 6" tail. Work Rows 1–36 of Puzzle chart 5 times, then work Rows 1–34

94

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P purlwise FN front needle BN back needle

Sequence A

Sequence B

Sequence C

P

K

BN

K

P

BN

P

K

BN

K

P

FN

K

P

FN

P

K

FN


Scarf

order in which the sequences are worked.

Using the long-tail method, CO 37 sts. Next

Sequence A (knit st on front needle, purl st on back needle)

row K1, *p1, k1; rep from * to end. Rep last row

Step 1 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on

piece measures 58" from CO, ending with

once more. Rep Rows 1–12 of Waffle chart until Row 10 of chart. Next row K1, *p1, k1; rep from

front needle, leave st on needle.

Step 2 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on

* to end. Rep last row once more. BO all sts.

back needle, remove st from needle. Step 3 Insert tapestry needle pwise into next st

Finishing Weave in ends. Block to measurements.

on back needle, leave st on needle.

s

Step 4 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on A Pacific Northwest native, Catrina Frost is also a knitter, designer, and fiber enthusiast. When she’s not busy working with fibers, she loves to spend time with her wonderful husband and two kids.

front needle, remove st from needle.

Sequence B (knit st on front needle, knit st on back needle) Step 1 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on front needle, leave st on needle. Step 2 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on back needle, remove st from needle. Step 3 Insert tapestry needle kwise into next st on back needle, leave st on needle. Step 4 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on

SPRUCE CREEK SCARF C a t r in a Fr o s t

front needle, remove st from needle.

page 5 0

Sequence C (purl st on front needle, purl st on back needle) Step 1 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on

Y O T H Ya r n s B i g S i s t e r

front needle, leave st on needle.

Step 2 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on back needle, remove st from needle. Step 3 Insert tapestry needle pwise into next st

Size 7" wide and 58" long Yarn YOTH Yarns Big Sister (80% super-

on back needle, leave st on needle. Step 4 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on

Sequence B 2 times, work Sequence C once,

wash merino wool, 10% cashmere, 10% nylon; 231 yd [211 m]/100 g): • Concord grape, 2 skeins Gauge 21 sts and 29 rows = 4" in charted patt

work Sequence B 3 times, work Sequence C

Tools

once, work Sequence B once, work

• Size 5 (3.75 mm) needles • Tapestry needle

front needle, remove st from needle. Graft in patt: Work Sequence A 2 times, work

Sequence C once, work Sequence B 5 times,

DILLON SCARF Emil y R in g e lm a n

work Sequence C once, work Sequence B 3 times, work Sequence A 2 times, removing st

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms

from back needle on Step 3 of last rep. Weave

you don’t know.

in ends.

page 35

s

Tanis Gray lives in the Washington, D.C., metro area with her mechanical-engineer husband and young son. When not knitting, she can be found digging in the garden, taking photos, making a mess in the kitchen, or at her sewing machine. She is the author of seven knitting books. See what she’s up to at www.tanisknits.com.

A m a n o P uy u

k on RS; p on WS p on RS; k on WS

Size 5¾" wide and 78" long, excluding fringe Yarn Amano Puyu (70% baby alpaca,

pattern repeat

Waffle 11 9 7 5 3

30% silk; 82 yd [75 m]/50 g): • #3003 caramel, 3 skeins Yarn distributed by Berroco Gauge 13 sts and 13 rows = 4" in Lace patt

Tools • Size 13 (9 mm) needles • Size M/13 (9 mm) or smaller crochet hook • Stitch holder • Tapestry needle

1

6-st rep

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms you don’t know. 2016 knitscene handmade

95

The Projects

the sequences appear first, followed by the


The Projects

Notes

half in front, join ends using garter st grafting

through fold to secure. Insert 1 strand of fringe

This scarf is worked in two identical halves,

as foll:

in every peak and valley of each end. Trim

Step 1 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on

fringe.

then the halves are grafted in garter stitch.

s

front needle, leave st on needle.

Stitches Lace Pattern: (multiple of 6 sts + 1)

Step 2 Insert tapestry needle pwise into st on back needle, leave st on needle.

Row 1 (RS) K1, *yo, k1, k3tog, k1, yo, k1; rep from

Step 3 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on

* to end. Row 2 Purl.

front needle, remove st from needle. Step 4 Insert tapestry needle pwise into next st

Rep Rows 1 and 2 for patt.

on front needle, leave st on needle. Step 5 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on

Scarf

back needle, remove st from needle. Step 6 Insert tapestry needle pwise into next st

First half: CO 19 sts. Work in Lace patt (see Stitches) until piece measures 32" from CO,

on back needle, leave st on needle.

ending with a WS row. Work in garter st for 7",

Rep Steps 3–6 until 1 st rem on each needle.

ending with a RS row. Place sts on holder.

Step 7 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on

Second half: Work as for first half, but end

front needle, remove st from needle. Step 8 Insert tapestry needle kwise into st on

with a WS row. Cut yarn, leaving a 32" tail for grafting. Do not place sts on holder.

back needle, remove st from needle. Weave in ends. Block to measurements,

Finishing

stretching lace portion to show patt. Fringe:

Return 19 sts of first half to empty needle.

Cut fourteen 12" lengths of yarn. Fold 1 strand

With 32" tail threaded on a tapestry needle

in half. Using a crochet hook, pull fold through

and WS tog, holding first half in back and 2nd

lower edge of scarf, then pull ends of strand

96

www.knitscene.com

Emily Ringelman lives in hot, humid Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Find her on Ravelry as EmilyRingelman.


Change to B and work for 4½". Change to A

With A and cir needle, CO 30 (32, 38) sts. Do

and work for 2". Flap: Next rnd K36 (40, 42),

not join. Work in k1, p1 rib for 4 rows. Set-up

BO 37 (40, 42) sts—36 (40, 42) sts rem for flap.

row (RS) K4 for left front buttonband, place

Beg working back and forth in rows. Change

marker (pm), k4 (4, 6) sleeve sts, pm, k14 (16,

to B. Knit 1 RS row. Work in k1, p1 rib for 3 (3½,

18) back sts, pm, k4 (4, 6) sleeve sts, pm, k4 for

3½)", ending with a RS row. Buttonhole row

right front buttonband. Next row (WS) K4, purl

(WS) Work 5 (5, 7) sts in patt, yo, k2tog, work

to last 4 sts, k4. Inc row (RS) K4, sl m, *k1f&b,

10 (12, 12) sts in patt, yo, k2tog, work in patt to

knit to 1 st before m, k1f&b, sl m; rep from * 2

last 7 sts, yo, k2tog, work in patt to end. Work

more times, k4—6 sts inc’d. Next row (WS) K4,

3 more rows in rib patt. BO all sts in patt.

purl to last 4 sts, k4. Change to B (see Notes).

CHEYENNE MOUNTAIN MONK EY SLEEP SACK Jessica Anderson page 5 8

Rep Inc row every RS row 3 times—54 (56, 62)

Sleeves

sts. Work 1 WS row even. Change to A. Rep Inc

Place 24 (26, 28) sleeve sts on dpn and, with

row—60 (62, 68) sts. Work 1 WS row even.

RS facing, rejoin MC. Next rnd K24 (26, 28),

Change to MC. Rep Inc row every RS row 5 (6,

pick up and knit 1 st along underarm edge, pm

6) times—90 (98, 104) sts: 34 (38, 40) back sts,

for beg of rnd, pick up and knit 1 st—26 (28,

24 (26, 28) sts for each sleeve, and 4 sts for

30) sts. Join in the rnd. Knit 6 rnds. Dec rnd K1,

each front band. Work 1 WS row even. Break

ssk, knit to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1—2 sts dec’d.

yarn. Place sts on holder and set aside.

Rep Dec rnd every 8 (11, 12)th rnd 2 more time(s)—20 (22, 24) sts rem. Work even until

Front

piece measures 5 (5½, 6)" from underarm.

With A and cir needle, CO 21 (22, 22) sts. Do

Change to A. Knit 2 rnds. Change to B. Knit 6

not join. Work in k1, p1 rib for 4 rows. Set-up

rnds. Change to A. Knit 1 rnd. Work in k1, p1

row (RS) K4 for right front buttonhole band,

rib for 4 rnds. BO all sts in patt.

pm, k13 (14, 14), pm, k4 for left front buttonhole band. Buttonhole row (WS) K2, yo, k2tog, sl m,

Finishing

purl to m, sl m, k2tog, yo, k2. Inc row (RS) K4,

Flap button bobbles (make 3): With B and

sl m, k1f&b, knit to 1 st before m, k1f&b, sl m,

dpn, CO 1 st. Next row [K1f&b] 2 times into

Sizes 17¼ (18¾, 19¾)" chest circumference

k4—2 sts inc’d. Next row (WS) K4, sl m, purl

same st, turn—4 sts; p4, turn; k4, turn; p4,

and 23¾ (26¼, 27½)" long; shown in size 19¾"; to fit newborn (3 mo, 6 mo) Yarn Spud & Chloë Sweater (55% wool, 45% organic cotton; 160 yd [146 m]/100 g): • #7524 chocolate milk (brown; MC), 2 (3, 3) skeins • #7500 ice cream (cream; A), 1 skein • #7518 barn (red; B), 1 skein Yarn distributed by Blue Sky Alpacas Gauge 17 sts and 24 rnds = 4" in St st

to m, sl m, k4. Change to B. Rep Inc row every

turn; k4, pass 2nd, 3rd and 4th st over first st

RS row 3 times—29 (30, 30) sts. Rep Button-

and off needle—1 st rem. Break yarn and

Tools

Body

• Size 6 (4 mm): 16" circular (cir) needle and set of double-pointed needles (dpn) • Markers (m) • Stitch holders • Cable needle (cn) • Tapestry needle

Return 90 (98, 104) back sts to needle.

hole row. Change to A. Rep Inc row—31 (32,

fasten off rem st. Top button bobbles (make

32) sts. Work 1 WS row even. Change to MC.

6): With B and dpn, CO 1 st. Next row [K1f&b,

Rep Inc row every RS row 3 times—37 (38, 38)

k1] into same st, turn—3 sts; p3, turn; k3, turn;

sts. Rep Buttonhole row. Rep Inc row every RS

p3, turn; k3, pass 2nd and 3rd st over first st

row 1 (2, 3) time(s)—39 (42, 44) sts. Work 3 (3,

and off needle—1 st rem. Break yarn and

1) row(s) even. Break yarn. Place sts on holder

fasten off rem st. Weave in ends. Block to

and set aside.

measurements. Sew ends of button bobbles tog to form a bobble shape. Sew on button bobbles opposite buttonholes.

s

Joining row (RS) Sl 4 buttonband sts to right 10 (10¾, 12¼)"

needle, remove m, place 24 (26, 28) sleeve sts on holder, join MC and k34 (38, 40) back sts, remove m, place 24 (26, 28) sleeve sts on holder, remove m, place 39 (42, 44) front sts

7 (7½, 8)"

½ (½ , ¾)" 4¼ (4¾, 4¾)"

on left needle, sl 4 buttonband sts onto cn See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms

and hold in back of 4 right front buttonhole

you don’t know.

band sts, [knit 1 buttonhole band st tog

body

6 (6½, 7)"

4¾ (5¼, 5¾)"

Spud & Chloë Sweater

with 1 buttonband st] 4 times, k31 (34, 36)

Notes

front sts, remove m, sl 4 left front buttonhole

This sleep sack is worked from the top down.

band sts onto cn and hold in front of 4 button-

The front and back are worked back and

band sts, [knit 1 buttonhole band st tog with

forth separately to the underarm, then joined

1 buttonband st] 4 times, thus joining pieces in

to work the body in the round. The sleeves

the rnd—73 (80, 84) sts. Pm for beg of rnd.

are worked in the round from the top down.

Work in St st until piece measures 11 (13, 14)"

Break yarn at each color change.

from underarm. Change to A and work for 1½".

19 (21, 22)"

3 (3½, 3½)"

17¼ (18¾, 19¾)"

2016 knitscene handmade

97

The Projects

Back


Hat With B and cir needle, CO 48 (54, 60, 66) sts.

The Projects

Place marker (pm) and join in the rnd. Work in k1, p1 rib for 1". Knit 1 rnd. Change to A (see Notes) and knit 6 (6, 8, 8) rnds. Change to MC and knit 6 rnds. Change to A and knit 9 (11, 12, 13) rnds. Change to MC and knit 2 rnds. Shape crown: Dec rnd *K4, k2tog; rep from * to end—40 (45, 50, 55) sts rem. Knit 1 rnd. Dec

rnd *K3, k2tog; rep from * to end—32 (36, 40, 44) sts rem. Knit 1 rnd. Change to B. Dec rnd *K2, k2tog; rep from * to end—24 (27, 30, 33) sts rem. Dec rnd *K1, k2tog; rep from * to end—16 (18, 20, 22) sts rem. Knit 1 rnd. Dec rnd *K2tog; rep from * to end—8 (9, 10, 11) sts rem. Break yarn and with tail threaded on a tapestry needle, draw tail through rem sts and pull tight to gather. Secure on WS.

CHEYENNE MOUNTAIN MONK EY HAT Jessica Anderson page 5 8

Finishing Ears: Fold hat in half with beg of rnd at center back, then with MC and dpn, beg about 2¼" up from CO edge, pick up and knit 8 sts over

RED FE ATHER SWE ATER Karen Giet zen page 57

about 1½" along fold at one side of hat, pm, rotate hat, then pick up and knit 8 more sts 1 stitch column away from first 8 sts—16 sts. Spud & Chloë Sweater

G r e a t L a k e s Ya r n C o. D i v i n e D K

Pm and join in the rnd. Knit 2 rnds. Inc rnd

Sizes 18½ (20, 21¼, 22, 24¼)" chest

every other rnd 2 more times—28 sts. Knit 2

tail. With tail threaded on a tapestry needle,

circumference; shown in size 21¼"; to fit 3 (6, 9, 12, 24) months Yarn Great Lakes Yarn Co. Divine DK (100% superwash merino wool; 274 yd [251 m]/100 g): • fall color tour, 2 (2, 2, 2, 3) skeins Gauge 22 sts and 33 rnds = 4" in St st

graft sts using Kitchener st. Block to measure-

Tools

ments. With B, make a 3" pompom and attach

• Size 6 (4 mm): 16" circular (cir) needle and set of double-pointed needles (dpn) • Markers (m) • Stitch holders • Size G/6 (4 mm) crochet hook • One 5⁄8 " button • Tapestry needle

Rep Dec rnd every other rnd once, then every rnd 3 times—8 sts rem. Place first and last 4 sts each on a dpn. Break yarn, leaving a 12"

securely to top of hat. Weave in ends.

s

Tools • Size 6 (4 mm): 16" circular (cir) needle and set of double-pointed needles (dpn) • Markers (m) • Stitch holders • Tapestry needle See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms you don’t know.

Notes This hat is worked in the round from the bottom up. The ears are worked in the round from stitches picked up from the sides of the hat. Break yarn at each color change.

Jessica Anderson enjoys designing fun and quirky knitting patterns. Read more about her knitting, designing, and family adventures on her blog at www.allinadays fun.blogspot.com, and find her on Ravelry as MonkeyButtBabies.

3¾ (4, 4, 4, 4¼)" 5½ (5½, 6, 6½, 7½)" ¼"

k2tog, sl m; rep from * once more—4 sts dec’d.

5½ (6, 6, 7, 8)"

rnds. Dec rnd *Ssk, knit to 2 sts before m,

2¼ (2¼, 2¾, 2¾, 3)" 3¾ (4, 4¼, 4½, 5)"

from * once more—4 sts inc’d. Rep Inc rnd

and 5 (5¼, 5½, 5¾)" tall; shown in size 14"; to fit newborn (3 mo, 6 mo, 12 mo) Yarn Spud & Chloë Sweater (55% wool, 45% organic cotton; 160 yd [146 m]/100 g): • #7524 chocolate milk (brown; MC), 1 skein • #7500 ice cream (cream; A), 1 skein • #7518 barn (red; B), 1 skein Yarn distributed by Blue Sky Alpacas Gauge 17 sts and 30 rnds = 4" in St st

body

6½ (7, 7¾, 8¼, 9)"

When working crown shaping, change to double-pointed needles when necessary.

98

www.knitscene.com

4¼ (5, 6½, 6¾, 6¾)"

*K1f&b, knit to 1 st before m, k1f&b, sl m; rep

Sizes 11¼ (12¾, 14, 15½)" circumference

18½ (20, 21¼, 22, 24¼)"


times—184 (196, 204, 214, 234) sts: 52 (56, 58,

you don’t know.

60, 66) sts for back, 64 (68, 70, 72, 78) sts for

Notes

Divide for body and sleeves: Next rnd Knit

This pullover is worked from the top down with

to 5 (3, 4, 5, 4) sts before sleeve m, pm for rib,

The Projects

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms

front, 34 (36, 38, 41, 45) sts for each sleeve.

raglan shaping. The collar is worked first

knit to sleeve m, remove m, place next 34 (36,

back and forth. The sleeves are worked in

38, 41, 45) sleeve sts on holder, remove m,

the round from the top down.

using the backward-loop method, CO 0 (0, 2, 2,

When working back and forth, slip the first

2) sts, k5 (7, 4, 3, 4), pm for rib, knit to 5 (7, 4, 3,

stitch of every right-side row purlwise with

4) sts before sleeve m, pm for rib, knit to sleeve

yarn in front and the first stitch of every

m, remove m, place next 34 (36, 38, 41, 45)

wrong-side row knitwise with yarn in back.

sleeve sts on holder, remove m, using the

The collar folds down, so the right side of the

backward-loop method, CO 0 (0, 2, 2, 2) sts, k5

collar is the wrong side of the body; there-

(3, 4, 5, 4), pm for rib, work to end—116 (124,

fore, the right side/wrong side designation

132, 136, 148) body sts rem.

changes when the body begins.

Body Pullover

Next rnd *Knit to rib m, [p2, k2] 2 times, p2,

Collar: With cir needle, CO 70 (74, 78, 80, 86)

sl m; rep from * once more, work in patt to end.

sts. Do not join. Set-up row (WS) [K2, p2]

Cont in patt until piece measures 4½ (5, 5, 6,

2 times, k2, place marker (pm), p25 (27, 29, 30,

7)" from underarm. Rib: Next rnd *K2, p2; rep

33), pm, p25 (27, 29, 30, 33), pm, [k2, p2]

from * to end. Cont in rib for 1". BO all sts

2 times, k2. Dec row (RS) Work in rib to m (see

kwise.

SILVERTHORNE BABY BL A NK ET Emil y R in g e lm a n page 6 0

Notes), sl m, knit to 3 sts before m, ssk, k1, sl m, k1, k2tog, knit to m, work in rib to end—

Sleeves

2 sts dec’d. Rep Dec row every RS row 7 (7, 9,

With dpn and RS facing, beg at center of

9, 10) more times—54 (58, 58, 60, 64) sts rem.

underarm, pick up and knit 1 (1, 2, 2, 2) st(s)

Work 1 WS row, removing center m. Body:

along underarm, k34 (36, 38, 41, 45) sleeve sts

Raglan set-up row (RS of collar; WS of body;

from holder, pick up and knit 1 (1, 2, 2, 2) st(s)

see Notes) Work in rib to m, sl m, k5 (6, 6, 6, 7)

along underarm—36 (38, 42, 45, 49) sts total.

for right front, pm, k2 (2, 2, 3, 3) for right sleeve,

Pm and join in the rnd. Work 5 (6, 11, 8, 7) rnds

pm, k20 (22, 22, 22, 24) for back, pm, k2 (2, 2, 3,

even in St st. Dec rnd K2tog, knit to last 2 sts,

3) for left sleeve, pm, k5 (6, 6, 6, 7) for left front,

ssk—2 sts dec’d. Rep Dec rnd every 6 (7, 12, 9,

sl m, work in rib to end. Inc row (RS of body)

8)th rnd 5 (4, 2, 3, 5) more times—24 (28, 36, 37,

Work in rib to m, sl m, *knit to 1 st before m,

37) sts rem. Work even until piece measures

Washable (100% superwash merino wool; 95 yd [87 m]/50 g): • #30 saffron (A), 4 skeins (see Notes) • #97 brushed silver (B), 4 skeins Gauge 18 sts and 26 rows = 4" in St st

k1f&b, sl m, k1f&b; rep from * 3 more times,

4½ (4½, 5, 5½, 6½)" from underarm, dec 0 (0, 0,

Tools

knit to m, sl m, work in rib to end—8 sts inc’d.

1, 1) st on last rnd—24 (28, 36, 36, 36) sts rem.

Next row (WS) Work in rib to m, sl m, purl to

Work in k2, p2 rib for 1". BO all sts kwise.

• Size 8 (5 mm): 24" or longer circular (cir) needle • Tapestry needle

last m, sl m, work in rib to end. Rep last 2 rows 6 (7, 7, 8, 10) more times, then work Inc row

E w e E w e Ya r n s Wo o ly Wo r s t e d Wa s h a b l e

Size 34" wide and 26" tall Yarn Ewe Ewe Yarns Wooly Worsted

Finishing

once more—118 (130, 130, 140, 160) sts: 36 (40,

Button loop: With crochet hook, join yarn

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms

40, 42, 48) sts for back, 18 (20, 20, 23, 27) sts for

with sl st to right front placket opening at

you don’t know.

each sleeve, 23 (25, 25, 26, 29) sts for each

base of neck. Ch 10, or as needed to encircle

front; placket opening measures 1¾ (2, 2, 2¼,

button. Join with sl st just below first sl st.

Notes

2¾)". Do not turn. Joining row (RS) Using the

Fasten off. Sew button to left front placket

This blanket is worked using the intarsia meth-

backward-loop method, CO 2 sts onto right

opposite button loop. Weave in ends. Block

needle, [k2, p2] 2 times, pm for beg of rnd, k2,

to measurements.

s

remove m, knit to rib m, remove m, k2, pm,

Karen Gietzen is a knitwear designer who

sts: 36 (40, 40, 42, 48) sts for back, 48 (52, 52,

lives in Clarkston, Michigan, and also runs her own hand-dyed-yarn company: Great Lakes Yarn Co. She designs alongside her sister, Cindy Newhouse, as Flora and Fauna knitwear designs.

each sleeve. Inc rnd *Knit to 1 st before m, k1f&b, sl m, k1f&b; rep from * 3 more times, knit to m, work in rib to end—8 sts inc’d.

working intarsia, bring the new yarn under the old yarn at each color change to twist

[p2, k2] 4 times, p2—120 (132, 132, 142, 162) 54, 60) sts for front, 18 (20, 20, 23, 27) sts for

od with two colors and two textures. When

yarns and avoid holes. The blanket shown uses almost all of four skeins of each color. Consider purchasing an extra skein of each color as insurance. A circular needle is used to accommodate the large number of stitches.

Rep Inc rnd every other rnd 7 (7, 8, 8, 8) more

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Blanket

• Stitch holders • Tapestry needle • 5 (5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6) ¾" buttons

With A, CO 160 sts. Do not join. Knit 4 rows,

The Projects

ending with a RS row. Next row (WS) K4, purl to last 4 sts, k4. Next row Knit. Next row K4, purl to last 4 sts, k4. Rep last 2 rows once

See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms

more. Join B (see Notes). Work color change

you don’t know.

sequence as foll:

Notes

Row 1 (RS) With B, k1, with A, knit to end. Row 2 With A, k4, purl to last 4 sts, k2, with B,

This sweater is worked seamlessly from the bot-

k2.

tom up. The sleeves and body are worked

Row 3 With B, k3, with A, knit to end. Row 4 With A, k4, purl to last 4 sts, with B, k4. Row 5 With B, k5, with A, knit to end. Row 6 With A, k4, purl to last 6 sts, with B, p2,

separately, then are joined at the underarm and the raglan yoke is shaped to the neckline. Underarm stitches are joined with a three-needle bind-off, then stitches are

k4.

picked up for the front buttonband.

Row 7 With B, k4, p2, k1, with A, knit to end. Row 8 With A, k4, purl to last 8 sts, with B, p2,

A circular needle is used to accommodate the large number of stitches.

k6.

Row 9 With B, k4, *k2, p2; rep from * to color change, k1, with A, knit to end.

Row 10 With A, k4, purl to 1 st before color

FRONT R ANGE R AGLAN K r i s t e n Te n D y ke

change, with B, *p2, k2; rep from * to last 6

page 61

sts, p2, k4.

Stitches K2, P2 Rib: (multiple of 4 sts)

Row 1 (WS) P3, *k2, p2; rep from * to last st, p1. Row 2 (RS) K3, *p2, k2; rep from * to last st, k1. Rep Rows 1 and 2 for patt.

Row 11 With B, k4, *p2, k2; rep from * to 2 sts

Sleeves

before color change, p2, k1, with A, knit to G r e e n M o u n t a i n S p i n n e r y C o t t o n C o m fo r t

end.

Row 12 With A, k4, purl to 1 st before color

With smaller dpn, CO 28 (28, 32, 32, 32, 36, 36) sts. Place marker (pm) and join in the rnd. Next rnd K1, p2, *k2, p2; rep from * to last st, k1. Rep

change, with B, *p2, k2; rep from * to last

Sizes 19½ (20¼, 21, 21¾, 22¾, 24¼, 25¾)"

4 sts, k4.

chest circumference, buttoned; shown in size 21"; to fit 3 mo (6 mo, 9 mo, 12 mo, 18 mo, 2 years, 4 years) Yarn Green Mountain Spinnery Cotton Comfort (80% wool, 20% organic cotton; 180 yd [165 m]/57 g): • #7506 suede, 2 (3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4) skeins Gauge 20 sts and 32 rows = 4" in St st on larger needle

last rnd 5 (5, 5, 7, 7, 7, 7) more times. Change to

Tools

on last rnd. Place first and last 3 (3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5)

• Size 4 (3.5 mm): 24" circular (cir) needle and set of double-pointed needles (dpn) • Size 5 (3.75 mm): 24" cir needle and set of dpn • Markers (m) • Cable needle (cn)

sts of rnd on holder—32 (34, 36, 34, 36, 38, 38)

Rep last 4 rows 36 more times—4 A sts and 156 B sts. Next row (RS) With B, k4, *k2, p2; rep from * to last 4 sts, k1, with A, k3. Next

row (WS) With A, k2, with B, k2, *k2, p2; rep from * to last 4 sts, k4. Next row With B, k4, *p2, k2; rep from * to last 4 sts, k3, with A, k1. Break A and cont with B only. Next row (WS) K4, *p2, k2; rep from * to last 4 sts, k4. Next

row K4, *k2, p2; rep from * to last 4 sts, k4. Next row K4, *k2, p2; rep from * to last 4 sts, k4. Next row K4, *p2, k2; rep from * to last 4 sts, k4. Next row K4, *p2, k2; rep from * to last 4 sts, k4. Next row K4, *k2, p2; rep from * to last 4 sts, k4. Next row K4, *k2, p2; rep from * to last 4 sts, k4. Knit 4 rows. With RS facing,

larger dpn and St st. Knit 2 rnds. Inc rnd K1, M1L, knit to last st, M1R, k1—2 sts inc’d. Rep Inc rnd every 8 (8, 10, 10, 8, 12, 12)th rnd 2 (1, 1, 2, 5, 1, 5) more time(s), then every 6 (6, 8, 8, 0, 10, 0)th rnd 2 (4, 3, 2, 0, 3, 0) times—38 (40, 42, 42, 44, 46, 48) sts. Work even until piece measures 6 (6½, 7, 7½, 8, 8½, 11)" from CO, ending 3 (3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5) sts before end of rnd

sts rem. Place rem sts on separate holder.

Body With smaller cir needle, CO 92 (96, 100, 104, 108, 116, 124) sts. Do not join. Work in K2, P2

BO all sts.

Finishing Weave in ends. Block to measurements.

3¾ (3¾, 3¾, 4½, 4½, 5, 5½)"

s

6 (6½, 7, 7½, 8, 8½, 11)"

¾ (¾, ¾, 1, 1, 1, 1)"

Emily Ringelman lives in hot, humid Baton

5½ (5½, 6½, 6½, 6½, 7¼, 7¼)"

3¼ (3½, 3¾, 3¾, 4¼, 4½, 4¼)"

Rouge, Louisiana. Find her on Ravelry as EmilyRingelman.

body

7½ (8, 8½, 8½, 8¾, 9¼, 9½ )"

6 (6½, 7, 7½, 8¼, 9¼, 10)"

18½ (19¼, 20, 20¾, 21¾, 23¼, 24¾)"

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Right Cable

Rib (see Stitches) for 6 (6, 6, 6, 8, 8, 8) rows.

raglan m, ssk, sl m, k1, k2tog, knit to 3 sts

Change to larger cir needle. Inc row (WS) P7

before raglan m, ssk, k1, sl m, k2tog; rep from *

(7, 7, 7, 11, 11, 11), k2, [p1, M1P] 2 times, k2, p33

once more, work in patt to last 3 sts, ssk,

(35, 37, 39, 37, 41, 45), M1P, purl to last 13 (13,

k1—10 sts dec’d. Rep raglan and neck dec row

13, 13, 17, 17, 17) sts, k2, [M1P, p1] 2 times, k2,

every RS row 6 (6, 6, 8, 8, 9, 10) more times—

p7 (7, 7, 7, 11, 11, 11)—97 (101, 105, 109, 113,

47 (47, 47, 55, 55, 57, 59) sts rem: 3 sts for each

121, 129) sts. Next row (RS) K7 (7, 7, 7, 11, 11,

front, 10 (10, 10, 12, 12, 12, 12) sts for each

11), pm, work Right Cable chart over 8 sts, pm,

sleeve, 21 (21, 21, 25, 25, 27, 29) sts for back.

knit to last 15 (15, 15, 15, 19, 19, 19) sts, pm,

Work 1 WS row. Rep raglan dec row once—

5

work Left Cable chart over 8 sts, pm, knit to

39 (39, 39, 47, 47, 49, 51) sts rem: 2 sts for each

3

end. Cont in patt until piece measures 6 (6½, 7,

front, 8 (8, 8, 10, 10, 10, 10) sts for each sleeve,

7½, 8¼, 9¼, 10)" from CO, ending with a RS

19 (19, 19, 23, 23, 25, 27) sts for back. With WS

row. Divide for fronts and back: Next row

facing, loosely BO all sts in patt.

The Projects

5 3 1

8 sts

Left Cable

1

8 sts

(WS) Work 27 (28, 29, 31, 32, 34, 37) sts in patt, place last 6 (6, 6, 8, 8, 8, 10) sts worked on

Finishing

k on RS; p on WS

holder for underarm, p49 (51, 53, 55, 57, 61, 65),

Return 6 (6, 6, 8, 8, 8, 10) held underarm sts

p on RS; k on WS

place last 6 (6, 6, 8, 8, 8, 10) sts worked on

from sleeve and body to separate dpn, then

holder for underarm, work to end—21 (22, 23,

pick up 1 additional st at each end of each

23, 24, 26, 27) sts rem for each front, 43 (45, 47,

dpn—8 (8, 8, 10, 10, 10, 12) sts on each of

47, 49, 53, 55) sts rem for back.

2 needles. Turn work WS out (so RS of pieces

sl 2 sts onto cn, hold in back, k2, k2 from cn sl 2 sts onto cn, hold in front, k2, k2 from cn

are tog). Join yarn and use three-needle BO

Yoke

to join underarm. Weave in ends. Block to

Joining row (RS) Work 21 (22, 23, 23, 24, 26, 27)

measurements. Front band: With smaller cir

front sts, pm for raglan, k32 (34, 36, 34, 36, 38,

needle and RS facing, beg at right front lower

Buttonhole row (RS) Work 95 (99, 103, 115, 122,

38) sleeve sts from holder, pm for raglan, k43

edge, pick up and knit 39 (43, 47, 47, 53, 58, 60)

133, 136) sts in patt, *yo, k2tog or p2tog as

(45, 47, 47, 49, 53, 55) back sts, pm for raglan,

sts (about 2 sts for every 3 rows) evenly spaced

needed to maintain patt, work 6 (7, 8, 8, 7, 8, 9)

k32 (34, 36, 34, 36, 38, 38) sleeve sts from

along right front edge to beg of neck shaping,

sts; rep from * 3 (3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4) more times, yo,

holder, pm for raglan, work 21 (22, 23, 23, 24,

10 (10, 10, 12, 12, 14, 15) sts along right front

k2tog or p2tog as needed to maintain patt,

26, 27) front sts—149 (157, 165, 161, 169, 181,

neck edge, 8 (8, 8, 10, 10, 10, 10) sts along

work in patt to end.

185) sts total. Work 3 (3, 3, 5, 5, 5, 5) rows in

sleeve, 18 (18, 18, 22, 22, 24, 26) sts along back,

Both sweaters:

patt, ending with a WS row. Raglan dec row

8 (8, 8, 10, 10, 10, 10) sts along sleeve, 10 (10,

Work 4 more rows in rib, ending with a RS row.

(RS) *Work in patt to 2 sts before raglan m, ssk,

10, 12, 12, 14, 15) sts along left front neck edge,

With WS facing, loosely BO all sts in patt. Sew

sl m, k1, k2tog, knit to 3 sts before raglan m,

and 39 (43, 47, 47, 53, 58, 60) sts along left front

buttons to band opposite buttonholes. Weave

ssk, k1, sl m, k2tog; rep from * once more, work

to lower edge—132 (140, 148, 160, 172, 188,

in ends.

in patt to end—8 sts dec’d. Rep raglan dec row

196) sts total. Work in K2, P2 Rib for 3 rows,

Boy’s sweater only:

s

every 2nd (2nd, 2nd, 4th, 4th, 4th, 4th) row 3 (4,

ending with a WS row.

Kristen TenDyke designs classic sweaters

5, 1, 2, 2, 1) more time(s)—117 (117, 117, 145,

Girl’s sweater only:

145, 157, 169) sts rem: 17 (17, 17, 21, 21, 23, 25)

Buttonhole row (RS) Work 3 sts, *yo, k2tog or

sts for each front, 24 (24, 24, 30, 30, 32, 34) sts

p2tog as needed to maintain patt, work 6 (7, 8,

for each sleeve, 35 (35, 35, 43, 43, 47, 51) sts for

8, 7, 8, 9) sts; rep from * 3 (3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4) more

back. Work 1 WS row. Raglan and neck dec row

times, yo, k2tog or p2tog as needed to

(RS) K1, k2tog, *work in patt to 2 sts before

maintain patt, work in patt to end.

with unique construction. She specializes in seamless knitting and always keeps Mother Nature in mind when making yarn choices. Find Kristen online as KristenTenDyke on Ravelry, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, and at www.kristentendyke.com.

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TECHNIQUES

Blocking for a Professional Finish Sheryl Thies

Most knitters have heard of the term “blocking” but don’t have an understanding of what the process actually requires. Many patterns end with the simple little word, “block.” As a result of this lack of understanding, many knitters simply skip this final step. Unfortunately, skipping this step can have big ramifications. If you’ve ever wondered why your finished piece doesn’t look quite like the photo in the magazine, or if your gauge is off a bit, lack of blocking may be the reason.

BLOCKING BASICS Blocking is the final step of making your project. It smooths and evens your stitches, sets the final dimensions, and gives your project that professional, finished look. Don’t be intimidated by blocking. The process is not complicated, and the results are well worth the effort. With a little care and attention, you can transform a rumpled piece of knitting into a beautiful showpiece. Even though blocking is considered the final step, you should block your swatches before casting on for your project. The gauge stated in a pattern is measured after the piece is blocked, so you need to know your blocked gauge in order to make the correct choice of needle size. Using your gauge swatches, you can try several blocking methods to determine which method you will use on your finished project.

FIBER AND PATTERN The type of fiber and the stitch pattern used factor into the best method for blocking your work. Often the pattern instructions will suggest a method. However, if you used a different yarn or the directions simply say “block,” you need to determine which blocking method to use. Keep in mind that some fibers block better than others. If you have difficulties opening your lace patterns, it could be the fiber used. While all fibers can be blocked and stretched, not all fibers stay in their ‘blocked’ shape. Natural fibers are some of the easiest fibers to block, and they will generally retain the shape and size they have been blocked to until they are re-blocked or they get wet. Acrylic and man-made fibers generally return to their pre-blocked

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shape fairly quickly after the pins are removed and may not be the best choice for an intricate and heavily patterned lace shawl.  Additionally, many natural fibers “bloom” when blocked. When knit, stitches worked in some fibers appear smaller and the fabric more open and loose. However, once blocked, these same stitches will “bloom,” filling in the gaps and creating a more solid and substantial fabric. To ensure that you will get the best possible finish for your handknits, be sure to block your swatch to see how the final fabric of your knitting will appear. Start by reading the yarn label. Care instructions are usually written out or indicated by symbols (see sidebar below). If the label gives instructions for machine washing and drying, follow these simple directions for easy blocking. If the label indicates handwashing and no machine drying, any of the methods listed here could be utilized. The first decision is to determine where you will block your knits and what surface to use. The surface should be large enough to allow the piece to be spread out, resistant to water, and located in an out-of-the-way place so that the piece can be undisturbed until it is completely dry. If there are pets in the house, the best place for blocking may be behind a closed door. Special SpaceBoards and interlocking blocking mats are sold in most craft stores and are very convenient to use, but you can make an acceptable facsimile by placing a large garbage bag or plastic tablecloth over a guest bed or on the floor and placing a heavy bath towel on top of the plastic. You should have two easily acquired tools on hand before beginning to block your project. Strong rust-proof pins, such as T-pins or U-pins, will hold your knitted piece in place. Depending on the size of your project, you may need quite a few. A mist bottle, like the kind used for plants, is available at hardware and grocery stores. Steel blocking wires and a steam iron can also be used for extensive blocking but are not usually required.

The first decisio n is to determine whe re you will block your knit s and what surface to use .

FABRIC CARE SYMBOLS

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UNBLOCK ED Acrylic Difference after blocking is minor, and swatch will return to preblocked shape fairly quickly.

Cotton After blocking, eyelets are more open and shape is more uniform. Additionally, yarn blooms so that stitches fill in open spaces.

Wool After blocking, stitches are smoother, eyelets are more open, and shape is more uniform.

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BLOCK ED


Too few pins creates points and scalloped edges

Enough pins create smooth edges

BLOCKING METHODS Mist Lay the piece on the prepared surface and shape to specified dimensions. Fill a clean mist bottle with water and mist the piece lightly. Allow piece to dry completely before moving. Misting is a good method to try if you are new to blocking or unsure of the fiber you’re dealing with. If the final result is not what you were hoping for, move on to the pin-and-mist method.

Pin and Mist Lay the piece on the prepared surface and pin, using T-pins or U-pins, to finished measurements. Use enough pins so that the edges are straight; using too few pins may result in points or scalloped edges. Fill a clean mist bottle with water and mist the piece heavily. Allow to dry completely before removing pins.

Immersion Misting is a wonderful place to start when blocking your first piece, but sometimes a light mist is not enough encouragement to keep your lacework open once it is dry. If you have mist-blocked your project and do not like the finished fabric, the next blocking method to try is immersion. Dip the piece in cool water. Let it soak for several minutes so that the piece is completely saturated. Gently squeeze out the water; do not wring or twist the piece. Roll the piece in an absorbent bath

towel to blot out the excess water. Spread the piece on the prepared surface and pin to the finished measurements. Blocking wires can be inserted along the edges and then pinned in place; this will keep the edges straight and use fewer pins. Allow to dry completely before removing pins.

Steaming Immersion blocking can cause some fabrics to stretch out of shape and grow in size. If you are worried about how immersion will affect your knitted fabric, try steam blocking. Lay the piece on the prepared surface and pin in place. Hold a steam iron or steamer above the piece, allowing the steam to penetrate the fibers. NEVER allow the iron to touch the fabric. Doing so will flatten the stitches and may actually damage (melt) the fibers. Allow to dry completely before removing pins. Use these straightforward blocking methods and make blocking an essential part of your finishing process. Your efforts will be noticed. s Sheryl Thies's passion for combining fiber, texture and color provided teaching opportunities both near and far. She is the author of numerous knitting and Tunisian crochet books and has designed for magazines and yarn companies.

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BOOK EXCERPT

TIME TRAVELER REVERSIBLE VEST When crossing centuries or just running errands, versatility is key. This unusual wrap can be worn several ways: belted or open, with a shorter collar and a longer vest (as shown) or turned upside down for an oversized collar.

Designed by Karen Clements Finished Size About 16" (40.5 cm) across back and 30" (76 cm) long.

Yarn Bulky weight (#6 Super Bulky). Shown here: Cascade Yarns Magnum (100% wool; 123 yd [112.5 m]/8.82 oz [250 g]): #9748 mocha heather, 3 skeins.

Needles Size U.S. 19 (15 mm): 16" (40 cm) and 24" (60 cm) circular (cir) needles. Adjust needle size if necessary to obtain the correct gauge.

Notions Tapestry needle.

Gauge 6 sts and 8 rows = 4" (10 cm) in Rev St st. See www.knittingdaily.com/glossary for terms you don’t know.

Notes Circular needle is recommended to accommodate large number of sts. Do not join; work back and forth in rows. This vest is a rectangle worked vertically, but turned and worn horizontally with the purl side on the RS so the collar shows the knit side.

Stitch Guide Reverse Stockinette Stitch (Rev St st) Row 1: (RS) Purl. Row 2: (WS) Knit. Rep Rows 1 and 2 for pattern.

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FRONT With longer cir, CO 45 sts. Do not join; work back and forth in rows. Beg with a WS row, work in Rev St st (see Stitch Guide) for 25 rows, ending after a WS row.

Shape Armhole Row 1 (RS): P12, BO 14 sts kwise, p19. Row 2 (WS): K19, use the backward-loop method to CO 14, k12.

BACK Cont to work 30 rows in Rev St st, or until piece measures desired width across shoulders, ending after a WS row.

Shape Armhole Rep Rows 1 and 2 of previous armhole.

FRONT Cont to work 25 more rows in Rev St st, ending after a RS row.

BO all sts.

FINISHING Block piece to measurements.

Armhole Trim With shorter cir and WS (knit side) facing, beg at lower edge of armhole, pick up and knit 14 sts along first half of armhole, 1 st between CO and BO, 14 sts along rem half of armhole, then 1 st between CO and BO—30 sts. BO all sts kwise. Rep for second armhole. Weave in ends. 30" 76 cm

13" 33 cm

Front

42" 107 cm

12¾" 32.5 cm

get this

BOOK 108

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Back

16" 40.5 cm

Front

13" 33 cm

9¼" 23.5 cm

8" 20.5 cm

Highland Knits Knitwear inspired by the Outlander series Interweave/F+W

www.bit.ly/HighlandKnits


Knitwear Inspired by the O UTLANDER series Knitwear Inspired by the O UTLANDER series

Inspired by Outlander, the romantic tale of time travel and adventure, Highland Knits is a rustic, yet sophisticated collection of quick-to-knit projects. From Claire’s “Rent Collection Shawl” to the “Sassenach Cowl,” all your favorite pieces worn by the series’ beloved heroine, and then some, are here, waiting to be knit. You’ll find each piece relevant to your wardrobe, whether dressing for today or eighteenth century Scotland.

9781632504593 | $22.99 | 112 pages

InterweaveStore.com


TA K E A S T E P I N A

NEW DIRECTION! Go beyond top-down or toe-up construction in New Directions in Sock Knitting. In the eighteen designs curated by knitting superstar Ann Budd, you’ll be treated to projects that range from traditional sock patterns to more challenging and innovative sock constructions. The socks in this collection use a variety of knitting techniques including double knitting, intarsia in the round, short-row shaping, mirrored color and texture patterns, and multidirectional knitting in both traditional and innovative ways. These techniques will have you casting on and knitting your socks from unexpected places—starting at the heel or sole or even from side to side! The instructions are all written in step-by-step detail that will ensure success, no matter which design you choose to knit. Original, innovative, and unique, it’s New Directions in Sock Knitting!

ISBN 978-1-62033-943-5 $26.99 | 168 pages

InterweaveStore.com


NEW HAMPSHIRE

Alpaca Fibers of Arizona—Benson

Harrisville Designs, Inc. —Harrisville

www.alpacafibers.com Large assortment of Luxury Alpaca yarns in natural and hand dyed colors. Alpaca Fleece’s, rovings and hand carded bats. 15900 S. Empire Rd. (520) 586-3920

CALIFORNIA

www.harrisville.com Yarns, Looms and Friendly Loom Products made by Harrisville Designs. Come visit our shop. We have our full product line on display, plus spinning equipment, fibers, yarns, books. Call for Classes. 4 Mill Alley (603) 827-3996

The Web Connection ONLINE STORE Abundant Yarn Online www.abundant-yarn.com (866) 873-0580 100 luscious yarn lines. User friendly website and service. Try us!

SHOPS/MAIL ORDER

A Yarn Less Raveled—Danville

OREGON

Patternworks

www.ayarnlessraveled.com Everything you need for your knit/crochet projects– beautiful yarns, patterns, needles, notions, and support to make your project a success. Classes of all levels! 730 Camino Ramon, Ste. 186 (925) 263-2661

Knotty Lady Yarns—Roseburg www.KnottyLadyYarns.com The premier location for your fiber needs in Western Oregon. The best stocked, fairest prices & most comprehensive teaching facility. 632 SE Jackson St. (541) 673-2199

www.patternworks.com/ visit-patternworks (603) 253-9064

Uncommon Threads—Los Altos

TENNESSEE

www.uncommonthreadsyarn.com Beautiful yarns from around the world. 293 State St. (650) 941-1815

Smoky Mountain Spinnery —Gatlinburg

Macedos Mini Acre—Turlock www.etsy.com/shop/macedosminiacre or www.macedosminiacre.com ALPACA! Fleeces, roving, batts, felt or yarn – variety of natural colors. Hats, scarves or socks also available. 11175 Golf Link Rd. (209) 648-2384

www.smokymountainspinnery.com nancy@smokymountainspinnery.com Visit our recently expanded 3000 square foot showroom and studio space. Equipment and supplies for spinning, weaving, knitting, crocheting, rug hooking, dyeing and felting. Classes, demonstrations, antiques and gifts. 466 Brookside Village Wy., Ste. 8 (865) 436-9080

IDAHO Knit-n-Crochet—Coeur D’Alene www.knit-n-crochet.com Friendly service and inviting atmosphere. Come in and see, or shop online, our large selection of yarn, needles, and accessories. 600 W. Kathleen Ave., #30 (208) 676-YARN (9276)

MASSACHUSSETTS Hub Mills Yarn Store —North Billerica www.hubmillsstore.com An outlet for discontinued Classic Elite Yarns and a full-service yarn shop carrying many fine yarns. 16 Esquire Rd. Unit 2 (978) 408-2176

MINNESOTA Amazing Threads—Maple Grove We Inspire, You Create www.amazing-threads.com Unique yarn, textile, and fiber arts in NW suburbs. Knit and crochet classes. 11262 86th Ave. N. (763) 391-7700

VIRGINIA Yarn Cloud—Occoquan “where nature meets imagination” www.yarncloud.com Yarn Cloud specializes in yummy knitting, crochet & tatting yarns, notions and classes. NEW LOCATION! 204 Washington St. (703) 763-3285

Classifieds Yarns WWW.WOOL2DYE4.COM Exclusive line of undyed yarns for hand-dyers. Make your work stand out! Wholesale inquiries welcome. Yarnie@Wool2Dye4.com.

ONLINE and RETAIL STORE! Woobee KnitShop www.woobeeknitshop.net (307) 760-2092 Products include Brown Sheep, Waverly, Jean Greenhowe, Addi, and Skacel.

YARNS

yarn shop listings / classifieds

ARIZONA

Gypsy Girl Creations www.stonebarnfibers.com (815) 968-1735 cathi@stonebarnfibers.com An ever changing kaleidoscope of unique colors.

Wool2Dye4 www.Wool2Dye4.com Yarnie@Wool2Dye4.com Exclusive line of undyed yarns for hand-dye artists.

advertisers’ index Anzula Luxury Fibers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Brown Sheep Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Cascade Yarns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C2 Denise Interchangeable Knitting & Crochet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Frabjous Fibers/Wool Peddler LLC, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Green Mountain Spinnery . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Halcyon Yarn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Interweave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 19, 23, 25, 67, 81, 109, 110, C3

ADVERTISE

HcallER E Jenn Rein

(970) 613-4695

or email at jenn.rein@ fwcommunity.com

Mango Moon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C4 Miss Babs: Hand Dyed Fiber Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Plymouth Yarn Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Skacel Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Solitude Wool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Stitch Sprouts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Wool 2 Dye 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

2016 knitscene handmade

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BEHIND THE SCENES Photos by Harper Point Photography unless otherwise noted

t y in g ly tr it ra te n e k p s o De el t mod o ur

o te

ach

Photo by Debbie Long

ra Dudek

Photo by Sa

A behind-the-scenes sneak peek at knitscene handmade photo shoot shenanigans!

Photo by Sara Dudek

Photo by Debbie Long

Rockstar hair and makeup ar tis t Janie put toge ther clo se to eighteen different looks over the cour se of two days!

Our male models are such divas...

#BTS #knitscene 112

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... but our editors and designers are chill!


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Knitscene 2016 handmade