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Oth.her


WHERE, WHY, WHAT IS SHE? THE TRUTH! MY LIFE IS IRONY AND CONTRADICTION, I THINK I AM A EMPOWERING INDIVIDUAL OF MY PATRIARCH. THE TRUTH IS... MORE UNVEILING THAN WORDS COULD EXPRESS. I’M LOST IN THIS WORLD OF GLOSS AND PERFECTION, WITHOUT ME EVEN KNOWING. I FIND MYSELF MIRRORING THIS WORLD OF HIGHFALUTIN PAGES. AM I LIVING VANITY OR AM I VANITY SANE. I’M SLOWLY VANISHING THROUGH RAPID CHANGES OF THIS WORLD. I’M BURNT BY THE SMEARS OF MY MAKE-UP, SUFFOCATING BY THE BONES IN MY BODY AND A TON OF BRICKS UPON MY BACK WITH THE FAST PACED LIFE OF MY CONSUMPTION. WHAT IS MY IDENTITY IN THIS WORLD, DOES IT EXIST, DO I FADE?

WHERE AM I ?


OTH HER

CONTENTS Oth.her

Page 6 // bloody dignity Page 11 // what lies beneath Page 17 // indecent exposure

The Other Face //

page 4-22

Page 25 // tort (her) Page 31 // the monstor sity Page 33 // trending venus

The Joke (her) // Page 41 Page 51

page 23-38

// third wave havoc // ironies of the past

The Other Figher //

page 39-60

Page 63 // consu me Page 71 // urge to splurge

Consume Her //

page 61-80


‘The Other Face’ Probably quoted by most women in todays day and age. Not leaving until you have applied your “other face”?

So what does this truly mean in todays world of the modern women. Is this the alter- ego which women could hide behind? Becoming someone they dreamed to be

or the simple reality that almost 50% of women feel the need to apply an identity in order to fit in societies wonder of the ‘ideal’ or ‘perfect’ beauty.


“THE GREAT IRONY OF COURSE IS THAT THIS CONCEPT IS SOLD TO WOMEN AS SOMETHING THAT IS IN THEIR BEST INTERESTS, ALMOST LIKE A FORM OF BODY-ONLY FEMINISM – LOOK A CERTAIN WAY, OR USE YOUR BODY (SEXUALLY SPEAKING) IN A CERTAIN WAY, AND YOU’LL FIND FEMALE EMPOWERMENT.”

The problem with this level of falsification of images is that it presents a completely unrealistic, and totally unattainable standard of what constitutes true beauty to many women and young girls. In fact, this is more than just a ‘presentation’ of something, instead its more like a bombardment, with women and girls now barraged 24/7 with these falsified images in magazines, on websites, adverts and billboards, etc.

of beauty and worth, and in the process femininity, and feminine value is reduced to nothing more than the possession of a certain set of physical attributes.

The great irony of course is that this concept is sold to women as something that is in their best interests, almost like a form of body-only feminism – look a certain way, or use your body (sexually speaking) in a certain way, and you’ll find female empowerment. Sure, doing this might enable you to get certain things you want, but you have to reduce your entire personhood and worth to nothing more than a physical attribute, or a physical sexual It doesn’t take a rocket scientist act in order to obtain what you desire, and to see that such a massive and that’s definitely not empowerment and constant slew of images is going it certainly doesn’t give women an equal to begin to impact upon the footing with men. self-worth of women, of all ages, and that it will have profoundly The important truth that, unfortunately, negative impacts upon the many have lost sight of today is that way they see themselves, and feminine worth, dignity and beauty is the way they live their lives if not found in physical attributes, or sexual they choose to pursue such an availability, instead it is found in nature – unattainable notion of beauty. women are human persons, and because of One of the major flaws with this they have an inalienable beauty, worth the culture of Photoshop and dignity that is theirs from the moment ‘beauty’ is that its sole focus is they come into existence. body-centric, in other words a woman’s physicality is held up as the ultimate standard

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THE OTHER FACE

The Bloody Femme Dignity Fatal


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THE OTHER FACE They really truly are the creatures of profound worth and great beauty that they’ve always desperately longed to be, but never actually realized they already were.

Consumed with insatiable vanity, Narcissus was lured to a pond by the Greek god Nemesis. There he fell in love with his own reflection ‌ and died in permanent adoration of himself, paralysed by his own beauty

Far from being a symbolic mythical anecWhen women truly grasp this dote, narcissism is a growing global pathology manifest as addiction to self-infatuation important reality they realize and self-love. At all times, narcissists' greatthat they no longer need to est concern is how they look as opposed to tolerate second-rate, or even totally unacceptable behaviours how they feel. So they deny any feelings or from men, because they know realities that contradict the image they seek. Their obsession shuts out all meaningful huthat they truly are worthy of, and have every right to expect man interaction to the point where afflicted individuals walk in a sea of imagined minonly the most respectful of ions all adoring their presumed grandeur. treatment. And this is where the culture of Photoshop falsification is totally Narcissism is also signified by unrelenting contrary to helping women to tendencies toward manipulation, seduction, power and control. form a healthy understanding about what feminine beauty, identity and worth is really all about.


Photographer // david beneleil Make-Up // virginia le lay @ ford artists Origination // NOI.SE Magazine

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THE OTHER FACE


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Photographer // david beneleil Make-Up // virginia le lay @ ford artists Origination // NOI.SE Magazine


THE OTHER FACE


The power of advertising To change, shape and mold the public's opinion has had a major impact on the lives of women. Women are the main target for many advertisements and are used in many forms of

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advertising. The media has historically used propaganda to define who women are and what they should be. The time period following WWII maybe one of the greatest examples of how completely media can control the ideas of the society on a specific group of people.


The power of advertising to change, shape and mold the public's opinion has had a major impact on the lives of women. Women are the main target for many advertisements and are

used in many forms of advertising. The media has historically used propaganda to define who women are and what they should be. The time period following WWII maybe one of the greatest examples of how completely media can control the ideas of the society on a specific group of people.

THE OTHER FACE

THE OTHER FACE

What Lies Beneath


“PSYCHOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF THE PURSUIT OF THE PERFECT FEMALE BODY INCLUDE UNHAPPINESS, CONFUSION, MISERY, AND INSECURITY.”

Beauty is a most elusive commodity. Ideas of what is beautiful vary across cultures and change over time. Beauty cannot be quantified or objectively measured; 13 // 14


THE OTHER FACE It is the result of the judgments of others. The concept is difficult to define, as it is equated with different, sometimes contradictory, ideas. When people are asked to define beauty, they tend to mention abstract, personal qualities rather than external, quantifiable ones.

The beholder’s perceptions and cognitions influence the degree of attractiveness at least as much as do the qualities of the beheld. Because beauty is an ideal, an absolute, such as truth and goodness, the pursuit of it does not require justification. An ideal, by definition, can be met by only a minority of those who strive for it.


SSkki ni n D Dee ee pp Photographer // lyle adams @ Unitec Make-Up // alarice stuart Model // lee-yonche kirchner Art Direction // tamsyn moses

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THE OTHER FACE


Indecent Exposure

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There is extensive evidence that viewing such images has a harmful effect on women and girls’ self esteem. For example, a study found that women who viewed magazine adverts featuring images of thin women felt more dissatisfied and anxious about their bodies.

THE OTHER FACE

The growth of cosmetic surgery usage has been driven in part by advertising by the cosmetic surgery industry in magazines, newspapers, on the internet and on television. Indeed, research has found that the growing visibility of cosmetic surgery in the entertainment industries and mass media – and people’s beliefs about their ability to change their appearance.


Photographer // greg adamski Make-Up // marianna yukiowicz

@ d’vision

Origination // NOI.SE Magazine

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THE OTHER FACE


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THE OTHER FACE


‘The Joke (her)‘ The real behind appearances is always suffering and power, tragic, sublime and transfigured: for even the heartless can fall victim to pity, to the dazzling lure of beauty within ugliness.

The real is ungrounded when it encounters the beautiful: beauty is the abominable underground, horror beyond horror, the ‘unlife’ beyond life, the inert decaying matter feeding swarms of parasites. Not the

abyss but con coursing flies, vectors of disorganization, dense congregations of insects pressing in the gaps, eternally unearthing. Pullulating herds of larval awareness.


“THEY SAY “BEAUTY IS SKIN DEEP”. IS IT TIME TO RETHINK THE ABOVE PROVERB?”

Beauty is a parameter which has been disproportionately placed over women to achieve by society. You like it or not, there is immense pressure from everywhere to conform to beauty standards. The pressure ranges from blatant encouragement and dictation of behaviour to subtle and unconscious behaviourreinforcement from people around. You realize that the day you are groomed, you are treated better. Women treat this as a subtle incentive and think that the social reward is worth the effort and time they spent in grooming themselves. By grooming, I do not just mean looking neat and formal, I mean all the painful procedures that women undergo to look well groomed like threading, waxing, facials, removing black heads, wearing uncomfortable high heels and multiple things that make them attractive. The standards of beauty for us are still lower; hence we just restrict ourselves to grooming. While when I think about women who make a living based on looks like models and actresses, the beauty standards are way too high. Think about Heidi Montag- 10 surgeries in a day?

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Women in china undergo foot binding (from the age of 3) to achieve lotus footwhich ultimately cripples them for life. In Indonesia, women get their neck stretched to over twice its natural length using brass rings since they are very young. By the time the woman is full grown, she may have as much as 20 lbs. of metal around her neck that is now 10” – 15” long. Having that much weight on top your shoulders is uncomfortable thus restraining them in even ordinary tasks such as drinking water from a cup or looking up. Women pull out their hair for an unnaturally receded hairline in England. American women undergo corset training for enhancing breasts and creating an extremely thin waistline thus restricting their ability to breath. Indian women apply harmful chemicals like bleach and a variety of fairness creams thus spoiling the quality of their skin over a period of time at a promise of better complexion. Women go on strict diets and almost starvation causing anorexia and cessation of menses at an early age. Is the social reward really worth it? They say “Beauty is Skin Deep”. Is it time to rethink the above proverb?


THE JOKE (HER)

Gloss OverTort [her]


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THE JOKE (HER) Porcelain dolls having shiny long curls, plum lips, amazingly beautiful breasts and nearly non-existent waists stare at us from each poster, billboard, magazine ad and television commercial. The border between real-life beauty and these non-existent Photoshop models is beginning to blur. Each day, hundreds of women fall victims to this deception. Each lady wants to resemble the fake dolls. Subconsciously, an average woman feels unhappy and unattractive. Media have played large role in setting new beauty standards. These beauty ideals are surely impossible to achieve. Photoshop has taken model perfection to a brand new level. Skin starts lacking wrinkles, beauty spots and pimples. Hair flows freely like a shiny silk river. Thighs tighten up to reveal every single delicate muscle. Eyes turn deep, crystal blue. “MEDIA AND FEMALE PSYCHOLOGY” All artificially imposed notions of beauty make a regular woman feel like the plainest creature to ever walk the surface of the earth. The shiny image of media models seems like a distant ideal coming from a parallel universe. Ladies start feeling miles away from thin, sexy and elegant. These sentiments are only to the benefit of the cosmetic industry and plastic surgery. The number of individuals spending serious amounts on beautifying procedures and products is constantly increasing. All these people are simply trying to achieve the impossible beauty standards determined by media.

“BEAUTY AND TEENAGERS “ The effect of these newly imposed beauty standards is extremely detrimental to the development of teen girls. Puberty is a period when no girl is at peace with her looks and body. It is a period of change and of novelties. Taking as an example the female image that media have put together in no way helps a growing girl in her transformation. Teen girls learn early on in life that beauty is a must if a woman wants to be successful and desired. Young women subject themselves to serious diets, which often turn into major eating disorders. The mindset of a young lady alters early on in life. The strive for this artificial beauty affects her objectives and goals. “WOMEN AS OBJECTS” Media also work hard to objectify women. Models are equal to bodies. Beautiful bodies. Bodies that act as delicate and impeccable accessories. Bodies that have no goals, plans, intellect and dreams. Simply objects spreading sex appeal over the world.


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THE JOKE (HER)

see-thru Photographer // lyle adams @ Unitec Make-Up // alarice stuart & lee-yonche kirchner Model // nicole peregrino Art Direction // tamsyn moses


The Monstor sity - NAOMI WOLF, THE BEAUTY MYTH: HOW IMAGES OF BEAUTY ARE USED AGAINST WOMEN

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THE JOKE (HER)

“The beauty myth of the present is more insidious than any mystique of femininity yet: A century ago, Nora slammed the door of the doll’s house; a generation ago, women turned their backs on the consumer heaven of the isolated multiapplianced home; but where women are trapped today, there is no door to slam. The contemporary ravages of the beauty backlash are destroying women physically and depleting us psychologically. If we are to free ourselves from the dead weight that has once again been made out of femaleness, it is not ballots or lobbyists or placards that women will need first; it is a new way to see.”


“WHILE THE TODAY'S MASS MEDIA CATER TO MARKET CONSUMER PRODUCTS, THE PURSUIT OF BEAUTY SEEM TO BE FOLLOWING THE SAME ROUTE. BEAUTY IS PERCEIVED AS WHATEVER PROMISES THAT PRODUCT OFFERS AND THE MASSES AGREE WITH IT. INDIVIDUALITY IS SLOWLY BEING REPLACED BY CONFORMITY.”

Throughout the ages, the media has played its hand against our perception of what is beautiful. From the renaissance era on graphic images depicting the fairest maidens of the land, to today’s magazine 2-page cosmetic advertisement spread. These images were supposed to replicate real life beauty but instead, it has evolved into subconscious messages, educating us on what should be beautiful. If history has thought us anything from the cone shaped bra period, it is that the masses can be easily swayed in the astuteness of beauty. Billboards around us display images of sleek artistry and cleverly themed colors. Models pictured with spaced-out stares or sullen pouts exude what deems to be sophistication. No one really walks around with a moody disposition 24 hours and looks like they're stoned. Yet we buy the products in hopes of achieving the same look. Hair was once wore meticulously styled, displaying confidence and accentuating the face. However today we are told that the 'just got out of bed' look is the latest trend.

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Women in that era strive to achieve fair skin and a voluptuous lower half, alluring men with the promise of fertility. Today, we view that painting differently. We see the lack of muscular form, generous thighs and love handles. Venus would be viewed as plus size by today's clothing stores. Current runway models get skinnier while designer labels cater for the tall and thin. Plastic surgeons are fought after to create bee-stung lips and a more generous chest with implants. Women put themselves through various forms of torture to look like their favorite celebrity. The personage of the moment is whomever who has appeared on the silver screen or grace the most number of magazine covers. Through the times, women wavered to whatever the media at that time viewed as beauty. While the today's mass media cater to market consumer products, the pursuit of beauty seem to be following the same route. Beauty is perceived as whatever promises that product offers and the masses agree with it. Individuality is slowly being replaced by conformity. The media use to tell us that beauty is fertility and prosperity, now it seems to be telling us that the secret of beauty is at a department store near you and that beauty is something you can achieve only through sacrifice and a hole in your pocket. Will the press one day tell us that real beauty lies within and that lash extensions, plumping lip glosses and fake nails are superficial and frivolous?


Trending Venus THE JOKE (HER)


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THE JOKE (HER) Photographer // lyle adams @ Unitec Make-Up // alarice stuart Model // nicole peregrino Art Direction // tamsyn moses

under the Blush


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THE JOKE (HER)


‘The Other Figher’ Branding and the substantial financial investment of beauty and image industries in magazines, theoretically, bodies being images becomes a highly desirable commercial strategy for these

publications. The concept of a body that is not self nor flesh but only what is seen, in many ways also legitimates a range of practices upon the body to produce a desirable image – the dualism of woman / body allows for a woman to

practice on or even against her body as an object alien to herself. The further of not just self but virtually all substance from the ‘body’ also devalues what may otherwise have been.


“ WHAT’S HAPPENING HERE? THE PREVALENCE OF EATING DISORDERS AND BODY IMAGE DESPAIR ISN’T CONTAGIOUS OR A MATTER OF INVERTED HEREDITY, SPREADING FROM YOUNG WOMEN TO THEIR MOTHERS. WHO ARE THESE ADULT WOMEN? AND WHY DO THEY NEED HELP? ”

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In the relatively short history of eating disorders treatment, the overwhelming majority of patients and clients have been young women in their teens and twenties. In most cases, a young woman’s mother makes the first call for help, arranging therapy, medical atten- tion, and other treatment for her daughter. Nowadays, adult women still make the initial calls to an eating disorder or body image professional. But more and more, these women call to get help not for their daughters—but for themselves. Over the past few years, the national press has periodically asked me to discuss the growing number of women over thirty seeking treatment for eating disorders. Each time a news story appears on this subject, I receive dozens of calls from additional reporters and pro- ducers. I also hear from many ordinary women who say, “This is every woman’s secret. It’s about time we started talking about it.” This buzz of media interest reflects the mounting number of women in their thirties, forties, fifties, sixties, and even older women who suffer from seriously disordered eating or body image problems.

The Renfrew Center, a national leader in eating disorders treatment, reports that one-third of its residential patients are now over thirty, a historical shift. Eating disorders therapists around the country are seeing steady increases in the number of adult women on their case- loads. On the outside, most of these adult women seem successful in their careers and appear to have their lives under control. Inside, however, they spiral through frightening and dreary stages of severe dieting, bingeing, purging, and obsessing about their weight. What’s happening here? The prevalence of eating disorders and body image despair isn’t contagious or a matter of inverted heredity, spreading from young women to their mothers. Who are these adult women? And why do they need help? They may be women struggling with body image loathing that arose during their youth and never really abated. They may have suffered from anorexia or bulimia in their teens but pulled out of the downward spiral for decades—only to relapse when they are older.


Third Wave Havoc THE OTHER FIGHER


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THE OTHER FIGHER

“MAGAZINES PORTRAY AND COMPARE HAPPINESS WITH BEING THIN; THEREFORE SOME FEEL IF THEY ARE NOT THIN, THEN THEY ARE NOT HAPPY. AS WITH WOMEN OF ALL AGES, MANY COLLEGE-AGE WOMEN ARE BELIEVED TO HOLD UNREALISTIC IDEALS OF BODY SHAPE AND SIZE, IDEALS THAT CAN BE BOTH PHYSICALLY AND EMOTIONALLY UNHEALTHY.”

Millions of women every day are bombarded with the media’s idea of the “perfect” body. These unrealistic images are portrayed in women’s magazines all over the country. The message being sent to women is that they are not pretty or skinny enough. The average American woman is 5’4” and weighs 140 pounds, while the average American model is 5’11” and weighs 117 pounds. Annually, magazine companies spend billions of dollars on diet and exercise advertisements to put in their magazines. Magazines sell body dissatisfaction to their readers through unrealistic images of women, as well as dieting and exercise information. Thirty years ago, Marilyn Monroe, a size 14, had the “ideal” body shape and size, but today’s standard is much smaller. As the beauty ideal continues to get smaller in our society, body image within American women continues to plummet. Magazines portray and compare happiness with being thin; therefore some feel if they are not thin, then they are not happy.

As with women of all ages, many college-age women are believed to hold unrealistic ideals of body shape and size, ideals that can be both physically and emotionally unhealthy. Our study, focused on women who attend the University of Wisconsin-Madison that are between the ages of eighteen and twenty-four. We wanted to identify the specific effects that the magazine portrayal of the “perfect” body has on collegeage women’s body image and self-esteem. We hypothesized that this portrayal contributes to women having negative body images and selfesteem due to the reinforcement of body shapes and sizes in magazines that are unrealistic for most women to attain. In our study we defined body image as the subjective concept of one’s physical appearance based on self-observation and the reaction of others. We defined self-esteem as the positive and negative evaluations people have of themselves.


Strait Fit Photographer // lyle adams @ Unitec Make-Up // alarice stuart & lee-yonche kirchner Model // nicole peregrino Art Direction // tamsyn moses

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THE OTHER FIGHER


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THE OTHER FIGHER


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THE OTHER FIGHER

Hyp n o t i z e d


Ironies Of The Past

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INEVITABLE. “

Because beauty is an ideal, an absolute, such as truth and goodness, the pursuit of it does not require justification. An ideal, by definition, can be met by only a minority of those who strive for it. If too many women are able to meet the beauty standards of a particular time and place, then those standards must change in order to maintain their extraordinary nature. The value of beauty standards depends on their being special and unusual and is one of the reasons why the ideal changes over time. When images of beauty change, female bodies are expected to change, too. Different aspects of the female body and varying images of each body part are modified to meet the constantly fluctuating ideal. The ideal is always that which is most difficult to achieve and most unnatural in a given time period. Because these ideals are nearly impossible to achieve, failure and disappointment are inevitable.

became and the more attractive they were considered to be. The painful custom of foot binding finally ended in the twentieth century after women had endured over one thousand years of torture for beauty’s sake.

In the sixteenth century, European women bound themselves into corsets of whalebone and hardened canvas. A piece of metal or wood ran down the front to flatten the breasts and abdomen. This garment made it impossible to bend at the waist and difficult to breathe. A farthingale, which was typically worn over the corset, held women’s skirts out from their bodies. It consisted of bent Although people have been decorating wood held together with tapes their bodies since prehistoric times, the and made such simple activities Chinese may have been the first to develop as sitting nearly impossible. the concept that the female body can and Queen Catherine of France should be altered from its natural state. The introduced waist binding with practice of foot binding clearly illustrates the a tortuous invention consisting objectification of parts of the female body of iron bands that minimized as well as the demands placed on women the size of the waist to the ideal to conform to beauty ideals. The custom measurement of thirteen inches. called for the binding of the feet of fiveIn the seventeenth century, year-old girls so that as they grew, their toes the waist was still laced, but became permanently twisted under their breasts were once again stylish, arches and would actually shrink in size. and fashions were designed to The big toe remained untouched. The more enhance them. Ample breasts, tightly bound the feet, the more petite they hips, and buttocks became the beauty ideal, perhaps paralleling a generally warmer attitude

THE OTHER FIGHER

“THE IDEAL IS ALWAYS THAT WHICH IS MOST DIFFICULT TO ACHIEVE AND MOST UNNATURAL IN A GIVEN TIME PERIOD. BECAUSE THESE IDEALS ARE NEARLY IMPOSSIBLE TO ACHIEVE, FAILURE AND DISAPPOINTMENT ARE


“THE PRESSURE TO COPE WITH SUCH CONFLICTING DEMANDS AND TO KEEP UP WITH THE CONTINUAL CHANGES IN THE IDEAL FEMALE BODY IS HIGHLY

AMERICAN WOMEN WITH NEGATIVE BODY IMAGES. ”

STRESSFUL AND HAS RESULTED IN A LARGE MAJORITY OF

toward family life. A white pallor was also popular at that time, probably as an indication that the woman was so affluent that she did not need to work outdoors, where the sun might darken her skin. Ceruse, a white lead-based paint now known to be toxic, was used to accentuate the pallor. Tight corsets came back into vogue in Europe and North America in the mid- nineteenth century, and many women were willing to run the risk of developing serious health problems in order to wear them. The tight lacing often led to pulmonary disease and internal organ damage. American women disregarded the advice of their physicians, who spoke against the use of corsets because of their potential to displace internal organs. Fainting, or “the vapors,” was the result of wearing such tightly laced clothing that normal breathing became impossible. Even the clergy sermonized against corsets; miscarriages were known to result in pregnant women who insisted on lacing themselves up too tightly. In 53 // 54

the late nineteenth century, the beauty ideal required a tiny waist and full hips and bustline. Paradoxically, women would go on diets to gain weight while, at the same time, trying to achieve a smaller waistline. Some women were reported to have had their lower ribs removed so that their waists could be more tightly laced In the twentieth century, the ideal female body has changed several times, and American women have struggled to change along with it. In the 1920s, the ideal had slender legs and hips, small breasts, and bobbed hair and was physically and socially active In recent decades the beauty ideal has combined such opposite traits as erotic sophistication with naive innocence, delicate grace with muscular athleticism, and thin bodies with large breasts. The pressure to cope with such conflicting demands and to keep up with the continual changes in the ideal female body is highly stressful and has resulted in a large majority of American women with negative body images. Women’s insecurity about their looks has made it easy to convince them that small breasts are a “disease” that require surgical intervention. The sophisticated woman of the 1990s who is willing to accept the significant health risks of breast implants in order to mold her body to fit the beauty ideal has not progressed far beyond her sisters who bound their feet and waists.


THE OTHER FIGHER


Photographer and Styling // tamsyn moses Model // nicole peregrino @ vanity walk models Make-up // lee-yonche kirchner

Looking Back

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THE OTHER FIGHER


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THE OTHER FIGHER


Fear Shaped

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THE OTHER FIGHER


‘Consume Her’ “No such thing ‘too much shopping or having more than one”. Most women would agree with that statement as most females are reluctant

to stop consuming in the latest trends. 60% of women surveyed and interviewed believe in staying in the ‘current season’ of clothing trends. What is this doing to

the identity of the women? Are they lost and over consumed by the the rapid changes of fashion trends in this fast paced cenutry?


“ALTHOUGH ALL WOMEN KNOW THAT THE “TRANSFORMATION FROM FEMALE TO FEMININE IS ARTIFICIAL”, WE CONSPIRE TO HIDE THE AMOUNT OF TIME AND EFFORT IT TAKES, PERHAPS OUT OF FEAR THAT OTHER WOMEN DON’T NEED AS MUCH TIME AS WE DO TO APPEAR BEAUTIFUL.” In the twentieth century, the ideal female body has changed several times, and American women have struggled to change along with it. In the 1920s, the ideal had slender legs and hips, small breasts, and bobbed hair and was physically and socially active. Women removed the stuffing from their bodices and bound their breasts to appear young and boyish. In the 1940s and 1950s, the ideal returned to the hourglass shape. Marilyn Monroe was considered the epitome of the voluptuous and fleshy yet naive and childlike ideal. In the 1960s, the ideal had a youthful, thin, lean body and long, straight hair. American women dieted relentlessly in an attempt to emulate the tall, thin, teenage model Twiggy, who personified the 1960s’ beauty ideal. Even pregnant women were on diets in response to their doctors’ orders not to gain more than twenty pounds, advice physicians later rejected as unsafe. Menopausal women begged their physicians to prescribe hormone replacement therapy, which was rumoured to prevent wrinkles and keep the body youthful, and were willing to run any health risk to preserve their 63 // 64

appearance. In the 1970s, a thin, tan, sensuous look was “in.” The 1980s’ beauty ideal remained slim but required a more muscular, toned, and physically fit body. In recent decades the beauty ideal has combined such opposite traits as erotic sophistication with naive innocence, delicate grace with muscular athleticism, and thin bodies with large breasts. The pressure to cope with such conflicting demands and to keep up with the continual changes in the ideal female body is highly stressful and has resulted in a large majority of American women with negative body images. Women’s insecurity about their looks has made it easy to convince them that small breasts are a “disease” that require surgical intervention. The sophisticated woman of the 1990s who is willing to accept the significant health risks of breast implants in order to mold her body to fit the beauty ideal has not progressed far beyond her sisters who bound their feet and waists. The value of beauty depends in part on the high costs of achieving it. Such costs may be physical, temporal, economic, or psychological. Physical costs include the pain of ancient beauty rituals such as foot binding, tattooing, and nose and ear piercing as well as more modern rituals such as wearing pointy-toed, highheeled shoes, tight jeans, and sleeping with one’s hair in curlers. Side effects of beauty rituals have often been disastrous for women’s health. Tattooing and ear piercing with unsanitary instruments have led to serious, sometimes fatal, infections. Many women have been poisoned by


Consu Me

CONSUME HER


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CONSUME HER toxic chemicals in cosmetics (e.g., Ceruse, arsenic, benzene, and petroleum) and have died from the use of unsafe diet products. The beauty-related disorders anorexia nervosa and bulimia have multiple negative health effects, and side effects of plastic surgery include haemorrhages, scars, and nerve damage. Silicone implants have resulted in breast cancer, autoimmune disease, and the formation of thick scar tissue. Physical costs of dieting include a constant feeling of hunger that leads to emotional changes, such as irritability; in cases of very low caloric intake, dieters can experience difficulty concentrating, confusion, and even reduced cognitive capacity. The only growing group of smokers in the United States are young women, many of whom report that they smoke to curb their appetites. High heels cause lower back pain and lead to a variety of podiatric disorders. Furthermore, fashion trends have increased women’s vulnerability in a variety of ways; long hair and dangling earrings have gotten caught in machinery and entangled in clothing and led to injury. High heels and tight skirts prevent women from running from danger. The New York Times fashion reporter Bernadine Morris was alarmed to see in Pierre Cardin’s 1988 summer fashion show tight wraps that prevented the models from moving their arms. Attaining the beauty ideal requires a lot of money. Expensive cosmetics (e.g., Makeup, moisturizers, and hair dyes and straighteners) are among the most popular and are thought to be the most effective, even though their ingredients cost the same (and sometimes are the same)

as those in less expensive products. Health spas have become fashionable again as vacation spots for the rich and famous, and everyone wants to wear expensive clothing with designer labels. Plastic surgery has become so accepted and so common that, although it’s quite expensive, surgeons advertise their services on television. Beauty rituals are timeconsuming activities. Jokes about how long women take to get ready for a date are based on the additional tasks women do when getting dressed. It takes time to pluck eyebrows, shave legs, manicure nails, apply makeup, and arrange hair. Women’s clothing is more complicated than men’s, and many more accessories are used. Although all women know that the “transformation from female to feminine is artificial”, we conspire to hide the amount of time and effort it takes, perhaps out of fear that other women don’t need as much time as we do to appear beautiful. A lot of work goes into looking like a “natural” beauty, but that work is not acknowledged by popular culture, and the tools of the trade are kept out of view.


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CONSUME HER

Photographer // tamsyn moses Model // brianna tuffrey @ nova models Styling // alarice stuart

Over Dressed


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CONSUME HER


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CONSUME HER


“THE RAPID STYLE CHANGES ALSO COME WITH SOCIAL COSTS. THE FAST FASHION PHENOMENON IS ONLY POSSIBLE BECAUSE CLOTHING IS SO CHEAP AND THAT IS ONLY POSSIBLE BECAUSE OF THE MOVING OF PRODUCTION TO LOW COST COUNTRIES, AND BY PUTTING DOWNWARD PRESSURE ON WORKING CONDITIONS AND ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS, THE SO CALLED

`RACE TO THE BOTTOM´.”

Increased buying has led to a growing problem of what to do with our castoffs. We buy more and more often and therefore get rid of our “old” clothes more frequently. It seems like quantity has become more important than quality. Today it seems like there is no need for recycling or reusing anymore, because there are new, cheap products available. The seasonal organisation of shopping practices and the turnover of new goods have changed. Today there is a constant turnover of products, compared to three or four fashion seasons 30 years ago. 71 // 72

“The rate of purchase and disposal has dramatically increased, so the path that a T-Shirt travels from the sales floor to the landfill has become much shorter”. People are no longer throwing out clothes because they are old and tatty but because they are out of fashion.

Three times out of four, our unwanted clothes go straight in the bin. This means our clothes have increasing environmental costs.

The rapid style changes also Fast fashion is about the trend of the come with social costs. The moment being “in fashion”, but declining fast fashion phenomenon is quality means that the vast amounts of only possible because clothing clothing we donate to charity and which is so cheap and that is only eventually end up at a textile recycling possible because of the moving plant like LMB cannot be reused (as of production to low cost second hand clothing) which leads to more countries, and by putting and more collected textiles still ending up downward pressure on working in landfill. An additional 74 per cent of conditions and environmental new purchases end up dying long, slow standards, the so called `race to deaths in the nations landfills. the bottom´.


CONSUME HER

Urge To Splurge


“ONCE A GARMENT COMES TO THE END OF ITS SHORT LIFETIME, IT IS TIME FOR THE BUYER TO GO AND REPLACE...”

The big fast fashion stores have made clothing so affordable that it has lead to an overconsumption of unsustainable clothing. Because prices are so low, it is easy for a shopper to almost overlook the fact that they are actually spending money in these stores. $5 here, $3.99 there, another $10.99 there… we believe that we are saving money by buying cheap clothing but sometimes do not realize that it all adds up in the end. Often times, someone will buy something they only wear once (even knowing that it will be only worn once) before discarding it. Enough change can be found in the cushions of a couch to go out into the fast fashion world and buy a plain T-shirt, but one may not realize that after its been washed once or twice, the dye will fade, it will shrink, or become misshapen. Once a garment comes to the end of its short lifetime, it is time for the buyer to go and replace it thus doubling the amount of money spent. This cycle repeats and eventually the same amount of money is being spent on fast fashion as it would be on more sustainable clothing with longer lifetimes. 73 // 74


CONSUME HER


Photographer and Styling // tamsyn moses Model // nicole peregrino @ vanity walk models Make-up // lee-yonche kirchner

Fast 75 // 76


Fashion CONSUME HER


77 // 78


CONSUME HER


79 // 80


CONSUME HER

Materialise


A CKNOWLEDGEMENTS Oth.her

the ugly truth about beaity // www.theleadingedgeblog.com power of advertising // www.123helpme.com beauty is a beast // jo freeman uncomfortable in our own skin // www.theguardian.co.uk why are women obsessed with beauty? // pixelsinlife.blogspot.com how the media changed the perception of beauty // www.helium.com the body myth // margo maine & joe kelly the beauty myth // naomi wolf overconsumption of clothes // make-doandmend.org

I want to give special thanks to family, friends, lecturers, photographers, make-up artists and models for the production of Oth.Her magazine and the guidance and support of my degree at Unitec.


a tm.d design 2012


Oth.her