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21 ALL-NEW DESIGNS

9

nifty braids

Projects for the disk or marudai How to finish your jewelry like a pro The secret to a seamless join

Add dimension with 2-hole beads

Tips & tricks for braiding bliss!


Let the adventure begin!

Editor Julia Gerlach Senior Art Director Lisa A. Bergman Associate Editors Cassie Donlen, Connie Whittaker Contributing Editors Adrienne Gaskell, Stacy

Werkheiser Editorial Assistant Lora Groszkiewicz Graphic Designer Lisa M. Schroeder Photographer Bill Zuback Illustrator Kellie Jaeger Production Coordinator Jodi Jeranek Editorial Director Diane M. Bacha

EDITORIAL Call (262) 796-8776 or write to: Editor, Bead&Button P.O. Box 1612 Waukesha, WI 53187-1612

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A

re you ready to explore something new in jewelry making? Then dive headfirst into this issue of Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry! Its an exciting time to be involved in this craft because while kumihimo has been around for centuries, the relatively recent inclusion of beads has led to an explosion of creativity from modern artisans who are coming up with exciting new designs and ideas every day, launching kumihimo from the realm of beautiful cords to gorgeous, professional-quality jewelry.

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ADVERTISE (888) 558-1544 x 648 Corporate Advertising Director Ann E. Smith Advertising Sales Lori Schneider

Many kumihimo devotees use the foam disk that was invented by Makiko Tada in the 1990s. It is, indeed, a handy and useful tool, especially because it is small, inexpensive, and portable. In this issue, though, we want to push your kumihimo experience to the next level so you’ll find that while most of the projects can be done on the disk (and in some cases, the disk is recommended) we are really encouraging you to discover the traditional Japanese kumihimo stand, the marudai. Once you learn to use it, this one amazing tool can really speed up the braiding process and will often improve the quality of your finished pieces. As with taking on any new challenge, it’s important to get a handle on the lingo, so unless you’re already experienced with braiding on a marudai, do a little kumihimo boot camp with the “Getting started” section — it goes over all the tools, supplies, and terminology you’ll encounter in these pages. It also covers the instructions for the very popular kongoh gumi technique, and we refer back to this section for all of the kongoh gumi projects as well as basic set up and finishing instructions for most of the other projects. You’ll find the eight other braid structures spelled out completely in the projects that feature them.

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Melissa Valuch

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Putting this special issue together has been an exciting undertaking for us. I hope it will be an inspiring resource for you as you say yes to your own kumihimo adventure! Please let me know what you think of this issue by emailing me at jgerlach@beadandbutton.com. Happy braiding!

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry (ISBN 978-1-62700-397-1) is published by Kalmbach Publishing Co., 21027 Crossroads Circle, PO box 1612, Waukesha, WI 531871612. Single copy prices (U.S. funds): $9.99 in U.S.; $10.99 in Canada and other foreign countries, payable in U.S. funds drawn on a U.S. bank. Canadian price includes GST. BN12271 3209RT Printed in the U.S.A. ©2016, Kalmbach Publishing Co. All rights reserved. Any publication, reproduction, or use without express permission in writing of any text, illustration, or photographic content in any manner is prohibited except for inclusion of brief quotations when credit is given.

Editor, Bead&Button editor@beadandbutton.com

May 2016

3


Welcome to Getting started

59 Seemingly seamless bangles

6 Supplies & terminology

by Deborah Shipp

9 Kumihimo basics

62 Crystal cache necklace by Sara Oehler

p54

14 Basic techniques

Gallery

16 Finishing techniques

49

Kongoh gumi projects

Other braid structures

19 Spitfire necklace

64 Focal bead bracelet

by Deborah Shipp

by Shirley Moore

22 Twirly-girl bracelet

67 Lava rain necklace

by Shirley Moore

by Jamie North

25 Pearl gables necklace

70 Beaded majesty necklace

by Diana Shiraishi

by Rebecca Combs

28 Zippered lentil lariat

73 Pretty portholes bracelet

by Randi Sherman

by Pru McRae

32 Braided gems necklace

76 Layered lattice necklace

by Helen Lamb-Orendorf

by Deborah Shipp

34 Awesome accents bracelet

80 O-bead obsession bracelet

by Sally Battis

by Carolyn Haushalter

37 Magnolia necklace

84 Seafoam necklace

by Diana Shiraishi

by Sheilah Cleary

40 Sunflower swirl necklace by Wendy Speare

88 Check me out necklace & bracelet

44 Over the rainbow bracelet

Excerpted from Kumihimo Simplified by Rebecca Combs

p56

by Adrienne Gaskell

54 Dragonfly necklace by Sally Battis

Resources 94 Kumihimo groups, products, and suppliers

56 Cute as a button bracelet by Sonia Corbin-Davis

96 Contributors 98 Marudai on the go

p73


p67 p70

p59 p25

p22


Supplies and terminology Get familiar with the materials and terminology you’ll encounter when learning kumihimo. by Adrienne Gaskell As with any discipline, it is important to learn the terminology associated with it in order to communicate with others and advance one’s own knowledge. However, identifying a common kumihimo language has been a challenge due to the reluctance of many to use Japanese terms combined with the fact that braiding does not have its own English lexicon. This has resulted in some confusion and misinformation about kumihimo terminology. This guide is intended to help clarify concepts and enable the kumihimo community to share knowledge more easily through a common terminology.

DISCLAIMER At the present time, there is no “Universal Kumihimo Terminology Council,” so the terms shown here are those most commonly used by the kumihimo masters. When there was no consensus among them, and multiple terms were used for the same thing, I used the term that has proven to be most easily understood by my students. In some cases, I coined my own term while making every effort to use descriptive and easy to understand words and phrases. For example, “2-drop kongoh” and “continuous beaded braids” are both terms that I created for easier communication which have now become accepted kumihimo terminology.

Equipment and supplies Bead Stoppers Flexible wire springs that can grip a cord tightly, used to prevent beads from sliding on a cord. Bobbins Small plastic bobbins that snap open and closed. They are used to hold the warp cords when braiding on a disk or plate. They can also be used to store beaded warp cords when transporting a project. They come in several sizes. Weighted versions are also available.

Chopstick A chopstick or pointed dowel is used with a marudai to hold the braid in position when taking a break or anytime you are not actively braiding. This is the same as in fiber braids. To put the 6

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

chopstick in position, work from under the mirror and, with one hand, gently pull the braid down while using the other hand to insert the chopstick on top of the warp cords at the point of braiding. Release the braid and the chopstick will be held firmly in position between the warp cords and the marudai mirror. If the marudai is accidentally knocked or bumped, the chopstick ensures that the warp cords do not move out of position. If you forget to use the chopstick and bump your marudai, the resulting mess will be a hard lesson that you will not soon forget. Counterweight (CW) The CW serves to balance the weight of the tama or bobbins. When working on a marudai, the CW is attached to the braid beneath the mirror. Sometimes a light CW is recommended for use with a disk. As the braid is forming, the CW pulls it down through the hole in the mirror, maintaining an even tension during braiding. A smaller ratio of CW to tama weight makes a tighter braid while more CW produces a looser braid.

Fiber braid patterns generally recommend CW that is about 40–50% of the tama weight. Continuous beaded braids generally follow the same ratio as fiber braids. However, this ratio does not work for 2-drop kongoh braids as it will produce a loose braid with a lot of exposed cord. For 2-drop kongoh patterns, as well as many other beaded designs, most designers want to have the beads as the focus of the braid rather than the cords. So after much experimentation, I learned that for the 2-drop kongoh braid, the CW ratio that works best is 25–35%. This ratio produces a braid with the beads closer together than a braid made with a 40–50% CW ratio, resulting in less cord being visible. To determine how much CW to use, add the weight of all of the tama plus the beads, and multiply that amount by your desired CW percentage. For example:

Eight tama @ 70 g + 40 g of beads = 600 g 600 g x 25% = 150 g counterweight Traditionally a CW bag (a small drawstring pouch containing weights) is used to hang the CW from the braid. A CW bag can be used with beaded braids, although weights with hooks


Disk The invention of the polyethylene foam disk and plate by Makiko Tada has made kumihimo more accessible and has been credited with the current explosion in the popularity of kumihimo. They are now available in a variety of diameters and thicknesses. The disk can be used for making round, square, and narrow flat braids, including 2-drop kongoh braids. However the disk is not recommended for continuous beaded braids, for which the marudai is a better option. The square foam plate is used for making wide flat braids. The braids that have been designed for the square plate resemble braids made on the takadai rather than the marudai. Many of these braids are Makiko Tada’s original creations. The plate is not often used for fully beaded braids. Cord stiffener A sealant, such as Fray Check, super glue, or nail polish, can eliminate the need for using a needle during bead stringing by stiffening the cord ends. Marudai (ma-ru-dye) The traditional Japanese braiding stand made of wood with a round

top. It is usually available in two heights: Western (26 in./66 cm) or Japanese (16 in./ 41 cm). The shorter Japanese version is used while sitting on a low stool or kneeling on the floor. The taller Western versions are worked while seated in a chair. Both versions can be raised on a stool or table top in order to be worked while standing. The marudai is the fastest and most efficient method of creating kumihimo braids. Once mastered, it is at least twice as fast as the foam disk. A good marudai is worth the investment as it will last a lifetime. Marudai leg extensions These 4-in. (10 cm) extensions (seen attached to the bottom of the legs of the marudai in the photo above) allow some of the Western height marudai to be raised to a more comfortable working height. When sitting in most chairs, a Western height marudai is too short to have a good visual perspective on the point of braiding without leaning forward, which can cause fatigue. By raising the marudai a few inches the braider can sit with a straight back. Mirror The name used for the top of the marudai. The mirror is usually round and should have a gentle slope starting at the middle of the radius down to the center hole. This is essential for maintaining proper braid tension. Common mirror diameters are 10 in. (25 cm) and 12 in. (30 cm). The 10-in. (25 cm) mirror easily accommodates up to 16 warp cord. The larger version is more often used for braids using 24 or more warp cords. Since beaded braids most often use 16 or fewer warp cords, the smaller diameter mirror is recommended, as it is easier to work on and usually less expensive.

Painter’s tape Use painter’s tape to secure your chopstick below the mirror and sometimes to hold warp cords in position during set-up of ending a braid. Painter’s tape is the only tape that should be used on the mirror as it will not harm the finish on the wood. Split ring A split ring is a handy tool for starting a braid with a nice, neat end. It also provides a place to hang your counterweight. It’s easy to make a split ring. Simply wrap 16-gauge wire around a dowel or a marker a few times, and trim. Tama (ta-ma) The weighted wooden spools used to hold the warp cords during braiding on a marudai. They come in different weights, including 70, 85, and 100 grams and all of these are acceptable for beaded braids. In most cases all of the tama being used for a project should be of equal weight. If a project calls for a specific weight tama it is usually possible to substitute a different weight tama as long as the counter weight ratio is adjusted accordingly. Tama also come in different sizes, with a larger one made specifically for beaded braids. Tama are sometimes called bobbins, however, this can be confusing since plastic bobbins are also used in kumihimo.

Warp cords Warp cords are the cords used to make a beaded braid, since cord (not thread) is used to hold the beads. “Ito” is the Japanese term used for warp or thread. In English many terms have been used, including warps, elements, cords, and threads. The word warp is borrowed from weaving. May 2016

7

GETTING STARTED

make it easier to adjust and/or remove the CW during braiding. Adding a wire hanger to egg-shaped fishing weights (above) works well and they’re easy to make. But the most convenient CW I have found is a scientific slotted weight set (right). You can easily remove small amounts of weight as you work. It’s a good idea to have several different size weights that total about half the weight of all of the tama being used in your projects. For example: For 16 tama @ 70 grams, your CW supply should be about 600 grams.


Terminology Beaded braid or fully beaded braid A braid where only beads are visible. This is not the same as a fiber braid that uses beads as accents, which are called partially beaded braids and usually have beads on some of the warp cords or the beads are only worked into the braid on certain moves. Braid structure The specific pattern of movements used for creating a braid. Most braid structures have an original Japanese name that doesn’t necessarily translate easily to English. Example: Yatsu kongoh gumi (aka kongoh gumi) is the name of the braid structure most often associated with beaded kumihimo braids. In Japanese,”yatsu” means “eight,” and refers to the number of cords used in the braid; “kongoh” means “strong”; and “gumi” means “group” or “braid.” In English, it is commonly known as the round braid. 2-drop kongoh (also spelled kongo) My term for the kongoh gumi braid, this is the most popular beaded braid technique and produces a braid that resembles a bead crochet rope. The kongoh braid is also known as the round braid, however since there are many round braid structures, that term can be confusing. I created the term 2-drop kongoh because two beads are moved, or dropped, with each step or move. Whether using a round disk or marudai, a step or move equals two hand movements. Once the beads have been dropped into the braid, they slide under the previously worked warp cords, forcing the beads to the outside of the braid. The kongoh braid, including its variations, is the predominant braid structure used with the 2-drop technique. Continuous beaded braids These braid structures are worked in the same manner as fiber braids, using long continuous strands of beads in place of the fiber cords or group of threads. Unlike fiber, bead strands can be difficult to work on the 8

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

disk or plate so a marudai is usually recommended for continuous beaded braids. Most braid structures can be used to make a continuous beaded braid. However, braid structures with eight, 12 or 16 warp cords are most commonly used. Point of braiding (POB) This is the spot where the braid is being formed and what you see in the center hole of the marudai mirror or disk. Each braid structure can have several unique points of braiding, resulting in a different look after each step or move. It is very important to watch the point of braiding and to become familiar with what it should look like while you are braiding so that if you make a mistake it will be possible to unbraid and correct it.

Sequence A complete series of moves for a braid. For instance, kongoh has two moves in the braid sequence. Sometimes the word sequence is used in place of the term step or move. Step or move In most braid structure diagrams, both hand movements are shown. Whether you are working on a disk or marudai, one step or one move equals two hand movements. Warp mates or warp pairs These are the warp cords that are worked together during a step or move. For many projects, warp mates will also have the same color of beads and type of beads.

Slipping hitch This is the slip knot that is used to hold the warp cord on the tama. As the braid is being worked, the warp cords will become shorter and the tama will need to be moved down from the mirror. The slipping hitch allows the tama to release the warp cord so that the tama can routinely be adjusted down or away from the mirror.

How to select cord A wide variety of fibers are used in kumihimo but for beaded kumihimo, the cords must work with the beads used in the design. Most of the projects in this issue use S-lon or C-lon, which are two different names for the same type of bonded nylon cord. Other brands of cord are suitable for kumihimo, including Tuff Cord, Amiet, and Conso, but for simplicity’s sake, we have listed only S-lon and C-lon in the materials lists. The chart below shows the four sizes these cords come in and what bead sizes to use them with.

Size

Name

Diameter

Tex 70

Micro cord

0.12 mm

Use with 150 seed beads

Tex 135

Fine cord

0.4 mm

110 seed beads and small-hole, lightweight beads such as pearls

Tex 210

Bead cord (aka #18*)

0.5 mm

80 seed beads, most glass, gemstones, and crystals

Tex 400

Heavy cord

0.9 mm

60 seed beads and large-hole beads

*Caution The #18 designation is sometimes applied to Tex 210 cords but this should not be confused with #18 crochet cords, which are considerably thicker.


In this section, you’ll learn all the techniques you need to get started with the beaded kongoh gumi braid structure, which we’ll refer to as 2-drop kongoh throughout this issue. There are separate instructions for using a marudai and a disk, plus we have included tips on stringing beads, how to bind or seal your braids, and several additional basic techniques you’ll need to know as you create the projects in this issue. The projects in the first section are all kongoh gumi braids, most of them fully beaded. The second section features a variety of other braid structures. Much of the setup — such as how to wind beads onto a tama and how to make a slipping hitch — is the same or similar for these projects as for kongoh gumi, but be sure to read the instructions carefully and note any differences, especially regarding the number of cords and sequence of braid movements.

Kongoh gumi on the marudai Setup

1 Cut four cords to the length specified in your pattern. Center the cords in a 10 mm or larger split ring, and tie an overhand knot to secure the cords to the ring (photo a). This creates the eight cords for your kongoh gumi braid. 2 Feed the ring through the center hole of the marudai, slide a chopstick through the split ring, and tape the chopstick to the underside of the mirror (photo b). Arrange the cords around the mirror, placing two at the top (north), two at the bottom (south), and two on each side (east and west). 3 Using a Big-Eye needle, string each cord with beads as indicated in the pattern you are going to follow. See “Stringing beads” on p. 12 for more guidance on bead stringing. 4 After stringing, tie a tama loop at the end of each cord, and attach a tama: • About 3 in. (7.6 cm) from the end of the cord, make a fold. With the folded

end, make a loop. Pass the folded end through the loop, and pull tight (photo c). This loop should be pretty small, but the size isn’t critical. • Next, pass the working cord through the loop, making a large slip knot (photo d). Insert the tama or bobbin into the new loop, and pull snug. • Begin wrapping the cord onto the tama, winding about half of the beads onto the tama as you go. Push the remaining beads up onto the mirror. Stop winding when you have about 6 in. (15 cm) of cord between the tama and the bottom edge of the mirror. Make a slipping hitch: With the working cord coming from the bottom of the tama, grasp the middle of the cord with your dominant hand palm down (photo e). Flip your hand over, wrapping the cord around your fingers to form a loop (photo f). Slip the loop over the tama (photo g), and tighten the cord. Photo h shows the finished slipping hitch.

c

a

e

b

f

d

g

h

May 2016

9

GETTING STARTED

Kumihimo Basics


i

j

DROP

SKIP 1

2

l

k

JUMP 6

6

1

1

6

1

8

3

8

3

8

3

7

8

7

4

7

4

7

4

4

3

6

5

figure 1

Braiding

1 Slide the beads off the mirror down to the tama. Remove the chopstick from the split ring below the mirror, and attach your counterweight to the split ring. 2 Work in kongoh gumi with no beads for 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm): Movement 1: Lift cords 2 and 6 simultaneously. Hold the cords, not the tama; the tama should hang freely. The cords hang over your fingers about 1 in. (2.5 cm) from the mirror. Working in a clockwise direction, place cord 2 to the right of cord 5 and cord 6 to the left of cord 1 (figure 1). Using both hands simultaneously, adjust the top and bottom pairs to look like figure 2. Movement 2: Lift cords 4 (right hand) and 8 (left hand) simultaneously. Working in a clockwise direction, place cord 8 above cord 3 and cord 4 below cord 7 (figure 3). Using both hands simultaneously, adjust the east and west pairs to look like figure 4. Repeat the two movements until the unbeaded braid is ½ in. (1.3 cm) and all the cords are back in their original positions. 10

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

5

figure 2

2

5

2

figure 3

Note: The cords switch positions as you braid but the active cords are always the ones in positions 2 and 6 and 4 and 8. It takes a total of four pairs of movements for the cords to return to their original positions. While you’re learning the braid, it may help to label the tama so you can easily tell them apart (putting a labeled sticker on one end of each tama is a great way to do this!).

3 Continue working as in step 2, but now add beads using the “Drop, skip, jump” method: Lift cords 2 and 6. Isolate the top bead on each cord. While lifting the cords, drop the beads toward the point of the braid (photo i). Lower the cords down to touch the mirror, and “skip” the cords into their new positions (photo j). Watch as the beads slip under the previously braided cords all by themselves! Lift the cords slightly, and “jump” the cords into their new positions (photo k). Continue to add beads on each move and keep braiding until you’ve reached the desired length. As you braid, your cords will get shorter and you’ll need to adjust them as the tama get too close to the mirror. To do so, lift

5

2

figure 4

the tama slightly to release the tension on the cord, and rotate the tama toward you a bit (photo l). The slipping hitch will release the cord, giving you more cord to work with. To release more beads onto the working cord, remove the slipping hitch from the tama. Slide more beads toward the mirror, and make a new slipping hitch. 4 When your beaded braid is the desired length, work ½ in. (1.3 cm) with just the cords. 5 Using pliers or a hemostat, grasp the unbeaded end of the braid just under the point of braiding. While securely holding the pliers or hemostat, use your other hand to remove the counterweight. Lift the braid from the marudai, and rest the braid and the tama on your work surface. Bind or seal the ends of the braid (see “Binding or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 12).


Setup

1 Cut four pieces of cord to the length specified in your pattern. Center them in a 10 mm or larger split ring, and tie an overhand knot to secure the cords to the ring. 2 Align the kumihimo disk so you have a dot at the top, the bottom, and each side. 3 Feed the ring through the hole in the disk, and arrange the cords so you have two cords flanking each dot. Slide the cords into the appropriate slots. 4 Use a Big Eye needle to string beads on each cord according to the desired pattern. See “Stringing beads” on p. 12 for more guidance on bead stringing. 5 Wind each beaded cord onto a bobbin, leaving about 4 in. (10 cm) of cord free between the disk and the bobbin. 6 Attach a counterweight to the split ring.

bottom-left cord up, and place it to the left of the top-left cord (figure 6). Rotate the disk 90 degrees (figure 7). Movement 2: Repeat “Movement 1” with the two cords that are now in the top-right and bottom-left positions (figure 8). Repeat the two movements until the unbeaded braid is ½ in. (1.3 cm) and all the cords are back in their original positions. Note: As you work, the cords will move around the disk — they will not remain adjacent to the dots. It takes a total of four pairs of movements for the cords to return to their original positions (relative to each other, not the disk). It may help to label the bobbins so you can easily tell which cord is which (putting a labeled sticker on each bobbin is a great way to do this!).

Braiding

1 Work a 2-drop kongoh braid with no beads for 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm): Movement 1: Bring the top-right cord down, and place it to the right of the bottom-right cord (figure 5). Bring the

2 Continue as in step 1, but add beads as you work: With each cord movement, slide a bead up to the braid before you move the cord. Slip the bead under the cord that crosses over the cord you are working with (photo m), and then cross the cord as usual. Repeat for the desired length braid, sliding a bead in place on each cord before making each movement. Release more thread and beads from the bobbins as needed. 3 When you reach the desired length, continue to braid without beads for ½ in. (1.3 cm). 4 Remove the braid from the disk, and bind or seal the end (see “Binding or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 12).

Documenting your work It is a good idea to keep a kumihimo notebook to document braid projects. This may seem like a lot of work, but in the long term it will save time. Suggested information to be documented: • Date braid was created • Complete list of all materials used, including quantity, supplier, and cost • Length and number of warp cords • Type of cord used for warp cords • Braid structure, including the book or source you found the pattern in • Finished braid length • Total working time – preparation, braiding, and finishing can be tracked individually, if desired • Beads and their warp cord position • If braid was sold, client information and price • Any lessons learned (i.e. what worked and what didn’t) • If possible, include photos of your work in progress.

m

figure 5

figure 6

figure 7

figure 8 May 2016

11

GETTING STARTED

Kongoh gumi on the disk


Stringing beads Because the cord used in kumihimo is generally thicker than beading thread, stringing beads onto the cords sometimes proves to be a challenge. Usually, using a Big Eye needle will work — the eye expands to accommodate thick cords yet the needle is quite thin and will pass through many beads easily, even with a double thickness of cord. However, small seed beads (150s, 110s, some 80s, and many drop beads, for example) often prove too small for this method. When you encounter such stringing problems, try one of these solutions: • Make a leader: Cut a 6-in. (15 cm) piece of 4–6 lb. Fireline, and thread it through the eye of the needle. Tie the ends together with a square knot. Thread your cord into the loop of Fireline, and resume stringing. • Apply a cord stiffener like Fray Check or super glue to the end of your cord, and allow it to dry. When it is dry, trim the end at an angle, and resume stringing.

To quickly load your cords, pour beads into the bowl of the bead spinner, filling it to about one-third capacity. Thread your cord into the eye of the beadspinner needle (using a leader, if necessary). Rotate the bowl by turning the spindle in whichever direction is most comfortable for you. As the bowl spins, dip the tip of the needle into the beads, pointing it in the opposite direction the bowl is spinning, and watch as the beads load onto the needle. Adjust the needle position as needed.

Spinning beads Spinning beads is a huge time-saver! One caveat — you can’t use a spinner on cords that require the beads to be strung in a specific pattern or orientation because the beads load randomly.

Binding or sealing the end of a braid

Traditional binding

To successfully separate your finished braid from the working cords, you need to make sure the braid won’t come undone. The traditional binding method is easy and low-tech but is made more secure with the help of Fray Check or super glue, which require some drying time. The cord burner, a relatively recently-introduced tool, allows you to cut and seal the cords in a single step, but it’s not required equipment. Whatever method you choose, you should have worked a ½ in. (1.3 cm) section of unbeaded braid before delving into one of the following binding or sealing approaches.

n

12

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

To bind the unbeaded end of a braid, cut a 6-in. (15 cm) piece of thread or cord. It can be the same as your working cords or a different kind entirely. Wrap the cord tightly around the unbeaded braid end one or more times, and tie it with a square knot (photo n). For extra security, place a drop or two of Fray Check or super glue onto the binding cord, letting it seep into the unbeaded braid end. This isn’t required, but it is a good idea for a bit of added security. Allow the cords to dry, and then cut the braid end to the desired length and trim the tails of the binding cord (photo o). After binding, attach a magnetic clasp, end cap with loop, cone, or

o

crimp-end finding (see “Finishing techniques,” p. 16).

Sealing with a cord burner Grasp the unbeaded end of the braid — just beyond the beaded portion — with pliers or a hemostat. Allow the cord burner to heat up for a second or two, and then apply the tip where you want to end the braid (photo p). Once the braid is separated from the working cords, take a moment to continue applying the thread burner to the end of the braid to melt and seal the cords. After sealing, attach a magnetic clasp, end cap with loop, cone, or crimp-end finding (see “Finishing techniques,” p. 16).

p


A kumihimo pattern is usually illustrated as a large circle representing the marudai or disk, surrounded by small colored circles, representing the cords. The colors indicate what color (or size or type) beads to string on each cord. Depending upon the complexity of the stringing pattern, there may be a bead stringing chart and/or a bead key to indicate what beads go on each cord. If there is just a single color indicated for any individual cord, it means the entire cord is strung with just that bead. The presence of

more than one color or circle means there is a pattern that needs to be followed. The movements required to make the braid are shown in subsequent drawings, usually with lines or arrows showing where the next cord or cords are supposed to go. Varying bead order and colors can offer a multitude of design possibilities. The photos and figures below show six basic patterns you can make in 2-drop kongoh and the corresponding cord setups you would follow to achieve the patterns.

repeat

repeat repeat

repeat OPPOSING DIAMONDS

ONE STRIPE

repeat

repeat

repeat

POLKA DOTS DOTS ON BOTH EDGES

repeat

repeat

repeat

repeat

repeat DOTS ON ONE EDGE

FOUR STRIPES

repeat repeat

May 2016

13

GETTING STARTED

Reading kumihimo patterns


Basic techniques

Square knot

Conditioning thread

1 Cross one end of

Use wax (beeswax or microcrystalline wax) or a thread conditioner (like Thread Heaven or Thread Magic), to condition nylon beading thread and Fireline. Wax smooths nylon fibers and adds tackiness that will stiffen your beadwork slightly. Conditioners add a static charge that causes the thread to repel itself, so don’t use it with doubled thread. All conditioners help thread resist wear. To condition, stretch nylon thread to remove the curl (you don’t need to stretch Fireline). Place the thread or Fireline on top of the conditioner, hold it in place with your thumb or finger, and pull the thread through the conditioner.

the thread over and under the other end. Pull both ends to tighten the first half of the knot. 2 Cross the first end of the thread over and under the other end. Pull both ends to tighten the knot.

Overhand knot Make a loop with the thread. Pull the tail through the loop, and tighten.

To end a thread, sew back through the last few rows or rounds of beadwork, following the thread path of the stitch and tying two or three half-hitch knots (see “Half-hitch knot”) between beads as you go. Sew through a few beads after the last knot, and trim the thread. To add a thread, sew into the beadwork several rows or rounds prior to the point where the last bead was added, leaving a short tail. Follow the thread path of the stitch, tying a few half-hitch knots between beads as you go, and exit where the last stitch ended. Trim the short tail.

Half-hitch knot Pass the needle under the thread bridge between two beads, and pull gently until a loop forms. Sew through the loop, and pull gently to draw the knot into the beadwork.

Lark’s head knot Fold a cord in half, and lay it behind a ring, loop, bar, etc., with the fold pointing down. Bring the ends through the ring from back to front, pull them through the loop, and tighten.

14

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

1 Hold a loop or a jump ring with two pairs of pliers, such as chainnose, flatnose, or bentnose pliers. 2 To open the loop or jump ring, bring the tips of one pair of pliers toward you, and push the tips of the other pair away from you. 3 Reverse step 2 to close the open loop or jump ring.

Wrapped loop

1 Using chainnose Attaching a stop bead

Ending and adding thread

Opening and closing loops and jump rings

Use a stop bead to secure beads temporarily when you begin stitching: Pick up a bead, leaving the desired length tail. Sew through the bead again in the same direction, making sure you don’t split the thread inside the bead. If desired, sew through the bead again for added security.

Crimping Use crimp beads to secure flexible beading wire. Slide the crimp bead into place, and squeeze it firmly with chainnose pliers to flatten it. Or, for a more finished look, use crimping pliers: 1 Position the crimp bead in the hole that is closest to the handle of the crimping pliers. 2 Holding the wires apart, squeeze the pliers to compress the crimp bead, making sure one wire is on each side of the dent. 3 Place the crimp bead in the front hole of the pliers, and position it so the dent is facing the tips of the pliers. Squeeze the pliers to fold the crimp in half. 4 Tug on the wires to ensure that the crimp bead is secure.

pliers, make a rightangle bend in the wire about 2 mm above a bead or other component or at least 1¼ in. (3.2 cm) from the end of a piece of wire. 2 Position the jaws of the roundnose pliers in the bend. The closer to the tip of the pliers that you work, the smaller the loop will be. 3 Curve the short end of the wire over the top jaw of the roundnose pliers. 4 Reposition the pliers so the lower jaw fits snugly in the loop. Curve the wire downward around the bottom jaw of the pliers. This is the first half of a wrapped loop. 5 To complete the wraps, grasp the top of the loop with one pair of pliers. 6 With another pair of pliers, wrap the wire around the stem two or three times. Trim the excess wire, and gently press the cut end close to the wraps with chainnose pliers. w


May 2016

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Finishing techniques Learn three methods for securely finishing kumihimo with a professional touch.

Finishing the ends of a kumihimo project can be done in several ways, and each method serves three primary purposes: • Provide a secure and sturdy way to attach a clasp or closure so you can wear your piece • Prevent the braid from coming undone — ever • Conceal the end of the braid Most of the projects in this issue use one of the following three finishing methods. Get familiar with them now so you know how to proceed when it’s time to finish your braids.

Glue and end cap with loops or a magnetic clasp Magnetic clasps are great for finishing kumihimo ropes. Most varieties have a magnet on one end and an opening on the other, which is where the end of the braid is inserted. End caps have an opening on one end and a loop on the other, to which you can attach a jump ring and clasp. Two-part epoxy is the only glue that makes a permanent bond, and it is recommended for all glue-on clasps and end caps. The epoxy forms a secure bond between the finding and the braid, even when there is a small amount of empty space in the finding. Any brand of epoxy will work, but Loctite brand Heavy Duty 5-Minute Epoxy is handy because it comes in plastic bottles rather than tubes. The bottles prevent the glue from oozing out, whereas tubes get messy very quickly.

entire opening of the finding. No beads need to be glued inside the finding.

Gluing the clasp or end cap Have the braid, finding, and a toothpick (or applicator) prepared and ready before mixing the epoxy. First, do a dry fit with the braid end. Trim any excess cords if necessary. Sometimes it is possible to glue both ends at the same time. However, this is not recommended on your first attempt. Get comfortable with the process first. 1 Stand the finding on end with the opening facing up. This way gravity will keep the epoxy inside the finding and not on the beads. If the magnet is flush with the bottom of the finding, you can place it on a metal bench block (photo b). Or you can place the finding in the center hole of a plastic bobbin (photo c), or secure it in a vise or even a ring clamp (photo d). 2 Use a discarded plastic bag or a piece of aluminum foil for mixing the

epoxy. Dispense equal amounts from each tube, and let it sit for several minutes. Once the epoxy settles, it is easier to see if both amounts are equal. If you are not sure, go with more hardener than resin. As long as the two parts are not touching or mixed together, the epoxy can sit for a long time. Once mixed, the working time is only a few minutes. Mix both parts together until they are well blended. 3 Use a toothpick to fill the opening with epoxy about half way, and spread epoxy all the way up the sides. 4 Insert the braid end into the finding opening. If necessary, remove the braid end to either add or remove some of the epoxy. Too little epoxy might not form a secure bond. Too much epoxy will force glue into the beaded braid or onto the clasp. Re-insert the braid end, firmly holding the braid in place while pushing down for several minutes. Immediately wipe off any excess glue. If desired, use a third-hand tweezer

a

b

c

d

Choosing a clasp or end cap For design and proportion, choose a clasp or end cap that is about the same diameter as the braid (photo a). The braid does not need to fill the 16

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry


e

f

Glue and crimp end Crimp-end findings may be appropriate for very thin braids and they are used in conjunction with jump rings and a clasp, similar to end caps with loops. Different styles of crimp-end findings are available but the concept is the same — you insert the cord, and then compress a portion of the finding to clamp the cord in place. To use one, bind or seal your braid, apply a bit of two-part epoxy to the end of the braid, and insert it into the crimp-end finding. Use pliers to squeeze the finding as dictated by the design of the finding. In photo g, the center of the finding features a slim band of metal that gets compressed. In photo h, four pronged “petals� get squeezed together to clamp the braid.

Cones (or end caps) and wire A cone has a large opening on one end, into which you will insert your braid, and a small opening on the other end. Using a cone and wire allows you to add decorative beads on the end of the braid. 1 Cut a 3-in. (7.6 cm) piece of 18or 20-gauge wire, and slide one end through the braid, near the the beaded portion of the braid (photo i). 2 Wrap the short end of the wire tightly around the unbeaded end of the braid a few times (photo j). For added security, apply a drop of Fray Check or super glue on the end of the braid, covering the wire wraps, and allow to dry. 3 String a cone on the wire, covering the end of the braid (photo k). String additional beads and components, if desired, and make the first half of a wrapped loop. String half of a clasp into the loop (photo l), and complete the wraps. w

g

h

i

j

k

l

May 2016

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GETTING STARTED

to suspend the braid over the finding as it dries (photo e). 5 Let it dry in position for about one hour. Repeat the process with the other end of the clasp. Let the epoxy cure for at least 24 hours before the finished piece is worn. 6 If you used end caps with loops, open a jump ring, and attach the end cap to a clasp loop (photo f).


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KONGOH GUMI

Spitfire necklace

Make this spirited necklace with two sizes of dagger beads against a backdrop of brightly colored SuperUnos. designed by Deborah Shipp

May 2016

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Setup

Difficulty rating

Materials necklace 19–20 in. (48–51 cm)

• dagger beads - 24 5 x 16 mm (red peacock) - 24 3 x 10 mm (silver) • 24 3 mm fire-polished beads (gold) • 40 g 2.5 x 5 mm SuperUno beads (opaque red) • accent beads - 2 6 mm bicone crystals (Swarovski, light Siam) - 2 5 mm round beads (silver plated) - 2 4 mm round beads (gold plated) • toggle clasp (gold plated) • 2 22 x 10 mm cones (gold plated) • 12 in. (30 cm) 20-gauge wire (gold plated) • 2 4–6 mm jump rings • S-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, red) • Big Eye needle or cord stiffener • kumihimo disk with 8 plastic bobbins and counterweight; or marudai with 8 tama and counterweight • 1 10 mm or larger split ring • chopstick and painter’s tape (if using marudai) • 2 pairs of chainnose, flatnose, and/or bentnose pliers • roundnose pliers • cord burner (optional) • wire cutters

Basic techniques, p. 14 • overhand knot • wrapped loops • opening and closing jump rings

20

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

1 Cut four cords to 71⁄2 ft. (2.3 m) each, and set up your marudai or disk for kongoh gumi (see “Kumihimo basics,” p. 9). If desired, apply cord stiffener to the end of each cord, allow to dry, and trim at an angle. 2 String each cord with beads as indicated in the Bead & cord layout. Note that each cord should end with a total of 88 beads. After stringing each cord, wind the end of the cord around a bobbin or tama.

Braid 1 Work in kongoh gumi with no beads for about 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm). Make sure that you end with all the cords in their original positions, as in the Bead & cord layout. 2 Continue in 2-drop kongoh, dropping one bead on each cord with each pair of moves. Keep in mind the following: • If you’re using a disk, place the cords only slightly in the slits around the disk. If you put the cords all the way into the slits, you will have to tug unnecessarily on the cords with each movement, causing the braid to become too tight. • The braid naturally spirals as you work, and this is OK until you begin braiding the section with the daggers and rounds. This section you do not want to twist. Roll this section between your fingers as you work it, untwisting and twisting the braid so that it straightens out. • Reposition the counterweight up the braid as you go, and add weight as you work the section of daggers and rounds to help keep

it from twisting. To hang the counterweight from a different position on the braid, cut a piece of soft leather into a 3 x 1-in. (7.6 x 2.5 cm) strip, and make a 2-in. (5 cm) lengthwise slit. Wrap the leather around your braid, pull one end through the slit, and hook your counterweight to the strip. 3 When all the beads have been incorporated into the braid, work 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm) with just the cords. 4 Lift the braid from the marudai or disk. Finish the braid by binding and cutting or sealing the end of the braid with a cord burner (see “Binding or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 12).

Finishing Finish this necklace with cones and wire, as described in “Finishing techniques,” p. 16. Use a 6-in. (15 cm) piece of 20-gauge wire for each end. The extra length gives you room to string a 22 x 10 mm cone and several accent beads: a 6 mm bicone crystal, a 5 mm round bead, and a 4 mm round bead. Do not attach the final wrapped loop directly to the clasp. Instead, finish each wrapped loop, open two 4–6 mm jump rings, and attach each loop to half of the clasp. w


Bead & cord layout

1

2

8

3

7

4

5

2.5 x 5 mm SuperUno beads 5 x 16 mm dagger beads 3 mm fire-polished rounds 3 x 10 mm dagger beads

Cord 5:

• 20 SuperUnos • One SuperUno, one 5 x 16 mm dagger, two SuperUnos. String this pattern a total of 12 times. • 20 SuperUnos

• 20 SuperUnos • Three SuperUnos, one 5 x 16 mm dagger. String this pattern a total of 12 times. • 20 SuperUnos

Cord 2:

• 20 SuperUnos • One SuperUno, one 3 mm round, two SuperUnos. Repeat this pattern a total of 12 times. • 20 SuperUnos

• 20 SuperUnos • Three SuperUnos, one 3 mm fire-polished bead. String this pattern a total of 12 times. • 20 SuperUnos Cord 3: • 88 SuperUnos Cord 4:

• 20 SuperUnos • Three SuperUnos, one 3 x 10 mm dagger. String this pattern a total of 12 times. • 20 SuperUnos

Cord 6:

KONGOH GUMI

6

Cord 1:

Cord 7:

• 88 SuperUnos Cord 8:

• 20 SuperUnos • One SuperUno, one 3 x 10 mm dagger, two SuperUnos. Repeat this pattern a total of 12 times. • 20 SuperUnos

May 2016

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Twirl-y girl bracelet Send drops and Rizo beads spiraling ’round and ’round in this easy kumihimo bracelet with multiple finishing options. designed by Shirley Moore

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry


Difficulty rating

Materials

Bead & cord layout

tan/blue bracelet with coiled wire ends 8 in. (20 cm)

3.4 mm drop beads 110 seed beads, color A 110 seed beads, color B

1

2

8

3

7

4

6

Cords 1 and 2: One Rizo, one color A 110 seed bead. String this pattern a total of 25 times. Cords 3 and 4: One drop bead, one color B 110 seed bead. String this pattern a total of 25 times.

Setup 1 Measure around your wrist, and multiply that number by six. If using a disk, cut four cords to that length. If using a marudai, double your result, and cut four cords to that length.

NOTE For example, if your wrist measures 7 in. (18 cm), then you would cut four cords to 42 in. (1.1 m) each if using a disk or 84 in. (2.2 m) if using a marudai. 2 Set up your marudai or disk for kongoh gumi (see “Kumihimo basics,” p. 9). If desired, apply cord stiffener to

5

Cords 5 and 6: One color A 110, one Rizo. String this pattern a total of 25 times. Cords 7 and 8: One color B 110, one drop bead. String this pattern a total of 25 times.

the end of each cord, allow to dry, and trim at an angle. 3 String each cord with the beads listed in the Bead & cord layout. Note that all the cords should end with a total of 50 beads. After stringing each cord, wind the end of the cord around a bobbin or tama.

Braid 1 Work in kongoh gumi with just the cords (no beads) for 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm). Make sure that you end with all the cords in their original positions, as in the Bead & cord layout.

copper/silver bracelet with bead ends 8 in. (20 cm)

• 2 9 mm large-hole decorative metal beads (Michaels Arts and Crafts) • 100 3 x 6 mm mini dagger beads, in place of Rizos (Czech, bronze red iris opaque luster) • 100 3.4 mm drop beads (Miyuki, galvanized silver) • 110 seed beads - 1 g color A (Toho 221, bronze) - 1 g color B (Toho 551, rose gold) • 1 lobster claw clasp • 6 in. (15 cm) 20-gauge wire • 1 4–6 mm jump ring • C-Lon nylon cord (Tex 135, black) • Big Eye needle or cord stiffener • kumihimo disk with 8 plastic bobbins and counterweight; or marudai with 8 tama and counterweight • chopstick (if using a marudai) Materials cont. on p. 24

KONGOH GUMI

2.5 x 6 mm Rizo beads

• 100 2.5 x 6 mm Rizo beads (white opal Picasso) • 100 3.4 mm drop beads (transparent aqua) • 110 seed beads - 1 g color A (Toho 83, metallic brown iris) - 1 g color B (Toho 2021, crystal silver-lined) • 1 lobster claw clasp • 20 in. (51 cm) 20-gauge wire • 1 4–6 mm jump ring • C-Lon nylon cord (Tex 135, beige) • Big Eye needle or cord stiffener • kumihimo disk with 8 plastic bobbins and counterweight; or marudai with 8 tama and counterweight • chopstick (if using a marudai) • 1 10 mm or larger split ring • 2 pairs of chainnose, flatnose, and/or bentnose pliers • wire cutters • Coiling Gizmo • two-part epoxy and toothpick • cord burner (optional)


• 1 10 mm or larger split ring • 2 pairs of chainnose, flatnose, and/or bentnose pliers • roundnose pliers • wire cutters • cord burner (optional)

Basic techniques, p. 14 • square knot • wrapped loop • opening and closing jump rings

2 Continue in two-drop kongoh, dropping one bead on each cord with each pair of cord movements.

NOTE As you work, make sure that each bead is secured under its crossing cord; the Rizos and drop beads may try to escape! Continue working until the beaded portion of your braid is 11⁄2 in. (3.8 cm) short of your desired bracelet length. (Don’t worry if you have extra beads.) 3 When the beaded portion is the desired length, work 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm) with just the cords. 4 Lift the braid from the marudai or disk. Finish the braid by binding and

cutting the end or sealing it with a thread burner about 1⁄8 in. (3 mm) from the unbeaded braid (see “Binding or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 12).

Finishing You may finish each end of the bracelet with cones and wire, as described in “Finishing techniques,” p. 16. The copper/silver bracelet shown on p. 22 substitutes 9 mm large-hole beads for the cones, but the technique is the same. Alternatively, make coiled ends to finish your bracelet, as in the tan/blue bracelet version: 1 Cut a 10-in. (25 cm) piece of 20-gauge wire. Using a Coiling Gizmo

There’s an app for that! Shirley designed these bracelets using the “Kumihimo bead designer” app available at https://play.google.com or at the Apple App Store. You can download a free demo version or purchase the full program for $19.98.

24

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

with a mandrel that best matches the diameter of the unbeaded ends of your braid, make a coil that’s slightly longer than one unbeaded end. Remove the coil, trim the ends of the wire, and bend the last wrap perpendicular to the coil, creating a loop. Repeat to make a second coiled end. 2 Use a toothpick to coat the inside of each coil with two-part epoxy, and slowly twist a coil over each unbeaded end of the braid. Allow to dry. 3 Use a 4–6 mm jump ring to attach a lobster claw clasp to one of the coils. w


KONGOH GUMI

Pearl gables necklace Capture a treasure trove of keshi pearls, lampworked glass, faceted crystal, and a Czech glass button at the pinnacle of this statement piece. designed by Diana Miglionico-Shiraishi

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Difficulty rating

Bead & cord layout

1

2

15-18 mm keshi pearls

Materials

13 x 11 mm lampworked teardrops

aqua necklace 181 ⁄2 in. (47 cm) plus chain extender

8

3

7

4

12 x 6 mm faceted crystal teardrops 3.4 mm drop beads 80 seed beads, color A 6

80 seed beads, color B

Cord 5: • 38 3.4 mm drop beads • 24 keshi pearls • 38 3.4 mm drop beads Cord 6: • 100 B 80s Cord 7: • 38 A 80s • 24 faceted crystal teardrops • 38 A 80s Cord 8: 100 3.4 mm drop beads

Cord 1: • 38 color A 80s • 24 faceted crystal teardrops • 38 A 80s Cord 2: 100 A 80s Cord 3: • 12 A 80s • 26 color B 80s • 24 lampworked teardrops • 26 B 80s • 12 A 80s Cord 4: 100 3.4 mm drop beads

Setup 1 Cut four cords to 4 yd. (3.7 m) each, and set up your marudai or kumihimo disk for kongoh gumi (see “Kumihimo basics,” p. 9). If desired, apply cord stiffener to the end of each cord. 2 String each cord with the beads listed in the Bead & cord layout. Note that all the cords should end with a total of 100 beads. After stringing each cord, wind the end of the cord around a bobbin or tama.

Braid 1 Work in kongoh gumi with just the cords (no beads) for 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm). Make sure that you end with all the cords in their original positions, as in the Bead & cord layout. 2 Continue in two-drop kongoh, dropping one 80 or one 3.4 mm drop bead on each cord with each pair of cord movements. When you reach the larger beads (faceted crystal teardrops, keshi pearls, lampworked teardrops), 26

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

5

stop dropping beads and work ⁄ in. (1.3 cm) with just the cords. This creates an unbeaded section where you will attach the button later. 3 Continue braiding while dropping two beads with each pair of cord movements. Make sure each bead stays under its crossing cord. 4 When all the beads have been incorporated into the braid, work 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm) with just the cords. 5 Lift the braid from the marudai or disk. Finish the braid by binding and cutting the end or sealing the end with a cord burner (See “Binding or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 16). Repeat at the other end of the braid. 6 Thread a beading needle on 12 in. (30 cm) of nylon beading thread. Leaving a 3-in. (7.6 cm) tail, stitch the button to the unbeaded braid worked in step 2. If desired, use beads to hide your stitches and the shank of the button. Once the button is secure, tie together the working thread and tail with a square knot, and trim the excess thread. 12

• 1 31 mm glass daisy button (Czech, turquoise with metallic gold) • 24 15–18 mm keshi pearls, top drilled (champagne) • 25 13 x 11 mm lampworked teardrops by Unicorne Beads (multi forest mix) • 48 12 x 6 mm faceted crystal tear drops, top drilled (jade brown half coat) • 15 g 3.4 mm drop beads (Miyuki 378, gold-lined crystal) • 13 g 80 seed beads (Japanese 375B, crystal-lined aqua metallic antique gold; used for both colors A and B) • 115 x 9 mm lobster claw clasp • 2 8 mm pagoda end caps • 41⁄2 in. (11.4 cm) oval cable chain, 5 mm links • 3 6 mm jump rings, 21-gauge • C-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, flax) • nylon beading thread, size D (C-Lon, dark cream) • beading needles, #12 • 2 pairs of chainnose, flatnose, and/or bentnose pliers • wire cutters • kumihimo disk with 8 plastic bobbins and counterweight; or marudai with 8 tama and counterweight • 1 10 mm or larger split ring • chopstick (if using a marudai) • two-part epoxy and toothpick • Big Eye needle or cord stiffener • cord burner (optional)

Finishing 1 Finish this necklace with glue and end caps, as described in “Finishing techniques,” p. 16. Allow the glue to dry overnight before completing the following steps. 2 Open a 6 mm jump ring, and attach a lobster claw clasp to one of the end caps. 3 Cut a 41⁄2-in. (11.4 cm) piece of chain. Open another jump ring, and attach it to the other end cap. 4 Use the last jump ring to attach a lampworked teardrop to the end link of the chain. w


coral necklace colors

• 80 seed beads - 8 g color A (Toho 2126, gilt-lined pale peach) - 5 g color B (Toho 1708, gilded marble red) Necklace kits available at www.jasmineteadesigns.etsy.com

KONGOH GUMI

• 31 mm glass daisy button (Czech, wheat) • 15–18 mm keshi pearls, top drilled (champagne) • 13 x 11 mm lampworked tear drops by Unicorne Beads (coral shade mix) • 12 x 6 mm faceted crystal tear drops, top drilled (jade peach half plated color) • 3.4 mm drop beads (Miyuki 378, gold-lined crystal)

Basic techniques, p. 14 • overhand knot • square knot • opening and closing jump rings

A selection of beautiful large beads creates a wonderful texture for the center portion of this necklace. The Czech glass button adds just the right accent.

May 2016

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Zippered lentil lariat Connect a pair of variegated kumihimo ropes, using twohole lentil beads to mimic the look of a lariat slider. designed by Randi Sherman

28

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry


Difficulty rating

Materials lariat-style necklace 35 in. (89 cm)

1 Cut four cords to 8 ft. (2.5 m) each, and set up your disk or marudai for kongoh gumi (see “Kumihimo basics,” p. 9). If desired, apply cord stiffener to the ends of the cord, allow to dry, and trim at an angle. 2 String each cord with the beads listed in the Bead & cord layout: Braid 1 (p. 30). Note that each cord should end with a total of 94 beads. After stringing each cord, wind the end of the cord around a bobbin or tama.

Braid 1 1 Work in kongoh gumi with just the cords (no beads) for 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm). Make sure that you end with all the

cords in their original positions, as in the Bead & cord layout: Braid 1. 2 Continue working in 2-drop Kongoh, dropping one bead on each cord with each pair of moves. If the lentil beads twist around the braid, massage it with your fingers, untwisting and twisting the braid so that the lentils form a straight line. Be sure to remove some of your counterweight as your braid gets longer. 3 When all the beads have been incorporated into the braid, work 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm) with just the cords. 4 Lift the braid from the disk or marudai. Finish the braid by binding and cutting or sealing the end of the braid with a cord burner

KONGOH GUMI

Setup for braid 1

• 6 9 mm glass donut beads (Czech, bronze) • 6 mm CzechMates two-hole lentil beads - 12 color A (dark bronze) - 5 color B (matte metallic flax) • 2 3 mm round beads (bronze) • 80 seed beads - 9 g color C (Toho 1207, turquoise blue marbled) - 9 g color D (Toho 223, yellow bronze) - 9 g color E (Toho Y322, hybrid transparent teal Picasso) - 9 g color F (Toho Y301, hybrid natural Picasso) • 110 seed beads - 2 g color C (Toho 1207, turquoise blue marbled) - 2 g color D (Toho 223, yellow bronze) - 2 g color E (Toho Y322, hybrid transparent teal Picasso) - 2 g color F (Toho Y301, hybrid natural Picasso) • 1 5–6 mm inside diameter magnetic clasp (bronze) • S-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, teal) • Fireline, 6 or 8 lb. test • Nymo D nylon beading thread • thread conditioner • Big Eye needle or cord stiffener • beading needles, #11 or #12 • kumihimo disk with 8 plastic bobbins and counterweight; or marudai with 8 tama and 30% counterweight • chopstick and painter’s tape (if using a marudai) • 1 10 mm or larger split ring • cord burner (optional) • super glue • two-part epoxy and toothpick

Basic techniques, p. 14 • • • •

overhand knot square knot conditioning thread half-hitch knot

May 2016

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(see “Binding or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 12). Set this braid aside.

Braid 2 1 Set up the kumihimo disk or marudai as in “Setup for braid 1,” and string each cord with the beads listed in Bead & cord layout: Braid 2. Note that each cord should end with a total of 91 beads, making this braid slightly shorter than braid 1. If you added or omitted beads to adjust the length of braid 1, do so again for this braid. 2 Work this braid as in “Braid 1.”

several stitches to anchor the Fireline.

2 Pass the needle up through the beads of the braid. Exit just below the bottom color A lentil, and sew up through the open hole of the same lentil (figure 1, a–b). 3 Pick up a color B lentil, and sew through the open hole of the next lentil (b–c). Repeat this stitch four more times (c–d).

NOTE Keep your tension firm but not tight. The lentils should be just aligned.

Lentil join

4 Line up the two braids side by side.

1 Thread a beading needle on

Pick up a 3 mm round bead, and sew down through the open hole of the top color A lentil on the second braid (d–e). 5 Sew through the open hole of

1 yd. (.9 m) of Fireline. Leaving a 4-in. (10 cm) tail, sew through the unbeaded end of one of the braids (the end nearer the lentils), and make

1

the next color B lentil, and continue through the open hole of the following color A lentil (e–f). Repeat this stitch to join the remaining lentils, making sure not to leave any slack between lentils (f–g). 6 Pick up a 3 mm, and sew up through the bottom color A lentil on the first braid. Continue through a few more lentils in the join, pulling tight to bring the two braids together (g–h). 7 Retrace the thread path of the join, sew to a color A lentil on the first braid, and exit the hole closest to the braid. Pass the needle back down through the braid as before. Sew through the unbeaded end of the braid several times to secure, and exit next to the tail thread. Tie the working thread and tail together with a square knot, and trim them 1⁄4 in. (6 mm) from the knot.

2

6 mm CzechMates two-hole lentil beads, color A 8

3

80 seed beads, color C

7

4

80 seed beads, color D 80 seed beads, color E

6

5

Bead & cord layout: Braid 1 Cord 1: 94 color C 80s Cord 2: 70 color D 80s, one color A lentil, 23 color D 80s Cord 3: 73 color E 80s, one color A lentil, 20 color E 80s Cord 4: 76 color F 80s, one color A lentil, 17 color F 80s Cord 5: 72 color C 80s, one color A lentil, 21 color C 80s Cord 6: 75 color D 80s, one color A lentil, 18 color D 80s Cord 7: 94 color E 80s Cord 8: 71 color F 80s, one color A lentil, 22 color F 80s

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

80 seed beads, color F

NOTE The bead counts listed at left for Braid 1 result in a 141⁄2-in. (36.8 cm) rope, which will make up half of the necklace. To adjust the length, add or omit beads at the beginning of each cord in groups of four. This will lengthen or shorten the necklace by 1⁄2-in. (1.3 cm) increments. For instance, for a 15-in. (38 cm) rope, string cord 1 with 98 color C 80s; string cord 2 with 74 color D 80s, one color A lentil, and 23 color D 80s; and so on.

Bead & cord layout: Braid 2 Cord 1: 91 color C 80s Cord 2: 70 color D 80s, one color A lentil, 20 color D 80s Cord 3: 73 color E 80s, one color A lentil, 17 color E 80s Cord 4: 76 color F 80s, one color A lentil, 14 color F 80s Cord 5: 72 color C 80s, one color A lentil, 18 color C 80s Cord 6: 75 color D 80s, one color A lentil, 15 color D 80s Cord 7: 91 color E 80s Cord 8: 71 color F 80s, one color A lentil, 19 color F 80s


Fringe

figure 1

1 Cut eight pieces of nylon beading 6 mm CzechMates two-hole lentil bead, color A Braid

Braid

6 mm CzechMates two-hole lentil bead, color B 3 mm round bead d

110 seed bead, color C

KONGOH GUMI

thread to 24 in. (61 cm), and lightly condition them with conditioner. Thread a beading needle on one of the threads, and center it through the unbeaded end of a braid 1⁄4 in. (6 mm) from where the beads begin. Use the two halves of the thread to tie a square knot against the braid. Repeat with the other threads so that you have 16 threads exiting all around the braid. 2 Dot super glue around the braid where the threads are anchored. Allow the glue to dry. If needed, use a cord burner to trim the braid just below where the threads are attached, being careful that you don’t trim the threads. String three 9 mm donut beads over the threads and the remaining unbeaded nub of the braid, making sure to hide the Fireline tails. Wrap a small piece of painter’s tape around the donuts, temporarily securing them to the beads (photo). 3 Thread a beading needle on one of the 16 threads. Pick up 43 color C 110s, skip the last three, and sew up through the next three or four C 110s (figure 2), forming a picot. 4 Push the beads up the thread until the top bead touches the donuts. You don’t want any gaps between beads in your fringe. Tie a half-hitch knot at the point where your thread is exiting the fringe, and sew through the next few beads (as in figure 2). Repeat to tie several knots along the length of the fringe. Exit near the top of the fringe, and trim the thread. 5 Work as in steps 3 and 4 with the remaining threads, using color C, D, E, and F 110s as desired and incorporating any patterns you may wish. Remove the painter’s tape when you are finished. 6 Repeat steps 1–5 to create fringe on the end of the other braid.

e f

h c

b a

g

figure 2

half-hitch knot

half-hitch knot

half-hitch knot

Finishing Finish the necklace with glue and a magnetic clasp, as described in “Finishing techniques,” p. 16. w

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Braided gems necklace Highlight your favorite gemstone in a short kumihimo rope accented by a pair of simple strung strands. designed by Helen Lamb-Orendorf

DESIGN ALTERNATIVE This necklace showcases garnet beads, but any gemstone will work! Many gemstones can easily be found in chip form and medium-sized rounds, and bicone crystals are a snap to find in a matching hue. Make this necklace in your birthstone, or look up the spiritual properties of different gems to choose the one that best reflects your personality.

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry


Bead & cord layout 30

60

1

2

Difficulty rating

5-6 mm gemstone chips 5 mm round gemstone beads 30 8

3 30

30 7

4 30

4 mm bicone crystals 80 seed beads

Setup 1 Cut four cords to 11⁄2 yd. (1.4 m)each, and set up your marudai or kumihimo disk for kongoh gumi (see “Kumihimo basics,” p. 9). If desired, apply cord stiffener to the end of each cord, allow to dry, and trim at an angle. 2 String each cord with the beads listed in the Bead & cord layout. Note that the 80 cords will have twice the number of beads as the other cords. After stringing each cord, wind the end of the cord around a bobbin or tama.

Braid 1 Work in kongoh gumi with just the cords (no beads) for 1⁄4 in. (6 mm). Make sure that you end with all the cords in their original positions, as in the Bead & cord layout. 2 Continue working in two-drop kongoh, dropping one gemstone chip, one gemstone round, one bicone, or two 80s on each cord with each pair of movements. Always remember to drop two 80s on cords 2 and 6. 3 When all the beads have been incorporated into the braid, work 1⁄4 in. (6 mm) with just the cords. 4 Lift the braid from the marudai or disk, and remove the tama or bobbins. To prevent the braid from fraying, secure the loose ends of the cords with an overhand knot. Stretch the braid gently to relax the braiding tension.

Finishing 1 On each end of the braid, trim the excess cord next to the knot so

6

5

60

30

that the knots are still attached to the braid. 2 String a head pin through one knot so that the head of the head pin is lodged securely against the outside of the knot and the other end extends in a straight line from the braid (photo). 3 Apply E6000 adhesive to the knot, the head of the head pin, and the inside of a cone. String the cone onto the head pin, and allow to dry. 4 Make a wrapped loop with the head pin. 5 Repeat steps 2–4 on the other end of the braid.

Stringing 1 Cut 12 in. (30 cm) of flexible beading wire. At one end, attach a Bead Stopper, leaving a 21⁄2-in. (6.4 cm) tail. On the working end of the wire, string the following beads: • One gemstone round, a gemstone chip, a 12 mm accent bead, a chip, and a round • One 4 mm spacer, a 12–16 mm gemstone nugget, a spacer, a round, three chips, and a round. String this pattern a total of three times. • One spacer and five bicones 2 On the working end of the wire, string a crimp bead and a wire guard. Thread the working wire and wire guard through half of the clasp. Feed the wire through the other side of the wire guard, back through the crimp bead, and through several more beads. Crimp the crimp bead, and trim the excess wire.

necklace 22 in. (56 cm)

• gemstone beads (garnet) - 6 12–16 mm nuggets - 112 5–6 mm chips - 76 5 mm rounds • 2 12 mm accent beads (rose motif; sterling silver) • 40 4 mm bicone crystals (Swarovski, garnet) • 2 g 80 metal seed beads (nickel) • 14 4 mm flat spacers • 1 toggle clasp • 2 12 mm cones • 2 21⁄2-in. (6.4 cm) head pins • 4 2 x 2 mm crimp beads • 4 3.2 mm crimp covers (optional) • 4 wire guards • S-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, wine) • flexible beading wire, .018 or .019 • chainnose pliers • crimping pliers • roundnose pliers • wire cutters • kumihimo disk with 8 plastic bobbins and counterweight; or marudai with 8 tama and counterweight • 1 10 mm or larger split ring • chopstick (if using a marudai) • Bead Stopper • E6000 adhesive • Big Eye needle or cord stiffener

KONGOH GUMI

Cords 1, 3, and 7: 30 gemstone chips Cords 2 and 6: 60 80s Cord 4: 30 bicone crystals Cords 5 and 8: 30 gemstone rounds

Materials

Basic techniques, p. 14 • overhand knot • wrapped loop • crimping

3 Remove the Bead Stopper, and finish the other end of the strand as in step 2, but this time feed the wire and wire guard through the wrapped loop at one end of the braid. 4 If desired, close a crimp cover over each crimp. 5 Work as in steps 1–4 to string and finish the other half of the necklace. w

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Awesome accents bracelet Mix O-beads with shaped accent beads, locking them all in place with a few kumihimo moves without beads. designed by Sally Battis

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry


notes on accent beads Setup

Difficulty rating

1 Cut four cords to 60 in. (1.4 m)

NOTE The cord is somewhat exposed in the O-bead sections, so if your accent beads and O-beads are different colors, select cord that blends best with the O-beads.

Braid 1 Work in kongoh gumi with just the cords (no beads) for about 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm). Make sure that you end with all the cords in their original positions, as in the Bead & cord layout. 2 While working the following bead clusters in the order listed, you need to count your moves (that is, the movement of a pair of cords from one side of the disk or marudai to the other) rather than complete sequences of all eight cords. End cluster • Work three moves, each time dropping one O-bead on each cord. • Work one move without beads to lock the O-beads in place.

Materials bracelet 81 ⁄4 in. (21 cm)

• 52 6 x 4 mm rice beads (Czech glass, peridot) • 184 1 x 3.8 mm O-beads (crystal silver metallic) • 1 lobster claw clasp • 2 3 mm inside diameter segmented crimp cord ends • 1 4–6 mm jump ring • C-Lon nylon cord (Tex 135 or 210, light green) • Big Eye needle or cord stiffener • kumihimo disk with 8 plastic bobbins and counterweight; or marudai with 8 tama and counterweight • 1 10 mm or larger split ring • chopstick (if using a marudai) • 2 pairs of chainnose, flatnose, and/or bentnose pliers • cord burner (optional) • two-part epoxy and toothpick Kits containing beads and cord for this design (under the name O My Bracelet) are available at http://stores.sallybeadjewelry.com.

2

Cords 1 and 5: 3 25

25 7

4

6

5

15 1 x 3.8 mm O-beads 6 x 4 mm accent beads

The bronze/red version features bronze 4 mm fire-polished round beads with matte red O-beads.

The blue/silver sample was done with 5 x 3 mm rice-shaped coated hematite and silver O-beads.

• overhand knot • opening and closing jump rings

15

8

The turquoise/copper sample shown here uses 6 x 4 mm barrelshaped turquoise beads with matte copper O-beads.

Basic techniques, p. 14

Bead & cord layout

1

Rice-shaped Czech glass beads in this size can be somewhat hard to find, so you may want to try other bead types. During testing, we successfully tried the following three bead types.

• 15 O-beads Cords 2, 4, 6, 8:

• One O-bead, one accent • Two O-beads, one accent. String this pattern a total of 12 times • One O-bead

Longer beads are a bit more difficult to work with as they have a tendency to sometimes slip out from under the crossing cord. Pay close attention to the point of the braid as you work these beads in, and if you If you see this happen, just reverse your cord movements to get back to the misplaced bead, and try again, holding the accent bead in place with your fingers if needed.

Cords 3 and 7:

• 25 O-beads

If you use beads that are shorter than 6 mm, you will need to string a few additional beads on each cord in order to create a full length bracelet.

KONGOH GUMI

each, and set up your marudai or disk for kongoh gumi (see “Kumihimo basics,” p. 9). If desired, apply cord stiffener on the end of each cord. 2 String each cord with the beads listed in the Bead & cord layout. Note that not all the cords have the same number of beads. After stringing each cord, wind it onto a bobbin or tama.


a

Accent bead clusters Dropping the accent beads is the trickiest part of this braid. If you have trouble with the following moves, see “Notes on accent beads,” p. 35, for help. • Push down the center of your braid about 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm) to make room for the accent beads (photo a). • Work one move, dropping one accent bead per cord. Because of their height, the accent beads will be pointing outward (photo b). • Work one more move, dropping one accent bead per cord. The accent beads will now be arranged

36

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

b

in two pairs and still be pointing outward (photo c). • Work one move without beads to tighten the four accent beads into a cluster (photo d). O-bead clusters • Work seven moves, dropping one O-bead on each cord with every move. • Work two moves without beads.

3 Alternate between “Accent bead clusters” and “O-bead clusters” 11 more times. Work one more “Accent bead cluster” and an “End cluster.” 4 Remove any extra O-beads, and

c

d

work 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm) with just the cords. 5 Lift the braid from the marudai or disk. Finish the braid by binding and cutting or sealing the end of the braid with a cord burner (see “Binding or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 12).

Finishing Finish the bracelet with glue and crimp ends, as described in “Finishing techniques,” p. 16. Once the crimp ends have been attached, open a 4–6 mm jump ring, and attach one crimp end to a lobster claw clasp. w


KONGOH GUMI

Magnolia necklace

See how this garden grows as twin beaded braids blossom with a designer pendant and matching lentil beads. designed by Diana Miglionico-Shiraishi

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Difficulty rating

Materials necklace 21 in. (53 cm)

• Golem Design Studio ceramic beads (magnolia flowers motif) - 1 45 mm large round pendant - 2 23 mm (size M) lentil beads • 80 4 mm mini lampworked teardrops by Unicorne Beads (strawberry cream glitter; www.unicornebeads.com) • 15 g 60 seed beads (Toho Y182, opaque luster green Picasso) • 1 5 mm inside-diameter clasping end caps (antique brass) • C-Lon nylon cord (Tex 400, sepia) • 2 Big Eye needles • kumihimo disk with 9 plastic bobbins; or marudai with 1 plastic bobbin and 8 tama • chainnose or flatnose pliers • hemostat or crimping pliers • wire cutters • cord stiffener • pointed tweezers • cord burner • two-part epoxy and toothpick

a

b

c

d

5 Bring the left and right cords down

Materials and kits for this project are available at www.jasmineteadesigns. etsy.com.

e

Basic techniques, p. 14 • lark’s head knot • overhand knot • square knot

This necklace is worked as a partiallybeaded eight-cord kongoh gumi design in which beads are dropped on some movements but not all.

Pendant 1 Cut eight cords to 75 in. (1.9 m) each, and separate them into two sets of four cords. 2 Thread a Big Eye needle over all four cords in one set, and center the needle on the cords. Sew through the pendant from front to back, and pull the cords through several inches to form a loop (photo a).

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

NOTE Grasp the needle with chainnose or flatnose pliers to help pull the cords through. Cut the Big Eye needle from the cords. (Don’t discard the needle, though — you can still use it like this!) Adjust the cords to keep them even and tidy, and then bring the eight cord ends through the loop to make a loose lark’s head knot. Pull the cords to bring the loop closer to the pendant, but do not tighten the knot all the way. 3 Center the other set of four cords in the lark’s head knot, between the loop exiting the back of the pendant and the eight ends exiting the front (photo b). 4 Working on the back of the pendant, loop the four left-hand cords through the knot once. Repeat with the four right-hand cords (photo c).

and around to tie a loose overhand knot at the bottom of the lark’s head knot (photo d). Once again adjust the cords to keep them even and tidy. 6 Still working on the back of the pendant, bring the left-hand cords up through the front of the lark’s head knot to exit alongside the eight cords already exiting the pendant.

NOTE You can use a Big Eye needle to help with this, or else fold the cords in half and lead with the fold as the cords go through the knot. Repeat with the right-hand cords. Take your time with this step, keeping the cords very neat. Turn the pendant to the front; your work should now look like photo e with 16 cords exiting the pendant. Gently pull on the cords to tighten the knots. 7 Divide the 16 cords into two sets of eight, with each set consisting of four cords from the center and four cords from the side. Wind one set around a bobbin to keep out of the way for now (photo f).

Setup 1 Feed the remaining eight cords up through the hole of the kumihimo disk


Bead & cord layout 1

2

3

7

4

6

f

5

4 mm lampworked teardrops 60 seed beads

Cord Cord Cord Cord Cord Cord Cord Cord

1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8:

four 60s five 60s four lampworked four lampworked four 60s five 60s four lampworked four lampworked

drops drops h drops drops

or maurdai so that the pendant is snug against the underside. Arrange the cords for kongoh gumi (see “Kumihimo basics,” p. 9). 2 Apply cord stiffener to the end of each cord, allow to dry, and trim each one at an angle. String each cord with the beads listed in the Bead & cord layout. Note that not all of the cords end with the same number of beads. After stringing each cord, wind the end of the cord around a bobbin or tama.

Braid 1, bottom half 1 Work kongoh gumi with just the cords (no beads) for 12 pairs of cord movements. 2 Work one pair of cord movements, dropping one bead on each cord. 3 Work four pairs of moves with just the cords, and then work one pair of moves dropping one bead on each cord. Repeat this pattern of four pairs of moves without beads and one pair of moves with beads until all the beads have been incorporated into the braid. 4 Work 12 pairs of cord movements with just the cords.

5 With a piece of scrap cord, tie two tight overhand knots (one on top of the other) as close to the top of the braid as possible (photo g). Carefully lift the braid from the kumihimo disk or marudai, and remove the bobbins or tama from the working cords.

Lentil bead String a lentil bead over as many of the cords as will easily go through the hole, making sure the design on the lentil is facing the same direction as the design on the pendant (photo h). Thread the remaining cords onto a Big Eye needle, and sew through the lentil, being careful not to split any of the cords already strung through. Once all eight cords are through the lentil, push the lentil down toward the double overhand knot.

g

listed below. After stringing each cord, wind the end of the cord around a bobbin or tama. Cord 1: eight 60s Cord 2: nine 60s Cord 3: six lampworked drops, two 60s Cord 4: six lampworked drops, three 60s Cord 5: eight 60s Cord 6: nine 60s Cord 7: six lampworked drops, two 60s Cord 8: six lampworked drops, three 60s 3 Work 12 pairs of cord movements with just the cords. 4 Work one pair of cord movements, dropping one bead on each cord. 5 Work four pairs of cord movements with just the cords, and then work one pair of moves dropping one bead on each cord. Repeat this pattern of four pairs of moves without beads and one pair of moves with beads until all the beads have been incorporated into the braid. 6 Work 12 pairs of cord movements with just the cords. 7 To prevent the braid from fraying, lift the next two cords to be moved, and tie them together with a square knot close to the end of the braid. 8 Lift the braid from the marudai or disk. Finish the braid by binding and cutting the end or sealing the end of the braid with a cord burner (see “Binding or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 12).

Braid 1, top half 1 Feed the cords up through the center hole of the kumihimo disk or marudai, and once again arrange the cords for kongoh gumi. From the underneath, use pointed tweezers to untie the double overhand knot, and remove the scrap cord. 2 String each cord with the beads

Braid 2 Work as in “Setup,” “Braid 1, bottom half,” “Lentil bead,” and “Braid 1, top half” to make the other side of the necklace.

Finishing Finish this necklace with glue and clasping end caps, as described in “Finishing techniques,” p. 16. w May 2016

39

KONGOH GUMI

8


Sunflower swirl necklace 40

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

Send stripes of color spiraling around a kumihimo rope abloom with magatama flowers. designed by Wendy L. Speare


Difficulty rating

Materials blue/gold necklace 20 in. (51 cm)

1 Cut four cords to 3 yd. (2.7 m) each, and set up your marudai or kumihimo disk for kongoh gumi (see “Kumihimo basics,” p. 9). If desired, apply cord stiffener to the end of each cord.

NOTE These instructions are for a 20-in. (51 cm) finished necklace. For a longer or shorter piece, multiply your desired length by six to determine how long to cut your cords. 2 String each cord with the beads listed in the Bead & cord layout (p. 42). Each cord should end with a total of 118 beads. The stringing order for each cord is split into three groups, indicated by bullet points. The first group creates the end 21⁄2 in. (6.4 cm) of the necklace — the part without flowers. The stringing order consists of a six-bead sequence that gets strung three times for a total of 18 beads. The second group is for the main section of the necklace with flowers. It consists of a sequence of 30 beads that gets strung three times for a total of 90 beads. Note that on most cords,

there are repeated groupings within the 30-bead sequence — these are indicated by several beads within a set of brackets [ ] and followed by an indication of how many times to repeat the sequence (i.e. [. . .] x 3). The third group consists of 10 beads per cord and finishes the necklace so there is another 21⁄2 in. (6.4 cm) with no flowers to match the starting end.

BEAD NOTES • The holes of the magatamas are angled. On one side, the hole is near the center of the bead. Flip the bead over, and the hole is closer to the end of the bead. The instructions will tell you to string each magatama through its center (C) hole or end (E) hole. • The 2 mm pearls have very small holes and you will not be able to use a needle to string them, so make sure the end of cords 3, 5, and 6 have been coated with cord stiffener before you start stringing.

3 After stringing each cord, wind the end of the cord around a bobbin or tama.

If you think adventure is dangerous, try routine; it is lethal. – Paolo Coelho

turquoise/amber necklace colors

• 4 x 7 mm long magatamas (Miyuki LMA-2006, matte metallic dark bronze) • 2 mm glass pearls (Czech, wine) • 80 seed beads - color A (Toho 133FR, matte transparent topaz AB) - color B (Toho 4514, opaque turquoise blue Picasso) • 110 seed beads (Toho 4515, opaque chartreuse Picasso) Materials and kits available at Poppyfield Bead Company, (505) 880-8695, webstore.poppybeads.com.

Basic techniques, p.14 • overhand knot • square knot • opening and closing jump rings

May 2016

41

KONGOH GUMI

Setup

• 54 4 x 7 mm long magatamas (Miyuki LMA-4202F, Duracoat galvanized matte gold) • 9 2 mm glass pearls (Czech, bronze) • 80 seed beads - 8 g color A (Toho PF569F, permanent galvanized matte turquoise) - 10 g color B (Toho PF557F, permanent galvanized matte starlight) • 2 g 110 seed beads (Miyuki 29, silverlined root beer) • 1 hook-and-eye clasp (antique brass) • 2 4–5 mm diameter end caps with swivel loops (antique brass) • 2 4–6 mm jump rings (antique brass) • S-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, brown) • kumihimo disk with 8 plastic bobbins and counterweight; or marudai with 8 tama and counterweight • 1 10 mm or larger split ring • chopstick (if using a marudai) • 2 pairs of chainnose, flatnose, and/or bentnose pliers • cord burner • two-part epoxy and toothpick • Big Eye needle and/or cord stiffener


1

Bead & cord layout

2

4 x 7 mm long magatamas 2 mm glass pearls

8

3

7

4

80 seed beads, color A 80 seed beads, color B 110 seed beads 6

5

Cord 1

Cord 5

• Group 1 — string this sequence a total of three times: One color B 80, one color A 80, one 110, one A 80, two B 80s. • Group 2 — string this sequence a total of three times: One magatama (C), one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, one magatama (C), one magatama (E), [one B 80, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, two B 80s] x 3. • Group 3: One B 80, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80.

• Group 1 — string this sequence a total of three times: One A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110. • Group 2 — string this sequence a total of three times: One A 80, one magatama (E), two B 80s, [one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s] x 2, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, one B 80, one pearl, one B 80, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110. • Group 3: One A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s.

Cord 2

Cord 6

• Group 1 — string this sequence a total of three times: One A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s. • Group 2 — string this sequence a total of three times: One A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, one B 80, one magatama (C), one magatama (E), one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, one magatama (E), two B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s. • Group 3: One A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110 one A 80, one B 80.

• Group 1 — string this sequence a total of three times: Three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80. • Group 2 — string this sequence a total of three times: One B 80, one pearl, one B 80, [one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s] x 2, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, two B 80s, one magatama (C), one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80. • Group 3: Three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80.

Cord 7 Cord 3 • Group 1 — string this sequence a total of three times: One A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s. • Group 2 — string this sequence a total of three times: One A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, one B 80, one pearl, one B 80, [one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s] x 3. • Group 3: One A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, one B 80.

• Group 1 — string this sequence a total of three times: Three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80. • Group 2 — string this sequence a total of three times: One magatama (C), one magatama (E), one B 80, [one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s] x 2, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, one B 80, one magatama (C), one magatama (E), one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80. • Group 3: Three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80.

Cord 4 • Group 1 — string this sequence a total of three times: One 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80. • Group 2 — string this sequence a total of three times: One 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, two B 80s, one magatama (C), one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, one magatama (C), one magatama (E), one B 80, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80. • Group 3: One 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, two B 80s.

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

Cord 8 • Group 1 — string this sequence a total of three times: Two B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, one B 80. • Group 2 — string this sequence a total of three times: One magatama (C), one magatama (E), one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, one magatama (E), two B 80s, [one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s] x 2, one A 80, one 110, one A 80, one B 80. • Group 3: Two B 80s. one A 80, one 110, one A 80, three B 80s, one A 80, one 110.


Braid 1 Work in kongoh gumi with just the

NOTE Make sure that each bead stays under its crossing cord, especially the magatamas and the 80s and 110s that immediately follow the magatamas. If one comes out of position, unbraid to reach the bead, reposition it, and continue braiding.

3 When all the beads have been incorporated into the braid, work 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm) with just the cords. 4 Lift the braid from the marudai or disk. Finish the braid by binding (photo a) and cutting the end or sealing the end of the braid with a cord burner (see “Binding or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 12). Repeat on the other end of the braid.

a

b

Finishing Finish this necklace with glue and end caps (photo b), as described in “Finishing techniques,” p. 16. Open two jump rings, and use them to attach each half of the clasp to the two end caps. w

May 2016

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KONGOH GUMI

cords (no beads) for 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm). Make sure that you end with all the cords in their original positions, as in the Bead & cord layout. 2 Continue working in two-drop kongoh, dropping one bead on each cord with each pair of movements.


Over the rainbow bracelet Work a cloud of teardrops across the top of a kumihimo braid — they’ll appear to float between two other braids when discreetly joined on the back. designed by Adrienne Gaskell

44

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry


Bead & cord layout: Center braid

1

Difficulty rating

2

Materials hematite bracelet 7 in. (18 cm) 3

7

4

6

5

Setup for center braid 1 Cut four cords to 6 ft. (1.8 m) each,

80 seed beads

and set up your marudai or disk for an eight-cord kongoh gumi (see “Kumihimo basics,” p. 9).

6 x 4 mm teardrop beads 6 mm CzechMates two-hole lentil beads Cord 1:

• [Nine 80s] • Two teardrops, one lentil, one 80. String this pattern a total of six times. • [Nine 80s]

NOTE Trimming and coating the ends of the cords with Fray Check makes it possible to string the beads directly onto the cord, rather than using a Big Eye needle, which might be difficult to pass through the lentil beads and teardrops.

Cords 2 and 3:

2 String each cord with the beads listed

• [Nine 80s] • One teardrop, two 80s • Two teardrops, two 80s. String this pattern a total of five times. • One teardrop • [Nine 80s]

in the Bead & cord layout: Center braid. These instructions result in a 7-in. (18 cm) finished bracelet, including a 1-in. (2.5 cm) clasp. Note that each cord should have a total of 42 beads. For a larger or smaller bracelet, please see “Bracelet sizing,” p. 48, which will have you adjust the number of 80s in brackets [ ] at the start and end of each cord. If you are adjusting the finished size, all cords should still have the same number of beads. After stringing each cord, wind the end of the cord around a bobbin or tama.

Cord 4:

• [Nine 80s] • Two 80s, two teardrops. String this pattern a total of six times. • [Nine 80s] Cord 5:

• [Nine 80s] • Two 80s, two teardrops • One lentil, one 80, two teardrops. String this pattern a total of five times. • [Nine 80s] Cords 6 and 7:

• [Nine 80s] • One 80, two teardrops • Two 80s, two teardrops. String this pattern a total of five times. • One 80 • [Nine 80s]

silver bracelet colors

• 6 x 4 mm teardrop beads, top drilled (Czech, crystal AB) • 6 mm CzechMates two-hole lentil beads (silver pearl) • 80 seed beads (Toho 711, nickelplated silver) • 110 seed beads (Toho 53, gray) teal bracelet colors

Center braid 1 Work a kongoh gumi with just the cords (no beads) for 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm). Make sure that you end with all the cords in their original positions, as in the Bead & cord layout: Center braid. 2 Continue using 2-drop Kongoh, dropping one bead on each cord with each pair of cord movements.

• 6 x 4 mm teardrop beads, top drilled (Czech, crystal AB) • 6 mm CzechMates two-hole lentil beads (silver pearl) • 80 seed beads (Toho 995, aqua gold-lined rainbow) • 110 seed beads (Toho 995, aqua gold-lined rainbow)

Basic techniques, p. 14

Cord 8:

• [Nine 80s] • Two teardrops, two 80s. String this pattern a total of six times. • [Nine 80s]

• 96 6 x 4 mm teardrop beads, top drilled (Czech, jet AB) • 35 6 mm CzechMates two-hole lentil beads (silver pearl) • 26 g 80 seed beads (Toho 81, metallic hematite) • 1 g 110 seed beads (Toho 81, metallic hematite) • 1 1-in. (2.5 cm) 3-strand magnetic clasp (www.adriennegaskell.com) • 1 10 mm (or larger) split ring • S-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, black) • Fray Check • Fireline, 6 or 8 lb. test • beading needles, #12 • kumihimo disk with 8 plastic bobbins and counterweight; or marudai with 8 tama and counterweight • crimping pliers • 2 Bead Stoppers • hemostat • cord burner • Two-part epoxy and toothpick • vise

KONGOH GUMI

8

NOTE Make sure that each bead stays in position under its crossing cord; the teardrops can be a challenge. Also, if you notice a twist in

• overhand knot • square knot • ending thread

May 2016

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a

your braid (photo a), no worries. It will straighten out when attached to the side braids.

3 When all the beads have been incorporated into the braid, work 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm) with just the cords. 4 Lift the braid from the marudai or disk. Finish the braid by binding and cutting or sealing the end of the braid with a cord burner (see “Binding or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 12). Set the center braid aside.

Side braids To save time, you’ll string the beads for both side braids on the same cords. You’ll create the first side braid, work a section of unbeaded braid, and then create the second side braid. The side braids will be separated later.

1 Set up the kumihimo disk or marudai as in “Setup for center braid,” but start with four cords cut to 7 ft. (2.1 m), and

Bead & cord layout: Side braids

1

2

8

3

7

4

string each cord with the beads listed in Bead & cord layout: Side braids. Again, these instructions are for a 7-in. (18 cm) bracelet. If you opted for a larger or smaller bracelet, return to “Bracelet sizing,” p. 48, to see how to adjust the number of 80s. 2 For cords 3 and 7, string the same pattern again after each Bead Stopper; these beads will be for the second side braid. After stringing each cord, wind the cord around a bobbin or tama up to the Bead Stopper, adjusting the position of the Bead Stopper to leave enough working cord below the disk or mirror. Keep the beads for the first side braid free of the bobbin or tama. 3 Work a kongoh gumi with just the cords (no beads) for 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm). Make sure that you end with all the cords in their original positions, as in the Bead & cord layout: Side braids. 4 Continue using 2-drop Kongoh, dropping one bead on each cord

with each movement until you’ve used all the beads before the Bead Stoppers on cords 3 and 7. Work three more steps, each time dropping one 80 per cord. This adds six more seed beads (one more seed bead each from cords 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, and 8). 5 Work 1 in. (2.5 cm) with just the cords. This unbeaded section will separate the first and second side braids. 6 For cords 3 and 7, remove the Bead Stoppers, unwind the bobbins, slide the remaining beads up toward the marudai or disk, and rewind the cords. 7 Work as in step 4 to create the second side braid. End by working 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm) with just the cords. 8 Using crimping pliers, grasp the cords at the point of braiding. With your other hand, remove the counterweight, and bring the braid down so the bobbins are resting on your work surface. Still holding the braid with the pliers, use a thread burner to burn off the excess cord (photo b).

Cords 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8:

Cord 3:

8 in. (20 cm) of 80s. Don’t worry about the exact number of beads; stringing this many 80s will give you enough extras to make two side braids up to 9 in. (23 cm) long. You will discard any extras later. Until then, wind the end of the cord around a bobbin or tama.

• [Seven 80s] • One 80 • One lentil, three 80s. String this pattern a total of six times. • [Seven 80s] • Attach a Bead Stopper after the beads about halfway down the cord (photo, right). Cord 7:

6

46

5

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

• [Seven 80s] • Three 80s, one lentil. String this pattern a total of six times. • One 80 • [Seven 80s] • Attach a Bead Stopper after the beads about halfway down the cord.


NOTE The metal jaws of the pliers act as a heat sink, keeping the heat away from the braid.

Join

b

c

and sew through the open hole of the second lentil on the side braid (b–c). Continue in this manner until you exit the last lentil on the side braid (c–d).

to the point just before the teardrops, and exit the underside of the braid.

NOTE You may need to exit and re-enter the braid a few times before reaching this point; just make sure your thread remains hidden inside the braid.

1 Center a beading needle on 4 ft. (1.2 m) of Fireline so you are working with doubled thread. Sew through one of the unbeaded ends of the center braid about 1⁄4 in. (6 mm) before the beads, leaving 3-in. (7.6 cm) tails. Tie together the working thread and tails with an overhand knot, and then tie together the two tails with a square knot. 2 Sew up through the inside of the braid

3 Lay one of the side braids next to the center braid, positioning the lentils on the center braid between the lentils on the side braid (figure 1). 4 Sew through the open hole of the first lentil on the side braid, pick up an 110 seed bead, and sew through the open hole of the first lentil on the center braid (figure 1, a–b). Pick up an 110,

6 mm CzechMates two-hole lentil bead, side view

bottom view

Side braid c

figure 2

Side braid Center braid Side braid

braids, the center braid lentils will rotate and the holes will be stacked vertically, so figures 1 and 2 show only the open (lower) hole of each center braid lentil.

5 Lay the other side braid next to the center braid, positioning the lentils as before. Turn, and sew through the open hole of the first lentil on the new braid. Join this side braid as you did the first (figure 2).

110 seed bead

figure 1

d Center braid

NOTE When attaching the side

a b

KONGOH GUMI

Keep burning the cords to melt and seal the end of the braid. 9 Locate the center of the 1-in. (2.5 cm) unbeaded section between the two side braids. Clamp a hemostat just to one side of the center point. Use crimping pliers to grasp the braid to the other side of the center point. Use the thread burner to separate the braids between the hemostat and pliers (photo c), melting and sealing the ends as before. 10 Melt and seal the remaining end of the first side braid below the knots. Do the same for both ends of the center braid. All six braid ends should now have neatly sealed ends.


The underside of the bracelet shows how the braids are joined, with each side braid being attached to the center braid through the bottom hole of the two-hole lentil.

Bracelet sizing For a 7-in. (18 cm) finished bracelet, including a 1-in. (2.5 cm) clasp, follow the instructions as written. Need a different size? Select the desired length below, substituting the number of 80s in brackets [ ]. When you string the beads on the cords, string this number of 80s wherever you see brackets [ ] in the instructions. Measurements are approximate, and results can vary depending on individual braid tension and bead manufactuer. The calculations are based on Japanese seed beads (Toho brand).

Center braid cords

Side braid cords

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 7, 8

1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8

3&7

# of 80 beads before and after pattern beads

Total length of 80 beads

# of 80 beads before and after pattern beads

6.5 in. (16.5 cm)

[7]

8 in. (20 cm)

[5]

7 in. (17.8 cm)

[9]

8 in. (20 cm)

[7]

7.5 in. (19 cm)

[11]

8 in. (20 cm)

[9]

8 in. (20.3 cm)

[13]

8 in. (20 cm)

[11]

8.5 in.(21.6 cm)

[15]

8 in. (20 cm)

[13]

9 in. (22.9 cm)

[17]

8 in. (20 cm)

[15]

BRACELET LENGTH

48

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

NOTE You will be sewing through the same holes of the lentils on the center braid as you did when joining the first side braid. Once all the lentils have been joined, secure the end lentils by sewing through the first and last lentils again. Insert the needle into the center braid, and work toward the unbeaded end inside the braid. Exit next to the starting knot in the unbeaded end. Cut off the needle, and tie a couple of square knots with the working thread and tail. Trim the threads close to the braid, being careful not to cut the knots; these will be further secured once the clasp is attached.

Finishing 1 Check that the unbeaded end of each braid fits into the appropriate openings on the clasp so that the beads butt up against the clasp. If any of the ends are too long, use the thread burner to trim. 2 Place half the clasp in a vise so that the three openings are pointing up. 3 Finish the bracelet with two-part epoxy and a magnetic clasp, as described in “Finishing techniques,” p. 16, keeping the following in mind: • Apply two-part epoxy all the way up to the beads but do not get it on or in the beads. • Insert the center braid into the center opening first, and then insert the side braids into the side openings. When all three braids are in position, hold in place while pushing the braids down into the clasp for several minutes. • Leave the clasp upright for one hour before gluing the other ends of the braids into the other half of the clasp. 4 Allow the epoxy to cure for 24 hours before wearing. w


Gallery

Twisted Silver Bracelet Two-drop kongoh braid made of metal seed beads and embellished with coiled sterling silver wire.

Adrienne Gaskell www.adriennegaskell.com

INSPIRATION

African Dreaming Armlet comprised of several kumihimo braids made of coated copper wire paired with a base and end caps of etched, forged, and formed sterling silver.

Giovanna Imperia www.giovannaimperia.com

Tassel Necklace Two-drop kongoh braid made of Japanese seed beads and Czech fire-polished beads.

Adrienne Gaskell www.adriennegaskell.com


Spiral Zigzag Metallic fiber worked in a zigzag pattern on a kumihimo plate.

Makiko Tada makikokumihimo@gmail.com http://www.texte.co.jp/makiko/books_en.html

Chrysocolla toursade Handwoven silk and cotton braids with sterling silver and chrysocolla.

Susan Basch www.susanbaschstudio.com

Ripples Hollow coated copper wire kumihimo necklace, flattened and hand-shaped with sterling tubing end caps and a commercial sterling clasp.

Giovanna Imperia www.giovannaimperia.com

50

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry


Amethyst Falls Sterling silver pendant with smoky quartz, tourmaline, and amethyst suspended from handwoven silk braids.

Susan Basch www.susanbaschstudio.com

Ruby Necklace Ruby stones and brass beads braided together and embellished with pearls and garnets, a hand made PMC silver ring, Japanese seed beads, metal bead fringe, and a marcasite ring.

Carolyn Kerr www.carolynkerr.com

INSPIRATION May 2016

51


Multistrand Braided Necklace Multiple silk braids, including Maru yatsu (round four-strand), Tsuri ito kaku yatsu (square eightstrand), and Tsuri ito Edo yatsu (round eight-strand) with Japanese seed beads, beaded end caps, sterling silver toggle, pearls, and a handmade PMC silver ring.

Carolyn Kerr www.carolynkerr.com

Chemistry Metallic fiber worked in a zigzag pattern on a marudai.

Makiko Tada makikokumihimo@gmail.com http://www.texte.co.jp/makiko/books_en.html

52

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry


Rain Forest Morning Twist-countertwist necklace of seed beads accented with drop beads, lentil beads, polymer clay leaves, a carved sloth focal, and sterling silver end caps and clasp.

Sheilah Cleary www.shebeads.com

Triple Spiral Necklace

INSPIRATION

Three beaded kumihimo ropes twisted together and finished with a custom beaded closure. Includes two-drop kongoh and continuous beaded braids made of Japanese seed beads and keshi pearls.

Adrienne Gaskell www.adriennegaskell.com

May 2016

53


Dragonfly necklace Incorporate crystal rondelles and dagger beads into a kumihimo rope, and watch the whimsy take flight. designed by Sally Battis

54

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry


Bead & cord layout

1

2

3

7

4

Cord 3:

Cord 5:

• 40 80 seed beads • Two 80s, one dagger, one crystal rondelle, four 80s. String this pattern a total of five times. • 36 80s

• 40 80s • Two 80s, one rondelle, five 80s. String this pattern a total of five times. • 36 80s

• 40 80s • One rondelle, seven 80s. String this pattern a total of five times. • 36 80s

Cord 4: • 40 80s

Cord 6:

• One 80, one rondelle, one dagger, five 80s. String this pattern a total of five times. • 36 80s

Cord 7:

Cord 2: 6

5

80 seed beads

• 40 80s • Two 80s, one rondelle, one dagger, four 80s. String this pattern a total of five times. • 36 80s

3 x 4 mm crystal rondelles 5 x 16 or 3 x 10 mm dagger beads

Setup

3 When all the beads have been

1 Cut four cords to 8 ft. (2.5 m)

incorporated into the braid, work ⁄ in. (1.3 cm) with just the cords. 4 Lift the braid from the marudai or disk. Finish the braid by binding and cutting the end or sealing the end of the braid with a cord burner (see “Binding or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 12).

each, and set up your marudai or disk for kongoh gumi (see “Kumihimo basics,” p. 9). If desired, apply cord stiffener to the end of each cord. 2 String each cord with the beads listed in the Bead & cord layout. Note that each cord should end with a total of 116 beads. After stringing each cord, wind the end of the cord around a bobbin or tama.

Braid 1 Work in kongoh gumi with just the cords (no beads) for about 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm). Make sure that you end with all the cords in their original positions, as in the Bead & cord layout. 2 Continue in two-drop kongoh, dropping one bead on each cord with each pair of cord movements.

KONGOH GUMI

8

Cord 1:

• 116 80s 116 80s Cord 8:

• 40 80s • Three 80s, one dagger, four 80s. String this pattern a total of five times. • 36 80s

Difficulty rating

12

Finishing Finish this bracelet with glue and crimp ends, as described in “Finishing techniques,” p. 16. Once the crimp ends have been attached, open a 4–6 mm jump ring, and attach one crimp end to a lobster claw clasp. w

DESIGN ALTERNATIVE This necklace features 5 x 16 mm dagger beads, and the dragonflies measure 11⁄4 in. (3.2 cm) across the wings. For smaller dragonflies, use 3 x 10 mm daggers.

Materials necklace 191 ⁄2 in. (49.5 cm)

• 20 5 x 16 mm or 3 x 10 mm dagger beads (black peacock) • 25 3 x 4 mm crystal rondelles (Swarovski 5040, jet) • 23 g 80 seed beads (Toho 112, transparent gray luster) • 1 lobster claw clasp • 2 3 mm inside diameter segmented crimp cord ends • 1 4–6 mm jump ring • C-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, gray) • Big Eye needle or cord stiffener • kumihimo disk with 8 plastic bobbins and counterweight; or marudai with 8 tama and counterweight • 1 10 mm or larger split ring • chopstick (if using a marudai) • 2 pairs of chainnose, flatnose, and/or bentnose pliers • cord burner (optional) • two-part epoxy and toothpick Kits for this necklace are available at http://stores.sallybeadjewelry.com.

Basic techniques,

p. 14 • overhand knot • opening and closing jump rings

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Cute as a button bracelet Combine traditional bead weaving with kumihimo to make a tidy button-loop closure for this bracelet. designed by Sonia Corbin-Davis

DESIGN ALTERNATIVE If desired, substitute a pre-fab shank button for the beaded button shown here. Before ending the braid, check that the 110 section is the right length to fit around the button, and add or remove 110s as necessary.

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry


Difficulty rating

10 mm crystal pearl

Materials

80 seed bead

purple bracelet 73 ⁄4 in. (19.7 cm)

figure 1

110 seed bead

a

a

b c

figure 2

figure 3

Beaded button 1 Attach a beading needle to 1 yd. (.9 m) of beading thread. Pick up a 10 mm pearl, leaving a 6-in. (15 cm) tail. Sew through the 10 mm again, creating a loop of thread around one side of the 10 mm (figure 1). Repeat to create a loop around the other side. 2 Work a round of brick stitch: • Pick up two 110 seed beads, sew under one loop of thread, and sew up through the second 110. Arrange the 110s side by side (figure 2, a–b). • Pick up an 110, sew under the same loop as before, and sew up through the 110 just added (b–c). Repeat this stitch around the entire loop and then around the other loop, creating a snug ring of approximately 17 110s around the 10 mm.

NOTE As you work around the 10 mm, the loops of thread may become loose. Pull on the 6-in. (15 cm) tail to tighten. 3 When you reach the first 110 in the ring, sew down through it, and sew up through the previous 110 to align them (figure 3). Retrace the thread path, and pull tight. 4 Notice the exposed thread between the 110s added in the previous round. These are called thread bridges, and you will work the next round of brick stitch off of them as follows:

figure 4

• Pick up two 80 seed beads, sew under the first thread bridge in the previous round, and sew up through the second 80. Arrange the 80s side by side (figure 4, a–b). • Pick up an 80, sew under the next thread bridge, and sew up through the 80 just added (b–c). Repeat this stitch to complete the round, adding 15 to 16 80s.

NOTE The idea is to create a snug ring of 80s around the 110s. If the 80s are so close to each other in places that the ring starts to buckle, skip over a thread bridge, and sew under the next one. 5 When you reach the first 80, sew down through it, and sew up through the previous 80 to align them. Then sew down through the first 80, the 110 below it, and the 10 mm, making sure you don’t sew through any beads on the other end. If you have a preference for which side of the 10 mm will be the back of the button, make sure you are exiting on the back at this time. 6 Pick up five 110s, an 80, and eight 110s. Sew through the 80 again to form the eight 110s into a loop (figure 5, back view and side view). The five 110s will make up the first “leg” of the back of the button, and the loop with be the shank. 7 Pick up five 110s, and sew through

• 1 10 mm crystal pearl (Swarovski, iridescent purple) • 9 g 80 seed beads (Toho 252, purple-lined blue) • 2 g 110 seed beads (Miyuki 574, lilac silver-lined alabaster) • C-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, medium blue) • nylon beading thread or Fireline • beading needles, #10 • tapestry or darning needle • kumihimo disk with 8 plastic bobbins and counterweight; or marudai with 8 tama and counterweight • chopstick (if using a marudai) • Fray Check

KONGOH GUMI

b c

gold iris bracelet colors

• 10 mm crystal pearl (Swarovski, magenta) • 80 seed beads (Miyuki 462, metallic gold iris) • 110 seed beads (Miyuki 191, gold plated) • C-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, gold) pink bracelet colors

• 10 mm crystal pearl (Swarovski, light green) • 80 seed beads (Miyuki 706, silverlined chartreuse; for button) • 80 seed beads (Toho PF552, permanent finish galvanized sweet blush; for bracelet) • 110 seed beads (Toho PF552, permanent finish galvanized sweet blush) • C-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, light green) Kits for this bracelet are available at www.thejewelryinstructor.etsy.com.

Basic techniques, p. 14 • ending thread • square knot

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c a

figure 5 back view

b figure 5 side view

the 10 mm again (figure 6), creating the second leg of the button.

NOTE Look carefully at the first two legs — they should follow the curve of the 10 mm without being tight against it. If the legs seem too long or too short, go back and increase or decrease the number of 110s that make up each leg. Retrace the thread path through the first leg, the 80, the second leg, and the 10 mm. Then sew through the first leg and the shank, exiting the 80. 8 Pick up five 110s, and sew through an 110 and an 80 in the brick stitch rounds to create the third leg, evenly spaced between the first and second legs (figure 7, a–b).

NOTE Remember to adjust the number of 110s in this leg if you did so before. Sew through the neighboring 80 and 110, retrace the thread path through the leg, and sew through the 80 your thread exited at the start of this step (b–c). Retrace the thread path of the shank, and exit the 80 again. 9 Work as in step 8 to create the fourth leg opposite the third. End the working thread and tail.

Setup 1 Cut four cords to 11⁄2 yd. (1.4 m) each. Center the shank of the button over all four cords. Apply cord stiffener to the end of each cord, allow to dry, and trim at an angle. 2 Feed the button through the center hole of the kumihimo disk or marudai, 58

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

figure 6

and attach the counterweight to the button shank, making sure that the button hangs straight down. Arrange the eight cords around the disk for kongoh gumi (see “Kumihimo basics,” p. 9). 3 String each cord with 42 80s and 18 110s.

NOTES • The 80s will make up the body of the bracelet and result in an approximately 61⁄2-in. (16.5 cm) braid. The 110s will form the button loop; the clasped button and loop will add 11⁄4 in. (3.2 cm) to the body of the bracelet. To change the length of the piece, string more or fewer 80s now, but hold off on stringing the 110s until you’ve braided the body of the bracelet and have determined that it’s the correct length. • If you’d like more color in the main body of the bracelet, choose a color pattern for the 80s from the options shown on p. 13 of “Kumihimo basics.”

4 After stringing each cord, wind it around a bobbin or tama.

Braid 1 Work four pairs of movements in kongoh gumi with just the cords (no beads). 2 Continue working in two-drop kongoh, dropping one bead on each cord with each pair of cord movements.

NOTE When you finish braiding the 80s, check that the body of the

figure 7

bracelet is the right length before braiding the 110s.

3 When all the beads have been incorporated into the braid, work four pairs of movements without beads. 4 Remove the bobbins. To prevent the braid from fraying, lift the next two cords that would be moved if you were to continue braiding, and tie them together with a square knot close to the end of the braid. Repeat with the next two cords that would be moved. Lift the braid from the disk.

Finishing 1 Thread a tapestry or darning needle over four cords. Form the 110 section of the braid into a loop, and sew through the braid where the 110s meet the 80s (photo). Repeat with the remaining four cords. 2 Working with one cord at a time, weave in and out of the braid down through the body of the bracelet. When the cord is secure, trim it close to the braid. Repeat with each of the remaining cords. 3 If there is cord showing where the button loop meets the body of the bracelet and you wish to disguise it, use a beading needle and nylon beading thread to add one bead at a time, covering the exposed cord. w


designed by Deborah Shipp

KONGOH GUMI

Seemingly seamless bangles

Work a kumihimo braid with long magatamas, whose unique profile allows you to stitch together the ends invisibly!

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Difficulty rating

figure 1

Materials blue/gunmetal bangle 81 ⁄4 in. (21 cm) circumference, 21 ⁄4 in. (5.7 cm) inner diameter

• 4 x 7 mm long magatamas (www.caravanbeads.com) - 20 g color A (Miyuki 451, gunmetal) - 20 g color B (Miyuki 283, noir-lined crystal AB) • S-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, black) • S-Lon D nylon beading thread • Big Eye needle or cord stiffener • beading needles, #10 • kumihimo disk with 8 plastic bobbins and counterweight; or marudai with 8 tama and counterweight • chopstick and painter’s tape (if using a marudai) • 1 10 mm or larger split ring • pliers or hemostat • cord burner • super glue (optional) purple/cream/silver bangle colors

• 4 x 7 mm long magatamas (www.caravanbeads.com) - 14 g color A (Miyuki 1884, violet gold luster) - 14 g color B (Miyuki 420, white pearl Ceylon) - 14 g color C (Miyuki 1051, galvanized silver)

figure 2

C

E

1

2

1

E 8

3 C

C 7

4 E

5

E

C

• 4 x 7 mm long magatamas (www.caravanbeads.com) - 10 g color A (Miyuki 138, transparent orange) - 10 g color B (Miyuki 140, transparent red orange) - 10 g color C (Miyuki 421, cream Ceylon) - 10 g color D (Miyuki 138FR, matte transparent orange AB)

3

7

4

5

4 x 7 mm long magatamas color A 4 x 7 mm long magatamas

color B

Setup 1 To determine the length of your braid, measure around your wrist, and add 21⁄4 in. (5.7 cm) to that length. For instance, a 6-in. (15 cm) wrist plus 21⁄4 in. (5.7 cm) equals an 81⁄4-in. (21 cm) braid; the instructions below are for this length. 2 Cut four cords to 50 in. (1.3 m) each, and set up your marudai or disk for kongoh gumi (See “Kumihimo basics,” p. 9). If desired, apply cord stiffener to the end of each cord, allow to dry, and trim at an angle. 3 String each cord with 40 long magatamas in your chosen pattern.

NOTE The holes of red/orange bangle colors

8

6 6

2

the magatamas are angled. On one side, the hole is near the center of the bead. Flip the bead over, and the hole is closer to the end of the

center hole

end hole

bead. Figure 1 shows which beads should be strung through the center hole (C) or through the end hole (E). For a two-tone bracelet, like the blue/ gunmetal bangle shown on p. 59, follow figure 2. To use three colors, as in the purple/cream/silver version, see figure 3. For four colors, like the red/orange bangle, refer to figure 4. 4 After stringing each cord, wind it around a bobbin or tama.

Braid 1 Work in kongoh gumi with just the cords (no beads) for about 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm). Make sure that you end with all the cords in their original positions, as in figures 1–4. 2 Continue in 2-drop kongoh, dropping one bead on each cord with each pair of moves.

NOTE The magatamas may spin on the cords as you drop them

Basic techniques, p. 14 • overhand knot • square knot • ending thread

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

a

b

c


figure 3

figure 4 1 1

2

3

7

4

8

3

7

4

6

KONGOH GUMI

8

6

2

5

5

4 x 7 mm long magatamas color A

4 x 7 mm long magatamas color A

color B

color B

color C

color C

color D

down to the braid. When you lock each bead under its crossing cord, check to make sure that the end without the hole is pointing outward. Hint: Imagine the top of the braid as a six-pointed star. If any of the beads appear to be distorting the star shape, use your finger to spin them on the cord before locking them under the crossing cord, or else lock them in place and then nudge them outward.

NOTE A cord burner will seal the

3 When all the beads have been incorporated into the braid, work 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm) with just the cords. 4 Lift the braid from the marudai or disk. Use a hemostat to grasp the unbeaded braid just above the beads. Make sure the pliers are as tight to the beads as possible. Use a thread burner to trim the braid (see “Binding or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 12) just beyond the pliers (photo a).

Join

cords together, securing the braid against fraying. Don’t have a cord burner? Dot super glue around the braid just beyond the pliers, allow to dry, and then trim. Repeat on the other end of the braid. Bring the ends of the braid together to check that you’ve trimmed close enough to the beads for the ends to mesh. Trim again, if necessary.

color patterns, and sew through two or three corresponding magatamas on the other end (photo c). 3 Turn, and sew back through the neighboring magatama, with your needle pointing toward the opposite end. Sew through beads as needed to exit this end of the braid, and then sew through two or more corresponding magatamas on the other end (photo d). Continue working in this manner (photo e) until the braid is joined all the way around.

1 Thread a beading needle on

NOTE Pull tight with each stitch,

24 in. (61 cm) of beading thread. Sew through the braid about two beads in from one end, leaving a 3-in. (7.6 cm) tail. Tie the working thread and tail together with a square knot. 2 Sew through the appropriate magatamas to exit a bead at the end of the braid (photo b). Align both ends of the braid, matching up any

but don’t let the join become too stiff. You want movement among the beads, so you can roll the bangle on and off your wrist.

4 When you reach the 3-in. (7.6 cm) tail, tie the working thread and tail together with a square knot, and end the thread in the beadwork. w

d

e

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Crystal cache necklace

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

Braid a bit of bling into any ensemble with Swarovski crystals strung on tough but ever-elegant flexible beading wire. designed by Sara Oehler


Bead stringing layout 6 mm saucer crystal 6 mm graphic cube crystal

KONGOH GUMI

8 mm graphic cube crystal

Setup

3 Feed the Bead Stopper through

For this project, you will be working with spools of flexible beading wire. Do not cut the wire from the spools until after the braid is complete. The spools will take the place of the bobbins or tama. 1 On each of the 10-ft. (3 m) spools, unspool several inches of wire, and string the following crystals: eight 6 mm saucers, four 6 mm cubes, two 8 mm cubes, four 6 mm cubes, and eight 6 mm saucers (Bead stringing layout). 2 Gather all eight wires. Line up the ends, and attach a Bead Stopper 2 in. (5 cm) from one end of the wires.

the hole of the kumihimo disk or marudai, and attach the counterweight. Arrange the eight wires around the disk for kongoh gumi (see “Kumihimo basics,” p. 9).

NOTE Pinch the wires between your fingers, and then fan them out into pairs. Spread the coils of the Bead Stopper, and slide each pair of wires between different coils (photo). If too many wires are between the same coils, they may slip out of the Bead Stopper while braiding. Pull on the Bead Stopper to make sure it’s secure. If desired, add a second Bead Stopper below the first for added security.

Difficulty rating

Materials Braid

necklace 22 in. (56 cm)

1 Work in kongoh gumi with

• Swarovski crystals (jet) - 16 8 mm graphic cubes (#5603) - 64 6 mm graphic cubes (#5603) - 128 6 mm saucers (#5305) • 1 toggle clasp • 2 3 x 3 mm crimp tubes • 8 10-ft. (3 m) spools Soft Flex Extreme Flex flexible beading wire, .014 (champagne) • Mighty Crimper crimping pliers • wire cutters • double density kumihimo disk or marudai with counterweight • 1–2 Bead Stoppers

just the wire (no crystals) for 63⁄4 in. (17.1 cm). 2 Continue braiding in two-drop kongoh, dropping one crystal on each wire with each pair of moves. 3 When all the crystals have been incorporated into the braid, work 63⁄4 in. (17.1 cm) with just the wire. 4 Pinch the end of the braid tightly, and lift it from the disk or marudai. Remove the spools.

Finishing 1 Over all eight wires, string a crimp tube and half of the clasp.

Basic techniques, p. 14 • crimping

NOTE Slide the crimp tube far enough down the wires so that it covers the loose bit of braid at the very end.

3 On the other end of the braid, remove the Bead Stopper, and repeat steps 1 and 2. w

Pass each wire back through the crimp tube, and pull tight to form even loops through the clasp. 2 Using Mighty Crimper crimping pliers, crimp the crimp tube. Trim the excess wires close to the end of the crimp.

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Focal bead bracelet Show off a favorite focal piece and your burgeoning braiding skills in a four-strand bracelet you can make tonight. designed by Shirley Moore

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry


Cord layout

Difficulty rating

1

color B cord

Materials

2

color A cord

gray/bronze bracelet, adjustable size

4

3

figure 1

figure 2

move A

move B

move A

This bracelet is worked as a four-cord braid called maru yatsu, which is explained in detail below.

Setup 1 Cut a color A and a color B cord to 24 in. (61 cm) each (double that length if you’re using a marudai). Line up the ends of the cords, and fold them in half. Slide the fold through one side of your focal, and pull all the ends through the fold for a lark’s head knot. This creates the four cords of your braid.

NOTE Try sliding the fold through the focal from back to front or from front to back to change the look of the lark’s head knot on the front of the focal. 2 Bring the cords up through the center hole of the kumihimo disk or marudai. Arrange the cords as shown in the Cord layout, noting the placement of the color A and color B cords. If using a marudai, attach each cord to a tama. Attach a 56 g counterweight to the focal.

Braid 1 Determine the desired length of your bracelet, and subtract the length of the focal and clasping elements. Divide this number in half to determine how long to make each braid. If you want to use an adjustable sliding clasp, as in the gray/bronze bracelet, see “macramé sliding knot,” p. 66 to determine how long to make your bracelet straps.

blue/green bracelet 71 ⁄2 in. (19.1 cm)

• 11⁄4-in. (3.2 cm) tree of life pendant, jump ring removed (www.ninadesigns.com) • 1 3⁄4 in. (1.9 cm) magnetic clasp (www.adriennegaskell.com) • 1 mm nylon Chinese knotting cord (www.jewelsinfiber.com) - color A (marina) - color B (verdigris) • two-part epoxy and toothpick

OTHER BRAID STRUCTURES

move B

• 1 35 mm shell donut (www.beadsandpieces.com) • 2 mm nylon satin rattail - color A (gray) - color B (bronze) • marudai with 8 tama and 240 g counterweight or kumihimo disk and 56 g counterweight • cord burner • E6000 adhesive or G-S Hypo Cement

pink/gray bracelet 91 ⁄2 in. (24.1 cm)

NOTE For example, the desired length of the blue/green bracelet was 71⁄2 in. (19.1 cm), so the math looked like this: 71⁄2 in. minus 2 in. (5 cm) for the focal and clasp equals 51⁄2 in. (14 cm). Dividing 51⁄2 by two equals 23⁄4 in. (7 cm). Therefore each braid in the blue/ green bracelet was worked to 23⁄4 in.

• 21⁄2-in. (6.4 cm) Tim Holtz Idea-ology word band focal (craft stores) • 1 8 mm magnetic clasp • 2 6 mm inside-diameter end caps with loops • 2 5 mm jump rings (silver) • 1.5 mm nylon (not rayon) satin cord (www.firemountaingems.com) - color A (pink) - color B (gray) • 2 pairs of chainnose, flatnose, and/or bentnose pliers • two-part epoxy and toothpick

2 Work the following cord movements:

Basic techniques, p. 14

• Move cord 1 to sit to the right of cord 3 (figure 1, move A). • Move cord 3 into the cord 1 position (figure 1, move B). • Move cord 4 to sit below cord 2 (figure 2, move A). • Move cord 2 into the cord 4 position (figure 2, move B).

• • • •

lark’s head knot overhand knot square knot opening and closing jump rings

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macramé sliding knot • “Reset” each cord to look like the original cord arrangement shown in the Cord layout. 3 Work as in step 2 until your braid is the length determined in step 1.

NOTE The cord burner will only work with nylon cord or rattail, not rayon.

NOTES If you’re using a disk, pinch the braid right below where the cords cross to keep the braid forming vertically rather than horizontally.

Finishing

4 When the braid is the desired length, lift the color A cords, and tie them with a square knot at the end of the braid. Repeat with the color B cords. 5 Lift the braid from the marudai or disk. Finish the braid by sealing the end with a cord burner (see “Binding or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 12).

6 Work the steps for “Setup” and “Braid” on the other side of your focal.

Finish your bracelet with an adjustable macramé knot (see sidebar at right) or with glue and end caps, as described in “Finishing techniques,” p. 16. Once the glue has dried, open two jump rings, and attach half of the clasp to each end cap. Alternatively, use glue and a magnetic clasp, as in the blue/green bracelet. w

DESIGN OPTION This pink and gray bracelet has a similar look but is made with 1.5 mm satin cord in an 8-strand square braid called edo yatsu. See p. 80 for the braid pattern. Start with two 24-in. (61 cm) cords in each of two colors, and set up the cords so that color A is in positions 1, 2, 5, and 6 and color B is in positions 3, 4, 7, and 8.

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

The gray/bronze bracelet features a macramé sliding knot in place of the end caps and clasp, which makes for a decorative and adjustable closure that looks beautiful with kumihimo braiding. If you choose this closure method, your braids will need to be long enough to overlap within the decorative sliding knot. The gray/bronze bracelet fits up to a 9–91 ⁄2 -in. (23–24.1 cm) wrist, and each braid measures 6 in. (15 cm) long. To make the macramé sliding knot: Cut 24 in. (61 cm) of cord (either color). Overlap the ends of your braids so they are parallel and pointing in opposite directions. Center the 24-in. (61 cm) cord around both braids, and work a macramé square knot by crossing the right cord over the two braids and under the left cord. Bring the left cord under the braids, through the loop on the right, and over the right cord. Pull tight, making sure the braids lie flat. Next, cross the left cord over the braids and under the right cord. Pass the right cord under the braids, through the loop on the left, and over the left cord. Tighten. Repeat to make a total of six or seven macramé square knots around both braids, and then tie an overhand knot at the end of each cord close to your work. Trim the excess cord, and seal each end knot with a cord burner. Apply E6000 adhesive or G-S Hypo Cement to each ending knot for extra security.


OTHER BRAID STRUCTURES

Lava rain necklace Highlight a trio of molten crystal drops and a bevy of other accents at the center of this hot braided necklace. designed by Jamie North

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Difficulty rating

Bead & cord layout

Materials

Kits are available at www.glitznkitz.com.

Basic techniques, p. 14 • overhand knot • wrapped loop

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

8 x 6 mm glass petal beads

A

necklace 19 in. (48 cm) plus chain extender

• raindrop pendants (Swarovski #6022, crystal red magma) - 1 24 mm - 2 14 mm • 15 8 x 6 mm glass petal beads (Czech, bronze) • 16 8 mm crystal rondelles (Swarovski #5040, crystal silver night) • 12 8 mm round beads, top drilled (onyx) • 15 6 mm drop beads (bronze) • 15 4 x 7 mm long magatamas (cranberry gold luster) • 17 4 mm round crystals (Swarovski #5000, crystal red magma) • 2 g 60 seed beads (Miyuki 304, garnet gold luster) • 16 g 80 seed beads (Miyuki 401, opaque black) • 1 15 mm lobster claw clasp • 1 2-in. (5 cm) head pin • 2 8 mm inside-diameter end caps • 6 in. (15 cm) 20-gauge wire • 3 in. (7.6 cm) chain, 6 mm links • 2 5 mm jump rings • S-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, black) • kumihimo disk (double-density foam recommended) with 8 plastic bobbins and counterweight • 2 pairs of chainnose, flatnose, and/or bentnose pliers • roundnose pliers • wire cutters • ball-point pen • cord stiffener of your choice • ruler

24 mm and 14 mm raindrop pendants

8 mm crystal rondelles

F

D

8 mm round beads, top drilled G

C

6 mm drop beads 4 x 7 mm long magatamas B

H

4 mm round crystals

E

60 seed beads 80 seed beads

Cord A: 45 80s, 16 60s, 45 80s Cord B: 45 80s, 16 4 mms, 45 80s Cord C: 45 80s, 15 long magatamas, 45 80s Cord D: 45 80s, 15 6 mm drops, 45 80s Cord E: 45 80s, 15 petals, 45 80s

Though not a traditional kumihimo braid as it didn’t originate in Japan, this seven-strand “fill-the-gap” braid looks a lot like kongoh gumi but the braid structure is different. This project was designed for a double-density foam kumihimo disk with a large center hole.

Cord F: 45 80s, three 8 mm rounds, one 14 mm raindrop, three 8 mm rounds, one 24 mm raindrop, three 8 mm rounds, one 14 mm raindrop, three 8 mm rounds, 45 80s Cord G: 45 80s, 15 rondelles, 45 80s

of your choice, allow to dry, and then trim the end of each cord at an angle.

NOTE Get expert insights from Jamie North and Sally Battis on the different products available for stiffening the ends of your cords by going to YouTube and searching the phrase “Stiffening cord ends.”

Setup 1 On the back of the kumihimo disk,

4 Feed the knot through the center

use a ball-point pen (not a felt-tip) and a ruler to draw four equally spaced lines all the way across the disk, dividing it like a pizza and connecting opposite slots. It doesn’t matter which slots are being connected as long as the disk is divided equally. This will be the top of your disk rather than the pre-printed side. 2 Mark the north-pointing line with an A. Moving counterclockwise, skip two lines, and mark the next line with a B. Repeat around the disk to mark lines C–H, as in figure 1. 3 Cut seven cords to 45 in. (1.1 m) each, and tie them at one end with an overhand knot. Stiffen the working end of each cord using the method

hole of the kumihimo disk, and arrange the cords around the disk in slots A–G, leaving slot H empty. Attach the counterweight to the knot.

Braid The cord movements for this braid follow the alphabet, and the cord you are moving always goes into the empty slot, hence the name “fill the gap.” 1 Position the disk so that cord A is in the top (noon) position. Move cord A to the empty H slot (figure 1). 2 Rotate the disk so that cord B cord is in the noon position. Move cord B to the empty A slot (figure 2).


figure 1

figure 2

figure 3

A

B F

D

G

E

C

B

H E

in the noon position. Move cord C to the empty B slot (figure 3). 4 Continue working in this manner until you have 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm) of unbeaded braid and the cords once again occupy slots A–G.

NOTE As you learn the cord movements, it will be helpful to rotate the kumihimo disk after each move so that the next cord to move is in the noon position. Once you’re familiar with the movements, you may not need to rotate the disk at all.

5 String each cord with the beads listed in the Bead & cord layout.

NOTE The bead counts result in a 19-in. (48 cm) necklace, not including the chain extender. Every 10 80 seed beads on each

F

D

H

C

A

A

E

D

F

cord will result in approximately 11⁄2 in. (3.8 cm) of braid, depending on individual braiding tension. To adjust the length of your necklace, add or omit the same number of 80s from each end of each cord.

6 After stringing each cord, wind the end around a bobbin. 7 Continue braiding, dropping one bead per cord movement. Keep in mind the following: • Make sure that each bead stays under the first cord crossed. • For the raindrop crystals, tuck the larger end into the center hole of the kumihimo disk first, and then lock the stung portion of the bead under the crossing cord. • Keep your cords taut, and ensure that the beads are being incorporated close to the core of the braid. • When you add the smaller beads, take the opportunity to “snug up” the braid.

H

B G

8 When all the beads have been incorporated into the braid, work another 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm) with just the cords. 9 Remove the bobbins, and lift the braid from the disk. Finish the braid by binding and cutting the end or sealing the end with a cord burner (see “Binding or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 12).

Finishing 1 Finish this necklace with wire and end caps as described in “Finishing techniques,” p. 16. 2 Cut a 3-in. (7.6 cm) piece of chain, open a jump ring, and attach the chain to one of the wrapped loops. Use another jump ring to attach a lobster claw clasp to the other wrapped loop. 3 On a head pin, string a 4 mm and a rondelle, and make the first half of a wrapped loop. Attach it to the end of the chain, and complete the wraps. w

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OTHER BRAID STRUCTURES

3 Rotate the disk so that cord C is

C G


Beaded majesty necklace Work with long strands of seed beads as if they were fiber cords for a new twist on a traditional square braid. designed by Rebecca Ann Combs

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry


Bead & cord layout

figure 1

move B 1

2

Difficulty rating

8

3

7

4

6

Materials necklace 20 in. (51 cm)

5

move A

110 seed beads, color A 110 seed beads, color B

Beads, clasp, and cord available at Design & Adorn Beading Studio, (520) 209-1900. Cord and clasp also available at www.kumihimostore.com.

a

Basic techniques, p. 14 b

c

This necklace is worked as a kaku yatsu “square” braid, which will be explained in detail below. It is made using beaded strands as though they were fiber (you do not move any beads while braiding) and a marudai is recommended to achieve a successful braid.

Setup 1 Cut four cords to 2 yd. (1.8 m) each. Line up the ends, fold all four cords in half, and tie an overhand knot near the

fold to create a loop (photo a) and the eight cords of your kaku yatsu braid. 2 Slide a chopstick through the loop, drop the chopstick down through the center hole of the marudai, and use painter’s tape to secure the chopstick to the underside of the marudai. Arrange the eight cords as shown (photo b), and attach 12 23-gram weights to the loop. 3 Using a Bead Spinner, string 24 in. (61 cm) of color A or color B 110 seed beads on each cord, as shown in the Bead & cord layout. At the end of each cord, attach an 80 seed bead as a stop bead. Adjust the position of the stop bead so that, for now, the 110s stay clear of the top of the marudai. Wind each beaded cord around a tama (photo c).

• overhand knot • attaching a stop bead

Braid 1 Remove the chopstick and all the painter’s tape. Work the following cord movements clockwise around the marudai with just the cords (no beads): • Move cord 6 to sit below cord 7 (figure 1, move A). • Move cord 2 to sit above cord 3 (figure 1, move B). • Move cord 7 into the cord 2 position (figure 2, move A). • Move cord 3 into the cord 6 position (figure 2, move B).

NOTE Since you are working on a marudai, you can work moves A and B of each figure at the same time, making move A with the left hand and move B with the right. May 2016

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OTHER BRAID STRUCTURES

• 8 80 seed beads (any color — will only be used as stop beads) • 110 seed beads - 16 g color A (Toho 455, goldlustered pale wisteria) - 16 g color B (Toho 1204, marbled opaque light blue amethyst) • 1 8 mm magnetic end cap clasp • S-Lon or C-Lon Micro Cord (Tex 70, purple) • Bead Spinner with needle • marudai with 8 70 g tama and 18 23 g weights • chopstick • painter’s tape • two-part epoxy and toothpick


figure 3

figure 2

move A

move B d

move A

move B

figure 4

figure 5

e

move A move B

2 Work the following cord movements counterclockwise around the marudai with just the cords: • Move cord 1 to sit above cord 8 (figure 3, move A). • Move cord 5 to sit below cord 4 (figure 3, move B). • Move cord 8 into the cord 5 position (figure 4, move A). • Move cord 4 into the cord 1 position (figure 4, move B). 3 “Reset” the cords to their original positions (figure 5). This completes one full kaku yatsu cycle. 4 Work as in steps 1–3 for 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm). 5 Unwind each tama, and adjust the stop bead on each cord to move the 110s up to the braid (photo d). Add six more 23-gram weights to the loop. 6 Continue working kaku yatsu cycles with the beaded cords.

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

NOTE Don’t allow any space between beads as you braid. If a strand begins to kink, loosen the tension by unwinding the tama or bobbin and adjusting the stop bead. When the beaded braid is 6–7 in. (15–18 cm) long, remove two of the 23-gram weights, and continue braiding. When the beaded braid is 12–13 in. (30–33 cm) long, remove two more weights. When the beaded braid is 17–18 in. (43–46 cm) long, remove two more weights. 7 Continue braiding until you’ve braided almost all the beads (photo e). Loosen the stop beads, and slide the stop beads and any extra 110s back down over the edge of the marudai (photo f).

f

8 Work with just the cords for 1⁄2 in. (1.3 cm) to match the starting end of the braid. 9 Lift the braid from the marudai. To prevent the braid from fraying, secure the loose ends of the cords with an overhand knot. Bind or seal the end of the braid (See Binding or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 12), and trim off the knot.

Finishing Finish the necklace with glue and a magnetic clasp, as described in “Finishing techniques,” p. 16. w


Pretty portholes bracelet Add Pellet beads to a ladder braid worked with embroidery thread for a brand-new window into kumihimo! designed by Pru McRae

OTHER BRAID STRUCTURES May 2016

73


Difficulty rating metallic embroidery thread nylon cord

Materials purple bracelet 7 ⁄ in. (19.1 cm) 12

• 4 x 6 mm Pellet beads (Preciosa) - 16–20 color A (amethyst) - 16–20 color B (jet lazure blue) • glue-in magnetic clasp with 5 mm inside-diameter opening • metallic 6-strand embroidery thread (DMC, purple ruby) • S-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, purple) • sewing thread (to match embroidery thread; for binding the ends) • kumihimo disk with counterweight • 1 10 mm or larger split ring • Bead Stopper (optional) • two-part epoxy and toothpick

Cord layout

figure 1 1

2

8

3

7

4

6

5

magenta bracelet colors

• 4 x 6 mm Pellet beads (Preciosa) - 16–20 color A (amethyst) - 16–20 color B (jet lazure blue) • metallic 6-strand embroidery thread (DMC, pink garnet) • S-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, pink) green bracelet colors

• 4 x 6 mm Pellet beads (Preciosa) - 16–20 color A (olivine) - 16–20 color B (jet green iris metallic) • metallic 6-strand embroidery thread (DMC, light green emerald) • S-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, green)

This bracelet begins as eight-cord kongoh gumi, and then transitions into a ladder braid, which is explained in detail below. While you can work this braid on a marudai, the instructions below are for the disk and refer to slot numbers into which the cords are moved. Disk designs vary, but for most disks, the number will be slightly to the right of the slot that is being referred to.

Setup 1 Cut eight pieces of metallic embroi-

Basic techniques, p. 14 • overhand knot • attaching a stop bead

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

dery thread (keeping all six strands together) to 24 in. (61 cm) each. Cut one piece of nylon cord to the same length. Tie one end of the threads and cord to a 10 mm or larger split ring. 2 Feed the ring through the center hole of the kumihimo disk. Arrange the eight threads around the disk for kongoh gumi (Kumihimo basics, p. 9), and then place the cord on top of the thread in position 6 as shown in the Cord layout. Attach the counterweight to the split ring.

Braid 1 Work in kongoh gumi for 1 in. (2.5 cm), moving the thread and cord in position 6 as one unit. Make sure that you end with all the threads in their original positions, as in the Cord layout. 2 Pick up just the cord (not the embroidery threads), and string 32 4 x 6 mm Pellet beads in an alternating pattern of a color A and a color B. Your bracelet may need up to 40 beads, depending on individual tension, but you can add beads later if necessary. Attach a stop bead or Bead Stopper to the end of the cord. 3 Turn the kumihimo disk so that the number 28 is at the top, and the threads form an X-shape. Position the beaded cord in an empty slot at the top of the disk (figure 1), keeping the beads below the disk for now. 4 Your braid will now split to begin the ladder braid, in which you’ll create the left and right sides of the ladder individually. Work the following movements with the threads on the left side of the disk: • Move the thread in slot 24 to slot 15 (figure 2).


figure 2

figure 6

figure 3

figure 7

figure 5

figure 8

• Move the thread in slot 26 to slot 9 (figure 9), inserting your thumbnail into the triangle-shaped opening formed at the center of the disk where this thread crosses thread 25. • Pick up the cord, and slide a bead down into the triangle-shaped opening, so that the apex of the triangle sits in the groove of the bead. Move the cord to an empty slot at the bottom of the disk. • Pull threads 25 and 9 so that the triangle grips the bead tightly.

NOTE You may need to lift each thread (one at a time) from its slot, pull almost straight up, and gently tug back and forth to achieve this. Replace the thread in its slot before repeating with the other thread. 7 To complete the join, work the following thread movements. These movements are mirror images of those worked in the previous step: • Move the thread in slot 32 to slot 31. • Move the thread in slot 16 to slot 32. • Move the thread in slot 31 to slot 16. • Move the cord to an empty slot at the top of the disk.

figure 9

• Check that the bead is sitting neatly between the left and right sides of the ladder, and pull threads 32 and 16 to tighten the join. 8 Work steps 4–7 for the desired length, adding beads to the cord if needed. 9 Turn the disk so that the number 32 is once again at the top of the disk. Remove any extra beads from the cord, and place it on top of a thread in one of the slots.

NOTE The cord doesn’t have to go back to slot 17, where it was before. Place it in any of the occupied slots where it looks best and least disturbs the braiding just completed. 10 Work a kongoh gumi braid for 1 in. (2.5 cm). 11 Lift the braid from the disk. To prevent the braid from fraying, secure the loose ends of the threads with an overhand knot.

Finishing Bind each end of the braid as described in “Binding or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 12. Finish this bracelet with glue and a magnetic clasp (“Finishing techniques,” p. 16). w

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OTHER BRAID STRUCTURES

• Move the thread in slot 16 to slot 24 (figure 3). • Move the thread in slot 25 to slot 18 (figure 4). • Move the thread in slot 17 to slot 25 (figure 5). • “Reset” the two bottom-left threads so that one is positioned on each side of the dot (figure 6). • Repeat all of these movements again. 5 Work the following movements with the threads on the right side of the disk. These movements are mirror images of those worked on the left side: • Move the thread in slot 1 to slot 10. • Move the thread in slot 9 to slot 1. • Move the thread in slot 32 to slot 7. • Move the thread in slot 8 to slot 32. • Reset the two bottom-right threads. • Repeat all of these movements again. 6 Next, you’ll begin to join the left and right sides of the ladder and add a bead between them. Work the following thread movements: • Move the thread in slot 25 to slot 26 (figure 7). • Move the thread in slot 9 to slot 25 (figure 8). This will look a bit awkward on the disk, but that’s okay.

figure 4


Layered lattice necklace Entwine two colors of cord into a peek-a-boo braid with beads, the perfect rope for showcasing a favorite pendant. designed by Deborah Shipp

76

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry


color A cord color B cord

Difficulty rating

Bead & cord layout 1

Materials

figure 1

50 2 3

50 16

necklace 20 in. (51 cm)

50

50 50

4

15

50 50

5 50

14

50 13

6 12

7 8

11

50

50 50

50

50

10 9

50

figure 2

figure 3

50

50

50

50 50

50 50 50 50 50

50

50

50

This necklace is worked as partially beaded 16-cord oimatsu braid, which will be explained in detail below.

NOTE To make stringing easier, you may wish to apply a cord stiffener to the end of each cord, allow to dry, and trim at an angle.

OTHER BRAID STRUCTURES

50

50

• 1 42 mm pendant with 9 mm inside-diameter bail (silver/turquoise) • 10 g 80 seed beads (Toho PF569F, permanent finish turquoise metallic matte) • 1 lobster claw clasp • 2 6 mm inside-diameter end caps with loops • 3 in. (7.6 cm) chain, 3 mm links • 2 5–6 mm jump rings • S-Lon nylon cord (Tex 400) - color A (aqua) - color B (olivine) • kumihimo disk with 16 plastic bobbins and 150 g counterweight; or marudai with 16 70 g tama and 450 g counterweight • 1 10 mm (or larger) split ring • chopstick and painter’s tape (if using a marudai) • 2 pairs of chainnose, flatnose, and/or bentnose pliers • hemostat or crimping pliers • scissors • cord burner • two-part epoxy and toothpick • cord stiffener (optional)

Basic techniques, p. 14 • overhand knot • opening and closing jump rings

Setup 1 Cut four color A and four color B

4 Wind each cord onto a bobbin

cords to 100 in. (2.5 m) each. Line up the ends, center them on a 10 mm or larger split ring, and tie them to the ring with an overhand knot. This creates the 16 cords of your oimatsu braid. 2 Feed the jump ring through the center hole of the kumihimo disk or marudai. If using a marudai, insert a chopstick into the ring, and tape the chopstick to the underside of the mirror. Attach the counterweight to the ring. 3 String the eight A cords with 50 80 seed beads each and arrange the cords as shown in the Bead & cord layout, noting the placement of the color A and color B cords.

or tama.

Braid 1 Remove the chopstick from the ring if you used one. Work the following movements clockwise around the disk or marudai with just the cords (no beads). • Move cord 1 into place above cord 5 and move cord 9 into place below cord 13 (figure 1). • Move cord 5 into the cord 9 position and move cord 13 into the cord 1 position (figure 2). • “Reset” the side pairs to look like the original cord arrangement (figure 3). 2 Work the following cord movements counterclockwise with just the cords. May 2016

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figure 4

figure 5

figure 6

50

50

50 50

50

50

50

50

50 50

50

50

50

50

50 50

50

50 50

50

figure 7

figure 8

50

50

50

figure 9

50

figure 10

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

• Move cord 2 into place above cord 14 and move cord 10 into place below cord 6 (figure 4). • Move cord 14 into the cord 10 position and move cord 6 into the cord 2 position (figure 5). • Reset the side pairs (figure 6). 3 Work steps 1 and 2 again. 4 Work the following cord movements clockwise with just the cords. • Move cord 15 into place above cord 3 and move cord 7 into place below cord 11 (figure 7). • Move cord 3 to the cord 7 position and cord 11 into the cord 15 position (figure 8). • Reset the diagonal pairs. 5 Work the following cord movements counterclockwise with just the cords. • Move cord 16 into position above cord 12 and move cord 8 into position below cord 4 (figure 9). • Move cord 12 into the cord 8 position and move cord 4 into the cord 16 position (figure 10). • Reset the diagonal pairs. 78

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

50

50

50

50 50

50

50

50 50

50

50

50 50

50

50

50

50

50

50

50 50

6 Work steps 4 and 5 again. This completes the unbeaded starting end of the braid.

NAME IT If it helps you understand the pattern, think of steps 1 and 2 as the vertical/horizontal sequence and steps 4 and 5 as the diagonal sequence.

7 Add the first round of beads as follows: • Repeat steps 1 and 2 with no beads. • Slide a bead up to the point of the braid on cords 1, 5, 9, and 13. The beads should rest next to the adjacent crossing cords (photo a). • Work the first movement of step 1 (photo b) and then the second movement of step 1 (photo c), noting that the beads will shift with the cords but they should not be allowed to “jump” any adjacent cords. • Work as in step 2 with just the cords, bringing the existing 80s in toward the center of the braid (photo d).

50

8 Add the second round of beads as follows: • Repeat steps 4 and 5 without beads. • Slide a bead up to the point of the braid on cords 3, 7, 11, and 15. The beads should rest next to the adjacent crossing cords. • Work as in step 4. Again, the beads should not be allowed to jump the adjacent cords (photo e). • Work as in step 5 with just the cords to bring the 80s in toward the center of the braid (photo f). 9 Alternate working steps 7 and 8 until all the 80s have been incorporated into the braid.

BRAIDING NOTES This is a tricky braid! Here are a few tips to keep in mind: • For each “round” of the beaded portion of the necklace, you will braid the first four pairs of moves without beads, move beads into place, and then braid the same four pairs of moves.


b

c

d

e

f

• This braid is like working two edo yatsu braids, moving the vertical/ horizontal pairs first and then moving the diagonal pairs. • As you work, you will need to move your counterweight up higher on your braid to maintain proper tension. • Watch your point of braiding closely. If you see the braid begin to come upward, add more counterweight to help pull it down.

OTHER BRAID STRUCTURES

a

Finishing 1 Center a pendant on the braid. 2 Finish this necklace with glue and end caps, as described in “Finishing techniques,” p. 16. Allow the glue to dry overnight before working step 3. 3 Cut a 3-in. (7.6 cm) piece of chain. Open a 5–6 mm jump ring, and attach the chain to one end cap. Open another jump ring, and attach a lobster claw clasp to the other end cap. w

10 To work the unbeaded end portion, repeat steps 1 and 2 twice without beads, and then work steps 4 and 5 twice without beads. 11 Lift the braid from the marudai or disk. Finish the braid by binding and cutting the end or sealing the end of the braid with a cord burner (see “Bind or sealing the end of a braid,” p. 12). Make sure you leave enough of the unbeaded braid to fit inside your end caps. Repeat on the other end of the braid.

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O-bead obsession bracelet

Contrast hip O-beads against a backdrop of colorful braided cord, then finish with your choice of two clasp options. designed by Carolyn Oliver Haushalter

80

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry


Difficulty rating figure 1

figure 2 2

Materials all bracelets

1 8

3

7

4

6

• kumihimo disk with 30 g counterweight • 1 10 mm or larger split ring • Bead Stoppers • Big Eye needle or cord stiffener • needle or pin

5

blue bracelet 81 ⁄2 in. (21.6 cm)

figure 3

figure 4

OTHER BRAID STRUCTURES

• 1 20 mm shank button (La Mode, antique silver; JoAnn Fabric and Craft Store) • 200 1 x 3.8 mm O-beads (jet AB) • S-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, Bermuda blue) • cord burner teal bracelet 81 ⁄2 in. (21.6 cm)

• 200 1 x 3.8 mm O-beads (crystal CAL) • 3.2 mm inside-diameter hook from hook-and-eye glue-in finding set (www.nottoto.etsy.com) • S-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, teal) • two-part epoxy and toothpick red bracelet 7 in. (18 cm)

This bracelet is an edo yatsu braid, which is explained in detail below. While this braid can be made on a marudai, a disk is recommended in this case because the finishing steps work better on a disk than a marudai.

the disk as shown (photo a). Allow the shorter cords to hang down with the knot, winding them onto a bobbin if desired. Attach the counterweight to the ring.

• • • •

160 4 mm Quad Beads (full chrome) 1 20 mm shank button S-Lon nylon cord (Tex 210, red) cord burner

Basic techniques, p. 14 • square knot

Buttonhole braid Setup for buttonhole braid 1 Cut eight cords to 45 in. (1.1 m) each. If desired, apply cord stiffener to each end of each cord. 2 Gather together the cords, line up the ends, and find the center of the cords. About 5 in. (13 cm) away from the center point, tie all eight cords to a 10 mm or larger split ring. You will now have eight longer cord ends and eight shorter cord ends. 3 Feed the ring and the short ends through the hole of the kumihimo disk. Arrange the eight longer cords around

Before stringing any beads, you will work an unbeaded braid to form the buttonhole or “eye” for either a button or hook clasp. 1 Work the following cord movements clockwise around the disk: • Move cord 1 to sit above cord 3 (figure 1). • Move cord 3 to slot sit to the right of cord 5 (figure 2). • Move cord 5 to sit below cord 7 (figure 3). • Move cord 7 to the cord 1 position (figure 4).

a

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figure 5

figure 7

2 Work the following cord movements counterclockwise around the disk: • Move cord 2 to sit above cord 8 (figure 5). • Move cord 8 to sit to the left of cord 6 (figure 6). • Move cord 6 to sit below cord 4 (figure 7). • Move cord 4 to the cord 2 position (figure 8). 3 “Reset” the cords to their original positions (figure 9). This completes one full edo yatsu cycle. 4 Work as in steps 1–3 until the unbeaded braid is long enough to loop around your button or hook clasp.

NOTES • To avoid irregularities in the unbeaded braid, keep your tension as even as possible by seating each cord all the way into each slot. • If using a button clasp, the unbeaded braid should be long enough to wrap completely 82

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

figure 6

figure 8

figure 9

around the button plus 4 mm of extra braid for ease of clasping.

Setup for beaded braid 1 Keeping the cords in position on the top of the disk, remove the counterweight, and untie the overhand knot from the split ring. Bring a pair of the shorter cords up between cords 1 and 2. Place one shorter cord in each of these positions so that there are now two cords per position. Repeat with the remaining shorter cords (photo b), forming the unbeaded braid into a loop below the disk. Attach the counterweight to the loop. 2 String 50 O-beads over both of the position 1 cords. The cords won’t be the same length; that’s okay. Working with both cords together, tie an overhand knot toward the end of the cords (photo c). Repeat for the position 3 cords, the position 5 cords, and the position 7 cords, leaving the remaining cords without beads.

NOTE These bead counts result in a 71⁄4-in. (18.4 cm) beaded braid, not including the clasping elements. To make your bracelet longer or shorter, add or omit seven O-beads on each cord for each inch you wish to add or subtract. Beaded braid 1 Work one full edo yatsu cycle as in steps 1–3 of “Buttonhole braid” with just the cords (no beads) and moving both cords in each slot as a single unit. 2 Work the first four cord movements of an edo yatsu cycle, but when you move each pair of cords, drop one O-bead down into the “corner” formed by the next two pairs of cords (photo d). 3 Work the last four cord movements of an edo yatsu cycle, making sure that each pair of cords goes to the outside of each O-bead, snugging the O-beads toward the center of the braid (photo e).


c

d

e

f

g

4 Work as in steps 2 and 3 until all the beads have been incorporated into the braid.

NOTE If any of the O-beads become buried inside the braid, use a needle or pin to pull them to the outside. 5 Work one full edo yatsu cycle with just the cords. 6 Untie the overhand knot on the position 1 cords. Separate the shorter position 1 cord and the shorter position 2 cord, and feed them down between the longer position 1 and position 2 cords. Repeat around the disk, feeding the shorter cords between their corresponding longer cords (photo f).

NOTE To keep the shorter cords taut and out of the way, add a bit of weight to them by gathering the four shorter cords and attaching one or two Bead Stoppers.

and 5, cross the cords through the shank of the button, and tie them together with a half knot (photo g) close to the top of the braid. Repeat with cords 3 and 7, cords 2 and 6, and cords 4 and 8. You’ll need to keep the knots loose until you get all the cords through the button. When the knots are tied, gently pull each pair of cords to tighten the knots within the shank of the button. 3 When all the knots are tight, place the tip of a cord burner at the base of a cord, and turn on the cord burner to trim and seal the cord. Repeat for all the remaining cords, including the short cords hanging between the button and the braid.

NOTE For cleaner cuts, feed each cord through the opening of the cord burner, turn on the cord burner, and pull the tool and the cord in opposite directions. Finishing: Hook clasp 1 With the remaining cords, work two

Finishing: Button clasp 1 With the remaining cords, work two full edo yatsu cycles to make a “stub” for attaching the button. 2 Remove the counterweight but not the Bead Stoppers. Pick up cords 1

full edo yatsu cycles to make a “stub” for attaching the hook clasp. 2 Remove the counterweight but not the Bead Stoppers. Pick up cords 1 and 5, and tie them together with a square knot close to the top of

h

the braid (photo h). Repeat with cords 3 and 7, cords 2 and 6, and cords 4 and 8. 3 Place the tip of a cord burner at the base of a cord, and turn on the cord burner to trim and seal the cord. Repeat for all the remaining cords, including the short cords hanging between the hook and the braid. 4 Mix the adhesive according to the manufacturer’s directions. Use a toothpick to apply adhesive to the stub made in step 1 as well as inside the opening of the hook clasp. Slide the stub inside the hook, and hold in place for one minute. Allow the adhesive to dry for 24 to 48 hours before wearing. w

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OTHER BRAID STRUCTURES

b


Seafoam necklace

Braid strands of beads that seem to capture other strands of beads, and then reverse the pattern for a total color transformation. designed by Sheilah E. Cleary

84

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry


Difficulty rating

Materials

a

This necklace is worked as a 12-strand “twist and countertwist” braid using nylon beading thread rather than cord. The piece was designed to be made on a marudai, because you’ll need to use both hands when working thread movements. If you wish to use a kumihimo disk, attach it to a My Kumi Stand from Maggie T. Designs.

sea foam necklace 211 ⁄2 in. (54.6 cm) b

Necklace setup 1 Cut six pieces of color A thread

NOTE For best results, choose thread colors that match your 110 seed beads. Line up the ends, and find the center of the threads. Tie an overhand knot with all 12 threads about 11⁄2 in. (3.8 cm) away from the center point. You will now have 12 longer threads and 12 shorter threads. Wind all of the longer threads onto a single bobbin to keep them out of the way for now. 2 Thread a needle on one of the shorter color A threads, and string 14 in. (36 cm) of color A 110s.

NOTE This is a great job for a Bead Spinner, if you have one! 3 Remove the needle from the thread. Slide the last 110 away from the others, and tie a loose overhand knot above it. Keeping the bead in the “belly” of the knot, tighten the knot so that the bead turns perpendicular to the others (photo a). This is your stop bead.

NOTE In this project, a knotted stop bead is preferable to a sew-through stop bead. A sew-through stop bead won’t provide enough tension, and if you split the thread when sewing through the bead, you’ll have a mess when removing it later.

c

Insert the eye of the needle into the stop bead, and slide it back against the other beads, gently snugging them to the knot tied in step 1. 4 Wind the beaded thread onto a bobbin, noting the direction you wind (clockwise or counterclockwise), and close the bobbin. 5 Repeat steps 2–4 with the remaining color A threads, winding all the bobbins in the same direction. Snap together all the A bobbins as you prepare the threads, forming a stack of six bobbins (photo b). 6 String the six color B threads with B 110s, attach the bobbins, and snap them together to form their own stack. 7 Remove the single bobbin from the longer threads, and make a slip knot with these threads as close to the overhand knot as possible (photo c). Set the bobbin stacks on top of the marudai, and feed the longer threads and slip knot down through the center hole. Drop the chopstick down through the marudai, slide it through the slip knot, and tighten the knot so that the chopstick is captured under the mirror. Keep the slip knot as close to the overhand knot as you can. 8 Roll each stack of bobbins to release enough beaded thread that the stacks drop over the edge of the marudai. (This is why you wound the bobbins in

Lampworked beads available from Sheilah Cleary, shebeads@aol.com. sea foam bracelet 101 ⁄2 in. (26.7 cm)

• 110 seed beads (same colors as necklace) - 11 g color A - 11 g color B • 1 toggle clasp • 2 16 mm cones with 8 mm insidediameter opening • 2 21⁄2-in. (6.4 cm) eye pins • Nymo nylon beading thread, size D - color A (to match color A 110s) - color B (to match color B 110s)

OTHER BRAID STRUCTURES

and six pieces of color B thread to 3 yd. (2.7 m) each.

• large-hole accent beads - 1 37 mm lampworked bead - 2 9 x 13 mm lampworked rondelles - 2 4 x 7 mm bead caps - 4 2 x 8 mm spacers • 110 seed beads - 26 g color A (Miyuki 2028, matte opaque seafoam) - 26 g color B (Miyuki 551, gilt-lined opal) • 1 22 mm hook clasp • 2 16 mm cones with 8 mm insidediameter opening • 2 21⁄2-in. (6.4 cm) eye pins • 2 8 mm jump rings • Nymo nylon beading thread, size D - color A (to match color A 110s) - color B (to match color B 110s) • beading needles, #10 • marudai with chopstick, 13 plastic bobbins, 12 85-gram tama, and counterweight; or kumihimo disk with My Kumi Stand (www.maggiet designs.etsy.com), 13 plastic bobbins, and counterweight • 2 pairs of chainnose, flatnose, and/or bentnose pliers • roundnose pliers • wire cutters • Bead Spinner (optional) • G-S Hypo Cement


color A

Bead & cord layout, braid 1

LH

color B

figure 2

RH

LH

RH

LH

RH

LH

1

6

1

6

1

6

LH

RH

2

5

2

RH

LH

5

2

RH 5

RH 3

4 RH

RH 3

4 RH

RH 3

4 RH

LH 4

3 LH

LH 4

3 LH

LH 4

3 LH

5

2

5

2

5

2

LH

RH

LH

RH

LH

RH

6

1

RH

LH

the same direction.) Separate the bobbins, and arrange the beaded threads as shown in the Bead & cord layout, braid 1, noting the placement of the color A and color B threads.

NOTES If using a kumihimo disk mounted to a My Kumi Stand, don’t worry about the number of slots between threads. Just make sure that for every thread there is another thread of the same color in the same approximate position on the opposite side of the disk. Also, check that there aren’t any gaps between the beads. If there are, unwind the bobbin, slide the stop bead up a bit, and re-wind. If using a traditional marudai, place the counterweight on the center of the marudai to hold the threads in place while you replace the bobbins with tama. Make sure there are no gaps between beads. 9 Attach the counterweight to the slip knot, and remove the chopstick. Make sure that all 12 beaded threads are still in the correct position.

Necklace braid 1 In the following steps, you’ll work two thread movements at a time, one with each hand. Each thread is numbered in the order you’ll move it and also labeled RH for right hand and LH for left hand. 1 Work the following thread movements: • Pick up both 1 threads, and move 86

figure 1

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

6

1

RH

LH

them clockwise to switch positions (figure 1). • Pick up both 2 threads, and move them counterclockwise to switch positions (figure 2). • Pick up both 3 threads, and move them clockwise to switch positions. • Pick up both 4 threads, and move them counterclockwise to switch positions. • Pick up both 5 threads, and move them clockwise to switch positions. • Pick up both 6 threads, and move them counterclockwise to switch positions. 2 Continue working as in step 1, picking up threads in numeric order and alternating between clockwise and counterclockwise movements. Keep in mind the following: • Make each thread movement low and close to the surface of the marudai. • Watch the point of the braid closely to be sure that it remains in the same position. If the point of the braid is too low, your braid will be loose. • Remove a little weight after every few inches you braid. • Keep an eye on the tension of the beaded threads. If a thread begins to kink, unwind the tama or bobbin, and slide the stop bead down a small amount — no more than the height of a single 110. Rewind the tama or bobbin, and continue working. 3 When the braid is the desired length, unwind each tama or bobbin. Insert the eye of a needle into each stop bead, and slide it down toward the

6

1

RH

LH

tama or bobbin. Do the same for any extra 110s. Re-wind all the tama or bobbins, capturing the stop beads and extra 110s in the wraps. Make sure that the color A and B threads are placed in the same position as when you left off braiding. 4 Continue braiding with just the threads for 1⁄4–1⁄2 in. (6–13 mm). 5 With one hand, slide all the tama or bobbins together around the top of the marudai, and then pinch the very top of the unbeaded braid. With your other hand, remove the counterweight from below the marudai. Pull the braid up through the center hole, and place everything on your work surface while still pinching the top of the braid. Cut the threads about 6 in. (15 cm) from the pinch point, and then tie an overhand knot over the unbeaded braid near where the beads left off. Do not trim the excess thread beyond the knot.

Accent beads Untie the slip knot made with the longer threads; do not untie the overhand knot separating these threads from the braid just completed. Holding the ends of the threads together, string your desired pattern of accent beads.

NOTE The bead pattern shown in the sea foam necklace is as follows: 2 x 8 mm spacer, 9 x 13 mm lampworked rondelle, spacer, 4 x 7 mm bead cap, 37 mm lampworked bead, end cap, spacer, rondelle, spacer.


Bead & cord layout, braid 2

LH

RH

LH

1

6

5 Work as in step 1 of “Necklace braid

RH 5

2

RH 3

4 RH

LH 4

3 LH 5

2

LH

RH

6

1

RH

LH

With all 12 threads, tie an overhand knot as close to the final bead as possible.

Necklace braid 2 removed from the counterweight while making the first braid. Furthermore, remove additional weight from the counterweight equaling the weight of your accent beads. This will be your counterweight for the second braid. 2 Work as in steps 2–4 of “Necklace setup” to string each thread with beads, snugging the beads gently to the overhand knot tied after the accent beads. Attach the bobbins as before, and snap them into stacks. 3 Feed the completed braid down through the center of the marudai, and roll the stacks of bobbins to release enough beaded thread that the stacks drop over the edge. Separate the bobbins, and arrange the threads as shown in the Bead & cord layout, braid 2. Make sure there are no gaps between beads.

Finishing

Basic techniques, p. 14 • • • • •

overhand knot square knot slip knot wrapped loop opening and closing jump rings

hand knot 6 in. (15 cm) from one end. String each longer thread with 12 in. (30 cm) of 110s; attach and stack the bobbins as for the necklace. Arrange the threads as in Bead & cord layout, braid 1 or Bead & cord layout, braid 2, depending on which look you like best. Start and end with 1⁄4–1⁄2 in. (6–13 mm) of unbeaded braid, and work the beaded portion as before. Follow the steps for “Finishing,” but substitute a toggle clasp for a more secure bracelet closure. w

1 On one end of the necklace, string the eye of an eye pin over all 12 threads. Bring the eye down to the overhand knot on this end, and tie two more overhand knots around the eye to secure it in place. Apply G-S Hypo Cement to the knots, and allow to dry. Trim the excess thread close to the knots. 2 String a 16 mm cone onto the eye pin, and make a wrapped loop. 3 Repeat steps 1 and 2 on the other end of the necklace. 4 Open an 8 mm jump ring, and attach a hook clasp to one of the wrapped loops. Attach another jump ring to the other wrapped loop.

Bracelet

NOTE If using a marudai, once again place the counterweight on the center of the marudai to hold the threads in place while you replace the bobbins with tama.

To make a matching bracelet, cut the color A and color B threads to 1 yd. (.9 m) each, and tie the over-

DESIGN OPTION 4 To attach the counterweight, cut a 3 x 1-in. (7.6 x 2.5 cm) piece of leather, and make a lengthwise slit down the middle. Wrap this strap around the finished braid, and pass one end of the strap through the slit. Hang the weight bag from this strap.

For a different look, arrange all the color A strands as strands 1–6 on one side and all the color B strands as strands 1–6 on the other side. This will cause the two colors to segregate into separate bundles as they are braided together. May 2016

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OTHER BRAID STRUCTURES

1 Do not replace any of the weight you

1” to create the second braid. Keep in mind the following: • Where you previously picked up and moved color B threads, you will now be working with color A threads, and vice versa. You will still move the threads in the same order and in the same direction as described in “Necklace braid 1.” • Measure your braid regularly to make sure it doesn’t get too long. • When the counterweight approaches the bottom of the marudai or My Kumi Stand, move the counterweight up. • Watch the point of the braid to make sure you have the same braiding tension as with the first braid. • Adjust the tension of the beaded threads as needed, each time moving the stop bead down no more than the height of a single 110. 6 Work as in steps 3–5 of “Necklace braid 1” to complete the second braid.


BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCE

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ERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT

OTHER BRAID STRUCTURES

Kumihimo Jewelry SIMPLIFIED Learn to Braid with a Kumihimo Disk

Get more kumihimo in this new book! Get a sneak peek into Rebecca Rebecca Ann Combs Comb’s new book, Kumihimo Jewelry Simplified. This project is from her chapter on the Naiki gumi braid, which Rebecca refers to as a “16-warp hollow braid.” This braid structure is related to the Edo yatsu braid, which Rebecca calls the “basketweave braid,” but has twice as many cords. This is an unbeaded design that features 2 mm satin rattail, which can be found at craft stores and online merchants, including Rebecca’s store, www.kumihimostore.com. Get the book at www.JewelryandBeadingStore.com.

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BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCE

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ERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT

OTHER BRAID STRUCTURES May 2016

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BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCE

l k j 29 t 26

1 t 30

28 t 32

o n m 25 t 22 this direction! Almost there! One more e the adjacent tak to Use your left hand or and place it ghb nei its r warp, jump ove warp (j). to the left of the very top plete the Now we’re going to com nd of counterrou a sequence by doing r left hand you e Us . ves clockwise mo warp; it’s to pick up the top-right tos. Moving blue in the example pho it above the k counter-clockwise, loc (k). rps next group of wa k up the Use your left hand to pic e. Moving blu adjacent warp; it’s also r one warp ove p jum counter-clockwise, up of gro t nex the ve and lock it abo warps (l).

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

21 t 18 ockwise Keep moving counter-cl pick up the to d and use your left han over one gray p jum rp, wa adjacent blue above the next warp, and lock in place blue warp (m). k up the Use your left hand to pic over one p jum rp, wa e adjacent blu to the left ce pla in k loc and rp, gray wa of the next blue warp (n). hands. Hold This is where we switch d and use han left r you h the disk wit up the adjacent your right hand to pick r-clockwise, nte blue warp. Moving cou rp and lock in wa y gra t jump over the nex rp (o). wa e blu t nex place below the

17 t 14


ERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT • BOOK EXCERPT

r q p 5t1

9t6

13 t 10

OTHER BRAID STRUCTURES

u t s

pick up the Use your right hand to p over one warp adjacent blue warp, jum the next blue and lock in place below warp (p). e, use your Moving counter-clockwis acent blue warp, right hand to lift the adj and lock in rp, jump over the gray wa warp (q). e blu t nex place below the t hand to lift Ok, last one! Use your righ p over the jum the adjacent blue warp, t of the righ the to k gray warp, and loc (r). very top warp

sequences, you After braiding about five at the point of can see a well is forming braiding (t). the core. Cut an This is where we’ll add and shove it 8" piece of plastic tubing m here on Fro down into the braid (u). the tubing. und aro g out, we’ll be braidin to stay up ugh eno f stif Conveniently, it’s most part, but and out of the way for the in place for a you may need to hold it few sequences early on.

cklace Finishing the Ne

necklace (the Slide your bail onto the n glue a the part with the core) and of the braid. end h eac 10mm endcap to 1 " of chain to Allow to dry. Attach 5 ⁄2 all jump ring. each endcap using a sm gle clasp to Attach one half of a tog using a small in each loose end of cha

will be As you braid, the tubing fiber and the by d ere cov completely reach the won’t be visible. Once you the hollow for ce uen seq the at least t’s for id tha Well end of the tubing, bra read it than to to make the nt wa t jus braid. It takes longer to another inch if you but each move cords if the of end the do it. It’s lots of moves, il unt necklace or r one ove p jum t Jus e. o. sam et, als When is really the you’re making the bracel k to the dis the et res to e sur the braid from warp. Be finished braiding, remove beginning the ore bef n itio nd knot. Bind pos g rha rtin ove sta disk and tie an this by scooting the making the If e. cor sequence again. You do the t tightly just pas ser to a dot to es on the flat tim re mo each warp one spot clo two d bracelet, bin ile wh de ma you s gap the at each end of close up all part of the braid, once (s). gth. g len braidin your desired bracelet

jump ring.

elet Finishing the Brac h end of eac o ont endcap

Glue an 8mm the flat braid onto the flat braid. I just fold nd endcaps. itself to help it fit in the rou gle clasp using Allow to dry. Attach a tog small jump rings.

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Kumihimo resources Societies, guilds, and groups

Handweaver’s Guild of America (HGA)

Braid Society

For those interested in all varieties of fiber arts, including weaving, felting, spinning, dying, and more, HGA was founded in 1969 and has an international membership. They host a biennial week-long conference with seminars, classes, and workshops in a variety of techniques, including a few kumihimo classes. This year’s conference is being held July 30– August 6 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and includes sessions by renown kumihimo artist Jacqui Carey. Membership in HGA is required for registration in a class. Learn more at www.weavespindye.org.

An online organization based in the UK, the Braid Society was founded in 1993 and promotes the art and craft of braiding in its many forms, including kumihimo, Peruvian braiding, loop braiding, inkle weaving, and more. Membership is open to everyone, and members receive a quarterly newsletter and annual journal. The society holds some events, mostly in the UK, including an annual international conference with seminars and classes. This year’s conference is not in the UK — it will be held July 24–30, 2016, in Tacoma, Washington. Visit www.braidsociety.com for more information. While on the site, be sure to check out the galleries of their past traveling exhibits, which feature amazing braided objects, accessories, and jewelry.

American Kumihimo Society Founded in 2016 for the purpose of furthering the art and craft of kumihimo, this new nonprofit organization is working on launching a rich website with a registry for kumihimo supplies, lists of classes, kumihimo terminology, and more. Future plans include a 2017 national conference, a teacher certification program, publication of an annual journal, and assistance for those wanting to start up local kumihimo groups. Visit www.amksoc.org for more. 94

Facebook Replacing yesteryear’s forums, Facebook has become a great place for people to virtually congregate and share ideas, info, and more on just about any topic under the sun. Type “kumihimo” into the search bar, and you’ll find a number of kumihimo groups to join, including: • Kumihimo Beaded Braids • Beaded Kumihimo – The Next Step • Kumihimo New Dimensions

Design apps & websites Craft Design Online A free and handy website, www.craftdesignonline.com gives you the ability to design your own braid patterns. With more than 25 patterns already avail-

Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry

able, the site allows users to customize the patterns with colors of their own choosing. Instructions for each braid structure are given for both the disk and the marudai. This site will not, however, create designs for beaded kumihimo (unless each cord uses beads of only one color) because the software allows only a single color per cord position.

Kumihimo Bead Designer This app is great for designing your own 2-drop kongoh patterns with 8, 12, or 16 cords. When you create a new pattern, you choose how many cords you want the pattern to use and how many beads will be on each cord. The app then reproduces a virtual kumihimo rope that you can rotate with a touch of the finger. An interactive palette allows you to fill each bead with your chosen color. When your pattern is complete, another touch of a button produces the stringing pattern for each cord. The program is very easy to learn. Available in the Apple app store and Google Play.

Beaded Kongo Gumi (BKG) Pattern Maker For PC users, the BKG Pattern Maker is an Excel add-in that also allows you to create beaded kumihimo designs, bead by bead. Users see a flat representation of the 2-drop kongoh braid (braid chart) and the accompanying bead loading chart, both on the same screen. The design can be created on the braid chart or the bead loading chart, which also includes a measurement indicator so you know how long of a piece your pattern will create. BKG is available at www.pacificpatina.com.

Suppliers Gesswein Suppliers to the jewelry casting industry, Gesswein offers the Speedy Wax Super Pen. Heating quickly to 2400°, this bad boy will easily burn through and seal even the thickest kumihimo braids. www.gesswein.com Braider’s Hand Kumihimo resources, supplies, and tools, including made-in America marudai and tama, books, braiding fibers, and more. www.braidershand.com


Maggie T Designs “My Kumi Stand” is a tangle-free, compact, and portable station that allows you to work kumihimo with both hands as you would on a marudai but also lets you use a disk for tracking your moves. It includes a removable storage container for tools and supplies, a ruler running along the edge, and a handy dowel where you can stack your bobbins (bobbins not included). It even comes in its own carrying case. www. maggietdesigns.etsy.com Fiber Artist Supply Co. Solid maple marudai with leg extensions, large tama for beads, and more. www.fiberartistsupply.com Kumihimo To Go Disks, kits, lots of fibers, books, beads, and more. www.accentbead.com

in a straight line. Packaged with access to complete instructions, a how-to video, and a necklace tutorial at www.prumihimo.com.

Kumihimo handle One of the difficulties of using a kumihimo disk is the hand fatigue you can develop from gripping the

Barron’s ISBN: 978-0-7641-6643-3 www.barronseduc.com

disk. The Beadsmith, manufacturer and distributor of a wide range of beading supplies, addresses that problem with the Kumi Handle, which can be inserted into a Beadsmith disk for easier braiding (caution — it is not compatible with other disks). Originally released in an opaque purple color, it now comes in clear plastic so you can evaluate your braid as you work. Find it at local bead shops or online at www.beadkraft.com.

Books and DVDs Twist, Turn & Tie 50 Japanese Kumihimo Braids

Kumihimo Jewelry Simplified By Rebecca Ann Combs Focusing mainly on fiber-only braids, Rebecca’s newest book includes excellent coverage of kumihimo basics, 24 projects (four projects in each of five different braid structures plus four that combine different braids), and fabulous troubleshooting tips throughout. This book is an exciting addition to any braider’s library.

Learn Beaded Kumihimo on the Marudai and More Beaded Kumihimo on the Marudai By Adrienne Gaskell Want to see the marudai in action? These two new videos from master kumihimo teacher Adrienne Gaskell teach all the ins and outs of braiding on the marudai, including terminology, set up, braiding, and finishing. The first disk (Learn Beaded Kumihimo on the Marudai) is a great introduction if you’re relatively new to the marudai and want to understand the 2-drop kongoh structure. More Beaded Kumihimo on the Marudai includes a refresher on the marudai set up but then gets into more advanced techniques, like how to prep and braid edo yatsu, kaku yatsu, hira kara, and ridged spiral continuous beaded braids.

www.JewelryandBeadingStore.com or www.adriennegaskell.com

Kalmbach Books ISBN 978-1-62700-227-1 www.JewelryandBeadingStore.com May 2016

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RESOURCES

New Prumihimo disk UK kumihimo artist Pru McRae (see her “Pretty portholes” bracelet, p. 73) has developed a new disk that is specifically for making braids with beads positioned

By Beth Kemp Featuring both beaded and unbeaded braids in a wide range of styles and braid structures, this book is full of lovely designs and inspiration. Complete photos, illustrations, and instructions will guide you through each project. Includes a bonus cardstock braiding disk to get you started plus templates for making your own round and square cardstock disks.


Contributors Susan Basch has been working in the fiber arts since the 1980s, participating in a wide range of juried shows and exhibits. She has studied with the likes of Roderick Owen (kumihimo) and Beth Beede (feltmaking) and has completed courses at the Jewelry Arts Institute and the Gemological Institute of America, where she received certificates in diamond grading, pearl grading, colored stones, and more. To see more of her work, visit her website, www.susanbaschstudio.com. Sally Battis has always been craft-y, a trait she inherited from her grandmother. She retired from her full-time job as a computer programmer five years ago, and the first thing she did was take a class on kumihimo. She fell in love with it! Contact Sally at sallybeadjewelry@ gmail.com, or visit her online store at http://stores. sallybeadjewelry.com. Sheilah Cleary has enjoyed a life-long passion for a wide array of needle arts. She began working with beads thirty years ago and has concentrated on kumihimo for the past twenty. As an accomplished wire, fiber and bead artist, Sheilah teaches across the United States and around the world. She is a frequent guest on the Do It Yourself

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(DIY) television network and she has published three best-selling books on beadwork. When not traveling, Sheilah can often be found teaching classes for Brea Bead Works in Southern California. Find Sheilah and see her designs at www.shebeads.com Rebecca Ann Combs founded Design & Adorn Beading Studio, a jewelry-supply store in Tucson, Arizona, specializing in kumihimo and beadwork. She is also the author of Kumihimo Basics & Beyond, Kumihimo Braiding with Beads, and her latest, Kumihimo Jewelry Simplified. See p. 88 for an excerpt from her newest book. You can reach Rebecca via her websites, www.designandadorn.com and www.kumihimostore. com. Find her books at www. JewelryandBeadingStore.com. Sonia CorbinDavis is a Realtor (“The Beading Realtor”) in Texas. She has been designing jewelry for more than 23 years, and teaching at a local bead shop for the past seven years. She also teaches a group of senior citizens in the City of Houston parks as well as special needs children and adults through a non-profit organization in Houston. Sonia is known for her “outside of the box” creations in kumihimo. Visit Sonia’s website, www.

Kumihimo FIBER & BEAD JEWELRY 2016

thejewelryinstructor.com, or email her at sonia. thejewelryinstructor@gmail. com. Adrienne Gaskell is a highly soughtafter kumihimo instructor. Her unique combination of kumihimo braiding, bead weaving, and metal fabrication techniques place her extraordinary pieces in a class of their own. Adrienne is one of the founders of the American Kumihimo Society (www.amksoc.org) and started up the “Kumihimo Beaded Braids” Facebook group. She is also a contributing editor to this publication. See more of her work at www.adriennegaskell.com. Carolyn Oliver Haushalter began doing beadwork in 2000, but it wasn’t until she picked up kumihimo in 2006 that she really found her creative passion. Now teaching others to braid is one of the greatest joys of her life. She is also the cochair of OCBPA (Obsessive/ Compulsive Beadworkers of Western Pennsylvania), and she thanks all the members for their support, advice, and encouragement. Contact Carolyn at coliver2@gmail. com, or visit www.topcenter. typepad.com, her blog on kumihimo braiding. Giovanna Imperia has always been inter-

ested in fiber as a creative medium and her work is focused on the tactile and organic nature of fiber and related materials. Her work has been shown in many juried and invitational national and international exhibits, has been reproduced in textile and jewelry books, and can be found in private and museum collections. She has written several articles on kumihimo and specialized weaving techniques and is the author of the book Kumihimo with Wire Jewelry. Learn more at www.giovannaimperia.com. Carolyn Kerr has always seen art as an important part of her life and she has done pottery, jewelry, and graphic design. She was introduced to kumihimo on the foam disk in 2010 and now most of her designs are made on the marudai. In 2014, she visited Japan where she studied fiber braids with Makiko Tada. The Japanese aesthetics taught her that clean, simple design speaks directly to peoples’ sense of balance and proportion. See more of her work at www.carolynkerr.com. Helen LambOrendorf started beading about 12 years ago. Around that time, a couple of her friends were into cutting, polishing, and wire wrapping their own cabochons. Helen was soon hooked. Now she works at


Discount Beads in Las Vegas, where she learned techniques like bead weaving and kumihimo. She also teaches beading classes at The Caring Place, a program of the Nevada Childhood Cancer Foundation. Contact Helen at orendorf@att.net. Pru McRae is a UK designer, tutor and TV demonstrator who specializes in kumihimo jewelry techniques. She writes regularly for several UK magazines, appears monthly on a UK jewelry making channel, runs a full program of workshops, and won the Braiding Britain competition in 2012. She has recently developed an innovative disk, called The Prumihimo Disk, which is available from her website at www.prumihimo.com. See more of her work and read her lively blog on her website or email her at pru@prumihimo.com.

Shirley Moore took a class at Moonstone Beads in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, while traveling with her husband for his job. Naturally, she got bit by the beading bug. She and her family eventually moved to that area, and now she works at the same bead shop where it all started for her! She’s tried many beading techniques, but she especially likes the endless variety of looks that can be achieved with kumihimo. Email Shirley at shirleymooredesigns@ gmail.com. Jamie North is a DIY jewelry designer from Canada, and owner of Glitz n’ Kitz, an online jewelrymaking kit and component shop. She is a proud Western Canadian girl and one of just two Swarovski Authorized Instructors in Canada. Her work has been published in many leading beading magazines and books, and she has taught extensively in Canada, the United States, and the Bahamas. Email her at Jamie@glitznkitz.com or visit www.glitznkitz.com.

Sara Oehler is a well-known designer residing in Phoenix, Arizona. Her designs are featured in numerous publications, and she is the co-author of Show Your Colors, a book of projects featuring Soft Flex beading wire (available online at www. JewelryandBeadingStore. com). She is the go-to girl for questions about Soft Flex Company products. Email her at sara@softflexcompany. com or see more of her designs on her website, www.saraojewelry.com. A former landscape architect, Randi Sherman now applies basic design principles to kumihimo jewelry design. She enjoys exploring the possibilities that arise when kumihimo meets 2-hole beads. For her kits and patterns, visit her etsy site, www.rshermandesigns.etsy. com. Contact Randi via email at rshermandesigns@ gmail.com. Deborah Shipp’s love of jewelry making began more than 30 years ago when she inherited her mother’s and great aunt’s costume jewelry, most of which was in need of loving care. As each piece was restored to its original beauty, Deborah learned various jewelrymaking techniques. One day, Deborah saw

a beaded kumihimo necklace and fell in love. Since then, she has studied the art of kumihimo and has utilized her skills to create innovative beaded kumihimo jewelry designs. Contact Deborah at dmkjewelry1@ gmail.com, or visit www. dmkartisanjewelry.etsy.com. Wendy L. Speare began bead stitching in January of 2012. Once a software developer, she now has the perfect job working at Poppyfield Bead Company in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Email Wendy at beadfingers3@gmail.com to find out about her other kumihimo patterns for sale, or visit poppybeads.com. Makiko Tada, Doctor of Engineering, has been creating Japanese kumihimo braids for 45 years and Andean braids for 25 years. She is a researcher, inventor of the kumihimo foam disk, a lecturer at the Kyoto Institute of Technology, and the author of Comprehensive Treatise of Braids. She creates kumihimo braids from both traditional designs and from her own original designs. Contact Makiko at makikokumihimo@gmail. com and find her books at http://www.texte.co.jp/ makiko/books_en.html or www.adriennegaskell.com. w

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Diana MiglionicoShiraishi began her creative life as a floral designer for her mother’s flower shop. Her many world travels led her to Japan where she discovered the art of kumihimo, the “gathering of threads” that she feels brings together all her artistic interests. Her business, Jasmine Tea Designs, fulfills her vision for an intimate boutique of handcrafted beaded jewelry and kumihimo.

Email Diana at diana@ jasmineteadesigns.com, visit her website at www.jasmineteadesigns. com, or browse her kumihimo kits and supplies at www.jasmineteadesigns. etsy.com.


Marudai on the go! Let’s face it — life isn’t always convenient. Maybe you started a kumihimo project on your marudai while on vacation and didn’t have time to finish it before it was time to pack up the car and head home. What to do? You could try to remove your work from the marudai without getting all the cords tangled, but good luck with that. You could devise a special marudai traveling box, but what a hassle! The fact is, traveling with a work-in-progress on your marudai is easy. Just secure your work, and strap that baby in!

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Secure the hanging warp cords to the legs of the marudai with foam pipe insulation or painter’s tape.

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Insert your chopstick!

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Tape the cords to the mirror.

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Put the marudai in your car, and buckle it in place. w

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Kumihimo Fiber & Bead Jewelry


LEARN BEADED

KUMIHIMO FROM AN EXPERT TEACHER Adrienne Gaskell shares her expertise with kumihimo on the marudai in two brand-new, technique-based DVDs. These 60-minute videos demonstrate beaded kumihimo techniques step by step for visual learners.

Learn Beaded Kumihimo on the Marudai • Covers the basics of the marudai from set-up to braiding to finishing. • Overview of tools, supplies, and techniques for beaded braids. • Perfect for those new to kumihimo or new to the marudai. • 60 minutes.

More Beaded Kumihimo on the Marudai

95 #15124 • $19.

• Review of the marudai basics. • Teaches techniques for making continuous beaded braids. • Ideal for those who have kumihimo experience and want to grow their skills. • 60 minutes.

JewelryandBeadingStore.com Also available at your favorite craft or bead shop! Sales tax where applicable. Price does not include shipping. P28069

#15125 • $19.95



Bead&button kumihimo fiber&bead jewelry 2016