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Alumni News Jennings was the chief operating officer and senior executive vice president for the Hillcrest Health System and Scott & White Healthcare. He was an operations and quality specialist for Tenet Health System, the director of rehabilitation for Bowie Memorial Hospital, the clinical programs coordinator for Good Shepherd Health System, and a practicing physical and senior therapist. In each of these positions, he has helped to expand the capacity of hospitals and clinics, reduce costs, recruit strong employees, and influence the community in which each hospital functioned. Jennings is committed to giving back to his community. Just a few of his roles include being a member of the executive council for the American Heart Association, a round table member of the Wounded Warrior Program, and a Mobile Meals volunteer. He is a guest lecturer at the Texas A&M University Mays Business School, a board member of the Bryan/College Station Chamber of Commerce, and a proud member of Grace Bible Church. He enjoys hunting, fishing, and playing soccer as well as spending time with his wife, Jennifer, and daughters, Reagan, who is 13, and Taylor, who is 10.

Dr. Eleanor M. Green and Dr. Duane Carl Kraemer Dr. Duane Carl Kraemer earned his B.S. in animal husbandry from the University of Wisconsin in 1955. Additionally, he went on to earn his 104 •

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M.S. in physiology of reproduction in 1960 and a B.S. in veterinary science in 1965 from Texas A&M University. Kraemer then decided to attend veterinary school while earning a Ph.D. in physiology of reproduction. He graduated with his DVM and Ph.D. in 1966 from Texas A&M University. Currently, Kraemer is a senior professor in the Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM). He was recruited in 1975 as an associate professor at the CVM, where he continued his work developing methods for the collection and transfer of embryos in a variety of species. Today, he is recognized for his work in developing methods for assisted reproduction in more animal species than any other person in the world. His research has played a critical role in the conservation of many mammalian species, including wild and exotic animals. A few of the accomplishments of Kraemer, his colleagues, and students at Texas A&M include producing the first horse that was the product of embryo transfer in the United States, being the first to demonstrate the birth of live offspring following embryo transfer in deer, cats, and dogs, and conducting the first embryo transfer in the cattle industry for commercial purposes. Kraemer is also responsible for producing the first cloned cat, CC. The successful cloning of CC was big news in the scientific community and the world in general, garnering many headlines. In addition to his contributions to reproductive physiology, Kraemer has dedicated himself to selflessly serving students, his college, his university, and many other people and organizations. He even served his country in the army as a commanding officer for the military police in 1958-1959. As a part of devoting his life to teaching and research, Kraemer has served as chair or co-chair for 32 Ph.D. students and 45 M.S. students. In addition, he has served on committees for 88 more graduate students. He is also an author of many publications, abstracts, and book chapters. Outside of work, Kraemer may be found working with the Lions Club or at home with his wife, Shirley, of 54 years. They have two lovely daughters,

Pam and Cyndi. He also enjoys spending time with his favorite pet, CC.

Dr. Eleanor M. Green and Dr. Gary Norwood Dr. Gary Norwood received his B.S. in animal science in 1964 and his DVM in 1965 from Texas A&M University. His journey to become a successful equine practitioner was both unique and adventurous. After earning his DVM, he joined the thoroughbred racetrack of Dr. Joe Burch based in Miami, Florida, and New England. In 1966, Norwood was drafted into the Army Veterinary Corps as a first lieutenant and served in Vietnam from 1967 to 1968. He inspected food at the Saigon Portland, held rabies clinics in and around Saigon, and treated livestock in the Montagnard villages located in the central highlands of the country. Norwood was promoted to the rank of captain during his service. After returning to the United States, he continued to work at thoroughbred racetracks. In 1972, Norwood joined Dr. Tom David, who had established Backstretch Surgery and Medicine, Inc.—a private racetrack practice based in New Orleans and with offices in Louisiana, Arkansas, Alabama, Kentucky, Illinois, and Texas. For over 40 years, Norwood served the equine community and promoted organized veterinary medicine through his private practice. He has encouraged and supported countless young veterinarians with interests in equine medicine. Norwood is also proud of his veterinary

CVM Today - Winter 2017  

A semi-annual publication for the faculty, staff, students, alumni, and friends of the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical...

CVM Today - Winter 2017  

A semi-annual publication for the faculty, staff, students, alumni, and friends of the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical...