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NOVEMBER 2016 Style 31 Wish list This month’s pick of afordable pieces and big investments that #EDLoves 33 News Stylish homeware from House of Fraser, Toast and Liberty; plus, the fascinating history of the Brown Betty teapot 45 Design How De Padova brought Scandinavian style to mid-century Italy; the rising success of British brand Bert & May 51 Decorating Why antiqued mirror is the material of the moment, and an in-depth guide to radiators

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BEDROOM SPECIAL S L E E P S O U N D LY I N S T Y L E Beds, storage, linens, mirrors, lighting, mattresses, headboards… Everything you need to know

59 Architecture David Adjaye discusses his latest projects and we look at Sir Richard Rogers’ favourite building, the ‘Glass Lantern’ 62 Technology The ultimate Apple Watch accessory, stress-busting jewellery and hot new headphones

MAIN COVER IMAGE: BETH EVANS (PHOTOGRAPHY), SANIA PELL (STYLING) SUBSCRIBER COVER IMAGE: FABRIZIO CICCONI/LIVING INSIDE (PHOTOGRAPHY), FRANCESCO DAVOLI (STYLING)

65 Simple skylights Get more natural light into your home! Find out how and be inspired by three amazing UK projects 75 The joy of colour Five new books that will inspire you to decorate with colour 83 Live-in exhibitions Look inside three homes decorated by design insiders

40 ON THE COVER This room set from Bedroom Special features a ‘Winston’ bed by Savoir Beds, mirror by Caravane, and bedside table by Classicon. For more bedroom ideas go to p88

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118 Norse code An Italian country house decorated with Scandinavian flair. Plus, a guide to the interior’s calming textural surface finishes 128 Grand scale This Johannesburg home is filled with luxe materials and modern design classics – we find out more about our three of our favourites 138 Dark materials Inspired by the Johannesburg house? Steal its style with this selection of marble, smoky glass and shiny brass pieces 140 New order Storage, sorted. 22 new sideboards, cabinets and cupboards that make a style statement 146 Bohemian blues A coastal Swedish abode decorated in calming pastels and punchy patterns. Plus, everything you need to get the look at home 156 The bird’s nest Built into a tranquil hillside with stunning views of Table Mountain, this treehouse-style home was a unique project for its architect 164 Italian renaissance A majestic Milanese apartment that boldly blends period architecture with modern buys. Owner Enrico tells us the best places to shop in the city

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172 High definition This family home in London won a RIBA prize. Its owners share the best things about living in an architectural masterpiece 182 Letter to the past Antiques and handmade furnishings complement the charming 18th-century features of this former village post oice

Escape

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193 News Join the design world in Miami or head to Vietnam to explore the world’s most opulent hotel. Plus, we reveal the UK’s awardwinning restaurant interiors

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Finally 24 Subscribe Fabulous ofers for our most loyal readers 205 Stockists Love something you’ve seen? Here’s where to buy it 218 The last word What #TeamED has been tackling this month

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M ICH E L L E O GU N DE H I N Editor-in-Chief

Editor’s Assistant Rosie Cave (020 7534 2522) Email editor@elledecoration.co.uk 72 Broadwick Street, London W1F 9EP (elledecoration.co.uk) Editorial enquiries elledecoration@hearst.co.uk Homes submissions homes@elledecoration.co.uk

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ELLE® and ELLE Decoration™ are used under licence from the trademark owner, Hachette Filipacchi Presse ELLE Decoration is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation and abides by the Editor’s Code of Practice. We are committed to upholding the highest standards of journalism. If you think that we have not met those standards and want to make a complaint, contact complaints@hearst.co.uk or visit hearst.co.uk/ hearst-magazines-uk-complaints-procedure. If we are unable to resolve your complaint, or if you would like more information about IPSO or the Editors’ Code, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit ipso.co.uk LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE Chairman and CEO Lagardère Active  Denis Olivennes CEO ELLE France & International Constance Benqué CEO ELLE International Media Licenses François Coruzzi Brand Management of ELLE DECORATION Sylvie de Chirée SVP/International Director of ELLE DECORATION Cristina Romero SVP/Director of International Media Licenses, Digital Development & Syndication Mickaël Berret Editorial Executive of ELLE Decoration Linda Bergmark Marketing Executive of ELLE Decoration Flora Régibier Syndication Coordinator Audrey Schneuwly INTERNATIONAL AD SALES HOUSE LAGARDÈRE GLOBAL ADVERTISING CEO François Coruzzi SVP/International Advertising Stéphanie Delattre stephanie.delattre@lagardere-active.com Lagardère Global Advertising , 10 rue Thierry Le Luron 92300 Levallois- Perret, France

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T H I S MON T H ’ S CON T R I BU TOR S Twitter @nellcard Profession Writer Features Live-in exhibitions, p83, and Norse code, p118 Likes Unexpected, handwritten French road signs that read ‘brocantes/vide-grenier’ (flea market/garage sale) Favourite colour Sadly, it’s what my friends call ‘greige’. Our home is painted in every conceivable shade of Farrow & Ball ‘white’ (the sludgier, the better) Dream buy Shutters. I just can’t find an afordable, good-looking way of dressing our Victorian bay windows. I have resorted to Ikea roller blinds for now

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Ali Morris Instagram @ali__morris Profession Writer Feature Letter to the past, p182 Likes Travel, good design and dogs Influences Meeting inspiring, independent business owners, learning about craft traditions from diferent countries and cultures and working with beautiful photography Design heroes I love the architecture of Marcio Kogan and Álvaro Siza; Ilse Crawford is queen of interiors and for product design it’s too close to call between Jasper Morrison and Barber & Osgerby

Hans Blomquist Instagram @hansblomquist Profession Stylist Feature The joy of colour, p75 Home I live in Paris, in a very typical Parisian apartment, with high ceilings, moulding, marble fireplaces and the most beautiful herringbone floors Interiors style I like to mix diferent styles and use natural materials and elements to create an interior with a lot of layers and texture Design hero Michael Thonet. I think his bentwood chair is a true design classic Most precious possession My whippet, Felix

INTERVIEWS: SARAH MORGAN

Nell Card


DESIGN DETAILS People often ask me where the inspiration for my letters comes from. Well, more often than not it comes from random conversations. Indeed, the day before this letter was due, I found myself lamenting how long it was taking me to finish of my house, because despite all the really big stuf being done – new wiring, plumbing, floors, kitchen and bathroom, even most of the internal decorating – I was now in the realm of the ‘details’. The trouble is, these details are small but incredibly important. For example, the kickboard beneath my kitchen units. The units themselves are grey lacquer, housed in Corian. I had first imagined brushed brass for the kickboard, seeing it as a strip of something unexpected that would reflect the touches of brass used elsewhere downstairs. Then again, I mused, mirror could be interesting (I’d seen a picture of Danish/Italian design duo Stine Gam and Enrico Fratesi’s kitchen with incredible mirrored units that was stunning). I just knew it must be anything but a finish to match the doors (too trad). However, upon discussion

‘When I find a solution that ticks all the right boxes, and it’s cut to fit in all the right places, this small but important detail will bring me immeasurable pleasure’

PICTURE: EMMA WEBSTER

with my builder, it became apparent that it was also more complicated to install than at first thought. The length I wanted could not be done in one piece. Mirror yes, brass, apparently no. And I didn’t want joins. I also needed to provide cut outs for the fridge and freezer vents. And the whole thing had to be easily removable for ease of appliance access. Oh, and my units are set slightly higher than average, so that needed to be accommodated as well. And, because all the appliances are integrated, they each sit at slightly diferent heights inside their housing too. Sigh. But the point is, when I find a solution that ticks all the right boxes, and it’s cut to fit in all the right places, this small but important detail will bring me immeasurable pleasure. It will epitomise a job well finished, because it’s not really a little thing at all, is it (within the realm of acutely first-world problems, of course). It’s something I will see everyday. And although I’m moaning now, I’ll be equally efervescent when it’s finally done; along with all those other ‘details’ requiring finessing... Did I mention the trim above the bath?

Editor-in-Chief

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SHOPPING • DESIGN • DECOR ATING • NA MES TO KNOW • A RCHITECTUR E

STYLE GIVE YOUR WALL A COLOUR WASH The wallcovering experts at Murals Wallpaper have released this gorgeous dip-dyed collection. The ‘Ombré’ range is available in a dizzying array of hues and styles, from super-smooth ‘Peach and Turquoise Fade’ (pictured) to the more deep and dramatic ‘Blue Grunge’. All of the designs are custom-made, so the full picture is guaranteed to fit perfectly where you want it. £25 per square metre (muralswallpaper.co.uk).

F O R M O R E O B J E C T S O F D E S I R E , V I S I T E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K / N E W S


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PICTURES: RORY TSEDDON, CAPTURE FACTU

WISH LIST From affordable treats to investment buys and everything in between, there’s so much that #EDLoves. Here’s this month’s pick of our favourite pieces… 1 House of Hackney’s new ‘Florika’ wallpaper is inspired by ancient prints from the Silk Road. £145 for a ten-metre roll (houseohackney.com) 2 The ‘Rosa’ marble side table by Bethan Gray is a timeless, understated take on the pink trend. £2,460, Liberty (liberty.co.uk) 3 This simple Hasami porcelain teapot by Workshop Living has a tactile, unglazed finish. £52 (workshopliving.co.uk) 4 Giorgetti’s glass ‘Vanity’ vases from the ‘Atmospheres’ collection have a jewel-like beauty. From £453 each, Harrods (harrods.com) 5 We love the rosy colourway of Arlo & Jacob’s ‘Aragon’ sofa, which has a dainty mid-century-style silhouette. From £995 (arloandjacob.com) 6 Add a touch of gold to your room with the foil-printed ‘Gleaming Rings’ cushion. From £48, Anthropologie (anthropologie.com) 7 Based in Rhode Island, designer Tracy Glover uses Venetian techniques to make her ‘Teardrop’ pendant light, £4,021 (tracygloverstudio.com) 8 New brand Bivain’s silk ‘Xanadu’ cushion celebrates Chinese decorative knots symbolising luck and prosperity. From £80 (bivain.com)

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TEA TIME Especially at London’s The Lanesborough hotel. A vision of impossibly beautiful Georgian splendour, it’s the perfect backdrop to a decadent afternoon tea (thelanesborough.com) SNAKES The hottest animal on the design scene, thanks to House of Hackney’s brass candleholder (£165; houseohackney.com) and new illustrated book ‘The Autobiography of a Snake’ by Andy Warhol (Thames & Hudson, £14.95) TOM FORD’S NEW SCENTED CANDLES Bringing the fashion guru’s sexy, modern take on scent into the home, the candles come in classic scents such as ‘Neroli Portofino’ and ‘Tuscan Leather’, with bronze covers to slip over the glass holders (£165; harrods.com)

UP AND DOWN

LAND OF LIBERTY For the first time, Liberty has translated four of its classic prints on to fitted carpets and bespoke rugs, as part of a new collaboration with Alternative Flooring. The results are surprisingly subtle and daringly vibrant by turns: the multicoloured 1970s-style floral ‘Flowers of Thorpe’ is not for shrinking violets, while, at the other end of the spectrum, ‘Strawberry Meadow’ – an exclusive version of William Morris’s 1883 ‘Strawberry Thief’ design – is more discreet, looking very grand in the ‘Peacock’ colourway (above). We also love ‘Felix Raison’, a paisley design reworked from a 19th-century shawl. £149 per square metre (alternativeflooring.com).

H I G H S T R E ET H I T We’re impressed by these lacquered walnut and brass designs from the ‘Living by Christiane Lemieux’ collection at House of Fraser. With their mid-centuryinspired shapes and perfectly proportioned legs (a detail high-street brands frequently get wrong), they strike just the right note. Who is Christiane Lemieux? She’s a New York-based former fashion designer at Gap who subsequently founded her own homes brand, Dwell Studio. She’s certainly one to watch. From left ‘Cleo’ bookcase, £925; ‘Mosaic’ side table, £389; ‘Bailey’ wardrobe, £899, all House of Fraser (houseofraser.co.uk)

CRUSHED VELVET The new, less stylish variant on all the plush upholstery we’ve been seeing lately. Back to good old plain velvets, please NOVELTY WALLPAPERS We’re talking about anything with cartoon characters, crude prints or (heaven forbid) emoji designs. Your walls deserve better

PINEAPPLES The homes trend that just won’t go away. They’re meant to represent hospitality, but sadly, for us, they’ve outstayed their welcome

TRIBAL DRESS REPURPOSED AS ORNAMENTS We’ve seen several examples of this recently; it’s much better in its original context

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N A M E T O WAT C H STELLA BAGGOT

FEELING TOASTY When was the last time you heard the phrase ‘bed jacket’ used in common parlance? Not since your granny’s granny was in her dotage, we think. This delightfully recherché garment is back in vogue, though, thanks to Toast’s cosy new autumn/winter collection. When the Brit brand first launched in 1997, the idea of ‘loungewear’ didn’t yet exist, but its core ofering of stylish pyjamas helped to popularise the idea. Its new range includes beautiful cashmere jumpers, supersoft jersey dresses, linen separates (from £79 for a t-shirt) and padded bed jackets in Indian cotton (‘Kantha’ gown, £195). There’s also an expanded selection of home accessories that, in the best Toast tradition, hail from all over the world: think splatter-design mugs from a potter in Brooklyn, cushions embroidered by a Fairtrade collective in Bengal (‘Mohenjodaro’ cushion, £95) and soft cotton pestemal towels ( jacquard towel, £39; toa.st).

Who is she? A Brighton-based ceramicist who founded her pottery label, Atelier Stella, in 2012. Baggot now sells from her website and at London store Twentytwentyone. Each piece is handmade in small, limited-edition batches. What does she make? Adorably anthropomorphic pots inspired by midcentury ceramics from Cornwall, Italy and Scandinavia. They have little faces, legs, ears and, occasionally, handles in the shape of arms. They all have bags of character! Star buys The ‘Laurel and Hardy’ vases, one short and fat and one tall and thin (above; £154 each), and fun planters that look like they’re sporting exotic hairdos when foliage is placed inside (above, from £48 each). They make perfect gifts and are all stocked at Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com; atelierstella.co.uk).

Buy this Take your tea rituals to the next level of sophistication with Wedgwood’s new ‘Tea Garden’ collection: a set of infusions that come with matching teacups or mugs. There are four flavours (blackberry, green tea and mint, lemon and ginger or raspberry), which can be mixed or matched with coordinating gold-edged chinaware. Each cup is adorned with painterly floral or fruit patterns inspired by designs from the British heritage company’s 250-year archive. Box of tea, £6; teacup and saucer, £45 per set (wedgwood.co.uk).

The best of British design and wood craftsmanship meets Japanese shoji screens in Terence Conran’s newest pieces for his Berkshire-based brand Benchmark Furniture. The ‘Firefly’ sideboard and cabinet have a clean, quadratic design with front panels made not with shoji paper, as used in Japan, but a very fine English porcelain, through which in-built LED lighting glows atmospherically when switched on. Storage and mood lighting in one? We like! £4,875 (benchmarkfurniture.com).

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PICTURE: DAVID LOTHIAN/MARK COCKSEDGE

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M Y C U LT U R A L L I F E ALBERTO ALESSI

We ask a tastemaker what they are reading, watching, listening to and downloading

WORDS: DOMINIC LUTYENS (MY CULTURAL LIFE), CHARLOTTE BROOK (COZY DOES IT) PICTURES: ALAMY

Alberto Alessi is president and head of marketing strategy, communication and design management at Italian design company Alessi – the brand celebrates its 95th anniversary this year. Since joining in 1970, he has initiated collaborations with cutting-edge designers. Most recently, a line of clocks with architect Daniel Libeskind and Antwerp duo Studio Job (@alessi_oicial; alessi.com). The last exhibition I saw was ‘Arts & Foods: Rituals Since 1851’ (1) at Milan’s Triennale Design Museum. It was curated by Germano Celant, a well-known Italian art critic. It focused on the complex relationship between the arts and food since the year of Britain’s Great Exhibition, and included some Alessi designs. The song that makes me feel happy is The 1 Beatles’ Penny Lane. I listen to The Beatles (2) a lot and find this track so uplifting. I go to Brittany every year with my family. We usually stay at a hotel-spa there called Sofitel Quiberon Thalassa Sea & Spa (3), which ofers therapies such as thalassotherapy [skin treatments using sea water] and is a great place to detox. I’m currently listening to This is Sinatra!, 2 a compilation album from 1956. It’s the perfect background music when I’m at home near Lake Orta in northern Italy (4), reading, swimming in my pool or relaxing with a glass of my favourite wine, which is produced in my vineyard, Cascina Eugenia. My favourite piece of music is La Valse d’Amélie by Yann Tiersen, from the soundtrack to the movie Amélie (5). To me, it perfectly evokes 3 Paris. I can also relate to the story of the film’s Parisian heroine: just as Amélie devotes her life to bringing happiness to others, so Alessi strives to fulfil people’s desire for happiness, injecting art and poetry into everyday objects. 4

THE BED IN A BOX The perfect guest bed is one that you can make use of even when friends and relatives aren’t in residence. Step forward the ‘Henry’ and ‘Hetty’ beds-in-boxes by Sofa.com. By day, they’re generous ottomans that come in a choice of over 150 fabrics; by night, they unfold to reveal a single bed complete with mattress, the top cleverly flipping up to form a headboard. Pictured: ‘Henry’ covered in teal linen, £760 (sofa.com).

COZY DOES IT Ever stayed at a posh hotel and fallen for the high-thread-count bedlinen or wished you could take the bathrobe home with you? You’re not the only one. Bob Roston’s family firm, which has supplied high-end linens to hotels like the Ritz, the Dorchester and the Langham since the 1900s, found that its clients were fielding an ever-growing number of requests from guests desperate to buy its products for their own homes. Realising that he was onto something, Roston has launched Coze: a retail website that specialises in fine cotton bedlinen (ethically produced and traced from seed), merino wool and Mongolian cashmere throws, plush towels and velvety bathrobes. Our top pick is this gorgeous ‘Oshin’ cableknit cashmere blanket, £640 (cozelinen.com).

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S E V E N FA S C I N AT I N G FA C T S A B O U T THE ‘BROWN BETTY’ TEAPOT

Pour yourself a cuppa and learn more about this 300-year-old British icon HOME SCENT ICON MR SEVERS CANDLE BY ANGELA FLANDERS The ‘Mr Severs’ candle is a unique fragrance because it was created for a particular house to evoke a particular atmosphere. That house is a terraced brick edifice in Spitalfields, built in the 1720s and inhabited like so many in the area at that time by Huguenot silk weavers. In 1979, it was bought by an American named Dennis Severs and turned into a remarkable home-meets-museum where visitors are invited to step back into the past. Scent is a vital part of that experience. What did an 18th-century house smell like? That was the question that London perfumer Angela Flanders had to answer when she was approached by the curators of the museum, who took over after Severs’ death in 2000. ‘The Huguenots would have scented their houses using pomanders and strewn herbs over the wooden floors, sweeping them to the skirting boards to deter mice and vermin,’ she says. Half-consumed oranges and pomegranates oozed juice on plates, log fires flickered (easy to forget in the modern age how wonderful these smell), beeswax candles gave of a honeyed odour and sweetmeats laced with clove and cinnamon difused a spicy warmth. Flanders included sweet orange, bergamot, amber, woods and spices in her candle. It is the smell of the era perfected, with nary an unwashed 18th-century human to complicate the pleasure. £40 (angelaflanders-perfumer.com; dennissevershouse.co.uk).

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD ILLUSTRATION: BABETH LAFON

F R O M S C E N T T O S O FA So many people associate Diptyque with candles that it’s surprising to learn it started out selling vintage finds and upholstery fabrics designed by its founders. Now, as part of its latest limited-edition ‘La Collection Trente-Quatre’ range, it has gone back to its roots by unveiling a selection of homeware designs. Illustrator Charlotte Gastaut has created modern interpretations of three archive fabrics, including ‘Prétorien’ (centre), which provided the inspiration for the medallion motif that decorates Diptyque candles. These have been printed onto the finest linen from Flanders and made into stylish cushion covers. £50 each (diptyqueparis.co.uk).

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The Brown Betty’s origins go all the way back to the 1690s, when Dutch brothers John Philip and David Elers began refining a seam of red clay in Stafordshire. They made some of the first red-ware pots, designed to withstand the thermal shock of boiling water, and in so doing provided a vital catalyst for the ceramics industry in Stoke-on-Trent. Why is it called the Brown Betty? The Brown part is obvious, but the Betty may have originated from the popularity of the name Elizabeth in 19th-century England. Many people had servants with this name, often shortened to Betty, and one of their key tasks would have been to serve the tea. Nobody knows who originally designed the Brown Betty, but it remains the most manufactured teapot in British history. Its glossy chocolate-brown glaze (known as a Rockingham glaze) handily renders tea stains invisible. How practical! The Brown Betty has lasted because it works so well. Its round shape is perfectly suited to brewing tea: it’s easy to swirl the leaves around and the red clay retains heat brilliantly. Despite its humble nature, the teapot has not been safe from fakers. Avoid inauthentic imports and buy from Cauldon Ceramics, the oldest remaining manufacturer, based in Tunstall, Stafordshire. Its Brown Betties are still made from the same seam of red clay unearthed all those years ago, and cost from just £18.40 (cauldonceramics.co.uk). London-based ceramicist Ian McIntyre, who has designed tableware for Hay and Another Country, is a huge fan of the Brown Betty and is working on a project to put it back in the spotlight. Supported by the British Council, he’s collaborating with Cauldon Ceramics on a new version, to be launched next year.

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Style | N E W S

BRAND TO KNOW HAMPSON WOODS The most fortunate of London’s ‘fallen giants’ – city trees that arborists decide require felling – make their way into the hands of cabinetmaker Jonty Hampson, who founded contemporary carpentry brand Hampson Woods in 2010. Its chopping boards, now stocked by the likes of Fortnum & Mason and John Lewis, ought to be high on any wood-lover’s wishlist. Hampson can be commissioned to make bespoke furniture, as well as selling smaller items of the peg from his website, such as porridge spoons (below; £14.50 each) and tealight holders. Serving boards (below; from £40 each) are made in sycamore or ash – Hampson’s favourite wood to work with thanks to its ‘buttery’ texture. The brand’s tactile pieces are designed by Hampson’s business partner and friend Sascha Gravenstein – a fine artist and product designer – then handcarved and finished in the duo’s Hackney workshop. What’s next? ‘I’m returning to my roots,’ Hampson says. ‘Setting up a new studio in an old barn in the Lake District.’ Watch this space (hampsonwoods.com).

GILDED TREASURE Eagle-eyed visitors to elegant establishments such as Spring restaurant at Somerset House, legendary stationer Smythson or several Harvey Nichols branches may have spotted lustrous decorative glass panels on the walls: these are handcrafted surfaces by Emma Peascod, a designer-maker who combines the ancient French technique of verre églomisé (gilding the reverse side of glass) with Japanese washi paper. From her Hackney studio, Peascod builds beautiful works layer by layer, applying metal leaf and paint pigments. She has just launched her debut furniture and lighting collection, entitled ‘Highlight’, which includes five Art Deco-inspired pieces. Choose from four glass finishes (we like ‘Emerald Magma’, above), polished brass or patinated bronze metalwork, and walnut or sycamore details. From £1,600 for a table lamp (studiopeascod.com).

CLEANER LIVING

Anyone who’s ever struggled with the chemical-filled, abrasively scented products routinely profered by household cleaning manufacturers will rejoice at the launch of Tincture. The new British company produces elegantly packaged natural alternatives that challenge the notion of garish bottles filled with unpleasant stuf. The range, which includes washingup liquid, glass spray and furniture polish, is afordable, made in Norfolk, and uses essential oils and botanical ingredients with antiseptic properties such as bay, Roman blue chamomile and high-altitude lavender. From £7.50 (tincturelondon.com).

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Style | N E W S

MICRO LIVING ELLE Decoration’s Amy Bradford looks at how the property crisis and technology are conspiring to scale down our idea of home When an interiors trend appears as a big sell in the annual Ikea catalogue, it’s safe to say it’s hit the mainstream. Which is why the 2017 edition’s focus on compact (read: ‘cramped’) living has alarm bells ringing in my head. Among the suggestions from Ikea’s living experts are buying a sofa that doubles as a bed; hanging your chairs on the wall to save space (it’s ‘wall art’, you see); and packing in a micro fridge beneath the sink of your three-foot-wide kitchen (which, being composed mostly of boxes and shelves on wheels, feels as precarious as can be). Presumably the latter holds the same Pot Noodles and cans of Coca-Cola that you lived on as a student – for that is what this is, student living for the perpetual ‘kidults’ that London’s spiralling property crisis is forcing us to become (not that the problem is unique to us; Ikea is Swedish, after all, and publishes the same catalogue in every territory). And it’s not just young singletons who are feeling the squeeze, according to Ikea: it counsels young families to pack a bunk bed into their living room (‘a stylish set-up that lets kids

PICTURE: PATRICK QUAYLE

‘Ikea encourages you to buy a sofa that doubles as a bed and hang your dining chairs on the wall (it’s “wall art”, you see)’ be kids and adults be adults’) and even empty nesters to rejoice in the intimacy of small, cosy corners (perhaps they’ve downsized, like the government asked them to). The message is clear: shrinking living quarters are the future we all face. A survey by Opinium Research for the capital’s Fifty Thousand Homes campaign revealed some disturbing facts. Forty-two per cent of the twentysomethings polled were putting of starting a family because of soaring housing costs. Four out of five of the 520 respondents were considering leaving London altogether. If they do, they may well be hit with huge transport costs in order to get to work back in the city. Perhaps, if they’re lucky, their finances will stretch to one of the new ‘coliving’ developments that are springing

up across the capital, such as The Collective (thecollective.co.uk), a place where everything except the bedrooms is communal, or WeLive, the new concept from collective workspace pioneer WeWork that will soon allow lucky workers to reside in pods above their oices. The same technology that liberates us to work flexible hours at home is also eroding the barriers that used to separate work from leisure. Over the past few years, this magazine has documented how fast-paced lifestyles and the recession have prompted people to spend more time at home, retreating from stress and strain. In the long term, could the ‘micro home’ phenomenon change that? Spending your downtime in a tiny space where there’s no opportunity to entertain friends is hardly an attractive prospect. Maybe we’ll develop richer social lives, as we venture beyond our own four walls. But we may sacrifice closer, deeper bonds in the process. We can’t blame Ikea for wanting to put a positive spin on a decline in our collective fortunes, but if this trend continues, they should be as worried as we are.

THREE OF THE BEST SMART DESIGNS FOR S M A L L S PA C E S

‘Airo’ folding dining table, £30, Habitat (habitat.co.uk)

‘Knotten’ standing desk, £115, Ikea (ikea.com)

‘T2’ charcoal linen sofa bed, £550, Muji (muji.eu)

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H I S T O RY O F A B R A N D D E PA D O VA

The Italian furniture company’s pared-down style stems from a passion for Nordic design and Scandinavian Modernism Post-war Italy had so many home-grown design heroes that it could be forgiven for not looking beyond its borders for more inspiration. But that’s exactly what Maddalena and Fernando De Padova (below) did when they decided to visit Copenhagen. They discovered not just a new city but a diferent kind of design: Scandinavian Modernism, which was more paredback than what they were used to at home in Milan. A passion was sparked. They set up their company De Padova in 1956 and became the first people to import Scandinavian furniture to Italy. By the mid 1960s, De Padova had also acquired the licence to produce designs by Charles Eames and George Nelson in Italy, and opened a showroom (below) that Nelson dubbed ‘the most beautiful store in the world’. The company collaborated with big names, including Dieter Rams and Achille Castiglioni, and had a long relationship with Vico

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD

De Padova was the first company to import Scandinavian furniture to Italy Magistretti, who was responsible for many of the classic pieces in its current collection. It has commissioned designers from all over the world, including Brit Jasper Morrison, Japanese studio Nendo and Spain’s Patricia Urquiola. Last year, the company was acquired by kitchen and bathroom specialist Boi and moved its showroom to a new location in Milan (above): a former laboratory that for 30 years was the headquarters of Dolce & Gabbana. The huge loft-like space was designed by Piero Lissoni, art director at both Boi and De Padova. It boasts extensive displays of the brand’s furniture and materials, and an on-site team of architects to help with home projects. You can also see De Padova’s main collection at the Boi showroom in London’s Chelsea (depadova.com; boiuk.com).

FOUR HERO PIECES B Y D E PA D O VA

‘Rales’ sofa by Vico Magistretti (1988), from £4,560. A sleek version of the classic Howard shape.

‘Shine’ table by Vico Magistretti (1991), from £3,473. A simple design for work or dining spaces.

‘Rokumaru’ coat stand by Nendo (2008), £805. A slim tree-like design. ‘Firefly’ lamp by Alexander Åhnebrink (2016), £534. A portable piece made from leather and glass.

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I N S I D E S T O RY B E R T & M AY

It started with reclaimed tiles and has grown to encompass a whole design empire that’s still expanding – here’s the lowdown on this brilliant British brand It took a year of planning and another of building work before Casa la Siesta (below right), the boutique hotel belonging to Bert & May founder Lee Thornley (left), was complete. The property, which sits among the rolling hills of the beautiful Cádiz countryside in Spain, was built in 2008, although the abundance of local reclaimed materials used in its construction make it appear centuries older. It was thanks to the discovery of those materials that Thornley’s salvage business was born. A trained barrister, he relocated in 2004 to learn Spanish, ending up in the sleepy town of Vejer, where he bought the land to do up an apartment. ‘I thought I’d be in Spain for four weeks,’ says Thornley. ‘But I didn’t go back to London for six years.’ Despite Thornley having no formal training, the project was a huge success, so he launched an online reclamation company specialising in ornate tiles. ‘Once the hotel was built, it became apparent that there was a demand for that aesthetic,’ he says. ‘The great thing about tiles is that you can send out samples.’ During that time, the owner of a local tile factory, Juan Menacho, approached Thornley with a view to selling old stock. It didn’t fit Thornley’s style, but as he was struggling to meet demand from clients with only salvaged examples, the pair decided to work together reproducing designs using traditional methods. At Menacho’s recently expanded factory, liquid cement coloured with natural pigment is poured into metal moulds, then compacted using hand-operated presses.

Due to the skilled nature of the job each craftsperson makes three-to-five square metres of tiles per day, or as little as one square metre for more complex designs. In 2013, Thornley rebranded his company as Bert & May and moved back to the UK, where he opened his London showroom in 2014. Since then it has grown into a lifestyle brand, ofering not only its signature tiles but also wood flooring, bathrooms, kitchens (left and top) and paints. On a larger scale, Bert & May has built a series of pre-fabricated cabins and a modern houseboat. New for autumn 2016 are fabrics and tiles designed with London label Darkroom (far left). Featuring the latter’s signature geometric patterns and monochrome palette with a flash of blue, the bold tiles can be laid in a structured pattern or more random arrangements. ‘I’m very keen to collaborate more with other designers,’ says Thornley. A range of rugs, a lifestyle shop and more reclaimed pieces are also in the pipeline. ‘Ultimately I’d like anyone to be able to come in and buy something from Bert & May,’ he says, ‘be that a bronze kitchen island for £20,000 or a pair of taps for £100’ (bertandmay.com; casalasiesta.com). Read more about Bert & May at elledecoration.co.uk 46 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK NOVEMBER 2016

WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE

Former barrister Lee Thornley founded his salvage business specialising in ornate Spanish tiles eight years ago. Now it has grown into a lifestyle brand


Style | N E W S

DREAM WEAVER Meet the German-born rug designer whose work is inspired by imperfection and faded beauty Despite being descended from two generations of carpet dealers, Jan Kath never intended to follow in his parents’ footsteps. But at the age of 20, while backpacking through Asia, the German-born rug designer found himself in Nepal, where friends of his family ofered him a job as a quality manager at their carpet production business. ‘When I was a boy, my father and I visited manufacturers in Iran and Turkey, which trained my eye and gave me a fundamental understanding of colour combinations and proportions,’ says Kath. ‘When I arrived in Kathmandu, my connection with the carpet world was re-established. I took control of the manufacturing process, then later began to produce original designs, developing my own style.’ Fast forward 24 years and Kath is one of the world’s most in-demand carpet manufacturers, with rugs exhibited globally and work scooping multiple industry prizes, including a Carpet Design Award and a prestigious Red Dot Award. Global recognition first came with Kath’s 2005 ‘Erased Classic’ collection. Based on traditional oriental designs, the rugs were woven, then treated with a lengthy finishing process. ‘We used fire and water to age the rugs until they became thin and looked a hundred years old,’ says

WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE (DREAM WEAVER) PICTURES: JOAS SOUZA

‘We used fire and water to age the rugs until they became thin and looked 100 years old’ Kath. ‘The whole process can take up to a month.’ Since then, imperfection and erosion have continued to play a central role in his work. His new ‘Heiter Bis Wolkig’ collection also plays on the idea of faded beauty, with pastel cloudscapes inspired by the church paintings of Baroque artists unfurling over faint scrolled patterns. Despite a love of the distressed, Kath is steadfastly uncompromising about quality – carpets are hand-woven in Nepal, Thailand, India and Morocco using the finest materials ( jan-kath.de). From top The Front showroom in London’s Mayfair; ‘Kirman Robson Raved’ from the ‘Erased Heritage’ collection; ‘Cloud 1’, both available at Front (frontrugs.com)

E V E RY T H I N G Y O U NEED TO KNOW ABOUT BENI OUARAIN RUGS What is a Beni Ouarain rug? It’s considered the most prestigious type of Berber rug in Morocco. Handwoven from high quality wool by the Beni Ouarain tribespeople, it’s one of many diferent types of rug that have been made by Moroccan craftspeople since the Paleolithic era. How is it different from other Moroccan rugs? Beni Ouarain rugs are more minimalist than most: they are usually cream or white with diamond or triangle patterns in black. Does that mean they work well in modern homes? Yes – these rugs were very popular with Modernist designers and architects such as Le Corbusier and Alvar Aalto, because they make such a great foil for contemporary furniture. What sizes and shapes do they come in? They’re tailored to Berber homes, which tend to be long and skinny, so it can be diicult to get the right fit for British spaces (unless you’re shopping for a hallway). Luckily, specialist supplier Beldi Rugs ofers a made-to-measure service, so you can specify the size of rug you want and have it handmade by a Berber women’s cooperative in the Atlas Mountains. Does that mean I can create my own pattern? Yes, although the palette will always be the same as the traditional rugs: cream or white with black or brown lines (beldirugs.com).

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ANTIQUED MIRROR WORDS: ALEX KRISTAL PICTURE: HELENIO BARBETTA/LIVING INSIDE (PHOTOGRAPHY), CHIARA DAL CANTO (STYLING)

The technique of aging (or foxing) mirrors is a centuries-old craft that is still on trend today. Here’s everything you need to know to work this luxurious finish in your home What is antiqued mirror? Mirror is glass that has been fused with silver nitrate on one side to create a shiny, reflective efect (this process is called silvering). The silvered glass’s surface can then be broken down using various chemicals and abrasives to achieve an attractive antiqued look – every piece is completely unique. Where can I use it? Antiqued mirror can be used to clad any surface, from wall panelling (above) to shower enclosures and furniture. The same distressed efect can also be applied to toughened glass, meaning that it’s a viable choice for kitchens – it would make a beautiful splashback. The mirror can be shaped, bevelled, polished, backed or framed, so you can have it cut to bespoke dimensions to fit any space. Alternatively, opt for of-the-shelf antiqued mirror tiles (turn the page for our top picks). How do I install it? You can apply it directly to a wall using special adhesive. No extra reinforcement is usually needed, but uneven walls can damage the back of the mirror, says Jo Young of Mirrorworks (antiquemirrorglass.com). She advises gluing the mirror to plywood or a piece of MDF before applying to the wall. What finishes are there to choose from? As it is handcrafted, there are numerous finishes available, from lightly silvered to heavily antiqued. You could also opt for colour tinted or metal leafed mirror that is then antiqued, or overlaid with decorative patterns.

CLAD A WALL ‘Antiqued mirror is a brilliant medium for creating light and space’, says surface specialist Rupert Bevan (rupertbevan.com). In this house, designed by Groves Natcheva Architects, panels of aged mirror complement the dark marble (grovesnatcheva.com). ADD A STATEMENT MIRROR The instant way to work the antiqued look. ‘Bordered Panel’ mirror, from £780 per square metre, The Antique Mirror Company (antiquedmirror.com) ➤

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FIVE OF THE BEST ANTIQUED MIRROR TILES The easy way to get the look, these pre-cut tiles add a sense of glamour to kitchens or bathrooms 5 3

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1 ‘Perseo’ mirrored glass tiles, £1,860 per square metre, Sicis (sicis.com) 2 ‘Dark Cloud’ antiqued mirror tiles, from £200 per square metre, The Antique Mirror Company (antiquedmirror.com) 3 ‘Antique Mirror’ tiles in grey, £199 per square metre, Original Style (originalstyle.com) 4 ‘Deco Glass’ tiles in Pewter, £148 per square metre, Fired Earth (firedearth.com) 5 ‘Antique Mirror’ tiles in copper, ££199 per square metre, Original Style (originalstyle.com)

OUR FAVOURITE ANTIQUED MIRROR PANELS

‘Rustic’, from £390 per sq m, Mirror Works (antiquemirrorglass.com)

‘Mottled’, £972 per sq m, Saligo Design (saligodesign.com)

‘Vintage’, from £408 per sq m, Rough Old Glass (rougholdglass.co.uk)

‘Old Gold’, £356 per sq m, Dominic Schuster (dominic-schuster.com)

Hand silvered, £540 per sq m, Rupert Bevan (rupertbevan.com)

Green tinted, £450 per sq m, Frame Emporium (frameemporium.co.uk)

Silver on bronze, from £408 per sq m, Rough Old Glass (rougholdglass.co.uk)

‘Dark Bronze’, £440 per sq m, Dominic Schuster (dominic-schuster.com)

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PICTURES: HEARST STUDIOS (PHOTOGRAPHY), ALEX KRISTAL (STYLING)

A bespoke made-to-measure piece of foxed glass makes a real style statement. Choose between these brilliantly textural finishes


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

FIVE OF THE BEST R A D I AT O R B R A N D S Best for reclaimed The Old Radiator Company This company specialises in refurbished models that can be plumbed into modern central heating systems. From £444. Hallmark Farm, Ashford Road, St Michaels TN30 (theoldradiatorcompany.co.uk) Best for colour Bisque In addition to its own colour range, Bisque can coat many of its designs in over 2,000 RAL or NCS shades. It also ofers a bespoke colour matching service. From £400. 244 Belsize Road, Kilburn, London NW6 (bisque.co.uk)

D E S I G N D E TA I L S

RADIATORS WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE PICTURES: MAGNUS TORSNE, BENOIT FRANCHIMONT

Gone are the days when a steel-panel radiator was the only option for efficient home heating. Here’s how to find a model to suit your interior Traditionally, radiators were always positioned in the coldest part of a room – usually under a window. This was the most eicient way to counter both the chill given of by the surface of the glass, and draughts as they came in. This is still the case in older houses (such as in this period property; above), particularly if windows aren’t double glazed. However, if a house is well insulated, radiators can be fitted wherever you like. ‘A slim design could be positioned in an awkward corner or any other redundant area’, says Barbara Payne, head of design and marketing at Bisque (bisque.co.uk). ‘Sizes can even be made to order, and angled or curved to fit a particular space.’ The amount of heat output you will need depends on the volume of your room – use an online BTU (British Thermal Units) calculator such as B&Q’s (diy.com) to assess what size radiator you will need. Radiators also now come in a wealth of shades and finishes, and can also be colour matched to perfectly suit your design scheme. ‘Classic matt white looks good in lighter rooms,’ says Guy Morgan Harris at Morgan Harris Architects (morganharrisarchitects.com), ‘but we often go for pure black or metallics, such as anthracite or bronze, all of which work well as part of a darker scheme’.

Best for eco homes Jaga Jaga’s ‘Low-H2O’ radiators are certified as being the most economical in the world. They also have the lowest carbon emission output on the market. From £254. Orchard Business Park, Bromyard Road, Ledbury HR8 ( jaga.co.uk) Best for minimalists Stelrad The maker of arange of understated designs including classic column pieces, which make an architectural statement, and modern flat panels (right), best for discreet heating. From £56.99. Marriott Road, Rotherham S64 (stelrad.com) Best for reproduction Period House Store Head here for all kinds of fixtures and fittings that replicate classic original designs. From £100. Gallowfields Trading Estate, Richmond DL10 (periodhousestore.co.uk)

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THE TILE REPORT

These new paints ensure that the air quality in your home is just as good as the colour scheme on your walls. Bauwerk’s lime wash (above, £22.50 for one litre; bauwerkcolour.co.uk) allows walls to breathe and comes in nine colours inspired by nature. Strong Natural Paints’ shades are also free from harmful pollutants, and the palette of 26 colours is designed to have a positive impact on your wellbeing (‘Wroughton’, far right, £31 for 2.5 litres; strongnaturalpaints.co.uk). Oricalcum has exteriors covered with its Linseed paint, which can protect timber, masonry, and plaster (‘Haddon Estate Grey’, right, £38 per litre; oricalcum.uk).

PEAKE CHIC Hermès’ wonderful new ‘Nigel’s Tartan’ wallpaper by Irish illustrator Nigel Peake charmed us all here at ELLE Decoration (you may have spotted it in our How to Decorate special last month), and led us to investigate other work. As well as infographics for ‘The New York Times’, Christmas cards for the Tate and published books of his sketches, Peake’s collaboration with Hermès goes way back. He has produced scarves, fabrics and window displays for the French fashion house, and this autumn’s collection includes a trio of large wallpaper panels entitled ‘A Walk in the City’. Both measuring 1.4 by 2.4 metres, they can be framed and displayed like art. £730 each (hermes.com; nigelpeake.com). 56 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK NOVEMBER 2016

PICTURES: HANS BLOMQUIST, HEARST STUDIOS

T H R E E O F T H E B E S T E C O PA I N T S

Transform walls and floors with these large-scale tiles by Italian ceramics brand Cedit. The company has been quiet for almost two decades, having had its heyday in the mid-20th century when it collaborated with a host of esteemed design talent including Marco Zanuso, Ettore Sottsass and famous brothers Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni. But this year, two decades after its last collection launched, Cedit is releasing brand-new contemporary styles. The new tile collection features six compositions designed by some of Italy’s hottest creatives. ‘Matrice’, pictured above, is a design by architecture duo Barbara Brondi & Marco Rainò: its subtle geometric pattern is reminiscent of a herringbone weave. Mounted on the wall, it creates instant artwork. Each of the six designs are made from hardwearing porcelain – so don’t be afraid of using them underfoot. From £90 per square metre, Florim (florim.it; ceditceramiche.it).


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ASK AN ARCHITECT D AV I D A D J AY E

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: ALAN KARCHMER, LINDA NYLIND, DAVID ADJAYE

David Adjaye is one of the most successful architects in the world, with projects ranging from the Nobel Peace Centre in Oslo to Rivington Place arts centre in London. Here, he talks about his inspirations and his latest work

What inspired you to become an architect? I think I’ve always had an architectural brain; I just didn’t know what architecture was to start with. I was fortunate enough to have been brought up in many diferent countries and cultures – from Tanzania to Egypt – all with diferent architectural styles: Modernist buildings, compound houses in cities and small country villages where huts were standard. In North Africa, the public environment was very much a male space, while courtyards and family spaces were female. I was exposed to all these issues very early on; I thought they were the norm. At around 18, I finally realised that those issues had something to do with architecture. How can architects bring value to housing design? I believe they can help turn the intangible – relationships, culture, ways of living – into a physical framework. Architects distil the human element into building form. How wonderful is that? But with house design it’s as much about function. What has been your favourite project to date? I don’t have a favourite, but certain projects do stand out, such as the series of artists’ residences that I designed in London soon after I set up my practice in 2000. The project gave me an opportunity to engage with the city and its cultural thinkers. My next breakthrough was a wave of civic building commissions in the capital, including the Bernie Grant Arts Centre (2), Idea Stores in Whitechapel, and the Stephen Lawrence Centre in Deptford. These were an opportunity to design on a larger scale; I was able to think about how architecture can communicate with the community. Moving on, the commission for Denver Art Museum (4) was a big success in America. It led to a number of other projects, as well as the opening of my New York oice.

3 What are you currently working on? A master plan in San Francisco, a residential development in Johannesburg, a mixed-use development in London’s Piccadilly (3) and a contemporary art

‘Architects distil the human element into building form. How wonderful is that?’ museum in Latvia. I feel very grateful to be working globally and across so many diferent scales. How important has it been to you to design the National Museum of AfricanAmerican History (1)? It’s a pivotal project for me. It has always been about creating a museum that has a narrative alongside a strong universal message. The African-American story is one that is incredibly interesting. My intention was for the museum to transcend the uneasy fact of the marginalised AfricanAmerican experience 4 through an exploration of history and society. I especially wanted to showcase the positive value that is inherent in creating a forum for multiple interpretations of America’s history – however uncomfortable those interpretations may be (adjaye.com).

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ARCHITECTURAL ICON MAISON DE VERRE BY PIERRE CHAREAU AND BERNARD BIJVOET

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: MARK LYON

A striking industrial glass gem in Paris inspired by traditional Japanese screens This Modernist 1930s abode is architect Sir Richard Rogers’ favourite building in the world. Situated in the fashionable Latin Quarter of the French capital, Maison de Verre (which translates as ‘Glass House’) was built for the prominent gynaecologist Jean Dalsace and his wife Annie. The couple tried to buy the whole site – originally an 18th-century apartment block – but an elderly tenant on the top floor refused to sell, leaving them to construct their home underneath by demolishing the bottom three floors without disturbing the original top level. Excited by the early Modernist movement, Annie wanted to create a property that was both radical and spectacular. French architect and designer Pierre Chareau (1883–1950) and Dutch architect Bernard Bijvoet (1889–1979), who both shared the same design approach, took five years to build the house, completing it in 1932. The innovative building doubled as Dalsace’s clinic (actress Brigitte Bardot was among his patients), and is perhaps Chareau and Bijvoet’s most celebrated work. The duo sought to create an architectural version

of a traditional Japanese screen, allowing in light yet providing privacy. A striking glass-block wall forms one side of the building, and as a result it is often described as the ‘Glass Lantern’ – in reference to the beautiful glow that it emits during the evenings. In essence a steel-framed box, the house is spacious, light and open-plan. A series of glass partitions and rotating walls allowed for endless room configurations. For example, a wraparound screen hid the stairs to the upper floors from patients during the day, but framed the staircase beautifully at night. The glass gem quickly became a salon for intellectuals, with the likes of GermanJewish philosopher Walter Benjamin, poet Louis Aragon and French writer Jean Cocteau among its regular visitors. Sadly the Nazi occupation of France forced the Dalsaces to flee – both were strong supporters of the Communist party. In 2005, American architectural historian and collector Robert Rubin bought Maison de Verre, restoring many of its architectural features and sourcing original furniture from the period. 31 Rue St-Guillaume, Paris, France NOVEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 61


Style | T E C H N O L O G Y

FIRST CLASS Luxury luggage brand Rimowa is known for its swish metal suitcases. Its latest model is ‘The Electronic Tag’, which has integrated GPS tracking and a digital display. You’ll be able to check in and tag your bag from your hotel room, just as you can check in for your flight using an app on your phone. But the actual transportation of the luggage itself? That’s still down to you... for now. £900, Harrods (harrods.com).

LITTLE GEM

Designed with daily commutes and evening runs in mind, Bang & Olufsen’s ‘Beoplay H5’ Bluetooth headphones have magnets in each earbud. When you need to pause your music, simply take them out of your ears and the buds will snap together, transforming them into a lightweight, convenient braided necklace inspired by high-end sportswear. £199 (beoplay.com). THE STRESS-BUSTING BRACELET The ‘Zenta’ by Vinaya is the first biometric bracelet capable of tracking emotional wellbeing. It monitors skin temperature and perspiration to provide actionable insights into what triggers the wearer’s positive and negative feelings. The London start-up’s 28-year-old CEO Kate Unsworth hopes that the crowd-sourced project will help users find their happy place. Due to be available in March for £120 – if you support the project now you will receive your bracelet at a discounted price (indiegogo.com).

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SING IT BACK This artful Wi-Fi connected speaker features a futuristic translucent LCD display that flashes up the words to a song in time with the music. The Japanese design, appropriately named ‘Lyric’, also analyses the tempo and structure of a tune as it plays, and changes its display accordingly. For instance, words to a ballad show up in softer fonts, while rock and heavy metal would look more angular. A treat for the eyes and the ears, but it doesn’t come cheap. £2,500 (lyric-speaker.com).

WORDS: TOM BAILEY PICTURES: JOHN ANDREAS GODWIN, JACQUI J SZE

MUSICAL STYLE

An Apple watch deserves so much more than a clunky charging cable. Native Union’s ‘White Marble Apple Watch Dock’ magnetically holds your precious timepiece in place and looks gorgeous while doing so. Plus, the dock’s arm rotates to allow your slice of Marc Newson design to be used as a bedside alarm clock – thus giving your night table a pleasing sense of minimalism. £100, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk).


Style | C A S E

STUDIES

SIMPLE SKYLIGHTS Every home would benefit from more natural light. In fact, a wellplaced skylight or light well can completely transform an interior. And, from bespoke creations to off-the-shelf options, there’s an abundance of choice available. We spoke to the architects behind three very different projects to find out what’s possible and how you can do it too

PICTURE: IOANA MARINESCU

Words GRACE ALLEN

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STUDIES

INSIDER GUIDE FITTING SKYLIGHTS

‘Oh, it can’t be that hard to stick in a few skylights’ – the famous last words of Editor-in-Chief Michelle Ogundehin

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THE SUNNY SOLUTION FOR A PERIOD PROPERTY

PICTURES: IOANA MARINESCU

Allowing original design features to shine through was key when developing Frame House, a dark but characterful mews property in Holland Park, London. Nic Howett of architecture firm Jonathan Tuckey Design outlines the key issues to be aware of when adding skylights to a period property ( jonathantuckey.com). Why did you choose to use skylights? This home already had skylights built in, but they were small and didn’t deliver much sunshine. Due to the listed status of Frame House, and the fact that it is located in a conservation area, we were unable to introduce new skylights to the building. Instead we had to improve what was already there, increasing the size of the existing lights. What type of skylight did you opt for? We chose to go with ‘Neo’ frameless skylights by The Rooflight Company (therooflightcompany.co.uk), which are designed to sit flush with the roof, limiting their impact on the look of the house. Was there anything you had to consider when installing them? As Frame House is an old building there were complications to consider: the light wells had to be carefully positioned within the existing timber joists, and had to align perfectly with the joints in the timber-lined ceiling. Apart from light, what do they add to the property? Atmosphere! The Douglas Fir plywood cowls around the skylights direct light to specific areas in the rooms, creating ambience and mood. The overall efect is made even more bright, airy and spacious thanks to the exposed beams and timber framework – which replaced the original walls – on the first floor (pictured). Was there anything about the project that you didn’t expect? As more of the original skeleton of the building was revealed during construction we incorporated it into the final scheme, making a feature of the original timbers. ➤

I took the ED team to the Sir John Soane museum a few months ago, and we were captivated by its treasures. But what really inspired me were the clever ways in which Soane had sneaked extra light into his home – light wells, skylights, mirrors, and clerestory windows fitted with yellow glass, said to have been chosen to replicate the Mediterranean light Soane loved so much. I went home determined to upgrade the small leaky skylight over my kitchen extension. How hard could it be? Just chop a hole and pop in a bigger window. I might even add a sun tunnel to the hallway, I thought! Only it wasn’t remotely simple. Here’s what I learnt… 1 Installing skylights into a new build is infinitely easier than into anything old. It’s all very well choosing a window that will fit between the joists to minimise chopping, but when those joists are 100 years old and revealed to be extraordinarily wonky, you realise you need to measure the real dimensions, not the theoretically perfect ones as guessed externally. 2 You really need to know what your roof is made of before you start works. Mine turned out to be asphalt on top of screed, over asbestos, over tiles over slate over wattle and daub. I jest not. 3 Check the pitch of your roof. 15 degrees is the minimum for decent rain run-of. Velux has a roof pitch indicator app that you can download for free, so it’s easy to do. That said, you need to check again once the roof is stripped. My top finish was 15 degrees but by the time we got back to the house’s original rafters, it was not. 4 Don’t forget to factor in the cost of ‘making good’ after works are completed. Not all roofers expect to do this for you, so it won’t necessarily be included in their quote, unless you ask. I ended up needing to get the whole inside of the extension re-boarded, re-plastered and re-wired. 5 To cut a long story short, strip and show what you are working with before you buy windows if your property is old with a roof made of anything other than nice straightforward joists and tiles.

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STUDIES

THE BRIGHT P R O B L E M - S O LV I N G DESIGN

PICTURES: IOANA MARINESCU

Located on an ex-industrial site, Vaulted House is an unusual property in Hammersmith, London, that has used a series of ingenious vaulted skylights and light wells to create a sculptural ceiling and overcome a lack of light. Charlie Chatfield from architecture firm vPPR explains how it was done (vppr.co.uk). Why did you choose to use skylights and which ones did you pick? We weren’t allowed to put in any eye-level windows because they would overlook existing houses [the property is built right up against garden walls] so skylights were essential. We chose lots of standard-sized and small skylights rather than one single piece of glass, which helped to keep the overall costs down. What should you consider when installing them? Think about exactly how you want to use your space. It made sense for the main living room in this build to occupy the large, open-plan area on the upper floor, as this is where the big skylights are situated. Meanwhile, we used smaller light wells to channel shafts of daylight into each of the bedrooms on the lower floor, which would otherwise have no source of natural light. What do the skylights add to the property and how do they influence the space? The vaults in the ceiling (each crowned with a skylight) provide a very sculptural look, while also helping to zone the largely open-plan space. Diferent areas are spotlighted in the morning and afternoon, which works for the owners (who have particular areas they like to relax in throughout the day). The vaults also help to difuse the light so that it always feels really bright. Were there any challenges with this build? The ceiling looks simple but was actually very complicated to construct. There are so many layers to it, as well as steel supports that had to be disguised. ➤

‘THE SKYLIGHTS MEAN THAT DIFFERENT AREAS OF THE HOUSE ARE SPOTLIGHTED IN THE MORNING AND AFTERNOON’ NOVEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 69


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STUDIES

INSIDER GUIDE VELUX SKYLIGHTS

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THE LIGHT AND S PA C I O U S R E A R EXTENSION

The owners of Slim House, a narrow property in Clapham, south London, wanted to extend their home and bring in more light. The co-founder of Alma-nac, Tristan Wigfall, explains how adding smart skylights and a light well to the property’s uniquely sloping roof did exactly that (alma-nac.com). Why did you choose to use skylights? We had first developed the idea of a dramatically sloping roof for the rear extension, then we settled on skylights as a way to provide framed views of the outside from every floor of the house. What type of skylight did you opt for? It was really important that they sat as neatly and as flush with the ceiling as possible, so for this project we went for manually operated centre pivot skylights by Velux. We chose standard sizes, except for the large skylight that sits directly above the dining area – that one was a bespoke creation. What do you have to consider when installing them? It’s important to think about the orientation of your roof – if the glass is south-facing there’s a risk of your room becoming too hot. If your window is very high up, you may need to opt for an automated, remote-controlled skylight (these cleverly open when the temperature rises and close if it rains). What are the benefits? In Slim House, the skylights provide both views of the sky and horizontally across the garden. Views of the horizon create a really enhanced sense of spaciousness, while skylights placed above the staircase act as a light well, brightening the house from within. Was there any result of the project that you didn’t plan for? I didn’t expect the skylights to have such an efect on the overall look of the outside of the building. The staggered arrangement has really played with the scale of the house. ➤ 70 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK NOVEMBER 2016

If your roof is new, or newish, then installing Velux windows will be a breeze (if not, see insider guide, p67). Almost any builder will have put them in before, plus the company has an army of on-hand installation experts you can telephone, or call out, if there are any complications. Skylights come internally finished in white painted wood, white polyurethane or pine, and there are options for use in conservation areas. There are lots of standard sizes on ofer, plus custom options, blinds and shutters. But you still need to do your research before you order. Here’s my starter list 1 Check the pitch of your roof to determine exactly which types of skylights you’re able to specify. Under 15 degrees qualifies as flat, and there are fewer models available for this. Over 15 degrees, you’ll have lots more options to choose from. 2 Be sure what roof finish you’re going for – tiles, asphalt and slates each require diferent flashing solutions (the way the skylight is wrapped to ensure no water ingress around the edges). Each finish has significant pros and cons. Consider the weight of classic tiles (can existing joists take it?), fibreglass stinks when being installed, asphalt is easy but ugly, and some slates can’t be used on low pitches. 3 Check with both your builder and Velux the distance apart you wish to fit a run of skylights. There are set dimensions that are preferable – usually ten centimetres minimum – which means most installations should fit neatly either side of existing joists, assuming they’re parallel. 4 Will you be able to reach your skylights? If not, consider the Velux ‘Integra’ solar powered remote control-operated options. Or remember to buy a pole. 5 Look at loads of case studies (see buildinginspiration.co.uk) to fully understand all of the options before you buy. You only want to do this once. Skylights, from £264 (velux.co.uk)

PICTURES: RICHARD CHIVERS

Not for nothing is Velux considered the UK market leader for skylights. Editor-in-Chief Michelle Ogundehin put it to the test and shares her tips


Style | C A S E

STUDIES

THREE OF THE BEST ROOF WINDOWS

Subterranean sunlight This property in north London was designed by architect Jack Woolley to channel as much light as possible into its below-ground levels. Clever skylights and windows ensure that the home, which is packed into a tight spot in an urban area, never feels dark or cramped. On bright days the carefully placed windows create beacons of light which add more interest to the build’s quirky lines ( jackwoolley.co.uk).

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Wraparound views When updating this 1990s property with a roof extension, its owners turned to Scenario Architecture to fill their new top-floor space with light. In particular, they were keen to have a view of the garden (located on the roof terrace). The solution was an ingenious and elegant one: lower the roof terrace and glaze it, creating a long ceiling-height window above the main living space (scenarioarchitecture.com).

Floor to ceiling Aptly named ‘The Lantern’, this home in south-west London, designed by architecture firm Fraher, is characterised by its manipulation of light. After obtaining planning permission for a side extension on this listed building, the owners and architects decided to separate the original property from the new brick-clad addition using a giant vertical window that extends elegantly over the roof (fraher.co). E D

PICTURES: JACK HOBHOUSE, MATT CLAYTON

From slivers of glass that cut horizontally or vertically through buildings to a property where every corner reveals a sunny view, here are more unique ways to flood your home with light


Style | C O L O U R

Colour has a huge effect on our emotions, and nowhere more so than in the home. Five new books offer inspiration on decorating with all kinds of shades, from rich jewel tones to pale pastels

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PERFECT PALETTES ‘In the Mood for Colour’ by Swedish-born stylist Hans Blomquist (Ryland, Peters & Small, £19.99) explores the way that diferent colours have the power to soothe, uplift, stimulate and inspire. Here are our two favourite palettes from the book.

MOODY BLUES

PICTURES: HEARST STUDIOS

In an interior, I like to layer diferent shades of blue, from darkest navy to washed-out cornflower. There is nothing more comfortable to wear than denim, and it is just as comfortable to live in a moody blue interior. Dark blue is very calming and tranquil.

Deep indigo mixed with natural materials and other shades of blue, browns and neutrals create a soothing bedroom. I like the cocooning atmosphere of dark bedrooms, where the colours seem to embrace you.

I can never throw away jeans, even when they’re past their best. I used some old pairs to make this tablecloth. The wall is painted in ‘Railings’ by Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com). ➤

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S O F T PA S T E L S Decorating with a delicate palette will create a dreamy look and introduce colour without being too ‘colourful’. Pastel hues can appear childish if they are too pure or baby-like, so choose shades with a dusty finish. Most colours are more comfortable to live with if they have black in them, as it makes them dirtier and more interesting.

In Marie Sixtine’s Paris apartment (below and right), a warm mix of natural wood and soft textiles make the space inviting, while the mural, painted by Alexandre Poulaillon, gives a personal look. The space is exceptionally relaxing to be in. All of my senses felt instantly soothed.

READER OFFER These palettes and many more are featured in new book In the Mood for Colour by Hans Blomquist (Ryland, Peters & Small, £19.99). ELLE Decoration readers can buy it for the special price of £14.99 including p&p by calling Macmillan Direct on 01256 302 699 and quoting reference HV3. ➤


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RAINBOW CONNECTIONS Our very own colour expert, Kassia St Clair, has penned a book! Brimming with interesting facts and historical insights, ‘The Secret Lives of Colour’ (John Murray, £20) explains the origins of colours both popular and obscure. Here, she selects five shades with particularly curious tales, and we pick modern-day paints to match

PICTURES: GETTY, ALAMY, HEARST STUDIOS

MUMMY From the 12th to the 20th centuries, those requiring a rich, reddish brown pigment might well have purchased ‘mummy’. Customers would have been surprised to know the name was literal: the colour was made from ground up mummified human remains plundered from Egypt. Pre-Raphaelite Sir Edward Burne-Jones (The Rose Bower, right) was so horrified when he discovered the grisly truth that he insisted on giving his final tube of the stuf ‘a decent burial’ in his back garden. ‘Callaghan’, £38 for 2.5 litres, Little Greene (littlegreene.com)

LEAD-TIN YELLOW In 1941, while analysing paint samples from the Old Masters, German scientist Richard Jacobi made a surprising discovery: a sulphur-yellow pigment that no one else even knew existed. Although it was the yellow used by luminaries including Titian, Rembrandt and Vermeer (Mistress and Maid detail, left), the recipe for lead-tin yellow vanished around 1750. Its 200-year absence remains a mystery. ‘Citron’, £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball ( farrow-ball.com)

PRUSSIAN BLUE Sometime between 1704 and 1706, an alchemist in Berlin used a tainted batch of potash when trying to make a bright cochineal red and wound up with a deep blue instead. The art world was in raptures over this new blue – it was one tenth of the price of previous favourite shade ultramarine. It became the blue of the 19th century, and was used on the uniforms of the Prussian Army (right). ‘Plimsoll’, £42.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com)

BAKER-MILLER PINK Colours are rarely called upon to fight crime. The lawlessness of the late 1970s, though, made America’s establishment desperate. Into the breach stepped this sickly hue. Its creator, Dr Alexander G Schauss, claimed it could sap the strength of the most recalcitrant delinquent. Slathered on correctional facility walls, it was found to render inmates docile and lower the heart rates of those exposed to it. It could claim to be the true colour of tranquillity. ‘Island Hibiscus’, £40 for 2.5 litres, Designers Guild (designersguild.com)

DRAGON’S BLOOD According to legend, this substance forms when a dragon attacks an elephant but is crushed by its prey’s weight. The creatures’ blood mingles and forms a glossy red, used since antiquity by artists for its colour, and by apothecaries for its supposed healing powers. The truth of its origin is less romantic: it is sap from the Dracaena tree genus. ‘Arts Club’, £42 for 2.5 litres, Mylands (mylands.co.uk)

‘The Secret Lives of Colour’ is out 20 October (John Murray, £20) ➤

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THE TRENDSETTER ‘On the Fringe: A Life in Decorating’ by Imogen Taylor (The Pimpernel Press, £50) Imogen Taylor joined famed decorating firm Colefax and Fowler in 1949 and was for many years the trusted assistant of its co-founder John Fowler. When he retired in 1971, he passed onto her his prestigious client list, which included HM The Queen, duchesses, film stars and courtesans. Published to celebrate Taylor’s 90th birthday, this book recounts her colourful career creating English country house style: readers will learn the secrets of fabric walling and trompe l’oeil painting, plus how passementerie was made for Buckingham Palace.

‘1000 Ideas for Colour Schemes: The Ultimate Guide to Making Colour Work’ by Jennifer Ott (Apple Press, £16.99) San Francisco-based interior designer Jennifer Ott has created this practical, inspirational book for anyone who wants to try unexpected colour combinations but fears the dreaded ‘colour clash’. Its 125 colour palettes ofer a wealth of handy ideas for selecting shades, allowing you to check that your dream decorating scheme works before you reach for the paint roller.

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THE DARK SHADE ‘Bitten by Witch Fever’ by Lucinda Hawksley (Thames & Hudson, £28) Its title taken from a quote by William Morris about the hysteria surrounding the discovery of arsenic toxicity in the 19th century, this book is a compelling and at times macabre story of how a lethal poison came to be intimately linked with home decoration. Richly illustrated with images of wallpapers that were dyed vivid green using arsenicderived pigments, it takes in stories of murder and accidental death as well as the enduring mystery of why Morris – a passionate socialist – was unmoved by the plight of workers manufacturing deadly wallcoverings. You’ll see green in a whole new light. E D

PICTURES: LIVING 4 MEDIA/MENTIS PHOTOGRAPHY

THE GUIDEBOOK


Live-in exhibitions What happens when you give a design insider a domestic space to decorate? You get the ultimate show flat! We asked the creators of these three apartments to share how they made high drama homely Words NELL CARD

T H E M I L A N E S E A PA R T M E N T R O S S A N A O R L A N D I

PICTURES: GIANNI BASCO/VEGA MG, DANILO SCARPATI

In April this year, the gallery owner opened her first public interior project, ‘Up in the Sky’, in the penthouse of City Life Residences in Milan, an urban complex designed by Daniel Libeskind. The twostorey ‘sky villa’ (above) has a unique geometry, and Orlandi has filled the angular space with cutting-edge designs from her eponymous showroom and gallery, all reflecting her signature eclecticism and passion for contemporary art (rossanaorlandi.com). How does a gallerist’s eye help when it comes to decorating a home? When I buy for my gallery, I buy what I like – whatever moves me. In contrast, if I am working within a domestic residence I have to make sure that there is a dialogue between the space, the people who live in it, and the furniture or art on display. In a home, it’s very important that everything has a function, and that every object is positioned where it will give the owners the most pleasure. In the reception room here, for example, a sculpture by Spanish designer Nacho Carbonell is positioned opposite a mirror so that you can see it from both ends of the room. What is your favourite piece in this space? The cloud-covered sofa by Nigel Coates for Fornasetti. It was the first piece I chose. I find that once you choose your first piece, everything becomes easier: you can start to build your story. How do you make a space filled with gallery pieces or design art look homely? I tell my customers not to be frightened of putting diferent pieces together. Don’t rigidly follow one direction. If you want your home to be real it should reflect your memories, your family and your travels.

Do you have any tips for using gallery pieces in real homes? Firstly, follow your instincts and be brave. If you love something, go for it. Second, experiment with how you arrange your objects. In this apartment, I have put two completely diferent sofas directly opposite one another: ‘Sofa Raw’ by Matteo Casalegno, which is angular and masculine, and another by Patricia Urquiola for Moroso, which is feminine, round and soft (above). Create communication between objects: it builds a sense of harmony and purpose. What would you say to someone who wanted to buy a gallery piece, but was worried it might be too fragile or impractical? The same thing: be brave. I have sold extremely delicate pieces to clients before. For example, one bought a pair of fabulous glass bowls that were 50 centimetres in diameter. They were incredibly nervous of their fragility, but they were convinced they had to have them. I wasn’t going to stop them! How does what you have in your own home compare to this apartment? It’s totally diferent. I live with my husband, so I have to respect his tastes. We have pieces that we’ve collected from our travels – an eclectic mix of things – and lots of grandchildren running around! We haven’t moved anything away from the children. I have a collection of chairs designed by my friends Nacho Carbonell, Piet Hein Eek and Max Lamb. The children enjoy them and respect them just as we do: it’s very Montessori! Have you ever come across a piece that was simply too challenging for everyday use? Too challenging? No. Too expensive? Yes. But even when I can’t buy something, I keep it in mind. ➤ NOVEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 83


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LIVE-IN EXHIBITIONS CONTINUED...

T H E B E R L I N T O W N H O U S E E M M A N U E L D E B AY S E R

How does a retailer’s eye help when it comes to decorating a home? The store has a signature look and this is carried over into my apartment. Whether it’s a book, a shoe or furniture, I want ‘Be humble enough every piece to stand out, so the background has to remain calm to admit when and neutral. That said, the shop a piece doesn’t is permanently changing – each season brings new colours and work. Remember, prints – whereas my apartment you have to be able is deliberately more timeless. I don’t believe in decorating an to live with it’ apartment in just two months: a home should grow organically over the years. This apartment was conceived as a space in which I can relax; the approach is diferent from the shop in that respect because it requires a diferent pace. What is your favourite piece? I love the curvy, comfortable form of my 1940s Jean Royère sofa and chairs (above). There’s a beautiful contrast between the high ceilings of the apartment and the low curves of the seating. I call the sofa ‘the polar bear’, because it’s covered in furry fabric. It’s very tactile. For me, this sensuality is really important. The first thing customers do in my store is stroke the beautiful fabrics they see: it’s instinctive and soothing. How do you make a space filled with gallery pieces look homely? The pieces I collect are very modern but not dramatic – I’m not a dramatic guy! The same applies to the store. I want our customers to buy investment pieces, not just ephemeral ‘fashion’ items. I find that dramatic pieces can break the balance of an interior. They work in a museum, but they can be overpowering at home. 84 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK NOVEMBER 2016

Do you have any tips for using gallery pieces at home? If you have the opportunity to borrow something before you buy it, then do so. Many gallerists are open to this. You need to be humble enough to admit when a piece simply doesn’t work. Remember, you have to be able to live with it, and you want the thing to function. I once struggled with a beautiful freeform Jean Prouvé side table. It was just too big and it overpowered the room. What would you say to someone who wanted to buy a gallery piece, but was worried it might be too fragile or impractical? You have to adapt your collection to the lifestyle you lead. You can’t invest in expensive ceramics if you have children running around. A steel Ron Arad chair might be a better investment. Is what you have in your own home similar to what you have in your store? Yes, from time to time I take things out of the apartment and display them in the store, and vice versa. Have you ever come across a piece that was too challenging for everyday use? There are always things I love that I simply don’t have space or use for. Usage is extremely important to me. I could never put things in storage. If I buy something, it’s for a precise purpose. The pieces that I have at home, I enjoy every day. ➤

PICTURES: MANOLO YLLERA/PHOTOFOYER

Emmanuel de Bayser is co-owner of The Corner Berlin, an internationally renowned design store. Since opening in 2006, it has partnered with major art galleries, auction houses, artists and collectors. De Bayser’s own apartment, which he has decorated in a similar style to his store, is located in a late 19th-century building in the same square. Expansive white walls ofset his collection of mid-century furniture and design (thecornerberlin.de).


Style | D E S I G N

LIVE-IN EXHIBITIONS CONTINUED...

How does a gallerist’s eye help when it comes to decorating a home? I began my career as an antique carpet specialist, so the carpet is usually my starting point for a project. For me, a room without carpet is a room without soul. In this apartment, the bronze ‘West Lake’ dining table by Massimiliano Locatelli is arranged on a carpet with copper threads by the Colombian designer Hechizoo. What is your favourite piece in this space? The Giò Ponti chandelier (above). It came from Ponti’s iconic Parco dei Principi hotel in Sorrento. I love the fact that it was designed for an entirely diferent space and yet fits so well here. It’s a huge, challenging piece, yet somehow it draws everything together.

How do you make a space filled with gallery pieces look homely? You have to adapt your choices according to the home you are working with. If the scale is wrong, there won’t be a sense of harmony or equilibrium. The SQUAT apartment is not huge, so I’ve chosen furniture accordingly. That’s not to say that you can’t play with scale: the oversized ceiling light by Patricia Urquiola (above left) creates a sense of drama in what is a relatively understated kitchen. Do you have any tips for using gallery pieces in real homes? You have to fall in love with something first and go from there. I usually start my projects with one piece and this informs my next steps. With this apartment it was all about the Giò Ponti chandelier, followed by the Osanna Visconti di Modrone cofee tables, the geometric carpet by Caturegli and ‘Play with objects Formica, and then the curved, Federico Munari sofa. You that have nothing 1950s should play with objects that appear to have nothing in common: in common: it an element of surprise. adds an element itIsadds what you have in your own home similar to what you have of surprise’ in your gallery? In both spaces I have amazing carpets. In my own reception room I have a black and pale orange carpet by Danish designer Vibeke Klint. And, in my bedroom, a precious 18th-century Chinese carpet fills the entire floor. It makes the room. Have you ever come across a piece that you loved, but was too challenging for everyday use? You have to adapt the pieces you love to the footprint of your home. I dreamt of having Jeroen Verhoeven’s ‘Cinderella’ table in my home: it’s fantastic, but visually, it’s just too much. E D

PICTURE: MEL YATES

T H E M AY FA I R P I È D - A - T E R R E N I N A YA S H A R SQUAT London is the latest project by the celebrated Milan-based gallerist Nina Yashar. Yashar – who founded the influential Nilufar Gallery in 1979 – partnered with interior and architectural design company Shalini Misra to create a decorative living space in South Audley Street, Mayfair. The Victorian apartment has been furnished with a combination of historic items, precious artworks and furniture from emerging contemporary designers. So seductive was the mix that it has now been sold! (nilufarsquat.com).


S L E E P S O U N D LY I N S T Y L E We have everything you need for the best night’s sleep. Find your ideal bed, perfect storage, and stylish linens. Plus, our essential guides to duvets, pillows, mattresses and headboards Styling SANIA PELL Photography BETH EVANS

12.00AM MIDNIGHT From left ‘Logan’ fabric (on wall panel), £120 per metre, Margo Selby (margoselby.com). ‘Pick-n-Mix’ pendant lights, from £325 each, Rothschild & Bickers (rothschildbickers.com). ‘Desdémone’ bed by Nasrallah & Horner, £3,119; ‘Bultex Sensus’ mattress, £942, both Ligne Roset (ligne-roset.com). ‘Rem’ bottom sheet, £299; pillowcases, £119 each, all by Society Limonta, Harrods (harrods.com). ‘Selena Washed Linen Engre’ purple sheet, £182; duvet cover, £281, all Caravane (caravane.fr). Cushion cover in Blue Lagoon, £29, West Elm (westelm.co.uk). ‘Minard Baguette’ white cushion, £60, Margo Selby (margoselby.com). ‘194 44’ side table by Piero Lissoni for Cassina, £936, Aram Store (aram.co.uk). ‘Nimbus’ table lamp by Niclas Hoflin for Rubn, £208, Skandium (skandium.com). Book, stylist’s own. ‘Delgra’ tumbler, £10, Habitat (habitat.co.uk). ‘Cashmere Blend Grey’ rug, £2,100, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Apparel’ valet stand by Vera & Kyte, £749, Opinion Ciatti (opinionciatti.com). Shirt, £195, Maxmara Weekend (gb.weekendmaxmara.com). Throw, £174, Larusi (larusi.com). ‘Lana’ curtain, £206, Caravane (caravane.fr). ‘Scorched Shake’ sideboard by Sebastian Cox for Benchmark Furniture, £4,600, The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). Vase, £450; bowl, £260, both by Ulla Forsell, Flow Gallery (flowgallery.co.uk). ‘Tealight’ candleholder by Jamie Hayón, £93, Republic of Fritz Hansen (fritzhansen.com). ‘Leather’ perfume, £260; ‘Ivy’ candle, £95, both Perfumer H (perfumerh.com). ‘Night Star’ mirror, £260, Ashley Yo Hei Luk (ashluklyh@gmail.com). ‘Platner’ chair by Warren Platner, from £3,140, Knoll (knoll-int.com). Concrete vinyl flooring, £28 per square metre, The Colour Flooring Company (colourflooring.co.uk). Wall painted in ‘Squid Ink’ emulsion, £42.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com) ➤

STYLING ASSISTANT: ENRICO DONADELLO

Be inspired by the colours of the witching hour, from darkest blue to navy


Sourcebook | B E D R O O M S

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BEDS 1 ‘Cassiopee’ bed by Cédric Ragot, £4,810, Roche Bobois (roche-bobois.com) 2 ‘Tufty-Bed’ by Patricia Urquiola, £3,180, B&B Italia (bebitalia.com) 3 ‘Amaranth’ bed, from £9,023, Ralph Lauren Home (ralphlaurenhome.com) 4 ‘Notturno Shabby Chic’ bed by Flou, £3,088, Aram Store (aram.co.uk) 5 ‘Fulham’ bed by Rodolfo Dordoni for Molteni & C, from £4,840, Chaplins (chaplins.co.uk) 6 ‘Camelia’ bed in Mole, £825, Button & Sprung (buttonandsprung.com) 7‘Hayward’ bed, £895, Heal’s (heals.com) ➤

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PICTURES: SILVIA RIVOLTELLA

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BEDS 8 ‘Harlech 08’ bed by Mandeep Dillon, £11,130, Savoir Beds (savoirbeds.co.uk) 9 ‘Innsbruck’ bed by Paola Navone, £6,998, Baxter (baxter.it) 10 ‘Nesttun’ bed, £99, Ikea (ikea.com) 11 ‘Makura’ bed by Piero Lissoni, £2,119, Porro (porro.com) 12 ‘Pimlico’ bed, from £4,985, And So To Bed (andsotobed.co.uk) 13 ‘Madeleine’ bed £1,150, Sofa.com (sofa.com) 14 4 ‘Oasi’ bed by Manzoni and Tapinassi, £3,400, Natuzzi (natuzzi.co.uk) ➤

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PICTURES: D.BLACKMORE, MIGUEL PEREZ, BILL BATTEN

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How to pick the perfect linens From delicate silk covers to wool throws and plush velvet quilts, we love our layers, but most of all we love real linens

w £174, Larusi (larusi.com). ‘Khullu’ blue scarf, f £264, Caravane (caravane.fr). Duvet coverr in Light From top ‘Charcoal’ merino wool throw, Grey, £79.99 for a set including pillowcases, H&M (hm.com). Silk duvet coverr in Silver Grey, £299, Gingerlily (gingerlily.co.uk). Cushion cover, r £29, West Elm (westelm.com). Velvet quiltt in Slate by Niki Jones, £195, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Tweed Emphasize’ linen blankett by Mourne Textiles, £195; ‘Scorched Shake’ sideboard d by Sebastian Cox for Benchmark Furniture, £4,600, both The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). ‘Squid Ink’ paint (on wall), £42.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com) ➤

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WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE

What are the advantages of natural linen? ‘The great thing about linen is that it’s breathable, highly absorbent and therefore cool in the summer and warm in the winter,’ says Theresa Tollemache, owner of Volga Linen (volgalinen.co.uk). ‘Not only that, but the more it is used and washed, the softer it becomes.’ Is it eco friendly? As linen isn’t chemically treated, it is naturally hypoallergenic and resists bacteria. It’s durable, recyclable and biodegradable: a great eco choice. Does linen have a thread count like cotton? No. Flax fibre is much thicker than cotton, so rather than a thread count, it’s measured by weight – the higher the weight, the thicker the yarn and the heavier the weave. From 160 gsm (grams per square metre) to 180 gsm is a good weight for bedlinen; anything above that is more suitable for table linen and upholstery. Where does the best linen come from? ‘European linen is renowned for its superior quality,’ says Inga Lukauskiene, founder of Linen Me (linenme.com). ‘Lithuania, Belgium and Normandy in France are considered the best climates for flax production. Asian producers often mix flax with synthetic materials or ramie (a less durable fibre made from nettles), which decreases the linen’s quality and overall appearance.’ How do I make my linen last? ‘Hand or machine wash on a cool cycle using mild soaps,’ says Lukauskiene. For a beautifully pressed finish, iron sheets while still slightly damp or if you prefer your linen slightly crumpled, finish in a tumble dryer. Store it in a dry place where air can circulate.


4.00AM THE SMALL HOURS Sleep deeply surrounded by comforting shades of teal and blue-grey, sumptuous upholstery and clever furniture

From left ‘Winston’ bed by Mandeep Dillon, from £16,480, Savoir Beds (savoirbeds.co.uk). Linen burgundy cushion, £59, Skandium (skandium.com). ‘Rem’ linen pillowcase by Society Limonta, £119, Harrods (harrods.com). ‘Jute’ dark blue cushion, £45, Caravane (caravane.fr). Linen bolster cushion, £59, Skandium (skandium.com). ‘Islington’ cyan cushion, £45, Heal’s (heals.com).‘Rem’ linen flat sheet in anthracite by Society Limonta, £299, Harrods (harrods.com). Duvet cover and pillowcases (one shown), £79.99, H&M (hm.com). ‘Nid’ throw in anthracite by Society Limonta, £439, Harrods (harrods.com). ‘Alba’ throw in Nuit, £149, Caravane (caravane.fr). ‘Goose Eye Icons’ rug (bottom) by Gunilla Lagerhem Ullberg for Kasthall, from £783, Skandium (skandium. com). ‘Pick-n-Mix’ pendant light, £325, Rothschild & Bickers (rothschildbickers.com). ‘Blurred Lines’ patterned rug, £449, West Elm (westelm.co.uk). ‘Pli’ side table by Victoria Wilmotte for Classicon, £897, Aram Store (aram.co.uk). ‘Incalmo’ glass, £100 for a pair; jug, £155, both by Jochen Holz, The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). ‘Smoke’ candle, £95, Perfumer H (perfumerh.com). ‘Spectiva’ bottle, £1,010, Becky Dennis (beckyjdennis@hotmail.com). ‘Leka’ mirror, £673, Caravane (caravane.fr). Wall painted in ‘Teal’ emulsion, £42.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com)


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PICTURES: ANDERS HVIID, PATRICK QUAYLE, ALLAN TROLLE, STUDIO 3, ELEVEN 1

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1 ‘Vipp913’ large mirror, £750, Vipp (vip.com) 2 Oval oak mirror, £550, Heal’s (heals.com) 3 ‘Emil’ dressing table in walnut, £595, Habitat (habitat.co.uk) 4 ‘Ren’ valet stand by Neri & Hu for Poltrona Frau, £3,260, Chaplins (chaplins.co.uk) 5 ‘Room Mirror’ by House Doctor, £85, Royal Design (royaldesign.co.uk) 6 Rectangular clothing rail, £296, Annaleena’s Hem (annaleena.se) 7 ‘Maskara’ dressing table by E Gallina, £4,586, Porada (porada.it) ➤

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How to design a headboard A stylish frame is just part of the bedtime story. Think of your headboard as the finishing touch

From leftt ‘Concrete’ pendant light, £365; ‘Thorid’ side table, £162.25; ‘Hurricane Cully’ vase e £20.80; marble box, £45.50; ‘Nordic Sand’ cup and saucer, r £13.20; ‘TVIS’ teaspoon, £8.55; ‘Clara’ duvet cover, r £154.45; pillowcases, £28.65 each; bedspread, £408; rug, £40.90; ‘Nordic Sand’ teapot, £16.25; bowl, £13.65; basket, £20.80, all Broste Copenhagen (brostecopenhagen.com) ➤

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WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE PICTURE: KLEIN&CO APS

What is the optimum size for a headboard? struts or a batten mounting system; alternatively you can pick up a pair of concealed fixing brackets for as little ‘Bedding will make a bed appear broader, so allow up to as £5.70 on Amazon (amazon.co.uk). Wall mounting is 7.5 centimetres extra width at each side of the bed to make your headboard look more generous,’ says Bertie Clayton, also space-eicient, as you can push the bed right up against the wall and allow the headboard to sit on top. director at interior design firm Jane Clayton & Company ( janeclayton.co.uk). Avoid anything much wider, unless How do I protect a fabric headboard from marks and you want a retro look. Contemporary headboards can stains? Treat it with an upholstery protector spray such be as tall as you like and, if you have a high ceiling, as Scotchgard (scotchgard.com) or choose a model with a large headboard makes a great focal point in the room. a removable cover that can be machine washed. What are the best materials to upholster a headboard How much would a bespoke headboard for a double with? Leather is hardwearing and will last for years, while bed cost? Expect to pay from around £200 for a simple Alcantara faux suede is also durable and stain resistant, design in a plain fabric. making it a good choice. ‘If you’re using fabric, look for something ‘IF YOU HAVE AN EXCITING FABRIC, KEEP THE textural that’s not too lightweight; SHAPE OF YOUR HEADBOARD SIMPLE. IF THE this will maximise the life of your headboard,’ says Clayton. FABRIC IS PLAIN, GO FOR BUTTONS OR STUDS’ ‘And don’t forget, all fabrics must meet fire regulations.’ The advice from Ian Lea, CEO at textile company Spruce London (sprucelondon.com), is to choose a tightly woven cloth. ‘This prevents the interlining showing through when it’s stretched over corners,’ he says. In terms of decoration, Laura Kelway-Bamber, creative director at The Headboard Workshop (theheadboardworkshop.co.uk) adds, ‘as a rule of thumb, if you have an exciting fabric, keep the shape of your headboard simple. If the fabric is plain, go for a more exotic shape, or add buttons, studs or contrast piping.’ How should it be mounted? Smaller designs can be attached directly to the bed, but larger headboards should be wall mounted. ‘This prevents movement,’ says Kelway-Bamber. The Headboard Workshop can provide suitable


Sourcebook | B E D R O O M S

How to choose a mattress Because what lies beneath all of those gorgeous linens is actually more important (hastens.com). ‘In contrast, top-end mattresses are handcrafted and use only the finest natural materials.’ These include horsehair, which is springy and soft, cotton, wool and even cashmere. Natural materials regulate temperature much better and wick away moisture from the skin so that you don’t overheat. ‘Aim for the best mattress within your budget,’ says Breitner. ‘That may not necessarily be the most expensive. It’s all about what feels right for you.’ What about memory foam? ‘There can be drawbacks to memory foam mattresses,’ says Richard Tucker, managing director of new mattress brand Leesa (leesa.co.uk). ‘They work by retaining heat and moulding around your body, so it can feel hot and movement is sometimes restricted. However, people with painful joints can benefit from the extra support. Be sure that you have a good trial period on any purchase to make sure that it suits you. How do I look after my mattress? Turn it every three months to ensure that there is no sagging. A mattress topper will provide an additional layer of comfort, while also further protecting the mattress. If you have a slatted bed, use a pad underneath your mattress to provide a protective layer. How often should I replace my mattress? The Sleep Council (sleepcouncil.org.uk) recommends you invest in a new mattress every seven years. From leftt Linen cushions, from £6.90 each, VT Wonen (vtwonen.nl); ‘Nite’ blue pillowcase by Society Limonta, £109, Harrods (harrods.com). ‘Gäspa’ sheet, from £15; ‘Henrika’ throw, w from £15, both Ikea (ikea.com) ➤

WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE

How hard should my mattress be? ‘The level of firmness depends on your height, weight, and how you sleep,’ says Jim Gerety, marketing director at bedding company ViSpring (vispring.com). ‘As a rule, the heavier you are the firmer the tension you’ll need, but it’s crucial that you go in to a store and test a mattress before you buy.’ The aim is for your spine to remain in a neutral position as you sleep, and you should feel no pressure on any part of your body when you lie down. If you are light, or sleep on your side, you will need a softer bed, while back sleepers can choose something firmer. Distribution of weight is also key, so tall, slim types may prefer a softer bed than someone with a compact frame. Many companies can make mattresses with a diferent firmness on either side of the bed to suit partners of diferent weights. Bear in mind that the type of bed you choose also has an impact: a mattress will feel harder on a slatted wooden base but softer on a sprung divan. What are the differences between cheap and ‘AIM FOR THE expensive mattresses? ‘Cheap mattresses are mass BEST MATTRESS produced and are made WITHIN YOUR from poorer materials, so aren’t as durable and won’t BUDGET. THAT provide such good support,’ MAY NOT BE says Damien Breitner, THE MOST manager at Hästens flagship Fitzrovia store in London EXPENSIVE ONE’

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6 . 0 0 A M D AW N Invoke sunny mornings with lighter shades of sky blue and lavender – we love the extra zingy pop of mustard here

From leftt Blue rug g by Golran, £4,490, Moroso (moroso.co.uk). ‘Bell’ side table by Sebastian Herkner for Classicon, £1,656, Aram Store (aram.co.uk). Small bowll by Kaori Tatebayashi, £26, Flow Gallery (flowgallery.co.uk). ‘Arc Wide Celadon’ white bowl by Luke Eastop, £95, Another Country (anothercountry.com). Vase, £130, Scott Carter Wilson (scwceramics.co.uk). ‘Saarinen’ side table by Eero Saarinen, £1,180, Knoll (knoll-int.com). ‘Maisie’ white and brass side table, £139, West Elm (westelm.co.uk). ‘Mia’ lamp by Paola Monaco di Arianello for Artemide, £350, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Rectangular Square’ headboard, £545, The Dormy House (thedormyhouse.com); covered in ‘Spritz’ fabric, £128 per metre, Rubelli (rubelli.com). ‘Prestige’ divan bed, £2,035, Heal’s (heals.com). ‘Belgian Flax’ sheet, £69; ‘Belgian Flax’ pillowcase in Peacock, £29, both West Elm (westelm.co.uk). Blue cushion n covered in ‘Hudson’ fabric, £78.40 per metre, Sahco (sahco.com). Yellow cushion, £72, Larusi (larusi.com). ‘Rem’ duvet coverr in Anthracite by Society Limonta, £479, Harrods (harrods.com). Merino wool throw, w £174, Larusi (larusi.com). ‘A Dip in the Lake’ paint (on wall), £38 for 2.5 litres,Fired Earth (firedearth.com)


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B E D S I D E TA B L E S 1 ‘Tetris’ bedside table by Nicola Gallizia for Molteni & C, £558, Chaplins (chaplins.co.uk) 2 ‘Jaan Server’ nightstand by EOOS, from £847, Walter Knoll (walterknoll.de/en) 3 Bedside cabinet, £325, Ferm Living (fermliving.com) 4 ‘Frame’ sideboard, £344, By Lassen (bylassen.com) 5 ‘Gladom’ tray table, £20, Ikea (ikea.com) 6 ‘Ziggy Night’ nightstand by C Ballabio, £1,419, Porada (porada.it) 7 ‘Ziggy’ side table by Emilio Nanni, from £387, Saba (sabaitalia.it) 8 ‘Svevo’ bedside table, £487, Natuzzi (natuzzi.co.uk) ➤

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How to start your day beautifully The perfect tea set and a wealth of comfy cushions in dreamy shades will make even early mornings worth waking up for From leftt ‘Prestige’ kingsize divan bed, £2,035, Heal’s (heals.com). ‘Cosy Boucle’ lilac cushion, £29, West Elm (westelm.co.uk). Linen cushion in anthracite grey, y £59, Skandium (skandium.com). ‘Maya’ brown cushion cover, r £64, Caravane (caravane.fr). ‘Belgian Flax Linen’ pale blue pillowcase, £24, West Elm (westelm.co.uk). ‘Rust’ linen pillowcase, £48, Larusi (larusi.com). ‘Fil à Fil Sarta’ large square pillowcase, £40, Caravane (caravane.fr). ‘Eclectic’ speckled cushion n by Hay, £35, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Mud’ linen flat sheet, £159, Larusi (larusi.com).‘Belgian Flax Linen Border Stripe’ grey sheett in Platinum, £69; ‘Belgian Flax Linen’ blue duvet coverr in Moonstone, £139, both West Elm (westelm.co.uk). ‘Mod’ blankett by Mae Engelgeer for Textiel Lab, £360, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Elca’ napkin, £60 for a set of four, Tori Murphy (torimurphy.com). ‘Turning’ tray y by Finn Juhl for Architectmade, £145, Skandium (skandium.com). Blue cup, £45; white cup, £45; teapot, £98, all by Hyu-Jin Jo; vase by Mizuyo Yamashita, £47, all Flow Gallery (flowgallery.co.uk). ‘Pale Cirrus’ paint (on wall), £38 for 2.5 litres, Fired Earth (firedearth.com) ➤

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1 ‘Oyster Border’ pillowcases, £15 each; duvet cover, from £59, both The Secret Linen Store (secretlinenstore.com) 2 Patchwork quilt, £540, APC (apc.fr) 3 ‘Lake Cave’ pillowcase in Breeze, £19, Sheridan (sheridanaustralia.co.uk) 4 ‘Loft Bed in a Bag’ duvet set, from £25 for a single; ‘Diamond’ multicoloured throw, £29.59; both Marks & Spencer (mands.com) 5 ‘Boston’ pillowcase, £12, Habitat (habitat.co.uk) 6 From top: ‘Multi’ throw, £435; ‘Nite’ sheet, £259; ‘Des’ bedcover, £475; ‘Lite Caos’ pillowcase, £199; ‘Kito’ pillowcase, £119; ‘Rem’ sheet, £299, all by Society Limonta, Harrods (harrods.com) 7 ‘Tile’ pillowcase in Blush Pink by Murmur, £17, Bedeck (bedeckhome.com) 8 ‘LM0600’ throw by House Doctor, £70, Design Vintage (designvintage.co.uk) 9 ‘Crinkle’ throw in Rose Pink by Hay, £89, Cos (cosstores.com) ➤

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PICTURES: TIM YOUNG, ADCAST NXT, PATRICK QUAYLE, ALLAN TROLLE, PAUL RAESIDE

BEDDING


Sourcebook | B E D R O O M S

10.00AM MORNING Be inspired by soft early light with pale shades that allow you to wake gently. Simple, streamlined furniture adds to the feeling of relaxation

From leftt Berber rug, £600, Larusi (larusi.com). ‘Dot’ stooll by Arne Jacobsen, £175, Republic of Fritz Hansen (fritzhansen.com). ‘Tumbler’ alarm clock k by Norm Architects for Menu, £69, Amara (amara.com). ‘A330’ pendant light, £699; ‘A330S’ pendant light, £320, both by Alvar Aalto for Vitra, Aram Store (aram.co.uk). ‘Dream Due’ bed by Marcel Wanders, £4,403, Poliform (poliformuk.com). ‘Fil à Fil Sarta’ sheet, £157; ‘Selena’ pillowcase (two pictured) in Ciment, £45, Caravane (caravane.fr). ‘Maya’ white cushion cover with black border, r £64, Caravane (caravane.fr). Striped patterned cushion, £64, Larusi (larusi.com). Duck Egg blue cushion n made by Floating Island (floatingisland.org.uk); covered in ‘Varese’ fabric, £68 per metre, Designers Guild (designersguild.com). Linen pillowcase in dark grey, y £7.99, H&M (hm.com). Small bespoke cushion n made by Floating Island (floatingisland.org.uk); covered in ‘Velours Oskar’ fabric, £92 per metre, Nobilis (nobilis.fr). ‘Lana Patchwork’ round cushion, £45, Heal’s (heals.com). ‘Chalk’ sheet, £159; duvet cover, r £297, both Larusi (larusi.com). ‘Penelope’ dark-blue throw, w £125, French Connection Home (frenchconnection.com). ‘Bertoia’ bench h by Harry Bertoia, £1,980, Knoll (knoll-int.com). Sheepskin rug, £70, Habitat (habitat.co.uk). ‘Horizontal Double Rib’knitted throw, w £69, West Elm (westelm.co.uk). ‘Dashes’ white rug, £800, Habitat (habitat.co.uk).‘Gong Due’ bedside table by Andrea Parisio, from £1,599, Meridiani (meridiani.it). ‘Kartio’ glass by Kaj Franck for Iittala, £8, Skandium (skandium.com). ‘First Light’ table lamp by Dana Cannam, £410, Another Country (anothercountry.com). Grey rug g by Ritva Puotila for Woodnotes, from £581, Skandium (skandium.com). ‘D.153.1’ armchairr by Giò Ponti, £4,244, Molteni & C (molteni.it). Linen throw, w £675, Catarina Riccabona (catarinariccabona.com). ‘Maya’ curtain, £140, Caravane (caravane.fr). Wall painted in ‘Peignoir’ emulsion, £43.50 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) ➤

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1 ‘Mini Gong’ pendant light, £620, Natuzzi (natuzzi.co.uk) 2 ‘Bluf City’ pendant light by Jonah Takagi for Roll & Hill, £965, SCP (scp.co.uk) 3 ‘Collect’ black pendant socket with brass disc shade, £136, Ferm Living (fermliving.com) 4 ‘CB0882’ wall light by House Doctor, £125, Design Vintage (designvintage.co.uk) 5 ‘Bidone’ wall lamps by Luigi Caccia for Azucena, £2,744 each, GMR Interiors (gmr-interiors.com) 6 ‘No.046’ table light, £65, John Lewis (johnlewis.com) 7 ‘Mayfair’ table lamp by Diego Fortunato for Vibia, from £680, Chaplins (chaplins.co.uk) 8 ‘Pileo’ floor light, £1,397, Porada (porada.it) 9 Angled sconce with moveable arms by Serge Mouille, £2,500, Tanguy Rolin (sergemouille.co.uk) 10 ‘Ongo’ lamp for Contardi, £557, Harrods (harrods.com) ➤

PICTURES: ALLAN TROLLE, ANNIE SCHLECHTER

LIGHTING


Sourcebook | B E D R O O M S

How to dress your bed for comfort Want to wake refreshed and rested every morning? The key is changing your bedding with the seasons and choosing designs that suit you What is a duvet tog rating and how do I decide which tog I need? The tog rating refers to the level of thermal insulation provided – the higher the tog, the warmer the duvet. ‘Duvets range from a 2.5 tog for the height of summer to an 18 tog for deepest winter,’ says Sarah Smith, head of buying at Soak & Sleep (soakandsleep.com). ‘For a fail-safe option, invest in an all-season set – two duvets that can be used individually or combined for perfect warmth all year.’ What are the different filling options? The main choice is between a natural or synthetic filling, which comes down to personal preference and budget. Natural fillers tend to be more expensive, but are durable and versatile. ‘Down is luxurious, soft, flufy and exceptionally warm, but at the same time very light,’ says Sara Wadsworth, brand marketing manager at The Fine Bedding Company (finebedding.co.uk). ‘Feather is heavier, but brilliant if you like a “tucked in” feeling.’ The two materials are often mixed, and the higher the down content the lighter the duvet will be. Alternatively, go for a wool, cotton or silk filling: they all have a denser feel and are naturally hypoallergenic. Silky microfibre and springy hollowfibre synthetic fillers are also good for people with allergies. How do I choose a pillow that’s good for my back and neck? Side sleepers need a thicker pillow that will support their head and neck at the right height, whereas back sleepers ideally need a firmer pillow with a lower profile. Front sleepers should choose a softer, low-profile pillow. Specialist pillows, often made from breathable latex, are good for people with specific back or neck problems – you can find a selection designed by physiotherapist Sammy Margo at The Good Sleep Expert (thegoodsleepexpert.com).

WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE PICTURE: PETER KRAGBALLE

From leftt Pink pillowcases, £42 each; duvet cover, £259; ‘Heather’ cushions (pictured in Grey and Velvet), £178 each; ‘Raul’ cushions (two pictured), £106 each, all Aiayu (aiayu.com) E D

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THE HEARTH OF THE HOME Charnwood’s next-generation stoves make it easier than ever to bring the natural warmth of a real fire into any living space, from town to country

If you’ve ever craved the warmth and comfort of a real fire but wondered at the viability of installing one in your home, the latest releases from Charnwood should help turn your coldweather fantasy into a reality. Charnwood – which has been designing and making wood-burning stoves on the Isle of Wight for over 40 years – has long had a reputation for innovation. Now the family-run business has done it again. As Charnwood’s greenest, cleanest and most fuel-eicient stove to date, its newest

Charnwood’s new woodburning stoves are its cleanest, greenest to date launch, the ‘Arc’, sets a new benchmark for modern, clean-burning stoves. The ‘Bay BX’, meanwhile, is as simple as it is stylish and can be floor or bench mounted. Both models are some of the most advanced on the market, exceeding all current UK regulations for eiciency and low emissions – which makes them a practical and thoroughly stylish option for modern urban settings as well as more traditional homes. (You don’t even need a fireplace to install one.) And with nearly all Charnwood stoves available in smoke-reducing versions your choices needn’t be limited. Finish with one of Charnwood’s attractive Vlaze vitreous enamel surrounds and you have a design feature that’s as attractive to look at as it is warm. Find out more at charnwood.com 112 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK NOVEMBER 2016

FINISHING TOUCH Complete the look with the Bodj range of fairtrade fireside accessories produced exclusively for Charnwood by selected manufacturers in Cambodia. bodj.co.uk


ELLE Decoration | P R O M O T I O N

This page ‘Arc’ stove in gunmetal, from £1,681 Opposite page, main image ‘Bay BX’ stove in black, from £1,620 Inset, top ‘C-Four’ stove in gunmetal, from £907; wall-mounted heat shield in ‘Cademuir’ by Voyage for Vlaze (vlaze.co), from £459; ‘G’ log holder, £91, Bodj for Charnwood. All stoves by Charnwood


F O R M O R E S T Y L I S H I N T E R I O R S , V I S I T E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K / I N S P I R AT I O N S


NORSE CODE Norwegian v interior designer Hanne Lise Poli has brought a calming sense of Scandinavian style to her Italian country house, combining muted greys, brass accents and raw finishes Words NELL CARD Photography FABRIZIO CICCONI/LIVING INSIDE Styling FRANCESCA DAVOLI


Dining area A wenge wood table designed by Hanne (for similar, try Makers’ Eye) is lined on one side with ‘CH 24 Wishbone’ dining chairs by Hans Wegner for Carl Hansen & Søn (available from Twentytwentyone). The oversized pendant light is from Oicina Casa, a local interiors store Stockist details on p205 ➤


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orwegian interior designer Hanne Lise Poli moved to rural Italy in search of la dolce vita with her then-husband and their two children, Alexander and Sebastian, 17 years ago. ‘The Italian way of life had always inspired me,’ she says. ‘I like the relaxed pace here, but it’s always tempered by my Scandinavian side.’ This sense of duality pervades every room of Hanne’s home, which nestles on the fringes of Trevignano Romano, a small town on the shore of Lake Bracciano, north of Rome. The property has the romantic air of an old country estate, but, in fact, Hanne built it over the course of nine years. ‘When I first viewed the house, it was little more than eight pillars with a roof, but it had a good energy,’ she says. The new single-storey abode that she has created feels at one with its surroundings. The building peeks through trees, and vines trail over its terracotta roof tiles. Inside, the 250-square-metre home is modern, almost monastic in its simplicity. ‘I love straight lines and high ceilings,’ Hanne explains. ‘All of my projects are about creating a sense of space. For me, this is real luxury – it’s not about gold ‘I LOVE STRAIGHT LINES AND HIGH accessories and taps.’ CEILINGS. ALL OF MY PROJECTS ARE At the rear of the house is a glass extension, which ABOUT CREATING A SENSE OF SPACE. Hanne fondly refers to as FOR ME, THIS IS REAL LUXURY’ her ‘glasshouse’. Here, the five-metre-high ceiling and oversized reclaimed fireplace reference the drama of a medieval comfort and warmth to the house, great hall. The room’s iron frame was made by a local Hanne has included pale wood blacksmith and encases what was originally an external dryfurnishings, brass accents and slubby linens, as well as flowers, stone wall, creating a wonderfully rugged feel. ‘It does leak a little when it rains, but I don’t care. There’s nothing in there foliage and antique candelabras. that can be ruined,’ Hanne says nonchalantly. Hanne’s home is now shared The glasshouse leads into an open-plan kitchen and dining with her youngest son, Sebastian room; from here, a hallway lined with family photos connects (18), her partner, Rafaele, and to three bedrooms and the main living space. The heated floors, their new puppy, Araba. Nieces which flow throughout, are coated in epoxy resin. ‘I have kids, Olivia (five) and Vilja (three; both dogs and cats running in and out of the house all day, so had pictured right) regularly visit too. ‘I don’t need lots of “things” around me to make me happy – just my kids, my partner, and to have something hardwearing,’ Hanne says, as she explains that the muted grey tone was custom-mixed for her (for more my dog. This is a house, not a museum and I’m not details, see Materials Checklist on p124). The plaster walls a perfectionist,’ she insists. ‘I don’t strive for perfection because are also a bespoke shade of cool grey. To bring some character, I don’t think it truly exists.’ hannepoli.com

Kitchen The cabinetry and island are by Modulnova (available from Design Space London in the UK) and the wall-mounted shelves were made-tomeasure by a local carpenter. The sand-coloured metro-style tiles are from Tonalite. The vase is from Globos in Zurich (try Amara for similar) Veranda Cushions piled upon a Sedir carpet from Dettagli Arredamenti create a relaxing spot to sit. For similar Moroccan lamps try Moroccan Decor. The crochet swing (right) is from Maisons du Monde Stockist details on p205 ➤

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THE FIVE-METRE-HIGH CEILINGS AND OVERSIZED RECLAIMED FIREPLACE RECALL THE GRANDEUR OF A MEDIEVAL GREAT HALL

Glasshouse The fireplace is a salvaged piece from an Italian castle and the 1940s armchair was picked up at a vintage store in Zurich. The black ‘265’ wall lamp is by Paolo Rizzatto for Flos. The artwork on the mantelpiece is by Dutch artist Joris Geurts. The iron daybed was designed by the homeowner and sits beside a patchwork rug by Tisca (try Benuta in the UK). Outside on the patio is a wicker chair from Maisons du Monde Stockist details on p205 ➤


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M AT E R I A L S C H E C K L I S T

We take a closer look at three finishes that give this Italian home its cool, collected charm

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1 Epoxy resin flooring This plastic coating creates a contemporary aesthetic that is also hardwearing, chemical- and temperatureresistant and hygienic. The resin is usually applied as a liquid, poured over a layer of primer and finished with up to three coats of sealant (this is a job for a professional builder or fitter) to create a watertight, dustproof and seamless finish. Once in situ, the flooring is easy to clean and can help to reduce the noise of footsteps. The Resin Floor Company is a good source of advice if you are planning a project (resinfloorcompany.com). Most finishes come in a selection of standard colours, various thicknesses, and in matt, gloss and silk finishes. Specialists such as Puur can also custom-mix colours, such as the bespoke grey that homeowner Hanne has chosen for this house. It estimates that the cost of epoxy resin flooring is £100–£150 per square metre (puurfloors.com). 2 Decorative polished plaster walls Also called decorative concrete, this features on all of the walls in Hanne’s house. The colour used is, once again, a custom-mixed shade of grey, made by specialist company Weber (netweber.co.uk). Evoke Polished Plaster Interiors is a company based in the UK that can adjust the colour and finish to suit your style. The cost starts at £65 per square metre (evokepolishedplastering.co.uk). 3 Porcelain tiles In the kitchen, porcelain ‘Satin’ metro-style tiles by Italian brand Tonalite are used above the cabinetry. Hanne eschewed the traditional white in favour of a soft sand-hued ‘Sabbia’ colourway that blends with the neutral grey woodwork (tonalite.it). The Tile Association lists selected stockists of Tonalite tiles in the UK (tile.org.uk).


‘I HAVE KIDS, DOGS AND CATS RUNNING IN AND OUT OF THE HOUSE ALL DAY, SO HAD TO USE MATERIALS THAT ARE HARDWEARING’

Details Two footstools from Ikea are covered in grey velvet from an old set of curtains. The chimneybreast in the bedroom is decorated with paper butterflies from a street market in London. A vintage vase from Italy and a wooden candleholder from Norway sit on the mantelpiece Hallway The homeowner’s niece Olivia stands beside a picture wall hung with Ikea frames. The walls are painted charcoal grey using a colour by Sikkens (for similar try ‘Urban Obsession’ by Dulux) Stockist details on p205 ➤


Bathroom An antique cast-iron bath, bought in Amsterdam, is placed beside the window. The contemporary freestanding ‘Pixel’ tap by Paini is a striking counterpoint to the tub’s elaborate design Bedroom The dark grey bedding is Egyptian linen by Orizzonte, sourced from Dettagli Arredamenti and the floral throw is by Italian artist Eva Germani Stockist details on p205


M Y S E C R ET ADDRESS BOOK Hanne tells us her favourite places to shop, eat, and drink in and around Rome Dettagli Arredamenti I’ve worked with Franco, the owner of this concept store, for 16 years. It stocks pieces by almost every Italian designer I know. Via Romana 24, 00061 Anguillara Sabazia (dettagliarredamenti.it) Hotel Locarno This is the perfect place for an aperitivo. Its style has changed very little over the years. It will still be cool in 20, even 100 years’ time. Via della Penna 22, 00186 Rome (hotellocarno.co) Bar La Vela I call this my second home. The atmosphere is hip and the view over the lake is amazing. It’s my favourite place in the world for lunch. Via della Rena 23, 00069 Trevignano Romano (barlavela.com) C.U.C.I.N.A This is a super-cool kitchen store in the centre of Rome, which sells everything from aluminium storage jars to kitchen shelving units. Via Mario de’ Fiori 65, 00165 Rome (cucinastore.com) E D


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Entrance The waxed-steel doorway frames another smaller glass door leading into the property. ‘The entire entrance, including the canopy, was designed as a piece of sculpture,’ says architect Enrico Dafonchio, whose project is inspired by Brutalism and Brazilian architecture ➤

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t first sight, this imposing concrete house in Johannesburg’s Hyde Park appears at odds with the sprawling Colonial-style mansions typical of the upmarket suburb. But in truth, its Brutalist design – a controversial 20th-century architectural style that favours raw concrete and monolithic forms – is just as impressive as the sweeping drives and columned portico entrances of its neighbours. Inside, the sense of monumental scale and luxury continues. Guests step straight into a 1,300-square-metre double-height space, which is scaled by a ‘floating’ glass and walnut staircase and hung with pendant lights that are as much sculptural pieces as lighting. The interior is everything owners David Engelbrecht, a company director and his wife Jana (who live with their son and daughter, Tom and Isabelle, who are both in their twenties) had hoped for when they approached architect Enrico Dafonchio to create a ‘sensational entertaining space’ for them. He, in turn, was inspired by the simplicity of Brazilian architecture, which is expressed in the airy openness of the concrete-framed interior. The living, dining and kitchen areas form one multifunctional space where family and friends can relax, sit at the dining table or prepare food on the freestanding island. Luxurious materials abound: a towering wall of oiled walnut cabinetry frames a picture window and, above the dining table, white oak slices into the concrete ceiling, which the architects lowered to create a sense of intimacy within the hangar-like space. Brass lighting and accessories are used like jewels to lift the dark porcelain floor tiles and furnishings. Behind these impressive reception rooms lies a secondary series of informal family spaces, including the TV room and a smaller kitchen with a casual dining area. ‘The house can instantly change atmosphere, becoming a cosy family home or a grand venue,’ says Enrico, ‘but it maintains a sense of luxury, comfort and sophistication.’ Upstairs, each of the three bedrooms has an en-suite and dressing room, and the couple’s suite is separated from their children’s by a study. The most indulgent space has to be the tree-lined roof terrace, where a west-facing deck and Jacuzzi await. ‘We love heading up there and watching the sunset,’ says Jana. dafonchio.co.za

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Ground floor The seven-metre-high ceilings in the hallway are hung with sculptural ‘Ring’ lights by Italian brand Henge. In the living area, twin ‘Ipanema’ armchairs and a ‘Bristol’ sofa are arranged around a ‘Tribeca’ marble-topped cofee table, all by Jean-Marie Massaud for Poliform. The ceiling here is clad in white oiled oak Stockist details on p205 ➤


GUESTS STEP STRAIGHT INTO AN IMPRESSIVE DOUBLEHEIGHT HALLWAY HUNG WITH SCULPTURAL PENDANT LIGHTS

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LUXURIOUS MATERIALS ABOUND, FROM OILED WALNUT AND PORCELAIN TO TOUCHES OF GLASS AND BRASS


Formal kitchen Lacquered cabinets are teamed with a Neolith porcelain worktop and a walnut breakfast bar (try Poggenpohl for a similar look). Handleless units in oiled walnut form a storage wall around the picture window; the tubular pendant lights are bespoke. ‘Manila’ chairs by Lievore Altherr Molina for Andreu World surround the ‘Element’ dining table by Tokujin Yoshioka for Desalto. The Italian porcelain tile flooring continues throughout the ground level Family kitchen Tucked behind the main living space is this more informal dining area. The built-in seating is simply a concrete base topped with leather cushions, while the glass table is a custom piece designed by the architect. ‘Diamond Dimple’ chairs by Italian brand Kubikof (available from Clippings in the UK) and glass ‘Vonk’ lights by South African brand Woltemade add jewel-like touches to the otherwise utilitarian room Stockist details on p205 ➤

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‘THE HOUSE CAN INSTANTLY CHANGE ATMOSPHERE, BECOMING A COSY FAMILY HOME OR A GRAND ENTERTAINING VENUE’


Lounge This seating area features a leather sofa by South African brand Mezzanine Interiors and a glass-topped ‘Bell’ side table by Sebastian Herkner for Classicon; the other two tables are by Tonic Design Terrace The exterior wall is clad in silver granite, the ‘New Easy’ table is by Fast Spa and the chairs are by Christophe Pillet for Emu Stockist details on p205 ➤

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DESIGNS DECODED We take a closer look at three of this home’s key pieces 1 ‘Wallace’ chair by Jean-Marie Massaud for Poliform (2010) The French architect and designer’s ‘Wallace’ chaise longue redefines the archetype of the armchair. Its slouchy leather form resembles a soft quilt draped casually across a painted aluminium frame and its innovative yet organic shape reflects Massaud’s pursuit of simplicity and lightness in his work. Available in a selection of colours (poliform.it).

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2 ‘Copycat’ lamp by Michael Anastassiades for Flos (2015) This elegant light is made from two spheres: one a large orb in hand-blown opal glass; the other a smaller ‘copycat’ that hides the LED light source and comes in various finishes (polished aluminium, black nickel, copper and 24-carat gold). The design references Anastassiades’ passion for geometric forms, which he combines to create his perfectly balanced lighting sculptures. ‘Copycat’ is the latest of a clutch of Anastassiades’ designs for Flos, which include the ‘IC’ and ‘String’ lighting collections (see the latter in our Milan home on p164; flos.com)

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WORDS: JACKIE DALY

Bathroom A ‘Barcelona’ bath by Victoria + Albert stands beside glass doors that ofer idyllic treetop views. The matching basin echoes the tub’s shape, creating a cohesive scheme tempered by oak Vanity unit This bespoke piece has a polished brass countertop and integrated splashback, which supports a bevel-edged mirror with concealed LED lighting Bedroom A muted monochrome colour palette sets a restful tone. The panelling behind the bed is oiled oak and the table light is from Mezzanine Interiors Stockist details on p205

3 ‘Bell’ table by Sebastian Herkner for Classicon (2012) This design turns the structure of a conventional side table upside down: lightweight glass forms the base and the top can be finished in metal. Herkner trained in design in Germany before interning with fashion designer Stella McCartney; he set up his own studio in 2006. His ‘Bell’ tables epitomise an aesthetic that combines beautiful materials with traditional craftsmanship. The coloured glass has a jewellike quality, but imperfections such as bubbles are deliberately left on its surface to lend it tactility. The black crystal glass top can be finished in brass or copper (classicon.com). E D


‘ALL OF THE DETAILS, FROM THE BRASS VANITY UNIT TO THE CONCRETE WALLS, REQUIRED A LOT OF WORK TO ACHIEVE THE QUALITY THAT WE DESIRED’


DA R K M AT E R I A L S Mix rich velvet, black marble, smoky glass and touches of brass to steal the look of David and Jana’s Johannesburg home Photography BEN ANDERS Styling AMANDA SMITH-CORSTON

From left ‘Mad’ chair by Marcel Wanders, £1,637, Poliform (poliform.it). ‘Match’ console by Paola Vella and Ellen Bernhardt for Arflex, £1,900, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Sorry Giotto’ blue table lamp by Catellani & Smith, £486, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). Brass vases by Skultuna, from £110, Modern Society (themodernsociety.com). ‘Pila’ ceramic vase by Zaven, £55, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Cage’ marble and brass coffee table by Gordon Guillaumier for Tacchini, £1,581, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). Turquoise bottle by Tapio Wirkkala for Iittala, £175, SCP (scp.co.uk). Black box with brass lid, £25, Absolute Flowers and Home (absoluteflowersandhome.com). ‘Shanghai Tip’ chrome side table by Patricia Urquiola, £315, Moroso (moroso.it). Black box with copper lid, £25, Absolute Flowers and Home (absoluteflowersandhome.com). Red table, £249, Ferm Living (fermliving.com). Cabinet by Aimé Cécil and Pierre Dubois, £3,110, Roche Bobois (roche-bobois.com). Candlestick by Richard Hutten for Skultuna, £108, The Modern Society (themodernsociety.com). Green bottle by Tapio Wirkkala for Iittala, £189, SCP (scp.co.uk). Brass sculpture, £305, Absolute Flowers and Home (absoluteflowersandhome.com). ‘Decolorized’ rug by Golran, £5,040, Moroso (moroso.it). Black marble-topped table by Knoll, £1,833, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). ‘Tip of the Tongue’ table lamp by Michael Anastassiades, £780, SCP (scp.co.uk). ‘Brass Boule’ vase by Olivia Herms for Skultuna, £100, The Modern Society (themodernsociety.com). Tray by Hay, £16, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Piano’ chair by Vilhelm Wohlert, £545, Stellar Works (stellarworks.com). ‘Void’ pendant light by Tom Dixon, £310, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). ‘Mass’ book stand by Tom Dixon, £1,800, Heal’s (heals.com). ‘Lightline’ floor lights: small, £530; large, £769, both by Lucie Koldová for Brokis, Minotti London (minottilondon.com) E D


From left ‘Rialto 2013’ chest of drawers by Giuliano Cappelletti for Riva 1920, £3,905, Heal’s (heals.com). ‘Cubo’ tallboy with blue mirrored doors, £1,295, Another Brand (anotherbrand.co.uk). ‘New Order’ sideboard by Stefan Diez, £1,146, Hay (hay.dk). ‘Rankin’ black metal storage unit, £399, Made.com (made.com). ‘MHC1’ wood cabinet by Werner Blaser for Molteni & C, £4,320, Chaplins (chaplins.co.uk). ‘Tama’ black lacquered ash and brass unit by Carlo Colombo, from £3,710, Gallotti & Radice (gallottiradice.it). ‘Design Project 004’ three-drawer oak highboard, £899, John Lewis (johnlewis.com). ‘Cute’ white three-drawer unit, £509, Bloomingville (bloomingville.com) ➤


NEW ORDER You can never have too much storage. Meet 22 of the best new-season sideboards, cabinets and cupboards that make a style statement out of hiding away your clutter

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NEW ORDER From left ‘Haze Vitrine’ glass storage unit, £1,226, Ferm Living (fermliving.com). ‘Kin Tall’ cupboard by Mathias Hahn for Zeitraum, from £4,670, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). ‘40/40’ white ash and brass sideboard by Bartoli Design for Laurameroni, £8,000, Chaplins (chaplins.co.uk). ‘Tip’ lacquered black and white unit by Daniel Debiasi, from £703, Lema (lema-uk.com). ‘Wireframe’ oak, walnut and white lacquer cabinet by Draga & Aurel, £8,196, Baxter (baxter.it). ‘Svelto’ oak sideboard with walnut doors, £1,795, Ercol (ercol.com) ➤

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NEW ORDER From left ‘Ludwig’ brass and mirror cabinet by Andrea Parisio, £6,600, Meridiani (meridiani.it). ‘Riesling’ walnut and brass cabinet, £30,150, Armani/Casa (armanicasa.com). ‘Lloyd’ sideboard by Jean-Marie Massaud, £8,832, Poltrona Frau (poltronafrau.com). ‘Frame’ grey metal and oak cupboard by Alain Gilles for Bonaldo, from £4,200, Go Modern (gomodern.co.uk). ‘Segno’ red cabinet by Annalisa Dominoni and Benedetto Quaquaro, £1,937, Baleri (baleri.it). ‘Lixhult’ yellow and grey metal cabinets, from £15 each, Ikea (ikea.com). ‘Ipercolore’ sideboard by Piero Lissoni, £6,805, Porro (porro.com) E D

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Decorated in a palette of moody hues that reflect the calm of the coast, this Swedish family home is filled with treasured heirlooms, bold artworks and punchy patterns Words HANNAH BOOTH Photography ANDREA PAPINI/HOUSE OF PICTURES Styling KRISTIN LAGERQVIST

Living room The walls are painted in ‘Krickelin Haze Blue’ by Belgian brand North Sea Paints: try Little Greene’s ‘Pale Wedgwood’ for similar in the UK. The rug and cushions are all by Chhatwal & Jonsson, while the rocking chair and cofee table are from the Swedish auction house Bukowskis. These vintage pieces are mixed with two modern lights by House Doctor: a glass pendant and black wall lamp. The cabinet (above) is topped with Bitossi ceramics, available from Liberty Stockist details on p205 ➤


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arberg reminds me of Australia’s Byron Bay – only in Sweden,’ says blogger and photographer Kristin Lagerqvist of the Swedish west coast beach resort she calls home. ‘It’s surrounded by endless sea and sky and is full of creative types.’ Kristin’s 1920s house nestles in Varberg ’s old town. The property had abundant character even before the family moved in, with its high ceilings, aged wood floors, period cornicing and big windows. As soon as they were handed the keys, Kristin updated the façade with a splash of sunny yellow paint, ‘in keeping with the bohemian spirit of the area’. The décor inside is true to Scandinavia, where muted blue tones are often used to enhance the cool northern light – and to boost the mood. Kristin lives with her banker husband, Jonas, their three sons Simon (17), Otto This is a family home in the truest sense, a place (10) and Igor (six) and Siv, the cat. Theirs is a family home in the truest sense – a place that puts those who enter at ease with its comfortable that puts those who enter at ease with its furniture, heirloom pieces and quirky knick-knacks comfortable furniture, family heirlooms and collections of interesting knick-knacks. Kristin’s grandmother’s crystal chandelier twinkles in the oice and her porcelain crockery is used every day in the kitchen. Artworks created by family and friends add more personal touches. ‘Almost all of my pictures are meaningful in some way; they each have a story,’ Kristin explains. Friends have even donated the odd classic design piece, such as the vintage Swedish ‘Bumling’ pendant light that hangs in the kitchen. ‘I was admiring one at my friend’s house when her husband suddenly disappeared into the garage and produced an identical one for me. It turned out they had a spare!’ Kristin recalls. The layout of the house is perfect for large gatherings: the ground-floor rooms flow into one another, both physically and in terms of the colour scheme. ‘We chose diferent tones and wallpapers for each room but mostly in blue, so they connect without being too similar,’ Kristin says. The blue living room leads into a simple whitewashed dining room that is a momentary pause before the kitchen: an intimate space decorated with a gold-and-green William Morris ‘Chrysanthemum’ wallpaper. The family oice also connects to the dining room, but has a more vibrant aesthetic thanks to friend and designer Emma Von Brömssen’s ‘Dancing Crane’ wallpaper and a vintage blue Chesterfield sofa. The wide windowsills, which are typical of Swedish houses, are put to good use as display areas for plants, books and accessories. This is a dream home for the family, and one, it would seem, that they were fated to own. ‘Jonas was raised in Varberg, and always said that if this house ever came up for sale he would love to buy it,’ Kristin says. ‘Here we are!’ kristinlagerqvist.com

Dining room The marble-topped table is the focal point of the space: find a similar design at Loaf. The glass light above is Verner Panton’s classic ‘VP Globe’ for Verpan (available from Skandium in the UK). The chairs are vintage, while the selection of artwork on the wall includes pictures taken by homeowner Kristin (pictured above) and Swedish photographers Hannah Lemholt and Mikael Pilstrand. The sliding door to the lounge is painted a dark blue (Farrow & Ball’s ‘Drawing Room Blue’ is a good match). The painting behind Kristin is by her friend and artist Lisa Burenius Stockist details on p205 ➤

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‘ We’re relaxed about mess and clutter, and always have visitors. I want people to feel they can have a good time here. It’s a house to live in’

Oice The pattern-filled space is decorated in ‘Dancing Crane’ wallpaper by family friend Emma von Brömssen. The desk and dresser are vintage (try Danish Homestore). The pendant light is an heirloom from Kristin’s grandmother, and Kristin found the blue Chesterfield sofa at a local vintage store (try Distinctive Chesterfields for similar) Kitchen The white cabinetry, which is teamed with William Morris’s ‘Chrysanthemum’ wallpaper, conjures a cosy, convivial feel. The vintage brass ‘Bumling’ pendant light is a classic Swedish design (find new ones at Royal Design). Simple metro tiles (try Fired Earth for similar) add a crisp edge to the aesthetic. The mismatched chairs include Børge Mogensen’s ‘J39’ designs (find new versions at Aram Store). For a similar kitchen with marble worktops, try John Lewis of Hungerford Stockist details on p205 ➤

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Love the cool blues and calming patterns in this coastal home? Here are the wallpapers, paints and tiles that give it its Scandinavian charm

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Entrance hallway The flower-festooned space is decorated with Designers Guild’s colourful ‘Seraphina’ wallpaper. For similar polished tiles, try ‘Pireough’ mirrored porcelain by Tile Valley Stockist details on p205

PHOTOGRAPHY: HEARST STUDIO STYLING: ALEX KRISTAL

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1 ‘Seraphina’ wallpaper, £68 for a ten-metre roll, Designers Guild (designersguild.com) 2 ‘Retro Metro’ tiles, £74.98 per square metre, Fired Earth (firedearth.com) 3 ‘Ithaque’ wallpaper in ‘COS23’, £92 for a ten-metre roll, Nobilis (nobilis.fr) 4 ‘Sage Green’ linen wallpaper by Boråstapeter, £29 for a 10.5-metre roll, Select Wallpaper (selectwallpaper.co.uk) 5 ‘Drawing Room Blue’ paint, £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) 6 ‘Woad 251’ paint, £38 for 2.5 litres, Little Greene (littlegreene.com) 7 ‘Dancing Crane’ wallpaper by Emma von Brömssen for Eco Wallpaper, £39 for a 10.5-metre roll, Scandi Living (scandiliving.com) 8 ‘Grey Sparkle Quartz’ tile, £49.94 per square metre, Walls and Floors (wallsandfloors.co.uk) 9 ‘Chrysanthemum Toile’ wallpaper in ‘Grape/ Bronze’, £62 for a ten-metre roll, Morris & Co. (william-morris.co.uk)

Top A sage green wallpaper from Boråstapeter’s ‘Linen’ collection (stocked Select Wallpaper in the UK) decorates the main bedroom Above The dramatic ‘Ithaque’ wallpaper by Nobilis features sailing ships and horses in the waves Stockist details on p205 ➤

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Main bedroom Plants in macramé-hung pots trail across the window. The linen bedding is from Merci in Paris – try Society Limonta in the UK (stocked at Harrods) for similar. The wall is decorated with a silk kimono that hangs from a brass hook in the shape of a dragonfly Igor’s bedroom The walls in Kristin’s youngest son’s room are painted in a rich blue that matches the bedding. Try Dulux’s ‘Sea Blue’ for a similar shade and pair with a crisp white such as Farrow & Ball’s ‘All White’. The canopy of fabric draped over the head of the bed is from Mokkasin.com and injects a spicy shot of mustard into the dark scheme. For a similar Moroccan rug, try Altai Stockist details on p205 E D

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Exterior This cylindrical home is clad in Western Red Cedar and raised on slim Corten steel legs. Gardens, grassland and ponds surround the house, which is accessed via a ramp to the side ➤


Perched on a hillside in Cape Town woodland, this treehouse-inspired home offers its owner peace, tranquillity and beautiful views of Table Mountain Words TRISH LORENZ Photography GREG COX/BUREAUX.CO.ZA/LIVING INSIDE Styling SVEN ALBERDING


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ape Town is a city where you feel a strong connection with the natural world. From its high mountains to its wild beaches, the South African capital has a temperate climate and a laid-back lifestyle. It is here, on a plot of mature woodland in the upmarket neighbourhood of Constantia, that businessman Graham Paarman commissioned architecture firm Malan Vorster to design a home that would make the most of the area’s scenery. Completed in March, following a three-year design and build project, the three-storey, 126-square-metre property is a raised, architecturally striking design inspired by treehouses. ‘Despite being just a ten minute drive from the city centre, it has a wonderful rural feel about it,’ says Graham. Built on one of the highest inclines on the plot, the new house sits beautifully in the surrounding woodland and grasses thanks to a red cedar-clad exterior and slim legs made of tough Corten steel, which has a weathered, natural finish. ‘We wanted the house to blend in to the backdrop, not stand out,’ says architect Pieter Malan. Inside, the first floor is an open-plan living, dining and kitchen area with a small balcony that frames amazing views of Table Mountain: it’s the perfect spot for breakfast. The doubleheight glass doors slide apart, so that two-thirds of the room is open to the outdoors. ‘There are no conventional walls in the house,’

says Pieter. ‘Your eye is constantly drawn outside. This makes the space feel larger than it really is and it’s very serene inside. You feel like you’re floating in the treetops.’ As you ascend the winding wooden staircase to the bedroom and bathroom on the second floor and the top-floor terrace, the treehouse design comes into its own. The bedroom has a raised bed surrounded by curved wooden walls, creating the sensation of being cradled by the branches of the trees. ‘I spend a lot of time in here,’ says Graham. ‘It’s a privilege to be woken by birdsong and the sound of squirrels clambering over the house, and to be able to see the amazing sunrises over the mountains.’ Naturally, wood is a key material throughout the interior, and furniture is kept neutral and understated – this design is all about allowing the natural world to have the upper hand. Graham likens his home to a cocoon and says that living here has had a big impact on his life. ‘The house has had a transformative efect on my lifestyle. It’s a sanctuary that’s far removed from the noise and disruption of daily life,’ he explains. With the South African summer fast approaching, he’s already making plans to enjoy the space with friends. ‘I’m looking forward to entertaining on the terrace, indulging in one of our local white wines, enjoying the sunshine and the views of the mountains in the distance,’ he says.

Living area The open-plan first floor has a galley-style ‘Sine Tempore’ kitchen by Valcucine. Copper taps from Vola add a modern accent to the natural wooden finish. The ‘Groundpiece’ sofa is by Flexform, as is the ‘Guscio Soft’ lounge chair and ottoman (try Aram Store in the UK). The square ‘G3’ metal-and-marble cofee table and the copper ‘Wander’ standing lamp are both by Roche Bobois. For a similar wood-burning stove try Chesney’s Stockist details on p205 ➤

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A R C H I T E C T ’ S D E TA I L S TREEHOUSE-STYLE LIVING

Pieter Malan of Malan Vorster Architecture Interior Design tells us about what makes this home unique What motivated the treehouse design? The owner, Graham, was inspired by the woodland location, and by a book that he’d recently read about treehouses. He commissioned us to create an architectural interpretation of this for him. The design we came up with blends into its setting. Why does the house stand on stilts? We didn’t want it sit on the ground in the way that ordinary buildings do; we wanted it to float among the trees, so we used these very light and slim Corten steel legs to lift the house up amongst the leaves and branches. Why is the main living area cylindrical? The platform upon which the living room perches gives it a nest-like feel. The house had to feel natural and organic and the circular shape of the living space helped us achieve that. What kind of glazing is used? The house is single-glazed with solar reflective glass. We’re lucky here in that we don’t have severe winters, so we didn’t need double-glazing. We did, however, need to minimise the weight of the building, and glazing is quite heavy, so that played a part in the final decision on the glass. Is this an eco house? The hot water comes from a ground source heat pump [a system of pipes that bring warmth from underground to be used as a domestic heat source], but ecological issues weren’t the primary consideration here. The building is designed to age naturally. The wood and steel won’t require much maintenance – they’ll get more beautiful as they weather over the years. Tell us about the bespoke pieces in the house. The staircase was one of the trickiest elements to install. It has a lot of complex shapes and details, and the curved timber handrail was entirely handmade on site. The bed and headboard were also crafted in Cape Town and designed specifically to work with the building. One of the nicest things about this project is that so many pieces were handcrafted. It was a labour of love for all the people who worked on it. malanvorster.co.za

Dining area A ‘Container’ table by Moooi and ‘Feelgood’ chairs by Antonio Citterio for Flexform create a snug spot for two Staircase This twisting structure is made of laser-cut Corten steel and laminated oak blocks, with a wooden handrail handcarved on site by a specialist craftsman Balcony This ‘Mood’ chair from Tribu is the perfect place to sit and take in the amazing views Stockist details on p205 ➤


‘IT’S A PRIVILEGE TO BE WOKEN BY BIRDSONG AND THE SOUND OF SQUIRRELS CLAMBERING OVER THE HOUSE’

Bathroom This semi-circular timber-clad bathroom has an outdoor feel. At its heart is a wetroom with a ceiling-mounted shower rose. All of the fittings are by Vola. For a similar basin, try Duravit Bedroom The raised bed, headboard and bedside tables were designed by the architecture firm, Malan Vorster, and made by Versfeld Custom Furniture in Cape Town. The lamp is the ‘Lekto’ by Swedish brand Rubn (try Twentytwentyone in the UK) Stockist details on p205 E D

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Entrance hall Custom-made sliding glass doors framed in iron open onto the dining room. The original marble floor enhances the opulence of the apartment Dining room An antique table is surrounded by bronze chairs upholstered in velvet Dedar fabric. The wall of mirror was designed by the architects and teamed with crystal sconces, which the family inherited. The restored parquet floor is hand-painted in a natural grey wash Stockist details on p205 ➤


ITALIAN RENAISSANCE Restored to its former glory by local artisans, this magical Milanese apartment captures the city’s bygone beauty Words KARINE MONIÉ Photography MONICA SPEZIA/LIVING INSIDE Styling FRANCESCA DAVOLI


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magnificent marble staircase sweeps up to the entrance of this top-floor Milanese apartment, which is just a short stroll from the city’s famous Teatro Nazionale. Entrepreneur Enrico Guarnerio shares the opulent home with his two sons Guglielmo (right, 17) and Alberto (15), daughter Ginevra (11) and dog Wesley, but when he first viewed the flat, it was in a dilapidated state – its elegant reception area did not prepare him for the decrepit interior within. Fortunately, Enrico caught glimpses of architectural beauty buried beneath the dust and debris, and purchased the property. He commissioned architect Francesca Neri, who had worked with him previously on his Milan oice, to restore the apartment to its former glory. ‘As soon as Enrico showed me the space I fell in love with it and accepted the challenge,’ she says. Her team painstakingly restored the four-metre-high decorative ceilings and the original floors, windows and doors during a seven-month project. Francesca employed local artisans to bring the interior back to life, and many of the pieces that furnish it are bespoke. ‘Designing a home in Milan is something very special,’ she explains. ‘You have

The brass 1950s chandeliers in the living room were the starting point for the apartment’s opulent design scheme the best talents here. Every idea turns out better than you ever imagined. That’s the beauty of Italian craftsmanship.’ The two brass 1950s chandeliers in the living room were the starting point for the décor. Below these Sputnik-style lights are pink velvet sofas dressed with cushions in a graphic Dedar fabric that enhance the vintage vibe. The walls in the living and dining rooms are coated in a Champagne-coloured Marmorino Venetian stucco, a traditional lime-based plaster that provides a neutral counterpoint to some of the bolder, more contemporary colour choices in the house. Enrico’s study, for instance, is adorned with an emeraldand-gold Cole & Son wallpaper and the cloakroom is decorated with a bright red William Morris pattern. Shades of blue set a more serene tone in the bedroom. The Boi kitchen, although streamlined, does not feel clinical thanks to collections of artwork and family heirlooms, including silverware and crystal sconces. ‘For me, it is the mix of styles, textures and details that make an interior really special,’ says Francesca. Throughout the apartment, natural light shines across the handpainted floors and catches the crystals that cascade from low-hung lights: the overall ambience is timeless and ethereal. ‘I love every inch of this apartment,’ Francesca says. ‘It’s a home where elegance and period imperfection meet and make magic.’ fnafrancescaneri.com Living room The custom-made sofas in crushed pink velvet (and blue in the family room, where Ginevra sits) are teamed with cushions in Dedar’s ‘On the Edge’ fabric, which was also used to cover the two vintage Art Deco armchairs Stockist details on p205 ➤

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Champagne-coloured Marmorino plaster provides a neutral counterpoint to some of the more contemporary colour choices in the house

Hallway The plaster walls were handcrafted during the renovation. A chain of modern ‘String’ pendant lights by Michael Anastassiades for Flos hangs above Dining area The table is by Serbian designer Draga Obradovic Studio Cole & Son’s ‘Hicks’ Hexagon’ wallpaper adds a luxurious shot of colour. The grey armchair and metallic side table create a comfortable spot in the corner of the room Kitchen The Boi island and cabinetry have Calacatta marble worksurfaces. The extractor hood was clad in mirror by the architect Stockist details on p205 ➤

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M Y S E C R ET ADDRESS BOOK Homeowner Enrico’s guide to Milan’s best vintage furniture shops Girotto Cornici This is a magical place to source antique and new picture frames. The family are experts and frame artworks for private collections and museums. Via Maurizio Quadrio 12, 20154 Milan (girottocornici.com) Il Valore Aggiunto My friends own this vintage furniture boutique, which is housed in a loft space in Milan and has a wonderful mix of antiques and eclectic pieces of furniture, lights and accessories. Via Gofredo Mameli 3, 20129 Milan (ilvaloreaggiunto.it) Oicina Antiquaria Owner Luca Vitali specialises in unique pieces of furniture and objects dating from the 17th century to 1900, and from all over the world. Via Pietro Maroncelli 2, 20154 Milan (officinaantiquaria.com) Monika Unger Studio Monika is an interior designer whose studio also ofers a collection of Modernist furniture and lighting. I particularly love her 1950s lights. Via Morimondo 26, 20143 Milan (monikaunger.it) Altai This is the best place in the city to find beautiful Berber carpets. Galleria, Via Pinamonte da Vimercate 6, 20121 Milan (altai.it)

Bathroom Swathes of Arabescato Corchia marble (available from Stone Collection in the UK) are teamed with brass-framed mirrors and a crystal chandelier, which is a family heirloom Bedroom Calming blue walls are matched with bedlinen from Society Limonta. Try Habitat for similar grey linen curtains and Swoon Editions’ ‘Seymour’ table in brass and glass Stockist details on p205 E D

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HIGH DEFINITION Built into the side of a hill in a leafy north London conservation area, this RIBA award-winning home combines cutting-edge architecture with playful touches Words EMMA LOVE Photography HENRIK KNUDSEN


Exterior Approached by a bridge leading into the ground level, this house has amazing views over Hampstead Heath. The top level is cantilevered, appearing to float in the canopy of trees ➤


Living room The open-plan family space is divided into zones: this is the main seating area and features a ‘Charles’ corner sofa by Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia, and poufs by Habitat. The rotating fireplace (try Morley Stove Company) hangs from the six-metre-high ceiling Stockist details on p205


e wanted a home among the trees, somewhere the kids could run around,’ says Oscar-nominated film director Mehdi Norowzian as he recalls how he, his wife Elli and their three children, Elika (16), Maani (10) and Matissa (nine) came to live in north London’s Fitzroy Park, a conservation area located a stone’s throw from Hampstead Heath. The couple bought a 1950s house here eight years ago and knocked it down to make way for their dream project: a 556-square-metre four-bedroom home with a generous open-plan living space. The result, created with architectural practice Stanton Williams, is so innovative that it scooped a prestigious RIBA London award in 2014. The sloped angle of the plot was the starting point for the design. The building cuts into the hillside and its glass-framed entrance hall has privileged views over the treetops. The huge open-plan basement living area, which includes dining and kitchen zones, leads directly onto a manicured lawn through tall glass doors. The top floor, meanwhile, is cantilevered above the garden, with each of the bedrooms benefitting from its own balcony.

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A sense of playfulness runs throughout the interior: push one of the minimal wall panels that line the entrance hall and it pops open to reveal a cosy secret cinema; nudge another to access the family’s oice. ‘We like houses to have fun elements,’ says Mehdi. ‘Maybe we’re chaotic as a family, but we love properties where everything is easy and integrated.’ The natural surroundings influenced the interior of the house as much as its architecture, and Elli (who trained as an interior designer at Chelsea College of Art) guided the design from the start. ‘We used a lot of mid-tones instead of white, with plenty of texture so that our home is warm and comforting.’ she says. The couple also love to entertain, especially outside in the summer, surrounded by the rockery and a soothing water feature. ‘You ask yourself why you commit to the process of building a house and the answer is quality of life,’ says Mehdi. ‘As we drive up the lane to our home, we can feel the stillness. All that you can hear is the sound of the birds – and that makes us happy.’ stantonwilliams.com ➤ NOVEMBER 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 175


Living area . The lights suspended above are Moooi’s ‘Random’ pendants by Bertjan Pot. The white leather B&B Italia sofa in the background is part of the cosy TV area Kitchen/dining area The lights above the island are opal and clear glass ‘Neverending Glory’ pendant lamps by Jan Plecháč and Henry Weilgus, from The Conran Shop; try Nicholas Anthony for a similar handleless kitchen. The French farmhouse-style table and chairs are all antiques purchased in west London Stockist details on p205 ➤


‘WE LOVE DOUBLEHEIGHT ROOMS AS THEY ALLOW YOU SPACE TO BREATHE, AND OPEN ZONES ARE PERFECT FOR ENTERTAINING’

POOL TERRACE KITCHEN

FAMILY ROOM

MAIN BEDROOM

LIVING AREA CINEMA GARAGE

ENTRANCE HALL

BASEMENT

GROUND FLOOR

FIRST FLOOR

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‘YOU ASK YOURSELF WHY YOU COMMIT TO THE PROCESS OF BUILDING A HOUSE AND THE ANSWER IS QUALITY OF LIFE’


Ground floor (from left) The staircase is tucked at the end of the property to make the most of the open-plan design. In the entrance hall, a minimal panel opens to reveal a secret corridor – painted in a vibrant yellow hue, it leads to the oice. The reception area is furnished with wire chairs by French artist Gérard Coquelin, and a rug by Angelo Contemporary Rugs (sold by Benuta in the UK); Elli sits at the grand piano Stockist details on p205 ➤

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‘WE USED A LOT OF MID-TONES INSTEAD OF WHITE, WITH PLENTY OF TEXTURE SO THAT OUR HOME IS WARM AND COMFORTING’

Child’s bedroom Each of the rooms has an en-suite and a balcony overlooking the garden Bathroom This sleek, streamlined wood-clad space also doubles as a steam room. The panelling around the bathtub conceals storage and the skylight above the tub is perfectly positioned to flood the room with light Main bedroom The space is furnished simply, allowing the views to take centre stage. The couple have a separate dressing room along the corridor


OUR FAVOURITE THINGS

Elli and Mehdi tell us more about how they spend time in and around their London home A perfect day at home involves lounging by the fireplace, reading the newspapers or Sunday lunch when the barbecue is on, the beer is chilling and you know that friends are coming over. We spend the most time in our oice or the kitchen. Even when we’re not entertaining, we do a lot of cooking. We also tend to eat in the

kitchen as a family. I cook Persian stews with safron and lots of herbs, but Mehdi experiments with Japanese and Chinese dishes. Last week he cooked seafood pasta; it was so amazing, I felt like I was in Italy [Elli]. My favourite pieces are my 35mm cameras. I’ve been collecting them forever and I use quite a lot of them. I like to think of them as little boxes that capture a person’s history, their dreams and good times. I just wish they could talk – they’d tell amazing stories [Mehdi]. Our favourite memory here is of Christmas 2014. It was our first festive

season in the house. Mehdi ordered a tree online and when it arrived it was huge. It took three guys to help us get it in the house. It was wonderful [Elli]. We shop at the Iranian Hormuz Grocery Store on Finchley Road, which is a 15-minute drive away. Last Christmas we bought our meat from Hampstead Butcher & Providore (hampsteadbutcher.com), but mostly we tend to go to Notting Hill to shop. We lived there for so many years and the owners of the local shops know us – our favourite place is the Lisboa Patisserie on Golborne Road. E D

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LETTER TO THE PAST The old-world charm of this 18th-century post office is complemented by its current owner’s collection of rare antiques, unique furniture and quirky curios Words ALI MORRIS Photography WARREN HEATH/LIVING INSIDE Styling SVEN ALBERDING/BUREAUX.CO.ZA


Porch This outdoor room is furnished with vintage finds and metal furniture designed by homeowner Cobus (pictured) – he created the ‘Modernistic Ladder’ chair and the lantern hanging over the table. For similar garden furniture in the UK, try Violet Grey. Source salvaged planters and benches from Lassco Stockist details on p205 ➤


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radled by the majestic Kleinrivier mountains, Stanford is a quiet South African outpost an hourand-a-half’s drive from Cape Town. Tempted by its stunning scenery and laid-back lifestyle, artist and interior designer Cobus van Niekerk moved here 16 years ago. He opened his antiques shop, The Stanford Trading Store, and made this former post oice, situated opposite the village church, his home. As soon as he moved in, he set about ripping out the new kitchen, false plywood ceilings and carpets that the previous owner had installed. ‘The builders thought I was mad,’ he recalls, ‘but when the renovations revealed the beautiful original ceilings and architectural features that had long been hidden, they changed their minds. The building dates back to 1760, which is very old for South Africa.’ From the street, visitors arrive at a long colonnaded porch that Cobus calls his ‘stoop’, because it reminds him of the entrance to an old-fashioned guesthouse. This welcoming outdoor room has a classic chequerboard tiled floor and is furnished with flea-market treasures and Cobus’s own creations, including metal furniture and a lantern that hangs low over a small dining table.

‘I like an old-world feel as it puts me at ease. It’s the memories of people who lived, used and worked with a piece that make it special. Still, I’m not precious about any of it – if something breaks, I won’t cry about it’ Inside, the property’s T-shaped layout allows for clear views from one end of the house to the other, and Cobus’ collections of antique furniture and ephemera are beautifully composed against a neutral backdrop of wooden floorboards, natural cement walls and reclaimed Carrara marble surfaces. Several of the rooms are painted in a dark charcoal shade that enhances the sense of warmth and intimacy. ‘The walls were white for many years – I can’t quite believe I waited so long to paint them black,’ he says. ‘It brings an incredible richness to the space.’ Many years have passed since Cobus moved to Stanford, but he remains happily entrenched in the post oice with Seuntjie, his Irish terrier, whose name means ‘boy’ in Afrikaans. He admits, however, to relentlessly rearranging his home: he plans to build another floor (a staircase has already been installed in readiness for the project), and is in the process of moving his shop into his home studio. ‘I love to play around with beautiful things,’ says Cobus of the world that he has created around him. ‘I guess I’m still a little boy playing with his matchbox cards – that’s where this passion for collecting all began.’

This page The circular Georgian rosewood table, a family heirloom, takes pride of place in the open-plan living space. The two modern chairs are second-hand – the ‘Fil’ chairs by Ligne Roset at Heal’s are similar. A selection of Cobus’s own alabaster urn sculptures are arranged on top of the table Opposite A wall in the sitting room is finished in natural cement, framing the fireplace beautifully. A 19th-century Federal Eagle mirror hangs above the mantelpiece (1st Dibs has original pieces) Stockist details on p205 ➤

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‘I can’t believe I waited so long to paint the walls black. It brings an incredible richness to the space’

Dining room A World War II steel helmet used as a cloche sits on the sideboard. The mahogany table is originally from England (try Elisabeth James Antiques for pieces). Above the doorway to the kitchen is a salvaged Victorian ceiling plate: painted white, it adds a decorative element to the dramatic black scheme. The bar stools, visible through the doorway, are made from old table legs Stockist details on p205 ➤


Kitchen A shelf made from rustic timber displays the homeowner’s collection of copper pans (John Lewis has a good selection of new copper cookware). The island is topped with Carrara marble and the pendant light is made from two basins and a cocktail shaker Stockist details on p205 ➤


A backdrop of natural cement walls and Carrara marble surfaces allows Cobus’s collections to shine


M Y S E C R ET ADDRESS BOOK Cobus tells us where to look for beautiful homewares in Cape Town Weylandts Home Local Capetonians Chris Weylandts and Kim Smith manufacture and sell luxury products inspired by their travels in Asia and Africa. Corner of Alfred and Hospital Streets, Greenpoint, Cape Town 8001 (weylandts.co.za) Karoo Moon Country Store This place is full of one-of-a-kind vintage treasures handpicked by owner Desiree Ward-Smith. The Old Biscuit Mill, 375 Albert Road, Cape Town 7915 (theoldbiscuitmill.co.za) Vamp Just along from the Old Biscuit Mill, this gem is great for mid-century furniture. 368c Albert Road, Woodstock, Cape Town 7915 (vampfurniture.blogspot.co.uk) Luvey’n Rose I go here for vintage pieces and beautiful views of the city. It’s wonderful to wander around antique furniture and Persian carpets while enjoying a fresh cofee or even a Cuban cigar. 66 Loop Street, Cape Town 7405 (luveynrose.co.za) Cécile & Boyd Housed in a renovated Arts and Crafts house in Tamboerskloof, this lifestyle store sells elegant furnishings and rustic objects that are beautifully curated. 26 Kloof Nek Road, Cape Town 8001 (cecileandboyds.com) E D

Studio Vintage mirrors (try Oka’s ‘Oban’ for a similar round one) and wooden columns are arranged in the doorway. The alabaster sculptures displayed on the table (right) are all by homeowner Cobus Bedroom Irish terrier Seuntjie relaxes on the four-poster bed, which was made locally to the homeowner’s design. A cement plate, painted black, is mounted on the headboard, which is made from an old stable door. The homeowner found the wooden bedside tables at an auction, and stripped and varnished them himself. The bedlinen is from Ralph Lauren Home Stockist details on p205

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A RTS • CULTUR E • BOOKS • TR AV EL

ESCAPE TRAVELLING MIGHT

PICTURE: LOUIS VUITTON MALLETIER/GREGOIRE VIEILLE

Take a tour of the golden era of travel with Volez, Voguez, Voyagez (Assouline, £32), a new compendium cataloguing Louis Vuitton’s elegant travelwear over the years. ‘There is no fantasy or extravagance that cannot be packed,’ it states, and its pages prove the point. Among the highlights are this 1906 trunk (below), which features the brand’s LV logo; a 1930 version with a pop-out desk; and an even larger 1936 portable library that contains a bookshelf, typewriter and pen holders. The prize for the best product name, however, goes to an 1890s cowhide overnight bag appropriately dubbed ‘The Neverfull’.

F O R M O R E P L A C E S T O E X P L O R E , V I S I T E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K / E S C A P E


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THE WORLD’S MOST OPULENT HOTEL In Vietnam’s most buzzing city, Ho Chi Minh, a businessman dreamt of building a new luxury hotel from scratch, which he considered would only be possible with the help of Italian craftsmanship. The result? The Reverie Saigon, a stunning clash of cultures with 286 rooms and 89 suites. The list of collaborators on this project reads like a who’s who of Italian design. Suites have been created by Giorgetti, Cassina and Visionnaire, and 12 kilometres of Rubelli fabrics and wallcoverings have been used in the decoration. Vast monoliths of Bolivian blue marble hold up doorways (above) and, to prevent style from overwhelming substance, a feng shui master was called in to perfectly map out the space. From £270 per night (thereveriesaigon.com).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: MATTHEW SHAW

PA I N T I T F O R WA R D The son of British artist Julian Trevelyan has found a way to continue his legacy and that of his artist wife Mary Fedden (right). He plans to turn their former home and studio into a not-for-profit business where postgraduate students will become artists in residence. For over 40 years, Fedden, who specialised in still lifes, and Trevelyan, who painted Surrealist scenes, lived in a cottage-style outhouse overlooking the River Thames at Chiswick, London. The building will be redeveloped by Turner Prize-winning architecture practice Assemble using funds raised by a Sotheby’s auction on 23 November. A gorgeous mix of artworks belonging to and painted by the couple will be up for sale, including an etching given to the them by Picasso; Fedden’s illustrations for the 1997 story Motley the Cat; and Trevelyan’s Sheds (left), as well as his ‘Jekyll’ landscapes and ‘Hydes’ canvases. Head to the Bond Street gallery for the pre-sale view on 18–22 November (sothebys.com).

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G O F O R S I LV E R

PICTURES: TONY GILBERT, MORLEY VON STERNBERG, NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY LONDON

Magpies make haste to Bath’s Holburne Museum for its new exhibition ‘Silver: Light and Shade’, which takes visitors through 500 years’ worth of objects made from the precious metal. Rare historical pieces such as a beautiful 1700 tea bowl and saucer (above right) by Mark Paillet rub shoulders with 20th-century designs by Archibald Knox (candlestick, centre) and new pieces by Kevin Grey (vase, left) and Hiroshi Suzuki (vase, centre). 22 October–22 January 2017 (holburne.org).

ART BEHIND B ARS This month’s highbrow arts destination? Reading Prison, which housed Oscar Wilde during his 1890s incarceration, and closed its gates in 2013. Organised by art funding body Artangel, ‘Inside: Artists and Writers in Reading Prison’ sees the Victorian building’s corridors and cells transformed into museum spaces for new works by leading creatives such as filmmaker Steve McQueen and photographer Wolfgang Tillmans. Letters by the likes of Ai Weiwei and Jeanette Winterson can be read or listened to and every Sunday Wilde’s letter De Profundis will be spoken aloud in the prison chapel by a diferent performer: Ralph Fiennes and Maxine Peake are both on the list. Until 30 October (artangel.org.uk).

WELCOME TO MIAMI Now is the time to visit this Florida metropolis, as Design Miami sees creatives, products and pageantry take over from 30 November–4 December. We reveal the sights not to be missed V I S I T Faena Forum, an arts and culture institution designed by

Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas, is the latest launch in cult hotelier Alan Faena’s eponymous South Beach district. Built like a Roman forum, the circular structure will host everything from dance performances to debates, street food pop-ups and concerts. The pink-marble-floored edifice launches during DesignMiami and thereafter will ofer a public arts programme (faena.com). S TAY Casa Claridges in Faena (above) looks like a 20th-century Havana hotel on the outside, but inside reveals eye-catching red suites and a colonial-style whitewashed courtyard full of bold artworks and leopard-print footstools (doubles from £266 per night; faena.com). Beyond Faena, in a 1950s building on South Beach restored by design studio Arquitectonica, Hotel Nautilus (right) has an elegant saltwater swimming pool and, inside, marries tropical charm with luxe materials to great efect. Palm trees hang over teal velvet banquettes in the lobby and rooms are refreshingly pared back (doubles from £148 per night; sixtyhotels.com/nautilus-south-beach). E AT Head to Ariete (below), which serves what it calls ‘Sunday-supper-style meals’ such as farmhouse rolls, tomatoes and burrata and kale tortellini in a bright, airy dining room (arietemiami.com). Klima, meanwhile, is a trendy-yet-welcoming Barcelona-inspired brasserie with a menu featuring jamon iberico, fennel carpaccio and Crema Catalana for pudding. Flos lights hang above comfy cushioned benches and Vitra chairs (klimamiami.com).

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GOLD AND DELICIOUS By the time you read this, the best, boldest and most beautiful restaurants and bars that have opened across the world in the last 12 months will have been declared champions at the 2016 Restaurant and Bar Design Awards. Here, we’ve cherry-picked five of our favourite venues from the UK shortlist (restaurantandbardesignawards.com).

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1 THE PRINTING PRESS, EDINBURGH

In a majestic George Street townhouse, this grand bistro brings a touch of old-world dining to the Scottish capital thanks to its polished herringbone flooring, Art Deco-style chandeliers and decorative plasterwork. The restoration was overseen by design firm Goddard Littlefair, which explains the attention to detail and luxe finishes – it has also just revamped much of Scotland’s grande dame Gleneagles Hotel. Dishes are cooked with ingredients from ‘Scotland’s larder’ – think North Sea cod and citrusy sea buckthorn tart (printingpressedinburgh.co.uk). The wacky name alerts diners to the eccentric interior on view at the newest outpost of north London’s pioneering Pan Asian restaurant brand. Monochrome graphics line the walls, floors and tabletops in the bar area, but another section is pure crimson, including gloss walls and matching pendant lamps. Both areas feature palm trees and bamboo aplenty. Like the décor, which was masterminded by Kingston Laferty Design, the menu is daring (tootomoo.co.uk). 3 G O U R M E T B U R G E R K I T C H E N , C A N T E R B U RY

Disproving the reputation chain restaurants have for being cookie-cutter replicas of more original venues is this wondrous burger joint. The menu won’t come as a surprise to GBK regulars, but the interior might: London design practice Moreno Masey has given the former cinema an overhaul, with reclaimed timber flooring, glossy tiled walls with marbled panels (pictured) and cosy leather banquettes (gbk.co.uk). 4 W I L D W O O D , P LY M O U T H

Architecture practice Gillespie Yunnie was asked to tread lightly on this Grade I-listed former military building in the Royal William Yard complex, which is slowly being restored. The result is a striking interior that puts the spotlight on rubble-stone walls, original timber trusses and worn paintwork, and makes a feature out of sturdy braced doors. Try the wild mushroom risotto or pop in to buy delicious locally sourced groceries from the attached deli (wildwoodrestaurants.co.uk). 5 A R C H I V E H O M E S T O R E & K I T C H E N , R A M S G AT E

Copenhagen or Kent? On the inside, this chalky-white pitch-roofed homeware shop and brasserie is pure Scandi, but step outside and you’ll see it is housed under a red brick Victorian archway in the coastal town of Ramsgate. Palest plywood cupboards and pendant lights hung from copper grids finish of the project by architecture firm Haptic, which, tellingly, has studios in both London and Oslo (archivehomestore.co.uk). 198 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK NOVEMBER 2016

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WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: GARETH GARDNER, HELEN CATHCART, RICHARD LEWISOHN, RICHARD DOWNER, GINA KENNEDY

4

2 TOOTOOMOO, LONDON


Escape | N E W S

THE CRAFT REVOLUTION There’s a raft of cool craft happenings this month, from new books that encourage DIY carving to breathtaking art-glass displays. Here’s how you can get involved B O O K S New title The Craft Companion (right, Thames & Hudson,

£24.95) is a comprehensive compendium for budding makers. Its 400 pages list the requisite tools, profile key designer-makers and ofer masterclasses in everything from felting and cross-stitch to gilding and marbling. Elsewhere, Max Bainbridge, co-founder of Forest & Found – winner in the Craft category at this year’s ELLE Decoration British Design Awards – has written The Urban Woodsman: A Modern Guide to Carving Spoons, Bowls and Boards (right, Kyle Books, £16.99), in which he extols woodcarving as a way of connecting with nature. FA I R ‘Handmade in Britain’ celebrates its tenth anniversary this year

with a two-for-one ofer on all advance tickets. Highlights include Kei Tominaga’s metalwork (‘Bud Dress’ vase, far right), Desa Philippi’s chalky white porcelain tableware (dinner set, right), and Mike Topham’s witty Alexander Calder-esque ‘wire illustrations’ (Mine, bottom right). 11–13 November, Chelsea Old Town Hall (handmadeinbritain.co.uk). O P E N S T U D I O Bow Arts, the philanthropic body that runs eight shared live-work spaces across east London, has opened a new venue in a Grade II-listed former library (top). The building has been converted by architecture firm Apparata. Working with Create London and Newham Council, artists run workshops and occasional open studios in exchange for their workspace (oldmanorparklibrary.org). E X H I B I T I O N On the edge of the North Yorkshire moors, in the picturesque market town of Kirbymoorside, sits Bils and Rye, a small but perfectly formed modern art gallery. This month, it is hosting an ‘Emerging Potters’ exhibition of work by little-known British artists. Our top picks include Judy McKenzie (top right) and Anne-Marie Jacobs (right). Until 31 October (bilsandrye.com).

THREE OF THE BEST PRINT EXHIBITIONS

‘Colour: The Art and Science of Medieval and Illuminated Manuscripts’ at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge showcases historical manuscripts from all over the world – ranging from 8th century Northumbria to 17th century Nepal – embellished with decorative initials, borders and marginalia. Until 30 December (fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk).

200 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK NOVEMBER 2016

‘The Book Beautiful: William Morris, Hilary Pepler and the Private Press Story’ at Ditchling Museum of Art + Craft has a particular highlight: fine-printing masterpiece The Works of Geofrey Chaucer designed by William Morris and leading Pre-Raphaelite artist Edward Burne Jones. Until 16 April 2017 (ditchlingmuseumartcraft.org.uk).

‘The Tale of Kitty-in-Boots’ at the House of Illustration in London ofers the chance to discover a lost Beatrix Potter tale. Quentin Blake has illustrated the new book, which has just been published by Penguin, and 50 of his drawings are on show alongside one of the two original Potter illustrations. Until 5 February 2017 (houseofillustration.org.uk).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: EMIL CHARLAFF, THE FITZWILLIAM MUSEUM/UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE, MARK HEATHCOTE, QUENTIN BLAKE

Revel in the art of bookmaking this month by visiting these inspiring shows


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ADVERTISING FEATURE

ST YLISH INTERIORS Design your home this month

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THE LAST WORD At ELLE Decoration we’re all self-confessed interiors fiends. Here, we reveal our current home obsessions, plus the products and projects we’ve been testing and tackling this month Photography Director Flora Bathurst is awaiting the delivery of her new statement light

MAKING AN ENTRANCE

Features Director Amy Bradford welcomes her new front door I was determined to have a proper Victorian-style wooden door on my house, and after a long search found someone to make it in sapele wood – Dalton Joinery in Kent (daltonjoinery.co.uk). I painted it with the perfect forest green – ‘Hunter Dunn’ oil gloss by Paint & Paper Library (£31 for 750ml; paintandpaperlibrary.com). The antique brass lion door knocker came from antiquedoorknockers.co.uk; the letterbox was £30 on Ebay; and the Yale locks and Victorian-style door number came from Amazon. Make sure you check that the lock you are buying is police/ insurance approved (the website should tell you) – not all the nicest looking ones are! My house is now like Fort Knox and the door is beautiful – it will probably be there as long as the house is standing.

‘I’ve just ordered this stunning new pendant light to hang over the kitchen island in my house, and I cannot wait for it to arrive. It’s big, at 150 centimetres long, and finished in brushed brass. The designer is a Danish brand called Anour (anour.dk), which is stocked in the UK at Simply Scandinavian (simply-scandinavian. co.uk). Very exciting!’ Chief Sub Editor Clare Sartin discovered a new favourite design brand on her travels From the Guggenheim Museum to the futuristic Philippe Starck-designed Azkuna centre, seemingly everywhere I went in Bilbao was showing love for local tableware brand Cook Play. I can see why. Its new “Yayoi” collection (right) is beautiful, organic, and afordable too – the four-piece porcelain set is £41 (cookplay.eu).

Deputy Chief Sub Editor Sarah Morgan’s latest Instagram find

‘The colourful photos of Yener Torun, or @cimkedi, are filling my Instagram feed with joy. Bold and bright, the architectural shots are a perfect pick-me-up on my daily grey commute.’ 218 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK NOVEMBER 2016


BAT H ROOM S Your essential guide to creating the perfect bathroom Pages of inspiration, new kit, great tech and the big trends Plus, the complete brand directory


BATHROOMS

CONTENTS 09

NEWS This season’s freshest ideas, from innovative materials to tubs designed for small spaces. Plus, how to plan your bathroom renovation and an expert guide to lighting 26

T E C H N OL O G Y The future of bathrooms revealed! Discover five cutting-edge products that promise to change your bathing experience, from the world’s smartest toilet to showering reimagined 32

DE TA I L S Want an instant update for your bathroom? Here we share the affordable accessories and investment buys that will help you master any look 40

MOR N I N G R I T UA L S Four experts across design, interiors and wellbeing tell us how they start their day and share the products, fittings and accessories they love 49

I N S PI R AT ION Step inside the world’s most beautiful bathrooms and discover unique, imaginative decorating – plus everything you’ll need to steal their style 86

DI R E C T ORY Try before you buy: our definitive guide to the best bathroom showrooms across the UK 96

STOCKISTS Love something you’ve seen? Find out where to buy it in our address book

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The bathroom was once the most no-nonsense, practical room of the home, where function ruled supreme. That’s no longer the case. Now it’s a sanctuary, a haven away from the hustle and bustle of daily life. It’s the place you start and end your day – on one hand somewhere to get energised and inspired, on the other a space where you can relax and unwind. It’s a room with many demands, and making it the best it can be is quite a feat. That’s why we’ve compiled ELLE Decoration Bathrooms, our first magazine dedicated to everything you need to create the perfect bathroom. Over these 100 pages you’ll find the latest trends, clever technology, insider guides and loads and loads of inspiration for your own bathroom project. And finally, there’s a complete list of the UK’s best brands and showrooms, where you can see the finest designs first-hand. Doing your kitchen? Download ELLE Decoration Kitchens – the essential guide to creating the perfect kitchen – available now for just £2.99 from the App Store* Editor-in-Chief M I C H E L L E O G U N D E H I N Deputy Art Director P H I L I P P E B L A N C H I N

Deputy Editor B E N S P R I G G S Art Director T O N Y P E T E R S

Junior Designer J A C K M E L R O S E

Features Director A M Y B R A D F O R D

Decorating Editor A L E X K R I S T A L

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Chief Sub Editor C L A R E S A R T I N

Photography Director F L O R A B A T H U R S T

Deputy Chief Sub Editor S A R A H M O R G A N

Photography Editor J A M E S W I L L I A M S

Decorating Intern S T E P H A N I E I L E S

PICTURE: ALL PRODUCTS SHOWN BY BOFFI (BOFFIUK.COM) AND DE PADOVA (DEPADOVA.COM) *FIRST PUBLISHED WITH THE APRIL 2016 EDITION

BATHROOMS


SHOPPING • DESIGN • NA MES TO KNOW • TECHNOLOGY • BIG IDEA S

NEWS

STRON G IS BEAUTIFUL The latest innovation in bathroom materials is Saphir Keramik, a new type of ceramic that is as strong as steel, meaning it can be used to create wafer-thin, minimalist bathroom products. Developed by Laufen over the past five years, the key to its super-strength – and its name – lies in a colourless mineral component that is also found in sapphires. Sleek and slender, this gold-glazed Saphir Keramik basin and black tap give this simple washtand a luxurious finish. From £446 for a white basin; from £354 for taps; ‘All Saints’ mirror in gold, £577; dark-oak vanity unit, £2,040, all Kartell by Laufen (laufen.co.uk).

F O R M O R E S T Y L I S H B AT H R O O M U P D AT E S , V I S I T E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K


Bathrooms | N E W S

C OL OU R WA S H Swedish brand Swoon has launched two freestanding vanity units, ‘Studio’ (right) and ‘Stone’ ( left), that come in ten gorgeous colours including Seal Grey and Seaweed Green ( both pictured). Available to order online and designed by Fredrik Wallner, the units are sold with a choice of stone and ceramic countertops, geometricshaped mirrors, storage options and matching washbasins designed by Claesson Koivisto Rune for Italian company Globo. Take the colour as a starting point for the rest of your room’s decoration – not just the walls, the fabrics and accessories too! From £760 for a small vanity unit (swoon.se).

T H E T I G H T- F I T T U B

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: KRISTOFER JOHNSSON, JOSE REQUENA JUAREZ, PHILIP ETHERDEN

ALL IN THE FINISH

With space at a premium in many UK homes, lots of bathroom brands are introducing slightly smaller versions of their most popular baths. The latest to catch our eye is The Albion Bath Company, which has released two of its luxurious roll-tops in smaller sizes. With standard baths measuring 170 centimetres and roll-tops often exceeding 180 centimetres, the new ‘Geminus Advance’ (left, 167 centimetres; £2,072) and the ‘Tubby Torre Duo’ (right, 150 centimetres; from £2,613) will both save you space without compromising on depth or style. Both designs are made from Iso Enamel, which is lighter than cast iron, and available in Dulux paint colours and metallic finishes (albionbathco.com).

Sometimes changing the smallest details can make the biggest diference, especially if it’s hardware you use every day. The sleek ‘Chelsea’ basin tap from Porcelanosa comes in gold, copper and chrome finishes, and will make even the most mundane basin shine. A modern take on metallic hues, its hexagonal base and faucet give the classic tap a contemporary twist. £375.60 for a single mixer tap (porcelanosa.com). 11


Bathrooms | N E W S

BASIN INSTINCT Bette’s latest freestanding washbasin may have an imposing name – the ‘BetteArt Monolith’ – but its seamless curved edges give it a delicate sculptural quality that is ideal for contemporary bathrooms. The creation, by Tessereux + Partner design studio in Germany, looks like it is carved from a block of pure white porcelain. In fact, it is made of a lightweight steel frame enamelled in ‘BetteGlaze’ – a glass-like finish that is highly durable and easy to clean. Want to complete the look? There’s also a matching bathtub. From £3,218 for washbasin (bette.co.uk).

FA DE T O GR E Y The ‘Maiolica’ collection by Iris Ceramica takes the rough-hewn beauty of Renaissance porcelain majolica (a form of tin-glazed earthenware characterised by ornate designs) and gives it a modern twist. With a mix of patterned and plain tiles to mix and match, in sizes from square to metro-style, you can create something unique. ‘Fantasia’ tiles, £32 per square metre (irisceramica.com).

Visit now ‘Soak, Steam, Dream: Reinventing Bathing Culture’, a new exhibition at London’s Roca gallery explores the history, future and societal impact of bathing culture from a design perspective. Stop by to see recent architectural projects including Peter Zumthor’s public baths in Vals, Switzerland, and Kengo Kuma’s coastal onsen spa in Yamagata, Japan. Until 28 January 2017 (rocalondongallery.com).

Concrete and brass are the ultimate combination for fans of raw, industrial style, but here Bert & May has taken a softer approach to the modern pairing. The brand’s new natural-pigment cast-concrete countertop basin is complemented by hand-polished, solid brass fixtures by Studio Ore that have a utilitarian shape. Team with conventional tiling or complete the look by attaching to a cast-concrete or marble shelf. The brass fixtures have been left deliberately unlacquered, so will develop a lovely patina over time. ‘Rho’ basin, £1,140; wall-mounted taps, from £726 (bertandmay.com).

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WORDS: EMMA LOVE

C O N T E M P O R A RY C L A S S I C


Bathrooms | N E W S

RAIL LIFE

WORDS: EMMA LOVE

For the ultimate slimline storage solution, choose the new ‘Dot Line’ rail from Agape. Simply fix the aluminium, wood-coated pole to the wall above the basin, and add hooks to hang handtowels and balance your toothbrush holder. From £872 for the bar, hooks and soap holder as pictured (agapedesign.it).

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Bathrooms | N E W S

H E AT WAV E Sleek, tactile, and available in 33 colours and finishes, Bisque’s new radiators are so much more unique than the standard chrome towel rail. The ‘Lissett’ is made of curved sections topped with chrome, and has minimalist brackets that allow the piece to sit flush to the wall. Opt for the smaller original version (below; from £439) in a compact room or, if you have space to spare, the larger ‘Lissett Towel’ ofers ample drying space (right, from £549 as pictured; bisque.co.uk).

Hot buy Cleaning the toilet is the worst bathroom chore, so make life easier with the wall-mounted ‘ME by Starck’ design by Philippe Starck for Duravit. It’s rimless, which enables a more powerful f lush without splashing – plus, you can select from three different water washes – and the seat has been coated with a ceramic Hygiene Glaze that kills 99.9 per cent of germs. From £1,480 (duravit.co.uk).

CARPET COVERAGE Looking for an attractive alternative to tiles? Try Limited Edition’s ‘Extreme’ and ‘Poolside’ jacquard woven waterproof coverings. Made from vinyl and glass fibres with a PVC backing, they are heavy-duty without compromising on style, and are available as a fitted floorcovering or a statement rug. Pictured: ‘Extreme’ in Licorice, £113 per square metre, Interior Supply (interiorsupply.co.uk).

Belfast sinks aren’t just for kitchens – the deep porcelain designs make great additions to a classic bathroom, too. Devol’s first collection of handmade ceramic sinks takes this traditional shape and adds a crackle glaze. There are four styles to choose from: some are slip-cast, which means the basin is set in a mould; others are slab built, which means the clay slabs are joined together before the sink is fired in the kiln. From £350 (devolkitchens.co.uk). 16

WORDS: EMMA LOVE

GLAZE UPON IT


Bathrooms | N E W S

C OA S TA L FLAIR Add a little Mediterranean flavour to your wall or floor with the new ‘Series S’ collection of colourful hand-painted tiles by Balineum. Celebrating the heritage of seaside port towns in places such as Amalfi and Portugal, the 90 designs feature traditional florals, decorative motifs and geometric patterns. Choose an eccentric mix of shapes and colours for a fun, vibrant look. From £380 per square metre (balineum.co.uk).

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Bathrooms | N E W S

T R AY C H IC

FOUR OF THE BEST SHOWERHEADS

Solve the dilemma of where to place products and potions with ‘Plateau’, Sebastian Herkner’s first bathroom range for Italian brand Ex.t. A simple side tray has been smoothly worked into the design of both the bath (£6,467) and basin ( from £913), meaning no more precariously balanced bubble bath or toothpaste. The new ‘Raso’ lamp ( from £226) and ‘Plateau’ mirror (£365) complete the set (ex-t.com).

Whether you prefer standing under a waterfall, or pivoting an adjustable jet, there’s a statement, modern design to suit

‘Closer’ showerhead by Diego Grandi, £1,078, Zucchetti Kos (zucchettikos.it)

‘Ametis Ring’ chrome rainfall showerhead, £8,546, Graf (graf-faucets.com)

Go digital Aqualisa Infinia’s new shower technology uses LED lighting and a super-slim control plate to indicate when the water has reached your pre-set temperature. You can also set your tub to fill without worrying that the water will overflow. £1,384 for single-outlet shower and accessories (aqualisa.co.uk).

The new ‘Boi Code’ bathroom collection by Piero Lissoni takes customisation to an entirely new level. A range of vanity units, which come in natural oak (pictured) or Canaletto walnut, can be tailor-made to suit your space. Pair with the new steel ‘Garden’ basin (pictured), which can be integrated seamlessly with the dark grey marble top, and choose from doors in a selection of finishes. Full bathroom from £15,000 (boiuk.com). 20

‘MGS SO612’ showerhead, from £7,820, Grange Design (grangedesign.com)

‘080 W’ showerhead by Vola, from £592, The Showroom Ltd (theshowroomltd.co.uk)

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: MAX ZAMBELLI, UMBERTO PASQUALE

SOURCE CODE


Bathrooms | N E W S

INSPIRED B Y I T A LY

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURE: KASIA GATKOWSKA

Stone specialist Salvatori has opened a London showroom, and it’s the perfect place to visit for bathroom inspiration. You’ll find a huge range of products on display, from shower trays and bathtubs to cabinets and basins. Salvatori’s expert craftspeople work with high-quality natural stone, including marble that has been excavated from quarries in northern Italy, where the company is based. Pictured: ‘Ninfa’ basin in Carrara marble, from £2,820; ‘Ciane’ shelves, £2,040, all from the ‘Fontane Bianche’ collection by Elisa Ossino (salvatori.it).

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Bathrooms | N E W S

A L L T H AT GL I T T E R S Make a grand statement with metallic mosaic wall tiles. The result can be stunning in both a classic and modern space, especially if you use a design such as these rhombus-shaped ‘Degradé’ tiles from the Sicis ‘Diamond’ collection. As well as precisely cut flat designs, the collection includes three-dimensional inserts that can be used to add texture. ‘Jog Degradé’ and ‘Yosemite Degradé’ mosaic tiles, £610 per square metre (sicis.com).

R O M A N B AT H S

HOVER CRAFT

Wall-mounted sink units are a saviour in small bathrooms, as a clear expanse of floor below creates the illusion of space. This minimalist design by Danish brand Vipp has the added bonus of ample storage – we particularly like the double drawers on the right, which are the perfect size for smaller items. Pair with a mirror in a matching powder-coated frame. From £2,700 (vipp.com). 24

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: SIMON WHITMORE, ANDERS HVIID

A freestanding bath is the ultimate hero piece and they don’t get more elegant than the ‘Warndon’, the latest addition to Victoria + Albert Baths’ ‘Traditional’ collection. Adopting the design details of a typical Roman bath, it has a ribbed rim and central taps. It’s made from Quarrycast, a stone-resin composite developed by the company that is scratch-resistant and retains heat for longer than cast iron – so there’s more time for soaking without worrying about the water getting cold. From £3,000 (vandabaths.com).


TECHNOLOGY FLUSH WITH PRIDE Japanese firm Toto has been making the world’s smartest toilets for 30 years, but now it has teamed up with Italian designer Stefano Giovannoni to create a throne that’s clever and super-stylish. Features include a self-cleaning ‘washing wand’, a heated seat and a deodoriser, all operated by remote control. What’s more, the bowl’s ‘CeFiONtect’ glaze helps to prevent bacteria build up. Easier cleaning? That is smart. £4,032 (gb.toto.com).

TA K E I T LY I N G D OW N The ‘Horizontal Shower ATT’ by Dornbracht challenges the received wisdom that showering is strictly a vertical activity. Like an at-home spa, it features six jets of water that can be choreographed to de-stress, balance or energise your body as you recline on the stone ledge. The design is handy, as you may require a lie-down when you see the price tag. £22,230, West One Bathrooms (westonebathrooms.com). Buy this Digital bath and shower controls help to reduce water consumption – that’s good for the planet and your household bills. CP Hart’s ‘eMoto’ enables you to pinpoint the precise temperature and flow of the water, or program your favourite setting to ensure a perfect morning shower every time. You can even start the bath running from bed using the free app. From £1,629 (cphart.co.uk).

HOT STUFF

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GIVE IT A WHIRL Love the idea of a relaxing whirlpool bath, but put of by ugly nozzles? The ‘Mia’ bath by Matteo Nunziati for Teuco is the sleek update you’ve been waiting for. Discreet ultra-thin slits spray out water at a pressure that mimics the feel of a gentle massage. £2,595, West One Bathrooms (westonebathrooms.com).

WORDS: TOM BAILEY

Few things are more delightful than slipping into a warm bathrobe after a shower. The aluminium ‘Secretaire’ by Ad Hoc not only heats your bathroom but stores robes and towels so that they are always toasty. Part airing cupboard and part radiator, with a full-length mirror on the front, this is a great multifunctional piece of furniture that will add luxury to bath time. £2,075, Arred Italy (arreditaly.com).


Bathrooms | N E W S PROJECT PLANNING

BAT H RO O M BREAKDOWN Angela Cheung, senior buyer, and Daniel Cook, principal development designer at CP Hart give us their top tips for managing a redesign (cphart.co.uk) Where do I start? Set a budget and draw a plan of your current bathroom, marking out any windows, radiators and existing plumbing. This will help you gauge the scale of the changes you are proposing, as well as the feasibility of your ideas. Architectural details, such as windows and doors, are not easily changed, so it essentially sets the framework in which you need to design your bathroom. Then consider what kind of style you’d like and, importantly, how your new bathroom needs to function. For example, many people who shower more and bathe less often go for a larger shower area and a smaller bath.

too – it can completely change the look of a bathroom. There will be some first fix elements to creating a lighting scheme. Opt for lights that produce warm hues, and always use more than one type of light (try LED strip lighting under the skirting of the bath or around the mirror). Turn to p31 for more expert lighting advice. It’s also important to make sure that any lights near wet areas are IP rated. After that, you need to concentrate on the tiling and ‘second fix’ jobs (installing fittings such as the toilet, basin and bathtub). A bathroom showroom will have a list of recommended builders who each work with their own plumbers and specialists. Once you have selected your builder (always check reviews first), they can organise installing your fittings. How can I maximise available space? At CP Hart we ofer a design service, advising on the layout of your new room, but also taking into account the existing plumbing (ie the toilet needs to be positioned with easy access to the waste pipe). Clever storage is key: if you have a mirror, ask your builder if the walls are deep enough for a recess cabinet to be built. Underneath the basin is another good place to add extra storage space.

What else should I consider? For the walls, choose non-porous Do I need to think about water pressure and plumbing? tiles that can cope with damp conditions and consider diferent One of the first questions you should be asked by a bathroom sizes (bigger tiles on a large wall will add to the illusion of space). designer (or need to ask your installer) is what type of boiler and If it blends in with the design of your tiles, go for a darker grout: water system your home has. All of the considerations in relation it wears better and shows the dirt less. Where you are using paint, to this subject revolve around water pressure and whether you choose eggshell, as this is made for moisture-rich environments. have a gravity fed system (producing low pressure), a mega-flow Also, don’t overlook easy-to-clean finishes, such as glass shower system (high pressure), or combination (combi) boiler. Many screens with a coating that prevents limescale build-up. contemporary, continental brassware ranges are designed to work on high pressure and, although some will work on less, you How long should a project take? It depends on the lead time do need to be careful because it is likely that the performance may of products; handmade pieces or brassware with specialist not be as powerful as you are expecting. finishes may take four to six weeks to arrive once ordered. If your pipework isn’t in the right place for the layout you’d like, Installation generally takes one to two weeks. moving pipes around isn’t particularly complicated, but obviously it adds extra ‘Choose non-porous tiles that can cope with damp time and cost to a project. If you’re conditions and consider different sizes (bigger tiles planning on installing a bath, it’s worth checking the state of the floor and joists on a large wall will add to the illusion of space)’ underneath first. Cast-iron baths and tubs made from Corian and other stones can prove to be very heavy by themselves, but add water and there is even more weight, so you need to make sure that the joists under your bathroom are firm.

PICTURE: GETTY

What other big decisions do I need to make? Tap holes and pipe sizes are pretty standard across all manufacturers, but you will need to decide whether you want a mono basin mixer (one hole), a three-piece mixer (three holes) or wallmounted brassware instead. If you want a wall-mounted design, you’ll need to decide earlier to ensure that the correct plumbing is completed before you tile your wall or add any decorative finishes. In what order should I approach the jobs? ‘First fix’ jobs (by that we mean all of the plumbing and anything concealed behind the wall) are always the starting point. Think about lighting at this juncture 29


Bathrooms | N E W S PROJECT PLANNING

BAT H RO O M LIGHTING Great lighting will enhance your space immeasurably. Here, Sally Storey, design director at John Cullen Lighting, explains how to tackle the task (johncullenlighting.com) P L A N A H E A D It is best to think about lighting

S PA S T Y L E Using soft one-watt, low-level LED lighting

at the same time you are considering plumbing. This will ensure that any new finishes are shown of to the best efect. This is also when you can choose to incorporate lighting into niches or window reveals.

creates a relaxed look. Consider uplights behind a freestanding bath or set into a windowsill to light the shutters. This efect is almost like putting nightlights or candles around the room. Combine these with floor washes (lights that sit under the sink or low on the wall) and produce a beautiful pool of light.

CONSIDER THE SIZE OF YOUR ROOM

F R E E S TA N D I N G B AT H S

Low ceilings (under three metres) make LED downlights a practical choice. To add drama, mount them close to the wall, creating streaks of light that look almost like running water. Position another light by the basin and one above the toilet or towel rail for a well-balanced look.

Your bathtub should be lit in a way that will enhance its shape and create a dramatic efect. Place an uplight behind the bath to throw it into silhouette, then consider adding low-level floor washes that will light it from below. The result is a glowing aura around your tub.

TA S K L I G H T I N G A well-lit mirror is a morning

essential. Without doubt the best solution is to place a light on either side of the mirror, as this produces a soft, balanced glow. Pendants such as the ‘Grissini’ (£619) by John Cullen Lighting are ideal. L I G H T I N G C O N T R O L To create the perfect balance

High ceilings (above three metres) If your ceiling is this lofty, I do not think recessed downlights are the best solution. Instead, choose lighting that will create a focal point in the room and help to visually lower the ceilings – I have used a statement chandelier in the past. Also, in lofty rooms, tiles or stone do not tend to reach all the way up to the ceiling: placing a spotlight or spinnaker light just above the edge of the tiling (left) will draw your eye towards the decorative fittings.

of light for all occasions, you need to include a dimmer function. Here are the four lighting schemes you need to master… Morning Bright, get up and go Early evening Softer, more flattering Spa time Dramatic and low Night light Guidance for late-night visits

S M A L L S PA C E S O L U T I O N If your bathroom is too bijou for wall lights, consider backlighting a mirror with an LED strip like the Contour HD27’ (£97.61 per metre). Place it behind a frosted edging, or float the mirror slightly of of the wall and place the light behind. The efect is very striking.

S A F E T Y F I R S T Electricity and water do not mix well. There are strict electrical safety regulations stating

what level of IP rating is required for lights in the bathroom – ones near a shower or bath will require more protection than those near mirrors, but always check to ensure that your choices have the correct rating. 31


D E TA I L S

TH E LUXE LO O K Give your bathing space a glamorous overhaul with a dreamy marble bathtub and opulent touches of brass and gold


Bathrooms | S H O P P I N G

From left Arabescato marble bath, from £12,500, Lapicida (lapicida.com). ‘Isla’ floorstanding tap in burnished brass, £1,560, Waterworks (waterworks.com). ‘Sunflower’ marble shelf by Jaime Hayón, £431, Bisazza (bisazza.com). Towels, from £16 each, The White Company (thewhitecompany.com). White and gold tumbler, £12; lidded container, £18, both by Bloomingville, Design Vintage (designvintage.co.uk). Towel rail, from £899, Balineum (balineum.co.uk). Brass cabinet, from £24,606, Studioilse (studioilse.com). Pewter bath accessories by Miranda Watkins, from £48 for a tumbler, Balineum (balineum.co.uk). ‘Uovo’ marble basin, £1,584, Salvatori (salvatoriuk.com). ‘Bedford’ swing arm wall lights, from £759 each, Balineum (balineum.co.uk). ‘Abd El Khader’ room spray by Cire Trudon, £175, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). Mirror, £24.95, Rockett St George (rockettstgeorge.co.uk). Backgrounds ‘Joie’ gold and marble tiles by Sara Baldwin for New Ravenna, £2,495 per square metre, Ann Sacks (annsacks.com). ‘Marmoreal’ tiles by Max Lamb, from £300 per square metre, Dzek (dzekdzekdzek.com) ➤

MONTH 2016


D E TA I L S

GO GR APHIC Focus on linear designs and sleek silhouettes for a contemporary take on monochrome


Bathrooms | S H O P P I N G

From left ‘Jessie’ ladder bookshelf, £95, Habitat (habitat.co.uk). ‘Cyclope’ small mirror by Ionna Vautrin, £222, Moustache (moustache.fr). White soap pump by Norm Architects for Menu, £49, Amara (amara.com). ‘Lux Shape’ basin by Bette, £2,551, West One Bathrooms (westonebathrooms.com). ‘Beyzade’ striped towel, £45, Harem Bath (harembath.com). ‘Chiltern’ wall mirror, £195, The White Company (thewhitecompany.com). ‘170104’ basket by Hübsch, from £25; ‘CQ0112’ basket with handles by House Doctor, from £10, both Design Vintage (designvintage.co.uk). ‘Cuna’ bath by Patricia Urquiola, £7,252; ‘Fez’ floorstanding tap by Benedini Associati, £1,240, both for Agape, West One Bathrooms (westonebathrooms.com). ‘String Pocket’ shelving unit by Nils Strinning for String, £109, Utility Design (utilitydesign.co.uk). Stoneware box, £6.99, H&M Home (hm.com). ‘Large White Dot’ wash bag by Hay, £29, Liberty (liberty.co.uk). ‘Stilts Vertical’ full-length mirror by Omelette Ed, £495, Heal’s (heals.com) Backgrounds ‘Iridium’ white tiles by Sicis, £242 per square metre, Domus (domustiles.co.uk). Square black tiles, £80 per square metre, Marrakech Design (marrakechdesign.co.uk) ➤


D E TA I L S

FA C T O R Y R E S E T Use strong materials such as concrete and iron and hardwearing accessories to bring the industrial trend into your bathroom


Bathrooms | S H O P P I N G

From left ‘Leni’ freestanding mirror, £85, Habitat (habitat.co.uk). ‘Tredi’ towels, £114 each, Society Limonta (societylimonta.com). Vintage stool, for similar try Lassco (lassco.co.uk). ‘Astonian Brunel’ cast-iron bath, £3,100, Aston Matthews (astonmatthews.co.uk). ‘TH 1161’ bath/shower mixer, from £903, Lefroy Brooks (lefroybrooks.com). Iron boxes, from £14.99 each, Zara Home (zarahome.com). ‘Fox’ concrete basin, from £660, Kast Concrete (kastconcretebasins.com). ‘TH 9004’ basin tap, from £495, Lefroy Brooks (lefroybrooks.com). Wall lights, £39 each, Trinity Marine (trinitymarine.co.uk). Rust-effect mirror, £150, Rockett St George (rockettstgeorge.co.uk). Oak and iron trolley by Hübsch, £695, Design Vintage (designvintage.co.uk). Soap dispenser, £12.99, H&M Home (hm.com). Shaving soap in concrete cup, £48.95; shaving brush, £34.75, both by SRF Hantverk, SCP (scp.co.uk). Tumbler, £7.50, Labour & Wait (labourandwait.co.uk) Backgrounds Clay plaster finish in ‘Buf’, £15 per square metre, Clay Works (clay-works.com). Hexagonal tiles, £39 for a box of 13 tiles, Marrakech Design (marrakechdesign.co.uk) ➤


D E TA I L S

INTO THE WOODS This season, we are seeing a trend for rustic timber in bathrooms. Think less polish, more salvage and rough-hewn finishes. Remember to apply sealant to soft woods


Bathrooms | S H O P P I N G

From left Large oval mirror, £260, French Connection (frenchconnection.com). ‘Xila’ cabinet, £25,000, Boi (boiuk.com). ‘Equilibrio’ tap by Gessi, available October, CP Hart (cphart.co.uk ). Wood-efect soap dish, £29.99; large jar with wooden lid, £17.99, both Zara Home (zarahome.com). Vintage stool, £110, Soho Home (sohohome.com). Cork bath mat, £24.95, Authentics (authentics.co.uk). Brushes, £20 each, Caroline McGrath (carolinemcgrath.co.uk). ‘Ofuró’ bath by Matteo Thun for Rapsel, from £14,280, Edwins Bathrooms (edwinsbathrooms.co.uk). ‘B88041’ towel hooks by Hübsch, £22.50, Design Vintage (designvintage.co.uk). ‘Gio19’ wall-mounted mixer with spout in bronze, £329, Cea (ceadesign.it). ‘Odin’ bamboo towel ladder, £50, Habitat (habitat.co.uk). ‘Andaman’ basket, from £118, Balineum (balineum.co.uk) Backgrounds ‘Point de Hongrie’ wooden cladding (on wall), £84 per square metre, Bert & May (bertandmay.com). ‘Wilderness’ smoked engineered oak floorboards, £115 per square metre, Fired Earth (firedearth.com) E D


MORNING RITUALS We asked four experts across design, interiors and wellbeing to share the products, accessories and finishes that turn a bathroom into a personal sanctuary. Here, they tell us how they start their days Words TESSA PEARSON AND KARA O’REILLY

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‘FIXTURES, FITTINGS AND MATERIALS SHOULD BE AN INVESTMENT’ LOUISA GREY

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LOUISA’S ESSENTIAL BATHROOM KIT

WORDS: TESSA PICTURES: CARL PEARSON BARTRAM

1 Striped hammam towels, £26 each, Bohemia (bohemiadesign.co.uk) 2 Carrara honed marble, from £58 per square metre, Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com) 3 and 4 Aged brass taps and fittings by Studio Ore: wall-mounted basin taps, £605; shower rose, £363; shower thermostat, £918.50, all Bert & May (bertandmay.com) 5 Wooden bath brush, £22.95, Nook (nookshop.co.uk) 6 ‘Purbeck Stone’ matt emulsion, from £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) 7 ‘Quadra QU2-QU3’ double-ended bath by Adamsez, £345, UK Bathroom Store (ukbathroomstore.co.uk). Installed with a bespoke marble surround, linen shower curtain and shower rail, all designed by House of Grey (houseofgrey.co.uk)

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Bathrooms | M O O D B O A R D S 4

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LOU ISA GR EY, IN TER IOR S ST Y L IST

LUXE LO O K

Louisa Grey runs her own interior design studio, House of Grey, working on commercial and residential design projects around the world. Her bathroom reflects her signature luxurious style. 6

My bathroom is the place I clear my head in the morning and take my time to gear up for the day ahead. I like to plan my timetable for the day, so that I don’t get sidetracked later on. I spend 15 minutes each morning in a kind of meditative state, trying to work out how the day is going to pan out. I mentally tick of a checklist of boring things that need to be done so that I can focus on what’s inspiring me and make time to be creative. I’ve created a very restful interior in my bathroom. It takes up the entire space of what used to be a double bedroom, which is a real luxury. But it’s also very practical, because my husband and I often tend to use it at the same time. It’s wise to spend time planning a bathroom and working out the functionality. I walked around the room a lot and did six or seven diferent floor plans with the architect before committing

to a final design. It’s such a big investment, so you only want to do it once and do it really well. I use a lot of colour in my work, but I like my own space to be aesthetically calming. I painted the bathroom in ‘Purbeck Stone’ by Farrow & Ball (see left). It’s the darkest colour I’ve ever had in a bathroom, but it works very well. If you have a good view, then you should make the most of it, particularly in the city. Looking out over open green space (no matter how small) prevents you from feeling like you’re being hemmed in by urban life. I always opt for deckmounted taps so you can sit comfortably at both ends of the bath for diferent vistas. I really dislike visible clutter, so hidden storage is a must. I think design has definitely become more pared back in recent years: perhaps because spaces are getting smaller and we’re spending so much more time in them. Fixtures, fittings and materials should be an investment. I love marble and natural stone – terrazzo stone especially. It provides a subtle pattern and has a lovely cool feeling underfoot. louisagrey.com; houseofgrey.co.uk ➤ 41


2 SOOTHING

S U S S Y C A Z A L E T, I N T E R IOR DE S IGN E R

COLOUR

Sussy Cazalet studied interior architecture at Parsons School of Design in New York before setting up her London studio. Recent projects include several private residences, including that of luxury nightwear designer Olivia von Halle, and the South Kensington Club. Her own space is decorated with pearlised tiles and earthy tones. I’ve never been a sleep-through girl, which can be annoying at times. I pretty much wake up every morning at the same time, around 6.30am. I am also not a shower person, I never have been. I like baths. I really want one of those hinoki wood Japanese baths, which are like a tall tub, so I can leap into that and semi-bath, semi-shower. Most mornings the first thing I do is go to dance class. I fall out of bed and head of to do a mixture of barre work and movement. If it’s a beautiful morning, I go to the park and sit under a tree and I think about the day coming up. Then I’ll come home and go into my bathroom. I think bathing is the most calming and wonderful thing. One day, if I get a house with a big garden, I will put a bathtub in front of a window facing out towards nature. My dream is to have a bath outside. I am not a traditionalist and I don’t think old-fashioned is best, but it seems that these days everyone is obsessed with this white, clean, shiny, hard look for bathrooms, which I think is not in any way conducive to relaxation or having that lovely spiritual feeling of being in a beautiful space and therefore inspired. I love teals, mossy greens, earthy terracottas, grey-pinks and dirty whites. I’m not into jarring colours. I don’t think they work for the mind. I’ve used oak on my bathroom floor. It’s such a lovely feeling to walk with bare feet on wood rather than on cold tiles. I think the idea that you can’t have wood on the floor in a bathroom is complete rubbish. Good lighting is so important. You should avoid those horrible spotlights that everyone is choosing, because they make you look ugly and you don’t want to look ugly first thing in the morning. I have wall lights that are on a dimmer. One of my favourite experiences growing up was using my aunt’s bathroom. She had this thick, mossy green carpet and this incredible jungle wallpaper and no tiles anywhere; she just lined the walls in beautiful glass. She had proper curtains and the light pull was a little tassel. Nothing in it felt like a bathroom, it was like being in a sitting room. It was just the most heavenly experience. sussycazalet.co.uk ➤ 42

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SUSSY CAZALET’S ESSENTIAL BATHROOM KIT 1 ‘Fresnel’ wall light by Joe Colombo for Oluce, £131, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com) 2 ‘Akari’ pendant lights by Isamu Noguchi for Vitra, £187 each, Skandium (skandium.com) 3 Zellige wall tiles in ‘Shade 3’, from £135 per square metre, Emery et Cie (emeryetcie.com) 4 Blinds in ‘Vista’ fabric, from £261, Woodnotes (woodnotes.fi) 5 ‘121-63’ wall-mounted single lever mixer tap, £880, Vola (vola.co.uk) 6 ‘Rena’ concrete basin in white, from £828, Kast Concrete Basins (kastconcretebasins.com) 7 Ivory travertine bath, £11,994, Lapicida (lapicida.com) 8 Cement floor tiles in ‘Shade 48’, from £78 per square metre, Emery et Cie (emeryetcie.com)

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‘I LOVE TEALS, EARTHY TERRACOTTAS, GREYPINKS AND DIRTY WHITES. JARRING COLOURS DON’T WORK FOR THE MIND’ S U S S Y C A Z A L E T

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‘IT’S IMPORTANT TO TAKE TIME TO RELAX. ONE NEEDS A BALANCE OF REST AND PRODUCTIVITY’ R O B E RT O PA L O M B A 1

ROBERTO’S ESSENTIAL BATHROOM KIT 1 Freestanding basin, £1,900; tap, £614, both from the ‘Faraway’ collection, Zucchetti Kos (zucchettikos.com) 2 Two of my bathroom walls are made of opaque glass and overlook the bedroom, so each room is partly visible from the other. This really helps bring in extra light, as does the predominantly white colour scheme. These two walls also form the shower enclosure. 3 ‘Gregg’ frosted glass ceiling lamp by Ludovica + Roberto Palomba for Foscarini, from £144, FCI London (fcilondon.co.uk) 4 Linen waffle towels, £18.99 for two hand towels, Linen Me (linenme.com) 5 White linen curtain, £29.99, H&M (hm.com) 6 ‘Shower Plus’ chrome showerhead, £2,192; thermostat, £378, all from the ‘Faraway’ collection, Zucchetti Kos (zucchettikos.com) 7 White metal storage cart, £700, from the ‘Faraway’ collection, Zucchetti Kos (zucchettikos.com) 8 ‘Square’ radiator, from £1,010, Tubes Radiatori (tubesradiatori.com) 9 Bath and shower with diverter, shower set, essential oil holder and incense boat shelf in white, £3,068, from the ‘Faraway’ collection, Zucchetti Kos (zucchettikos.com)

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3SLEEK

ROBERTO PA LOM B A , PRODUCT DE SIGN ER

AND CHIC

PICTURE: ENRICO COSTANTINI

As one half of husband-and-wife team Ludovica+Roberto Palomba, this Italian designer has created bathroom ranges for the likes of Boi, Zucchetti Kos and Laufen. So it’s no surprise that his own bathroom is a slick modern retreat.

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I usually wake up feeling energetic and positive, with the desire to work and create. In the week I wake up early and take my time getting out of bed – at least 15 minutes – so that my mind is fully active and I can start to organise my day. I try to spend as much time as possible in the bathroom. I love long showers and moments of relaxation in the tub. I like to design bathrooms that are feel-good spaces, where people can enjoy privacy and sanctuary. Bathroom materials tend to be dictated by function, with ceramics being the most practical. I also work with modern materials, such as resin and acrylic, because they are incredibly hardwearing yet can appear delicate. Even the most unassuming items can be decorative. We work with a company called Tubes

Radiatori (see above), which makes bathroom radiators that look like sculptural works of art. If you are renovating a bathroom on a limited budget, a simple trick is to paint your tiles with a coloured glaze and extend the same shade to the ceiling and the doors, creating a dramatic monochrome box. Mixing vintage and contemporary fittings and sanitaryware can also add instant character. I find colour a huge source of creative inspiration. A particular shade can set of billions of forms and thoughts. Three years ago we designed a bathroom collection called Kartell by Laufen, featuring lots of colourful orange products and accessories. Changing the colour scheme immediately alters the mood of a space. I think it’s important to take time to relax in order to stay focused, and that everyone needs a balance of rest and productivity to generate new ideas. Creative brains are like muscles: the more projects you are working on, the more ideas you have. palombaserafini.com; laufen.co.uk ➤ 45


4 PR ACTI C A L

M IC H E L L E O G U N DE H I N , E DI T OR-I N- C H I E F

STYLE

ELLE Decoration Editor-in-Chief Michelle Ogundehin tells us about her bathroom. With a busy schedule and toddler in tow, her key concerns are practicality, order and calm

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MICHELLE’S ESSENTIAL BATHROOM KIT 1 ‘Eames’ stool in walnut by Charles and Ray Eames for Vitra, £1,006, Heal’s (heals.com) 2 Lithoverde Carrara marble floor tiles, £204 per square metre, Salvatori (salvatori.it) 3 ‘Snowdrop’ tiles, from £0.86 per tile, H&E Smith tiles (hesmith.co.uk) 4 ‘Bette Floor’ inset shower tray with anti-slip finish, from £725, Bette (bette.de) 5 ‘Renaissance’ dual-control shower, £533, Bristan (bristan.com) 6 ‘Ice’ wall-mounted mirror-fronted cabinet, from £323, Saneux (saneux.com) 7 ‘Toulon’ bath mat runner, £32, The White Company (thewhitecompany.com) 8 ‘1901’ chrome-plated basin taps, from £85, Bristan (bristan.com) 9 ‘Matteo’ sink with white-gloss drawers, from £470, Saneux (saneux.com) 10 ‘Elephant’ stool by Sori Yanagi for Vitra, £78, Heal’s (heals.com)

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PICTURE: PAULA BEETLESTONE

I’d love to start each day in a leisurely fashion, but with a toddler and two dogs, this is rarely possible. That said, my en-suite bathroom is one of the spaces in my home that I’m happiest with design-wise; it’s clean and calm, so enables an organised, if not exactly serene, start to any day. One of the things I always insist that people do is choose wall-hung fittings. Just getting the loo and sinks of the floor makes any space seem bigger. My other top tip is to choose simple sanitaryware: in other words, no unnecessary crevices or fiddly indents. This is as much about aesthetics as it is practical, making cleaning easier. I have two basins, side by side, hotel-style. It means there’s always plenty of space for everyone to brush their teeth in the mornings! There are two levels of lighting, too. I have spots above the bath and shower, and a central ceiling pendant from Lee Broom (leebroom.com) for a softer glow. They work well together, as the room can be brightly lit and practical for cleaning or applying make-up, but for evening bathing I can take it down a notch. And I prefer oil difusers for fragrance rather than candles, having once set a pile of towels on fire. I used Lithoverde marble from Salvatori to line my shower and bath enclosure, but I also took the marble down to and across the floor. It makes the room feel very seamless (caveat: underfloor heating is a must if you put tiles on the floor!). The wall behind the washbasin and loo is tiled all the way to head height, rather than just a splashback. Here I used tiles from H&E Smith (see right), which are fabulous because the collection includes curved corner tiles, skirting tiles and special edging tiles, allowing me to make a tiled shelf replete with a decorative border. I had them laid in vertical columns rather than brick style, as I think this looks more contemporary. A pair of my favourite pictures are hung opposite the shower. They’re in an antiqued gold frame, and I’ve not had any problems with condensation. But then I just open the window to let any steam out. I can’t stand the noise of extractor fans, although these are essential if your bathroom has no natural ventilation. One of the best times to have a bath is as the sun sets, because my bathroom is west facing so it’s suddenly filled with glorious glowing natural light. And, as the house was built in 1821 and still has its original leaded glass windows, the crooked, ancient nature of the glass acts as a natural screen – no net curtains required!


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‘I ALWAYS INSIST ON WALL-HUNG FITTINGS. JUST GETTING THE SINK OFF THE FLOOR MAKES A SPACE SEEM BIGGER ’ M I C H E L L E O G U N D E H I N 7

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KEY TR ENDS TO TRY NOW • THE WOR LD’S MOST BEAUTIFUL BATHROOMS

INSPIRATION

HOT TREND

#1 F U L L CIRCLE PICTURE: DERRICK SWALWELL

Create luxury even in the tightest of corners with a circular bathtub The deep, bowl-like ‘Haven’ stone bath by Apaiser is ideal for smaller spaces. Add a statement tap, such as this one by Astra Walker, and wall-mounted showerheads to make your en-suite feel spacious. ‘Haven’ bath, from £3,789, Apaiser (apaiser.com); ‘Icon’ floorstanding tap, £956, Astra Walker (astrawalker.com.au) ➤

T O S E E M O R E S T U N N I N G B AT H R O O M S , V I S I T E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K / I N S P I R AT I O N S


Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

HOT TREND

#2 S U P E R CHIC Go for grandeur with marble finishes and traditional details With ornate materials, oversized elements and precise finishes, bathrooms that up the opulence factor are a big trend for 2016. Fresh takes on classic fittings add to that feeling of new-age luxury. Take this freestanding ‘Eleganza’ bath by Gessi, which has a traditional panel-style design. Matched with the same collection’s freestanding mixer tap, the look is utterly modern, while the seamless shower enclosure – try Matki’s ‘Wet Room’ (matki.co.uk) – adds another level of glamour. Try Rex (rex-cerart.it) for large-scale porcelain tiles that mimic the look of marble – they’re cheaper, more hardwearing and easier to install than the real thing! ‘Eleganza’ bathroom range by Gessi: side table, £1,920; bath, from £8,252; bath filler, from £1,390, all CP Hart (cphart.co.uk) ➤ 50


B AT H R O O M I N D E TA I L # 1

Tarnished beauty Floor Sanded Portuguese limestone – for similar try the Limestone Gallery (limestonegallery.com) Walls They have been treated with rough plaster and three layers of limewash, applied with a special block brush to perfectly colourmatch the floor. For a similar look try ‘Panna Cotta’ limewash, £20.60 for one litre, Francesca’s Paints (francescaspaint.com) Bath Hans designed the bespoke ‘Alu’ tub, which is made from welded aluminium sheets and clad with a 1.5 millimetre brass sheet. Special waterproof paint was used on the bath’s interior Brassware Vola taps and shower hose (vola.com), all given a special patina finish by Hans

PICTURE: HANS VERSTUYFT

The brilliance of architect Hans Verstuyft’s bathroom is in its imperfection. As this custom-made bathtub ages, its brass coating will grow more unique (hansverstuyftarchitecten.be)


Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

HOT TREND

#3 C O L O U R PICTURE: CAROLA RIPAMONTI

Embrace pastels for a look that’s anything but saccharine It’s high time that things took a turn for the more colourful. Combining subtle shades of pale blue and softest pink, this bathroom by UdA Architetti in Turin, Italy, has a vibrant uplifting efect. We love the rosy basin by Flaminia (toughened up with a matt black tap) and the bespoke cabinet – try West One Bathrooms for coloured bathroom furniture. The floor-to-ceiling metro tiles (try Fired Earth; firedearth.com) allow kitsch accessories to shine. ‘Nile’ countertop basin in pink by Flaminia, from £315, Hugo Oliver (hugooliver.com) ➤

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HOT TREND

#4 S O A K U P THE VIEW Create a sense of al fresco bathing without having to brave the British weather As we look to improve the sense of light and space in our homes by merging indoors and out, bathrooms are becoming more fluid, versatile spaces. Inspired by members’ club Soho Farmhouse and its outdoor roll-top baths, many of us are looking to create a sense of al fresco indulgence. While we may not have the weather to consider outdoor bathing all year round in the UK, placing a bath in front of a window or transforming a ground floor extension into a glass-backed bathroom, as here, is a great way to get back to nature. ‘Paiova 5’ bathtub by EOOS, £2,544 as shown, Duravit (duravit.co.uk) ➤


Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

B AT H R O O M I N D E TA I L # 2

Pretty in pink Take inspiration from this late 19th-century apartment on Lisbon’s waterfront, where architectural practice Rar.studio has used swathes of muted pink marble (rar-studio.com)

PICTURES: SCANDERBEG SAUER, SIMON BEVAN (OPPOSITE)

Walls Clad in Portuguese Pink marble – try ‘Pink Estremoz’, £240 per square metre, Stone World (stoneworldlondon.co.uk) Flooring Aged larch floorboards. Bert & May sells similar (bertandmay.com) Basin A bespoke design, also clad in pink marble, inspired by traditional stone troughs Brassware Polished chrome wall-mounted single lever basin mixer and spout, £768; wallmounted single lever shower mixer with two-way diverter, handshower and wall-mounted showerhead, £2,729, all Vola (vola.com) Shower screen For a similar custom-made glass screen try Majestic (majesticshowers.com)

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HOT TREND

#5 T O U G H L U X E For a tactile take on the industrial trend, mix aged metal and concrete The key to making the industrial look work in a bathroom is getting exactly the right balance between rugged utility and refined finishes. For instance, this impressive bathtub by Catchpole & Rye contrasts a weathered copper exterior with a high shine nickel interior. It is a reworking of a traditional French design, but surrounded by concrete panelling (try Concrete LCDA for similar; concrete-beton.com) and factory-style steel-glazed windows it looks ultra modern. ‘The Copper Bateau’ bath, from £5,400, Catchpole & Rye (catchpoleandrye.com) ➤


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HOT TREND

#6 S O C I A L B AT H I N G Bathtubs are getting a makeover with new shapes and sizes made for two Bathroom designers are rethinking the classic shape of the tub. At the forefront of this revolution is Agape, whose new ‘DR’, pictured below, is a distorted bean shape made for two people to bathe together. Crafted from Agape’s Solid Surface composite with an exterior clad in Okumé plywood, it’s also more tactile than traditonal tubs. Elsewhere, Duravit’s latest ‘Paiova 5’ by EOOS (see Soak up the view, p54) is pentagonal, a shape that also allows room for two to comfortably soak side by side.

PICTURE: ANDREA FERRARI

‘DR’ bath by Studio MK27 by Agape, from £10,200, West One Bathrooms (westonebathrooms.com) ➤

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B AT H R O O M I N D E TA I L # 3

Five-star quality Take inspiration from this genius double-sided en-suite created by Norm Architects. Built for a Copenhagen townhouse, it’s hotel-style luxury at its most cool and collected (normcph.com)

PICTURE: JONAS BJERRE POULSEN

Walls Concrete has been chosen for its tactile quality and contrast to the surrounding plain white walls. Discuss a similar solution with Concreations (concreations.co.uk) Flooring Wooden flooring by Dinesen (dinesen.com) Shower area ‘Eifel’ porcelain tiles by Inalco, from Byens Fliser in Denmark (byensfliserogsanitet.dk) Cabinetry and basin A ‘Zero20’ double-basin vanity unit with burnished copper front, £5,584 as pictured, Moab80 (moab80.it) Brassware Customised bronzed Vola taps and shower (vola.com) Mirror Bevelled vintage mirror, £420, Moab80 (moab80.it) ➤

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HOT TREND

#7 R O O M SWITCH It’s time to blur the boundaries between bathing and living spaces Always on the lookout for ways to innovate, Italian brand Zuchetti Kos has recently focused on bathroom products that appear to have been sourced elsewhere in the home. For instance, its new ‘Morphing’ bath has slim raised feet that transform it into something more akin to a sideboard, while the ‘Closer’ showerhead mimics a jointed task light. Another way to bring a living room feel into the space is to hang curtains, but be sure to ventilate the space well.

PICTURE: MAX ZAMBELLI

‘Closer’ showerhead by Diego Grandi, £1,078; ‘Morphing’ bath, £4,680; towel holder, £600; ‘Pan’ mixer tap, £1,917; ‘Geo’ shower tray, £1,680, all Zuchetti Kos (zucchettikos.com) ➤

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HOT TREND

#8 T O TA L R E L A X AT I O N Transform your bathroom into a state-of-the-art spa Spa style has been a major influence in bathroom design for a number of years, but there’s a diference between filling a few bowls with some shells and embracing spa ideas on a larger scale. Increasingly there’s a desire to emulate spa spaces fully, incorporating both wellbeing and relaxation elements. This ‘Neos’ bathroom by Neutra marries a high-tech steam room – try Efegibi (efegibi-perfect-wellness.com) for similar – and two-person massage beds with a walk-in shower. If you have the space and budget, this is the ultimate modern bathroom. ‘Neos’ collection by Neutra: basins, from £1,373; bath, from £30,154; furniture, from £2,523, CP Hart (cphart.co.uk) ➤


HOT TREND

#9 S H A R P COMFORT Give directional style a softer touch A boxy bathtub, chevron-style parquet on the ceiling and a showstopping pendant lamp highlight this room’s angular dimensions, while a large super-soft rug and a dreamy colour scheme keep things cosy.

PICTURE: RCS/PER/BEPPEE BRANCATO

‘Marsiglia’ bath by Lucidi Pevere for Agape, from £8,502, West One Bathrooms (westonebathrooms.com)


Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

B AT H R O O M I N D E TA I L # 4

Curved cocoon Dark-timber panelling, natural stone and soft mood lighting intensify the effect of this windowless powder room in Australia, designed by Fiona Lynch (fionalynch.com.au)

PICTURE: SHARYN CAIRNS

Walls Small flat-grey mosaic tiles sourced locally from Signorino (signorino.com.au) – try Bisazza in the UK (bisazza.com). For similar dark-stained European oak panelling, try The Wall Panelling Company (thewallpanellingcompany.co.uk) Cabinetry Bespoke vanity unit with a Nero Marquina marble top and decorative brass towel rail – try Balineum (balineum.co.uk) Brassware Taps from Astra Walker (astrawalker.com.au) – try Waterworks for similar (waterworks.com) Mirror For a similar design try Simpsons Mirrors (simpsonsmirrors.com) Accessories Cotton-tasselled hand towel by Loom Towels (loomtowels.com) – try The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Vase Tumbler’ in Ash, £56, Mud Australia (mudaustralia.com) ➤

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B AT H R O O M I N D E TA I L # 5

Seamless suite

Flooring Wood-efect porcelain tiles – for similar try Porcelanosa (porcelanosa.co.uk) Walls Stone tiles in the wet areas, with cream quartzite and textured stones around the washbasin – for similar designs try Domus (domustiles.co.uk) Bath ‘Chalice Minor’ Acrymite tub by BC Designs, £1,198, Ripples (ripplesbathrooms.com) Brassware All from the ‘Xenon’ collection by Samuel Heath, from £450, Ripples (ripplesbathrooms.com) Cabinetry and basin A bespoke vanity unit by Ripples featuring ‘Pro S’ countertop basins by Laufen, £173 each (ripplesbathrooms.com) Mirror Recessed LED-equipped mirror cabinets by Burgbad, £2,195, Ripples (ripplesbathrooms.com) ➤

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PICTURE: PAUL CRAIG

A rich butterscotch colour scheme links this en-suite to the bedroom beyond. Created by interior designer Richard Fox of Ripples, it features clever touches such as recessed mirrored cabinets and a floating countertop that doubles as seating (ripplesbathrooms.com)


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B AT H R O O M I N D E TA I L # 6

Modern terrazzo These eye-catching tiles are made from offcuts of marble and resin. Their speckled, multicoloured design adds zing to this Californian bathroom created by Carter Design (carterdesignwest.com)

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Walls and flooring ‘Marmoreal’ tiles by Max Lamb, £390 per square metre, Dzek (dzekdzekdzek.com) Bath A double-ended design sourced locally from Americh (americh.com) and clad in Ipe wood (a durable Brazilian walnut). For a similar bath in the UK try Kaldewei (kaldewei.co.uk) Brassware ‘New Tempesta Cosmopolitan 100’ handshower, from £25, Grohe (grohe.co.uk) Doorknob ‘Winchester’ doorknob in ‘Black Bronze’ sourced locally from Emtek (emtek.com) – try The Nanz Company (nanz.com)


Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

HOT TREND

#10 D A R K LY D R A M AT I C Go all black for a moodier take on washroom style We’re increasingly seeing a trend for daringly dark shades in bathing spaces. Take this new collection from Italian manufacturer Ceramica Althea, which includes a toilet and bidet in matt black. It contrasts beautifully with chrome fittings and lighter wood accessories.

PICTURE: BRIAN W FERRY (OPPOSITE)

‘B-Colour’ collection by Ceramica Althea, £1,116 for a toilet, Crosswater (crosswater.co.uk) ➤

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HOT TREND

#11 S I M P L E RUSTIC Boost your country credentials by using heavily grained pale woods in the bathroom Once a no-no for bathrooms, light wooden furniture and surfaces was one of the main design trends spotted at this year’s Salone del Bagno, a hugely influential trade fair that sets the design directions across the industry. Thanks to a range of new finishes and treatments, woods that once wouldn’t have survived in such damp environments are now hardwearing enough to withstand wet conditions. This simple sanitaryware by Cielo is the perfect understated suite to accompany a rustic scheme. ‘Shui Comfort’ bathroom collection by Cielo: basin, £443; WC and bidet, £516 each; bath, £5,016, all available at CP Hart (cphart.co.uk) ➤ 73


Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

B AT H R O O M I N D E TA I L # 7

Moroccan adventure An indulgent sweep of statement patterned tiles wow in this west London bathroom, a collaboration between Suzy Hoodless (suzyhoodless.com) and Hackett Holland (hackettholland.co.uk). The effect is grounded with soothing pale-grey walls and touches of brass

PICTURE: LUCAS ALLEN/HOUSE + GARDEN/CONDE NAST

Walls Treated with tadelakt, £125 per square metre including installation, Tadelakt London (tadelaktlondon.co.uk) Flooring For similar graphicpatterned cement tiles try the ‘Harlequin’ design from the ‘Pacific’ collection, £4.45 per tile, The Cement Tile Shop (cementtileshop.com) Washstand An ‘Original French’ design, from £5,995, The Water Monopoly (thewatermonopoly.com) Brassware ‘Henry Gooseneck’ brass three-hole faucet with metal cross handles, £1,238, Waterworks (uk.waterworks.com) Mirror Bespoke brass-framed mirror cabinet – the ‘Pharmacy’ brass medicine cabinet by Balineum, £5,900, is an impressive alternative (balineum.co.uk) Lighting Bespoke brass wall lights – try Jim Lawrence for similar (jim-lawrence.co.uk) Towel rails A pair of ‘Henry’ wall-mounted rings, £257 each, Waterworks (uk.waterworks.com)

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Walls and flooring ‘Ghiaccio’ tiles by Ceramica Vogue, from £28.20 per square metre, Casa Ceramica (casaceramica.co.uk) Paint ‘Absolute White’ matt emulsion, £20.99 for 2.5 litres, Dulux (dulux.co.uk) Cabinetry Custom-made geometric-shaped storage unit Basin A ceramic countertop sink sourced from local company Caroma (caroma.com.au). For similar try the ‘Geo’ basin, £520, Fired Earth (firedearth.com) Brassware Sourced from Roger Seller (rogerseller.com.au). Try the ‘Tara’ collection by Dornbracht for similar in the UK, £963 for a basin mixer (dornbracht.com) Mirror Custom-cut in this angular shape, it gives the impression that the wall tiles have been removed to reveal a mirrored surface beneath ➤

B AT H R O O M I N D E TA I L # 8

PICTURE: TESS KELLY

Take on Tetris White tiles and a uniquely geometric basin cabinet give this bathroom – part of an award-winning house in Australia designed by Austin Maynard Architects – a quietly quirky quality (maynardarchitects.com)


B AT H R O O M I N D E TA I L # 9

Dawn chorus We’d love to wake up and see the sun rising through this beautiful decorative glass shower screen. It is the crowning glory of this eclectic en-suite in a London family home, created by interior designer Hayley Tarrington-Robson of Day True (daytrue.com)

Shower screen A bespoke fused-glass design, from £950 for one panel, Morpheus Glass (morpheusglass.co.uk) Brassware ‘Axor’ overhead showerheads, £980 each, Hansgrohe (hansgrohe.co.uk) Flooring ‘Azulej’ patterned porcelain floor tiles by Patricia Urquiola for Mutina, £185 per square metre, Domus (domusgroup.com) Basin A bespoke mineral-cast design by Burgbad (burgbad.com) Mirror Built-in LED lights give the glass a soft glow. From £1,500, Day True (daytrue.com) ➤


B AT H R O O M I N D E TA I L # 1 0

Black forest Subtle splashes of velvety matt black springboard this rustic wood and white bathroom scheme into chicer territory

WORDS: NAME PICTURES: NAME

Walls Try ‘Cotton Street’ emulsion, £42 for 2.5 litres, Mylands (mylands.co.uk) Flooring ‘Retreat’ vinyl tiles in ‘Summer House’, £49.96 per square metre, Fired Earth (firedearth.com) Bath For similar try the ‘Nendo’ larch wood bath with handy external storage boxes, £13,800, Bisazza (bisazza.com) Brassware ‘Pan’ soft-touch black basin mixer, from £311 and bath mixer, £1,666, both Zucchetti Kos (zucchettikos.it) Basin ‘Alimia’ Carrara marble bowl, £600, Fired Earth (firedearth.com) Lighting ‘Stanley’ black nickel pendant, £299, Original BTC (originalbtc.com) Bath linen ‘Check’ towel in ‘Crème’, £28; hand towel, £11; bath mat, £23; all by Tracie Ellis for Aura Home (aurahome.com.au) Accessories Black metal towel ring, £30; black wire basket with lid, £134, both by Ferm Living, Amara (amara.com)


Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

HOT TREND

#12 T H E P E R F E C T F I T It’s now even easier to get scaled-down versions of your favourite pieces If you hanker after double basins and a freestanding tub but your own washroom lacks the proportions, fret not. Fired Earth’s ‘Lonsdale’ double washstand, which measures 108 centimetres wide, can be incorporated into compact areas. Emphasise this duality by hanging a light above each basin: Original BTC’s ‘Stanley’ pendants (from £249 each; originalbtc.com) are similar to these brass beauties. ‘Lonsdale’ double basin, £525; ‘Malia’ freestanding bath, £1,600; ‘Berlin’ waxed concrete-efect porcelain tiles (on wall), £49.97 per square metre; ‘Rhombus’ mosaic ceramic tiles (on floor), £275 per square metre, all Fired Earth ( firedearth.com) ➤

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B AT H R O O M I N D E TA I L # 1 1

The light house An impressive lighting scheme traces this room’s architecture, lending the raised bath an altar-like feel. The design is the result of a collaboration between CP Hart (cphart.co.uk) and Chris Diamond Design (chrisdiamonddesign.com)

Lighting Concealed LED strips are used to create this bespoke design by Twisted Light (twistedlight.com) Bath Sunken design by Bette, from £1,435, CP Hart (cphart.com) Brassware ‘Supernova Cascade’ bath spout, £1,200; ‘Tremillimetri’ showerhead by Gessi, £900; ‘Supernova’ handshower, £876, all by Dornbracht, CP Hart (cphart.com) Shower screen A bespoke frameless design – try Majestic for similar (majesticshowers.com) Walls Grey wood-grain efect marble tiles sourced from Italy. Lapicida sells similar in the UK (lapicida.com) Flooring Try Natural Stone for similar white limestone tiles (naturalstone.co.uk) Accessories Large stainless-steel lanterns, from £145 each, Nordic House (nordichouse.co.uk) ➤

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PICTURE: JAMES FITZPATRICK DIAMOND

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HOT TREND

#13 M A R B L E TO THE MAX Make a style statement with all-over marble Follow the lead of designer Katty Schiebeck (kattyschiebeck.com) and turn to the decorative allure of natural veined marble. Used liberally alongside the sleek working elements of this beautiful Barcelona bathroom, it delivers the perfect note of extravagance. ‘Calacatta Viola’ polished marble, from £89.98 per square metre, Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com)


Bathrooms | I N S P I R A T I O N

B AT H R O O M I N D E TA I L # 1 2

Space to ref lect This antiqued metal wall adds warmth and the appearance of extra square footage in this seaside home just north of Copenhagen – a project by Norm Architects (normcph.com)

PICTURE: JONAS BJERRE POULSEN

Walls ‘Tombak’ copper and brass panels. A similar efect can be achieved with ‘Foxed on Bronze’ antiqued glass, £528 per square metre, Rough Old Glass (rougholdglass.co.uk) Paint ‘All White’ modern emulsion, £43.50 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) Flooring Resin-treated concrete. For a similar look, contact The Concrete Flooring Contractors (theconcreteflooring.com) Bath This bespoke tub is cast in concrete – see above Brassware Natural brass exposed bath mixer with diverter and hand shower, £1,539.60; wall-mounted single lever shower mixer with hand shower and high level holder, £1,215.60; wall-mounted single lever basin mixer/spout, £850.80, all by Vola (vola.com) Lighting ‘Duell’ ceiling lights by Modular featuring a golden interior, approximately £237 each (supermodular.com) ➤

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HOT TREND

#14 B L O C K PA R T Y It’s hip to be square! Embrace the trend for cuboid shapes and minimal detailing Perhaps it’s a backlash against the soft curves and organic forms that have dominated bathroom design in recent years, but this season there’s a move towards more angular shapes. This ‘Feel’ range by K-Stone, for example, sees straight lines and boxy shapes employed across the design of the whole suite, from bidet and toilet to bath and basin. Ladder-style shelving units are also increasingly popular thanks to their slim profile and versatile storage possibilities. Try Hem’s ‘Verso’ ladder by Mikko Halonen, which comes in two sizes and has coloured lacquered metal shelves (from £209; hem.com). ‘Feel’ bathroom range by K-Stone: bidet, £1,254; WC, £1,254; bath, £5,190; freestanding basin, £1,530, all CP Hart (cphart.co.uk) E D

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THE SHOWROOM

D I R E C T O RY Whether you’re upgrading an existing bathroom or putting in a whole new suite, start your planning with a visit to one of our recommended showrooms. At these top venues located around the country, you can experience the best of both British and international brands up-close, compare different product features, materials and colourways, and select every important finishing touch with the guidance of experts Words SARAH SLADE

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A L B I O N B AT H C O M PA N Y This Essex brand crafts its 54-strong luxury bathtub collection from a durable Iso-Enamel material that gives the look and feel of original cast iron at a third of the weight. Fine brassware, basins and cabinetry are also ofered. Pictured ‘Tubby Torre’ bath, £2,289, with ‘Beaufort’ nickel bath/shower mixer tap, £489 The Factory, High Birch Road, Weeley Heath CO16 (albionbathco.com)

ALTERNATIVE BATHROOMS Find great style at every price point at the three London showrooms. From deluxe showers to waterproof TVs, it has products by 100 brands, including Duravit, Dornbracht, and Lefroy Brooks. Pictured ‘Bahia Corner’ Cristalplant bath by Oriano Favaretto for Mastella, £10,560, with ‘Polar Rim’ mixer tap by Mastella, from £1,195 105–107 Wandsworth Bridge Road, London SW6 (alternativebathrooms.com) 86

A S T O N M AT T H E W S Founded in 1823, this impressive north London showroom stocks over 2,000 big-name brands and exclusive lines in a mix of styles sourced from across Europe. Browse modern wall-hung basins, sleek showers, traditional wooden cabinets and classic cast-iron baths. Pictured ‘Streamline’ oak and ceramic basin, £1,786, with mirror, £290 141–147A Essex Road, Islington, London N1 (astonmatthews.co.uk)


Bathrooms | D I R E C T O R Y

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B & Q In-store consultants at this DIY chain use the innovative ‘B&Q Spaces’ 3D software to help bring your design to life. Both traditional and contemporary ranges are available at the 300 nationwide branches, and space-saving and storage ideas are key considerations. Look out for toilets and basins by Ideal Standard and showers by Mira. Pictured ‘Luciana’ range by Cooke & Lewis, from £273 for a toilet and basin set Showrooms nationwide (diy.com)

PICTURES: PHILIP ETHERDEN, PAOLO GOLUMELLI

B AT H R O O M S I N T E R N AT I O N A L B Y T H G Looking for hotel-style luxury? This French-owned company ofers sleek and highly ornate bathrooms that can be viewed at its London showroom. The brassware collaborations with Baccarat and Studio Putman are highlights. Pictured ‘Rose’ gold basin taps with pink Daum Crystal handles by THG, from £6,589 4 Pont St, London SW1 (bathroomsint.com)

B A G N O D E S I G N The company’s practical, eye-catching designs encompass everything from walk-in showers to taps and furniture. You can explore it all at the brand’s new flagship showroom on London’s King’s Road (opening this month), which joins existing branches in Leeds, Glasgow and Edinburgh. Pictured ‘Mezzanine’ vanity unit in ‘Oceano Satin’, from £795, with mixer tap, £195; basin, £365; and ‘Metreaux’ mirror, from £230 Junction 27, Unit 1, Oakwell Park, Birstall, Leeds WF17 (bagnodesign.co.uk)

BATHSTORE This one-stop bathroom retailer sells its own ‘Contemporary’, ‘Traditional’, ‘Boutique’, ‘Timeless’ and ‘Space-saving’ ranges plus lighting, heating and decorating solutions. It has 173 UK venues, with a refurbished branch in Edinburgh and flagship store in London. Pictured ‘Lagoon’ Touchstone freestanding bathtub, £1,799, with ‘Openwater Mono’ bath filler, £749 Showrooms nationwide (bathstore.com)

B E R T & M AY A dreamy bathroom collection is now available at the London showroom of this encaustic tile expert. Visit to admire and explore its graceful cast concrete basins, ofered in an impressive 28 natural-pigment colours, with solid brass tap and shower fittings by British design brand Studio Ore. Pictured ‘Rho’ concrete basin, £1,140 67 Vyner Street, London E2 (bertandmay.com) ➤ 87


B O F F I With a roster of world-class designers on board, this Italian kitchen and bathroom brand stands out for its use of ultra-luxe materials. Coming soon is the ‘Eclipse’ stainless-steel tap range by Studio Charlie and Piero Lissoni’s extra-special ‘Garden’ basin, which sees a stone worktop double as the sink’s base. Pictured ‘Xila’ vanity units, with ‘Pipe’ taps by Marcel Wanders, from £24,000 254 Brompton Road, London SW3 (boffiuk.com)

C B I S A Z Z A This Italian mosaic specialist teams up with designer greats like Jaime Hayón and Marcel Wanders for its ‘Bisazza Bagno’ collection. Expect to find everything from sanitaryware to stylish lighting and accessories such as marble trays. Pictured ‘Nendo’ wall-mounted washbasin by Nendo, £4,858, with chrome tap, £773; mirror, £862; lacquered shelves, from £320 60 Sloane Avenue, London SW3 (bisazza.com)

C P H A R T This London flagship store is the place to find trends from Bette, Duravit, Fantini, Neutra and Ex.T, as well as a range of ceramic and brassware designed in house. Eight further London stores, join the other UK branches in St Albans, Tunbridge Wells, Manchester and Guildford branches. Pictured ‘Boutique’ glass and chrome corner shower by Matki, from £2,893 Newnham Terrace, Hercules Road, London SE1 (cphart.co.uk) 88

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D AY T R U E A young, London-based firm that creates grand bathrooms using stylish storage furniture by Rexa Design, luxury shower enclosures by Majestic and much more. Showrooms are in Maida Vale and Chelsea – the latter directed towards the trade. Pictured ‘Hammam’ basin, from £934, with clay base, from £123, both by Monica Grafeo for Rexa Design. Brushed stainless steel tap by Inox, £749 128 Elgin Avenue, London W9 (daytrue.com)

C AT C H P O L E & RY E A maker of timeless sanitaryware and taps in classic silhouettes and alluring finishes. Its hero cast-iron baths are poured using traditional techniques at its foundry and showroom in Kent. It has a London flagship and a store in Tunbridge Wells. Pictured ‘Nickel Bateau’ bath with painted charcoal exterior, £6,600, with ‘La Loire’ tap, £1,620 282–284 Fulham Road, London SW10 (catchpoleandrye.com)

D E S I G N S PA C E L O N D O N Now at its new south London base, this company’s huge showroom is arranged as a series of room sets to demonstrate the reasons to opt for one of its Italianmade Modulnova bathrooms. There’s also a showroom on London’s Wigmore Street. Pictured Teak basin, £3,960, with ‘Open’ shelves, from £660, both by Modulnova, and ‘Innovo’ steel tap by Cea, £534 120 Webber Street, London SE1 (designspacelondon.com)


PICTURES: SIMON BEVAN, MAC MINI, PHOTO4

Bathrooms | D I R E C T O R Y

DEVON & DEVON

D O M U S Celebrating 52 years of

Taking its style influence from the 1920s, this Italian brand’s luxe west London showroom has freestanding baths, vanity units and marble flooring. Plus, a ‘Bath Couture’ service ofers made-to-measure furniture, fixtures and fittings. Pictured ‘Harry Junior’ basin cabinet, £2,340, with ‘Etoile’ ceramic basin, £618, and ‘Black Dandy’ taps, £513 77–79 Westbourne Grove, London W2 (devon-devon.com)

trading, this south London company sources stone, tiles and mosaics globally, with designs by Mutina and Florim. It also has its own engineered-oak flooring range in over 40 colourways and concrete tiles by Kaza. It has four showrooms in London and an outlet store in Surrey. Pictured The ‘New Terracotta’ tiles by Domus, from £180 per square metre 60 Queenstown Road, London SW8 (domusgroup.com)

D R U M M O N D S Classically inspired and traditionally made, this British company’s elegant collection includes freestanding cast-iron bathtubs, china sinks and glass wall lamps – all on display at its Chelsea showroom. A second London store is located in Notting Hill. Pictured ‘Double Ladybower’ Arabescato marble and nickel vanity basin by Martin Brudnizki for Drummonds, from £7,860 642 King’s Road, London SW6 (drummonds-uk.com)

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E D W I N S B AT H R O O M S This family-run firm stocks elite brands such as Flaminia, Laufen and GSI Ceramica. There are several showrooms and a dedicated plumbing and heating counter dotted along London’s All Saints Road. A specialist ‘Spa and Wellness’ venue equipped with working state-of-the-art designs opened on Westbourne Park Road last year. Pictured ‘Sky Glass’ sauna by Talocci Design for Efegibi, around £15,000 17–26 All Saints Road, London W11 (edwinsbathrooms.co.uk) ➤ 89


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F I R E D E A R T H Combining expert craftsmanship with practicality, this brand’s products span the classic to the contemporary, and includes superb paints and tiles. It has 62 showrooms, with a new branch in Hale Barns, Cheshire. Pictured ‘Futurism’ tiles in (from top) ‘Marinetti’, ‘Severini’, ‘Munari’ and ‘Balla’, all £79.46 per square metre. Pictured with ‘Nagoya’ stone basin, £350 and ‘Metro’ basin mixer, £900 Stores nationwide ( firedearth.com)

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H

H A N S G R O H E The showroom, The Water Studio, in London’s Clerkenwell design district has working tap and shower displays. Products can’t be bought there, but customers can look at design features before being referred to a retailer. Pictured ‘Axor One’ chrome thermostatic control by Barber & Osgerby for Axor by Hansgrohe, £889, with ‘Raindance Royale 350’ overhead shower £1,967 12–16 Clerkenwell Road, London EC1 (thewaterstudio.co.uk)

H O L L O WAY S O F L U D L O W Known for its unique displays, this brand’s basement showroom (it sells lighting upstairs) combines a reclaimed wood basin shelf, sleek Vola taps and a copper bath to great efect. Burlington, Cea, Dansani, Saneux and Lineart are just some of the top brands represented. Pictured ‘14 Series’ glass pendant light by Bocci, from £315 113 Shepherds Bush Road, London, W6 (hollowaysofludlow.com)

J U S T A D D WAT E R Championing contemporary names including Bauhaus, Crosswater, Grohe, Sottini, Kelly Hoppen and Jacuzzi at its ample showrooms found in London, Hertfordshire and Essex, this company shares space with plumbing, heating and building merchants for added customer convenience. Pictured ‘Cape Cod’ vanity unit, £3,289, with washbasin, £308, and LED mirror, £2,008, all by Philippe Starck for Duravit; with ‘Axor Starck’ tap by Philippe Starck for Hansgrohe, around £570 202–228 York Way, Kings Cross, London N7 ( justaddwater.co.uk) 90


Bathrooms | D I R E C T O R Y

L I V I N G S PA C E L O N D O N An Italian designer furniture company with three London stores, featuring modern bathroom ranges by Lago. Floating modular vanity units, illuminated mirrors and glass-bottomed basins are standout signature looks. Pictured ‘Skin’ basin by Daniele Lago, from £2,693, with brushedsteel tap by Cea, £1,634 55 Baker Street, London W1 (livingspaceuk.com)

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MANDARIN STONE

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K O H L E R AT W E S T O N E B AT H R O O M S This east London showroom is the flagship space for luxury US brand Kohler and its other labels Kallista, Robern and Sanijura. We especially love the glass basins and beautiful brassware. Look out for its association with Ann Sacks, one of our top brands for beautiful surface finishes – it ofers an excellent range of mosaic tiles. Hot buy ‘Minima NG’ shower enclosure, from £1,320 44–48 Clerkenwell Road, London EC1 (kohler.co.uk)

PICTURES: NIC LEHOUX

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LAURENCE PIDGEON

LIQUID DESIGN

Visit Laurence’s London showroom for high-end solutions from Italian brand Moab 80 and Copenhagen Bath, as well as a new collection of taps by Cea, finished with stylish wooden handles. Pictured ‘Harmony’ bath, £6,172, with basins, £845 each, both Kelly Hoppen for Apaiser, and stainless-steel pillar mixer tap by Cea, £3,468 31-35 Fulham High Street, London SW6 (laurencepidgeon.com)

High-end bathrooms with designs by Italian brands Agape and Antonio Lupi are paired with superbly engineered Vola and Dornbracht fittings at this Northampton showroom, which works closely with architects and designers. Hot buy ‘Mem’ spout, £1,240, with SmartWater’ electronic control, £5,005, all by Sieger Design for Dornbracht 64–66 High Street, Kingsthorpe, Northampton NN2 (liquiddesign.co.uk)

A large selection of luxurious stone, decorative tiles and practical wood-efect porcelain planks can be found at this brand’s ten showrooms around the country – including a recently relocated branch in Cardif. Materials are competitively priced and the majority held in stock for speedy delivery. Pictured ‘Calacatta Viola’ polished marble, from £89.98 per square metre Stores nationwide (mandarinstone.com)

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N A P I E R B AT H R O O M S AND INTERIORS

This Edinburgh-based retailer sells bespoke bathrooms and ofers installation services. It is one of the only Scottish venues to showcase pieces by Armani/Roca & Keuco. Pictured ‘Venticello’ wall-hung toilet by Villeroy & Boch, £653, with basin, from £865 and units, from £923 each 30 Canonmills, Edinburgh EH3 (napierinteriors.co.uk) ➤ 91


NICHOLAS ANTHONY Ranges from leading names including Dornbracht, Duravit, Hansgrohe and Teuco are ofered. Consultations are available at all showrooms, but for full displays visit its Colchester store. Pictured In-house designer Simon Lecomber finished his mosaic-clad display with ‘Raindance’ waterfall showerheads by Hansgrohe, from £590 43–45 London Road, Colchester CO3 (nicholas-anthony.com)

NU-LINE

This homeware company is known for solid timber washstands, simple accessories and oversized mirrors. It collaborates with Lefroy Brooks and Perrin & Rowe. Pictured ‘Chichester’ washstand in ‘Charcoal’, from £995, with ‘Buckingham’ mirror, £225; ‘Ashcroft’ accessories, from £23 each; and single lever tap by Perrin & Rowe, £280 Showrooms nationwide (neptune.com)

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PLUG INTERIORS

PORCELANOSA

This Leicester-based company covers kitchens, bedrooms and lighting, so you can coordinate the look of your whole home efortlessly. Its superb bathroom portfolio includes luxury tubs by Adamsez and Clearwater, heating by Aestus and brassware by Vado. Pictured ‘ISpa’ collection by Prospero Rasulo for Gessi, from £420 for a tap 20 South Churchgate, St Margarets Way, Leicester LE1 (pluginteriors.com)

This Spanish manufacturer has 22 UK showrooms and delivers functional yet luxurious style. Expect to find watersaving toilets, smart shower columns and radio-integrated mirrors. Pictured ‘Mood’ shower column, £5,016, with ‘Mood’ handshower, £94 and bracket, £59; floor-mounted bath shower mixer, £2,164; and ‘Novak’ bath, £3,114 Wandsworth Bridge Road, London, SW6 (porcelanosa.com)

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RIPPLES A luxury retailer that creates its bespoke bathrooms using designs by Samuel Heath, Bisque, Burgbad and Hansgrohe. It has 12 showrooms in the south of England. Pictured In-house designer Siobhan Scott created this walk-through shower, which features the ‘Ultra Slim Square’ showerhead by Cifial, £302; hand shower by Axor Starck, £187 and a special bespoke lighting efect, from £500 Showrooms nationwide (ripples.ltd.uk)

PICTURES: VIVIANA, JOSE REQUENA JUAREZ, KASIA GATKOWSKA

NEPTUNE

Whether you prefer retro curves or sleek lines, this established London showroom carries a huge selection of brands such as Catalano and Stonekast. It has on-site departments for expert help with plumbing, heating and DIY materials. Pictured ‘D-Light’ oak basin unit, £592, with ‘D-Light’ tall unit, £486; side unit, £300; and ‘Classic’ mirror, £115, all by VitrA Unit 12–14 Malton Road, London W10 (nu-line.net)


Bathrooms | D I R E C T O R Y

R O C A L O N D O N G A L L E RY This Spanish brand’s basins, showers and brassware are on show alongside its collaborative ‘Armani/Roca’ luxury range at the London showroom. The space is designed by the late Zaha Hadid, who leaves an outstanding legacy, including the London 2012 Olympics Aquatics Centre. Swiss brand Laufen and its ‘Alessi by Laufen’ and ‘Kartell by Laufen’ of-shoots are also ofered. Hot buy ‘Inspira’ glossy wall-hung unit, £696, with basin, £300, and ‘Lanta’ basin mixer, £342 Station Court, Townmead Road, London SW6 (uk.roca.com)

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S A LVAT O R I

S A M U E L H E AT H

Designed by architect Piero Lissoni, the London showroom of this luxurious Italian stone specialist will tempt you with elegant bathroom collections, supreme wall and floor surfaces and smaller gems like mirrors and side tables. Pictured The ‘Ninfa’ marble basin in ‘Bianco Carrara’ by Elisa Ossino, approximately £2,208 26 Wigmore Street, London W1 (salvatoriuk.com)

Made by an elite team of craftspeople, this British heritage company’s brassware and accessories are available in a variety of finishes. Visit the Chelsea showroom in London to see the full range – the most recent ‘Landmark’ line is inspired by the Bauhaus School of Design. Pictured ‘Style Moderne’ non-lacquered brass high spout basin tap, from £914 Design Centre Chelsea Harbour, London SW10 (samuel-heath.co.uk)

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TOTO

Visit the east London showroom of this Japanese firm to discover state-of-the-art investment tubs, showers, basins, taps and its world-famous shower-toilets, which provide gentle cleansing with warm water. Look out for its compact ‘Clean Dry’ hand dryer, perfect for domestic bathrooms. Pictured ‘Giovannoni Washlet’ showertoilet by Stefano Giovannoni, from £3,440 140–142 St John Street, London EC1 (gb.toto.com) ➤ 93


TUTTO BAGNO Based in the north west of England, this family business imports top-end products from brands such as Art Ceram, Hidra, Knief and Ypsilon – think statement ‘talking point’ products that inject a sense of fun. Its substantial showroom is a favourite port of call for the trade. Pictured ‘Wire’ metal freestanding basin by Hidra, £1,536 excluding waste The Sidings, Thomas Street, Blackpool FY1 (tuttobagno.co.uk)

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VICTORIA + ALBERT B AT H S Sculptural baths and basins based on the design of cast-iron tubs are supplied in Quarrycast (an easy-to-clean stone). There’s also hardwood furniture and Art Deco-inspired brassware. Pictured ‘Pescadero’ Quarrycast bath, from £2,976, with ‘Tubo 15’ polishedchrome tap, from £1,570 Design Centre Chelsea Harbour, London SW10 (vandabaths.com)

V I C T O R PA R I S This is Scotland’s leading high-quality bathroom and tile specialist. It has a variety of styles, from vintage to modern glam, with brands including Jacuzzi, Hurlingham and Geberit. Showrooms in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Dundee. Pictured ‘AquaClean Mera’ remotecontrolled sensor toilet with ‘WhirlSpray’ shower by Geberit, from £4,740 178 Dundee Street, Edinburgh EH11 (victorparis.com)

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WA R E B AT H R O O M CENTRE Visit this riverside showroom in Ware, Hertfordshire, to browse designs by Aqualisa, Svedbergs, Hib and Villeroy & Boch. The company prides itself on over 30 years of product knowledge and products to suit every style. Pictured ‘Ombrone’ basin, £1,380, with ‘Ciane’ basin mixer, £290, both by Sottini 4 Star Street, Ware SG12 (warebathrooms.co.uk)

T H E WAT E R M A R K COLLECTION

VOLA Expect iconic brassware collections by design hero Arne Jacobsen, plus minimalist accessories, that evoke a spa-like feel at the London showroom. You can’t buy at the studio, but Vola has over 50 showrooms and can put you in touch with your local dealer. Pictured ‘Combi 32’ brushed stainless steel waterfall shower with Kneipp hose and built-in stop valves, £2,034 32–36 Great Portland Street, London W1 (vola.com) 94

Combining industrial heritage with a contemporary spin, each of this US brand’s eight brassware designs are handmade in 15 finishes including ‘Vintage Copper’. London showroom open by appointment. Pictured ‘Loft’ floorstanding bath set with slimline hand shower in ‘Polished Copper’, £3,031 58 Riley Road, London SE1 (thewatermarkcollection.eu)


PICTURES: SIMON UPTON, TERESA ENG

Bathrooms | D I R E C T O R Y

T H E WAT E R M O N O P O LY

WAT E R W O R K S

W E S T O N E B AT H R O O M S

An expert in antique and reproduction bathrooms, this UK firm has its own technicians, restorers and plumbers. It sells sanitaryware by Thomas Crapper and is the distributor of French-made Volevatch taps. Pictured ‘Rockwell’ reproduction ‘Vitrite’ bath with interchangeable ceramic feet, from £6,056; with ‘Rockwell’ wall-mounted bath spout, from £720 10–14 Lonsdale Road, London NW6 (thewatermonopoly.com)

High-end bathroom furniture and fixtures are this US company’s trade. Visit the London showroom to be wowed by ‘Isla’, a new 30-component fittings collection inspired by rock – a dual efort with New York sculptor and designer Jill Platner. Pictured ‘Isla’ gooseneck faucet with metal geode handles in burnished nickel, £2,218 579–581 King’s Road, London SW6 (uk.waterworks.com)

Established in 1978, this family-run brand supplies bespoke bathrooms worldwide, including Agape, Antonio Lupi, Kreoo, Milldue, Omvivo and Splinter Works. It has nine showrooms and the Mayfair flagship store has the world’s largest collection of bathroom accessories. Pictured ‘Closer’ showerhead by Diego Grandi for Zucchetti Kos, from £780 45–46 South Audley Street, London W1 (westonebathrooms.com)

WILLIAM HOLLAND Visit this Dorset-based business for beautiful brassware and glorious, handcrafted copper baths and basins available in over 70 finishes, including the stunning new ‘Verdigris’ with its tarnished copper look . Customers can order a miniature bath handmade to their material and colour speci���cations as a handy design tool for planning the rest of their bathroom project. Pictured ‘Patina Rotundus’ copper and tin bath, £7,748; with basin, £859 Lower Lewell Farm, West Staford DT2 (williamholland.com) E D 95


ADDRESS BOOK

STOCKISTS Love something you’ve seen in ELLE Decoration Bathrooms? Here’s where to buy it AGAPE agapedesign.it ALBION BATH COMPANY albionbathco.com ALTERNATIVE BATHROOMS

alternativebathrooms.com AMARA amara.com AMERICH americh.com ANN SACKS annsacks.com APAISER apaiser.co.uk AQUALISA aqualisa.co.uk ARRED ITALY arreditaly.com ASTON MATTHEWS astonmatthews.co.uk ASTRA WALKER astrawalker.com.au AURA HOME aurahome.com.au AUTHENTICS authentics.co.uk B&Q diy.com BAGNO DESIGN bagnodesign.co.uk BALINEUM balineum.co.uk BATHROOMS INTERNATIONAL BY THG

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D E S I G N D E C O D E D The making of an iconic brand German bathroom company Duravit Go to the bathroom in most UK hotels and restaurants and the basin, bath and WC will more than likely be manufactured by Duravit – and yet you probably didn’t know that this porcelain sanitary brand started life as a tableware manufacturer. In 1817 German craftsman Georg Friedrich Horn founded a factory in the picturesque Black Forest town of Hornberg (Duravit’s headquarters are still there). Originally focusing on crockery, the company didn’t start making bathroom products until 1956, when it switched from earthenware to porcelain and became the huge success we know today. One key aspect to the brand’s 21st-century success is its acknowledgement of the importance of design. In 1989 Duravit approached French designer Philippe Starck to overhaul and revitalise its bathroom collections. Starck, who had already achieved success with his celebrated pieces for Italian brands Alessi and Kartell, realised it wasn’t necessary to reinvent the wheel in order

to create contemporary shapes. Instead, he based his first designs on ancient forms and simple domestic objects such as a washbowl and bucket. In 1994 he unveiled ‘Starck 1’: its glossy white sculptural forms became an international award-winner and helped expand Duravit into over 100 countries. That same year the brand opened a new state-of-the-art design centre and production plant, also designed by Starck (the notoriously maverick designer created a huge toilet sculpture to dominate the building’s façade). Next came the launch of the ‘Starck 2’ range in 1998, inspired by the motion of water; regular additions to the collections have followed ever since. As well as Starck, British architect Norman Foster and German industrial designer Christian Werner have also contributed to the company’s extraordinary success, extending the range to furniture and now accessories. In 2017 Duravit will celebrate its 200th anniversary, which it promises will be an ‘unforgettable year’ (duravit.com).

FA C T O RY S E T T I N G Founder Georg Friedrich Horn chose to site his factory in the Black Forest in order to make use of the area’s natural resources, including kaolin, a clay used in porcelain manufacture.

FA M O U S G R O U S E In 1937 Duravit introduced the image of the wood grouse as its trademark. ‘It can carry greetings from our beautiful Black Forest homeland around the world,’ the then managing director Eduard Cronn once said.

MODERN M AV E R I C K The ‘Starck 1’ collection (washbasin unit, pictured) was launched in 1994 and represents the moment that Duravit became a big global player.

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WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS

S TA R C K C E N T R A L In 1994 Duravit opened a brand new design centre and production plant, designed by its new collaborator Philippe Starck, who created a huge toilet sculpture to sit inside the building’s glass structure.



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