Page 1

Introducing

Multidisciplinary Engineering Technology

ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

Mechatronics Emphasis

1

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY & INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION

TRANSFORMING ENGINEERING EDUCATION

engineering.tamu.edu/etid

Annual Report

2015-2016


LETTER FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD Howdy! It is my pleasure to introduce you to the Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution’s (ETID) Annual Report. ETID has a long history of educating engineering technologists and industrial distribution professionals dating back to its origin of industrial education in the 1920s through industrial technology in the 1950s, engineering technology in the 1960s and eventually engineering technology and industrial distribution since 1981. Through the years, the department has offered a variety of degree options consistent with industry needs. At present, ETID consists of four areas: electronic systems engineering technology (ESET), industrial distribution (IDIS), manufacturing and mechanical engineering technology (MMET) and multidisciplinary engineering technology with concentration in mechatronics (MXET). With approximately 1,560 students at the undergraduate level and 120 at the graduate level, ETID is one of the largest departments in the Texas A&M University College of Engineering. The department offers a solid education in applied engineering under ESET, MMET and MXET headings, and a highly sought after industrial distribution (IDIS) degree at the undergraduate level. The IDIS program also includes a widely recognized and award winning executive master’s degree in distance education mode (MID) that is tailored to industry professionals seeking to reach a high level of performance in managing distribution, logistics and supply chain operations in a broad range of industries.

Table of Contents ETID Fact Sheet................................ 3 Multidisciplinary Engineering Technology.................... 4 Manufacturing & Mechanical Engineering Technology.................... 6 Industrial Distribution....................... 10 Electronic Systems Engineering Technology.................... 15 New Faculty..................................... 19

ETID prides itself on offering a hands-on educational experience to its students, which leads to marketable skills and solid job opportunities. Our students come from a diverse set of backgrounds, including many veterans and active duty members of the military who take part in the MID program. The technology programs are all accredited by ABET, the main accreditation agency for engineering and technology areas. The IDIS program is currently seeking ABET accreditation as well. The university, as a whole, is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). The ETID faculty includes 29 tenured and tenure-track members as well as the full time equivalent (FTE) of 13 academic track professionals with significant industry experience. The faculty members are passionate about their work and generally maintain an open door policy that enables students to reach out to them on all matters pertaining to their education. The advising office, under the direction of the associate head for undergraduate studies, provides timely and accurate advice to our students. ETID prides itself on the highest retention rate and best time to graduation, starting with a student’s entry to the program, among the 14 departments in the college of engineering. ETID has a long history at Texas A&M and a bright future ahead as it continues to engage in innovations in teaching, applied research and outreach. Our faculty members are well known and highly recognized by their peers for their dedication to teaching and service, and are highly regarded nationally and internationally for their contributions to research and educational innovation. As the university grows, the ETID will continue to provide access to quality education to its students and will serve the needs of the state, the region and the nation by producing some of the highestquality engineering technologists and industrial distribution professionals in the world.

Reza Langari, Ph.D Professor and J.R. Thompson Department Head Chair 2

On the Cover Edna Cano, project manager of the ESET capstone team Intellimotion Innovations, works alongside her team on its driverless go-kart system. To read more about Edna and her team’s project, see page 18. Texas A&M Engineering Communications 2016 Taylor Phillips-Rodriguez


Fact Sheet

ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

Fall 2016

Enrollment

MID IDIS

121

MMET

903

ESET

MXET

376

270

12

graduate: 121 undergraduate: 1561 total: 1682

Demographics graduate

undergraduate

n

ca

ri

af

n

ca

ri

af

er

n

an

ic

er

am th

o

22%

ia

ic

te

66%

as

hi

n

2%

an sp

hi

w

ia

er

9%

as

th

o

9%

an

ic

ic

15%

er

am

an sp

hi te

hi

w

65%

5% 4% 2%

Enrollment and demographic data taken from 12th day of class records

Faculty 11 Professors 3 Endowed Professors 1 Faculty Fellow 2 Chair Holders 12 Associate Professors 5 Assistant Professors 2 Professors of Practice 2 Instructional Professors 12 Lecturers/Adjunct Professors 14 Emeritus Faculty 3

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY & INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION

engineering.tamu.edu/etid


ETID introduces new Multidisciplinary Engineering Technology program with emphasis in mechatronics

W

hen you think of the future, what do you see?

Self-driving cars, objects that ‘talk’ to one another via the internet or maybe high-functioning robots? No matter what you picture, the future of technology will certainly be coming from one field in particular — mechatronics. This union of electrical and mechanical engineering technology will bring the Internet of Things to life; it is now an undergraduate program at Texas A&M University. The Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution (ETID) is excited to offer a new Multidisciplinary Engineering Technology (MXET) degree with an emphasis in mechatronics, the first of its kind in the state of Texas. The new mechatronics program is the vision of ETID Department Head, Dr. Reza Langari, who knows first-hand the value and need for such a program at Texas A&M. “There are two major factors involved,” said Langari. “One, there is continued interest in the job market for graduates who have interdisciplinary skills in mechanical design, electronics and software to develop more comprehensive, integrative products. Two, we are looking at expanding beyond Texas A&M in College Station; there is demand for a broad-based engineering technology degree at branch campuses and community colleges. We developed a

program with the intent to serve both purposes.” Built on two ABET accredited programs, electronic systems engineering technology (ESET) and manufacturing and mechanical engineering technology (MMET), MXET emphasizes technical areas identified through industry and faculty collaboration. The 127-hour curriculum combines a comprehensive range of hands-on disciplines including mechanical, electrical, communications, control and computer systems. To get a better scope of what this means for students, MXET Program Coordinator Dr. Joseph Morgan shared the feedback he has received from industry professionals. “There’s a tremendous interest and support from the private sector … aerospace, automotive, oil and gas, medical are all talking about mechatronics,” said Morgan.” Instead of needing to hire both an electrical and mechanical engineer, companies will have the option to bring on an MXET graduate who has a general understanding of both disciplines. “National Instruments and other companies have shown strong interest in [MXET] – they are supporting it,” said Morgan. “Students are drawn as well because it provides a set of skills that are very marketable.”

4

MULTIDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY


ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

After gaining a fundamental understanding of mechanical and electrical engineering from ESET and MMET curricula, students will take MXET-specific courses uniting both disciplines, as well as capstone classes tackling real-world problems. Students will use LabVIEW software and National Instruments’ Real-Time InputOutput (NI RIO) technology for hands-on learning in the mechatronics courses. Thanks to ETID’s relationship with National Instruments, students will utilize NI’s commercial-grade myRIO and cRIO devices for MXET I and II, respectively. “Students will gain experience with real industrial hardware and be able to transport their knowledge of LabVIEW so they can hit the ground running upon graduation,” said Morgan. “They will already know what the real world is like in mobile and manufacturing robotics.” According to the latest long-term employment projections, MXET graduates will not have a problem finding a highpaying job after finishing school. Since MXET combines multiple

USA Engineering Employment Growth Outlook (2012-2022)1 Occupation

Growth Rate

Annual Pay

Number of Jobs in 2022

Mechanical Engineers (BS)

5%

$80,580

269,700

Electrical & Electronics Engineers (BS)

4%

$89,630

318,700

22%

$93,350

1,240,600

Software Developers

Texas Long-Term Employment Projections (2012-2022)2 Occupation

Growth Rate

Annual Pay

Annual Average Job Opening

Electrical Engineers

20.8%

$101,126

580

Electronics Engineers

22.2%

$100,002

485

Mechanical Engineers

20.0%

$99,073

990

Software Developer, Applications

25.1%

$97,035

1,540

United States Department of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook 2 Texas Workforce Commission - Labor Market Information 1

engineering disciplines, graduates will be uniquely qualified for a myriad of lucrative careers upon graduation. Mechatronics is the only emphasis for MXET at the moment, but more options are planned for the future. This framework will

allow ETID to offer unique multidisciplinary engineering degrees catered specifically to student, industry and job demands. For more information on the MXET program, contact Morgan, jmorgan@tamu. edu, 979-575-0128.

5

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY & INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION

engineering.tamu.edu/etid


Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering Technology

6

MANUFACTURING AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY


ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

Hung, Hsieh share manufacturing expertise with educators nationwide in summer programs

T

his past summer, two professors in the Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution at Texas A&M University participated in programs to help teachers and two-year college faculty learn more about general and automated manufacturing. Hung Drs. Wayne Hung and ShenJen “Tony” Hsieh, professors in the Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering Technology (MMET) program, each combined classroom and hands-on Hsieh manufacturing education with educators from the area as well as across the nation. “How do we get people interested in manufacturing? This was the crucial question that spurred the creation of his program,” said Hung. Five high school teachers from the BryanCollege Station and Houston areas were provided professional, intensive training on general manufacturing over two weeks and took the knowledge learned back to their schools to share with students. Funding from the Gene Haas Foundation allowed teachers to attend Hung’s program at no cost. Additionally, the organization will help implement what teachers learned to their classrooms and curriculum back home. “Most of [the teachers] have some machines in their schools, but they do not always know how to operate them,” says Hung. “Now they can not only know how to use them, but also implement what they learned in the program.” On Oct. 7, the teachers from Hung’s program will have an opportunity to bring their students to campus and participate in Manufacturing Day – a nationwide celebration of modern manufacturing meant to inspire the next generation of manufacturers. There will also be a mini-

Dr. Wayne Hung (second from left) poses with the local and Houston-area teachers who participated in his summer manufacturing program.

Dr. Shen-Jen “Tony” Hsieh (far left) enjoys lunch with educators from all over the nation during his NSF-funded summer engineering program.

competition between teams that will allow students to implement what their teachers learned from the program. Hsieh’s program, “Research Experiences for High School and Two-Year College Faculty in Mechatronics, Robotics and Industrial Automation,” lasted six weeks during June and July on the Texas A&M campus and was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Designated as a Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) site by the NSF, 10 participating high school and two-year college faculty members were provided a weekly stipend and engaged in a research project with faculty mentors, attended special topic presentations and site tours and developed an instructional module to teach a topic related to their research. Hsieh was responsible for the industrial automation aspect of the program, working alongside six faculty members from other departments to provide a diverse array of expertise. “The teachers had to develop a

lesson plan to be implemented into their classroom based on their research experience,” said Hsieh. “Several participants from last year’s program were able to publish their research through ASEE, the American Society for Engineering Education. We want to demonstrate that their work is not just for the classroom, but that it is being recognized at a higher academic level.” This summer marked the program’s third year; in the spring, teachers who participated in the program will have an opportunity to bring some of their students and present the results of implementing their created lesson plan. Both Hung and Hsieh’s summer efforts exemplify the commitment to community outreach and dynamic research that ETID faculty are known for. “We bridge the gap,” says Hsieh. “By making an impression with these teachers, their students get an idea of what ETID does and it sparks an intense interest in our programs.” 7

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY & INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION

engineering.tamu.edu/etid


Alvarado delivers invited lectures on multiple droplet impengement dynamics at UC Riverside, Rice University

D

r. Jorge L. Alvarado, professor in the Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution at Texas A&M University, gave two invited lectures this past year on multiple droplet impingement dynamics and surface cooling at Rice University and University of Calfornia, Riverside. During the lectures, Alvarado revealed his most recent findings about the hydrodynamic behavior of impinged thin liquid films under the effects of multiple droplet impingement events.

He and his team have been able to conduct microscale experiments and numerical simulations to understand the physical mechanisms of multiple droplet impingements on heated surfaces as they relate to electronic cooling and biomedical applications. His current research efforts are part of a project funded by the Qatar National Research Foundation (QNRF), in which he and his collaborators at Texas A&M University at Qatar, Dr. Reza Sadr and Dr. Anoop Kanjirakat, are uncovering the fundamental physical processes taking place when microscale droplets impinge heated surfaces at high speed. One of the long-term objectives of the study is to formulate efficient cooling strategies for microreactor cooling

8

MANUFACTURING AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

applications. Alvarado and his team have been able to develop a state-of-the-art facility for droplet impingement studies and are also conducting numerical studies to understand transient heat transfer phenomena in droplet impingement cases. At Riverside, Alvarado was invited by Dr. Guillermo Aguilar, department chair of mechanical engineering, who is also active in the field of droplet impingement and sprays for biomedical applications. During his visit, Alvarado also had the opportunity to meet with graduate students to talk about rewards and challenges of pursuing an academic career.


ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

Hsieh named Honorary International Chair Professor by National Taipei University

D Wang Elected to SME College of Fellows

D

r. Jyhwen Wang, professor in the Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution at Texas A&M University, was one of seven elected into the 2015 SME College of Fellows. SME elects Fellows once a year from among the highest achievers of industry, academia and government. Only honorary, Fellow, life or professional members of SME may nominate individuals for the honor of Fellow. Those selected as Fellows have 20 years or more of manufacturing experience and expertise. They have contributed notably to the social, technological and educational benefit of manufacturing and the engineering profession. Wang’s research interests are in the area of manufacturing science and engineering with a focus in material deformation processes. He has conducted extensive research on high-strength steel applications in metal packaging and plastic deformation of layered materials. SME is a nonprofit organization that has served practitioners, companies, educators, government and communities across the manufacturing spectrum for more than 80 years. SME is dedicated to the advancement of manufacturing by addressing knowledge and skills needed for the industry.

r. Sheng-Jen (“Tony”) Hsieh, professor and director of the Rockwell Automation Laboratory in the Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution at Texas A&M University, was named Honorary International Chair professor by National Taipei University of Technology (Taipei Tech) in Taipei, Taiwan, in 2015. Hsieh also holds a joint-appointment in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. This is recognition of his overall contributions in the area of industrial automation and control, especially in the area of remote control, diagnosis and preventative maintenance of automated assembly systems. The international chair professor is the

institution’s highest scientific recognition. Taipei Tech was founded in 1912, and is a top-ranked public university in Taiwan with a longstanding history in educating and cultivating top technical professionals. A recent teaching excellence evaluation by Taiwan’s Ministry of Education rated Taipei Tech first among all the other technological universities. Hsieh’s research interests lie in the fields of automated system integration and cyberenabled control/diagnosis of machines and systems; optical and infrared imaging for characterization and failure prediction; micro/nano device fabrication; and design of technology for engineering education. Currently, he leads a $900,000 NSF project to develop innovative curricula and instructional technologies such as telelabs and intelligent tutoring systems for industrial automation. He served as Chair of SPIE’s ThermoSense XXXVII Conference and ASEE’s Manufacturing Division in 201415.

9

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY & INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION

engineering.tamu.edu/etid


Industrial Distribution 10

INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION


ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

Industry Speakers During fall 2015, multiple industrial distribution courses enhanced industry focused experiential learning by inviting industry representatives to speak on various topics including trends, challenges and opportunities in the industrial channels: IDIS 240: Introduction to Industrial Distribution IDIS 330: Sales Engineering IDIS 340: Manufacturer Distributor Relations IDIS 343: Distribution Logistics IDIS 344: Distributor Information and Control Systems IDIS 424: Purchasing Applications in Distribution IDIS 464: Distributor Operations and Financial Management IDIS 434: The Quality Process for Distributors IDIS 444: Leadership and Ethics The Industrial Distribution Program has received approval to construct a building on the new Texas A&M RELLIS campus (formerly the Riverside Campus). The building will be approximately 50,000 square feet and will include the Distribution Leadership Laboratory, the Sales Excellence Lab, the Distribution Innovation Studio, the Talent Incubator as well as research offices for the Thomas & Joan Read Center and Global Supply Chain Laboratory. The building is expected to break ground in spring 2018. Naming opportunities for labs, studio, lobby, floors and meeting rooms are available. Please contact Dr. F. Barry Lawrence for more information at barry.lawrence@tamu.edu.

Industrial Distribution program enhances industry-focused experiential learning via field trips

M

ore than 125 students from the Industrial Distribution Program visited Womack Machine Supply Co. in Dallas on Oct. 1, 2015, as part of their Manufacturer Distributor Relations class (IDIS 340). This class includes an industry project, which culminates with student presentations of their findings to an executive panel of the sponsoring company (See page 10, bottom right photo). Students gained real-world experience by touring the distribution facility and listening to talks by different executives and managers which influenced the direction of their projects on a variety of proposed topics. Students worked on relationship issues between manufacturers and distributors and how they can interact to maximize efficiencies within distribution channels. They also analyzed challenges faced by Womack within the distribution channel and formulated alternative resolutions to these challenges. The final class presentations were

presented to the management team from Womack. Students made recommendations for improvement, outlined a strategy for best practices and explored benefits of the projects to Womack and its suppliers. On Oct. 22, 2015, almost 80 industrial distribution Students visited Purvis Industries in Houston as a part of their Distributor Informational Management class (IDIS 344). It is one of the nation’s largest independent wholesale distributors. The trip gave the students an opportunity to see firsthand all the various functions performed by a distributor including the use of its Enterprise Resource Planning System (ERP). The students had the opportunity to tour Purvis’ facilities, ask questions and be briefed on how Purvis does business. After lunch, the students finished their tour and had another question and answer opportunity. It contributed to the overall learning objectives of the class, and the students enjoyed the opportunity.

Industry Events In addition to bringing industry speakers to classes, students are provided opportunities to participate in industry conferences and competitions. These enhance their exposure to the latest trends in the industry as well as provide an opportunity to meet industry professionals: 2015 Houston Electric League Cross Fire – Over 50 students participated in a discussion panel consisting of six industry representatives. 2015 Material Handling Equipment Distributors Association Convention and Exhibitors’ Showcase – Nearly 40 students toured the convention floor, participated in speeches and sessions with nationally known speakers. 2015 Rockwell Automation Fair – Five students attended this event and interacted with automation and automation related equipment manufacturers and distributors (See page 10, top right photo). 2015 Electronic Components Industry Association Project Host at EDS – Three students participated in real world meetings while manufacturers used this time to meet with as many of their distributors and reps as possible. 11

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY & INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION

engineering.tamu.edu/etid


T

Researchers are changing the game through sales education

he Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution at Texas A&M University prepares students for careers with the use of gaming technology. The Lead Generation Game (LGG), a part-time job and experiential learning opportunity for students, uses the science of game design to teach sales skills. The program is sponsored by various organizations and businesses. In return, participants put their new knowledge to the test by generating leads for the sponsoring industry partner. “The training is invaluable,” said Clayton Raemsch, a student in the LGG. “While the LGG competition is enjoyable, the real reward is hearing from your sponsor when they close the generated leads. We’re able to pay them back by using what they’ve allowed us to learn.” The lead generation research initiated some years ago through a project conducted at Talent Incubator Program in the Thomas and Joan Read Center and ETID when students created a model that was applied by a manufacturer and its distributor to generate leads in a new product/service introduction. This methodology provided metrics for sales leads. The companies sponsoring this project were able to sell the product in new markets and regions through the leads with a high success rate and achieved their ROI. The Lead Generation process evolved and Brandon Hagen, a researcher in the Global Supply Chain Lab (also part of the

Read Center), took lead generation to a tactical level through implementing the concept into a game along with Dr. Norm Clark, a professor in the ID Program. “We crafted the LGG with the goal of enabling our students to put what we teach into practice,” Hagen said. The LGG works to bridge that gap before students begin their careers. By making the learning process fun for students, the LGG makes the challenge of cold calling more enjoyable. The process engages different learning styles in various capacities, allowing all students to thrive in a hands-on environment. The Game - The program employs gamification — the process of applying game design to engage and motivate people in goal achievement. The LGG connects students and provides extrinsic motivators for project success. Gamification is an innovative way to make learning enjoyable, providing extra motivation and improve skills. The design of the LGG provides a collaborative, yet competitive environment for students to engage with their peers. Students work in teams, listen in on other student’s phone calls and complete activities that earn points for their team. The point system provides an internal competition that keeps students connected, on-task and motivated to fine tune their sales abilities. This dynamic environment helps students be self-driven and self-motivated—skills that are vital to their future careers. While students are developing leads for their sponsor, they are also being trained

Global projects enhance IDIS study abroad program in China

T

he Industrial Distribution Global Study Abroad Program (GSA) has provided global business experience and cultural awareness to undergraduates since 2009. The 2016 summer program focused on China. The study abroad program was a six-credit hour, summer I program with 31 students. The group traveled to Beijing, Tianjin, Suzhou, Shanghai and Hong Kong. In each city the students were exposed to real-world business challenges at companies through visits, guest lectures and case studies. The class is project-based with teams of students working on real-world challenges. The students visited multiple companies while in China including Flowserve, CXPC, Brenntag, TTI and Rockwell. The Global Study Abroad Program is made possible by the generous support of 12

INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION

on the attention and discovery steps of the sales process. The game quickly shows students how and why customers make decisions. Connection with Industry - As the program provides interaction with real practice, industry likewise experiences benefits in overall sales and recruiting. More companies are choosing to be involved and enjoy the relationship they maintain with these students and the university. Among sponsors of the LGG are Crawford Electric Supply, TMS South, TTI, Pipeline Packaging, Womack, Hisco, Alloy-Metals to name a few. With a semester-long sales training program, this is the first of its kind, following in the footsteps of the Talent Incubator Program that centers on experiential learning aligning industry to advancement of student learning. Through great partnerships, students work on realprojects. Optimizing the Sales Process – Currently, the LGG is managed by the Talent Incubator Program, directed by Dr. Esther Rodriguez Silva, and has evolved by automating the sales process. This means the sales activities are integrated and the students are engaged on generating leads through cold calls, but also are now able to track the result of their leads, they follow strategy with the industry outside sales force regarding the estimated prospect opportunities, propose solutions in the selling phase aligned with the sales capabilities and customer typologies, and assess the value add on post-sales activities.

Brenntag, Mike Rowlett of Womack Machine supply and a generous former student, Tom Ferguson. These gifts have made the course a sustainable, yearly program that provides the students with global experience and knowledge.


ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

Quick Facts The Master of Industrial Distribution (MID) Program is a 21-month distance education graduate program specifically designed for working professionals. The program is designed to serve the needs of working professionals who require flexibility in their schedules and location. The program dramatically increases the participant’s ability to think globally, integrate trends, acquire knowledge and act strategically.

Mobile Learning iPad Pro, eBooks & Apps Provided Closed Captioned Videos

MID students travel abroad for Global Distribution class

MID program hosts annual Residency Week, 120 attend

Master of Industrial Distribution (MID) students visited Singapore and Malaysia in October 2015. The visit was part of the Global Distribution course that involves experiential learning and featured projects with Brenntag, TTI Asia, Rockwell Automation and Flowserve (See page 10, middle left photo). The class worked on 12 projects with the four companies. The students visited the project companies, toured operations and participated in a panel discussion with executives from multiple companies. More than 30 managers and executives from the companies met with the students to answer questions. Students also visited the operations of Baker Hughes in Singapore and Baker Hughes in Johor Bahru, Malaysia. The teams provided solutions for various projects for the four companies and presented their recommendations to the companies at the end of November.

The Master of Industrial Distribution (MID) program at Texas A&M University hosted its annual Residency Week in August in College Station, Texas (See page 10, upper left photo). This year, 120 professionals attended, making it one of the program’s largest classes to date. Residency Week is filled with intensive learning focused on the latest trends in industrial distribution, as well as activities to help students build stronger relationships with their peers. In addition, students have the opportunity to meet the faculty who are in regular contact with them throughout the year. Students in the MID program are required to participate in two Residency Weeks; two groups, the classes of 2017 and 2018, attended this year. The MID program is a 21-month distance education graduate program, the largest of its kind in the college of engineering.

Upcoming Admissions Information Events Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016 Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017 Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017 Wednesday, March 8, 2017 Thursday, March 9 , 2017 Thursday, March 23, 2017 Thursday, April 13, 2017

Houston Houston Dallas San Antonio Austin Houston Houston

All events are from 6:30-8:00 p.m. Register at mid.tamu.edu

• Established 200, 15 Years of Excellence • Largest Distance Education program in the College of Engineering by scheduled credit hours • 430 plus former & current students

MID Awards 2016 21st Century Best Practice Distance Learning The United States Distance Learning Association (USDLA) presented its 2016 International Distance Learning Award for 21st Century Best Practices to the Master of Industrial Distribution (MID) program in the Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution at Texas A&M University. 2016 Outstanding Commitment to Excellence and Innovation The Master of Industrial Distribution (MID) program at Texas A&M University was selected as one of the recipients of the 2016 Texas Distance Learning Association (TxDLA) Award for Outstanding Commitment to Excellence and Innovation by a fouryear higher education institution.

MID Courses Receive QM Certification Three of the Master of Industrial Distribution courses in the College of Engineering at Texas A&M University have achieved a Quality Matters certification, becoming the first and only engineering courses at Texas A&M to receive this recognition. Quality Matters is a nationally recognized, faculty-centered, peer review process designed to certify the quality of online and blended courses. The certification helps the MID program demonstrate that its courses are designed specifically for online education and delivered effectively, reinforcing our commitment to quality of education. 13

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY & INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION

engineering.tamu.edu/etid


FY 2015-16 Quick Facts

V I S I

2

4

3

WHAT IS THE MARKET?

WHERE DO WE WANT TO BE?

WHERE ARE WE?

1.4 HR Structure & Systems

1.3 Talent Forecasting

EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT

PA1 PA2 PA3 PA4 PA5 PA6 PA7 PA8 PA9 PA10

Outcome Metrics

IMPROVEMENT TOOLS

Identifying Talent Philosophy Talent Culture Assessment SWOT Analysis Scenario Planning Assessing People Equity Intangible Audit Talent Segmentation Talent Gaps Prioritization Integrated Talent Assessment Self-Assessment for HR Professionals

PROCESS OUTCOMES

FINANCIAL ELEMENTS

Increase in Organizational Capability Increased Market Share Increase in Productivity HR Leading Indicators Reduction in Turnover Value added Per Employee Reduced Organizational Knowledge Drain Improved Customer Service

> Profit Per Employee > Gross Revenue Increase > Net Revenue Increase > Fixed Expenses Reduction > Variable Expense Reduction

RETURN ON TALENT ASSETS

Competency Model Sales Competencies Checklist Customer Service Competencies Checklist Managerial / Leadership Competencies Checklist AI10 Talent Acquisition Guide AI11 New Hire Onboarding Checklist

> > > > > > > > >

Reduction in Turnover Reduction in Supervision Reduction in Errors Increase in Productivity Advancement Potential Ability to Perform Wider Range of jobs Improved Customer Satisfaction Score Attitude Change Reduced Customer Complaints

> Recruiting and Hiring Cost Reduction > Sales Growth > Operating Cost Reduction > Net Profit Increase > Gross Revenue Increase > Variable Expense Reduction

RETURN ON TALENT ASSETS

MI12 Performance Objectives Development MI13 Performance Planning Guide and Worksheets MI14 Effective Performance Management Guide MI15 Performance Dashboard MI16 Team Building MI17 Performance Coaching & Mentoring

> > > > > > > > > > >

Increase in Productivity Reduction in Turnover Value added Per Employee Reduction in Supervision Reduction in Errors Advancement Potential Ability to Perform Wider Range of Jobs Improved customer Satisfaction Score New Customers Account Penetration Attitude Change

> Selling Expenses Reduce > Variable Expenses Reduction > Fixed Expenses Reduction > Net Margin Increase > Net Profit Increase

DI18 DI19 DI20 DI21 DI22 DI23

> > > > > > > > > > > >

Increase in Productivity New customers Account Penetration Reduction in Errors Value added Per Employee Increase in Organizational Capability Value added Per Employee Improved Customer Service Advancement Potential Ability to Perform Wider Range of Jobs Attitude Change Reduction in Supervision

> Selling Expenses Reduction > Variable Expenses Reduction > Fixed Expenses Reduction > Net Margin Increase > Net Profit Increase

> > > > > > >

Increase in Productivity Attitude Change Reduction in Turnover Value added Per Employee Reduction in Turnover Reduction in Supervision Improved Customer Satisfaction Score

Strategic Talent Planning Guide Talent Strategy Alignment Talent Analytics Guide Prescriptive Analytics Guide Knowledge Management Guide

S H A R E H O L D E R

FINANCIAL METRICS

> > > > > > > >

PI1 PI2 PI3 PI4 PI5

MARKET SHARE GROWTH REVENUE GROWTH EBITDA GROWTH

GROWTH

GROWTH

PROFITABILITY

ASSET EFFICIENCY

TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES

2.1 Personality Competence & Assessment

CULTURAL FORCES

1

INDUSTRY

INDUSTRY TRENDS

COMPETENCIES

2.2 Job Design

2.5 Managerial Onboarding

INDUSTRY STANDARDS

COMPETITIVENESS

DISTRIBUTION CHANNELS

2 GENERATING GROWTH

MANAGING GROWTH

TALENT AQUISITION

3

SUSTAINING GROWTH

Key Attributes:

Key Attributes:

Key Attributes:

INNOVATION

ALIGNMENT

VALIDATION

FOCUS

COMMUNICATION

CONSISTENCY

STRATEGIC FIT

ACCOUNTABILITY

STABILITY

2.4 New Hire Onboarding

2.3 Talent Sourcing

3.1 Organizational Structure

N

3.5 Performance Improvement

3.4 Performance Analysis

INTEGRATED TALENT PRACTICES

R

T

U

C

T

R

5

E

TALENT RETENTION 4

C

U

L

T

U

R

AL YT IC

TALENT MANAGEMENT

S

2

3

TECHNOLOGY

1 EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT

VALUES

2

CUSTOMERS

INDUSTRY

ORGANIZATION

4.2 Career Development

TALENT DEVELOPMENT

4.4 High Potential Development

4.3 Succession Planning & Management

AI6 AI7 AI8

AA11 Personality Assessment AA12 Competencies Assessment AA13 Job Design Diagnosis AA14 Job Analysis AA15 Recruitment Assessment AA16 Onboarding Assessment

MA17 MA18 MA19 MA20 MA21 MA22 MA23 MA24

AI9

Fishbone Diagram Why-Why Technique Performance Diagnostics Models Cause Analysis Team Assessment Performance Appraisal Diagnosis 9-Box Performance Evaluation Management by Objectives

DA25 DA26 DA27 DA28 DA29 DA30 DA31

Training Needs Assessment Training Audience Analysis Training Cost Analysis Training Impact/ ROI Analysis 4-Level Training Evaluation Career Assessment Benchmarking Succession/ Career Planning DA32 Leadership Assessment

Training Design Guide Learning Evaluation Guide Succession Planning Guide Career Development Guide High–Po Development Guide Leadership Development Guide

TALENT 6 PROPOSITION Bs BUY - External Sourcing BUILD - Internal Sourcing BORROW - Outsourcing BOUNCE - Outplacing BIND - Retaining BOOST - Promoting

4

3

4.5 Leadership Development

1

TALENT AQUISITION

ALIGNME NT GOALS/STRATEGIES

E

TALENT PLANNING

TALENT DEVELOPMENT

3.3 Performance Evaluation

4.1 Training

IP

S

U

3.2 Performance Goal Setting

TALENT MANAGEMENT

SH

&

1.2 Workforce Analysis

TALENT PLANNING GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS

SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONDITIONS

POLITICAL CLIMATE

ALIGNME NT

M I S S I O N

1.1 Organizational Culture

WHY SHOULD CUSTOMERS DO BUSINESS WITH US?

HOW DO WE GET THERE?

Talent Tools ASSESSMENT TOOLS

5

1.5 Talent Analytics

AN

Nepal, Cortez and Johnson awarded National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education grant Natarajarathinam awarded 20162017 Tier One Program Grant to help Texas food banks, nonprofit organizations

C O M P A N Y

1

Talent Practices

ER

A Process Map for Distributors

Strategic Planning

AD

Faculty Projects

The speed at which most distribution development, and the perception that firms can grow (profitably) doesn’t solely people are more expendable than other depend on the distributor’s geographic assets within the business. reach, physical assets, product selection, Wholesaler distributors often struggle access to capital or innovative services. It with recruiting, developing and retaining depends on its human resources. sales talent. They also experience Human resources are the most challenges with developing a leadership significant factor in distributor success. pipeline for growth and success. Not on the balance sheet and only listed Successful distributors understand the on the profit and loss statement as an importance of acquiring, developing, expense, the value of human resources motivating and retaining talented within a company is often underestimated. employees, but often struggle to develop Distributors have expended tremendous and implement successful programs. energy on optimizing operations Texas A&M University has completed with information technology, facility a consortium in alliance with the NAW development, inventory control and Institute for Distribution Excellence that transportation management. Human identified how distributors can optimize resources are often left behind due their human resources. to a lack of resources for training, a 18 distributors participated in poor understanding of the return-onthe consortium, with a budget of investment (ROI) for human resources $425,000. OPTIMIZING HUMAN CAPITAL DEVELOPMENT

LE

The Read Center is currently engaged in three major research projects. A warehouse utilization optimization project is being explored in collaboration with a building materials service distributor. The project focuses on helping the distributor balance its resources as the firm expands its footprint in terms of new warehouses. The second project works with a healthcare service provider in developing its sales process and lead generation capability as part of its growth initiative. The third project is helping a food service distributor optimize its customer segmentation and pricing strategies. The project looks into critical pricing drivers as well as implementation factors.

2014-15: Optimizing human capital development

B U S I N E S S S T R AT E G Y

Research Projects Update

Consortia Update

TA L E N T S T R AT E G Y

Proposals Submitted: 34 Proposals Funded: 18 Education Sessions (Domestic): 16 Education Sessions (International): 6 Number of Attendees: 567 Center Revenue (Research and continuing Education): $2,145,970

5.1 Compensation & Benefits

5.5 Change Management

TEAM

5.2 Employee Engagement

TALENT RETENTION

5 INDIVIDUAL

ORGANIZATIONAL CAPACITY

5.4 Multi-generation Management

x

5.3 Off-boarding/ Exit Process

RA33 Employee Engagement Survey RA34 Supervisors/Managers Engagement Survey RA35 People Cost Analysis RA36 Disengagement Diagnostics Matrix RA37 Strategic Alignment Assessment RA38 Force-Field Analysis RA39 Key Success Factors for Change

RI24 RI25 RI26 RI27 RI28 RI29

Employee Engagement Guide Total Rewards Guide Retention Management Guide Leadership Engagement Model Multi–generation Management Guide Change Management Guide

x

INDIVIDUAL COMPETENCIES

ENGAGING CULTURE

=

REVENUE GROWTH NET MARGIN GROWTH RETURN ON TRAINING

MARKET SHARE GROWTH REVENUE GROWTH RETURN ON TALENT ASSETS EBITDA GROWTH CASH FLOW INCREASE

MARKET SHARE GROWTH REVENUE GROWTH NET MARGIN INCREASE RETURN ON TALENT ASSETS EBITDA GROWTH

REVENUE GROWTH > Recruitment & Hiring Cost Reduction > Sales Growth > Variable Expense Reduction > Net Profit Increase > Fixed Expense Reduction

NET MARGINS RETURN ON TALENT ASSETS EBITDA GROWTH CASH FLOW INCREASE

GROWTH

PROFITABILITY

V A L U E

PROFITABILITY

ASSET EFFICIENCY

GROWTH

GROWTH

GROWTH ASSET EFFICIENCY

PROFITABILITY

ASSET EFFICIENCY

PROFITABILITY

CASH FLOW

CASH FLOW

GROWTH

GROWTH

PROFITABILITY

ASSET EFFICIENCY

PROFITABILITY

GROWTH

PROFITABILITY

ASSET EFFICIENCY

PROFITABILITY

CASH FLOW

C U S T O M E R S E R V I C E

TALENT ROI © 2015 Global Supply Chain Laboratory

Upcoming Programs Visit readcenter.tamu.edu for more info

Advanced Sales Management March 28-30, 2017 Distribution Manager Certificate April 17-21, 2017 Executive Session on Distributor Competitive Advantage July 11-13, 2017 Intensive Inventory Management Sept. 26-29, 2017 Pricing Optimization Oct. 18-19, 2017 14

INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION

CRDBP

2016-17: Optimizing business analytics COUNCIL F R RESEARCH

ON DISTRIBUTOR BEST PRACTICES

An Alliance of the NAW Institute & Texas A&M University

www.nawpubs.org

Analytics is the hidden force that brings sanity to profitable decision making. Top-quartile distributors use data analytics to identify patterns in customer buying behavior, analyze customer-level profitability, assess operational efficiency opportunities, manage cash flow through inventory levels, target micro market segments, detect salesforce performance gaps and many other applications. Successful distributors use analytics as a tactical weapon, but not strategically. Even

www.naw.org/crdbp

http://supplychain.tamu.edu

top performers have only begun to unlock the power contained within distributor’s data. Leading distributors are realizing the data they own is a gold mine that will determine their future success. Texas A&M University has initiated a consortium in alliance with the NAW Institute for Distribution Excellence that will investigate how distributors can optimize their data and analytics. 11 distributors participated in the consortium, with a budget of $275,000.


ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

Electronic Systems Engineering Technology

15

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY & INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION

engineering.tamu.edu/etid


ESET capstone team launches project into outer space, wins 2016 Texas Instruments Innovation Challenge

F

our seniors in the Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution (ETID) at Texas A&M University assembled individual strengths under a team identity — DVDT — to undertake a capstone project that was effectively launched into outer space on April 9 from Hillsboro Airport in Hillsboro, Texas. On July 19, the team surpassed nearly 180 teams from around the nation and won the 2016 Texas Instruments Innovation Challenge. In affiliation with a T STAR initiative, the objective was to provide a communications platform for cube satellite technology (TSAT) in low-earth orbit at 400km. The students, mentored by department and industrial advisers, went on to surpass equipment requirements. “We made a system that actually works,” said Trent Tate, team program manager. “We did field testing and found that our system could easily transmit over four times the distance to the International Space Station (1600km).” The Electronic Systems Engineering Technology (ESET) program degree plan requires that prior to graduation, seniors must solve a problem for industry and their solution must work. DVDT began developments of a Modular Integrated Stackable Layers (MISL) stack-compatible communications module in the summer of 2015. The team decided to use a highaltitude balloon filled with helium as the launch vehicle for the module, which lifted the device to 107,000 feet. “We went into it knowing nothing about communicating in space,” said David Smith, who performed testing and simulations for the team. “Going through that process, weighing through the pros and cons and building the system is a good experience that we have.” Asked about trials the team faced in working on such a technical, real-world problem, Dakotah Karrer, the team’s hardware engineer, said, “When you have to integrate with multiple and different parts, it can be challenging. I communicated

From left: Dakotah Karrer, Vince Rodriguez, David Smith and Trent Tate pose with their 2016 TIICwinning communications platform for cube satellite technology (TSAT) in low-earth orbit.

with NASA to know their standards. The integration aspect is important. You’re never just going to be working by yourself.” Vince Rodriguez, the team’s software engineer, added, “The videos show people what we are doing. My family really caught on to them.” He advises other students who will begin their capstone projects to ask questions, many of them. “One of the most professional presentations I’ve ever seen: from its completeness, to the data they achieved and what their design looked like,” said Matt Leonard, T STAR president and industry client for the project. “T STAR is a startup company and TSat is the turnkey satellite we are developing. The communications layer is critical to the satellite being able to be on orbit and communicate its data back to earth. This was our first flight unit. Now we can say we already have a unit that has flight experience.” “They are the gold standard,” said Dr. Joseph Morgan, professor in the Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution and capstone course director. “In [ESET], what we’re trying to do is create an experiential education, so our undergraduate students learn by doing.” Part-time ESET professor and Chief Technology Officer of Paragon Innovations H. Michael Wiley, who also serves as DVDT’s technical adviser, shared his thoughts shortly after DVDT was presented with the winning $10,000 check from Texas Instruments. “[ETID] doesn’t take it (education) just as an academic exercise,” Wiley said. “This

16

ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

department really is serious about making sure that the students we graduate have an understanding of what the real world is like for engineers, giving them a great background in it.” Since the project began in summer 2015, DVDT has been selected as the highest placing capstone team at the 2016 Engineering Project Showcase, the winner of Mays Business School’s 2016 Raymond Ideas Challenge and the best design project in the national Texas Instruments 2016 Innovation Challenge. For each of the members on the team, this win highlights a successful transition from Texas A&M to the beginning of their respective careers. Tate graduated in May and is now a part of the technical sales rotation program for Texas Instruments and may join the group permanently in early 2017. Smith also graduated in the spring and is currently pursuing a commission with the United States Air Force, hoping to work in satellite communications. Rodriguez, a May graduate, accepted and started a position with Texas Instruments’ application rotation program in June. Karrer, currently a senior planning to graduate in December, is now an intern with Texas Instruments and hopes to join full time once he finishes school. Each team member expressed gratitude not only for the advisers and sponsors who helped along the way, but also for the opportunity ETID and ESET were able to provide. 16


ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

RIoTS in Aggieland - A new ETID technical elective

T

he Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution at Texas A&M University recently contacted Dr. John Hill, senior group manager for Cloud and Mobile Technologies within National Instruments Research and Development Group, about working with 14 students in the Electronic Systems Engineering Technology (ESET) Program on a new technical elective focusing on Internet of Things (IoT). Hill had one condition — the projectbased course had to include robotic systems. As a result, the ESET created the Robotic IoT Systems, or RIoTS, experiential learning opportunity during the first summer session. The project, in part defined by the students, employed the ESET small form factor DSTR (pronounced Disaster) robot powered by the Texas Instrument SensorTag as the primary edge device. DSTR’s bigger brother, ASEP, powered by the National Instruments myRIO embedded controller, was used as a Gateway device for the IoT system. The project also incorporated PTC’s ThingWorx Cloud Development Environment and data analytics proposed by Sparkcognition. National Instruments (NI) took on the industry leadership role and worked closely with the ESET faculty and students. Its contributions made the course an exciting and relevant learning experience for everyone. Hall was not only able to bring in a number of subject matter experts from NI, but was also able to identify and introduce the program to several other companies involved in the development of IoT technology and systems. Included in this group were representatives from Cisco Systems, PTC and Sparkcognition. Leveraging other industry contacts, ESET was able to arrange for presentations by industry experts from Texas Instruments, DENSO and Schneider Electric. Although a small number of the guest lectures were made using video conferencing, many were made in person at Texas A&M. To kick off the course, NI invited the entire class to spend the day interacting with its IoT experts and touring the labs where IoT development is in progress. “Learning from a textbook just doesn’t compare to interacting with practicing engineers who are developing the

Above: ESET students visit National Instruments, displaying their experiential learning opportunity Robotic IoT Systems (RIoTS). Left: Visualization of how the DSTR robot functions.

technology now,” said one of the ESET students. To give the course focus, a mission statement was created as part of the day-long visit to NI. The NI engineers and students decided the goals of the course would be: 1) The DSTR Robots controlled by TI SensorTags as edge devices would sweep a minefield to detect mines. 2) The DSTR Robots would then determine their position and report the location of the mine to an ASEP Robot controlled by an NI myRIO over Bluetooth low energy wireless communications. 3) The ASEP Robot would receive information from the swarm of DSTR Robots and move this information to the cloud over 802.11 wireless communications. 4) Using both a MySQL database developed by the students and a MashUp created using PTC ThingWorx, the

information was received, stored and analyzed to determine the safest path for the ASEP Robot to negotiate the mine field. 5) An Android cell phone app was also developed that allowed for the real-time display of DSTR Robots and the mines they had detected. The app allowed the user to start, pause, and stop the operation of the robots over the 4G cellular network via the cloud service. 6) Document the work done by the student group in a final report. Because of time and budget constraints, the students were not able to complete the entire mission, but each team was able to contribute value to the overall defined mission. In addition to the technical work, the students prepared and delivered two design reviews to the NI subject matter experts. Several students are continuing to work on the project over the remainder of the summer to fully develop a demonstrable Robotic IoT System. 17

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY & INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION

engineering.tamu.edu/etid


A

ESET students work together to create driverless go-kart

group of seniors in the Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution have formed a capstone team to tackle one of the biggest emerging technologies of the future - vehicle automation. The team’s task is to equip a gokart so that the electronic vehicle will follow another go-kart all on its own, as in: without a driver. This study in intelligent transportation systems is the capstone design project plan for one male student and three female students in the department’s Electronics Systems Engineering Technology program as they prepare for graduation in December. Intellimotion Innovations is the name of the team, whose objective is to create a scaled prototype of a phase 1 vehicle following system, with all movement dependent upon wireless sensing, control and communication. The lead vehicle will have a driver and the second go-kart will trail its path autonomously. Such synchrony does not come by accident, but will be the direct result of the mindful assembling of the four students as a corporate body. “We grew together over the years,” said project manager Edna Cano of the team’s decision to work together. Each member self-selected his or her own position for the project. “We have to implement hardware, software and control design into two vehicles, they must be scaled and they need to work in an enclosed area with the second vehicle having to intelligently mimic the first vehicle.” The first vehicle is going to have sensing and it will process data that wirelessly communicates with the second vehicle, controlling the vehicle’s speed, steering and braking. “Right now we are in the planning stage, doing research,” said Cano. “I feel confident that we’ll get this done.” “We’ve already talked amongst ourselves that when the summer hits we are not leaving on vacation but we are going to stay here and work,” said Geno Martinez, software engineer. Faculty member Dr. Joseph Morgan said, “They will be designing their own circuit board, which will have embedded intelligence and it will be required to work.

From left: Geno Martinez, Edna Cano, Giselle Perez and Kenia Sifuentes, together known as the team Intellimotion Innovations, work on their driverless car capstone project.

We are talking about a significant level of work that is not typical of a senior design project. They build everything, from the boards to the enclosures. They’ll be under the car with crescent wrenches and screwdrivers.” “The automotive industry has been trying to pursue this capability of wireless communication between cars for many years,” said Martinez. “This capability could then be scaled up in many ways.” While the scope of this effort is rare, more so is the composition of the team. Never before in the program has a four-person capstone project team included three female students. Since the project will occupy a year of the student’s time and effort, each responded to questions about the familial support and interest surrounding this initiative. “I’m going to be a first-generation college graduate,” said Kenia Sifuentes, hardware engineer from Mexico. “Of this project, my mom said, ‘Do you think you can do it?’ It makes them proud, but at the same time I have to prove to them that I am going to do this.” Giselle Perez, systems engineer from Cuba, said, “My parents are not very technical, so they probably would not understand the concept. I should probably [explain it to them].” Martinez added, “When I shared this with my parents, my father, who is a Marine, wondered if the military would be interested in using this technology.” “I don’t have engineers in my family, but they are aware of how much work I have to put into it. They are very proud and very supportive of me,” said Cano. By the summer of 2016, Intellimotion expects to have reached the design implementation phase of the project. Funding for the project was obtained from General Motors and awarded to Dr. Reza Langari, department head and professor. “This project enables our students to work on a cutting edge problem in the emerging area of automated and connected vehicles while also providing an opportunity for the GM partnership to have meaningful impact on the education of our students,” said Langari. Capstone projects in the Electronics Systems Engineering Technology program must meet a technical merit, software and hardware must be developed and the project needs to be funded.

18

ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY


ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

NEW FACULTY FALL 2016 Dr. Byul

Hur

Assistant Professor Electronic Systems Engineering Technology

Dr. Chao

Ma

Assistant Professor Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering Technology

Mr. Robert M.

Borsh, Jr. Associate Professor of Practice Industrial Distribution

Mr. Bill

Fidler Senior Lecturer Master of Industrial Distribution

Hur received both his Master of Science degree and Ph.D. from the University of Florida in electrical and computer engineering. His research interests include mixed-signal/ RF circuit design and wireless system development, RF test and measurement automation, and environmental and biomedical data measurement and analysis. Prior to joining the faculty at Texas A&M, he served as lecturer and post-doctoral associate at the University of Florida.

Ma received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles in mechanical engineering. His research interests lie in the field of advanced manufacturing, such as additive manufacturing, laser manufacturing, nanocomposites and modeling of manufacturing processes. Prior to joining the faculty at Texas A&M, he pioneered fundamental studies on laser interaction with nanoparticles reinforced metals.

Borsh graduated from the Texas A&M MID program while working as a corporate president. His research interests include teamwork within industrial distribution and manufacturing organizations, as well as leadership within organizational structures. He has served on numerous professional association boards and is very passionate about teaching transferable skill-sets to young professionals and future leaders.

Fidler is a High Point University graduate with a Bachelor of Science in business administration and a Top Executive Management Program graduate from INSEAD University in Fontainbleau, France. He is a member of the Chemical Education Foundation board of trustees and has served as a member of the board of directors for the National Association of Chemical Distributors and the board of Henderson Community College. 19

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY & INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION

engineering.tamu.edu/etid


NONPROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID COLLEGE STATION TX 77843 PERMIT NO. 215

College of Engineering | Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-0000

TRANSFORMING ENGINEERING EDUCATION

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY & INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION

engineering.tamu.edu/etid

ETID 2015-2016 annual report  

Learn about the great things that ETID has been up to in the past year!

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you