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THE STYLE MAGAZINE FOR YOUR HOME MARCH 2016 £ 4.40

THE N EW FUTU R E GR E E N   L I V I N G How to make it sexy and stylish

RISE AND SHINE

9 770957 894205

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14 inspiring bathrooms to help kickstart your day

Step inside the Memphis movement

BUMPER HOMES I N S P I R AT I O N

Interiors to fall in love with from colourful to calming


THE NEW FUTURE

MARCH 2016

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LIVE THE GREEN DREAM A new wave of eco-friendly design is making it easier than ever to go green. Here’s everything you need to know the crusade 59 Join Eco expert Lucy

Siegle explains why now is the time to get involved

Style 25 News The latest design trends, from chunky knits to luxury flooring, and the hottest high-street finds. Plus, we dive into the world of sharp-witted antiques expert Geofrey Bennison

Solutions 83 Bathroom trends 14 fresh ideas to help you create a relaxing spa-like space that soothes and uplifts. From stylish surfaces to bold new finishes, this special is packed with inspiration

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houses Three 62 Green pioneering homeowners tell us what it’s like to live in an eco home

style Furniture 68 Eco and homewares

COVER IMAGE: FELIX FOREST/LIVING INSIDE

that do good and look good

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How to go green The brands and labels that every savvy shopper should know

buster 80 Jargon Important eco

terms explained

MARCH 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 15


Escape 191 News Exhibitions, restaurant openings and three new independent cinemas; plus, the ultimate Alpine adventures 202 Architecture Nordic landmarks, inspiring cofee-table books, and the story behind Mexico’s National Museum of Anthropology

Finally 22 Subscribe Fantastic ofers for our most loyal readers 207 Stockists Names and addresses 218 Decoded The history of Henning Koppel’s elegant ‘HK’ pitcher

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178 Home 112 Classic beauty Designer furniture and global treasures add a modern edge to a 19th-century apartment in Lyon’s design district 122 Den of Zen Taking inspiration from its owner’s passion for meditation, this townhouse is the ultimate urban retreat

150 The enchanting palace This neo-gothic landmark in Switzerland is a beautiful blend of contemporary furniture and original design features 162 Blue sky thinking The bright and breezy rooms in this compact Copenhagen apartment are defined by cheerful colours

136 Working in Memphis Inside the studios of Nathalie du Pasquier and George Sowden, two founders of the Memphis design movement

168 Pure bliss Discover the secret to combining practical family living with clean, all-white Nordic style

142 Arabian light A Marrakesh apartment that eschews a clichéd Moroccan aesthetic in favour of minimalist white walls and floors

178 The borrowers One creative couple have filled their Milan home with a characterful mix of vintage accessories and salvaged finds

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THE NEW FUTURE 1 

‘To do things diferently, we must see things diferently.’ So says John Thackara, an author, speaker and social innovator who has devoted his working life to the championing of good design and the pursuit of a sustainable future via his organisation Doors of Perception (doorsofperception.com). In a recent blog post he references the papal encyclical on climate change, Laudato Si, thus: Whether we’re talking about brands or ourselves ‘The Pope’s 700-page document tells an alternative story about the as individuals, we need to acknowledge that daring relationship between humans and to do things diferently does make an impact the natural world. At its centre is the concept of “integral ecology”: the text calls on all peoples to be protectors of the environment; states I’ve deliberately linked these two stories because to me they actually that care for creation is a virtue in its own right; and advocates global speak of the same thing. Whether we’re talking about brands or solidarity as “a key value to direct our search for the common good.”’ ourselves as individuals, we need to acknowledge that daring to do I quote this because it’s all too easy to lament ‘well, what diference things diferently does make an impact. It’s about confidence. It’s will my little bit of recycling really make’, or to dismiss green issues knowing that your personal recycling matters, whether by example as boring or unduly worthy. It’s also easy for magazines to efectively or contribution. For brands, it’s recognising that shouty logos matter ghettoise ecological design by dedicating special pages to ‘green’ not one jot when it comes to the excellence of your goods. stuf, as if it’s rare or unique, when, in fact, it should simply be Certainly, an element of marketing plays its part. After all, it was mainstream and intrinsic to what makes something good. the jewel-box nature of the David Naman shop that pulled me into it Nevertheless, we kickstart our increased contribution to the in the first place – great colours (a vivid turquoise for some walls), ecological debate with a Green Living section this month, proving graphic wallpaper, some marble, no banging house music. Think that it can be both sexy and super stylish, and henceforth anything discreet chic. From fashion to green living, it’s clearly smart to be smart. eco will be mixed in with all the other things we consider of note.

PICTURE: EMMA WEBSTER

I have been looking for a simple, black leather rucksack for over a year. Admittedly, not a concerted 24/7 major research ofensive, more a keeping-a-constant-eye-out sort of thing. I really didn’t think it’d be so hard to find. I was seeking practicality (a way of closing it that will keep everything inside dry in case of rain), simplicity (no overt logos, big brass buckles or any other unnecessary accoutrements – dangly bits, studs etc) and relative capaciousness (it needs to be able to fit several copies of ELLE Decoration inside but still look like a smart work bag rather than something I’d take trekking). The hunt was on. But everything I saw failed one of my requirements. Too big. Too ugly. Not nice leather. Too many straps. And so it went on. Several times I almost capitulated, so desperate was I to ditch my trusty, but not very Editor-in-Chiefy, Eastpak, but I hung in there, determined that my bag would finally materialise. And it did, four days before writing this, courtesy of a small Italian menswear brand I’d never heard of before: David Naman. My bag has one zip, one clip, the logo is embossed and so tiny that it’s barely visible, the leather is the sort that looks and feels as if I’ve owned it for an age, and it cost £158. Worth every penny.

Follow me on Twitter: @MOgundehin

Editor-in-Chief

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M ICH E L L E O GU N DE H I N Editor-in-Chief

Editor’s Assistant/Features Assistant Charlotte Brook (020 7534 2522) Email editor@elledecoration.co.uk 72 Broadwick Street, London W1F 9EP (elledecoration.co.uk) Editorial enquiries elledecoration@hearst.co.uk Homes submissions homes@elledecoration.co.uk

E DI T OR I A L Art Director Tony Peters (020 7534 2521) Deputy Editor Ben Spriggs (020 7439 5027) Features Director Amy Bradford (020 7534 2524) Photography Director Flora Bathurst Acting Photography Director Elizabeth Wood (020 7534 2530) Homes Editor Jackie Daly (020 7534 2512) Decorating Editor Alex Kristal (020 7534 2527) Art Editor Philippe Blanchin (020 7534 2518) Chief Sub Editor Clare Sartin (020 7534 2519) Senior Sub Editor Sarah Morgan (020 7439 5343) Photography Assistant James Williams (020 7534 2513) Junior Designer Eloise Adler (020 7534 2581) Decorating Intern Stephanie Iles (020 7534 2526) Associate Features Editor Emma Love Associate Editor Sarah Slade Editor-at-Large Talib Choudhry Managing Editor Debbie Morgan (020 7534 2558) Workflow Director Imogen Van Zaane (020 7534 0000) Associate Stylists Hannah Bort Sania Pell Amanda Smith Suzanne Stankus

Group Publishing Director Jacqui Cave (020 7439 5273) Publisher’s Assistant Charlotte Rottenburg (020 7439 5954) Associate Publisher Christopher Daunt (020 7439 5175) Account Manager Octavia Thompson (020 7439 5462) Classified Sales Executive Hannah Symondson (020 3728 6233) Director of Hearst Magazines Direct Cameron Dunn (020 7927 4699) Regional Sales Lisa Rogers (01619 629254/07702 346037) Group Director: Create Rhiannon Thomas (020 7439 5202) Director: Create Rashad Braimah (020 7439 5399) Account Manager: Create Jane Kelly (020 7439 5106) Art Director: Create Tanja Rusi (020 7439 5374) Art Editor: Create Leo Goddard (020 7439 5583) Project Managers: Create Richard Adams (020 7534 2596) Danielle Falco-Grimshaw (020 7439 5617) Acting Head of PR Debra Johnson (020 7312 3812) PR Manager Ben Bolton (020 7534 5218) PR Executive Alice Roberta Taylor (020 7439 5047)

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CI RCU L AT ION Circulation and Marketing Director Reid Holland Head of Marketing Operations Jennifer Smith Head of Consumer Sales & Marketing James Hill Group Customer Marketing Manager Karen Sharp (020 7439 5543) Senior Marketing Executive Vicky Chandler (020 3728 7688)

H E A R ST LU X U RY

H E A R ST M AG A Z I N E S I N T E R N AT ION A L President/CEO Duncan Edwards Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Oicer and General Manager Simon Horne Senior Vice President/Director of Licensing and Business Development Gautam Ranji Senior Vice President/International Publishing Director Jeannette Chang Senior Vice President/Editorial Director Kim St Clair Bodden

Head of Experience Rachel Wood Brand Marketing Manager Aoibheann Foley (020 7439 5046)

Executive Editor Eleonore Marchand

H E A R ST M AG A Z I N E S U K Chief Executive Oicer Anna Jones Chief Finance Oicer Claire Blunt Director of Editorial Strategy & Content Louise Court Managing Director, Brands Michael Rowley Group Commercial Director Ella Dolphin (020 7439 5689) Vice President, Strategy and Product Management Lee Wilkinson Chief Technical Oicer Darren Goldsby Director of Communications Lisa Quinn HR Director Surinder Simmons ELLE Decoration is published by Hearst Magazines UK, a trading name of The National Magazine Company Ltd.

Executive Creative Director Peter Yates Fashion and Entertainment Director Kristen Ingersoll

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T R A DEM A R K NO T ICE ELLE® and ELLE Decoration™ are used under licence from the trademark owner, Hachette Filipacchi Presse LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE Chairman and CEO Lagardère Active  Denis Olivennes CEO ELLE France & International Constance Benqué CEO ELLE International Media Licenses François Coruzzi Brand Management of ELLE DECORATION Sylvie de Chirée SVP/International Director of ELLE DECORATION Cristina Romero SVP/Director of International Media Licenses, Digital Development & Syndication Mickaël Berret Editorial Executive of ELLE Decoration Linda Bergmark Marketing Executive of ELLE Decoration Flora Régibier Syndication Coordinator Audrey Schneuwly INTERNATIONAL AD SALES HOUSE LAGARDÈRE GLOBAL ADVERTISING CEO Claudio Piovesana claudio.piovesana@lagardere-active.com Lagardère Global Advertising , 10 rue Thierry Le Luron 92300 Levallois- Perret, France

APRIL ISSUE ON SALE MARCH 4, 2016

T H I S MON T H ’ S CON T R I BU TOR S Andrew Bannecker Twitter: @andrewbannecker Profession Illustrator Feature Live the green dream, p59 Likes Spending time with my family; antiques; anything nautical Favourite city Paris – it’s so old, beautiful, and full of history Dream destination Anguilla Interiors style A combination of clean white walls with antique statement pieces Favourite design object My paintbrush Design hero American sculptor Nick Cave Dream buy Mark Ryden’s new painting, Aurora

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Sarah Slade Profession Writer Feature The borrowers, p178 Interiors style Relaxed, modern and cosy. I like new-craft, lots of wood, pottery and simple patterns, and for rooms to flow together Home An open-plan Edwardian house in West Worthing. I bought it for the amazing light and the fact that I can walk out of my front gate and see the sea Most precious possession A very wobbly hand-drawn family portrait by my eldest son, Max Dream buy A state-of-the-art cinema with huge squishy armchairs and popcorn on tap

Lucy Siegle Twitter: @lucysiegle Profession Writer Features Join the crusade p60; How to go green p75 Likes Small dogs, extreme recycling Dislikes Instagram (encourages wild narcissism), seasonal trends (I don’t like systems that promote waste), non-recyclable packaging Design hero I’m obsessed with Timorous Beasties. I think their constant witty reinvention of tradition is brilliant. In terms of ethical design my heart goes to Fairphone, a Dutch cooperative that has reimagined the ubiquitous smartphone with a clean supply chain

INTERVIEWS: SARAH MORGAN PICTURE: MATT AUSTIN IMAGES

PU BL I SH I NG & A DV E RT I SI NG


ELLE Decoration | S U B S C R I P T I O N

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SHOPPING • DESIGN • CR A FT • ECO • NA MES TO KNOW • BIG IDEA S

STYLE

PARQUET THE MODERN WAY We’ve seen wooden and metal parquet floors, but now you can reach new heights of luxury with a marble version. Stone specialist Lapicida has selected several of its most distinctive vein-cut marbles to create beautiful chevron tiles. The subtle colour graduations of ‘Silk Georgette’ (pictured) or the more rustic fossil-packed ‘Hanover Blue’ lend this classic style a fresh appeal. £235 per square metre (lapicida.com).

F O R M O R E O B J E C T S O F D E S I R E , V I S I T E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K / S H O P P I N G


PICTURE: HENRIK BECKER NIELSEN

Style | N E W S

O R D E R LY FA S H I O N Italian designer Gianfranco Frattini created the ‘Albero’ bookcase in the late 1950s – rather than sitting against a wall, it is secured between the ceiling and the floor and has an adjustable rack-and-pinion shelf system. Manufacturer Poltrona Frau has just released this new limitededition version in beautifully grained olive wood, which accentuates the design’s tree-like form. £10,800 (poltronafrau.com).

THE FA I R E S T O F THEM ALL We mostly associate design hero Giò Ponti with mid-century furniture, but Danish brand Gubi is reissuing two of his early works. The ‘Randaccio’ mirror (below; 1928) was created for Ponti’s first architectural project – his own home on Via Randaccio in Milan – where it hung in his bedroom. The delicate crown-like detail on the top became one of the designer’s style signatures. In 1933 Ponti created the ‘F.A.33’ mirror (above) for Italian lighting and glass brand Fontana Arte. An embellished oblong shape with a gilt surround, it epitomises the elegance of the decade. ‘Randaccio’ mirror, from £509; ‘F.A.33’ mirror, from £799, both by Giò Ponti, Gubi (gubi.com)

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Style | N E W S

MORNING STAR London-based Tunisian designer Hend Krichen created her debut collection of decorative copper and terracotta vessels with artisans from her native country. Now she’s moved in a new direction, creating a range of functional crockery that’s made in Stoke-onTrent and pays tribute to the area’s ceramics tradition. The ‘British Made’ set is designed specifically for breakfast, and is the first of a planned series catering for diferent mealtimes. ‘Starting with breakfast crockery made sense because it’s the first meal of the day,’ says Krichen (hendkrichen.com). Condiment pot, £35; side plates, teacup and saucer, milk jug and bowl, all £50 each, Hend Krichen (hendkrichen.com). Copper cutlery by Bell & Blue, £36 for a four-piece set, Not On The High Street (notonthehighstreet.com). Linen napkin, from £10, 31 Chapel Lane (31chapellane.com)


Style | N E W S

TIDY DESK, TIDY MIND Our hot pick from Marks & Spencer’s spring/summer ofering is this walnut ‘Ashworth’ desk from the ‘Conran +’ collection. Perfect for those who like to keep a neat workspace, it has a glass top that allows you to see what’s inside your drawers. Its compact size is ideal for small spaces, too. Given the slick finish, we think the £499 price tag is a steal (marksandspencer.com).

DISCOVER THE SCENT OF HOME When she moved into a new house, the first thing ELLE beauty director Sophie Beresiner did was unpack a scented candle to make the place feel like her own. She’s now launched her own candle brand, No22, with three homely scents. ‘Bookshelf ’ has warm leather tones; ‘Centrepiece’ smells like fresh peonies; and ‘Woodstove’ combines smoky wood with powdery notes. We love the knitted texture on the ceramic holders. £38 each, Liberty (liberty.co.uk).

Could Arne Jacobsen’s classic ‘Swan’ chair ever be improved upon? We thought not until we saw these new limited-edition versions in softly hued nubuck leather, a velvety material with an elegant matt finish. Choose from dusty pink or a warm, pale green hue. No wonder Fritz Hansen has dubbed this edition the ‘Choice Swan’. £3,033 each (fritzhansen.com). 30 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2016

PICTURE: PAUL RAESIDE

T H E S WA N ’ S NEW GUISE


Style | N E W S

EXOTIC YARNS Inspired by the vibrant patterns and colours worn by women in Mayan tribes, this bold ‘Kaya’ rug is part of a collaboration between London flooring expert Floor Story and design studio A Rum Fellow, which specialises in designing and sourcing beautiful textiles made using traditional techniques. The sharply defined geometric shapes, enlarged versions of the brocade designs found on traditional huipil tunics, are hand cut by skilled artisans to create a crisp, clean finish. From £800 for a 1.2x1.8-metre rug (arumfellow.com).


Style | N E W S

GET THE LUXE LOOK If you are in the market for a sleek Italian wardrobe system, a statement bed, capacious sofa, trim table or smart chairs, and you want a lavish choice of exquisite finishes (30 lacquers, in gloss and matt, plus more than 300 fabric choices), then look no further than the newly revamped Poliform showroom. Bigger and better than ever before, it’s laid out like a series of dreamy roomsets, so you can really get the feel of what it might be like to live with the furniture. We just want to move in! Added bonus: the Varenna kitchen showroom is right next door, so you can fantasise about your perfect new cook space at the same time. 278 King’s Road, London SW3 (poliformuk.com). ‘Gaston’ armchair by Vincent Van Duysen, £2,144, Poliform (poliformuk.com)

Visit now Kartell, famous for its colourful, stylish plastic furniture, has just opened its first UK flagship store. The two-floor showroom will be an ever-evolving gallery of inspiration and ideas, and is designed by Ferruccio Laviani, who has created many products for the Italian brand over the years. Visit now to discover an exciting mix of furniture, tableware and home fragrance. 232 Brompton Road, London SW3 (kartell.it).

PICK UP STIX A passion for preserving traditional British steambending techniques led designer Ian Archer to create his ‘Stix’ seating collection for his label Archer + Co. The three-seater sofa, love seat, dining chair and carver chair are all made by craftsmen at Sitting Firm. ‘Inspired by Windsor chairs, I exaggerated the scale of the steam-bent back and arms to give an elongated sweep of wood that holds the delicate spindles,’ he says. ‘This creates a cage-like structure that embraces the cushions.’ Sofa, from £4,575, Aram Store (aram.co.uk). MARCH 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 35


WOOL IS THE WORD Chunky knits are the ultimate comforting treat for your home. From do-it-yourself knitting kits to ready-made pieces, here’s how to embrace the trend Looking for a new way to cosy up your home? Drape your bed with layers of these specially commissioned pieces by Jacqueline Fink, founder of Little Dandelion, renowned for her oversized knits (on bed, from £336 each; littledandelion.com). Alternatively, consider upholstering your favourite piece of furniture with a luxurious knitted fabric, such as Dominique Kiefer’s collection for Rubelli (below right), or invest in one of our pick of products (below and left) to add instant warmth.

WORDS: ALEX KRISTAL PICTURES: JOSELE CASTELLON PASCUAL, HEARST STUDIOS BACKGROUND CLAYWORKS

Top ‘Simple’ lampshade, from £831, Naomi Paul (naomipaul.co.uk) Above ‘Prairie’ throws, £248 each, Anthropologie (anthropologie.com) Below, from left 1 ‘Mangas’ rug, £1,043; 2 sofa modules, from £918 each, all by Patricia Urquiola, Gan (gan-rugs.com) 3 Ottoman, £2,600, Claire Anne O’Brien (claireanneobrien.com) 4 Cushion, £195, Rose Sharp Jones (rosesharpjones.co.uk) 5 ‘Knitted’ fabric by Dominique Kiefer, £142 per metre, Rubelli (rubelli.com) Knitting kits 6 Blanket crochet kit, £90, The Toft Alpaca Shop (thetoftalpacashop.co.uk) 7 Rug kit, £75, Stitch & Story (stitchandstory.com) 8 ‘Panther’ pouf kit, £51, Wool and the Gang (woolandthegang.com )

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Style | N E W S

KNITTING KNOW-HOW Make your own woollen wonders. Here’s everything you need to get started BUY For wool in every imaginable colour and weight, look no further than invaluable online resource Loveknitting (loveknitting.com). DOWNLOAD Travelling to New York just to visit contemporary wool shop Purl Soho is extravagant – thankfully, you can download its exciting modern patterns and instructions from the website (purlsoho.com). WATCH If you get stuck on technique, the ‘how-to’ videos by trendy knitters Wool and the Gang (aka Aurelie Popper and Jade Harwood, above) are a great place to start (woolandthegang.com). VISIT If you’re after some tips on your crafting project or like the idea of social knitting, try a class at your local wool shop. We like North London’s Nest (nestknitting.com) and Brighton’s Yak (yarnandknitting.com).

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Style | N E W S

Cloud gazing The style forecast shows that stormy skies are the next big thing in wallpaper prints. Amazing colour gradients from moody grey to coppery red wash across a linen-backed paper by heritage Brit brand Zofany (right), while Italian pattern king Casamance takes a similar palette and explores a more cloudstrewn horizon (centre). And, if you fancy slightly paler skies, look no further than this wonderful ‘Cielo’ print from the fantastic Designers Guild (below).

From left ‘Cielo’ wallpaper, available in six colourways (‘Dusk’ pictured), £213 per 12-metre roll, Designers Guild (designersguild.com). ‘Copper Panoramique’ wall panel, £297, Casamance (casamance.com). ‘Atmosfera’ wallpaper, £60 per ten-metre roll, Zofany (zofany.com)

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ELLE Decoration | P R O M O T I O N

THE NEW COLOURS

‘Inchyra Blue No 289’ estate emulsion, £39.50 for 2.5 l, Farrow & Ball

‘Salon Drab No 290’ estate emulsion, £39.50 for 2.5l, Farrow & Ball

‘Yeabridge Green No 287’ estate emulsion, £39.50 for 2.5l, Farrow & Ball

‘Vardo No 288’ estate emulsion, £39.50 for 2.5l, Farrow & Ball

‘Worsted No 284’ estate emulsion, £39.50 for 2.5l, Farrow & Ball

THE PERFECT PALETTE Paint and paper specialist Farrow & Ball is celebrating 70 years with the release of nine brand-new shades

Main picture Walls painted in ‘Salon Drab’, doors in ‘Yeabridge Green’, and floor in ‘Plummet’ Above Walls and ceiling painted in ‘Peignoir’, woodwork in ‘Worsted’

Farrow & Ball’s reputation precedes it. It’s a reputation that is built on expertise and craftsmanship. It acknowledges the paint and paper specialist’s understanding of British design heritage and commitment to age-old methods; knowledge that has been developed over seven decades since the brand was established in 1946. But it’s more than that. For all that Farrow & Ball has built its legacy on traditional techniques, it has also succeeded in capturing the imaginations of contemporary design enthusiasts. Its carefully created palette of 132 shades – updated only every two to three years – is the company’s calling card. It’s no wonder, then, that all new releases are hotly anticipated. For 2016, Farrow & Ball has produced a collection that features nine new shades. It’s an enticing ofering: soft neutrals alongside muted pastels; rich dark tones that complement strong brights. Each one has been carefully crafted to sit perfectly within Farrow & Ball’s existing colour families, adding new accents that will serve as an instant update to any interior. As ever, the new colours celebrate timeless Farrow & Ball style – all the way down to the unique story that lies behind the name of each and every shade. At the same time, every new hue has been developed to enhance contemporary ways of living and set a nod to future trends. Here’s to 70 more years in perfect style. For more information visit farrow-ball.com/newcolours2016

‘Drop Cloth No 283’ estate emulsion, £39.50 for 2.5l, Farrow & Ball

‘Cromarty No 285’ estate emulsion, £39.50 for 2.5l, Farrow & Ball

‘Peignoir No 286’ estate emulsion, £39.50 for 2.5l, Farrow & Ball

‘Shadow White No 282’ estate emulsion, £39.50 for 2.5l, Farrow & Ball

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Style | N E W S

M Y C U LT U R A L L I F E JANE SHEPHERDSON

We ask a tastemaker what they are reading, watching, downloading and listening to Jane Shepherdson has been CEO of fashion store Whistles since 2008 and has overseen the transformation of what she describes as ‘a slightly boho, girly-frilly’ brand into a highly contemporary label. In 2014 it launched its much-anticipated debut menswear collection, and will open its first menswear store in Shoreditch this spring. Shepherdson is also a visiting professor at the London College of Fashion and a creative advisor to Oxfam (@thisiswhistles; whistles.com).

WORDS: DOMINIC LUTYENS PICTURES: ALAMY

The song that makes me feel instantly happy is anything by The Clash (right), especially Police & Thieves and I Fought the Law. The Clash represented my generation, and I still love their raw energy and anti-Establishment lyrics. At the moment I’m reading A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara (right; Picador, £16.99). It starts as a tale of four friends in New York, and rapidly darkens as you learn about the abuse sufered by one of the characters. I find myself both compelled by it and questioning why I’m so intrigued by such unrelenting anguish: I can’t put it down. My favourite film is Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel (above, right). It has such beautiful sets and costumes, and it makes me laugh out loud. Ralph Fiennes as Gustave is hilarious, full of contradictions – both suave and terribly vulgar. The interaction between him and Zero, the bellboy he’s taken under his wing, is magical. Everyone in the film, from Bill Murray to Tilda Swinton, plays their part beautifully – just the right side of farce and with such charm.

The last exhibition I saw was Tate Modern’s retrospective of American artist Agnes Martin. It was so serene – her signature grids and striped canvases in pale colour-washes were beautiful. It’s fascinating that she was a key figure in the otherwise maledominated field of 1950s and 1960s abstract art, and spent a large amount of her life in New Mexico creating her visionary paintings. If I had a free day in London I’d start by swimming at London Fields Lido first thing, before it gets busy. I’d then head to Broadway Market (top) for a leisurely breakfast at Market Cafe (market-cafe.co.uk), which serves delicious pancakes, and potter around the great independent bookshops nearby. I’d then walk along Regent’s Canal (left) and pop into the Barbican Centre. In the afternoon I’d go to the V&A (vam.ac.uk) and look through its collections for inspiration. I’d end the day with a cocktail at The Zetter Townhouse hotel (thezettertownhouse.com) and dinner at Granger & Co (grangerandco.com). I have two favourite destinations. One is Argentina. The scale of its mountains is breathtaking and it calms me to be surrounded by such beauty. The other is Corsica, which is wild and rugged and ofers the perfect combination of a beautiful coastline with secluded beaches and forest hikes in its high peaks. In summer I like to swim in the sea in the morning, then drive up into the mountains, where it’s cooler. TV has reinvented itself, and now some of the best drama is on the small screen. True Detective had me gripped with incredible performances by Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey, Transparent addressed transgender issues head on, and Mad Men’s portrayal of 1960s America (left) is hard to beat.

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THE DESIGNER MAKER A N N E M A R I E O ’ S U L L I VA N

The Sussex-based willow weaver who crafts natural baskets and large-scale sculptures ‘When my children were young I took a one-day basketmaking course at Stanmer Park in Brighton and went to bed that night unable to sleep because I was so excited,’ recalls East Sussex-based artist Annemarie O’Sullivan. It was an event that sparked a dramatic career change, from teacher to basket maker, 11 years ago. For five years, O’Sullivan spent one day a week studying a City and Guilds course in basket making at City Lit in London; today, she makes kindling baskets, stools and trays, plus bigger, site-specific pieces and installations. O’Sullivan began buying the willow that she uses to make her designs from suppliers in Somerset, but for the past four years she has also been producing her own.

‘I grow about 20 diferent varieties on a piece of community land in Horam. Every January, I harvest it with a group of friends. Cutting, bundling and sorting it into pieces of the same size is a massive job,’ she explains. The harvested willow is left standing in a covered space in her studio, a former fire-control centre in Lewes, to dry for eight months before it’s ready to work with. Often, says O’Sullivan, selecting the right pieces of willow can take almost as long as the weaving process itself. ‘Every year’s crop is diferent, depending on the weather and how the bundle has set.’ Like traditional Sussex trug makers, she uses coppiced sweet chestnut to create frameworks for her baskets. She chops the wood, shaves it down and then steam bends it. Once the structure is complete, she weaves the willow strips onto it. Recently, she has made a series of large woven willow spheres for Charleston, the former country home of the Bloomsbury Group. She also runs courses to teach others her skills. ‘Basketry is a funny craft – when I exhibit at shows, I’m often the only basket maker there and I think, “why am I the only one?”. But I know that this is exactly the right thing for me to be doing.’ (annemarieosullivan.co.uk). 42 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2016

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURE: ALUN CALLENDER (PORTRAIT)

‘Selecting the right pieces of willow can take almost as long as the weaving process itself’

Annemarie O’Sullivan uses sweet chestnut and willow to create sculptures and small woven products including trays (from £70), brushes (from £55) and kindling baskets (from £310)


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MORANDI’S STILL LIFE

PICTURES: JOEL MEYEROWITZ

The artist Giorgio Morandi led a quiet existence in Bologna. For over 40 years, he sat at his work table painting and re-painting the same series of humble objects: vases, tins, shells and watering cans. His still-life compositions have an unerring tranquillity and luminosity. It’s this quality that attracted New York photographer Joel Meyerowitz to create Morandi’s Objects (Damiani, £35), a cofee-table book that adds an inspired twist to the artist’s legacy. Using only the warm natural light in Morandi’s study, Meyerowitz has photographed over 250 objects that the artist painted, placing them on the desk that still bears the marks he used to position his subjects. Beautifully and simply presented, the photographs ofer a new insight into the life and work of an extraordinary modern master.

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FOLLOW YOUR NOSE Five of our favourite home fragrance brands have opened smart new shops this season – here’s where to go and what to buy has been given a colourful redesign inspired by Art Deco style; check out its new patterned glass candle surrounds, created with French glass artist Vincent Breed, and spicy ‘Benjoin’ candle (£40), displayed on library-style shelving (37 Brook Street, W1; diptyqueparis.co.uk). A stone’s throw away in Piccadilly, perfumer Roja Dove has opened his debut standalone store (4). The opulent space is the place to purchase his new ‘Figuier’ and ‘Baies’ candles (£75 each; 51 Burlington Arcade, W1; rojaparfums.com). Finally, French scent guru Fréderic Malle has opened an apartment-like boutique (5) a few doors down: inspired by the work of interior decorator Madeleine Castaing, it has tile-print carpets and a scentfilled armoire. Don’t miss the ‘Fleur Mécanique’, a red lacquered cube scent difuser (£170; 14 Burlington Arcade, W1; fredericmalle.com).

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PICTURE: ASH KNOTEK

Numerous new launches and shop openings in the capital demonstrate the ever-growing popularity of home scent. Jo Malone London has secured a prestigious spot on bustling Regent Street for its first Global Premier Boutique (1), which boasts a perfumed garden, a programme of craft and floral masterclasses, and a fragrance library where discontinued scents are reissued; snap up the ‘Mimosa & Cardamom’ candle (£42; 101 Regent Street, W1; jomalone.co.uk). In Mayfair, French brand Creed has unveiled a golden boutique (2) designed by Paris-based architect Can Onaner. The geometric interior houses its vast catalogue of fragrances and candles, including the classic ‘Spring Flower’, originally created for Audrey Hepburn in the 1950s (candle, £85; 99 Mount Street, W1; creedfragrances.co.uk). Nearby, Diptyque’s Brook Street store (3)

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PICTURES: HEARST STUDIOS

COOK AND KEEP In our February issue we reported on the pressing issue of food waste, and Parisian councillor Arash Derambarsh’s campaign to reduce it. And as if by magic, Alistair Donald’s hokan bowls landed in our inbox. Created after Donald realised how much food he and his family were needlessly throwing away, his stoneware designs – glazed in a dramatic cobalt blue – are an all-in-one solution for cooks. Pop them in the oven or microwave to cook your meals, present them at the table, and use them in the fridge or freezer to keep leftovers fresh. No waste and less washing up – what’s not to like? £87 for a set of three (hokanbowls.com).


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I N S I D E S T O RY D E N B Y Reassuring to the touch and almost impossible to break, Denby tableware evokes nostalgia in many Brits, who may remember its simple ‘Regency Green’ pieces from 1980s homes. But the pottery’s story goes back far further than that. In 1806, a seam of clay was discovered in the village of Denby during the construction of a road to link Derbyshire’s industrial towns. Entrepreneur William Bourne realised its potential and three years later began making salt-glazed pottery on the site. At first, he made bottles and jars for substances such as preserves, ink, medicines and drinks – glass being expensive at the time. Salt glazing, which involved throwing salt into kilns at the hottest stage of firing, produced hard-wearing, shiny brown vessels. Denby did a roaring trade in bottles, pie dishes, jelly moulds and early-era Denby products today are hot water bottles, all in this rustic hue. still made from the same By the 1920s glass was cheaper and seam of clay first discovered brown stoneware was becoming passé. While many of its competitors more than 200 years ago went under, Denby invented new glazes and firing techniques to keep up with the latest fashions. Ranges such as ‘Epic Green’ and ‘Cottage Blue’ brought in new fans and set a reputation for plain yet colourful crockery that endures to this day. Other innovations followed during the 1970s, when Denby pioneered the concept of ‘oven-to-tableware’ in response to the trend for less formal dining. Today, every Denby item – from the smallest bowl to the biggest casserole dish – is robust enough to travel between oven, microwave, table, dishwasher and freezer. The brand has more than 5,000 glazes, all of which are harder than steel: we love the classic ‘Imperial Blue’ (centre), a rich cobalt shade; the ‘Heritage’ collection for perfect pastels; and ‘Halo’ (top), a reactive inky-blue glaze. The company’s most recent launch is the ‘Canvas’ range, an of-white collection with a delicate embossed chevron pattern inspired by archive designs from the 1960s. Like all Denby wares, it’s made from the same clay source that was unearthed 210 years ago. In 2010 Denby began acquiring other British potteries to help secure their futures and now counts Burleigh, Poole Pottery and Hartley Greens & Co as part of its thriving family (denby.co.uk). 50 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2016

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: JEN MILES

The British pottery with timeless style


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TWISTS ON A CLASSIC The elegant bentwood ‘214’ chair, created by Michael Thonet in 1859, has been reimagined in three fresh new ways

The bentwood ‘214’ chair is a design icon that has graced countless cafes all over the world (it’s also afectionately known as ‘the bistro chair’). Launched in 1859 by German designer Michael Thonet, it was made in numerous factories in various European countries, including Austria, Germany and Hungary. Thonet adopted this strategy for three reasons: he was following sources of beech wood, a material well suited to his groundbreaking steam-bending technique; avoiding import duties; and keeping up with snowballing demand. The last patent on Thonet’s design expired in 1869, and dozens of competitors sprang up, cashing in on his success. The efect of this is still visible today, with versions of the ‘214’ produced by more than one manufacturer. The latest reincarnations of the design are by Italian brand Poltrona Frau, which has just launched three versions produced by Wiener GTV Design (turn the page to see them all; poltronafrau.com). ➤


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TWISTS ON A CLASSIC

The new versions of Michael Thonet’s original ‘214’ design for Gebrüder Thonet Vienna

‘POSTMUNDUS’ The original’s bentwood form is exaggerated in this elaborate design by Italian Martino Gamper. From £512, Poltrona Frau (020 7014 5980)

‘MORRIS’ By Danish duo Gam Fratesi, this model simplifies the bistro chair’s curvaceous lines. Its cane backrest comes in two heights. From £563, Poltrona Frau (020 7014 5980)

‘RADETZKY’ Sinuous lines and an almost oriental feel set this version by architect Michele De Lucchi apart. From £547, Poltrona Frau (020 7014 5980)

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STYLE ICON GEOFFREY BENNISON

The British decorator who skilfully combined comfort, grandeur and exoticism

‘Put something mad on top of something very good, or something passions were for Persian and Turkish carpets, neoclassical statues very good on top of something mad,’ was the advice ofered by interior and faded floral fabrics, in particular a line of rose-sprigged linens decorator Geofrey Bennison (1921–1984). Born in Lancashire, he with a ‘tea-stained’ vintage look that he produced himself. He was studied fine art and theatre design at the Slade School of Art during known for unearthing exotic statement pieces, such as the giant the war years. A star student, he was set for a career as a painter – but carved camel that watched over the dining table in his Golden in 1942 was diagnosed with tuberculosis and spent the rest of the Square apartment. This home was crammed with books and carpets decade in a Swiss sanitorium. Returning – on walls, floors and even in place of to London in 1950, penniless and minus a bedspread – and had bright red walls. Bennison’s interiors exuded a lung, he spent his remaining funds on At home or at play in his beloved a collection of junk and a stall at Morocco, Bennison was often to be an air of worn grandeur Portobello market. His instincts had found wearing kaftans over fishnet that made them look as if they led him to his dream career. In fact, his tights, with full maquillage. His love eye for antiques proved so good that he of outrageous gossip fuelled his teahad been there forever was warned trade might sufer, since and-biscuit parties, held in the back buyers would keep their knowledge of of his shop. Stingy clients were treated him to themselves. Undaunted, Bennison soon outgrew his stall and to his rapier wit (‘How about opening the handbag, madam, opened his own shops (Pimlico Road, above). His love of arranging and blowing the cobwebs of your cheque book?’) but he hated objects in clients’ homes led to a thriving career as a decorator, too. gratuitous displays of wealth (‘I can’t bear the look-what-I’ve-got What makes him an icon? Bennison’s interiors exuded an air of look’). After his death, his former assistant Gillian Newberry worn grandeur that made them look as if they had been there set up Bennison Fabrics, where you can still buy the designer’s forever, a quality that endeared him to wealthy and aristocratic distinctive prints (bennisonfabrics.com). clients – he created homes for Baron Paul de Rothschild and his To find out more Read Geoffrey Bennison: Master Decorator wife, Marie-Hélène, as well as the actor Terence Stamp. His chief by Gillian Newberry (Rizzoli, £35). 56 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2016

PICTURE: DERRY MOORE

Words AMY BRADFORD


LIVE THE GREEN DREAM

A new wave of eco-friendly designers and architects are making it easier than ever to go green. Here’s everything you need to know

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JOIN THE CRUSADE We explain why now is the time to get involved

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GREEN HOUSES Who actually lives this way? Meet three eco-home owners

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ECO STYLE Furniture and homewares that do good and look good 75

HOW TO GO GREEN The brands and labels that every savvy shopper should know 80

JARGON BUSTER A quick guide to sounding like an eco expert

Illustration ANDREW BANNECKER


JOIN THE GREEN A CRUSADE Now’s the time to adopt a more sustainable way of living, from wasting less to buying smarter. But going green doesn’t have to be daunting. Eco expert Lucy Siegle shares her tips

BOUT 15 YEARS AGO I DECIDED THAT

my vocation was to spend my waking hours trying to get everyone to support green living. I wanted them to treat ideas about maintaining a sustainable, ecologically harmonious existence with the same passion that they might ordinarily feel for shopping, brioche buns or Instagram. Much of the time I tried to force my views through with sheer enthusiasm. I would proclaim ‘wormeries are great’, then explain how magical it was to see worms eat your kitchen discards and turn them into compost – or ‘black gold’ as I call it. But the problem with enthusiasm is that not everybody always shares it: many were polite yet secretly reticent or, in fact, blatantly worm-phobic; a good friend refused to visit my flat until my compost creators were wiped out, which inadvertently happened when I left their home outside during a violent storm. So it’s RIP to the worms, but not to a green design for life. Because, ironically, as soon as I stopped pushing it, the eco cause turned the corner from niche trend to almost-mainstream movement. Programmes explaining the horrors of food waste and advocating the upcycling of furniture are now prime-time TV viewing, and Ikea’s annual sustainability report is as eagerly awaited as its catalogue (okay, perhaps that’s just in my house). A natural extension of this newfound interest in all things eco is to apply it to your living space. While you might feel that the machinations of the recent UN climate talks in Paris are beyond your influence, you can control how much energy your home uses, or choose Green living has to purchase ethical gone mainstream, products. Indeed, it’s time to take a more with TV shows critical look at the dedicated to stuf we own. After the

upcycling and fighting food waste

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LIVING

boom of ‘fast fashion’, with t-shirts being sold for less than the price of a cup of artisan cofee, interiors have followed. The fast furniture market has seen provenance home to make it stylish and green (explore some of the and quality sacrificed for a cheap price tag and has added to society’s growing mountain of waste – the Royal UK’s finest eco homes on p62). A growing number of Society of Arts’ recent report, Rearranging the Furniture, homeowners and architects are seeing the benefits of estimates that 1.6 million tonnes of furniture is being building houses to Passivhaus design principles – these not only create a more eco-friendly home, but a more slung into UK landfill each year. But then it’s always been hard to get attached to cheap, energy-eicient one that could save you money on fuel mass-produced goods. They are designed to be expendable bills – as well as storing, purifying and reusing rainwater, and some have been found to give off toxins as the installing more efective insulation and buying into adhesives used to make them break renewable energy cooperatives (ask down – a recent Exeter University If a product is made your local council about schemes). report found that this made many UK Searching for even more green homes more polluted indoors than out. using quality inspiration? Look to Auroville, an eco Cheap leather products are sometimes materials, has an community of Tamil and European processed in clandestine tanneries in villagers in southern India that has so far planted three million trees – it’s one the developing world; places that use authentic story of chemicals long banned in the EU. These how it was created of the only places on the planet where insidious pollutants can trigger allergic biodiversity is actually increasing thanks reactions, so why on earth would we and is built to last, to its inhabitants. Political scientist Karen Litfin regards eco villagers as want this stuf in our houses? The key it is easier to love is to think less about accumulating ‘pioneer species’: they use 10–50 per things and more about carefully curating our life with cent fewer resources than normal communities in the products we are passionate about. If something is made same country. However, Litfin has calculated that even if the global population was to live with as light a footprint from quality materials, has an authentic story of how it as these green pioneers, the earth’s natural resources was created and is built to last, it is far easier to love. In his wooden cabin, located in Devonshire woodland, would still be stretched. So, you might ask, what is the craftsman Rupert McKelvie makes wooden furniture actual point of green living? that is the perfect balance of ethics and aesthetics. I came This is a tone I’m familiar with. A criticism of and across McKelvie’s of-grid workshop last year and instantly deterrent to embracing green living in the past has been adored his sustainable output (find out more and shop the defeatist cry, ‘well, you can’t stop climate change his collections at outofthevalley.co.uk). You get a diferent by changing your light bulbs’. But wouldn’t you sense of joy at the annual Festival of Thrift established still rather be part of the solution than the problem? The world is changing, with a growing number by Wayne and Gerardine Hemingway (founders of ’90s fashion label Red or Dead). Forty thousand people visited of institutions choosing to take their investments out this eco event in Darlington last year, all aiming to learn of fossil fuels and place them into renewable energy; from the UK’s best upcyclers, thrifty livers and vintage clean technology is in the ascendancy. There’s mavens – and to invest in some ethical products, too (see never been a better time to go green. E D ELLE Decoration’s edit of stylish eco homeware on p68). Of course, living green is not just about what you put in your house. If you’re building from scratch or carrying out an extensive renovation, you can future-proof your

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GREEN HOUSES We all know we ought to embrace the eco-friendly ethos, but what does it really take to live this way? We talk to three pioneering homeowners to find out how their properties improve their lives and lower their bills Words EMMA LOVE

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S TA C K YA R D BY MOLE ARCHITECTS, SUFFOLK

Psychotherapist Jane McClintock (left) and her husband Ian, a retired farmer, swapped life in a 16th-century farmhouse in the Sufolk village of Palgrave for an award-winning home designed by Mole Architects to Passivhaus principles (more details on p67), on the same site as their former home. Jane explains what it’s like to live here. Why did you want a sustainable house? Having looked after properties that were rather old, we wanted a house that looked after us. The farmhouse was beautiful, but not very comfortable – there’s nothing sexy about a draught! The joy of our new home is that there are no draughts, even when it’s blowing a gale outside. We are very warm all the time and our heating bills are lower. What are the building’s eco credentials? It has solar thermal panels, which heat the water supply, and solar photovoltaic panels to convert sunlight into an electric current; plus rainwater harvesting – we use it to flush the loos – and a green roof. We’re huge wildlife fans so there are also nesting boxes built into the frame of the house. We have a room with all the kit in it – a control panel for the underfloor heating, a mechanical heat and ventilation recovery unit, a thermal store, water pumps and the electrics. One of my concerns with such a well-insulated house was whether we would fry in the summer, but it’s fine. We have two roof lights that work like a funnel to disperse hot air. Are there any throwbacks to your old home? I’ve always had a fireplace and although we don’t need one for warmth anymore, we do have a wood burner to add cosiness. molearchitects.co.uk

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PICTURES: DAVID BUTLER, ANDREW BANNECKER

‘Having looked after properties that were rather old, we wanted a house that looked after us’

Stackyard has solar panels, rainwater harvesting, a green roof and insulation, which all contribute to its eco-friendly credentials. The property has been designed in line with Passivhaus, a set of principles centred on using ‘passive’ methods of heating to reduce energy waste and maintain a comfortable temperature ➤

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‘The brief was to create a beautiful, modern home that wasn’t dominated by its eco credentials’

Pavilion Eco House’s sleek interior, featuring a kitchen by Chamber Furniture (chamberfurniture.co.uk) contrasts with the Grade II*-listed Pagoda – where the homeowners used to live – situated directly behind it

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PICTURES: ALEXANDER JAMES

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PAV I L I O N E C O H O U S E BY E2 ARCHITECTURE, LONDON

For more than 20 years, interior designer Caroline Cooper (left) and her architect husband Philip lived in The Pagoda, a Grade II*-listed property designed by William Chambers (the architect behind Somerset House). Their new home, designed by their son, architect Sam Cooper, could not be more diferent: a green house that scores a Level Five (out of six) on the Code for Sustainable Homes – the national standard for eco dwellings. Here, Caroline tells us about living in one of the few private properties in the UK to achieve this accolade. What are the house’s eco credentials? Our water is heated by solar panels and a ground-source pump. The building is super-insulated, with natural wood fibres that reduce heat loss – internal walls are finished with breathable lime plaster and paint. Plus, we have a green roof and rainwater harvesting. We also have an AAA-rated washing machine and dishwasher, which keeps our water usage down to 80 litres per day. How did the house achieve its rating on the Code for Sustainable Homes? Certain criteria had to be met for water usage, ecology, materials used and health and wellbeing. The key factor, and the toughest to achieve, is that the house has to be ‘net zero carbon’ for a year. That means that it has to produce as much energy as it uses. Is there any day-to-day maintenance involved? We have to sweep the leaves of the solar panels on the roof from time to time, but that’s all. The brief was to create a beautiful, modern home that wasn’t dominated by its eco credentials. The only way anyone would know it’s eco is when they flush the loo, because the water is a brownish colour. What do you love most about your home? The quality of the light and how open the space seems. We always wanted the experience of living in a contemporary house. For us, living here is a huge change, but really refreshing. e2architecture.com ➤

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Nine years ago, interior designer Fiona Terry (left) and her property investor husband Malcolm commissioned Bere Architects to design the first certified Passivhaus in London. Fiona talks to us about the benefits of living there and the challenges involved in creating it. Why did you decide to build an eco home? We weren’t interested in Passivhaus per se, but more generally in green living. When researching, my husband came across Bere Architects, who introduced us to the idea of Passivhaus [more details, right]. Justin Bere is a very passionate pioneer of this type of building. What appealed to you about the Passivhaus model in particular? One of the things that impressed me most was the fact that you don’t have to open the window to air your bedroom. The ventilation system constantly sucks in fresh air from outside, so it’s always clean. Even if you have teenagers living with you, the whif of dirty socks can never linger! My daughter lives in the house at the moment and she is asthmatic, so the great air quality is very beneficial to her. Are there any downsides to a Passivhaus? The cost. At the moment, because there aren’t many homes like this being built, it’s expensive, but once more people catch on to their benefits and creating these houses becomes more popular that should change. If you’re designing a new-build property, a Passivhaus really is a no-brainer: why wouldn’t you want an energy-eicient home that saves you money on heating bills? How does living here difer to living in a non-green home? It’s always warm without being stufy and the property doesn’t require heating. Occasionally the filters in the heat exchange system need to be changed and salt tablets added for the water softener. The house also has a wildflower meadow on the roof, underground rainwater harvesting and solar thermal panels. bere.co.uk

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PICTURES: TIM CROCKER

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PA S S I V H A U S BY BERE ARCHITECTS, LONDON


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‘ Why wouldn’t you want an energy-eicient home that saves you money on heating bills?’

LIVING

HOW TO RETROFIT YOUR HOME TO PA S S I V H A U S P R I N C I P L E S Developed in the 1990s by professors Bo Adamson and Wolfgang Feist in Germany, Passivhaus is a construction concept that requires houses to use very little energy for heating and cooling. The result is energy-eicient homes that render traditional heating methods unnecessary and ofer fresh air and a constant, comfortable temperature for living. Retrofitting a home to Passivhaus principles can be trickier than starting from scratch with a new build, but Jon Bootland, chief executive of the Passivhaus Trust, has a few tips to get you started.

Light and airy, this 118-square-metre twobedroom house in Camden became London’s first Passivhaus when it was completed in 2011. Homeowner Fiona was particularly impressed by the improvement in air quality at the new house in comparison to her previous homes

• Tackle the changes step by step and work towards achieving a Passivhaus standard over a number of years – there is a specific standard for retrofitted homes that takes into account the things you can’t alter, such as party walls and the orientation of the building. • Consult a Passivhaus designer to do the calculations using the Passivhaus Planning Package (PHPP). They will be able to advise which aspects of your home it’s worth changing to make a diference in terms of how much energy it can create and how much it can save. • Concentrate on three key areas: insulation, airtightness and ventilation. A Passivhaus has a mechanical ventilation system that extracts old air and moisture and replaces it with fresh air. Windows need to be triple-glazed and fitted with high-quality frames. • Think of long-term benefits. A retrofitted Passivhaus can cost up to £100,000 depending on the size of your home, but once a house meets Passivhaus standards it will need minimal heating (at a cost of around £100-£200 per year). However, expense isn’t usually the motivation for a retrofit – it’s comfort. The indoor temperature will be constant (around 18-24°C). passivhaustrust.org.uk E D To see examples of retrofitted eco-homes, visit the Superhomes Network (superhomes.org.uk).

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STYLE

A green home can also be a stylish home! Here’s our edit of products that do good as well as look good – from sustainably sourced furniture to ethical accessories that promote traditional crafts

From left ‘Bowl’ sustainably harvested mango wood side table by Ayush Kasliwal, £308, Mater (materdesign.com). ‘Tepee’ sofa with FSC-certified beech frame by Lucy Kurrein, £4,636, SCP (scp.co.uk). Linen cushion by Margarete Häusler painted with natural pigments, £80, Oggetto (oggetto.com). ‘Grain’ bamboo-mix pendant lights by Jens Fager, £99 each, Muuto (muuto.com). Rattan ottoman by Franco Albini for Sika Design, from £295, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). ‘Box’ sustainably harvested mango wood modular storage, from £109 for a medium-sized unit, Mater (materdesign.com). ‘Restore’ basket made from recycled PET bottle fibres by Mika Tolvanen, £59, Muuto (muuto.com) ➤

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PICTURE: FOTOLIA

Compiled by AMANDA CORSTON-SMITH


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ECO STYLE

From left ‘Esterban’ recycled-glass vases, £30 each, Habitat (habitat.co.uk). ‘Elmer’ sofa with FSC-certified beech frame by Lucy Kurrein, £3,480, SCP (scp.co.uk). Fairtrade ‘Kiko’ antiqued-brass frames, £9.95 each, Nkuku (nkuku.com). ‘Fragment’ organic cotton cushions, £52 each, Ferm Living (fermliving.com). ‘Harpsden’ renewable English ash cofee table and pair of nesting tables by Sitting Firm, £775, John Lewis (johnlewis.com). ‘Hydria’ ceramic pitcher with biodegradable filter, £180, Brook Sigal (brooksigal.com). Handmade Bat Trang espresso cups by Arian Brekveld, £32 for a set of three,

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PICTURES: FOTOLIA, BJARNI B JACOBSEN FOTOGRAFIE, SJOERD EICKMANS FOTOGRAPHIE

Style | G R E E N

LIVING

Imperfect Design (imperfectdesign.eu). ‘Wilbur’ rattan pendant light, £65, Habitat (habitat.co.uk). ‘Shell’ FSC-certified wood chair by Michael Dreeben, £920, Mater (materdesign.com). ‘Fragment’ organic cotton cushion (as before). Oak and coppiced hazel sideboard by Sebastian Cox, £1,495, Heal’s (heals.co.uk). ‘Trash Me’ paper pulp table lamp by Victor Vitterlein for &Tradition, £79, Paper Rooms (paperrooms.co.uk). Vase, £69.95; ‘Tall’ boxwood bin , both by Piet Hein Eek for Fair Forward, £99.95, SCP (scp.co.uk) ➤

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PICTURES: DAVID BROOK, YESHEN VENEMA, FOTOLIA, PATRICK QUAYLE, ANTHONY OLIVER, BILDFELDT AB


Style | G R E E N

LIVING

ECO STYLE

From left ‘This’ grey chair by Stefan Diez for E15, from £370, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). ‘Semley’ PEFCcertified oak dining table by Another Country, £875, John Lewis (johnlewis.com). Rattan chair, available in May, Ikea (ikea.com). ‘Una’ handmade recycled glasses (two pictured), from £4.95 each, Nkuku (nkuku.com). ‘Emiko’ bamboo salad bowl, £18, Habitat (habitat.co.uk). ‘Dafen’ bamboo baskets, £12 for a pair, Habitat (habitat.co.uk). ‘Navy 111’ recycled-plastic chair, £252, Folklore (shopfolklore.com). ‘Luiz’ cork pendant light by Böttcher+Henssler, £170, Mater (materdesign.com). ‘Viktigt’ bamboo chair by Ingegerd Råman, available in May, Ikea (ikea.com). Plates (on wall), from £22 each, Folklore (shopfolklore.com). ‘Ashridge’ renewable ash console table by Sitting Firm, £550, John Lewis (johnlewis.com). ‘Kikapu’ platter, £210; vase, £130, both woven by a women’s cooperative in Swaziland, Otago (otagodesign.com) E D

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HOW TO GO GREEN Want to become an eco shopper? First you need to know the labels and the brands to trust. Here’s our guide for beginners TEXTILES

WORDS: LUCY SIEGLE ILLUSTRATION: ANDREW BANNECKER

On the hunt for eco-friendly linens and fabrics? These are the logos to look for. Cotton Connect This social enterprise develops sustainable supply chains for cotton, and counts John Lewis among its partners. It has worked with the retailer to build a relationship with 1,500 small-yield farmers in Rajkot, India, helping them to pick more eiciently and environmentally produced cotton. Since the initiative started, there has been a nine per cent drop in the use of chemicals (cottonconnect.org). Fairtrade, fair trade and fairly traded The Fairtrade Foundation was conceived as a response to unfair global trade, the argument being that millions of small-

scale farmers in developing nations are left scraping a living because the terms of commerce are set by global governments, the World Trade Organisation and the World Bank. Products carrying the Fairtrade logo are guaranteed to adhere to the Foundation’s ethics. The terms fair trade and fairly traded are used to show a company’s commitment to paying a fair price to workers (fairtrade.org.uk). Global Organic Textile Standard There are nearly 440 eco labels worldwide, but the Global Organic Textile Standard is the world’s leading grade for organic fibres. When a textile – anything from bedding to bathmats – carries the GOTS label, you know that it has been processed with the least possible environmental impact, minimal use of chemicals and under good social conditions (global-standard.org).

Goodweave The Rugmark’s Goodweave project has been working since the 1990s to certify that rugs are produced without using child labour, once endemic in production in South Asia. Over two decades Goodweave has worked to get some 3,000 children out of rug workshops and into education (goodweave.org.uk). The Better Cotton Initiative The Better Cotton Initiative (BCI) was formed in 2010 by conservation organisation WWF and retailers including Ikea and H&M to make mainstream cotton production more ethical. Ikea uses a huge amount of cotton – 0.7 per cent of the world’s yield – for everything from sofas to towels and, since September 2015, all of its cotton is guaranteed to be from BCI sustainable sources (bettercotton.org). ➤

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HOW TO GO GREEN FURNITURE

Between 2000 and 2012 the world lost 1.5 million square kilometres of forest. Don’t add to the problem. Here’s how to be sure you buy from sustainable sources. Antiques Are Green A thought-provoking website representing an efort by the antiques trade to qualify its eco credentials. Its analysis shows that a chest of drawers dating from 1830 is 16 times more carbon eicient than a newly made piece – based on the fact that it has been restored twice, has a lifespan of 195 years, was freighted by sail, and the woodwork was done using treadleoperated lathes (antiquesaregreen.org). Forestry Stewardship Scheme (FSC) FSC was established more than 20 years ago as an urgent response to global deforestation. There are now more than 20,000 FSC-certified products and three FSC standards: FSC 100% means everything in the product is sourced from FSC-certified forests; FSC Recycled means that the product includes 85 per cent reclaimed materials; FSC Mix combines FSC-certified and reclaimed wood (at least 70 per cent) with non-certified, qualitycontrolled wood (fsc-uk.org/en-uk).

There are now over 20,000 FSC-certified products, from loo rolls to furniture and barbecue charcoal. It is regarded as a gold standard for wood

Black Mountain Natural Insulation Made from the fleece of British sheep, this insulation is ultra-eicient and helps to reduce condensation. A home-grown eco solution (blackmountaininsulation.com).

Historic England Ofers advice on draught proofing and insulation for listed, conservation area and pre-1919 houses, helping you to make any home more energy eicient (historicengland.org.uk).

GreenSpec Edited by architects who have a passion for green design, this website features technical advice and product suggestions for those hoping to build their own eco home (greenspec.co.uk).

Sustainable Furnishings Council This is for builders and architects who want to create eco-friendly homes. The site recommends suppliers that limit carbon emissions and ofer recyclable material options (sustainablefurnishings.org). ➤

B U I L D I N G M AT E R I A L S

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HOW TO GO GREEN R E C O M M E N D E D R E TA I L E R S

These British brands and businesses have serious eco credentials. Clay-works Natural clay plasters derived from rammed earth, an ancient material that’s chemicalfree and renewable (clay-works.com).

Ethical Consumer A place to learn about the best eco companies in every industry, from tech and clothing to kids’ toys, cosmetics and even bank accounts. It also tells you the brands to avoid (ethicalconsumer.org).

Ecotricity An energy supplier that generates its own renewable gas and electricity. Great deals if you have solar panels (ecotricity.co.uk).

Green Building Store This is where you head to get hold of the kit that will put sustainable design into the fabric of your home, from Passivhauscertified ventilation to heat pumps (greenbuildingstore.co.uk).

Empatika You can tell a lot about a sustainable brand by the company it keeps. Empatika, maker of fitted furniture, has become one of more than 50 companies to join the WWF Forest Campaign (empatika.uk).

Green Woods Furniture This Bristol-based furniture and homeware retailer has notably high standards for its products. A great place to find chemical-free, naturally fire-retardant sofas (greenwoodsfurniture.co.uk).

Naturepedic These mattresses are certified by the Global Organic Textile Standard (see p75) and are manufactured using plant-based fabrics and sustainably harvested wools, to ensure that you have a chemical-free sleep (naturepedic.com). Peridot Place The founder of this beautifully edited homeware store has an eye for conscious design. Everything it sells is either ethical, organic, energy-eicient, sustainable or chemical-free (peridotplace.com). The Green Room This eco showroom is a fascinating place to find cutting-edge sustainable materials, including panels made from moulded recycled paper, self-sealing concrete and coconut-shell tiles (scin.co.uk). The Lost Lanes An online marketplace of more than 3,500 ethically made products, including a great selection of stylish homeware. All sellers must clearly state their eco credentials using the website’s simple icons (thelostlanes.com). E D EU Ecolabel Awarded to more than 100 products, from energy-eicient white goods to heat pumps for eco homes, this label is a symbol of ‘environmental excellence in the life cycle of the material – from the extraction through to production, use and disposal’. For the full lowdown on Ecolabels from all over the world, visit ecolabelindex.com

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THE ECO JARGON BUSTER Green, eco and sustainable are often used interchangeably to describe products that have been made in a low-impact way. It’s important to know the difference. Our expert Lucy Siegle explains the key terms Cradle to Cradle The Cradle to Cradle system rates products based on their longevity of usefulness. The theory is that a circular economy (where goods are as useful at the end of their lives as they are at the beginning) will result in higher production standards and fewer products ending up in landfill (c2ccertified.org).

Low emission/ VOC free Scientists researching pollution have become concerned about the mix of

Used without context, the term ‘recyclable’ makes my blood boil. Why? Because technically any material is recyclable – it just depends how much time and money you’re willing to spend prising it apart brominated fire retardants, formaldehyde and plastics in materials and products in the home, particularly as we hermetically seal our houses to save energy. It’s a case of one green turn (energy eiciency) inadvertently causing a non-green toxic atmosphere. Many manufacturers, notably those who make paint and vinyl wallcoverings, have now reformulated products to ensure they are free of volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

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Recyclable/ Recycled Employed without any context, this term makes my blood boil. Why? Because technically any material is recyclable, even intricate plastic composites where polymers have been melted together. It just depends how much money and time you’re willing to spend prising the materials apart! Make sure you know where your nearest recycling centre is (check direct.gov.uk) and look out for companies that promise to recycle pre-consumer waste – the scraps and ofcuts from the production process. Sustainable Friends of the Earth define the word sustainability as ‘encompassing the simple principle of taking from the earth only what it can provide indefinitely, thus leaving future generations no less than we have access to ourselves’. Look out for labels, such as FSC (see p77), that actively make sure that manufacturers are ‘treading lightly’ on the planet. E D

ILLUSTRATION: ANDREW BANNECKER

Eco Design There is no badge for this, but there are core principles. The point is that product designers should be creating pieces with the future in mind, not just for profit. Examples of celebrated eco designs include the iconic Evian bottle – the grooves on its sides allow it to be easily squashed down so that it takes up less space on a recycling truck – and the Nokia phones that feature biodegradeable components which are designed to break down to nothing but sunflower seeds.


B AT H R O O M TRENDS PICTURE: ELSA YOUNG

According to recent research, first thing in the morning is when we are at our most creative, in that hazy mist between sleep and wakefulness as we perform our daily bathing rituals. To make the most of this precious time, you need a bathroom that both relaxes and stimulates. Here, we share 14 fresh ideas, from interesting finishes to daring designs

INDUSTRIAL APPEAL Statement fittings can transform a small bathroom into a truly unique one. This bespoke basin stand in the Satyagraha House hotel near Johannesburg, South Africa (pictured; satyagrahahouse.com) has a weathered, patinated metal finish. Watermark’s steampunkstyle ‘Brooklyn’ taps have a similarly industrial aesthetic (£1,172; thewatermarkcollection.eu). ➤


Solutions | B A T H R O O M

M I X A N D M AT C H

PICTURES: WICHMANN + BENDTSEN, YESHEN VENEMA, ANDREW STILES

Introducing pattern into your bathroom using tiles is easy and efective. But why stick to just one design when you can create an individual look using a collage of many? Hotelier Andrea Falkner’s converted home in Spello, Italy, the work of designer Paola Navone, features a tonal palette of whites and greys. Umbrian stone is combined with a selection of cement floor tiles – try Fired Earth (firedearth.co.uk) or Bert & May (bertandmay.com). For a classic shower, we suggest Samuel Heath’s ‘Royal Crown Derby Exposed’ set (from £2,507; samuel-heath.co.uk). ➤

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ile walls and floors in powerful brights that are guaranteed to lift your mood in the morning. This opulent Parisian ensuite is influenced by the design of traditional oriental bathhouses and is lined with stunning blue and metallic mosaic tiles by Bisazza. Finish the look with gilt tile trim, available from B&Q, designed to cover awkward edges. The ‘Must’ metallic vanity unit by Altamarea is the perfect focal point in this space.

‘Mosaic Blend’ tiles, £145 per square metre, Bisazza (bisazza.com); gold metal tile trim by Homelux, £12.72 for a 1.83-metre strip, B&Q (diy.com); ‘Must’ vanity unit, £4,505, Altamarea (altamareabath.it) ➤

PICTURE: PHILIPPE GARCIA

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PICTURE: KRISTA KELTANEN/LIVING INSIDE

ndulgent sunken baths are not only for spas and five-star hotels. If you have enough floor space in your bathroom, build a raised, enclosed platform within which to set the deepest of tubs for long soaks. Once installed this can be covered with tadelakt, a versatile Moroccan plaster that’s a good alternative to tiles. Applied seamlessly, it has a beautifully smooth, waterproof finish without any grout lines – contact Decor Tadelakt (tadelakt.co.uk) for bespoke quotes. Want a luxurious tub? We recommend the ‘Whirlpool’ range by Villeroy & Boch, which gently massages you with jets of water as you relax – find the collection at West One Bathrooms (westonebathrooms.com). ➤

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PICTURE: KRISTA KELTANEN/LIVING INSIDE

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C O N T E M P O R A RY S T O N E Ditch uniform tiling and take inspiration from this pared-back Finnish shower room, where white stone quarried in Lapland has been used for the floor and shower enclosure. Arranged in a ‘crazy paving’-style pattern, it’s a modern take on traditional stonework. Source similar irregular-sized slabs at York Stone (yorkstonesupplies.co.uk) or Rhino Rock, which specialises in granite (architecturalgranite.co.uk). The slimline shower and fittings are by Hansgrohe (hansgrohe.co.uk). For seamless shower enclosures much like this flawless glass one, try Matki (matki.co.uk). ➤ MARCH 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 91


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RUSTIC CHARM The bathroom in this American ski lodge is inspired by its rugged setting, combining timber flooring and beams with quarried stone. To bring these traditional elements up to date, architecture firm JLF & Associates has added cutting-edge fixtures. The tub pictured here is Marcel Wanders’ ‘Gobi’ design for Boi (£8,690; boi.com). For other contemporary options try Agape (agapedesign.it) and VitrA (vitra.co.uk). ➤

PICTURES: AUDREY HALL, ALAMY

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TWILIGHT ZONE F

PICTURE: MOLTENI & MOTTA

ollow the creative lead of Milanese fashion designer Maurizio Pecoraro and go sultry and black in your bathroom, rather than the conventional white and bright. Paint walls a velvety dark hue (we like Dulux’s ‘Bathroom+ Rich Black Soft Sheen’ emulsion, £22.93 for 2.5 litres, B&Q; diy.com) for a bold efect. Mirrored cabinets – Aston Matthews sells a wide selection (astonmatthews.co.uk) – help to reflect light back into the room.

For a similar cast concrete washbasin, try the ‘Siena’ model by Nottinghamshire company Kast (£1,350; kastconcrete basins.com) ➤


PICTURE: KATTY SCHIEBECK

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OPTICAL ILLUSION Use reflective surfaces in innovative ways to enhance the efect of graphic tilework. Here, Barcelona-based interior architect Katty Schiebeck has added panels of monochrome mirrored glass in diferent shades to complement the Art Deco-style pattern of the tiles at the back of the sleek, glass shower unit. For bespoke mirror work, try Mirrorfit (mirrorfit.co.uk). The ‘Original’ freestanding shower by Jee-O at CP Hart (£1,828; cphart.co.uk) is a good match for this minimalist shower column, while Salvatori (salvatori.it) is the go-to place for beautiful marble washbasins. ➤ MARCH 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 97


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roving that rough finishes can be breathtakingly beautiful, this Australian bathroom by architect Peter Stutchbury (peterstutchbury.com.au) features an irregularly shaped tub made from unpolished concrete, alongside tumbled stone cladding. Exposed brass piping and fixtures add to the raw, ‘unfinished’ aesthetic. Love this brass shower rose? Drummonds has one just like it (£450; drummondsuk.com). Concreations specialises in creating bespoke concrete designs (concreations.co.uk). ➤

PICTURE: TOM FERGUSON/COURTESY OF ANGEL WING

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PICTURE: KAROLINA BAK

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THE NEW LOUNGE Blur the lines between bathing and lounging areas to form the ultimate relaxation zone. This Berlin bathroom designed by Loft Szczecin (loft.szczecin.pl) incorporates a bespoke mirror and chaise longue, both manufactured in oak and coated with furniture oil to make them suitable for a damp environment. Extra seating is on hand in the form of the ‘Afteroom’ chair by Menu (£186, Nest; nest.co.uk). The stylish basin is the ‘Starck 1’ by Philippe Starck for Duravit (£667, CP Hart; cphart.co.uk). For other sleek options look to Laufen (laufen.co.uk) and Zuchetti.kos (zuchettikos.it). ➤ MARCH 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 101


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ntroduce a glamorous feel to your bathing space with lustrous metallic finishes and touches of marble. Australian architect and interior designer Fiona Lynch has clad joinery panels in brass to make the shell of this bathroom cabinet, which hangs above Elba marble tilework. The metal has been left unlacquered, allowing it to gain its softly tarnished appearance – a stylish counterpoint to the luxe look of the marble. However, if you want to maintain a high shine, apply a layer of beeswax or a polyurethane lacquer.

The matte-finish stainless steel tap and mixer are by Vola (vola.com). Metal Sheets sells a range of brass panels (metalsheets.co.uk) ➤


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PICTURE/STYLING: DANIELLA WITTE

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osition your bath beneath a window to make the most of natural light, as well as the view. Consider your tub as you would your sofa – it’s a place to relax and muse as you luxuriate. Ripples’ bathroom design service can help you to create the built-in bath of your dreams (ripples.ltd.co.uk). For similar tiles, try ‘Marmi’ by Surface Tiles (from £107 per square metre; surfacetiles.com). ➤

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ROUGH LUXE Create a sophisticated and sensual environment by mixing unrefined finishes with simple fittings. Studioilse’s design for this bathroom in the Ett Hem hotel in Stockholm (pictured; etthem.se) features large limestone tiles – try ‘Quebec Classico Bioprot’ tiles by Porcelanosa (£63.45 per square metre; porcelanosa.com), which have a similar textural finish. Choose a shower with hidden pipework, such as Catchpole & Rye’s ‘Le Thermo Concealed’ model (from £2,316; catchpoleandrye.com) so as not to distract from the efect. ➤

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PICTURE: FEDERICO CEDRONE

dd subtle depth and a tactile quality to walls and floors with densely patterned tiles. We love these new ‘Pætchwork’ engraved options by top Italian designer Piero Lissoni for Thai brand Cotto (pictured) and the equally beautiful ‘Tratti’ collection by Inga Sempé for Mutina (£137 per square metre, Surface Tiles; surfacetiles.com). Apply them as the perfect foil to glossy fittings – you can find a selection of clean-lined options at Sottini (sottini.co.uk). E D


HOME T H I S MON T H ’ S MO S T I N S PI R I N G S PAC E S

F O R M O R E S T Y L I S H I N T E R I O R S , V I S I T E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K / I N S P I R AT I O N S


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This serene, elegant 19th-century French apartment is a refined mix of iconic designs and sleek antiques Words TESSA PEARSON Photography FELIX FOREST/LIVING INSIDE

Living room The capacious sofas were designed by the homeowners and are part of Maison Hand’s ‘Abito’ range. Along with a vintage Eames lounge chair (above), they surround a ‘Platner’ cofee table by Knoll and a striking black table by Il Laboratorio Dell’imperfetto. Floor lights by Isamu Noguchi and Arne Jacobsen add to the modern feel Stockist details on p207 ➤

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ocated in Ainay, a historic neighbourhood known as Lyon’s design district, this 400-square-metre, 19th-century apartment belongs to Pierre Emmanuel Martin and Stéphane Garotin, the French couple behind design consultancy and interiors brand Maison Hand. ‘It’s diicult to find an apartment here because these houses tend to stay in the same family for many generations. We were lucky to find ours,’ says Pierre, who, along with Stéphane, put a lot of time and efort into reviving the property’s ornate interior. ‘We restored all the original wooden panelling and tried to preserve as many of the fixtures and fittings as possible.’ Alterations to the flow of the house were minimal, but the couple have transformed the former dining room into a spacious kitchen/ diner that is perfect for entertaining – they are both keen cooks and seldom dine alone. ‘It’s a rather special layout, because the whole building wraps around a large courtyard,’ Pierre says. ‘You can walk around the entire apartment in a loop, which makes the space feel much bigger than it is. We can see from room to room via the internal windows and all the major external windows face south, so it always feels very bright and airy.’ To maximise light, Pierre and Stéphane chose a palette of pale neutrals, using the same shade of paint on the walls throughout the whole house (a grey-beige hue created with the help of a friend who owns an organic paint company). The simple scheme is brought to life with the duo’s trademark mix of contemporary designs, global treasures and soft furnishings. Bespoke Moroccan rugs line the original parquet floors, which have been stripped back and oiled for a more natural finish; graphic, monochrome wall art ofsets the intricate woodwork; and rough-hewn handmade pieces are displayed throughout with a curator’s skill. ‘Every time we travel we try and find a piece to bring home with us,’ says Pierre, referencing the vast collection of pottery and cookware that forms a striking centrepiece in the sleek Boi kitchen. The finished home is a beautifully balanced combination of elements that perfectly embody the couple’s aesthetic; a convivial, liveable scheme infused with an air of understated luxury. ‘We wanted the interior to be elegant, clean, and easy to live in,’ concludes Pierre. ‘It’s a very relaxed space. I feel as if we have been living here forever.’ maison-hand.com

Living room Striking floor lamps – ‘Luminator’ by Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni for Flos (right), a Serge Mouille design (top) and a ‘Mahari’ by William Pianta for Luminaire (opposite) – stand in contrast to the restored period woodwork Stockist details on p207 ➤

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Kitchen Sleek ‘Xila’ units by Boi provide ample storage and continue the white scheme. Stools by Hans J Wegner for Carl Hansen flank the marble island, while the designer’s ‘Wishbone’ chairs surround the brass-topped dining table Stockist details on p207 ➤

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Hallway and kitchen Global treasures add personality and a rustic edge to the classical architecture. A towering collection of pots and crockery is displayed on ‘Royal’ shelving by Poul Cadovius for DK3 (available from Twentytwentyone in the UK) Stockist details on p207 ➤

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Bathroom Carrara marble creates a luxurious feel. The ‘Adnet’ mirror by Gubi is ofset by candlesticks from Morocco and a vintage wooden stool Bedroom Elegant task lights by French designer Daniel Gallo hang on either side of the Letti & Co bed, which has been covered in fabric by Dominique Kiefer and dressed in linen by Couleur Chanvre. The chair is Warren Platner’s ‘Platner’ design for Knoll Stockist details on p207 E D

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N E Z F O DEN

e his Cologn t in e m e h lack sc U LI N mporary b e t AN SCHA n o c k c y CHRISTI h p ra g to The sli o C H A D Ph IS Word s KR

D E RS TI N A R A


el ditative fe e m a h it eat w a cit y retr g in t a e r c ences, sign inf lu e d n ia s A red by e is tempe townhous

Living room The sofa, daybed and lounge chair are all by Antonio Citterio for Flexform (try Chaplins). They are teamed with two ‘Wishbone’ chairs by Carl Hansen and a Jan Kath rug (try Front Rugs). Artwork includes pieces by Gary Hume and Max Frintrop Stockist details on p207 ➤


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arc Meiré leads a busy life as a co-owner of one of Germany’s leading creative agencies, Meiré und Meiré, which he runs with his art director brother, Mike. Consequently, his Cologne home – a vast four-floor 1,200-square-metre villa close to the city’s university campus – which he shares with his beloved dog Leila, a Rhodesian Ridgeback, is designed as a place to relax. ‘I have been practicing the art of meditation for many years. It helps me to find calm, clarity and strength,’ he says. The first floor of the house is dedicated to Marc’s passion, with a meditation room overlooking a This is a peaceful Zen garden: planted with bamboo, environment, it has a pool lined with ultramarine tiles. To enhance the serenity of the carefully decorated space, the room is dotted with with curated pieces, Buddhas, singing bowls and a wooden tablet originally from where the din and a Balinese temple. These objects rush of the city sit beneath a beautifully decorative cherrywood ceiling. This Asian instantly evaporates aesthetic is carried through the rest of the house, but is combined with contemporary elements for a modern look. The meditation area, for instance, flows into the study, which Marc calls his ‘world room’ and is defined by a black feature wall decorated with photographs, postcards and souvenirs from his Pan-American tours. ‘I admire the lively cultures of South America,’ he says. ‘I have travelled the legendary road between Alaska and Tierra del Fuego many times, and plan to publish a book of my experiences on those journeys.’ On the ground floor, guests are welcomed into a peaceful environment that is carefully decorated with curated pieces and modern art, where the din and rush of the city outside instantly evaporates. The stainless steel Boi kitchen is designed for entertaining and adjoins a convivial dining space, arranged around a fireplace, and a living room that leads into the garden. Marc enjoys hosting guests, and his home is frequently used as a party pad, but the penthouse at the top of the property (which includes the roof garden, bedroom and dressing room) is his personal realm. Here, he reads by the fire or enjoys his huge private spa, designed with both a freestanding bathtub and a Dornbracht ‘Rainsky’ shower. This is his private retreat within a retreat. meireundmeire.de

Living room This space overlooks the Zen garden. The light on the gold feature wall is a design by Serge Mouille, available from Made in Design, and the desk is an extendable ‘Isaac’ dining table by Philippe Allaeys for E15. The three-legged side table is Franco Albini’s ‘Cicognino’ design for Cassina Stockist details on p207 ➤

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A traditional Asian aesthetic is carried through the design of the villa, but mixed with contemporary accents

Kitchen Stainless steel Boi units create a professional-style cooking area. The Emperador marble-topped ‘Tulip’ dining table is by Eero Saarinen for Knoll and above it hangs a cluster of ‘Beat’ lights by Tom Dixon. Seating includes a ‘Washington Skeleton’ side chair in a copper finish by David Adjaye for Knoll, ‘Cherner’ chairs by Norman Cherner (try Nest) and a black stool by Mattiazzi. Two artworks by Damien Hirst hang on the wall Stockist details on p207 ➤


Library The homeowner calls this space his ‘world room’ – a feature wall is dedicated to displays of travel mementoes. The rug was part of an art installation by Rudolf Stingel in Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin. The sofa is by Hannes Wettstein for Cassina, and the two chairs and black stool are all by Artek Stockist details on p207 ➤


‘I have been practicing the art of meditation for many years. It helps me to find calm, clarity and strength’


Meditation room Buddha statues, singing bowls and a large wooden tablet originally from a Balinese temple tell of journeys to Indonesia, Burma and Bhutan, while the customised cherrywood ceiling is reminiscent of a Thai temple ➤


Private lounge This sanctuary is situated in the penthouse and adjoins the homeowner’s bedroom. The large marble-topped ‘Fly’ table is by Flexform, as are the armchair and black table lamp. The rug is by Jan Kath Stockist details on p207 ➤


Bathroom An Antonio Lupi freestanding tub takes centrestage in this vast home spa. The small stool is by Charlotte Perriand for Cassina; the homeowner designed the bench Bedroom The monochrome artwork is by Fabian Marti and the rug by Woodnotes. The side tables are by Antonio Citterio for Flexform Stockist details on p207


M Y FAV O U R I T E T H I N G S I have so many fond memories of travelling along the Pan-American Highway. I collected lots of pictures on the journey which are displayed in the library. My favourite chair is an old traditional rattan one that I bought last February from Sri Lanka. I’ve given it a black tint to match the decor of the house. The Buddha’s presence helps to calm the senses. One of the red Buddhas in my meditation room was a present from a very good friend. I love the way that the light changes throughout the day: it can transform your state of mind. The moment that it gets dark, the black walls come alive. I like the view of the Rautenstrauch Canal from my window. The waterway runs alongside the house – it’s so picturesque and framed by old trees. My Zen garden is very peaceful and planted with amazing Japanese Bonsai trees. I have arranged them so that they appear random but, of course, the planting is deliberate. They are framed by an eight-metre-high wall of bamboo that protects the house from the city outside. E D


WORDS: NAME PICTURES: NAME


WORKING IN MEMPHIS George Sowden and Nathalie Du Pasquier are two founding members of Memphis, the irreverent design movement that offered an antidote to Minimalism. We explore their studio spaces, which are bursting with fun, colour and pattern Words EMMA LOVE Photography GIANNI BASSO/VEGA MG

Renowned design couple George Sowden and Nathalie Du Pasquier are founding members of the radical Memphis Group (The Design Movement To Know in last month’s Trend Issue). Formed in Italy in 1981 by Ettore Sottsass, the movement dominated the international design scene with its irreverent style – a mix of bright colours and bold graphic motifs used mostly on laminate (a material chosen for its ‘lack of culture’) that was a backlash against the prevailing influence of Minimalism in the 1970s. At the height of Memphis’ influence, in 1984, Sowden moved his studio into a Milanese former warehouse (overleaf ); Du Pasquier, now a painter and sculptor, joined him 12 years later when an adjacent space became available. Their own home is just a 30-minute walk from this creative hub. ‘The stroll to work in the morning is part of our ritual. It allows us to feel the city, to enjoy it,’ says Du Pasquier. ➤


WORKING IN MEMPHIS Sowden’s atelier (right) is the most oicelike of the two – he works with a four-person team on products such as his ‘SoftBrew’ cofee pot (£44.50; sowdenathome.com). Du Pasquier’s space (overleaf ) is more fluid; it brims with paintings and prints, many designed for the ‘Wrong for Hay’ collection which launched three years ago. Here, we talk to Sowden about the benefits of a shared workspace and his thoughts on the recent resurgence of Memphis style. This building is a former warehouse that used to store pharmaceutical bottles. It was abandoned until the 1980s, when it was turned into oices. I did very little to it apart from adding the electrics and heating. I’m located at the north side of the space and Nathalie’s studio is at the sunnier end. I had no idea what design was as a child. It wasn’t until I came to Italy [Sowden was born in Leeds, Yorkshire] after studying to be an architect that I decided to be a designer. I was very fortunate that I found a job with Sottsass working for his client, Olivetti. My time working with Olivetti led to my involvement in the Memphis movement: I was in contact with radical design at a time when Modernism was looking for a way out. I began to introduce elements into my work that were frowned upon, such as decoration. I’m fascinated by anything eco or that helps to prevent waste. I’m also interested in products that provide simple solutions to everyday problems. Post-financial crisis there is a definite desire in the design world to rethink everything in simpler terms. I’m currently working on a low-energy LED light bulb. As the population grows, the consumption of energy is becoming a problem, so anything we can do to reduce how much we use is very important. It’s good to work with people that you like to be with. Nathalie and I don’t share projects, but we do share opinions. We start work at 8am and finish at 8pm. Most days we arrive at work together, but have separate entrances to our studios and spend the working day apart. We do regularly meet in the building’s shared kitchen. ➤ 138 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2016


‘MEMPHIS WAS EXTRAORDINARY IN THAT IT UNDERLINED A NON-IDEALIST, INDIVIDUALISTIC WAY OF WORKING’

Sowden’s studio One wall is covered in colourful abstract drawings from the early 1980s, while the shelves brim with ephemera and designs collected over the years


WORKING IN MEMPHIS At the height of Memphis I recall that we spent a lot of time as a group just talking about design. There was a feeling that something was happening that we were all excited about; there was a lot of energy. Is there a resurgent interest in Memphis? Generally, what people are interested in now is the graphics: the stylistic leftovers that they can reuse. People say that those visual elements are ‘Memphis’ but I don’t know if there was ever a Memphis style. Memphis was a collage of eight energised people’s ideas, but if you had an exhibition of Sottsass’ work, my work or Nathalie’s, each one would look very diferent.

The real legacy of Memphis is the change of approach it prompted in design. When you think about design movements, whether it’s Arts & Crafts or Bauhaus, what unites them is that each has a unique approach. Memphis was extraordinary in that it underlined a non-idealist, individualistic way of working. People said: ‘Wow, finally I can do what I want – I don’t have to follow stylistic rules’. Memphis was a catalyst for that, a real moment of change. Sottsass didn’t care about copyright and neither do Nathalie and I. People who copy designs aren’t worth bothering about: they don’t know what to do themselves and in that sense it is quite sad. They are using

someone else’s energy and diluting it. Creativity is a sacred thing, and if there’s a copy of a copy of a copy, it doesn’t produce anything except stupidity. Memphis furniture would be diicult to reproduce because every piece was a oneof design. However, it’s very easy to duplicate textile prints or graphics and a lot of those have been copied – even Prada did a collection of clothes a few years ago using Nathalie’s drawings from 1981. No one asked her. Memphis Milano (memphis-milano.it) has the exclusive licence to sell small amounts of original Memphis furniture, mostly to collectors and museums. sowdenathome.com; nathaliedupasquier.com E D

‘THE REAL LEGACY OF MEMPHIS IS THE CHANGE OF APPROACH IT PROMPTED IN DESIGN’

Du Pasquier’s studio A vintage wooden desk and a trolley filled with brushes furnish this practical workspace, alongside a colourful Memphis chair


ARABIAN LIGHT This apartment in the bustling heart of Morocco’s Rose City blends local treasures with design classics Words JACKIE DALY Photography GAELLE LE BOULICAUT Production JEREMY CALLAGHAN

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Left On top of a Beni Ourain rug from the homeowner’s design brand Kulchi sit two armchairs and a table that were all sourced from Marrakesh’s Bab el Khemis market. The sofa is by Caravane and the wall lamp is vintage: try Serge Mouille for new versions or Trainspotters for salvaged options Right The artworks above the sideboard (try Poliform for similar) are by Karen Darling and the vases are Tinja Design. The floor light is a classic ‘Grasshopper’ design by Greta Grossman for Gubi (available at The Conran Shop) Stockist details on p207 ➤

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‘ I

love Marrakesh, but after a day spent trekking through the souk among the dust and noise, I need a place that is calm,’ says Australian-born Cassandra Karinsky of her home in the Moroccan city. Cassie discovered Marrakesh in 1996, when she worked as a restaurant consultant for a Chicagobased business. The job took her to New York, Sydney and Ibiza, but after her first taste of Morocco she was drawn to the Rose City. ‘I love its energy. The local artisans are so creative and inspiring,’ she says. ‘Marrakesh is, and has always been, a creative hub.’ Cassie made the move to Morocco in 2005. Initially, she established a kaftan label with a partner, and attributes its subsequent popularity to Gwyneth Paltrow (who mentioned the brand on her blog). Since then, she has styled and written for several international editions of ELLE Decoration, established herself as an interior decorator, and set up Moroccan rugs and homeware brand Kulchi. Her Marrakesh home is a two-bedroom apartment with views of the mosque located in Guéliz, a modern district that attracts a contemporary design crowd. ‘I have to admit that when I moved in, I did do the Moroccan tea-stool thing: cushions on the floor and 144 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2016

all of that,’ she says. ‘But after a few years of living here, I just wanted to create a place that reflected my own identity.’ As a result, her home eschews a clichéd Moroccan aesthetic in favour of minimalist white walls and floors, accented by splashes of colour. This blank canvas allows Cassie’s collections of art and furniture to shine. The huge modern painting in the living room is by her brother, Alex Karinsky, while graphic images by New York fashion photographer Randall Bachner – a regular visitor to the apartment – are framed in the kitchen. ‘We have an open-door policy here. It’s like Melrose Place on rue du Mosque,’ she jokes. Cassie takes regular trips to Atlas Mountain to hunt for things to sell in her two Kulchi stores. Many of those tribal pieces end up in her home. ‘There are things in my life – furniture, rugs and old photos – that I discovered in Morocco and couldn’t live without,’ she says. These local treasures are artfully mixed with design classics, such as a ‘Diamond’ wire chair by Harry Bertoia. ‘What I’ve created here does not look like it belongs in Marrakesh,’ she says, ‘but when you look a little closer, you see its influence – this home has my personal style with a hint of the city’s intensity.’ kulchi.com


Dining area Leather chairs stand at either end of the trestle table, which is flanked by a bench and simple wooden stools. Try Jonathan Adler for similar 1960s-style pendant lights Oice This space is in a recess of the living room. The vintage ‘Diamond’ chair by Harry Bertoia for Knoll is from a flea market (buy new at Skandium) Stockist details on p207 ➤


‘When I first moved in, I did do the Moroccan tea-stools and floor cushions thing. But after a few years here I wanted to create a space that reflected my own identity’

Living room The white walls and floors, as well as the open-plan layout, allow the homeowner’s collections of artwork, vintage furniture and trinkets to take centre stage ➤


Kitchen A section of blue-grey paint frames the glossy black tiles (try Fired Earth for similar), which are paired with a Butler sink. The chairs were bought at a souk (try Retrouvius for a choice of reclaimed seating in the UK) Stockist details on p207


Bedroom A palette of soft greys and blues creates a tranquil sleep space; the print hanging on the wall is by the homeowner’s friend Randall Bachner. The ‘AJ’ wall lights are by Louis Poulsen (try Skandium) and the bedding is from Maison de Vacances Stockist details on p207 E D


THE ENCHANTING PALACE Clean-lined furniture and a monochrome colour scheme give this ornate neo-gothic landmark in Switzerland a stylishly modern new look

Words MARK C O’FLAHERTY Photography FABRIZIO CICCONI/LIVING INSIDE Styling FRANCESCA DAVOLI

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hen Francesca Neri Antonello and her husband Giulio happened upon architect Agostino Camuzzi’s 19th-century neo-gothic landmark – once home to poet, painter and novelist Herman Hesse – in Lugano, Switzerland, they knew that they had to live there. It was an unlikely choice: the style of Francesca’s eponymous architectural practice, FNA, is profoundly modern. And yet she found Camuzzi’s stucco-rich style, full of the visual flourishes so familiar from his work for Tsar Nicholas at the Hermitage in St Petersburg, enchanting. The couple moved in with their children – Claudia (15) and Filippo (13) – and their dog Coco, and instantly began transforming two of the palace’s six apartments into contemporary spaces that maintained the spirit of the place. ‘We tried to keep the aura of the house,’ says Francesca, who enforced a restrained colour scheme, focusing on light to accentuate the texture and detail of Camuzzi’s stucco. ‘Every building has a life, and who are we to destroy it?’ she asks. ‘It’s a matter of keeping hold of the right cards. Without them, you can’t play.’ Francesca compares working around the original stucco detailing to ‘dressing a beautiful woman’. In some rooms the walls are stark white to show of new Modernist flourishes, such as a set of linear, dramatic wall lights by Charlotte Perriand and a monochrome chequered floor. ‘We have deliberately opted for minimal colour in the living spaces,’ says Francesca, ‘but we have more colourful surfaces in the corridors – the oranges and blues echo the artworks and fabrics throughout the house.’ While the family’s apartment only takes up 500 square metres of the original palace, it seems much larger. ‘I think a home needs to have a labyrinthine feel to it,’ says Francesca. ‘I love it when people get lost in a space.’ Much of the furniture is custom-made by Francesca’s studio, but the most important pieces are family heirlooms and precious trinkets collected on the couple’s travels: ‘the things that we have gathered and inherited,’ she says. Francesca has led an international life – living in Peru, the East Coast of the US, Italy and Switzerland – but it seems that fate had a hand in selecting her current abode. ‘Giulio and I have both lived in so many diferent houses,’ says Francesca, ‘but this home brought us both back to our childhoods. It reminds us of our grandparents’ houses. The scale, shapes and stucco all have such resonance. And weirdly, we both went to boarding school right next door. I think this place was just waiting for us.’ fnafrancescaneri.com

Living room The ceiling fresco dates from the 1830s and the fireplace is an original marble piece. A pair of worn leather club chairs and a reclaimedwood cofee table form a relaxed counterpoint to the palace’s elaborate details – a key design theme throughout the home ➤

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show of both The walls are painted stark white to dern flourishes the original stucco detailing and mo


Living room A pair of ‘Potence Pivotante’ lights by Charlotte Perriand for Nemo hang above the custom sofa. The leather stool is by Baxter Dining room A 1930s table is teamed with Fermob chairs. The ‘Great JJ’ light is by Leucos Stockist details on p207 ➤

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Hallway The lime-green corridor is dressed with two armchairs designed by the homeowner Kitchen The resin and lacquer cabinets, which are topped with Corian surfaces, were made by FNA. The ‘Surpil’ chairs are by French firm DCW Éditions; try Skinflint for vintage pendant lights Stockist details on p207 ➤

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‘We wanted to keep the aura of the house. Every b u il d in g has a life, and who are w e to destroy it? ’


Bathroom The roll-top bathtub is by Devon & Devon, and is teamed with sleek bespoke cabinetry. Try Fired Earth for patterned tiles Hallway ‘We have deliberately opted for monochrome in the living spaces, but we have more colour in the hallways,’ says the homeowner Stockist details on p207 ➤

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Bedroom The original 19th-century parquet floor has been preserved, and is accentuated by the bespoke four-poster bed. The feature wall (opposite) is covered in ‘Fil D’Argent’ wallpaper by Hermès. The practical Via Bizzuno task light blends into the wallpaper, allowing the low-hanging vintage metallic lampshade to shine Stockist details on p207

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A D AY I N T H E L I F E First thing in the morning I open the shutters and look out at the lake. Then I have a glass of hot water and lemon. I love to walk to the nearby forest. I rarely ever see another person. The air is so silent and clean there; I love it. My favourite artwork is our painting by Alberto Burri. He was an Italian sculptor and painter. I love the way that he treated texture and mixed colour. He cut, tore and stitched materials together. My perfect dinner party would involve dear friends, Taurasi red wine and great music. I am not a fantastic cook, but I can prepare beautiful appetisers. Last thing at night, I practice yoga and drink a cup of chamomile tea. E D


BLUE SKY THINKING Sweet pastel shades accented with bright hits of yellow give this Copenhagen apartment, home to a creative photographer and her young family, a sunny charm Words EMMA LOVE Photography MARTIN SOLYST/LIVING INSIDE Styling EVA MARIE WILKEN Production SUZANNE DE JONG


Living area The homeowner’s favourite piece of furniture is her ‘Cocoon’ sofa by Danish brand Eilersen. It sits on a rug from Massimo (stocked at Heal’s) alongside a vintage spool-shaped cofee table and cardboard stools from Tiger. Artwork by the homeowner hangs on the wall above, which is painted a blue chosen to complement the earthy tones of the sofa Stockist details on p207 ➤

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Norwegian photographer Anette Ravenhill met her now husband Christian, a managing director at a digital company, on a weekend trip to Copenhagen in 2009. After travelling the world together for more than a year, they settled in the Danish capital and rented this 89-squaremetre, one-bedroom apartment in the up-and-coming Nørrebro district. ‘It used to be a poor area, but now it’s trendy, multi-cultural and full of artists trying to make their mark on the city,’ says Anette. As a trained interior designer and someone who builds sets for her own photography shoots, Anette has used her creative talents to devise a backdrop of soft pastels throughout the apartment that are a foil to vibrant accents introduced by furniture and accessories. ‘We started experimenting with colour as a way to make the place our own,’ she says. ‘I wanted to create diferent zones within the open-plan living area, so we decided to use blue on the living room walls to complement the earthy colours of the sofa. The bedroom and oice are painted mint green, a shade that symbolises calmness and growth.’ Introducing so many colours into the home may seem a bold move for some, but Anette is relaxed in the knowledge that the painted walls can be easily altered. ‘We can always re-paint them in a year or so, but it’s harder to change the furniture,’ she says. Consequently, these pieces

‘I ALWAYS COMPARE NØRREBRO TO BRICK LANE IN LONDON, BECAUSE IT’S SO VIBRANT AND THERE ARE SO MANY ARTISTS LIVING HERE’ are a mix of old and new styles that work together to create a timeless, convivial feel. In the living room, for instance, Anette has teamed her favourite ‘Cocoon’ sofa from Danish company Eilersen with a vintage red armchair passed down from Christian’s grandmother. Anette’s creativity is evident in her own furniture designs for the apartment, which include the tree-shaped coat stand at the far end of the dining room, the rug crocheted from old sheets and textiles and the mobile above the bed, which is fashioned from a Gubi light, wire and paper. The map of the world on the bedroom wall is a treasured item from Christian’s school days. ‘We have placed pins to show where we have been and where we want to go in the future,’ Anette says. ‘It reminds us of the things that we want to do: travel more, live more and create many more moments together.’ anetteravenhill.dk

Living room Homeowner Anette (above) uses colour to create diferent zones – the snug seating area is demarcated from the hallway by a blue wall. The yellow shelf is from Nova Møbler, a store in Nørrebro (John Lewis sells similar A-frame-style shelving) Stockist details on p207 ➤

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Kitchen A soft blush feature wall anchors the room, which features a coat stand and table designed by the homeowner. Try Trainspotters for similar lampshades Bathroom Yellow towels by Hay pep up the simple, serene bathing space Bedroom The homeowner made the mobile using a Gubi pendant light as a base. The cushions on the bed are by Hay and Place de Bleu Stockist details on p207


M Y FAV O U R I T E T H I N G S As a new mother I go for a lot of walks with my baby, Emilia. One of the most beautiful places to go in Copenhagen is Assistens Cemetery (Kapelvej 4, 2200 København N), where writer Hans Christian Andersen is buried. In the summer people sunbathe next to the graves, which at first seems very strange, but you get used to it. I visit a lot of cafes. Cofee Collective on Jægersborggade makes the best cofee I’ve ever tasted. We also like to visit Meyers bakery (on the same street) – the cinnamon rolls are to die for! The most used piece of furniture in our home is the sofa. It’s so big that two people can lie next to each other on it. My favourite artwork in the house is the painting in the kitchen. We bought it from an artist on the street in Lima, Peru. My most treasured items are my camera and my computer, because they allow me to be creative. E D MARCH 2016 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 167


PU RE BLISS A love of calm, uncluttered design keeps this family home in the Netherlands looking pristine yet inviting

Words HANNAH BOOTH Photography JANSJE KLAZINGA/TAVERNE AGENCY Production SUZANNE DE JONG

Living room The pale-brown sofa (find similar at Heal’s) is dotted with throws and cushions from Stockhome, Tine K and Stapelgoed. The homeowners built the cofee table themselves. A black Anglepoise lamp sits atop an old army trestle table from Combitex. The stool is from VT Wonen Stockist details on p207 ➤

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PANTRY

GROUND FLOOR

nita Vermeulen’s villa, which she shares with her husband LIVING AREA Willem and three children – Finn (10), and twins Mick and Bo (seven) – is a white space that is, at first glance, the antithesis of a typical family home. This schoolteacher has an exacting approach KITCHEN to design: ‘I love white, it’s so calming. In this house it’s a warm colour, never cold,’ she says. The property is located in the riverside town of Alphen aan den Rijn, 50 kilometres from Amsterdam. ‘Our old house is just a block away. I used to pass this place on my bike and recall FIRST FLOOR feeling a little flutter inside each time,’ she says. ‘I couldn’t put my finger on it, but it felt like my WARDROBE ideal home. Then, suddenly, it went up for sale, which was serendipitous.’ BEDROOM Anita has made the villa her own by creating MAIN an open-plan living space centred around a stone BEDROOM fireplace. The brilliant white walls and poured resin floor allow natural light to bounce of of BEDROOM BATHROOM every surface. The serene scene is enlivened by eye-catching vintage accessories and interesting design pieces, from a shaggy sheepskin-topped stool to a rustic side table made out of a large log. Anita is a fan of wooden furniture, using it to soften the all-white scheme. ‘It adds just the right amount of warmth,’ she says. ‘The contrast between light and dark is so beautiful.’ To perfect this sparse but cheerful look, Anita employs a simple design trick: empty space. If a room is beginning to look too cluttered, she rearranges it. ‘The less stuf I have in my house, the more individual pieces shine,’ she explains. An expert bargain-hunter, Anita sources finds from Craigslist, flea markets and secondhand stores, as well as waiting for the sales. ‘The kitchen is an ex-showroom model that cost half the price of a new design,’ she says. But how does Anita keep the house looking pristine with three children in residence? There are a few rules: ‘I don’t allow them to eat while walking, or on the sofa. But, of course, they can be kids. Toys scattered across the floor are not a problem, as long as they clean them up afterwards. Upstairs is their domain – they can make as much mess as they like up there.’ Come evening, once the children are in bed, Anita cleans up the downstairs. ‘White shows everything, so it does create extra work, but the efort is worth it. I love living in a home that not only looks good, but feels good,’ she says.

Kitchen The crochet-style rug is by Puur Basic and the shaggy ‘Bèèè’ stool was purchased at Stockhome. The pivoting door that leads to the hallway was custom-made by a blacksmith Stockist details on p207 ➤

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‘I LOVE WHITE, IT’S SO CALMING. IN THIS HOUSE IT’S A WARM COLOUR, NEVER COLD’


Kitchen The streamlined white units are by Italian brand Comprex Segno. The dining table is by Arco (try Made in Design) and is flanked by ‘DSW’ chairs by Charles and Ray Eames for Vitra (available at The Conran Shop). A ‘Z11’ pendant light by Ay Illuminate hangs above Stockist details on p207 ➤

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‘THE LESS STUFF I HAVE IN MY HOUSE, THE MORE INDIVIDUAL PIECES SHINE’

Kitchen The shelving unit on castors was discovered on Craigslist: it holds an ever changing display of curiosities Details The desk is also from Craigslist and the wooden stool is from Leen Bakker. A pulp paper vase by Serax, a ladder from L’Etoile, a typewriter picked up at a local flea market and a charming old key that the homeowners’ son found on the street are displayed artfully in this clean, white space Stockist details on p207 ➤

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Bedroom The grey rug is from Berden (try Heal’s) and the bedspread is from Piet Boon. A pair of black vintage chairs serve as bedside tables, while the walls are filled with artworks. The light perched on the headboard is Chris Kabel’s ‘Sticky Lamp’ for Droog Stockist details on p207 E D

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Entrance hall Vintage pendant lights, bought at a flea market in Brooklyn, hang above a row of antique seats. This informal waiting area is situated outside the homeowners’ oice Stockist details on p207 ➤

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How one creative couple with a strong design vision created a cosy but dynamic Milanese home using only vintage pieces Words SARAH SLADE Photography FABRIZIO CICCONI/LIVING INSIDE Styling FRANCESCA DAVOLI

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Living room The steel-framed partition that separates the seating area from the kitchen gives this space an industrial edge. The leather sofa is an original ChesterďŹ eld (try 1st Dibs) Stockist details on p207

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OFFICE

BATHROOM

BEDROOM LIVING AREA

BALCONY

KITCHEN MAIN BEDROOM

ucked away in a quiet side street in the historic Ticinese district of Milan, this 100-square-metre apartment is home to Italian duo Giovanni Gennari and Anna Carbone, and their two-year-old son Tito. It’s also where they run their business, The Chic Fish, a blog and online shop with a separate graphics and set-design studio. The couple moved into this cosy home, located on the second floor of a property built in the early 1800s, two years ago, just before the birth of their son. It is the family’s urban oasis, with one side leading out to an idyllic 20-square-metre terrace and the other offering rooftop views of the traditional ateliers, galleries and trendy bars that lend this area its unique character. ‘There’s a real neighbourhood feel here,’ says Giovanni. ‘We love being a part of the mix of the old and new generations.’ The interior of the apartment is an engaging blend of past and present. In the entrance hall, salvaged scafolding boards are arranged in a sophisticated parquet pattern across the floor, while geometric reclaimed tiles add a pop of colour in the living room. The distressed plaster finish on the walls has been deliberately exposed to reveal the building’s history, as with the old electric cables that have been turned into a unique design feature. The seating area and kitchen are separated by an industrial steel-framed screen, which also betrays signs of age and use. ‘It came from a disused Fiat factory in Turin and was the perfect size – it was destined to be in this space,’ says Giovanni. ‘We love to let the personality of every item shine through,’ explain the couple, who have arranged vignettes of antique objects and curios gathered while globetrotting or saved from childhood in every corner of their home. Larger pieces, such as the beautifully worn Chesterfield sofa and cracked leather boxing bag, add a sense of lived-in elegance. Some of the furniture, such as the oice desks crafted from vintage Singer sewing machines, are bespoke, made by the homeowners themselves. For design inspiration, the pair visit New York; their favourite vintage hunting grounds in Europe are Italy, France, Amsterdam and Berlin. They have even discovered tarnished treasures abandoned on the streets of Milan. ‘We’re not interested in unearthing expensive designs,’ says Giovanni. ‘What we enjoy is looking for beautiful objects that we can put together to tell our story.’ thechicfish.com ➤

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Details Homeowners Giovanni and Anna sit with their son Tito on their Chesterfield sofa. Its aged leather matches the beaten boxing bag in the corner, sourced from Milan’s famous Doria Gym Kitchen The wall is decorated with a large pharmacy sign, picked up in Naples, and white metro tiles (try Fired Earth for similar). The ‘Bufer’ porcelain pendant lights are by Wieki Somers for Pols Potten (available at Skandium). Their gold glaze creates a warm glow Stockist details on p207 ➤

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Hallway A set of antique oratory seats are perched outside the couple’s oice Oice Farrow & Ball’s ‘Bumblebee’ wallpaper, gives a playful edge to the room, and complements the tiled floor. An old industrial trolley has been put to use as book storage Stockist details on p207 ➤


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Dining room The table was built by the homeowners using a block of solid cedar and a heavy iron base. The chairs came from a flea market in Paris and the white ceramic pendant lights match the ones in the kitchen. Family photos, a human anatomy poster found in an antique shop in Berlin, and a vintage poster of Italy’s ‘Queen of the Circus’ Moira Orfei line the walls ➤

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M Y FAV O U R I T E T H I N G S The kitchen has a convivial atmosphere. We dedicated a lot of space to this one room when we designed the layout of the apartment – it’s where the family gathers to cook, eat, talk and play. I like the view through the French doors in the kitchen out to the terrace – it’s our little green paradise in the city. I often ride alongside the Naviglio canal on my vintage Vespa and grab cofee at the nearby Pasticceria Cucchi (Corso Genova, 20123; pasticceriacucchi.it), one of the oldest cafes in Milan. We regularly hunt for treasures at the Navigli flea market (Mercatone dell’ Antiquariato, Naviglio Grande; naviglilive.it). Every last Sunday of the month there is a great selection of antiques, furniture and vintage clothes on ofer. One of our favourite places to find vintage gems isRossana Orlandi (Via Matteo Bandello, 20123; rossanaorlandi.com).

Bathroom The claw-foot tub came from Portugal. For similar classic sanitaryware, try Drummonds Bedroom The Tuscan-inspired motif on the wall was created by a local artist using bespoke stamps designed by the homeowner: it gives the impression of antique wallpaper. The bedlinen is by Society Limonta Stockist details on p207 E D


A RTS & CULTUR E • BOOKS • A RCHITECTUR E • TR AV EL

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: COURTESY OF WADSWORTH ATHENEUM ,USEUM OF ART, HARTFORD, LT

ESCAPE

I F YOU V I S I T ON E E X H I BI T ION T H I S MON T H . . . ‘I PERHAPS OWE HAVING BECOME A PAINTER TO FLOWERS,’ Claude Monet once

said. Although our green and pleasant land won’t be in bloom for several months yet, seize the opportunity to take artistic inspiration as the great Impressionist did by making a trip to the Royal Academy’s new show, ‘Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse’. It’s a verdant ode to gardens as depicted by modern artists: alongside multiple Monet works, such as the iconic 1904 Water Lillies, more unexpected interpretations are on display, by giants of 20th-century art not usually associated with horticulture. A rarely seen painting by Paul Klee will sit alongside pictures by Matisse, Renoir (Monet Painting in his Garden, pictured) and John Singer Sargent, but our highlight is Kandinsky’s Murnau The Garden II: its bold brush strokes and Fauviststyle colours will banish winter blues. Until 20 April; admission £17.60 (royalacademy.org.uk).

F O R M O R E P L A C E S T O E X P L O R E , V I S I T E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K / E S C A P E


ALPINE ADVENTURE Where is it? South Tyrol feels Austrian – architecturally (it’s all frescoed chalets and Salzburg-esque churches), linguistically (the common language is German) and gastronomically (apple strudel is a local speciality!) – but actually lies in Italy. How do I get there? Skip the airport stress and travel by train from London via Paris and Zürich to Innsbruck, where you can pick up another train to Bolzano, South Tyrol’s capital. Book trains via European train expert Loco 2 (loco2.com). Why go now? This year, the region comes into its own as an arts and architecture destination. The highlight is the new Messner Mountain Museum (messner-mountain-museum.it), a series of six extraordinary spaces with exhibitions curated by Italian mountaineer Reinhold Messner and scattered (at upwards of 1,900 metres above sea level) around the Dolomites. Four of the museum’s outposts are renovated historic buildings (MMM Ortles is a former climbers’ lodge; MMM Juval is a

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converted 13th-century castle with a glass roof ) and two are purpose-built landmarks. The views from MMM Corones (left), an astonishing Zaha Hadid-designed edifice that juts out of the side of Mont Kronplatz, are awe-inspiring. The museum is open year-round but spring, when the snowy peaks melt and the early wildflowers bloom, is the perfect time to visit. Where to stay? Hotel Greif in Bolzano (above), a 17th-century guesthouse transformed into a design hotel with Iranian Gabbeh carpets and furniture made from local maple and burr walnut (double rooms from £106 per night; designhotels.com). Or, if you want your head to remain in the clouds, check in to sustainable spa Vigilius Mountain Resort, accessible only via cable car (double rooms from £164 per night; vigilius.it). What else is there to do? Take a turn on the Rhätische Bahn, or Rhaetian railway (top), a charming scarlet train that majestically winds its way over Swiss-Italian landscapes via mountain passes and jaw-dropping viaducts. We suggest taking the three-hour World Heritage Route from Tirano to Thusis for some restful sightseeing (£34 one way; rhb.ch).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: HARALD WISTHALER, GETTY

Discover the joys of slow travel while navigating South Tyrol and the beautiful Austrian-Italian Alps by rail


Escape | N E W S

DINING EXPERIENCES

PICTURES: NG MAPS/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM, LONDON, PAUL WINCH-FURNESS

MAP YOUR STYLE Celebrate the magnificence of cartography this month with two map-related launches. New book ‘Map: Exploring the World’ (Phaidon, £39.95) is a remarkable compendium featuring everything from hand-illustrated maps detailing the migration routes of South American birds and World War I naval routes to an infographic of who lived where in Hollywood in 1937. Educational, and beautiful enough to bring out the buf in everyone. Meanwhile, Swedish start-up Mapiful allows you to create and print a stylish map of any place on the planet. Designs are monochrome, with a Sans Serif font used to list the place name, date, latitude and longitude ( from £40; mapiful.com).

BOTTICELLI SEASON A veritable spring fever for Italian Renaissance master Sandro Botticelli is sweeping the UK. An exhibition of 30 of his drawings, originally commissioned to illustrate scenes from Dante’s Divine Comedy, go on display as part of ‘Botticelli and Treasures from the Hamilton Collection’ in the Courtauld Gallery at London’s Somerset House (18 February–8 May; courtauld.ac.uk). At the V&A, ‘Botticelli Reimagined’ is a bold show demonstrating how the artist’s influence has permeated fashion, design and film (5 March–3 July; vam.ac.uk). As well as more than 50 Botticelli works, an Arts and Crafts translation of Primavera (original above) by William Morris and Dolce & Gabbana’s ‘Venus’ dress are on show. Gallery-goers eager to learn more ought to pre-order Botticelli (Phaidon, £95).

The latest restaurants are more than just spaces to eat: they’re set in some truly unexpected buildings. Check out these three venues that are rewriting the rulebook on polite dining. German Gymnasium (above) is a glamorous dining space within Britain’s first purpose-built athletics centre. Built in 1865 for the German Gymnastics Society, the Grade II-listed red-brick edifice in King’s Cross is now home to a modern European restaurant, grand cafe and a ground-floor bar that serves Austrian wines. We love the marble floors and grey-blue leather banquettes (germangymnasium.com). InGalera (right) is an eatery with a social purpose, recently opened in Milan’s Bollate prison. Housed within prison walls, the space was designed by architect Augusta Comi and is stafed by detainees, overseen by a maître d’. Black-and-white archive shots of the prison serve as placemats (ingalera.it). The Clink Restaurant at Brixton Prison (below) is a similarly philanthropic enterprise. It’s the brainchild of Chris Moore, formerly Harrods’ director of catering and now CEO of the Clink Charity, and chef Alberto Crisci. Moore’s charity works with HM Prisons Service on rehabilitation. Front-of-house staf are inmates preparing for release, as are the chefs, whose cooking is as sophisticated as the restored Victorian dining hall (theclinkcharity.org).

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Escape | N E W S

SHOPPING UNWRAPPED

WORDS: NAME PICTURES: NAME

Imagine a supermarket where everything on the shelves, from pasta to pears, is sold without packaging. That’s the idea behind Berlin grocery Original Unverpackt (the name translates as ‘original unpacked’), which occupies the site of a former butcher in the Kreuzberg district of Berlin. The founders, Milena Glimbovski (right) and Sara Wolf, were fed up with the amount of food packaging waste generated by the industry and left college to set up a crowdfunding campaign to raise money to open the shop. Of the 500-plus products on sale, the majority are organic and locally sourced (another way to avoid unnecessary packaging). On your first visit, you bring your own containers that are weighed and labelled. At the till, their weight is subtracted from your bill and you pay just for your groceries; the shop also stocks non-food items such as detergent. Simple, and not a five-pence plastic bag in sight! (original-unverpackt.de).


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LONDON’S BEST BRUNCH SPOTS The burgeoning trend for chic breakfasts continues apace. If you aren’t disposed to preparing a handcrafted feast at home, we can recommend three new London venues in which to start the day. Anna Hansen has opened a second Modern Pantry in Finsbury Square. The soaring Art Deco building (top) has subtle decor inspired by Hansen’s Scandinavian heritage, and faces south, meaning it’s bathed in morning light. The muesli with buckwheat, pufed wild rice and fennel is our pick, with a delicious malt and caraway hot chocolate (themodernpantry.co.uk). The Bourne & Hollingsworth Buildings (left; bandhbildings.com) – a brasserie, bar and greenhouse in Islington – sparkles at night, but with the appointment of a new executive chef, ex-Le Manoir Adam Gray, bringing the focus away from the cocktails and towards simple, modern British food, it’s now an essential brunch spot, too. Down in Dulwich, maker of award-winning sourdough Brick House Bread (above; brickhousebread.com) has opened a cafe in an old electrical warehouse – go for great cofee and, of course, excellent toast after a walk on nearby Peckham Rye Common or a visit to Dulwich Picture Gallery.

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: ANNA BATCHELOR

F L I G H T S O F FA N C Y It’s time to restore the glamour of travel, but first we must pay homage to the past. ‘The Art of Flying’ (Assouline, £115) is a visual chronicle of elegant air voyages, from the golden era of the 1940s (think ladies in diamonds, gin cocktails and a chef serving in-flight soufflés on silver platters) to Concorde’s first flight and cabin crew uniforms designed by Emilio Pucci, Moncler and Dior. A more thought-provoking read is the new edition of philosopher Alain de Botton’s ‘The New Art of Travel’ (Penguin, £12), published in association with Airbnb. Exploring everything from hotel minibars to foreign romance epics, de Botton asks how and why we travel, quoting thinkers, artists and writers such as William Wordsworth and Van Gogh. To make your own flight more glamorous, we suggest Neom Organics’ new ‘On the Go’ collection of travel-sized products, including ‘Tranquillity’ lavender and basil pillow mist and the citrussy ‘Intensive Energy Boosting’ pulse-point roll-on (£8 each; neomorganics.com).


Escape | N E W S

THE PEAK OF CHIC Now is the best time to visit the Alps, with great snow and increasingly warm temperatures. Here, we ofer more Alpine inspiration, revealing three of the hippest new hotel openings

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WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: ROCKS RESORT/LAAX, GAUDENZ DANUSER

Rocks Resort (above and left) is one of the first destinations to break out of the Alpine chintz archetype. Megalithic on the exterior, inside the Swiss ‘village’ apartments (which are also available to buy) feature wet rooms and kitchen surfaces made from local Valser quartzite stone. Stylish details abound – from Alessi cutlery to Schott glassware – but the views remain the star of the show (from £150 per night; rocksresort.com). Chetzeron Hotel (centre) is in the Swiss resort of Crans-Montana. Architects Actescollectifs and Swiss-Lebanese hotelier Sami Lamaa have taken the humble ‘room with a view’ concept to the next level, transforming a former cable-car station into this fantastic modern hotel. The vast mouth of the station, wherein gondolas once entered, is now a Modernist-style restaurant that serves charcuterie platters cured in the on-site smokehouse. Accessible only by ski, snowmobile or foot, this hotel is a true hidden gem (double rooms from £180 per night; designhotels.com). Terminal Neige (bottom) makes skiing holidays accessible for the modern urbanite on a budget. It’s the first three-star project from the Sibuet family, renowned purveyors of French boutiquestyle breaks. Set in a grey, Marcel Breuer-designed Bauhaus building in respected French ski-spot Flaine, the imposing concrete hotel is made cosy with chestnut furniture, ethnic woollen textiles and multicoloured ‘Hang it All’ coat racks by Charles and Ray Eames. Rooms look onto a striking sculpture by Pablo Picasso: the ‘Totem’ silhouette figure (double rooms from £110 per night; terminal-neige.com).

MASTERS OF THE HAUS Vitra Design Museum’s ‘The Bauhaus #itsalldesign’ exhibition aims to demystify the often polemical aspects of the German design movement. Including works by Marcel Breuer, artist Wassily Kandinsky and product designer Marianne Brandt, it’s a great reason to visit the Frank Gehrydesigned museum in Germany. Until 28 February (design-museum.de).


Escape | N E W S

STARS OF SILVER SCREEN Traditional cinemas may be under threat from internet downloads and video streaming services, but we’re delighted to see a colony of cool new venues bucking the trend Kino is a digital film-screening enterprise that has opened its second cinema, cafe-bar and arts venue in the medieval East Sussex town of Rye, in a restored Grade-II listed Victorian school (top). Ribbed oak panelling inside has been designed to echo the frames of old film strips, and red cedar-clad extensions house auditoria that will show foreign-language films, kids’ movies and documentaries, as well as the big new releases (kinodigital.co.uk). In London, the University of Westminster has rejuvenated a historic 1848 cinema – Britain’s first venue to show a motion picture – in the heart of the West End. The Regent Street Cinema’s Art Deco features, domed ceiling and golden velvet seats have been splendidly restored (centre), and its programme bridges the historic and contemporary (regentstreetcinema.com). Nearby, arthouse chain Picturehouse Cinemas has opened a Martin Brudnizki-designed flagship, Picturehouse Central (bottom), whose seven-screen theatre, retro cafe and carousel-style light installation all somehow squeeze in behind Piccadilly Circus (picturehouses.com). And round the corner, the basement of Dean Street’s new Soho House has been overtaken by a 45-seat bijou film salon: its red velvet armchairs and individual side tables with copper lamps are fit for royalty (sohohouse.com). Lastly, coming soon to Galway, Ireland, is Picture Palace, due to open in spring 2016. Designed by dePaor Architects, the dove-grey concrete edifice sits behind a row of Georgian terraced houses. The state-of-the-art cinema will show international films, host an annual festival and was part of Galway’s successful 2014 bid to become one of only five UNESCO Cities of Film (picturepalace.ie).

A ROOM OF ONE’S OWN Fabulous news for bookish East Londoners with a taste for bohemia: Society Club has just opened in Shoreditch. The literary-inspired private members’ lounge – a sister to the Soho outpost – has a bar and bijou bookshop stocked with a fascinating selection of first editions, newly penned novels, art books and rare, out-of-print titles. No library rules apply, though: conversation is encouraged, as is tea, cake and cocktails. The venue hosts literary talks and poetry nights, plus you might spy an author. It’s members-only in the evenings, but anyone can drop in during the day. Membership costs £175 per year, with any books you buy deducted from the price. 3 Cheshire Street, London E2 (thesocietyclub.com). 200 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2016

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: OLIVER PERROTT

From top The panelling in Rye’s new Kino cinema is inspired by old film strips; Art Deco elements have been restored in The Regent Street Cinema; the new Picturehouse venue is right behind Piccadilly Circus


ARCHITECTURE NEW NORDIC LANDMARKS Three prestigious cultural centres that are set to transform the Scandinavian skyline

GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, HELSINKI Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum in New York and Frank Gehry’s in Bilbao are soon to be joined by a third outpost in Helsinki. Moreau Kusunoki, a French-Japanese architecture practice based in Paris, won the competition to create the new artistic destination, seeing of more than 1,700 other entries. Its design encompasses a cluster of pavilions, all clad in native woods and glass and linked by a series of garden-like spaces. As the competition jury put it, it’s a place ‘where art and society can meet and intermingle’. (designguggenheimhelsinki.org). 202 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2016

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF ART, ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN, OSLO Situated on Oslo’s historic waterfront, this extension to the National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design has been designed by German practice Kleihues + Schuwerk Gesellschaft Von Architekten as part of a project to regenerate the harbour into a bustling cultural hub. The building consists of a number of staggered, boxy floors, all coated in grey stone and concrete, that are in keeping with the look of the existing cityscape. It’s planned to open in 2020 (nasjonalmuseet.no.).

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS

NOBEL CENTRE, STOCKHOLM For the first time ever, a building will be erected in honour of the renowned Nobel Peace Prize. The Nobel Centre (or Nobelhuset in Swedish) – the work of British architects David Chipperfield and Christoph Felger – will have a central auditorium to host ceremonies, as well as spaces for exhibitions and debates, all encased in a concrete and glass box. Construction begins this year (nobelcenter.se).


Escape | A R C H I T E C T U R E

3 ESSENTIAL READS

The High Line (Phaidon, £50) is the first book to fully outline the eight-year transformation of New York’s elevated railway from abandoned relic to famous public park. Since it opened in 2009, the green space has attracted worldwide attention, inspiring other projects such as Edinburgh’s Leith Walk.

PICTURE: CHRISTIAN BRANDSTAETTER

Bauhaus (Taschen, £17.99) explores the revolutionary architecture school that counted Modernist masters Josef Albers, Marianne Brandt and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe among its students. It includes gems from the school’s archives, from sketches to rarelyseen models and photographs.

England’s Post-War Listed Buildings (Batsford, £40) is a stylish guide to more than 500 exceptional Modernist structures. It includes London’s Centre Point by George Marsh and Preston’s controversial-yeticonic Brutalist bus station.

D E S I G N T H AT C A R E S Maggie’s cancer care centres have long been linked to world-renowned architecture, with buildings created by Snøhetta, OMA and Sir Richard Rogers. The late Maggie Keswick Jencks, who co-founded the venture with her architect husband Charles Jencks, wanted to create oases for patients. Now, a new wave of architectural talents are continuing her fantastic legacy, with Thomas Heatherwick and Amanda Levete set to design new centres in Leeds and Southampton. Heatherwick’s plan is to create a building that resembles a cluster of giant plant pots (above), situated in the grounds of St James’s University Hospital. Set to open in 2017 (maggiescentres.org).

T H E B U I L D I N G VA N I S H E S Austrian-based practice Delugan Meissl Associated Architects (DMAA) recently designed Casa Invisible, a pre-fabricated house that blends superbly into its natural surroundings. The cabin-like prototype is clad in metallic Alucobond panels, made using an aluminium composite, which create a spectacular mirrored efect. The layout is customisable and the wooden shell can be delivered fully formed (dmaa.at).

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A R C H I T E C T U R A L I C O N N AT I O N A L M U S E U M O F A N T H R O P O L O G Y, M E X I C O C I T Y

The Modernist landmark that celebrates Mexico’s ancient history THIS JEWEL IN MEXICO’S ARCHITECTURAL CROWN

is dedicated to 3,000 years of human history. Located in the northern part of Mexico City’s Chapultepec Park (known for hosting traditional festivals and displaying contemporary sculpture), the National Museum of Anthropology was designed by Mexican architect Pedro Ramírez Vázquez (1919–2013) and opened in 1964. Vázquez was a national treasure: president of the organising committee for the Mexico City Olympics in 1968 and the World Cup in 1970. The museum, however, is his proudest achievement. As he once said: ‘The aspiration for architects in the past was to build a cathedral… today it’s an archaeology museum.’ The building itself is a huge stone-and-steel complex clad in marble. It consists of four rectangular blocks placed around a large central courtyard filled with landscaped tropical plants and ponds, with ancient native sculptures nestled amongst the foliage. The most impressive 204 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2016

feature of this garden is its large umbrella roof; the unique design, cantilevered from a central concrete column that is clad in ornate Aztec motifs, is inspired by the pyramid shapes popular in ancient Mayan architecture. A shrine to Mexico’s rich past, the museum concentrates on the period of history before the arrival of the Spanish in 1519, during which the country was home to a diverse mixture of native tribes and imperial civilisations, from the Aztecs to the Toyonac, Husastec, Mixtecs and the Mayans, which predate the Greek and Chinese empires. The museum’s vast rectangular wings hold major collections of artefacts, including the Aztec Sun Stone (or Calendar Stone; left), one of the most prized pieces of Aztec culture. If you visit Mexico’s capital city, add this cultural landmark to your itinerary. Avenue Paseo de la Reforma and Calzada Gandhi S/N, Chapultepec Polanco, Miguel Hidalgo, 11560 (mna.inah.gob.mx)

PICTURE: ALAMY

Words JAMES WILLIAMS


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ADVERTISING FEATURE

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FOSTER & GANE Foster & Gane curate an engaging selection of furniture, lighting, art, objects and flatweave rugs, selling internationally to interior decorators and private clients. Exquisite 17th century Venetian embroidered panels might join a smart 1930s desk, a pair of exceptional 1940s Swedish cabinets, a set of Viennese chairs and a unique piece of studio glass or sculpture. Val and Ed Foster source their covetable collection from around the world, combining the unusual with simple timeless design. If you have a specific space to fill, they can ofer suggestions. And their personal delivery service means you can try pieces before you buy. www.fosterandgane.co.uk


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HOME SWEET HOME Create your dream living space with our inspiring collection LOVE YOUR HOME Love Your Home are experts at what they do. In 2008 the company set out to deliver beautifully designed and well-made sofas and beds at competitive prices. Love Your Home has decades of expertise and design and make all of their product range – they live and breathe design and build, they are always pushing for perfection. The company has an understanding of their clients’ needs and as a result introduced the Bespoke Service that ofers a great and easy solution ensuring your piece fits the space it is intended for perfectly. The Bespoke Service has come to make up 48% of their orders as it ofers a excellent design tool and is not intimidating, but easy to use and well worth it. Love Your Home has a core collection of beds and sofas which is regularly updated and can be seen either online at www.love-your-home.co.uk or in person at their stunning barn showroom set in the Surrey Hills, 45 minutes from London.

Clementine Sofa Bed

Reader ofer, 15% of (cannot be used in conjunction with any other ofer) for all new orders placed by February 29th. Use promo code for online purchases: EDOFFER and quote ED for inshore and telephone orders 01483 410 007.

REBECCA CHAN Furniture and product designer Rebecca Chan's work is primarily inspired by nature and organic forms as she believes that the natural world contains hidden beauty and many subtle qualities that are often overlooked. Her most recent furniture collection 'Zephyr' includes a cofee table, stool and side table and was influenced by the qualities of wind movement. The word 'zephyr' literally means wind or more specifically a light gentle breeze. Each piece is hand built and carefully hand finished. For further information, visit www.rebecca-chan.com

ALDGATE HOME RARE ANTIQUE BERBER RUG 20th Century from Georgiana Hodsoll Design. For more details visit www.georgianahodsolldesign.com Tel. +44 (0) 7 802 803 916 Email. Georgie@georgianahodsolldesign.com

Aldgate Home restore original architectural mirrors, perfect for display in the home and garden area. A delivery and installation service is available. View their collection at www.aldgatehome.com, call 07785 296830, or email shop@aldgatehome.com


ADVERTISING FEATURE

SCANDINAVIAN SURFACE Brand new! Scandinavian Surface proudly presents the mural 'Panorama, grey' from the new collection Nordic Moods. The design is inspired by old black and white photos and discovering the nordic landscape seen throug pieces of antique, rippled window glass. The Panorama design consists of a ten metre slightly changing landscape. You can choose the part that suits your wall. Comes in six colour schemes. Have a closer look on the new collection at www.scandinaviansurface.com Scandinavian Surface mural designs are to be found in public spaces and private homes all over the world. The designers are: Åsne Midtgarden, Ann-Tove Engenes and Kristine Dybwad. Order at www.photowall. co.uk (or the webshop for your country) and check out their outstanding customer service!

THE BRITISH WOOD FLOORING COMPANY The British Wood Flooring Company is proud to work with clients of discerning taste and who appreciate the beauty of having original, authentic wood floors in their home. Our floors add a natural, warm and welcoming environment to any home. Sourcing original reclaimed and antique wood floors, with the original patina gained from centuries of footfall, sunlight and general wear-and-tear, these floors achieve a finish not possible with any new or manufactured products giving our clients a unique, bespoke floor to enjoy for years to come. More details can be found at www.britishwoodflooring.co.uk or by calling 01428 604700.

SWOON EDITIONS From artisan workshops direct to your doorstep, discover new designs every day without the inflated price tag at SWOON EDITIONS. Like the made-to-order Winston armchair, shown here in Granite velvet and dark beech. The iconic chesterfield, updated. Our designer pored over every detail from the exaggerated scrolled arms to the feather-filled cushions. Available in two sizes and 25 sumptuous textiles. From £599, including delivery. Readers also save £20 on orders over £200 with voucher code ELLEDECORATION. To order, go to swooneditions.com/elledecoration or call 020 3137 2464. Ofer expires on 26.02.16.


Classifieds | N E W

DESIGNER

DORGLAZE ® VISON PANELS FOR DOORS

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

ANTIQUE CHANDELIERS

Chandeliers, wall lights and lanterns sourced from all over Europe and fully restored by hand.

Matthew Upham Antiques Ltd 584 Kings Road, SW6 2DX www.matthewupham.com 020 7731 4444

P orter

WWW. NI CHEM O DERN .COM/ELLE

HANDMADE IN NEW YORK

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NORTH 4 DESIGN LTD T: 0208 885 4404 NORTH4.COM

PICTURE TABLE Model Classic

115 Queenstown Road London SW8 3RH www.portervanities.com

PULLMAN EDITIONS PULLMAN EDITIONS designs, commissions and publishes striking original posters which capture the enduring appeal of Art Deco. Their newlycommissioned posters feature winter sports, glamorous resorts around the world, and the world’s greatest historic automobiles. All £395 each. Call 020 7730 0547 or view and buy online at www.pullmaneditions.com

212 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK NOVEMBER 2015

MARB LE AN D MINT www.marbleandmint.co.uk Unique vintage Berber rugs, kilims and Moroccan homewares. info@marbleandmint.co.uk | 0044 (0)7746 727536


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BATHROOMS, BEDS & GARDEN ART

460 years of combined creative heritage DESIGN CENTRE, CHELSEA HARBOUR SAMUEL-HEATH.CO.UK MADE IN ENGLAND

What makes an Albion bath unique? Our exclusive bath material creates a difference you can feel....

For the best night life.

Request your brochure on: 01255 831605 or go to: www.albionbathco.com

ALBION Handmade bathrooms directly from our factory

www.buttonandsprung.com 03333 201 801

NOVEMBER 2015 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 213


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DANISH FURNITURE, INTERIORS & GIFTS

Interior Design | Fabrics | Gifts | Furniture

P R I M R OS E H I LL • N OT T I N G H I LL • PA R K R OYA L

96 Portland Road London W11 4LQ www.LMaison.London 214 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK NOVEMBER 2015

D i s co v e r t he n e w co l l e cti ons

W W W. G R A H A M A N D G R E E N . C O . U K


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Classifieds | A – Z RUGS, LIGHTING, PAINT, BLINDS & SHUTTERS

HANDMADE ARTISAN RUGS T H AT M A K E A D I F F E R E N C E

at Bookbarn International, Wells Road, Hallatrow, Bristol, BS39 6EX 01761 451 764 www.orientalrugsofbath.com

HALF PRICE SALE

C L E A N I N G Ÿ R E S T O R AT I O N Ÿ VA L U AT I O N

MADE TO MEASURE BLINDS, CURTAINS & SHUTTERS

TO BOOK AN APPOINTMENT WITH YOUR LOCAL ADVISOR CALL 0800 587 6428 OR VISIT HILLARYS.CO.UK

*T’s

& C’s apply.

NOVEMBER 2015 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 215


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FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS

Handmade in Britain, in any fabric in the world.

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Scottlorenzo.com Mid century furniture & art work

CHANDIGARH

www.fiftiesdesign.com 216 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK NOVEMBER 2015

scottlorenzo side table, Finn Juhl Chieftain Chair

Tel 07778 668 137


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NOVEMBER 2015 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 217


DESIGN DECODED The making of a modern classic # 20. ‘HK’ pitcher by Henning Koppel for Georg Jensen This elegant jug has been nicknamed the ‘pregnant duck’; others have hailed it as a piece of sculpture. Indeed, its designer Henning Koppel (1918–1981) started out by studying sculpture, first in his native city of Copenhagen, then in Paris. He went on to create sleek timepieces, jewellery and homewares, all featuring sinuous lines reminiscent of the work of Surrealist artist Salvador Dalì. Like many Danish Jews, Koppel fled to neighbouring, neutral Sweden in 1943 during the Nazi occupation. While in Stockholm, he began to sell his artworks to support his family. One particular shop invited him to make small jewellery pieces, which caught the eye of Anders Hostrup-Pedersen, head of jewellery at Danish silversmith Georg Jensen. Hostrup-Pedersen was searching for new talent and commissioned Koppel to design jewellery for the brand. He made his first piece, the ‘Amoeba’ bracelet (1947), when he returned to

Words JAMES WILLIAMS

Denmark after the end of the war. It was dainty, abstract and fluid: somewhat ahead of its time. After making a series of small items, Koppel joined Georg Jensen’s in-house cookware department, where he reached his full potential. He created a number of pieces with the brand, including five pitchers: the ‘HK’ (1952) is by far the most famous. Its distinctive shape requires a lengthy production process: two identical, thin pieces of metal are cut and shaped onto a mould while hot to create a smooth curve (this technique is called ‘raising’). They are then soldered together and the spout, handle and base are added. Georg Jensen still produces many of Koppel’s works today. The originals have all become collectors’ items, regularly sold as covetable ornaments by the likes of auction house Christie’s. From £175 for a 1.9-litre ‘little brother’ version, Georg Jensen (georgjensen.com). E D

GREAT DANES

Koppel started working for Georg Jensen when he was 27, and produced jewellery and cookware for the Danish company. SCULPTUR AL SIGNIFICANCE

Koppel’s tableware designs blur the line between practical product and beautiful art form. Above is a watercolour sketch of the curvaceous ‘Pitcher 992’ (1952).

TIMELESS DESIGNS PITCHER PERFECT

Koppel designed five pitchers for Georg Jensen, and originals fetch high prices at auction. Models from left: Pitchers ‘992’, ‘978’ and ‘1052’.

218 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MARCH 2016

The matte-finished ‘New York’ cutlery (1963) and sleek ‘Koppel’ clock (1978) reflect the designer’s clean-lined style.



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