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O C TO B ER 2016

GRIMES #futurefifteen S P E C I A L

A N N I V E R S A RY

I S S U E


 


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OCTOBER 2016

CONTENTS

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ON THE COVER

GRIMES Talking perfume, politics, mixed martial arts, alcohol, medieval churches and a whole lot more (phew) with the uber-talented Canadian musician #FUTUREFIFTEEN Meet the actors, writers, artists, musicians and innovators you need on your radar right now

WHAT’S NOW

THIS MONTH Hologram headliners at Glasto, drone-delivered dinners, new-gen scents and Game Of Thrones, Season 21 – life in 2031, as seen through InStyle’s crystal ball

‘ I n e ve r l i ke d [ h o r ro r m ov i e s ] . T h e f i r s t o n e I w a tc h e d w a s m y s e l f i n T h e W i tc h ’

YOUR LOOK

INTO DETAIL The new season accessories we can’t wait to get our hands on FUTURE-PROOF YOUR WARDROBE Being on-trend is no longer enough, friends – you’re going to want to get ahead

PAG E 1 3 8

FEATURES

FORWARD THINKING Actress Anya Taylor-Joy showcases fashion’s hottest new names to watch THE TOMORROW GIRLS Lola Leon, Kenya Kinski-Jones, Amandla Stenberg… Stella McCartney’s POP fragrance girls are a force to be reckoned with IN SEARCH OF NOWNESS Wondering what the collectable pieces of the future will be? Vintage clothing expert William Banks-Blaney gives us the lowdown

BEAUTY

WE ARE FIFTEEN Beauty regimes

186

193 199

202

of today’s 15-year-olds (turns out it’s not all about filters) MAN FROM NARS The legend that is François Nars chats to InStyle about inspiration, YouTube and perfectionism NOUVEAU NICHE Why we’re all about the new chic, pared-down beauty brands NOTES FROM THE BEAUTY DESK The style advice Mossy would (probably) give her teen self, classics rebooted and the genius new online store making shopping a cinch BEAUTY TALK King of guyliner, Jared Leto

206

57 67 99 104 218

RISE OF THE UNIVERSAL FACE Scientists have predicted what the future has in store for our faces and we think you’re going to like it

EVERY ISSUE

THE LOOK The young stars of tomorrow you need to start style-stalking READER OFFER You could win one of five Claudie Pierlot Marjan bags, worth £369 each READER OFFER 20% off at Neal’s Yard Remedies SUBSCRIPTIONS 12 issues from £13.99 THE TROPHY Happy birthday to us!


OCTOBER 2016

R’S O T I ED LETTER

PHOTOGRAPH BY RODRIGO CARMUEGA. ARTWORK BY PABLO THECUADRO

We love an excuse to do something different/ special here at InStyle HQ, so to celebrate our 15th birthday, we really wanted to go for it. But in this (sometimes) scarily dynamic world, that’s pelting along so ridiculously fast, it seemed somehow wrong to look back at what we’ve done in the past and way more relevant (and useful) to think about what’s next. And because at InStyle we’ve always championed new talent – transforming burgeoning actors, musicians and talented personalities in our fashion and beauty shoots – this issue is devoted to all that’s new, now and entirely current. We thought about who would be the creators, makers and thinkers shaping our future world. It seemed only right that the intriguing musician Claire Boucher (aka Grimes) should be our cover star. I was lucky enough to interview her, and she is one of the most captivating and brilliantly curious women I have ever met. But who else is changing the way we experience fashion, film, music and art? For our #FutureFifteen portfolio (page 120, InStyle’s Chloe Mac Donnell interviewed pioneering and exceptional creatives,

from filmmaker Samantha Michelle to shoe designer Dora Teymur and spatial designer Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance. It makes for interesting reading about what our impending world might look like. We commissioned 21-year-old photographer Ronan Mckenzie to capture 15-year-old girls on camera, discovering their take on skincare, make-up and (inevitably) the Kardashians. As we’ve become increasingly digitally focused, with Facebook live videos broadcasting regularly from my office and our YouTube stars Josh Newis-Smith and George Driver keeping it real with celebrities and beauty experts, we’ve also thought quite a lot about how the print slice of InStyle might look as time passes. For me, a magazine should be beautiful, tactile and thought-provoking. So we went all out for this special edition by involving an array of new artists and photographers to help create the issue. We hope you like Nhu Xuan Hua’s portraits of Grimes (page 107), illustrator Pablo Thecuadro’s renditions of our #FutureFifteen images, Amy Gwatkin’s eerily exquisite photographs of this autumn’s gorgeous accessories (page 70) and the Tattooed Bakers’ idiosyncratic birthday cake that they made for us (page 218). Enjoy the issue and join in the celebrations!

EDITOR From left, Grimes wears: sweater, £540, and skirt, £505, both Stella McCartney (stellamccartney.com). Sweater, £875, JW Anderson (j-w-anderson.com). Dress, £730, and bralet (just seen), £495, both Stella McCartney (stellamccartney.com); ring, £2,500, Shaun Leane (shaun leane.com). Coat, £800, and body, from a selection, both Acne Studios (acnestudios. com); ear cuff, £120, Coops London (coopslondon.com)

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OCTOBER 2016

CONTRIBUTORS RONAN MCKENZIE Up-and-coming photographer Ronan shot our We Are Fifteen beauty feature. What was it like working with 15-year-olds? ‘For some of them it was really awkward, so I tried to catch them off-guard, but the ones who had actively put more effort into their look were more confident in front of the camera – maybe they take more selfies!’ Her inspiration? ‘I’m inspired by the diversity of cultures in my environment. I’m also drawn to interesting faces – I love capturing people at their most natural.’ Thoughts on the shoot? ‘I loved how different all the girls were. One of them, Lily-Blue, was so honest about how she chats with her friends and how nails are a huge thing in her life. I thought it was so sweet. She wasn’t trying to please anyone with what she was saying.’ What does the word ‘future’ mean to her? ‘It’s whatever you want it to be.’

A M Y G WAT K I N Photographer Amy comes from an artistic family. Her mother shoots everything on disposable cameras and Amy shares a studio space with her equally cool ceramic artist brother. Where does she gather her inspiration? ‘I mainly like to look to films, books and dark corners of the internet.’ Her favourite from the InStyle accessories shoot? ‘The first shot of the Loewe shoes – we had to get knee-deep in mud to balance them on the tree. The mud makes an incredible gradient from brown to almost navy blue – no retouching required.’ What does the word ‘future’ mean to her? ‘Uncertain.’ INTO DETAIL, PAGE 70

WE ARE FIFTEEN, PAGE 166

RODRIGO CARMUEGA Though it wasn’t Rodrigo’s first career choice, his talent for photography first came to light on an acting job in Peru. His vision? ‘I love to capture the subtlety of the moment, a small expression that will take the viewer to a particular place or feeling, whether it be a simple move or quick moment of movement.’ His thoughts on the #FutureFifteen shoot? ‘It was amazing, the variety of personalities made for a great and extremely fun day of shooting.’ What does the word ‘future’ mean to him? ‘Salvador [my son], Valeria [my wife], and my family and friends.’ #FUTUREFIFTEEN, PAGE 120

Photographer Xuan grew up in Paris, spending most of her days in her artist father’s studio. Her thoughts on the InStyle Grimes cover shoot? ‘The day before, I got so excited I ended up drawing a dozen moodboards!’ What was her favourite shot of the day? ‘I love the one of her in the sand. She became an imprint of herself.’ What does the word ‘future’ mean to her? ‘Time – you make your own future, so every day counts. The future will look good if you search for things that make you happy.’ LIFE OF GRIMES, PAGE 107

DON’T MISS OUR EXCLUSIVE VIDEO W I T H C O V E R S TA R GRIMES

WORDS BY KATIE TUCKER

NHU XUAN HUA


Editor CHARLOT TE MOORE Creative director HANNAH VERE

FEATURES Associate editor NIKI BROWES Fashion features editor HANNAH ROCHELL Fashion and features writer CHLOE MAC DONNELL Editorial assistant KATIE TUCKER FASHION Fashion director ARABELLA GREENHILL Executive fashion director NICK SPENSLEY Fashion editor ROBYN KOTZE Shopping editor JOSH NEWIS-SMITH Fashion assistants HANNAH LEWIS, HELEN ATKIN BEAUTY Beauty director CASSIE STEER Acting beauty editor KATIE THOMAS Beauty writer GEORGE DRIVER

Digital editor SUZANNAH RAMSDALE Digital writers AMIE-JO LOCKE, REBECCA GILLAM Digital assistant ISABELLA SILVERS INSTYLE INTERNATIONAL Editorial director ARIEL FOXMAN Executive creative director RINA STONE Deputy creative director BRIAN ANSTEY Executive managing editors PATRICK MOFFITT, LAVINEL SAVU International manager NATALIE McCREA International assistant RODERIC DAVID PUBLISHING Publisher PATRICK J. CONNORS

Deputy editor EMILY DEAN

ART Deputy art director JAMES DAVIES Junior designer GEORGIA ALLEN PICTURES Senior picture editor CHARLIE HALL Deputy picture editor JAMIE SPENCE Producer and bookings editor ELISE HALL COPY Chief sub-editor SUSAN HENDERSON

LUXURY FASHION HUB Head of production NICOLA MOYNE Deputy head of production SOPHIE DAVIS Chief sub-editor CLAIRE HEARN Sub-editor LÉA TEUSCHER Deputy art editor BRYONY MACQUEEN

TIME INC. CEO JOSEPH RIPP Chief content editor NORMAN PEARLSTINE Executive vice-presidents JEFF BAIRSTOW, LYNNE BIGGAR, MARK FORD, GREG GIANGRANDE, LAWRENCE A JACOBS, ERIK MORENO, EVELYN WEBSTER TIME INC. LICENSING & SYNDICATION Senior Vice President, Strategic Partnerships JIM JACOVIDES Senior director JENNIFER SAVAGE Director of advertising sales & marketing JOELLE QUINN Director of licensing operations RICHARD SCHEXNIDER Director of editorial operations PAUL ORDONEZ Manager of advertising sales & marketing KIRSTIN KELLY Business development managers SIOBHAN MCINTOSH, ALEXANDER SMITH

OCTOBER COVER 2016 GRIMES PHOTOGRAPHED BY NHU XUAN HUA Styled by Arabella Greenhill. Hair by Craig Marsden using Balmain Paris Hair Couture. Make-up by Mary Wiles at The Wall Group using Chanel Le Rouge Collection N°1 and Le Lift V-Flash. Nails by Lucy Tucker at One Represents using Dior Vernis, Fall Look and Capture Totale Nurturing Hand Repair Cream


Managing director JUSTINE SOUTHALL Brand publisher TOBY EVANS Publisher JHAN RUSHTON (020 3148 7618) PA to managing director RIA HARRIS (020 3148 7664)

ADVERTISING Retail and beauty manager

CREATIVE MEDIA Creative Media business director

BANDI MANZINI (020 3148 7404;

LILLIAN BETTY (020 3148 6707)

bandi.manzini@timeinc.com) Advertising business executive JAMES ZAMAN (020 3148 7579; james.zaman@timeinc.com) Head of agency sales LINDSAY DEAN (020 3148 3668; lindsay.dean@timeinc.com) Regional trading director RUSSELL MATTHEWS (0161 601 3730) Italian advertising MARIOLINA SICLARI (00 39 02 49 53 06 40; mariolina.siclari@burda-vsq.it) French advertising BCN PARIS MARION BADOLLE-FEICK

(00 33 172712524; marion.badolle-feick@burda.com) Spanish advertising MARIA MAISEY, SPECTRA MEDIA (00 3172 712524; mariamaisey@spectramedia.es) MARKETING Head of marketing and events KATE THOMPSON (020 3148 7684) Subscriptions marketing manager DIANE HORNBY (020 3148 6295) Senior circulation manager MATTHEW PROCTER (020 3787 9195) FINANCE Editorial business manager ALISON WILLIAMS (020 3148 7484) Management accountant JULIE-ANN MUDGE

Creative Media account director EMILIE MORRISSEY (020 3148 3647)

Content development director JOANNA RAHIM (020 3148 6710)

Project director KATHRYN CANE (020 3148 6710)

Shoots director GINNY HENRY (020 3148 3620)

Project manager SHELLEY HALPERIN-SMITH

(020 3148 3654) INSERT SALES Loose inserts sales director LINDSAY MARTIN (020 7611 8151) Senior sales executive PALOMA WALDER (020 7611 8147) Regional advertisement manager (Manchester) KATHERINE BROWN (0161 601 3725; stephen.walsh@timeinc.com) PRODUCTION Group production manager SUE BALCH Production manager SAM WACKENIER Digital producer DOMINIC EVANS Advertisement production ROSANNE HANNAWAY Colour origin RHAPSODY, London EC2 (020 7729 1000)

TIME INC. (UK) LTD Group managing director ANDREA DAVIES Executive assistant to Group managing director AMANDA COLEMAN (020 3148 5103)

InStyle is a monthly publication of Time Inc (UK) Ltd. Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU (020 3148 7399; fax: 020 3148 8166). InStyle is printed in Great Britain by Wyndeham Bicester. Cover is printed by Wyndeham Peterborough. DISTRIBUTION: Marketforce (020 7633 3300). SUBSCRIPTIONS: (0330 333 4333; help@magazinesdirect.com) 12 issues (incl p&p) UK, £44; Europe/Eire, ¤105.99 (priority 3-5 days); North America, $138.99 (priority 5-7 days); Rest of World, £90.99 (priority 5-7 days). Send a cheque to InStyle Subscriptions, FREEPOST Time Inc (no stamp needed – UK only). For enquiries and orders please e-mail: help@magazinesdirect.com, alternatively from the UK call: 0330 333 4333, overseas call: +44 330 333 4333 (Lines are open Monday-Friday GMT, 8:30am-5:30pm ex. Bank Holidays). SHOWCARDS: (020 3148 7684). BACK ISSUES DEPARTMENT: PO Box 772, Peterborough PE2 6WJ (01733 385 170; mags-uk.com/ipc). InStyle does not accept unsolicited material. The material in InStyle is subject to copyright. All rights reserved.


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*Global total donated by ghd to breast cancer charities over the last 12 years **£10 per styler sold will be donated to Breast Cancer Now, registered charity No. 1160558 (England and Wales) and SC045584 (Scotland) and a company limited by guarantee (Company No. 9347608). €10 per styler sold is paid to the Irish Cancer Society’s Action Breast Cancer programme (Registered charity number CHY586).

*

£9,000,000 RAISED SO FAR LET’S MAKE IT £10,000,000

DONATION WITH EVERY PURCHASE OF THE ghd ELECTRIC PINK COLLECTION**

For more ways to support visit ghdhair.com/pink


Reach for the, er, camera. Anya Taylor-Joy works a swing rope

Scavenger or selfie hunt?

Pokémon GO hysteria. Well, you h ’’em allll gotta catch

Well, that’s one way to hide from the paps

Squeezing into a phone box. All part of the day job…

Eau de Grimes From cake to crumbs in 25 seconds

WORDS BY CHLOE MAC DONNELL

Work out like a Kloss

#INSIDE INSTYLE HOW TO CELEBRATE THE CLOSING OF AN EPIC BIRTHDAY ISSUE… Step one: head to east London for a ‘Big Smoke Scavenger Hunt’. Step two: have some Prosecco, then hit the streets to complete 27 random tasks. Step three: don’t take it personally when a colleague takes you to one side for a pep talk on being more enthusiastic. Step four: also remember this when the same colleague shouts at you to ‘just get on and do it’ when you hesitate in asking a perfect stranger for a business card. Step five: and again when they yell at you to ‘hurry the hell up’ as you run like Usain Bolt towards the finish line. Step six: laugh when said colleague asks for a recount after your team loses.

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@INST YLE_UK


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Check out the seriously talented stars

A n y a Ta y l o r - J o y

Grimes

Lola Leon

of our shoots this month

Her look T h i n k j u n i o r S c a n d i - n o i r

Her look O t h e r - w o r l d l y , w h i m s i c a l

Her look A d e s c e n d a n t o f p o p

detective in the making (complete

warrior

modern

royalty (no need to even ask),

with a serious pout and don’t-

tomboy. Think forever-changing

she makes the combination of

mess-with-me gaze) with a case

magical

s i l v e r- p i n k h a i r, l a y e r e d v i n t a g e

o f u t t e r l y b r i l l i a n t h a i r.

T-shir ts and quirky tattoos.

Why we love her She’s the girl who can rock a new-season Gucci dress straight off the runway, but still look totally chic in black skinny jeans and Nikes. ‘I call them my Ninja turtle shoes.’

Why we love her Her whole schtick is scrappily cool – from her electro-pop sound (which led Jay Z to sign her up) to her front row and Met Ball looks, and new-gen feminism – and it works. Plus, the name is genius.

queen

hair

meets

colours,

band

jeweller y,

ripped

fishnets

and

French manicures look chic. And

34

What you’ll know her from Her Glasto set this year, when she wrapped herself in a rainbow flag, her Insta feed @actuallygrimes (all cute manga stuff and Pokémon Go screenshots), and her legendary hair shade-shifting. ‘When I was 11, my mum dyed my hair red because I was Anne of Green Gables in a play. I kind of got a taste for it.’

Madonna’s closet archives. Why we love her She’s kind of elusive. Her cool-girl attitude – zero presence on social media and a distinct lack of ‘my mum is…’ – makes us think she’d be a pretty great person to hang out with. And yes, she even has ‘mom’ and ‘dad’ tattoos on her hands. What you’ll know her from These

What w as the main fashion vibe? Some of the best new designers from this season, including Beaufille (from Canadian sisters Chloé and Parris Gordon) and Georgian talent Anouki.

How we styled her In Stella McCartney a/w 2016 – the look was oversized shapes meets transformative tailoring.

days it’s less likely to be because of her mum, and more to do with her general teen-icon awesomeness. That’s why she’s one of the faces of Stella McCartney’s new POP fragrance campaign, which celebrates individuality.

>Forward thinking p138

>Life of Grimes p107

>The tomorrow girls p150

INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016

WORDS BY KATIE TUCKER. PHOTOGRAPHS BY INSTAGRAM/ANYATAYLORJOY, ACTUALLYGRIMES, MADONNA

What you’ll know her from Her 2015 breakthrough role in Sundance-favourite The Witch. This year, she’s going major league, starring in sci-fi thriller Morgan, directed by Luke Scott (son of Ridley), and Marrowbone alongside Mia Goth. Next year she’s in psychological thriller Split with James McAvoy.

now we all want to raid her mum


next E D I T E D B Y HANNAH ROCHELL &

CHLOE MAC DONNELL

Who will be on the cover of InStyle in 15 years’ time? And what will you be up to w h e n y o u ’ r e n o t r e a d i n g i t ? To c e l e b r a t e o u r 1 5 t h b i r t h d a y , w e a s k e d t h e e x p e r t s t o t e l l us what to expect from television, eating out (or eating in, as it turns out) and everyone’s favourite summer event: festivals. Hold the wondering… the future is here.

INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016

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what’s NEXT The device you’ll be looking at

The shows you’ll be watching Hunger Games-esque televised death matches are big business, as are never-ending reality series like The Truman Show. Harper Beckham and Prince George are the stars of Made In Chelsea. Game Of Thrones season 21 just landed, featuring the young Jon Snow Junior. Tamwar now runs the Queen Vic microbrewery in EastEnders. The X Factor is still going, although Simon Cowell, Sharon Osbourne and Louis Walsh arrive on stage on Stannah Stairlifts.

A N D

TVs are vast, wafer thin and curved for a full panoramic experience. They have 3D capability and a hologram function so characters can appear in front of you at key moments. Try not to doze off, as it can be disconcerting to wake up and find a mini Kim K on the coffee table.

Netf lix C H I L L

The remote you’ll be wielding Remote controls are, like, so 2016. Everything is done with your iPhone 32, which is the size of a credit card and made from recycled materials (mainly kale, quinoa and Gwyneth Paltrow’s nail clippings) and automatically changes colour to match the decor.

2 . 0

A night in front of the telly in 2031 looks like this (as imagined by Michael Hogan) The ads you’ll be watching Actually, you won’t really be watching adverts. Like Spotify, you can pay extra for streaming services to be ad free. Instead, you’re sold stuff via product placement within shows, so you can click through to buy characters’ outfits, furniture or other props.

What you’ll be sitting on Sofas have been upgraded to modular pieces in the Scandi or Ligne Roset style. So you’ll be snuggled up on a chic squishy piece that can be folded into a daybed, chaise longue or L-shaped banquette, with smart-cushions moulded to your head and heated upholstery for cold evenings. Slanket no longer required.

The channels you’ll be watching Keep up, grandma. Old-skool channels have been replaced by on-demand streaming services. Netflix v3.0, Amazon Optimus Prime, Big Apple TV and Sky MegaPlus are the major players. The BBC is now basically one giant iPlayer with a sad face but some splendid period dramas.

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How you’ll be sharing it You can Tweet, Snapchat and Instagram about your favourite shows from the corner of the screen while still watching. Facebook hosts live cyber-streaming parties so you can watch remotely with friends. There’s a facial recognition facility, so you can figure out where the hell you’ve seen that hot actor before (usually GoT).

What you’ll be eating and drinking No time to cook? Drones are the new Deliveroo, so your favourite takeaway can be summoned at the press of an app button, flown directly through your window and straight into your gaping, baby bird-like mouth. Afterwards, load the plates into your silent Dyson ecodishwasher. Hard work being a domestic goddess, huh? You mostly eat genetically modified veggie dishes (meat’s too expensive and unhealthy), raw superfoods and deep-fried insect tempura. Drink has gone hyper-local to save air miles, so you’ll be sipping homebrewed wine or artisanal gin made by an organic collective two blocks away.


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what’s NEXT

W O R D S B Y H A M I SH M AC BA I N

H O L O G R A M S

hoverboards and R E T R O

H U N T E R S

The former deputy editor of NME takes a trip to Glasto 2031

‘Did

anybody

here

come

to

see

us back in 2016? ’ a sk s Chris Mar tin hopefully, as he strums the opening chords to Yellow. I did, Chris. I remember when Coldplay were the grand finale on the Pyramid Stage, rather than stuck out here in the tiny #RealLife tent, playing to the 60 or so old timers who still prefer to watch actual human beings. Instead, it’s holograms of The Beatles, Amy Winehouse, Prince and Coldplay in their twenties that are taking up all the slots on the bigger stages this year. In reality though, they are so good that even I can barely tell the difference any more. Truthfully, the only thing that distinguishes the ‘real’ Coldplay from the projected Coldplay is the laughter lines on Chris’s face and the few tufts of grey hair still left on his temple. Still, if these are tough times for him, Adele, Muse and the other old favourites returning for the 15th anniversary of the year they all headlined, then those attending their first Glastonbury festival in 2031 have it far easier than the crowd back in those days. For a start there’s the giant underground campus they all get to sleep in instead of tents (the brainchild of Emily Eavis’s son George), then there’s the controversial ‘put-off’ pills that will delay their hangovers until long into next week. Best of all are the now-ubiquitous mud-proof exoskeleton suits (although lots of the girls still persist with those retro festival-chic wellies – the Hunter Moss 2005 range having sold out even faster than the tickets did back in December). But when I’m walking around the site – as someone who remembers when hoverboards first became a (very annoying) thing, I still prefer to walk, thank you very much – I have to admit I can feel exactly the same good-

time Glastonbury vibes that have always been here. The veggie burgers may now be downloadable, the toilets may smell of fresh lavender and the hospitality area may be floating high above the clouds, but this place has still got something that other festivals will never have. It was most evident late on Friday night, when I stumbled across an impromptu party celebrating the collapse of Trump Jr’s presidential campaign. Young people dancing, singing, drinking and feeling carefree and positive about the world, forgetting about the grim reality of life for just a few beautiful days. Of course, with h their bodies encased in latex and selfie drones perpetually ly hovering around their heads, most of them look a bit

“ I t ’s h o l o g r a m s o f T h e B e a t l e s , P r i n c e a n d Coldplay in their twenties that are on the bigger stages this year”

ridiculous to me. But being here among them, rather than being sat at home on my sofa screaming in annoyance at the BBC’s VR coverage as I was last year, makes me realise they’re here for exactly the same reasons that I first started coming to Glastonbury. The next day I bump into Chris Martin, and as we watch Queen bring David Bowie o n s t a g e to perform their half-century-old single Under Pressure together, he is grinning from ear to ear, having the time of his life. He will be back next year. As will his 22-yearold holographic self on the Pyramid Stage. See you there. INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016

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what’s NEXT W O R D S B Y A M A N DA K LU D T

L I F E

A F T E R

avo on toast T h e e d i t o r - i n - c h i e f o f N e w Yo r k ’ s E a t e r. c o m r e v e a l s the US trends that’ll shape the way we’ll eat in 2031

Yo u r l o c a l t a k e a w a y j o i n t w i l l g o l u x e At the moment in New York, delivery-

only restaurants are becoming a thing. The biggest are Maple and Ando, both of which restaurateur David Chang is behind. They focus on really great, delicious food delivered straight to your home. There is no normal working restaurant that you visit. It’s very tech forward. You order online and they text you when it arrives. There are usually five options, featuring things like a fried chicken sandwich or a Korean dish. The branding is very beautiful and stylish – nothing like what you would expect from your usual takeaway place. New York City already has a big delivery culture, so I wouldn’t say they’re disrupting the industry, but they are bringing a modern mindset to it. Meat won’t be the star of the show

It would be silly of me to say that people aren’t going to keep loving meat, because it is such an obsession in this country. However, I think we are being more careful about our consumption, so maybe it will become something we eat less frequently. The idea of having meat as a supporting character in most of your meals is really catching on here. Yo u ’ l l j o i n G w y n n i e a n d g o v e g a n

Healthy living has become the fashionable lifestyle of choice, where Instagramming your avocado toast is now a tool that says something about you and how you live. Restaurateur Ravi DeRossi, who owns 15 bars and restaurants in

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NYC, is turning them all vegan and vegetarian. Even the bar snacks are going to be meat-free. At NIX, John Fraser is adding his gourmet touch to vegetarianism. You wouldn’t even notice it’s veggie. It’s not a new concept but it is gaining more attraction.’

choosing where I want to go for dinner. Independent critics really don’t owe anybody anything. They say what they feel freely.

The chef’s table won’t be the best s e a t i n t h e h o u s e I think chefs have

“ R e s t a u r a n t s a r e s a v v y n o w, t h e y

gotten used to interacting with customers through an open kitchen. They like feeling part of the dining room. But I feel there will be a little bit of a pull back from the chef’s table, where the customer is right in their face asking questions. They will still want you to be able to see what’s going on, but there will be less interaction.

w i l l i nv i t e I n s t a g r a m m e r s i n”

Yo u ’ l l be Te a m Critic not I n s t a g r a m m e r … User-generated content

from influencers and websites like Tripadvisor are good in many ways – as long as you know what you’re looking for. Like if you have one person you follow and you really trust their opinion. But you need to be able to find a critic or at least someone writing on the internet who you know and trust first. That way, you can actually believe in what they’re saying. Critics generally pay for their meals whereas the other types don’t. Plus restaurants are savvy now, so they will often invite Instagrammers in and give them free food, and that’s going to influence their opinion. It’s not really a system I would trust in terms of

Forget having to queue for a b u r g e r We’ve had an infatuation with food

halls and food markets, but diners are going to get tired of eating in that way. We’ve had so many years of just really loud, crowded, dark places, where the staff are not paying as much attention to the service and to the treatment of the customers as they should. You can’t really overstate just how nice it is to go to a comfortable restaurant where you can hear the other person speak and see what they look like. I’m hoping the pendulum swings back the other way, into really caring about service and the experience the diner is getting. If I wanted to have an uncomfortable meal I could just go to a food hall and maybe pay a bit less than I would in a real restaurant. But if I want to have a nice time and feel like I’m on a night out, I want to go somewhere where they’ll take good care of me.


 

         

 


what’s NEXT

W O R D S B Y E M I LY DE A N

F R A G R A N C E

w hy it ’s c o o l t o b e

It seemed a harmless enough remark to make to someone. ‘I love your perfume!’ I gushed, waiting for the customary rush of female bonding. It may have been ten years ago but I’ll never forget the response as my colleague narrowed her eyes and announced with firm resolve: ‘I’m sorry. I can’t tell you. I like to keep my fragrance secret.’ I never did find out what it was. But I did think back to that elusive character recently and realise she wasn’t unhinged. Her attitude was just several years ahead of the rest of us because, these days, fragrance is becoming increasingly personal and rarefied. We no longer want to smother ourselves in pink-andgold-packaged scent and get a secondary waft of it when we brush past someone on the Tube. And who aspires to smelling of something just because an X Factor judge with extensions tells you to buy it? Scent is fast going the way of everything else in our lives, from coffee shops to Pinterest pages: curated, individual, niche. It’s an elaborate, subtle story rather than a cheap hit of synthetic vanilla. Selfridges gave us a taste of things to come back in 2014 when it opened a pop-up Fragrance Lab, which took us through an immersive experience where we sniffed objects and assessed our likes to customise our scent. Small fragrance companies like Byredo and Atelier Cologne offered us scents that felt unique and complex. Big perfume brands started launching exclusive versions of old favourites. We didn’t want to smell ell like a passing

fad any more, we wanted to smell like a mysterious oneoff. If you need gilt-edged proof that the elite scent is here to stay, just check out megabrand Louis Vuitton’s first fragrance launch for 70 years. It’s the ultimate in haute parfumerie, created not by focus groups and a marketing team but by a third generation master nose at a dedicated perfumery in Grasse. There isn’t one single smell but a collection of seven highly complex, nuanced varieties all with incredibly ornate back stories involving travel and one-off moments. They’re niche narrative journeys rather than mere extensions of a luxury brand. It’s a fragrance launch that hints at a totally new approach to what we want from a big-name designer perfume. The scents are shrouded in secrecy, they’ve taken several years to perfect by a dedicated artisan perfumer in the old tradition and the names sound less like Apprentice teams and more like dark, French novels – ‘Matiere Noire’ and ‘Contre Moi’. If you want to buy one next month, you won’t have much joy in your local high-street chemist – they’ll be tucked away in apothecary-style leather open trunks in the Louis Vuitton stores themselves (or try Harrods if your outfit isn’t quite Bond-Street ready). Perhaps Louis Vuitton has been hanging out with that ex-colleague of mine who told me, ‘I like to keep my fragrance secret.’ But in the interests of research and, well, smelling awesome, we hopped over to Grasse for a sneak preview of what this unique launch tells us about the future of fragrance.

It ’s got to have a stor y ‘ Tu r b u l e n c e s ’ w a s t h e result of trying to recreate a specific scent the nose had smelt briefly one evening years ago – a mixture of tuberose and jasmine

Minimalist bottles

Le s fo Pa r 1 rfu 00 ms ml L ( lo ouis ui sv Vuit ui tt ton on , £ .co 18 .u 0 k)

Bling bottles are over. LV has brought ought in hind Apple designer Marc Newson (the man behind watches) to create the kind of minimalist malist bottle throom of the th you’d expect to see in the bathroom editor of Wallpaper* magazine.

Scents will be complicated

bushes by the gate of his

T h e r a r e r t h e i n g r e d i e n t s , t h e b e t t e r. Put aside all thoughts of ‘it’s sort of citrus’. These scents feature extractions of leather from the handles of an LV case, magnolia and jasmine sourced from tea plantations in China. And a dash of bitter cocoa.

old garden at dusk.

No naff straplines Yo u k n o w t h e s o r t : ‘ f o r w h e n a w o m a n wants to be a woman’ etc. Instead, you’ll get poetic insta-worthy musings from a t h i r d - g e n e r a t i o n p e r f u m e r. ‘ P e r f u m e i s l i k e an Aladdin’s lamp – once opened it should produce some form of magic’

It’s got an artisan behind it In this case it’s one of the most famous noses in the world, Jacques Cavallier, who invented L’Eau d’Issey and Jean Paul Gaultier’s iconic fragrance. He works out of a former 17th-century perfume house, a ridiculously picturesque shuttered pink villa in Grasse filled with herbs and flowers.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY AMOS CHAPPLE/GETTY IMAGES, ALAMY, UTS FUTURE OF FASHION SHOW 2014, DUO, UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY SYDNEY, YOUTUBE, FRANK MINNAERT, GETTY IMAGES, TIM BODDY, CHANTAL ANDERSON, CHARLIE HALL, LUKE & NIC

C O M P L I C A T E D


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INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016


          

       

    

     



                        




the LOOK It doesn’t take a genius to work out whose daughter this is. Cindy Crawford’s mini-me is already

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red-carpet moments in the future.

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following in her mother’s footsteps with a modelling career

INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016

59


the LOOK

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Already a firm favourite both on the red carpet and for her

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incredibly successful acting c a r e e r, i t ’ s h a r d t o i m a g i n e that we once referred to the

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6

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THE FASHION DARLING

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you’ve got to know how to

Dakota’s younger sister

dress to handle the paps.

might be giving her some

For 17-year-old model Sofia,

healthy competition in

this means lots of long

the film stakes (watch

layering with only a flash of

o u t f o r h e r i n H o w To

flesh and oversized sunnies.

Ta l k To G i r l s A t P a r t i e s later this year), but with her polished yet quirky off-screen looks, she’s making a name for herself in the fashion world, too.

60

INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016


the LOOK It was always a nob ra i n e r t h a t s h e ’d b e a n

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M A D D I WAT E R H O U S E

8 If you’ve got model big sisters like Suki and Immy to borrow clothes from, chances are yo u ’re a l w a y s going to look pretty slick. Though judging by her Instagram account, the youngest Waterhouse is happiest (like most 17 year

9 THE CHIC TEEN

KIERNAN SHIPKA She’s like the new Emma Watson – we grew up with her on screen in Mad Men, and her style has suddenly matured to one not far off the Harry Potter star’s sophisticated vibe. Monochrome princess coming through.

62

INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016

olds) in sweatshirts and baseball caps.


   

    



  

    

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just like her namesake.

15

T H E R O C K R O Y A LT Y

ANAÏS GALLAGHER

The 16-year-old daughter of Noel Gallagher and Meg Mathews doesn’t hang about with her career; she’s been signed to Select Models since she was 13. Her off-duty look of tight retro tees and flares is totally Britpop (see Instagram for details), but she also rocks a more polished 90s vibe in trouser suits. Smart.

66

INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016

ADDITIONAL WORDS BY HANNAH ROCHELL, KATIE TUCKER. PHOTOGRAPHS BY GETTY IMAGES, SPLASH, PRESS ASSOCIATION, EROTEME, FLYNET

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your LOOK

R e p r o g r a m y o u r

s t y l e

Living in the present is SO last season. Our resident Mystic Meg, Josh Newis-Smith (and company), show you how to conquer new fashion frontiers

P U T

G E N D E R Y O U R

l your make al clothes consci ous Let’s get deep here. How we combat climate change will define us in the history books. Environmentally friendly clothing isn’t just designed for tree-huggers – eco elegance has come a long way, so what’s stopping your style from being sustainable? Buying into the philosophy of these brands will ensure you’re free of guilt – but no less glam. Edgy eco: H&M Conscious Through addressing the life cycle of H&M’s products, this collection aims to do what many high-street brands can’t: make fashion both sustainable and sustainably fashionable. As H&M’s creative adviser Ann-Sofie Johansson explains, ‘We brought the idea of sustainability to new levels by working with innovative materials such as beads and rhinestones made from recycled glass, and Denimite, a material made from recycled, worn-out denim.’ Fun fact: H&M made 1.5 million items from recycled materials last year. Claps! Understated undies: Baserange Using only natural fibres, including bamboo [insert panda emoji here] and organic cotton, Baserange is all about comfortable, contemporary underwear with a sporty yet feminine feel. Bags of style: Freedom of Animals Sustainable, check.

Cruelty-free, check. Freedom of Animals’ pared-back bags are constructed from organic cotton and polyurethane, which not only looks and feels as soft as leather, but is also a safer alternative to PVC and requires 70 per cent less energy to manufacture. So many facts, so little time. In conclusion, these bags are sleek and sustainable. Double win. Community-friendly catwalk: Edun Ninety-five per cent of its collection is made in Africa and the label aims to foster long-term partnerships with vendors while investing in community initiatives across the continent. And it’s ruddy beaut to boot. This season, designer Danielle Sherman was inspired by ‘the amalgamation of found materials’, adopting a magpie approach to tweed, denim and responsibly sourced leather across long-line knits, slip dresses and overblown overcoats.

ng cycle Beat the clothi Doesn’t it feel like we have been experiencing a 90s throwback phase for longer than the 90s actually lasted? Haven’t we been swinging back into the 70s since 1 January 1980? Fashion’s favourite pastime is to look back, so what’s next? Oops, we did it again. Noughties numbers are about to make a comeback in the immediate future – just like t h e d e c a d e ’ s b r e a k o u t s t a r, C r a i g D a v i d . T h e r e ’ s n o w a l k i n g a w a y f r o m t h i s , so fill your wardrobe in with the following: A going out-out top – think Keira Knightley circa the Bend It Like Beckham clubbing scene and score a win by teaming with bootcut jeans. A bucket hat (enough said ). Baggy trousers, with random sprinklings of zips and pockets. A spaghettistrap minidress. Meatballs, depending on your dietary requirements. B u t l e a v e r i g h t n o w – t o q u o t e a n o t h e r N o u g h t i e s s u p e r s t a r, W i l l Yo u n g – i f y o u ’r e e v e n t h i n k i n g a b o u t s l i p p i n g i n t o v e l o u r. E x e r c i s e s o m e r e s t r a i n t .

O N A G E N D A

Fashion has bent gender boundaries since the cavemen first styled up a loincloth. But after relatively recent decades of restraint (men being largely resigned to straight-up-and-down suits, and women to dresses and skirts), both sexes can once again sashay around in puff-sleeved glory. However, while the likes of Selfridges has created gender-neutral spaces for consumers, the question is, will this attitude ever really be ‘mainstream’? Heather Gramston, Selfridges’ womenswear buying manager, wades into the murky waters of genderless garms. ‘Some brands on the men’s floor are particularly popular with female shoppers,’ she says. ‘For example, we have noticed women buying Raf Simons sweaters, Off-White jackets or Thom Browne shirts season after season.’ So while you flounce around in the knits you’ve nicked from your partner, is your other half shopping – or, rather, raiding your wardrobe – in the same way? They’re about to. Prepare for a genderneutral future with unisex brands that are redefining the distinctions. Toogood’s new uniform-inspired unisex outerwear (coats akin to beekeeper garb, anyone? Yes please!), 69’s shirts with a twist on the norm and Nicopanda’s perfect pussy-bow blouses are all style staples you can exchange with any willing man in your life. Should we even be calling it ‘menswear’ and ‘womenswear’? Right now it’s almost fashionable to discuss gender and how we appropriate, but such a ‘trend’ or, rather, a movement goes beyond adopting trendy buzzwords (like we did with ‘jegging’). Gender neutrality in relation to fashion is something we can figure out without the help of fabric scientists, and without necessarily having to buy into a brand. It’s a mindset, and one we can all personally change today. RIP His ’n’ Hers.

INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016

101


your LOOK any t just o n s ’ t i high-street dre ss .. . it’s a … high-street piece you will keep forever. Unthinkable, right? How many impulse purchases have stood the test of time in your wardrobe? Do you still have that black fedora you had to buy last summer, or that fruit-print swimsuit you absolutely needed in 2014? Finery is an online retailer with high-street price tags that is looking to disrupt our view of ‘throwaway fashion’. Its brand director and co-founder Caren Downie explains, ‘People already are and will continue to become more discerning. Consumers are spending more money on fewer things. Provenance and quality

are important.’ But where does this actually leave the throwaway attitude we associate with high-street brands, which serve up new styles almost as quickly as McDonald’s can a Big Mac? Personally, to leave my room every morning, I have to shift through piles of high-street clobber. Finery is tapping into a ‘desire to create a set of “forever pieces” for the wardrobe, and it’s important that the basics have a little personality,’ Downie continues. So, ladies, instead of purchasing the latest fad piece, fill your wardrobe with basics that have no sell-by date.

Buy now, use it to pay for your mortgage later With fast fashion out of style and investment the order of the future, one would do well to spend wisely. That might be a foreign concept to many of you, myself included, but savvy spending could mean you bagsy a collectable of the future. According to Browns’ Laura L a r b a l e s t i e r, n o w i s t h e t i m e t o t a p u p s o m e t h i n g f r o m S a i n t L a u r e n t : ‘ I t ’s H e d i S l i m a n e ’s f i n a l co l l e c t i o n f o r t h e l a b e l . We ’ve h a d s t ro n g i n te re s t i n one of the collection’s most stand-out pieces, the red heart jacket. It’s a real investment piece. Gucci is also having such a moment, so I would also a rg u e t h a t e v e r y o n e n e e d s t o o w n a t l e a s t o n e p a i r o f G u c c i l o a f e r s .’

future Fabricating the We a r a b l e t e c h n o l o g y h a s c o m e a l o n g w a y i n 1 5 ye a r s – l a s t ye a r ’s

pping Seasonless sho With our collective attention spans diminishing thanks to the prevelance of social media and a thirst for ‘see now, buy now’ fashion, is there any longer a point to season-led collections? With all its glorious gimmicks, Moschino, designed by the media-savvy Jeremy Scott, has made certain pieces immediately available after fashion shows since 2014. And now, from s/s 2017 (if we can still refer to it as a season), Burberry will make its entire collection immediately shoppable. It remains to be seen whether every brand can manage such a fast-paced retail model. How should you shop from these ‘seasonless’ collections, though? The key is to balance the need for immediacy with shrewd styling – it’s a technique that will prevent your wardrobe from being filled with multiple basics. Take a velvet slip dress: ideal for the party season, but with a T-shirt underneath, dum dum dummm… it’s a minimalist day piece that you can work from nine to five, all year round.

Apple Watch launch being a per fect example. But people do still wear mechanical watches (how old-school), and not everyone is parading around in a glow-in-the-dark fibre-optic dress, like Claire Danes in Zac Posen at this year’s Met Ball. So where does this leave us humble folk? Intelligent fabric is coming into the mainstream thanks to the likes of Kit and Ace. As co-founder JJ Wilson explains, the brand brings ‘functional a t t r i b u t e s y o u ’d e x p e c t f r o m a t h l e t i c wear’ into your everyday wardrobe, using revolutionary fabrics such as silks and technical cashmere that you can even throw in the wash – adios, dry cleaning bills! Now that’s a refreshing future-forward look that doesn’t appear to have fallen from the Starship Enterprise.

the time(less) capsule What Michael Kors doesn’t know about dressing the female form isn’t worth knowing. So who better to call upon to construct your forever wardrobe? ‘Seventy per cent of a woman’s wardrobe should be “meat and potatoes”,’ he declares. But don’t worry – he’s not recommending that you sport a steak à la Lady Gaga. As Kors continued, these are ‘the clothes she reaches for day in and day out – a classic trench coat, a cashmere knit, a great T-shirt, a white blouse, a black dress, a leather carry-all and aviators.’ So, tell us about the remaining 30 per cent, Mr Kors. ‘The “icing and fluff”. Those are the pieces that she just falls in love with, from a pair of feathered jeans to a sequined streamer skirt.’ What about our age and body shape – how do they

factor into this? ‘If you’re 60 years old but you have great legs, why not wear a skirt that makes you feel great? It’s going to be more about dressing for your body and your lifestyle, not for your age or for anyone else.’ Take to the streets with ‘Miniskirts for all!’ placards at once. If you still have some spare change lying around after having snapped up all those future-perfect staples, Net-A-Porter’s retail fashion director Lisa Aiken homes in on another key addition to your wardrobe: ‘Fine jewellery is the best investment. You can wear it forever, it can define your entire look and it will never go out of style.’ Go, create your own set of crown jewels. Who knows, you could be the Kate Middleton of the future – Harry is still single, after all. INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016

103


PHOTOGRAPH BY JEFF HAHN


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g r i m e s

She’s the whimsical musician and poster girl for Generation-Z cool. Welcome to Grimes World where anything could happen This page, sweater, £875, JW Anderson (j-w-anderson.com)

S T Y L I N G B Y A R A BE L L A G R E E N H I L L INSTYLE XXXXXXXXX 2014

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Opposite page, jumpsuit, £945, and necklace, £395, both Stella McCartney (stellamccartney.com) This page, coat, £695, and trousers, £785, both Stella McCartney (stellamccartney.com); choker, about £330, Uncommon Matters (amazon.co.uk)

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This page, dress,£730, and bralet (just seen), £495, both Stella McCartney (stellamccartney.com); ring,£2,500, Shaun Leane (shaunleane.com) Opposite page, silver shirt, £990, and grey trousers, £380, both Y/Project at Browns (020 7514 0040); ear cuff,£120, Coops London (coopslondon.com)


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This page, coat, £800, body, from a selection, and tights, £40, all Acne Studios (acnestudios.com); ear cuff, £120, Coops London (coopslondon.com) Opposite page, jumpsuit, £945, and necklace, £395, both Stella McCartney (stellamccartney.com)

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Bra, just seen, ÂŁ90, and trousers, ÂŁ390, both Barbara Casasola (net-a-porter.com)

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W O R D S B Y C H A R L O T T E MO OR E

THE FIRST thing you realise when you sit down to interview Grimes–aka Claire Boucher, the extraordinary Canadian singer/songwriter/performer/ artist – is that you have to surrender to Grimes World. You will not have anything close to a normal/mundane opening chat about where she’s staying and whether she’s found that new Korean eaterie around the corner. Within seconds you step into this other-worldly place that meanders fascinatingly from US politics to the feminism/Game Of Thrones debate via Harry Potter and the classic sci-fi novel Dune to video on iPhone. It’s a discussion that could never-ever end, the kind that you might have at 4am after a drunken night out, rather than at 12pm in a corporate hotel lobby in west London. We first meet just as the InStyle cover shoot is closing. Boucher’s cheeks are brushed with an exaggerated pink blush that gives her skin a beautiful surreal flush. Her hair is white blonde, her frame toned and tiny like an athletic contemporary dancer. I’ve brought along a 15-yearold girl who has been doing work experience at the magazine and she greets both of us with an enthusiastic ‘Hello’ and strong handshake. This is the first women’s fashion magazine cover shoot Boucher has ever done. As the front-woman for Stella McCartney’s new fragrance POP, this is all part of the deal. But unlike other ‘faces’ who just go along with what they’re told to do, you get the sense that she has made many considered decisions about her collaboration with Stella. ‘My manager was like – “Hey do you want to go to dinner with Stella McCartney tonight?”’ she says, happy to explain exactly how it all works. ‘So I was like – “Yeah, OK”, because although I love fashion there are a lot of issues with workers’ rights in the fashion industry, but Stella wanted to do something different. She wasn’t interested in using just models – she wanted to use people like Amandla (Stenberg, the actress/ activist/poet) and I like that.’ This is Boucher all over. While her manner is loose and light, there is always a fierce backbone to the conversation. That Stella McCartney is a campaigning vegan so vehement in her belief that she continues to create high-end designer shoes and bags out of man-made materials is unusual and important. Boucher describes herself as a ‘bad vegan’. ‘I’m a vegan as much as I can be but when you’re travelling on a lot of flights they just won’t give you vegan meals.’ It has to be said that her life since the release of her latest album Art Angels has been one long flight – the endless touring, performances, hotel rooms and media days. But this is what she does and loves. ‘I like being in the working mode,’ she says, ‘and Hana and Mac are here, so it’s like a party all the time.’ Hana is musician and collaborator Hana Pestle. At Grimes’ recent Glastonbury set Hana was there with her on stage. Check out Boucher’s social media and you’ll see the endless Hana and Claire free-form chat. Mac is her brother with whom she makes her amazingly imaginative videos. ‘We’re shooting a music video right now,’ she explains. ‘Like right now my brother’s in his room googling medieval churches around here – it’s insane, he’s so good at finding locations. One of the first videos I did with him was Realiti and it was such an awesome experience we’ve been working together ever since.’

It all begs the question of what the Boucher family was like to spawn two such individual creatives. The second oldest of five children and the only girl, she spent her childhood in the wilderness of Canada. At high school she did a lot of drama, music and art. ‘I guess this sounds kind of sucky and lame but I honestly think that the arts funding is a big part of why there are so many creatives from Canada.’ As it turned out, Boucher was more of a science than an arts person. ‘It’s weird that I am a professional musician,’ she says, ‘because that was never the plan.’ She studied neuroscience at university in Montreal. Her mother is the editor of leftwing newspaper Vancouver Observer and her father works in biosciences, which also goes some way to explaining why she’s so multidisciplined. She didn’t start making music until halfway through college, when she was in her early twenties (she is now 28). When asked how she had the confidence to just start, or whether being a woman made that harder, she just says: ‘To be honest, it just never struck me as something girls couldn’t do. Even shooting. In Montreal, that’s what you do. I mean one time I shot an animal. It was my living nightmare, never again. But my grandpa was like – “Yeah, Claire’s the best shot”. I hadn’t been raised as a boy, but with four brothers I did everything they did.’ So quickly music went from being an interest – where Boucher would do the door or design the flyers for her friends who were musicians or ran music venues – to performing and making music herself. ‘In Montreal there were lots of female producers, everyone kind of produced their own stuff.’ This was the late noughties when the internet was making music a more democratic medium. ‘It was a free-for-all when I made the first album,’ she says. ‘I just put it on the internet, emailed a bunch of blogs and got press for it because people said they really liked what I did.’ On the first record she made she describes how she


Coat, £800, body, from a selection, and tights, £40, all Acne Studios (acnestudios.com)

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HAIR BY CRAIG MARSDEN USING BALMAIN PARIS HAIR COUTURE. MAKE-UP BY MARY WILES AT THE WALL GROUP USING CHANEL LE ROUGE COLLECTION N°1 AND LE LIFT V-FLASH. NAILS BY LUCY TUCKER AT ONE REPRESENTS USING DIOR VERNIS, FALL LOOK AND CAPTURE TOTALE NURTURING HAND REPAIR CREAM. FASHION ASSISTANT: HANNAH LEWIS. DIGITAL OPERATOR: MARC PRITCHARD. PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANT: LEO BORNATI AND JOE WILSON. PROP STYLIST: BRYONY EDWARDS

Dress, £730, bralet, £495, and trousers, £490, all Stella McCartney (stellamccartney.com); ear cuff, £120, Coops London (coopslondon.com); ring, £2,500, Shaun Leane (shaunleane.com)


HAIR BY CRAIG MARSDEN USING BALMAIN PARIS HAIR COUTURE. MAKE-UP BY MARY WILES AT THE WALL GROUP USING CHANEL LE ROUGE COLLECTION N°1 AND LE LIFT V-FLASH. NAILS BY LUCY TUCKER AT ONE REPRESENTS USING DIOR VERNIS, FALL LOOK AND CAPTURE TOTALE NURTURING HAND REPAIR CREAM. FASHION ASSISTANT: HANNAH LEWIS. DIGITAL OPERATOR: MARC PRITCHARD. PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANTS: LEO BORNATI AND JOE WILSON. PROP STYLIST: BRYONY EDWARDS

had so little money to make the cover that when anyone asked to buy it she would have to draw it herself. That she had such a strong look going on clearly helped. ‘When I was 11 my mum dyed my hair red with Kool-Aid in the sink because I was Anne of Green Gables in a play. Then I kind of got a taste for it and kept on doing it, and my mum was really upset and was like “Why isn’t it coming out?”’ As well as the rainbow fairy hair that she has become synonymous with, she has this innate way of making what she’s wearing something other than it was meant to be. Today it’s pink furry Rihanna for Puma pool slides with socks, plus Adidas by Stella McCartney leggings and ‘my pyjama shirt’ – a fan T-shirt featuring martial arts superstar Ronda Rousey. Vetements’ uber-stylist Lotta Volkova couldn’t have put it together better. I’d read that Boucher was a huge Ronda Rousey fan, but had to confess to her that I had no idea myself who she was. ‘She’s like a mixed martial artist. She’s the first woman who was ever in the UFC (Ultimate Fighting Championship).’ Have you ever got in touch with her? ‘No definitely not. That would be weird. She’d probably be creeped out by me.’ For someone so seemingly self-confident and focused about expressing her art she also conveys a clashing sense that she is just like everyone else. A pop culture fan who would love to get involved, be asked, if only that would happen. Video games are another great passion and one that she has been asked to get involved in. She has recently done the music for a basketball game. ‘My family are all obsessed with basketball and I am a huge sports fan (a spectator more than a player) and I love video games so I thought “Yeah I’ll do this”.’ We ponder whether gaming has become more girl-friendly in the past few years. ‘I guess it’s more male dominated,’ she says, ‘but Hana’s a big gamer. Most of the girls I know play video games and I read that last year there are now more female gamers than men.’ Which kind of leads us on to feminism. Boucher describes herself as ‘gender neutral’. At Glastonbury she wore an LGBT flag as a quasi cloak when she glided around the stage with fellow performer Hana. Gender politics – as for many women in their twenties – is important. Does the music industry reflect a more progressive culture? ‘I think there are a lot of problems with it, but I’ve decided to stop talking about it because a lot of people kept trying to make that my thing. It ends up as kind of “Grimes is a victim of the

‘I’ve always had [panic att acks]. I’d be on st age crouching behind the keyboard thinking, I can’t leave’ sexist music industry” and that isn’t what I think,’ she says. I wonder what she would say to a 15-year-old girl trying to get into music right now. ‘I’d say learn about technology and learn about how to produce. If you can work on your own you don’t even need anyone.’ This is a powerful mantra and one that she herself certainly lives by. She is a self-taught musician. When she wanted to learn to play the guitar she just got on and did it. ‘Tutorials on the internet are great.’ Everything she does is because of her. Her synthy K-pop meets country vibe is like nothing you’ve heard before – it defies any musical genre you try and place her in. She has influences, but as with

musicians like Björk it’s always absolutely about doing what she wants. The dancers that she brings on stage are because she believes it’s straight up more entertaining to watch people dancing than to just watch her. For some reason we slide into a conversation about Game Of Thrones, I think because she was up all night watching back-toback episodes. She’s horrified that I’ve never got into it. ‘I mean I am just a fantasy nerd and this is like the best of Lord Of The Rings and Dune, but almost like Homer, too, in that it takes elements of folk history and folk tales and becomes this amazing fiction.’ She says all this in almost one breath. I ask whether she has ever met any of the cast or whether she would like to be in it? She laughs. ‘I think my management have asked numerous times whether I can audition for the roles. They’re probably getting annoyed with me!’ At the time of this interview there is just one episode of this season left. ‘I am actually quite depressed about it. Like when Harry Potter ended I was literally depressed about it for seven years.’ It’s interesting that when it comes to her own work she seems far less impressed. ‘I don’t think I’ve achieved that much,’ she says. ‘You get so much hype over one album, but it’s not a great accomplishment – not like my friends who are doctors.’ Although she’s flippant about the act of making music, of performance she has a little more to say. ‘Playing live for me is not that natural. I mean I’m not a trained musician,’ she continues. ‘In 2015 all the guitar parts on set were my worst nightmare. Before every show I was like “Oh god”. I had to stop drinking so I could do the guitar part.’ Hasn’t drinking helped with her anxiety? ‘Well I was only doing it before the show to prevent the panic attacks. I’ve always had them – I always think I am having a heart attack. And I would be on stage crouching behind the keyboard thinking, I can’t leave, I can’t leave. I think quitting drinking has made me have less anxiety overall.’ Before our interview ends I feel I must ask her how she feels about the imminent American election. She sighs and comes at it as if she’s talked herself out already. ‘It’s a disaster. I mean the two-party system is a disaster. There has to be a spending limit on the campaigns – it’s like only the rich can run, which clearly is just not about representing the interests of the people,’ she says. ‘I think because people hate the system so much it’s led to such extremism on the left and the right.’ Does she think that Hillary’s going to win? ‘I don’t love her, but I’d rather her than Trump. And it would be great to have a female president.’ We leave it at that. Boucher is clearly wary of her thoughts being taken out of context. She tells me about a book she’s reading about the history of barbed wire – about how it carved up America in the late 1800s, ‘I’m on a history kick right now.’ The Grapes Of Wrath is also on her bedside table but she says she’s only one chapter in and it’s ‘not going well’. She’s twitchy to leave – move on to the next thing that’s happening in her rare afternoon off in London. Her and her brother Mac are planning to do some filming – they’re looking for a traditional British tea to shoot for the video. ‘I have that intense Catholic-girl guilt about being lazy,’ she says. ‘If I don’t do something all day then I have this terrible anxiety.’ Discerning, original and brilliantly odd, you can’t imagine Claire Boucher ever doing nothing – her brain just wouldn’t let that happen. Grimes is the face of POP fragrance by Stella McCartney. Art Angels is out now

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ILLUSTRATIONS BY

PABLO THECUADRO

WORDS BY

CHLOE MAC DONNELL

# FutureFifteen T h e y ’re t h e m o v e r s , s h a ke r s a n d m a ke r s o f t h e f u t u re . From music to movies and art to apps, these are the

01.

Musician

Kelsey Lu

‘The first note that I hit was like a reverberating sonic boom pressed up against my body.’ Instrumentalist/singer Kelsey Lu is explaining her first experience of the cello aged nine. She started out copying her older sister and playing the violin, but when she discovered a cello in her teacher’s studio and was allowed to take it home, she says that’s when she ‘immediately fell in love with it’. Born Kelsey McJunkins (Lu was a childhood nickname that’s stuck) in North Carolina, she grew up surrounded by music. Her mum played the piano, and her dad was a portrait artist and a percussionist in a jazz band. ‘He was always blasting things in his studio,’ she says. However, pop music was an unknown genre to her. Raised as a Jehovah’s Witness, it was banned. Instead, Lu worked on finding her own sound, attending cello practice and dreaming of playing in a symphony orchestra. Aged 18, she managed to get a scholarship to study classical music at university. When her parents found out, she was forced to flee from home. Now, aged 26, they have managed to rebuild their relationship with one another. ‘When I perform, I feel consumed with tsunami waves of emotion. It varies from performance to performance and the energy that’s in the room. But as long as I feel a connection, I get very lost in that.’ It’s easy to get lost too while watching and listening to Lu perform. Her sound is hypnotic – a mixture of haunting strings and her lilting voice full of emotion. And it’s clearly hypnotised others as well. She’s collaborated with Dev Hynes, aka Blood Orange, plays cello on Kelela’s forthcoming album, has worked with Sampha and, earlier this year, opened for Florence and The Machine. But Lu is also doing her own thing. In July she released her debut EP, Church, that was recorded in a Brooklyn church all in one take. ‘There are different stages that have brought me here. I’ve gone through experiences in music, life and art that have kind of led me to myself. I’ve been slowly working on my own things and figuring out what to do. So I think that’s taking off now.’ Photograph by Rodrigo Carmuega

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INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016

KELSEY WEARS: JUMPSUIT, £1,930, HOLLY FULTON (HOLLYFULTON.COM). SANDALS, £535, DSQUARED2 (DSQUARED2.COM)

hot new names to drop


GIRLI WEARS: JACKET AND TRACK PANTS, £1,047 EACH, ASHISH (BROWNSFASHION. COM); ROLL-NECK, £49, MADS NØRGAARD (LIBERTY.CO.UK)

02.

Shoe designer

03.

Pop star

D o r a Te y m u r

Girli

‘Hands. Definitely hands. Not shoes. Shoes are the second thing.’ I’ve asked Dora Teymur what he notices first about a person. As a shoe designer, you’d think he’d have a bit of a foot fetish, but it turns out not. ‘I don’t hate them, but I don’t like them, either.’ However, it all begins to make sense when you look at his collections, which he’s designed with the mantra ‘to hide the foot’ in mind. Free from toe cleavage-enhancing designs, instead you’ll find loafers, backless mules and little booties. Some come with a strip of studs or a septum-style ring. But it’s the baroque heel on many that’s become Teymur’s signature. ‘My design style is all about mixing different references from different decades and adapting them to today. It’s a mix of various nostalgic elements.’ A bit like Teymur himself, who says he’s always enjoyed dressing up. Today he’s wearing Levi’s and a balloon-sleeved shirt. Launched in 2012, Teymur’s shoes have quickly become fashion bait. Originally from Istanbul, he moved to London aged 17 to study at the London College of Fashion. He quickly realised that the student lifestyle of partying and Pot Noodles wasn’t for him. ‘I was like, wow, it’s not going to work out. I’m not a person to be a student.’ But instead of quitting, Teymur started his brand during his second year with support from his property developer father. His big break came when one of his friends, who worked at Browns Fashion, wore a pair of his shoes and was spotted by the head buyer. Opening Ceremony and Net-A-Porter quickly followed. Instagram has also proved to be a savvy sales move. ‘I post a style and it sells out within the hour. It’s amazing.’ When Teymur’s not sketching, you’ll find him at the barre. ‘I take ballet classes twice a week. My mother was a ballerina, but I never had the right posture to become professional.’ Lucky for all us shoe lovers. Photograph by Rodrigo Carmuega

‘There is so much going on in the world and there are people with huge influence who say f**k all, and that pisses me off,’ says Milly Toomey, aka Girli, as she furiously spreads Marmite onto a piece of charred toast. Sitting cross-legged on a couch post-shoot with her pink highlighter-coloured hair, this 18-year-old is far from the apathetic teen stereotype. Earlier this year, she released her debut track online, So You Think You Can F**k With Me Do Ya. Think M.I.A. meets Lily Allen – all big power beats and cutting lyrics fused with sound effects like iMessage alert tones. A typical line? ‘You know the two blue ticks shows that it’s been seen?’ ‘I used to describe my sound as brat pop,’ she says, but now I don’t like the word brat as that’s only used for women. Like you wouldn’t call the Beastie Boys brats, even though they’re f**king tongue in cheek!’ Growing up in north London with both parents working as stage actors, Toomey always knew she wanted to perform. Aged 15, she started doing open mic nights using a fake ID. She then turned down a place at The Brit School – ‘all the competitiveness and pop-star machine thing bugged me’ – for a spot at a music college in east London. It was there that she focused on her Girli persona. ‘I wanted a name that represented a strong female figure. Sometimes when I’d be wolf-whistled at by guys, they’d shout, “Hey girli!”, and I thought that’s an interesting pronoun – what does that mean?’ Unsurprisingly, she’s amassed a lot of female fans, who say how she is their role model and that her songs such as Girls Get Angry Too are their anthems. So, what’s it like being a female pop star in 2016? ‘The music industry is a boys’ club. I’ve caught myself trying to fit in, to be one of the lads, and it’s just bullshit. As a woman you do have to have thicker skin. I do what I do because I want to make people think.’ Photograph by Rodrigo Carmuega

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04.

Actor

C a l l u m Tu r n e r

When Callum Turner wanders into the studio, it’s fair to say most of the crew get a little flustered. He pulls off a beanie hat to reveal a ‘just rolled out of bed’ head of hair. ‘Sorry, it’s a bit of a mess,’ he says to the hairstylist with a grin. It’s that grin (with its hint of naughtiness) that made us put down our phones to watch him play a brooding twenty-something who embarks on an affair with a married Helen McCrory in ITV drama Leaving. It was the same on-screen charisma that had us hooked on the gritty murder mystery Glue, in which he played the possessive Eli Bray trying to track down his brother’s killer. But it was his role as the villainous Anatole in BBC’s War And Peace that really put him in the spotlight. Growing up in Chelsea (not in an MIC way), Turner says he has always loved films. However, his childhood dream was to be a footballer. It was only after dabbling in modelling (he’s shot for both Reebok and Burberry) that he decided to go down the acting route. ‘I did a couple of courses and got a few jobs. But it wasn’t until about two years into being “an actor”, like on TV and stuff, that I was like, OK I really want to do this.’ Next up, he stars alongside Michael Fassbender in the fantasy thriller Assassin’s Creed. ‘He’s a hero of mine. I was nervous at first, but I think he liked what I did.’ Surprisingly, for a 26-year-old on the cusp of stardom, Turner is very unassuming when it comes to talking about career highlights. ‘Every job is a break – a chance to show how you can be different. It’s a constant evolution.’ And although Hollywood is sure to beckon soon, in the meantime you’ll find him hanging out with his school friends. ‘They’re super-supportive. But I get the piss taken out of me. Not because I’m an actor. Even if I wasn’t an actor it would be something else.’ Photograph by Rodrigo Carmuega


CALLUM WEARS: JACKET, £2,000, LOUIS VUITTON (LOUISVUITTON.CO.UK), ROLL-NECK, £140, SUNSPEL (SUNSPEL.COM); TROUSERS, £295, BURBERRY (BURBERRY.COM); TRAINERS, £475, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN (LOUISVUITTON.CO.UK); SWEATER, IN BACKGROUND IMAGE, £995, BURBERRY (BURBERRY.COM). MARIA-INES WEARS: TOP, £740, JW ANDERSON (SELFRIDGES.COM); CULOTTES, £799, ROKSANDA (HARRODS.COM); SHOES, £680, PIERRE HARDY (PIERREHARDY.COM)

05.

Illustrator

Maria-Ines Gul

‘I set myself the challenge of posting something every day,’ says illustrator Maria-Ines Gul on why she set up her Instagram account. ‘If you know someone is waiting to see something new, it helps you to keep doing it.’ When she says ‘someone’, Gul modestly means one of her 149k followers, who double-tap her bright, whimsical and charming drawings. Originally from Poland, she moved to London to do a Masters in visual communication at the Royal College of Art. Her first big break came when Tavi Gevinson approached her to work with her on Rookie magazine, a moment that Gul describes as ‘very surreal’. Since then she hasn’t looked back, taking on commissions from the Tate and New York Times. ‘I’m very fast, so that’s one of my biggest advantages, but it also means that I say yes to a lot. The best projects are the ones that happen super-quickly, though; when someone says we need this by tomorrow.’ A self-confessed night owl, Gul says she’s trying to work to a more structured schedule, but it’s under pressure that she thrives. ‘I like the thrill and really need a deadline. If I have too much time, I just become lazy.’ Next up is a book cover for Penguin and she’s already collaborated with Gucci on its cruise collection show at Westminster Abbey, which was a bit of a dream come true for Gul. ‘Growing up, I wanted to be a fashion designer. Since then I’ve always wanted to be involved in the industry, but because I hadn’t learned how to sew I felt there wasn’t really a place for me.’ Although she does worry about the impact of technology on hand illustration, she also thinks it can be a positive thing. ‘Take Instagram. You can show your work, but also your personality. It helps you connect with people.’ Photograph by Rodrigo Carmuega

INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016

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06.

Actress

Jenn Murray

‘I went for a really firm one. The man in John Lewis was like, “Are you sure?” And I was like, “Yes, I know what I like.”’ It’s post-InStyle shoot and Jenn Murray is telling me about how she can’t wait to get home to have a nap on her new mattress. After months of filming the upcoming adaptation of JK Rowling’s Fantastic Beasts And Where to Find Them, Murray has finally found the time to move house. With her porcelain skin and piercing blue eyes, it’s not hard to see why the bewitching 30-year-old was cast in the fantasy drama about a secret community of witches and wizards in New York. Growing up in Northern Ireland, films were always a means of escapism. ‘One time at school I was really unwell and my mum came to take me home. We watched The Money Pit with Tom Hanks and that’s a memory I’ll never forget. It’s like you don’t feel well, but you watch a story and you just feel better.’ Although acting was always the career goal, the path to get there wasn’t exactly clear. ‘I didn’t have anyone around me who represented that world,’ says Murray. ‘My father was a pharmacist, my mum was a teacher. My brother and sister are lawyers. So it was

just a quiet dream that I had.’ But after deferring a place at university to try out for drama school, things really took off. Murray’s first big break came when she was cast as the lead in the thriller Dorothy Mills while still studying. ‘It was the hardest job, ironically, because it was the first thing I ever did. Most people start off with a few lines here or there, so there was a lot of pressure on me.’ Her next pinch-me moment came along with a role starring alongside Saoirse Ronan in Brooklyn. ‘I’d read the book many times. It’s about grief, love and making choices in your life. It’s relevant to everyone.’ So what did she learn from her Oscar-nominated co-star? ‘Saoirse is really kind and low-key. The best actors I’ve met have eyes in the back of their heads. I love people like that, who are quite understated but underneath there’s this power, which they’re not showing. That’s why when I was younger and wanted to act, I didn’t tell anyone. The child at school who wants to be an actor is always the loudest person in the room, the one who sings songs. But the best actors I’ve worked with are very shy; the people who observe.’ Photograph by Rodrigo Carmuega

07.

Fashion designer

‘That’s actually the worst moment. I just feel awkward about it. Maybe it’s my self-esteem,’ says Eudon Choi. I’m sitting with the Korean-born, London-based designer discussing what I thought was going to be the highlight of Fashion Week – taking a bow at the end of a show. But for Choi it’s actually the other part most designers hate that’s the most enjoyable for him – reading what the critics have to say. ‘I read them all. For me the most rewarding moment is when my collection gets positive reviews.’ Ever since Choi made his brand debut back in 2009, affirmative feedback both from stylists, buyers and writers has been the general consensus from women who love his clever feminine tailoring. Having originally studied menswear in Seoul, Choi was lured to London after reading about John Galliano and Alexander McQueen. Graduating with a Masters in womenswear from the Royal College of Art, he started working with Sienna and Savannah Miller on their now defunct fashion label, Twenty8Twelve. His eponymous brand came about quite spontaneously. ‘It wasn’t even in the plan to do my own business,’ says Choi. ‘I was just sick of touching cheap fabrics. I wanted to create something beautiful of my own.’ Three years after going it alone, he made his on-schedule London Fashion Week debut. Now he’s ready to take it to the next level with help from the British Fashion Council (earlier this year, he was awarded business support through the form of grants and mentorship). But although Choi reads all the reviews, he himself is his biggest critic. ‘I used to have OCD, so I am a perfectionist. I know it’s never going to be perfect. When starting a collection the uncertainty makes me very anxious, but once I start creating it’s very satisfying.’ Photograph by Rodrigo Carmuega

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INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016

JENN WEARS: TOP, £1,045,AND TROUSERS, £1,095, BOTH HUISHAN ZHANG (HUISHANZHANG.COM)

Eudon Choi


08.

Writer

Scarlett Curtis

‘It’s a complicated thing, because you don’t want to be defined by them and I don’t want to feel I’ve got where I am because of them.’ Scarlett Curtis is talking about her parents. It’s a subject that’s hard to avoid when your dad, Richard, has written the majority of the UK’s favourite films – think Love Actually and Notting Hill – and your mum is the popular broadcaster and writer, Emma Freud. Although it would have been easy for Curtis to piggyback on her parents’ names, she’s actually done her best to avoid it. ‘I want to keep my work to myself,’ she says. ‘It can be difficult, but I think it’s about what you’re doing and how well you do it. Although you can feel self-conscious, you just have to get on with it, do your own thing and whatever you’re doing will shine through.’ Curtis started out blogging from her bedroom at the age of 14 when she became very ill and was forced to drop out of school. ‘I found massive solace in writing. I was isolated from people my age, so I started to make friends online in the blogging community and through Twitter.’ Aged 17, she recovered physically, but began to suffer mentally. ‘I had quite bad anxiety and depression. It was new to me, and I felt so ashamed and alone. Writing about it was a huge aspect of me getting better. It’s part of losing the stigma.’ Now, living in New York where she’s studying a mixture of international development, politics and English literature at NYU, she also writes part time and has been published in the majority of the UK glossies and broadsheets. Similar to her hero Lena Dunham, Curtis isn’t afraid to delve into the more taboo issues. ‘I’ve met Lena a couple of times. She’s my number one person. I think a lot of celebrities can be scared about expressing an opinion, and I love that she’s come out so strong.’ With the political election looming, Curtis explains how she feels really lucky to be living in the States at such a time of change. ‘You can feel everything is becoming more divided, but you also get a lot more people realising that actually we’re not done with the movement for race or womens’ rights, and they need to use their voice. Online writing can be criticised, but everyone has a right to start or join the conversation.’


09.

Photographer Coco Capitán

Capitán almost didn’t become a photographer. Having been an A student at school, the Spanish 24-year-old thought that she might study law. It was only during her final exams, when she was spending all her free time taking pictures and doing odd jobs to be able to buy film roll, that Capitán realised she could make a career out of it. ‘I was always a really well-behaved child,’ she says. ‘I think I was a little annoying about it, but I thought that if I was good my parents would let me do what I want to do. So then when I was 17, I was like “doing photography is my rebel moment’.” She moved to London to study it and hasn’t looked back since. Although she only graduated from the Royal College of Art this year, Capitán has already shot campaigns for Mulberry and Paco Rabanne. And when we speak she’s just returned from shooting another project for Gucci. But Alessandro Michele didn’t have her shooting one of the supers in his amazing creations, instead he simply told her his favourite Italian coastal spots and asked her to go off and photograph them. ‘I think brands are taking bigger risks – you don’t need a model to show the clothes in a campaign any more,’ says Capitán. ‘You just want to share an experience. It’s all about saying, “Join us, be part of this and you’ll be cool”. I think that’s how marketing works now.’ For Capitán, the most important thing when working with a brand is trust. ‘Most will let me work in film and they’re excited about it. But at the same time, they’ve become really spoilt by digital imagery because they can see the pictures straightaway. I think people sometimes forget about the quality of printing.’ And although her portfolio is filled with amazing images of celebrities she’s worked with, including rapper A$AP Rocky, Capitán says they are never her favourite subjects. ‘You don’t have that much freedom, as you have to have so many approvals.’ Instead, you’ll find her most excited by her personal projects. ‘When I was a teenager, I lived in Beijing for three months and it was intense. I’d go out on the street, ask people for their pictures and end up in the strangest places; sometimes even dangerous situations. You definitely get distracted when you’re looking through a camera lens. I think the older you get the more scared you get, which is why I’m going back there in a week. I’m so excited.’

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10.

Set designer

Robert Storey

‘I had such a great time, I wanted to stay for longer. I had a friend who was an agent that looked after a set designer and he was like, “Why don’t you assist her?”. It kind of clicked into place that you could be very artistic and creative – make props and apply all the things that I learned during my art degree and my own artistic sensibility.’ Aged 23, he opened his own studio and now has a team of 12. ‘Sometimes when I walk in and everyone is sitting at their desks, I’m like, “Oh my god, this is really scary!’’’ With everyone hunting for Instabait, what’s Storey’s take on social media? ‘In the last few years, one of the things that’s been added to my brief, which was never there before, is to create “an Instagrammable moment”. I have absolutely no qualms about it at all. I mean, naturally I would want to create one. Instagram has actually encouraged people to work with special designers like me, because they need to create these immersive experiences that people get to see first hand, rather than a two-dimensional thing in a magazine.’ Photograph by Rodrigo Carmuega

ROBERT WEARS: JACKET, £350, 3.1 PHILLIP LIM (31PHILLIPLIM.COM);ROLL-NECK, £140, SUNSPEL (SUNSPEL.COM); TROUSERS, £800, LOUIS VUITTON (LOUISVUITTON.CO.UK)

When it comes to career highlights, for set designer Robert Storey it’s hard to know where to start. He’s created giant Perspex shoe plinths for Nicholas Kirkwood, filled Hermès’ windows with ginormous moss-covered stones, built futuristic LED light-filled rooms for a Nike presentation in New York, installed oil-slick black flooring at the Tate Modern for Christopher Kane and spent an entire day hand-folding paper sculptures for Vionnet. He also counts Louis Vuitton, Victoria Beckham and Kenzo as clients. It’s even more impressive when you discover that it’s only been eight years since Storey graduated from Central Saint Martins, where he studied fine art sculpture rather than spatial design. ‘I was kind of starting to actually design the space that the sculpture sat within, because for me the experience of seeing a sculpture was about being inside a space which was then relevant to the sculpture itself. My thesis was actually about the importance of the environment for a sculpture.’ After graduating, Storey hotfooted it to New York.

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Activist

Carys Afoko

It’s four days after the Brexit result when the InStyle shoot takes place, and political activist Afoko is fuming. ‘Most people in Britain are better than what’s going on now and I think that’s what’s so depressing about it.’ In between hair and make-up, she goes outside to Skype her friend about iStreetWatch, a website they launched a couple of hours ago inspired by the post-referendum results to track racist and xenophobic harassment in public spaces. ‘Being a Londoner is such a big part of my identity, so when something like this happens and you feel quite powerless, it’s good to think, “What exactly is happening? What do I have control over and what can I do?”’ Growing up in Brixton, south London, Afoko says her household was always quite political. ‘My dad is a refugee – he came over from Ghana. My mum is Welsh and was working for a refugee council, which is how they met.’ It was at school, while the Iraq war was unfolding, that Afoko realised she could make a difference. ‘Loads of us at school went on protests. That was the start of me wanting to change things.’ She credits being a Londoner as a big influence on getting into politics, but the final catalyst was going to university. ‘I studied politics at Oxford. I grew up in a family that wasn't very rich, then went to university and met some very privileged people. It was a big culture shock. I was like, “Oh my god, who are these posh people?”’ After graduating, Afoko moved back to London and is now communications director at SumOfUs, a digital campaign organisation. Remember those sexist beach body billboards? Well, Afoko and her team were the ones who started to campaign, demanding that Protein World apologise and remove them from the Underground. ‘I think the more digital campaigning and social media campaigning I’ve done, the more I’ve realised that most people do care. I mean, they’re busy and they all have lives, but actually if you ask them to do something, like just a tweet or an Instagram, they will. And it can make a difference.’ Photograph by Rodrigo Carmuega

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CARYS WEARS: SHIRT, £630, STELLA MCCARTNEY (BROWNSFASHION.COM); SKIRT, £128, PERSONA BY MARINA RINALDI (MARINARINALDI.COM)

11


Elisa Sednaoui Dellal

I like to mix things up.

Shop High Street to High End. Fashion Online. No Compromise. zalando.co.uk


12.

Spatial designer

Noé Duchaufour Lawrance

If you’ve ever visited London’s Sketch restaurant, had a stopover in an Air France business class lounge or bought a bottle of Yves Saint Laurent serum, you’ll have seen a Noé Duchaufour Lawrance design. Although they’re different – from giant egg-shaped loos to a curved, purple gradient bottle – they all have something in common: the line. Lawrence is pretty obsessed with lines, which he describes as ‘his language’. ‘You have the inner space of an object, which is something you are connected with, and you see the dimensions of an object, which is the volume. Then the outer space is related to it, although it is outside of it. You can create a space within a space and not stop the line.’ It’s this idea that becomes most clear in his furniture design, especially in his most recent collaboration with Hermès on a sofa and dressing table that he created for the fashion house. ‘Furniture is what drives me to design. Interior design comes with work. It’s more a job to be honest; it’s less of a passion than furniture.’ Surprisingly, Lawrence never studied design, instead opting for sculpture. ‘I knew aged 11 I would do design,’ he says. ‘My stepfather tore a page out of a magazine for me about a man who was a sculptor, an artist and a designer. That connection really interested me.’ For Lawrance, the combination works naturally. ‘Furniture is very close to my personal language and way of thinking. It needs to be functional, but you can let it become a little bit more artistic – it’s like a usable sculpture.’ So what are his pet hates when it comes to design? ‘Anything that’s made for effect, just for show. And even more if there is a coloured light on it.’ Is this a trend he’s seeing a lot of. ‘Everything has become design and no one knows what it is any more. The problem is, every student who’s doing a new piece becomes fancy, going on Instagram and Facebook. There is a high level of communication, but not a high level of quality.’ For Lawrence, he prefers to remain in the background working away, a bit like Céline’s Phoebe Philo rather than, say, Jeremy Scott. ‘As creators we are connected to the same vibration in a way that we try to do something pushed by passion and to make it happen through a production. I’m just a bit quieter about it.’

13.

Artist

Hannah Perry

‘Being an artist is about vulnerability, not being afraid to make mistakes. The stronger you feel these things, the deeper you go into your creativity,’ says the installation, music and video artist Hannah Perry. In an era where everyone is self-publishing and self-promoting online, it comes as a surprise to find that Perry’s website has a password. ‘I want people to view the work as it is. For me, it’s important to experience it, to feel it,’ she says. ‘A lot of the videos/installations are immersive. Documentation online doesn’t present the best reading of the work viscerally.’ With a BA from Goldsmiths University, Perry went on to do an MFA at the Royal Academy of Arts in London. Since graduating in 2014, she’s been featured in exhibitions around the world, including New York, Warsaw and Amsterdam. Perry describes her music and video work as ‘therapy’. ‘Right now I’m writing a lot of hate mail – salty unrequited spam emails that I’ll never send; collecting seemingly general but targeted posts to people who will know damn well what it’s about – like target marketing. I’m also in the middle of making some pretty imposing phallic sculptures from traumatised metal and liquid latex. The relics of some kind of skewed, stereotyped role play, where the end credits roll up on a car crash sex scene,’ she explains. When it comes to everyone being a videographer nowadays, what with iPhone footage and Snapchat, Perry has an open attitude. ‘It’s great that there is that space to be creative or expressive. We had the same conversation when snapshot cameras came out in the 80s, and we will have it again. But being able to inspire people is not about tools; it’s about making people feel and be felt.’

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Phoebe Collings-James

My style is my own.

Shop High Street to High End. Fashion Online. No Compromise. zalando.co.uk


14.

Filmmaker

Samantha Michelle

15.

Digital innovator

Daniel Murray

Grabble founder Murray has just flown in from a business trip to Berlin. He’s clock-watching as he needs to leave for the airport again shortly for a flight to Barcelona. In the past month, he’s ticked off meetings in Hong Kong, Singapore, Dubai, Paris and New York. ‘My body clock is a bit all over the shop,’ he exclaims. Bearded, with thick-rimmed glasses and wearing trainers, Murray looks like a stereotypical app developer, but he’s adamant that’s where the clichés stop. ‘I think the biggest misconception people have about app developers after thinking we are geeks, is the assumption that we have had this light-bulb moment and know what the market wants. But that’s bullshit.’ Instead, for Murray, his fashion app that lets you grab pieces you like from various online shops and store them in one place to buy came about after various other attempts. Having worked in creative advertising for a bit, he and his current business partner Joel Freeman decided to go it alone. Their first business, a QR code card-playing platform failed. ‘It was too early, people were still using Sony Ericssons,’ he says. This was then followed by an attempt at a Pinterest-style business. ‘We ran it for a year until we realised it wasn’t going anywhere as actual Pinterest had taken off.’ It was when Murray and Freeman changed their mindset and thought about what works well on a phone that the idea for Grabble was born. ‘People like single-use apps,’ says Murray. ‘That’s why Tinder is great. So we created a Tinder for fashion – you swipe right on the pieces you like.’ Launched in 2013, it immediately went viral. ‘It wasn’t a secret. I read so much about how to trend on Twitter etc, and then I followed it to a tee. I locked myself in a room for a week and just made it happen.’ Last year, Murray and Freeman received a £1.2 million investment from a consortium of investors keen to get involved in the start-up. Now they’ve begun to consult with brands to help them develop their own mobile apps. So why does Murray think his app has worked? ‘We’re totally comfortable with changing our business model. We’re pragmatic. We look at the metrics and see what’s working and what’s not. Even if something sounds like a good idea, if people aren’t using it we get rid of it. You have to go where the money goes.’ Photograph by Rodrigo Carmuega

DANIEL WEARS: SWEATER, £350, NEIL BARRETT (MRPORTER.COM); TROUSERS, £260, SOLID HOMME (MYPORTER.COM). HAIR BY LOUIS BYRNE AT THE LONDON STYLE AGENCY USING FUDGE. MAKE-UP BY AMY CONLEY AT STELLA CREATIVE ARTISTS USING CHANEL LE ROUGE COLLECTION NO.1 AND LE LIFT V-FLASH

‘I’ve had agents take me on and then drop me because I wouldn’t go to their house for drinks or be their girlfriend.’ Actress-turned-filmmaker Samantha Michelle is talking about her experience of Hollywood. ‘I come from a loving family and had a 3.9A f**king grade point average from NYU and Oxford. But I still found myself in situations where I was entertaining these disgusting propositions, because the film industry is so competitive.’ It’s this notion of ‘the boys’ club’ that Michelle explores in her first short film The Dark Side Of The Sun. ‘I wanted to start a discourse about sexploitation on the casting couch, but this time with gender role reversal. The world of film is foul when it comes to the treatment of women.’ Starring Jack Fox, it made its debut at Cannes earlier this year. Encouraged by positive reviews, Michelle is now in the process of writing and turning it into a feature-length movie. When it comes to saying no to sexploitation, Michelle doesn’t think the perpetrators were that shocked. ‘It was more like, “OK, next!”’ You’re a dime a dozen.’ As well as the casting treatment, the type of roles available to women is also frustrating for Michelle. ‘We live in a culture where females are supposed to be Bond girls – sexy, violent, glamorous and slightly in the background at the wills and whims of men. The content created promotes that type of myth.’ In order to change this, Michelle thinks the best approach is a different type of content creation. ‘You need to work with the system in order to change it. My film doesn’t seem like a didactic piece of cinema – it’s entertaining, but at the same time it evokes questions rather than communicating one singular message.’


JosĂŠphine de La Baume

I know what I want.

Shop High Street to High End. Fashion Online. No Compromise. zalando.co.uk


f o r w a r d t h i n k i n g S h e ’s

t h e

a c t r e s s

S t o r m

A n y a

m o d e l

t u r n e d

Ta y l o r -J o y

w e a r s

S u n d a n c e f a s h i o n ’s

s e n s a t i o n – f u t u r e

s t a r s

S T Y L I N G B Y ROBY N KO T Z E


P H O T O G R A P H S B Y CA R L I J N JAC OB S

Anya wears

J a m i e

W e i

H u a n g

Now in her sixth season, Huang showcases her futuristic designs with their elongated lines and asymmetric cuts at both Paris and London Fashion Weeks. The 30-year-old set up her label after winning the Designer For Tomorrow award in 2013 Opposite page and this page, coat, £1,675, dress, £1,055, and bag, £755, all Jamie Wei Huang (jamieweihuang.com); rings, on ring finger, £315, stacked on middle finger, £295 each, all Sophie Buhai at Dover Street Market (doverstreetmarket.com)


Anya wears

B e a u f i l l e

Sisters Chloé (28) and Parris Gordon (26) – who both studied at Nova Scotia College of Art and Design – originally started their label under the name Chloé comme Parris in 2009, but changed it in 2013. Chloe designs the ready-to-wear and Parris the accessories This page, top, about £660, and skirt, about £510, both Beaufille (beaufille.com) Opposite page, coat, £1,224, top, £540, and skirt, £450, all JH Zane (jhzane.co.uk)


Anya wears

JH Zane Chinese-born Juhao Zeng studied at Winchester School of Art before cutting his teeth in the studios of Katie Eary and Gareth Pugh, and also working as a stylist. He has been creating his androgynous basics â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with that allimportant twist â&#x20AC;&#x201C; since 2013


Anya wears

Plys

Seoul-raised South Korean Lee Joon chose the name of his brand to reflect the fact that it is knitwear (the plural of ply). Although currently settled in Berlin, where he is inspired by cycling culture, he originally studied fashion in London, first at Chelsea College and then Central Saint Martins Sweater, ÂŁ335, Plys (selfridges.com); jeans, ÂŁ285, Magda Butrym (magdabutrym.com)


Anya wears

S a r a

R o b e r t s s o n

After studying at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in her home country, Robertsson was head designer of jewellery and accessories at Weekday, so it was a natural step to set up her own jewellery brand in 2015 Earring, about ÂŁ210, Sara Robertsson (sararobertssonjewellery.com); shirt, ÂŁ700, Pinghe (skp-beijing.com)


Anya wears

Anouki Georgian Anouki Areshidze, 26, studied fashion design and styling at Istituto Marangoni and Accademia del Lusso, but returned to her home country to set up her own label in 2013. She also has a diffusion line, MISS ANOUKI – with products updated weekly, it’s the most in-demand clothing brand in Georgia This page, shoes, £415, Anouki (avenue32.com); trousers, £420, Pinghe (skp-beijing.com) Opposite page, dress, £360, and top, £225, both Haizhen Wang (haizhenwang.co.uk)


Anya wears

Haizhen Wang Thirty-eight-year-old Wang is originally from Dalian, China, but studied at Central Saint Martins and worked for the likes of Max Mara, Boudicca and AllSaints before setting up his eponymous label in 2010. He takes inspiration from British culture and the Orient for his hyper-minimalist tailoring

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Blueberry Musk T H E S C E N T O F S E N S UA L I T Y

complimentary delivery at SHAYANDBLUE.COM


Anya wears

Maria Piankov Not every designer can say they have the technique to create embroidery and hand-stitching at a couture level, but assisting Valentin Yudashkin at the beginning of her career means that Piankov can make precisely that claim. Her designs are heavily influenced by sportswear and technology

Top, ÂŁ250, and trousers, ÂŁ380, both Maria Piankov (mariapiankov.com)

INSTYLE XXXXXXXXX 2013

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Anya wears

K o c h é

Hailing from Strasbourg, Christelle Kocher studied at Central Saint Martins and launched her label in 2014. Her practical sportswear and urban separates are made from luxurious fabrics, using techniques that are usually only associated with couture garments Dress, £1,030, Koché (avenue32.com); shirt, £210, Palmer//Harding (palmerharding.com)


Anya wears

Magda Butrym

At 19, Butrym – now 31 – began studying fashion design and working as a stylist in her native Poland. She went on to work for a number of Polish brands before starting her own label in 2014, marrying modern design with traditional craftmanship such as braiding, pleating and knitting Dress, £2,120, Magda Butrym (net-a-porter.com)

HAIR BY NICK IRWIN AT THE LONDON STYLE AGENCY USING UNITE HAIRCARE. MAKE-UP BY ADELE SANDERSON AT FRANK AGENCY USING TOM FORD BEAUTY. NAILS BY SABRINA GAYLE AT LMC WORLDWIDE USING NAILS INC. FASHION ASSISTANT: HELEN ATKIN. DIGITAL OPERATOR: WILLOW WILLIAMS. PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANTS: DAVID MANNION, PETER SMITH. DESIGNER PROFILES BY HANNAH ROCHELL

Anya Taylor-Joy ‘When I was a kid I wanted to run away with the circus, so today was a bit of a dream come true,’ Anya Taylor-Joy tells me as we watch a trapeze artist warm up and a tumbler practise flips. We’re in an aerial dance centre, the location for today’s InStyle shoot, but Anya’s shaken off her threads and slipped into black skinny jeans and black Nikes: ‘I call them my Ninja Turtle shoes.’ The 20-year-old is blending in to the background this afternoon but she needs to make the most of her anonymity while she still can. ‘Maybe I’m trying to evade it already,’ she says of her steadily increasing profile. ‘Last week, I lopped off all my hair with my friend’s kitchen scissors and dyed it black.’ Ever since her on-screen debut in The Witch at Sundance, Taylor-Joy has gone on to bag a stack of big movies, all set to roll out over the next couple of months. First up is Morgan, a sci-fi thriller and the directorial debut from Ridley Scott’s son Luke; then the psychological thriller-horror movies Split and Thoroughbred, and on the day we meet she’s just found out she’s landed a role alongside Mia Goth in another watch-through-your-fingers movie, Marrowbone…. Your upbringing sounds quite boho… ‘I was born in Miami, lived in Argentina until I was six and then moved to London. It was a huge change. The Argentine culture is very warm and affectionate. When I came to the UK, I remember hugging people and they were like, “What are you doing? You don’t know me!” and I was like, “I’m sorry, culture block!”’ Does acting run in the family? ‘I’m the youngest of six and a bit of a black sheep. My dad was a powerboat racer and my mum flitted around doing photography and interior design but eventually stopped to take care of us. I think it became very clear from a young age that I was unbelievably stubborn and I was going to do whatever the hell I wanted to do. They’ve just been like; “Go do your thing.” I don’t know if they understand me but they support me.’ You left school aged 17 to pursue your career. That’s pretty brave… ‘I never really fitted in with my own age group. It felt like there was something between us. I just wanted to act. The minute I stepped onto the set of The Witch, I was like, “I’m never leaving.” I felt like I had found home.’ You seem very independent. How do you handle being told no? ‘My first audition was for Maleficent, and when I didn’t get it I cried for a

couple of hours. Now I tell myself if it’s not for you, it’s not for you, and you’d be detracting from the project and from the character. If it’s yours, it just is and nothing can stop you from getting the role.’ Do you get nervous before auditions? ‘If I’m nervous I know I like it. Afterwards, for some films I’ve had to lock myself in the bathroom so I don’t follow the director to ask if I’ve got it. I’m not exactly a people pleaser but I’ve been surprised that when a role doesn’t feel right, I’ve found it really easy to say no. Even if there are a million reasons why I should do it like, “This movie is going to catapult you to wherever.” I just don’t want to show up on set and not feel a connection to the character.’ Did you watch a lot of horror movies growing up? ‘I never liked that genre. The first one I watched was myself in The Witch! And then The Blair Witch Project. After that I was like no, never again. It’s weird I don’t have a particular category I’m into, I just get a very strong instinct when a project is meant for me and I also get it when it’s not. It just so happens that they’ve all been of a similar theme.’ Your character, Morgan, is pretty terrifying but at the same time you kind of feel sorry for her… ‘I always called her my little critter. I don’t think she’s evil. She’s been put into a situation where she doesn’t really have morals in the same way we do but she’s trying desperately to be good. Then she’s betrayed and she’s pissed off.’ You and Kate Mara have some pretty intense fight scenes… ‘We tried to do as many of the stunts as we could. I went home every night after filming with a kaleidoscope of bruises. Kate and I had to really trust one another because we were throwing punches inches away from each others’ noses.’ And it gets pretty violent with Paul Giamatti, too… ‘He went off script during a take, which surprised me. I went up to him afterwards and asked, ‘You can do that?’ and he was like, ‘Hell yes!’ He also went back on a line he fluffed and I was like, ‘Oh wow, I thought you had to stop the entire scene and take it from the top.’ Silly things I didn’t know as I hadn’t spent much time on a set. Seven movies later I’m like, ‘I was so naïve!’ Morgan is in UK cinemas from 2 September. Words by Chloe Mac Donnell INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016

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e h t

t o m o r r o w s l r i g

Passionate. Hot. Super talented. New-gen feminists. Meet Stella McCartneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s POP fragrance girls â&#x20AC;&#x201C; role models just went next level

P H O T O G R A P H S B Y G L E N L UC H F OR D


W O R D S B Y H A N NA H RO C H E L L

L O L A

L E O N

Performing arts student You’ll know her as Lourdes Leon, but it seems like Lola, aka Madonna’s eldest daughter, has been saving her voice for just the right moment. ‘It’s impor tant for me to overcome a lot of insecurities,’ she says of starring in Stella McCar tney’s POP fragrance ad campaign. ‘I have a lot of people judging my ever y move. It’s impor tant for me to not let it rule my life.’


K E N Y A K I N S K I - J O N E S Animal rights activist Kinski-J o ne s’s id e a o f m o d e rn-da y fema le b e au t y d o e sn’t co nfo rm to t he fa mehu ng r y p ro file s o f a ce r t ain well-known fam ily o f wo m e n w ho share her firs t two i n i t i a l s . T h e d a u g h te r o f c u l t a c t re s s N a s t a s s j a K i n s k i a n d record p ro d u ce r Q u incy J o ne s, she d e scrib e s a modern beauty as: ‘She is natural and effortless. S h e ’s p a s s i o n a te , c u r i o u s , e d u c a te d a n d flawe d in t he b e st w ay.’ Kinski -Jones co u ld e asily b e d e scrib ing hers elf.


A M A N D L A

S T E N B E R G

A c t o r, c a m p a i g n e r a n d p o e t T h e H u n ge r G a m es sta r a nd re cip ie nt o f a ‘Fe m i n i st of th e Yea r ’ a w a rd in 2015 says: ‘I g et f r ustr a te d w h e n oth e r p eo p le ’s vo ice s are be i n g si l en ced . M y j ob i s to b e a m e g ap ho ne fo r oth er p e op l e . I h a ve a p owe r fu l to o l o f having p eop l e l i ste n to w h a t I a c tua l ly say and I w ant to i n sp i re c h a n ge .’


What does it mean to be a cool young woman in 2016? And what will it mean to be a cool young woman in 15 years’ time?

If the young stars of Stella McCartney’s mesmerising ad campaign for her new fragrance POP are anything to go by, it’s about having something to say about the world, it’s about being authentic, and it’s about doing way more than just posting on Instagram. Kenya Kinski-Jones, Amandla Stenberg, Lola Leon and InStyle’s cover star Grimes, were all hand-picked by McCartney for the campaign. It’s a pretty radical move to cast a gang of girls who are more underground than mainstream for a perfume ad, but it’s one that taps into the mood of what it takes to be cool right now. ‘It’s about the casting of new girls and giving a new identity to beauty for a different generation of women,’ says McCartney. ‘I feel strongly that a lot of the time the way women are portrayed in this kind of arena is a hard one to live up to. What I wanted to do here with POP was to get different personalities, different young women, and celebrate them and bring them together. Each of them has their own voice and identity.’ Take Lola Leon who, at 19, has managed to stay relatively out of the limelight compared to some of her contemporaries like Brooklyn – or even Harper – Beckham. She has instead been busy doing ‘normal’ girl stuff, studying performing arts at the University of Michigan. You won’t find her on Instagram or Snapchat, save for in the guise of her and her mother’s Material Girl fashion label, and there have been virtually no interviews with her. Next, Kenya Kinski-Jones, a 23-year-old model and animal rights activist whose parents are film star Nastassja Kinski and the renowned music producer Quincy Jones (the mastermind behind the biggestselling album of all time, Michael Jackson’s Thriller). She has a degree in journalism from Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles and says she is most comfortable wearing faded jeans and a pair of Vans rather than bodycon and Louboutins. And, at 17 years old, but wise well beyond her years, there’s Amandla Stenberg. You likely remember her as Rue in 2012’s The Hunger Games, but she’s now making a name for herself for being outspoken on issues of race and gender. A video she made for a school project last year called Don’t Cash Crop On My Cornrows on the subject of cultural appropriation has had over two million views on YouTube, and she refers to her gender as non-binary. Stenberg has also penned a comic book called Niobe: She Is Life, the first of its kind with a black writer, black star and black illustrator. It makes sense for a fragrance that its ambassadors should be about something other than looks, but get used to a new generation of authentic, individual, selfie-shunning, smart girls in all arenas. Because the future’s female role models look like this. POP by Stella McCartney EDP, £54 for 50ml (stellamccartney.com)


Game-changing fabrics, designs for life and the names to invest in now. Vintage king William Banks-Blaney explains why the past can tell us more about the future of fashion than we might think 156

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GUTTER CREDIT HERE GUTTER CREDIT HERE GUTTER CREDIT HERE

I N T E R V I E W B Y H A N NA H RO C H E L L


HOW I GOT INTO FASHION

I was never really into clothes for myself, but through my work as an art dealer and interior designer, I started to look at photography from the 1960s, 18th-century oil paintings and 19thcentury photography. The people in those photographs and paintings, and that sense of place, was what started my love of vintage. The power of clothing – seeing how it changes a person and how they hold their body – intrigued me. I found vintage fashion liberating. Instead of trying to fit the diktats of what’s around you, you could actually think about who you really wanted to be. When I was sourcing interiors I used to buy pieces of clothing as gifts, and friends said, ‘You should do this for a living.’ I held a pop-up for 30 of my girlfriends and every piece sold out. By my fourth sale I’d hired a five storey townhouse and 400 women came in the space of just one day. I realised that this idea of very edited vintage, that’s not just in great condition but is relevant, had become a thing. That’s how William Vintage started. FASHION GOES IN CYCLES

I think that everything goes in circles. Even the greatest designers in the world would agree that you can’t reinvent the wheel and it’s like any form of art; people are always inspired by something. Silhouette in particular can keep reverting and generally it’s often because of the mood of the time. In the 90s we were having a 70s disco revival in music. If you go back to the 70s themselves, there was a massive kickback because of Mia Farrow’s movie The Great Gatsby, set in the 20s. Right now, there’s a huge throwback to the 90s, not just in silhouette but in colour blocking, proportion of cut, execution of hair and clash of lip colour. With fashion, it’s about what’s actually happening in the world. For the last five or six years we’ve had a period of deconstructed, tonal, elegant but safe, wearable clothing. It’s been a very modern look. But over the past 15 months there’s been a real shift. Now the 90s element is really huge and I don’t think it’s any coincidence that it’s coinciding with the Chinese market collapsing and being in a period of huge flux in the UK. I think the cyclical nature is there, but I think the catalyst is far more than what’s hot right now. E V E N D I O R ’ S N E W LO O K WA S N ’ T N E W

You don’t have to be a vintage buyer to know what the 50s New Look is – tiny waist, fantastic bust shoved up, great big full skirt. It was called the New Look, but it wasn’t a new look. If you put that woman beside any of the caricatures

or sketches from 18th-century France, it’s exactly the same silhouette: the woman is constricted. Over the previous 50 years, Chanel and Vionnet had thrown away the corset, had given us the bias cut, the drop waist, the freedom to reflect the sexual and legal rights women were gaining. The right to vote, the right to marry anyone you choose, the right to drive. Dior arrived and suddenly women were back in corsets for the first time in 50 years. To put this in context: in 1939 the men went off to fight and women showed that they could not only raise the children and look after the house, but they could also do the men’s jobs. They could weld, they could plough, they could run companies and they could manage the accounts. To me, that moment at Dior wasn’t just about reviving the couture economy (because it increased the amount of fabric used), it was about putting women back on a pedestal. Dior’s New Look was actually a reimagining of the past.

‘I hope mass production is a blip in the story. I think people will become bored of fast fashion’

H O W FA B R I C S E V O LV E D

Whereas silhouettes tend to be cyclical, since the 60s fabrics have started to evolve. It was the first time that a woman could walk into a store and find a dress in her size and in the colour she wanted, rather than having to order it. We take it for granted but it was a whole new world. To have Yves Saint Laurent and Courrèges and all of these huge names say, ‘Here you are, you can have it and take it away’ meant that fabrics had to change. To go from having three months to make a dress for Lady Fortescue, to Lady Fortescue coming in and wanting to take it with her in 15 minutes, the manufacturing processes had to change, the finishing and stitching had to change, and if you’re changing the way you have to finish and stitch, you might have to change the composition of the fabric. So it works backward from that moment. THE BIRTH OF T H R OWAWAY FA S H I O N

By the 70s, the impact of Far East production and factory-made garments had started to kick in. Quality suffered because se fabric had to be cheaper. Liz Taylor might have been turning up at Studio 54 in silk Halston but the rest of us were wearing a poly version of it. People wanted solid coloured, shiny at under the club fabric that would look great lights. I love the 70s but 99 per cent of the vintage items I find from that era have sweat marks, hot rocks holes or ripss on the hems because someone tripped d down own the stairs (it was a party decade). This was the INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016

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FASHION AND TECHNOLOGY

The next advancement in fashion will be the development of production, either to create clothes that are more technologically sophisticated, or the reverse – where it will be more about the naïve, about hand-knit or hand-cut. There are two sides to the coin. On the one hand, Iris van Herpen’s show featured clothes that respond to touch and sound. The models are interpreting how a fabric reverberates for them and the clothes reflect that – there was interplay between audience, wearer and garment. Then there was Zac Posen’s gown for Claire Danes at the Met Gala. It was an old-school shape with supernatural cutting using the very latest technology to create a dress that could shimmer like an opal. It looked like a glacier at sundown. Yes, it sounds pretentious and, yes, it’s very expensive – the Zac Posen gown is available to buy at one London store for £75,000 – but it’s a standout moment. A game changer. On the other hand, I

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think basic fabrics are going to develop much more. At couture this season, there were a lot of fabrics like cotton calico, jersey, knits and felt. These are all construction fabrics and it was as though the garments had been turned inside out. When I find a piece of couture I always turn it inside out to see the integrity of its construction. After a period of extraordinary fantasy and opulence in haute couture, there is a sense that it’s turning itself inside out. TECH FOR EVERYONE

Of course, £75,000 dresses aside, even the average woman on the street will end up benefiting from these cutting-edge fabrics. The advancement of technology and levels of production will eventually make prices much cheaper. But the future of fashion is going to be multi-layered; it’s a much broader picture than just fabrics, with the immediacy of fashion online and our increasingly global lifestyle. Fashion Week is already changing because the idea of seasonal dressing is ridiculous. It’s always summer somewhere; you can always ski somewhere. And whereas a show used to be for commercial buyers and haute couture clients, it’s now about the marketing of a brand, not the selling of a collection. Bella Hadid walked on water at the Trevi Fountain for Fendi. That’s not selling the

dress – it was creating a mood, a moment, access to something beautiful. Ultimately though, the future rests on the turn of a dime – if there’s a war, if there’s a famine, if there’s a huge upturn in the economy. It often feels as though whenever there’s a peak or trough economically or politically, or in the rights of women, there is a paradigm shift in clothing, so it’s hard to predict what the future will be. T H E F U T U R E O F V I N TAG E

Whose vintage designs will I be stocking in my shop in 15 years’ time? Nicholas Oakwell (he may be the next Dior, you never know). Christopher Raeburn’s method of printing is extraordinary. Bora Aksu has a very definite language, that fusion of incredible delicacy for a really strong woman. Mary Katrantzou, Simone Rocha, Roksanda. These designers are now entrenched and it’s for a reason – you recognise their signature and I think that’s what sets a long-term designer apart. I really like J JS Lee – there’s an intellect there, a thinking about the woman inside the garment. I hope I’ll be stocking more female designers in general. I always hope for more female everything! People ask me, ‘What should I be buying right now?’ What you should be buying right now is whoever makes your favourite dress, whether that’s Zara or Nicholas Oakwell. Follow your heart.

AS TOLD TO HANNAH ROCHELL. PHOTOGRAPHS BY PHILIP BEESLEY © PBA1, MOLLY SJ LOWE, SOPHIE VAN DER PERRE, MORGAN O’DONOVAN. ALL CLOTHING PICTURED IS BY IRIS VAN HERPEN

start of throwaway. I hope mass production is a blip in the story. I think people will become bored of fast fashion. Now they’re aware of the impact on the environment and realise where their clothes are made, they want a morally clean garment. I love the idea of being able to see the journey of a garment on the label in the future.


Theodora earrings £19.96 ‘I like the combination of a pearl, with a Diamonique stone and silver chain to create a long drop earring, which can either hang at the back or the front. You can also wear them without the pearl for an alternative look.’

instyle PROMOTION

t h e e a r r i n g e d i t InStyle’s fashion director – and earring addict – Arabella Greenhill has teamed up with QVC to design a gorgeous bespoke collection

‘I love jewellery – so much so that I have seven ear piercings in all, which gives me lots of chances to wear earrings. I like to find little pieces that I can wear every day, that can be slept in, showered in, that I can run in and never have to take out. When I first started to get more ear piercings, it sparked an obsession with finding the perfect earring collection. Having worked as a fashion director for many years, I was thrilled to be asked to design my own Earring Edit for QVC’s exclusive brand, Diamonique. What was important to me was keeping the pieces true to myself and to what I wear, so they are small, delicate and interchangeable – pieces that can be worn casually with jeans or dressed up for special occasions. Whether you have a classic, one-hole-per-lobe piercing or multiple ones, you can mix and match them however works for you. Keep it unique and individual. How will you wear yours?’

Clementine earrings £14 ‘For daytime, I often wear jeans but still like to add something special. I’d wear a single silver stud or two like these on one ear, and a drop earring on the other.’

Th Earring Edit is available from 1 September The aat qvcuk.com/DiamoniqueByInStyle q Watch Wa QVC on Freeview channel 16, Sky channel 650, Virgin TV channel 740 o channel 800 or Freesat F Grace earrings £21.96

Elfie earrings £46 ‘I love a classic hoop but a silver chain with Diamonique stones gives it a modern twist. It’s up to you whether you wear the chain at the front or the back.’

‘A beautifully cut earring in sterling silver is a timelesss piece that you can wear ffor years to come. Wearing o one earring is very on trend at the h moment, or try multiplee earrings in one ear or both th.’

Mischa earrings £17 ‘For an everyday earring that you never need to take out, a stud with a delicate chain that fastens at the back is perfect. I wear one of these each day, but not as a pair.’

Tune in to QVC at 1pm on 8 September T to catch Arabella presenting her debut collection


PHOTOGRAPH BY RONAN MCKENZIE

Fifteen-year-olds ponder what beauty means to them; Franรงois Nars talks through two decades of making women beautiful; the new Insta-worthy niche brands; plus Jared Leto on men in make-u p 165


Poppy ‘Exams stress me out so I’m really into aromatherapy and oils that help relax me. Make-up isn’t so much my thing, I’m more into taking care of my skin. I’ve got so many products and a full-on routine with hundreds of steps but I’m starting to think it might be better to just leave my skin alone. I’m not worried about ageing, it’s gonna happen to everyone, but I do think taking care of yourself is important. When you’re older you have a different type of beauty which comes with a sort of wisdom. I think Gisele is amazing. Obviously she’s a model but she seems like a genuine, kind person and it’s that inner self that makes her even more beautiful. I don’t shave my armpits and neither do most of my friends. At the beginning I felt really self-conscious but now I feel way more relaxed having one less burden to think about.’


we are

f i f t e e n No one can predict the future but it will be the next gen who shape it. From expressing their individuality to cultural appropriation and perceptions of beauty, only they know what

it

feels

like

to

be

a

centennial

navigating a world where your whole life is visually

curated.

InStyle

commissioned

21-year-old photographer Ronan Mckenzie to capture a group of 15-year-olds â&#x20AC;&#x201C; sans Snapchat filter â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and found out what beauty means to them W O R D S B Y G E ORG E DR I V E R

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Li l y- Bl u e ‘I definitely buy a lot of make-up – I love the feel of it when it’s new and fresh. I even like just looking at it! The last thing I saved up for was an Anastasia Beverly Hills highlight palette. I saw it on Instagram and saved a picture of it on my phone so every time I washed the dishes or hoovered, I’d look at it and be like “I want this, so I’ve gotta work hard for it.” I’ll go on eBay to buy make-up because it has really good deals and make-up is so expensive. I did a big haul last week and spent £50, but I won’t buy anything without talking to my friends. We’ve got a WhatsApp group called ‘make-up’ and we’ll post pictures of what we like and talk about it. Yesterday we went straight after school to get our acrylics done but we decided who was getting what design on the group chat before. We always get a Coffin or Ballerina shape end which is really in right now and I can still play the piano with them on.’

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M e l i s s a ‘I wouldn’t put myself in a particular group but I guess I fall into the emo category because of my piercings. The first-ever piercing I got was my tragus and I almost passed out. I thought I could handle it but obviously not! I go to this place in Stratford and my mum always comes with me. She’s really supportive of it because she knows one way or another I’m going to get it done anyway. My sister has her septum and side of her nose pierced like me, so I’m sort of following in her footsteps. Then there’s my secret undercut in my hair and my braces. I didn’t like them to begin with but now I have different colours and everyone’s always like, ‘Oh, they’re so cool.’ I just see them as another accessory, like a bracelet for my teeth. When I get them off I’m gonna get a smiley piercing – if I got one now I’d be terrified of getting it caught in my braces!’


A le x is ‘My mum’s Dominican and English and my dad’s Scottish. People are always like, “You don’t look mixed race”, and I’m like, “Oh god, not this conversation again.” It’s ridiculous because my heritage is actually quite simple compared to some people. I met a girl the other day who’s German and Swedish and her mum is black. I read that in the future everyone’s going to have mixed heritage. I definitely get my hair from my parents – my mum’s is super-curly and my dad has a ginger beard. It’s the thing that most makes me different to everyone else, which I like. I think everyone secretly wants to be the same as everyone else and fit in but they also want to be different and have everyone copy them. You get brainwashed by Instagram – I became friends with a girl I met on there and in her pictures it didn’t look like she was wearing loads of make-up but in real life it was like, woah. It can be really deceiving.’

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GUTTER CREDIT HERE GUTTER CREDIT HERE GUTTER CREDIT HERE

K a i n a a t ‘I never feel like being a hijabi is a problem – wearing a scarf should never be something that’s looked down on or seen as a burden. For me, it feels weird to wear my hair down. Wearing a hijab is so much easier. There are a lot of misconceptions about it, but I wear whatever colour scarf I want – if I’m covered and feeling happy that’s all that matters. I feel like being a teenager is a bit like being a sponge – you’re so easily influenced by social media, which is why I don’t have Instagram. Without it I can just focus on myself and my family, which is way more important to me. I go on YouTube to find new makeup looks but I don’t just follow hijabi vloggers. If you look at people who aren’t the same ethnicity as you, you can learn a lot more. Being on trend is boring for me – at the moment I’m really into henna. When I was younger my grandma would do it for me with matchsticks, but now I freestyle my own designs and try them out on my little cousin when she visits from Abu Dhabi. I think trying out looks from different cultures and spreading that is really interesting. I’m not worried about cultural appropriation – if someone wants to try out a look we shouldn’t judge them for that.

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M a r i y a ‘If I’ve got a free lesson at school I’ll watch YouTube tutorials. I love doing my hair so I try different styles all the time. I saw Kim Kardashian’s boxer braids on Instagram and thought, “I want that, it looks really cool,” so I got my friend to do them for me. I love Kim and Selena Gomez – I always want my hair to be long and straight like hers. I’ve got five sisters so whenever we see a new hairstyle on YouTube they’ll try it on me first because my hair is so long. I used to go on Pinterest all the time but I kept getting told off for looking at make-up and hair in my art lessons instead of doing work.’


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A d e la ‘My friend puts highlighter on her nose because she thinks it looks big, and I keep seeing girls with white patches under their eyes because they’ve used powder to ‘bake’ their make-up. It’s so stupid. There’s so many ridiculous trends out there, like people contouring with knives and forks – just use a make-up brush! I prefer Kendall Jenner’s style to Kylie’s. She’s so pretty and way more natural. I have all of them on Snapchat and me and my friends are always shocked by how much make-up Kylie wears and how young she is. But, to be honest, I still want lip fillers. All these YouTubers have lip fillers and it gets into your head. There’s Emily Canham, she’s 19 and a YouTuber, and she has her lips done and lives in a flat with her boyfriend. I love her.’


GUTTER CREDIT HERE GUTTER CREDIT HERE GUTTER CREDIT HERE

M e l o di e ‘Make-up is like art to me. It’s a different way of expressing yourself and showing who you are. Whenever I paint a portrait I always make the person look like they’re wearing make-up so I can practise on the canvas instead of doing it badly on my face. I got my eyebrows threaded for the first time when I was 13 and it hurt a lot. It made me think, “OK, this is what people have to go through to look pretty” Now I get them done every two weeks. I’ll go with my friends, then afterwards we’ll go and try on lipsticks and foundations. Buying make-up with your friends is like a free risk assessment!’ INSTYLE XXXXXXXXX 2014

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O r i nt a ‘I only started contouring two weeks ago. My friend Abbey was doing it so I thought I’d try it because everyone else was. First I use Nivea face cream, then I put foundation on using a beauty blender. After that I use the pointy bit of the sponge to put concealer under my eyes. I like using nude and brown eyeshadows, then I do my mascara and finish with highlighter and contour. I don’t wear make-up to school but my friends do. I think it makes them look prettier but if they do it badly, I tell them they look orange. I started wearing make-up because a girl told me I was ugly but now I’m like, God made me a certain way and I’m happy with that. When I see people with pumped-up lips and faces I just think they’re fake.’


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GUTTER CREDIT HERE GUTTER CREDIT HERE GUTTER CREDIT HERE

H a ns ni i ‘You can cover so many things with make-up, which is definitely a good thing. If a celebrity has nice make-up and their hair done, I think that’s beautiful. But natural beauty is good as well – sometimes when you wear loads of make-up you can’t see what you actually look like. I’m still happy when I’m not wearing any make- up, which is just as well because I’d definitely get in trouble if I wore it to school. At the moment I’m trying to learn how to do my hair – it’s so curly and all I want is for it to be straight because it’s so much easier to work with. I’ve got glasses as well so I like to make my eyes stand out by wearing eyeliner and eyeshadow. Although I try not to wear them as much now because my friends keep saying I look better without them.’

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WITH THANKS TO THE CONNAUGHT SCHOOL FOR GIRLS

‘I usually do black braids but I wanted to try red for summer. They’re expressions so you stretch your hair so it’s long enough then plait in the extensions. My sister used to do it for me but it took ages so she made me learn how to do it myself. She still tells me if I’ve put too much make-up on though! I like watching YouTubers with similar hair to me because I can relate to them more. I wouldn’t want to watch someone who doesn’t know how to deal with my type of hair. I think it’s nice when you see people who have made an effort. Sometimes people who love themselves can come across as vain but when you accept yourself it’s nice to see because it shows confidence. You’re beautiful and pretty, you should love yourself.’

Katrina


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Meet the facemaker the fashion greats have on speed dial. That flush on all the supersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; faces is down to this man (sorry Leo). François Nars talks backstage, dream muses and life on planet Nars

WO R D S BY L I S A H AY N E S


s k i n . T h e m a k e - u p i s q u i t e s i m p l e a n d s t r u c t u re d t o b r i n g o u t h e r b o n e s t r u c t u re .’

a s t r a n g e b i r d , a l m o s t . I w a n t e d h e r t o l o o k l i k e a G re e k s t a t u e i n t h i s c a m p a i g n , w i t h t h i s g re a t l o n g n e c k a n d p o rc e l a i n

‘ T i l d a s p e a k s f o r h e r s e l f. I l o v e e v e r y t h i n g a b o u t h e r – h e r p o s t u r e , h e r a t t i t u d e , h e r n a t u r a l b e a u t y. Yo u k n o w, s h e ’s l i ke

NARS SPRING 2015 CAMPAIGN. PHOTOGRAPHS BY FRANÇOIS NARS, REX FEATURES. MODEL: TILDA SWINTON

BEAUTY

Name a blusher. Chances are you just found yourself blur ting

out ‘Orgasm’. The peachy apricot face changer has been selling

out worldwide for over 20 years to the likes of you , me and Kim

Kardashian and there’s one man responsible for it – the legend

that is François Nars.

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Way more than a cosmetics tycoon, more influential than any make-up ar tist, he created an entire look for a generation, turning Linda, Naomi and Christy into unstoppable forces with his clever use of colour and his ability to transform the beautiful into the extraordinar y. The photographer Steven Meisel has him in his squad, Madonna snapped him up for her 90s book Sex, Marc Jacobs adores him, and for over 20 years he’s become synonymous with the high-glam end of the beauty market. He’s not low-key by any means – he owns an island in the South Pacific (currently on sale on Sotheby’s website for £50 million, if you fancy a Bora Bora pad) and the cult of the @narcissist currently has over 3 million followers on Instagram and counting.

Like any icon, he’s worthy of a coffee-table tome, which he's just produced – the unapologetically named François Nars by François Nars. It chronicles his career in striking images, from getting his first break with Yves Saint Laurent to shaping the careers of the supers. Oh, and he also happens to be a photographer. So how does the man himself view his epic reputation? ‘I’m a perfectionist. I can be difficult. I can be a bit of a control freak. But I also love to laugh.’ So tell us – how do you become a make-up empire? ‘I’m always working. No matter what. 24 hours a day. I’m very demanding on the team at Nars, “Did we do that right, or can it be better?” And, yeah, sometimes, I get mad and scream if people don’t do their job. I’m always scared by people who say they’re bored. Even if I’m just sitting looking at Central Park on my terrace, taking in the colour

‘It was always my goal to have a skincare line, so we launched that in 2012. There is no good make-up without good skin. It doesn’t matter how much you apply, if your complexion looks like hell, your make-up will never look nice. Taking care of it is the number one step in beauty.’

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THIS PAGE, TOP LEFT, NARS SPRING 2001 CAMPAIGN. MODEL: COLETTE PECHEKHONOVA. PHOTOGRAPH BY FRANÇOIS NARS. BOTTOM, NARS SKINCARE. OPPOSITE PAGE: NARS ORGASM BLUSH. PHOTOGRAPH BY BRENTON CARTE

time, which makes it wearable.’

a strong impact because the colour ’s really bright, but there’s also a softness at the same

keep it ver y transparent to avoid it looking too heav y. You can see her freckles. There’s

‘This is almost a monochromatic look. It was an intense, reddish colour so I wanted to

BEAUTY


‘Make-up should be like a candy store. I hate cosmetic lines that are just based on beige and brown – it’s the most boring thing. Make-up should cover the entire spectrum of colour, from neutrals to wild. I think it’s a good tool against depression – it should be a fun experience; like a rainbow of colour that lifts you up.’


‘Make-up should be more than buying a bottle of milk. It should be fun’

of the sky, or looking at the trees. That fills up my imagination.’ How does a man decide, ‘I’m going to be a make-up artist’? You don’t grow up with it in the same way as a woman. ‘I had a very glamorous mother and my two grandmothers were also beautiful and elegant. It really shaped my aesthetic and my vision of women. At 15 I wanted to be a make-up artist. My mother was my first model – I’d play with make-up on her. She hated foundation. She was incredible looking and wore a lot of Yves Saint Laurent in the 70s. She could have been a movie star. When my mother walked down the street, people would always look.’ You’ve shaped the careers of models like Karen Elson and Erin O’Connor. What makes a good canvas? ‘I can’t work with people just because they’re

beautiful. They need to have more than that. I like strong women – powerful figures, amazing actresses. I started watching movies at

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NARS SUMMER 2013 CAMPAIGN. MODEL: STELLA TENNANT. PHOTOGRAPH BY FRANÇOIS NARS

per fect look for them and making sure it sells.’

person wearing bright colour. With campaigns, it’s about finding the right model, the

made it cool. She can carr y off anything. The worst mistake you can do is have the wrong

That collection had really crazy, intense shades of colours. She brought it to life and

‘Oh, Stella. I loved Stella so much – we wanted to give her a bit of punk-meets-wild child.

BEAUTY

INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016

an early age – it was a great way to learn about style, make-up and lighting.’ You’ve worked with some great beauties… have you got a favourite? ‘Working with Charlotte Rampling was a dream come true for me. I fell in love with her as a teenager so working with her on the Audacious campaign and her endorsing my name – what else can you ask for? Sometimes we email each other and she sends lovely notes when she’s travelling saying: “I saw our lipsticks there!” Who intrigues you most as a model? ‘Tilda Swinton has this timeless look. It’s almost impossible to take a bad picture of Tilda.’ Selfies, contouring… What’s hot right now? ‘There used to be a time where there was just one look. Now there are no rules. Beauty now is really a reflection of who you are.’ Sum up make-up for the future. ‘Freedom. Women don’t want to be told, “You have to wear this colour.” Individuality is taking over backstage. Like at Marc Jacobs, it’s more modern, more fresh. You work with each girl’s personality – not everybody’s the same.’ Are YouTube and Insta a good thing for make-up? ‘Today, nobody’s allowed to not look good – there’s so much information about beauty on the internet. And the bloggers are pretty talented. If I was a woman today wondering how to apply a product? I’d just go online. Women have never been more experimental.’ © François Nars by François Nars, Rizzoli International, 2016 (£55)


     

       



  

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Lose the logos. Dump the loud packaging. Beautyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new direction flies under the radar

P H O T O G R A P H S B Y LU K E & N IC

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BEAUTY T r a i l b l a z e r s Previous page, Unnamed EDP, £90 for 50ml, Byredo (selfridges.com) Left (and overleaf ), clockwise from top left, Rose Atlantic EDP, £175 for 100ml, D.S. & Durga (liberty.co.uk); Fun Fair Candle, £34, Lola James Harper (lolajamesharper.com); Hydra-Repair Day Cream, £29, Grown Alchemist (grownalchemist.com)

Like most revelations, it happened in the s h o w e r – d u r i n g a s t a y a t L o n d o n ’s s w i s h Mondrian hotel. As I hunted around for the trad bland bottles of complimentary scented toiletries, I found myself reaching for Malin+Goetz Rum Body Wash. All Skandi graphic text and Fair trade ingredients, somehow pared-down, super-normcore beauty had found its way into my luxe hotel bathroom. A spritz of my new uber-hip Brooklyn brand D.S. & Durga perfume and a slick of vegan-friendly Ta r t e m a s c a r a l a t e r, a n d t h e 1 0 0 p e r c e n t n i c h e transformation was complete. So when did we start falling so desperately in love with boutique brands?

A bit like the current passion for vinyl (although FYI, we owned a record player way before it made a basic bloke’s gift list), our obsession with belowthe-radar beauty brands is gaining serious momentum. The rule? The more boutique, the better. The irony? Niche brands are only getting bigger. Selfridges alone now stocks 106 niche brands in its hallowed beauty hall while, ever the arbiter of chic, Net-A-Porter’s top sellers are dominated by brands like Insta gold Byredo and new hipster make-up fave Hourglass. As Net’s beauty merchandiser Sophie Bottwood puts it, ‘Niche brands feel more artisanal and personal, and customers connect with this. Take May Lindstrom skincare, she still hand mixes all of her products, so there’s a sense of emotion there, which is invaluable to the customer.’


BEAUTY B o u t i q u e

b e a u t y

Below, Parsley Seed Cleansing Oil, £39, Aesop (aesop.com); AB Tokyo Musk, £108, Blood Concept (selfridges.com)

It seems that these days, to get us on board, brands need more than a celeb face or an annoyingly catchy YouTube ad – they need integrity. So you can see why Manhattan’s so-cool-it-hurts hotel 11 Howard stocks guests’ rooms with Grown Alchemist products, and gets The London Edition commissioning perfume apothecary Le Labo to create an original scent (inspired by black tea, no less). But wait, aren’t Le Labo – and niche perfume pioneer Frederic Malle – owned by cosmetic giant Estée Lauder? Yep, even the big guys are getting in on the niche action. What to do when start-up brands are giving you a run for your money? Buy them, of course. Failing that, adapt. Both Lancôme and Louis Vuitton (Emily Dean reveals more on page 52) have created uber high-quality perfume wardrobes, selling a story, not a scent. Yes, beauty is still about buying into a lifestyle, it’s just not as we knew it. Gone are the giant celeb-endorsed logos and flashy packaging of the noughties, now it’s about being quiet, considered and, most importantly, cool. A little bit more Christine and the Queens, and a little less Khloé and Lamar Unbreakable. ‘Products alone are not necessarily enough any more; brands have to give meaning to their work,’ says Rami Mekdachi, ex-L’Oréal perfumer and founder of ultra-chic candle/perfume/lifestyle collective Lola James Harper. ‘We’re all dreamers and story-makers, not just product consumers.’ Saying that, pretty packaging does help, and original niche brand Aesop has totally got it down. The oh-so-squeezable foil packaging, that minimal black lettering, it’s unsurprising they’re a go-to tag for Instagram. ‘Social media is a great place to tease and test new products,’ says Victoria Buchanan (whose job at The Future Laboratory means predicting just that), ‘Pat McGrath introduced her first make-up range, Gold 001, to her 500,000 Instagram followers, and it sold out in minutes.’ No longer do you need a small fortune and 100 sq ft in Covent Garden

to get your brand noticed, now three posts a day and some savvy hashtags and you’re well on your way to being a successful (but totally not mainstream, ewww) beauty brand. Or as online shopping expert Michelle Madhok puts it, ‘Social media allows a small brand to spread like wildfire. Just look at cult natural brand Glossier, which was born on Instagram. People feel like they have a personal relationship with the founder and the products, so they’re much more personally invested.’ And yes, OK, it’s a bit about showing off. Oh, you’ve got that Niod Photography Fluid Opacity 12% super-primer (yup, actually a thing)? OK, we can hang. Take super-cool US import The Academy New York – one visit to its edgy monochrome website and whatever they’re selling, we’re buying (not that we’re sure what that actually is). Why? According to Victoria Buchanan, it’s because, ‘Gen Z are looking for brands that speak directly to their sensibilities and they want their beauty choices to reflect their independent spirit.’ Because today your make-up bag isn’t just your latest beauty haul, it’s who you are.

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Dear Mossy...

1. Wear crop tops while you can… When you’re 15, there are things you can work without even trying, like wearing Gigi-style crop tops (she’s a model, and big on this thing called Instagram. Buy shares in it, FYI). For everything else? Listen up. 2. Please don’t pluck those brows. Yes, they look great when you’re a teenager, but when the 90s are over, you’ll be lucky if they grow back. Remember Nan who’s been having hers tattooed on since the 60s – not ONE-STOP BEAUTY SHOP

a good look. Give your daughter the same advice. Even if she wants to paint her eyebrows on so they’re massive, tell her to step away from the tweezers and watch out for a thing called a Scouse Brow. THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT.

KATE MOSS INTERVIEW AS TOLD TO GEORGE DRIVER

3. One day, you’re gonna hear about this thing called contouring (and this has nothing to do with maps). Steer well clear. It might look good in pictures, but in real life? You’ll just look scary. Save it for the photoshoots, darling. And by the way, one day, around 1996, someone will tell you to outline your lips with a brown liner and f ill

ml, Stella £54 for 50 ) P O P E D P, r t n e y. co m a c c m a l ( stel McCartney

xt tion ne genera

the middle in with pink. Ignore them. Kisses, Kate La Nu stin de g F 55 ini , £ sh 6.4 By K 9, Ri ate mm Li el pst ( b ick oo i ts n M .co y m )

Kendall’s Estée Edit, Insta-famous Milk Makeup, Stella’s latest nu-feminist, girl-gang perfume campaign, and don’t even get us started on ‘so peppy it’s insane’ brand 3INA, whose street-cast teen models we re s e l e c te d b a s e d o n t h e i r p e r s o n a l i t y, n o t l o o k s – # s o i n d i v i d u a l . Yu p , b e a u t y brands with the Gen X seal of approval (and a dash of social media strategy) are o f f i c i a l l y h a v i n g a m o m e n t . A n d w e ’r e o n b o a rd . L i ke to t a l l y.

one quick click. And you can keep the duvet and glass of Sauvy Blanc in hand.

by Kate Moss (kinda)

s i t e F a b l e d . c o . u k . Yu p , t h a t B e n e f i t e y e b r o w p e n c i l y o u ’ v e h a d y o u r e y e o n f o r a g e s c a n b e y o u r s i n

self

o b s e s s e d w i t h . N o n e e d t o b r a v e t h e t r a d E n g l i s h w e a t h e r, j u s t c h e c k o u t b r a n d s p a n k i n g n e w b e a u t y

o my t r e t t e l A 15-year-old

F R O M T H E B E A U T Y D E S K S t o p t h e p re s s ! We ’v e d i s c o v e re d t h e e a s i e s t w a y t o b u y t h o s e b e a u t y b i t s t h a t y o u ’re t o t a l l y

N O T E S


BEAUTY

Classics.

Re b o o t e d

The new beauty essentials seeing you through to infinity and beyond

If you loved Origins Drink Up 10 Minute Mask. Hi-tech reboot A peel-off, copper-coloured mask to wake up tired skin. GinZing Peel-Off Mask, £24, Origins (origins.co.uk).

WORDS BY GEORGE DRIVER. PHOTOGRAPHS BY REX FEATURES, INSTAGRAM/MILKMAKEUP. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

If you loved Jo Malone’s classic Lime, Basil & Mandarin Cologne. Hi-tech reboot Basil & Neroli Cologne, £44 for 30ml, Jo Malone (jomalone. co.uk), created using headspace tech to capture the complex smell of basil.

If you loved Estée Lauder’s fluted lipsticks and discontinued classics. Hi-tech reboot VB’s new collection, including the return of highlighter Modern Mercury. Victoria Beckham x Estée Lauder, from £22 (selfridges.com).

If you loved Pantene’s original Classic Clean conditioner. Hi-tech reboot A game-changing foam conditioner – perfect for boosting fine hair. Air-Light Foam Conditioner, £3.99, Pantene Pro-V (boots.com).

If you loved Dior’s Capture Totale Dreamskin serum. Hi-tech reboot A skin-perfecting cushion compact with SPF50. Capture Totale DreamSkin Perfect Skin Cushion, £62, Dior (dior.com).

If you loved your Oral B 600 electric toothbrush, but it’s totally knackered. Hi-tech rebootThe techiest toothbrush ever, the Genius 9000 uses an app to keep an eye on your brushing. Genius 9000, £280, Oral B (boots.com).

If you loved your bathroom-shelf staple L’Oréal Paris Revitalift day cream. Hi-tech reboot A serum that’s as good as a laser facial thanks to NASA-worthy pro-xylane. Revitalift Laser Renew The Double Care, £20, L’Oréal Paris (boots.com).

If you loved the iconic and true original Chanel No5. Hi-tech reboot Take away the (dare we say it) old lady-style powder and add a citrus hit. No5 L’Eau EDT, £68 for 50ml, Chanel (020 7493 3836).

If you loved that first essence that totally changed your skincare routine. Hi-tech reboot Shiseido’s Bio-Performance LiftDynamic Cream, £90, Shiseido (houseoffraser.com) uses dual stem-cell technology to help skin defy gravity.

super sonic Three ways sonic waves can make good-looking – no needles required

1

For your face… It sounds obvious, but sonic waves are what power your Clarisonic to give your face one epic c l e a n s e . Tr e a t y o u r s e l f t o baby-soft skin with a Clarisonic x Cowshed Anti-Ageing Facial (£90 for 75 minutes).

you

2

ridiculously Fo r yo u r b o d y… U s i n g t h e power of micro-focused ultrasound, Dr Sebagh’s Ultralift For Body treatment (from £800 for 40 minutes; drsebagh. com) lifts your skin, as well as the muscle layer underneath, for surger yworthy results.

3

F o r y o u r h a i r… Yu p , t h o s e sonic waves work on your head as well. Wave goodbye to dir ty, city hair with the Kérastase Specifique Scalp Purification System (£85, salons.kerastase. co.uk). that uses a Clarisonic to give your scalp a good old clean.

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BE AUT Y TALK

J A R E D

L E T O

The guyliner-wearing, boundary-breaking method actor is the source of more hair and make-up inspo than Kendall’s Insta account. No wonder fashion’s chicest futurologist Alessandro Michele chose him for his new fragrance campaign

We a r m a k e - u p (but practise first)

‘I did my own for Dallas Buyers Club, but it was bad. The first thing pretty ba dw was red lipstick I tried d blue and bl eyeshadow h r, so basically the together b biggestt rookie mistake Playing Rayon ever. P fi y taught me what definitely f it feels liike to wear heels d do your make-up and eevery day.’

Every day’s an eyeliner day ‘G u y li n e r was k i n d of m y t h i n g i n t h e n o u g h ti e s. W h e re ve r I w a s , I ’d f i n d b l a c k e ye l i n e r p e n c i l s i n the b o t to m o f g i r ls’ p ur se s and u s e t h e m. Pe o p l e a l w a y s a s k m e w h o m y e ye l i n e r in s pi r at i o n i s – I ’ve g ot two e r t S m i th wo rd s f o r yo u : Ro bber [ f ro m T h e Cure].’ Cu re ]].’

Go bright or go home ‘My hair has been pretty much h every colour th here is, b but I k kind d of like that. I haad ggreen to be The Joker, white forr Fight Club b, black k for Requiem F For A Dream and a brown womaan’s wig for f r Dallas D ll s Buyers Club. When hen it it’ss not dyed forr a film, I just leave it long. As they say, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.’

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Smell gender neutral

‘I’m more into choosing scents I like than wearing a per fume directed at a par ticular gender. Some o f m y f a vo u r i te s m e l l s e ve r are sage and papyrus leaf.’

Commitment is key ‘For Suicide Squad, I had to gain a load of muscle weight, wax, shave my entire body and spend hours every day in hair and make-up having all my tattoos painted on. Playing The Joker was a pretty intense experience and a massive commitment, but that’s what I found exciting.’

INTERVIEW BY GEORGE DRIVER. PHOTOGRAPHS BY GETTY IMAGES, REX FEATURES, LICKERISH, INSTAGRAM/JAREDLETO JARED LETO IS THE FACE OF GUCCI GUILTY POUR HOMME

Get inked ‘ Yo u d o n ’ t w a n t a t a t t o o t h a t looks like you’ve had a weekend in Vegas. But if I found the right d e s i g n , I ’d l i ke to g e t a f a ce t a t to o o n e d a y – I t h i n k t h e y ’re s u p e rbeautiful. At the moment, I’ve got two ancient symbols on my arms that represent air and the spirit of the world, and a bunch of o t h e r s a l l ove r m y b o d y.’


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W h e n y o u ’re c o n s t a n t l y o n t h e m o v e , it’s all about those instant pick-me-ups

REBECCA GILLAM D I G I TA L W R I T E R

‘There’s nothing better than a pair of box-fresh plimsolls – far better than worrying about tripping up in heels.’

CHLOE MAC DONNELL F A S H I O N A N D F E AT U R E S W R I T E R

‘I always carry a miniature-sized version of my favourite perfume. It reminds me of fun nights out.’

CASSIE STEER BEAUTY DIRECTOR

‘I likee to put my favourite son ng on my iPod and do a serious power waalk. In my head I’m chaannelling Beyoncé.’


instyle PROMOTION FIVE GEORGIA ALLEN

p l a ce s t o b r u s h , w h i t e n , g o…

JUNIOR DESIGNER

‘Wear that special underwear set that makes you feel sexier than you do in your everyday Bridget Jones knickers.’

ONE When you catch sight of your reflection in the lif t on the way to a job inter view. Quick

enough to do between the ground and third f loor for a job-winning first impression.

THREE Going up the tube escalator before a huge meeting with your bosses. Turn your head

towards the posters for subtlety.

TWO In the backseat of an Uber on your way to meet your boy friend for date night. Uber drivers

have seen it all – trust us, this won’t be the weirdest. #irresistible smile

FOUR Between courses at a dinner party. Coffee and white

teeth don’t mix, so nip to the bathroom and give your teeth a once over. FIVE On the day of your wedding.

Before jumping into your vintage Roller with your dad, this should be your last beauty touch-up.

K AT I E T H O M A S BEAUTY EDITOR

HANNAH LEWIS F A S H I O N A S S I S TA N T

‘If you’ve had a late night, apply lashings of red lipstick. Attention will be drawn away from your dark circles and lacklustre skin. Pop a pair of sunnies on too and you’ve got yourself a look.’

‘Stick to great basic staples that move with your body. I always feel most confident when I’m wearing comfortable clothes that don’t restrict me.’

We d o n ’t n e e d t o t e l l y o u t h a t y o u ’r e b u s y . Yo u k n o w t h a t a l r e a d y . Yo u b o o k Pilates classes for 6am and eat your lunch at your desk. This is not news. We hear you, girls! With London Fashion Week on the horizon, things are going to get a whole lot more manic. Adding another step to your beauty regime is probably the last thing you want to do, but Colgate’s Max White Toothbrush Plus Whitening Pen is a quick and easy way to boost your smile and confidence levels. Brush as normal using Colgate Toothpaste. Next, twist and pull out the pen from the bottom of the brush and apply the whitening gel, which contains hydrogen peroxide, the same ingredient dentists use. It starts working straight away. Use it for three weeks and you’ll notice your smile is up to three times whiter. It’s small enough to fit in your clutch, easy enough to do touch-ups in the back of a taxi and quick enough to apply without anyone even noticing. Confidence in a click.


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U n i v e r s a l f a c e Hormones to delay ageing, soundwaves to reverse sagging and a to-die-for caramel complexion. How will we really look in ten, 50 or even 500 years from now? ( Spoiler alert: itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good news)

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BEAUTY W O R D S B Y CA S SI E S T E E R

2016. The year of the selfie, if last year ’s stats were a n y t h i n g t o g o b y. Tw e n t y - f o u r b i l l i o n o f t h e m w e r e u p l o a d e d to Google’s photo app alone – just the tip of the #me iceberg . We ’re s h o w i n g o f f a n d s c r u t i n i s i n g o u r f a c e s m o re t h a n e v e r b e f o re . And worshipping the same facial symmetry goals (which probably explains why so many women on Insta seem to look like Megan Fox).

But the way we look is changing and evolutionary theorists have an idea of how our faces are likely to evolve. Dr Oliver Curry from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) forsees 7ft giants with life spans of 120 years, who will develop hairless skin, large eyes, pert breasts and perfectly symmetrical features 1,000 years from now. Which sounds kind of scary (the giant bit) and amazing (the pert breasts bit) all at once. BYE-BYE REDHEADS But before we get to the 1,000 years from now bit, we might already be on the road to looking a lot more similar if scientific predictions are anything to go by. John McDonald, an evolutionary expert at the University of Delaware in America predicts that our overriding skin colour will become caramel. According to the Census Bureau, ‘multiracial’ is the biggest growing category in the US. And due to immigration and people’s ability to interbreed more easily, recessive genes like blue eyes and red hair, which are more likely to occur when small communities breed, could become rarer. Red hair (thought to have sprung from a mutated gene in Europe thousands of years ago) comes about when both parents carry a non-working copy of the MC1R gene. Around 40 per cent of Britons are thought to carry the gene, with Scotland having the highest number of redheads (13 per cent). Until now, these numbers have been able to stay at this relatively high level (partly because it seems that redheads generally dig each other, so they make more redheads), but also due to the fact that us humans haven’t always had the opportunity to move around the world quite so much and mix things up. A rather quaint little fact shows that before the invention of the bicycle, the average distance between the birthplace of spouses in England was a mile. Throw EasyJet, Uber and cyberspace

into the mix, and you have the beginnings of homogenisation. As globalisation grows and travel gets easier, these redhead/blue-eyed genes will continue to flow into the bigger gene pool, where global canoodling will reduce the chances of two parents carrying one of these recessive genes getting it on. The upshot? A couple of centuries from now, we’ll all look like Brazilians – where 44 per cent of the population currently classify themselves as ‘Pardo’ or multiracial. But how will our facial characteristics change? REAL-LIFE FACETUNE Generally speaking, thanks to better nutrition, better working conditions (we may debate that one with our bosses), better skincare (ie SPFs) and probably a more youthful approach to style in general, we’re already looking younger than ever before. The chances are your granny at 50 looked way older than your mother at the same age. In fact, according to GP and aesthetic doctor Dr Jane Leonard, owing to a new generation of HRT pills, we could be looking more youthful well into the menopause: ‘The hormones you get from your birth control and HRT are currently synthetic substitutes for oestrogen and progesterone.’ Meaning you’re kind of faking it till you stop taking it. But Dr Leonard says she’s been prescribing an alternative – bio-identical hormones, which have the same structure as the ones in your body. So, could these be having a lasting youthful effect on your body rather than a temporary one? ‘After the age of 25, oestrogen levels begin to decline,’ she explains. ‘As oestrogen plays a big role in keeping the skin plump and youthful-looking, these bio-identical hormones can actually be regarded as an anti-ageing medicine. And if you’re optimising your hormones from a younger age, that ageing process is going to be delayed.’ INSTYLE OCTOBER 2016

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But one of the other major changes to how we’ll look in the future is the development and accessibility of non-surgical procedures. People have been undergoing nose reconstructions since Egyptian times, however what we want has changed. The First World War was the most significant precursor to modern plastic surgery due to attempts at facial reconstruction, but it was during the 80s that it really made a name for itself. ‘I’d describe this era as the “overdone” one,’ says Dr Benji Dhillon of Harley Street’s PHI Clinic. ‘It was characterised by what we now call the ‘Our overriding skin colour will become windswept look – overstretched facelifts and caramel… A couple of centuries from pointy noses as a result of poor rhinoplasties.’ now, we’ll all look like Brazilians’ By the 90s, we were doing less stretching and more freezing and filling, although the results weren’t necessarily any more natural-looking. ‘The Botox aesthetic can certainly be mapped with the very shiny foreheads of the early noughties,’ says Dr Geoff Mullan of Medicetics. ‘Treatments tended to be more heavy-handed on the centre of the face and reduced over the lateral brows, giving that sharp brow look with total paralysis. This caused the frontalis muscle (the main one on the forehead) to atrophy, resulting in a tight effect. The fact that Botox also turns off the sweat glands added to that characteristic frozen look.’ So far so bad. Today and beyond? ‘Patients are moving away from surgery and becoming more

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BEAUTY informed about the options available to them,’ says Jonquille Chantrey, aesthetic surgeon and lecturer in skin health. ‘Most women want natural results that even their friends won’t notice. It’s more about looking like a better version of themselves.’ (There goes our vision of morphing into Margot Robbie then.)

THE NIP/TUCK TIMELINE 20s

SELFIE ESTEEM Now that we’ve all seen our faces looking that little bit better (OK, way better if you go for the Snapchat flower princess filter), it’s difficult to accept the slightly more ‘real’ image staring back at us in the mirror. Cue what Dr Sebagh terms the ‘selfie look’ – the trend he thinks will have the biggest impact on facial aesthetics, in the near future at least. ‘One thing that’s totally different from any other decade that’s gone before is the selfie craze,’ says Dr Sebagh. ‘It’s a perfectionism that’s gone way beyond reality, with girls morphing their faces on apps such as Facetune and expecting cosmetic surgeons to recreate it.’ According to Dr Sebagh and others, girls want to look like a cyber version of themselves. ‘Most would like to improve what they have, but there’s a conflict between anatomy and what we can do and what they can do with an app,’ he explains. So what should we expect of our future selfies, as well as those of our daughters? We may not have morphed into the Brazilian glamazons scientists predict just yet, but thanks to a combination of Botox, fillers, fat transfer and a bigger focus on skin texture, we’ll be looking pretty darn good for our age, thanks. And for now we’re pretty happy with our lot.

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Sir Harold Gillies, the ‘founding father’ of plastic surger y, pioneers numerous maxillofacial surgical techniques during WWI. Silent movie star Rudolf Valentino has his ears pinned back.

30s The golden age of Hollywood sparks a wave of wannabe stars (even Burt Lancaster and Dean Martin admitted to going under the knife) having a little ‘tweak’ to jump-start their careers.

40s While many surgeons were busy with reconstructive surgery p o s t - w a r, N o r m a J e a n reportedly had a nose job ( a n d l a t e r a c h i n implant), which catapulted her to ‘Marilyn Monroe’ fame.

60s Plastic surgery was fully integrated into the medical world and silicone began to emerge as a tool for plastic surgeons (initially used to treat skin imperfections).

50s Hollywood continues to go under the knife and does a pretty good job of it (Marlene Dietrich, Joan Crawford and Lana Turner are all said to have obliged). A turned-up nose was the trend and hair transplants were introduced.

70s Plastic surgeons started to use lipoplasty (liposuction) as a method of sculpting the area beneath the chin and jawline for the first time.

80s Scooped, slimmed down noses were in fashion. In 1988, the first botulinum toxin (Botox) was approved by the FDA (mainly used to treat eyelid spasms).

00s Straight noses were in fashion and Botox procedures increased dramatically.

90s Facelifts were replaced by Botox and fillers (with a few ‘trout pout’ casualties along the way). More than 1m cosmetic procedures were performed each year in the US alone.

10s

Botox was up 621 per cent from 2000, but the biggest increase is in chin augmentation (mentoplasty). The first full face transplant is performed.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALFREDO PIOLA, SHAWN BRACKBILL

RIP FACELIFTS According to cosmetic legend Dr Sebagh, the facelift is dead. ‘It used to be about gravity and muscle sagging. Now we have Botox to prevent drooping for as long as possible, coupled with fillers, thread lifts and, more recently, ultrasound – the breakthrough that’s allowed us to fight sagging,’ he says. ‘The latest ultrasounds have the ability to work on the muscle below the skin,’ explains Dr Sebagh. ‘They make little cuts that close up over the course of a few weeks, shortening the muscle as it does so. It’s perfect for the generation that’s already been using Botox to prevent sagging, and it doesn’t give that slightly odd “what has she had done?” look, as you shorten the muscle’s own length without changing the axle like surgery does.’ Luckily, the overdone look is out now, largely as a result of doctors understanding more about how the face ages. ‘Myself and Dr Vicky Dondos pioneered the micro-droplet technique [for Botox] back in 2007 with the aim to minimise lines at rest, while leaving as much movement as possible,’ says Dr Mullan. This ‘baby Botox’ technique is more about preventing wrinkles, rather than correcting them, while fillers have evolved to the point where we might well be able to do away with Snapchat filters. ‘New approaches, such as the eight-point or liquid facelift [involving eight suggested injection sites], give non-surgical alternatives to traditional facelifts,’ says Dr Leonard. We’re also lucky enough to have surgeons with better tools. ‘The introduction of blunt cannulae to inject gave us more accuracy and meant less trauma to the area,’ adds Dr Mullan. ‘When done well, this can give a great result.’ In fact, fillers such as Juvéderm have improved so much that they’re now available in a variety of consistencies and also integrate way better into the tissue, meaning they don’t stay static when your face moves.


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Instyle october 2016 uk