Page 1

S U S TA I N A B L E   ZEPHYRHILLS  CONSERVE  |  EMPOWER  |  THRIVE 

COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN  CITY OF ZEPHYRHILLS  |  APPROVED JUNE 11, 2012 


CITY OF ZEPHYRHILLS CITY COUNCIL Steve Van Gorden, Mayor Kenneth V. Compton, President Lance A. Smith, Vice President Fay J. "Jodi" Wilkeson, Councilwoman Kenneth Burgess, Councilman Charles E. Proctor, Councilman

CITY MANAGER

PROJECT TEAM

James Drumm

PLANNING DEPARTMENT

SUPPORTING CITY DEPARTMENTS

Todd Vande Berg, Director R.J. Keetch, Assistant City Planner Beverly Jones, Grant Support Specialist

BUILDING DEPARTMENT

William Burgess, Building Official LIBRARY Vicki Elkins, Director MIS DEPARTMENT

Michael Panak, Director PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT

Richard Moore, Director Shane LeBlanc, Public Works Superintendent UTILITY DEPARTMENT

David Henderson, Director

CONSULTANT

Vrana Consulting, Inc. SUBCONSULTANTS Michael R. Wood Land Use Planning Ekistics Design Studio Laurie Meggesin Public Involvement Ramona Madhosingh-Hector, UF/IFAS COMMUNITY MEMBERS + PARTNERS

Thank you for your time and energy spent creating this plan. You are the champions!


table of contents  SECTION ONE ‐ INTRODUCTION  Introduc on ......................................................... 1‐1  Community Sustainability .................................... 1‐2  Plan Overview ...................................................... 1‐4  Guiding Principles for Decision Making ................ 1‐6  SECTION TWO ‐ TARGETS + INTIATIVES  Community Awareness + Ac on........................... 2‐1  Green Buildings & Clean Energy ........................... 2‐9  Green Jobs + Green Businesses .......................... 2‐15  Land Use, Design + Connec vity ......................... 2‐21  Waste Reduc on + Reuse ................................... 2‐29  Water Conserva on + Protec on ....................... 2‐35  Urban Agriculture .............................................. 2‐39  SECTION THREE ‐ TOOLS + TIMEFRAMES  Ac on Plan .......................................................... 3‐1  Implementa on Tools .......................................... 3‐1   

APPENDIX Separate Document  Community Mee ng Materials  Assistance Programs for Sustainability Projects 

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS  |  i 


SECTION ONE     

               

introduction

S U S TA I N A B L E ZEPHYRHILLS 


SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLLS 

introduction As a society, we are ever learning about the interconnectedness of the world in which we live.  The answers to how we affect our environment and, in turn, how the environment affects us  continue to unfold. While the term “sustainability” might seem a catch phrase of the moment  to some, the evidence shows that our collec ve ac ons drive outcomes that can be felt across  space,  me, boundaries, culture, and species.   So, it is natural for the City of Zephyrhills and the community to delve into the issues of sustain‐ ability to better understand the risks and challenges of a world with fewer natural resources  yet more people, and also the opportuni es for mee ng demand with new, more efficient  ways of using resources. Planning for the future health, safety, and welfare of ci zens, a er all,  is the core function of government.   In pursuit of a vibrant and resource‐efficient Zephyrhills, this plan addresses several sustainability  topics and a range of recommended ac ons to move the community toward its near‐term  sustainability targets. Not every action must be achieved but each action will lead the community  to a higher plane of sustainability—either through energy efficiency, pollu on reduc on, a  more resilient local economy, a stronger community, or some combination of each. Sustainable  prac ces and ac ons are like the interwoven threads of one cloth. The greater the number  and  diversity of threads, the stronger and richer the cloth will be.     

SUSTAINABILITY IS A COMMUNITY VALUE  Though sustainable ac ons, it shows that we care about people and we care about the  natural environment and the local economy that supports life and our community. 

INTRODUCTION | 1 ‐1    


THE IMPERATIVE FOR 

community sustainability  During the  me that the Zephyrhills community began  working on this plan, the Earth’s popula on reached  seven billion. Today there are roughly four billion more  people on Earth than there were 50 years ago and  three billion less than are projected in year 2050. More  people translates to more need for natural resources,  including finite supplies of drinking water, arable land,  and fossil fuels.  A growing popula on will also place greater strain on  the planet's sinks—features of Earth’s ecosystem that   remove pollu on from the atmosphere, biosphere,  and oceans. More of “us” means greater consumption  and also greater waste, a por on of which is pollu on.    If concentra ons of pollu on (e.g., carbon dioxide in 

EARTH’S CLOSED‐ECOSYSTEM  All of the living processes on Earth occur within  a closed system. Except for sunlight, resources  available on Earth are limited to those inside  this system. Change in one part of the system  can have an effect on other parts of the system.  

Air &  Climate 

SUSTAINABILITY—A DEFINITION  Sustainability creates and maintains the   condi ons under which humans and nature  can exist in produc ve harmony, that permit  fulfilling the social, economic, and other    requirements of  present and future              genera ons.                — U.S. Environmental ProtecƟon Agency  the atmosphere) exceed the pollu on processing     capabili es of sinks (e.g., forests, soils, and oceans),  the environment can become inhospitable to support  life (e.g., global warming and climate change).  The potential for dwindling natural resources and  water, land, and air pollu on have implica ons for   society and economies on global, regional, and local  scales—including scarcity, higher costs, and a host  of related vulnerabili es in parts of the world such as:  • • • •

Ecological degradation  Hunger and poverty  Political and social unrest  Economic injustice 

Alterna vely, concerted efforts to use resources wisely  and efficiently can extend a range of benefits to the  Zephyrhills community including:   • Cost savings  • Greater produc vity  • Less dependence on foreign oil  • Healthier environments (natural and human‐built) 

Life

• Be er buildings and las ng neighborhoods  • Sustainable livelihoods  • Stronger community  • A rac ve city image  

Soil

• A viable future for future genera ons 

Preparing our community for the future is probably the  most important challenge and opportunity of our time.  What will be Zephyrhills’ legacy to future generations?  

1 ‐2  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   


SUSTAINABILITY ‐ A SIMPLE PRINCIPLE   Everything that we need for our survival and  well‐being depends—either directly or indirectly— on our natural environment.  Fostering a  strong, stable &  sustainable   economy 

SUSTAINABILITY SUSTAINABILITY   Promo ng   effec ve,   par cipa ve   governance 

economy

FINANCIAL   CAPITAL  NATURAL  CAPITAL 

SOCIAL   CAPITAL 

community

Living within    environmental  limits 

ecology

Nurturing a  strong,  healthy, and  just society 

THE TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE 

THREE SPHERES OF SUSTAINABILITY 

The triple bo om line involves understanding  and integrating the concerns and opportunities   of ecology, economy, and community in decision  making for community development. 

The concept of sustainability is frequently illus‐ trated as three spheres represen ng ecology  (natural environment), economy, and community  (society). The spheres are arranged to show their  dynamic rela onship, which is to say that any  change to one affects the others.   The figures are arranged in two ways to show  interdependence of our ecology, economy, and  community. In the figure above, economy and  community are nested within ecology to illustrate  that everything we need for survival and well‐being  depends on and is constrained by the natural   environment. Everything produced and consumed  takes from ecology—water, energy, plants and  animals. Ul mately, all of the goods, materials,  and by‐products created are returned to our air,  water, and land ecosystems.  

Sustainable   Development 

The figure at le  shows sustainable development as the area where the three spheres overlap, con‐ veying balance between ecology, economy, and  community. In decision making for sustainable  development, this balance is commonly referred  to as the triple boƩom line.  

INTRODUCTION | 1 ‐3    


CONSERVE | EMPOWER | THRIVE 

plan overview  The City of Zephyrhills and community stakeholders  have created this strategic action plan to guide all levels  of community involvement toward a greener, more  sustainable city. The aim of Sustainable Zephyrhills is  to engage the community in both small and large actions  to protect the environment, conserve natural resources,  foster a more resilient local economy, and enhance  overall quality of life for current and future genera‐ ons of Zephyrhills residents.  

PLAN FOCUS  Sustainable Zephyrhills addresses the seven focus areas  listed below as they primarily relate to energy and water  conserva on, strengthening the local economy, and  enhancing quality of life.    • • • • • • •

SUSTAINABILITY TARGETS  Reaching the Sustainable Zephyrhills targets will  be the sum result of ac ons by all community  stakeholders—individuals and organiza ons— primarily through using resources efficiently and  wisely every day, in every way.  Sec on 2 provides a discussion of the issues for each  focus area followed by a series of initiatives and actions  to address the issues and achieve one or more meas‐ urable targets. The community was consulted in the  development of the ini a ves, and again to priori ze  the initiatives, as measures to garner community support  and par cipa on in the plan implementa on phase. 

Sec on 3 contains a detailed Ac on Plan iden fying  Community awareness and ac on      the ini a ves and ac ons along with poten al lead  Green buildings and clean energy                  and support entities, estimated timeframes for comple‐ Water conserva on and protec on                                       tion, and implementation methods. The Action Plan is  Waste reduc on and reuse                           a central feature of Sustainable Zephyrhills that com‐ Land use, design, and connec vity             municates ways for interested community members to  Green jobs and green businesses                             “plug into” plan implementa on ac vi es over the  plan’s 10‐year  meframe.   Urban agriculture                

The plan’s themes—Conserve, Empower, Thrive— emphasizes the community’s expanded role in plan  ini a ves and outcomes. Community awareness and  ac on are by far the most important aspect of Sustain‐ able Zephyrhills for it is only through broad community  ac on that the plan targets will be reached.   For several plan initiatives, the city could serve as  connector, convener, or facilitator to individuals or   organizations wishing to take lead roles in sustainability  efforts. The desired end, along with achieving targets,  is to create a strong core of sustainability advocates  and leaders in Zephyrhills through exposure to project  planning, decision making, and achievement. 

PLAN SECTIONS  Section 1 of Sustainable Zephyrhills conveys the spirit,  objectives, and foundation of the plan and identifies  guiding principles for decision making corresponding to  the plan’s seven focus areas.  1 ‐4  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   

PLANNING PROCESS  The Sustainable Zephyrhills planning process is depicted  on page 1‐5. The process began in February 2012 with  the Green Ideas for Zephyrhills community workshops.  Approximately 50 people a ended and generated  more than 200 ideas about ways to make Zephyrhills a  be er and more sustainable community. The most  popular ideas involved better facilities for safe, conven‐ ient walking and bicycling and making recycling easier.  Ideas from the workshops formed the basis of set of  preliminary initiatives presented at two community  workshops later that February. The Green AcƟons for Zephyrhills workshops allowed par cipants to express  their preferences for the ini a ves through a polling  exercise.   An ice cream social/community workshop was held in  early June to present the dra  plan and receive input.  City Council accepted the plan on June 11, 2012.   


GREEN IDEAS WORKSHOPS 

GREEN ACTIONS WORKSHOPS 

 

   

COMMUNITY AWARENESS 

PLANNING   PROCESS  COMMUNTY   FACTORS 

ECONOMIC FACTORS 

ECOLOGICAL FACTORS  POLLING EXERCISE 

DRAFT PLAN WORKSHOP 

CITY COUNCIL APPROVAL 

INTRODUCTION | 1 ‐5    


To achieve sustainability, the        community’s approach must be       strategic—integra ng the principles  of environmental stewardship, social  responsibility, and economic prosperity  to ensure that current and future  genera ons have the resources to  meet their own needs.   Everyday decision making can have a  bearing on the achievement of the  community’s sustainability targets.   Decisions and ac ons that work in  harmony with Sustainable Zephyrhills  ini a ves can mean reaching sustain‐ ability targets sooner rather than later,  or at all.  The guiding principles presented on  this page establish a framework to  help guide decision making by the  city in all ma ers of government    opera ons.  

guiding principles                                                      FOR DECISION MAKING  as drive a car. Build on neighborhood  strengths–repair, reconnect, regen‐ erate. Work in partnerships to create  sustainable development and rede‐ velopment to ensure long‐term  resource availability, thriving busi‐ ness districts and workplaces, and  las ng neighborhoods.  WASTE REDUCTION + REUSE  COMMUNITY AWARENESS + ACTION  It takes a village. Promote a culture  of sustainability in Zephyrhills that  inspires personal responsibility, com‐ munity ac on, and synergis c part‐ nerships in support of sustainability.  

Reduce, reuse, recycle. Conserve   energy and natural resources,       reduce environmental pollutants,  and s mulate commerce and        economic opportunity through local  ac ons aimed at reducing solid  waste. 

GREEN BUILDINGS + CLEAN ENERGY 

WATER CONSERVATION +             Create value through resource      PROTECTION  efficiency. Decrease reliance on energy  City of Pure Water–Our legacy.     generated from fossil fuels through  Conserve and protect precious water  more energy and water‐efficient  resources that are vital to the health  buildings and a greater supply of    of the people of Zephyrhills and the  energy made from renewable        local economy.   resources.   GREEN JOBS + GREEN BUSINESSES  

URBAN AGRICULTURE 

Build economic capacity by nurturing  green industry businesses. Increase  local demand for green products and  services by promoting the merits of  energy efficiency and recycling. Reduce  barriers to business startups or expan‐ sions. Encourage employees and the  community at‐large to shop local  businesses.  

Conserve and connect through local‐ ly‐ produced food. Foster local and    regional food produc on and distri‐ bu on that shortens the distance  between producer and consumer,  creates a vibrant network of people  and organiza ons, connects farms  and community, and increases food  security and job opportuni es in        Zephyrhills. 

LAND USE, DESIGN + CONNECTIVITY  A city of short distances. Promote  socio‐economic diversity through a  mix of housing types. Create streets  that are safe and a rac ve places to  walk, bike, and use transit, and well  1 ‐6  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   


SECTION TWO     

               

targets + initiatives  

S U S TA I N A B L E ZEPHYRHILLS 


A man doesn't plant a tree for himself.  He plants it for posterity.                                    ‐ Alexander Smith 

2 –i | SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS 


WORKING TOWARD SUSTAINABILITY: A STARTING PLACE  THE CONCEPT OF SUSTAINABILITY is far reaching, and certainly more than can be addressed  by one community, in one plan. Achieving balance among the three spheres of sustainability— ecology, economy, and community—requires awareness and action at all levels and in all locations  of human ac vity and behavior on the planet. As such, Sustainable Zephyrhills is a star ng  place for the Zephyrhills community to begin sharing informa on, issues, and prac ces un l a  ‘ pping point’ for sustainability is reached and the community takes the next steps toward  achieving its shared vision of a sustainable future.  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS FOCUS AREAS  EDUCATION +   AWARENESS 

GREEN BUILDINGS +   CLEAN ENERGY 

GREEN JOBS +   GREEN BUSINESSES 

LAND USE, DESIGN +   CONNECTIVITY 

WASTE REDUCTION +   REUSE 

WATER CONSERVATION +   PROTECTION 

URBAN   AGRICULTURE 

THIS SECTION provides an overview of the  issues surrounding the Sustainable Zephyrhills  focus areas. Issue discussions are followed  by a list of community initiatives and actions  that chart a course for achieving the com‐ munity’s near term aspira ons (targets). The  Action Plan in Section 3 goes further by  iden fying poten al ac ng en es and  meframes for implemen ng ac ons.    TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐1    


I hear and I forget.   I see and I remember.  I do and I understand.                         ‐ Confucius 

2 ‐2 | SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS 


A strong community‐government link               elevates the profile of sustainability in the community, and                 

leverages more support for sustainable ac

on.

community awareness + action 

“Where knowledge meets prac cality” is a Zephyrhills  mo o that points to the importance of informa on  and understanding in accomplishing goals. This philos‐ ophy is vitally important to achieving the community’s  goals for a Sustainable Zephyrhills. Several of the plan’s  ini a ves for a greener community rely on the ac ons  of individuals and groups in reducing their ecological  footprint and engaging in learning, teaching, and    advocacy rela ve to sustainability.   Whole‐Community Approach to Sustainability  While government plays an important role in sustaina‐ bility by making planning, policy, and infrastructure  decisions, dissemina ng informa on, engaging and       empowering stakeholders, and exhibi ng leadership,  the community’s sustainability goals cannot be achieved  by government ac on alone. Every member of society  consumes resources and creates waste and, therefore,  has some degree of impact on resource availability for  present and future genera ons. As such, the shortest  distance to a sustainable future is a Whole‐Community  Approach to raising awareness and fostering a culture  of responsibility and ac on.  The Whole‐Community Approach involves three levels  at which learning and ac on for sustainable change  takes place:  •

Individual. The individual develops new knowledge  and skills through training, communi es of prac ce 

inter‐disciplinary learning, and exchange networks.  • Organizational. Organizations establish new priorities,  procedures, and practices to reposition their services  and implement new prac ces.  • Community at‐large. Learning and change occurs at  the society level through new agendas, new part‐ nerships and networks, and new methods of inter‐ ac on and par cipa on.  Dialogue: Pathway to Community Awareness  Ac on requires awareness, which is shaped by culture,  educa on, peers, and personal experience. It is not  sufficient to simply educate people about issues so they  can correct what they do. Interac ve and par cipatory  communica on helps develop deeper understanding  and shared meaning. It is through dialogue—two‐way  communications—that different perspectives on the  issues and possible solutions can be identified, vetted,  supported, and implemented.  Increasingly, community par cipa on is turned to as  an educa onal and learning process to address com‐ munity needs and nurture stakeholders to become  agents of their own ini a ves. This approach creates  condi ons for innova on and systemic thinking about  community sustainability. These condi ons are more  likely to lead to structural changes and behaviors  needed to advance the community’s sustainability  goals.   TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐3    


City of Zephyrhills 2010 

DEMOGRAPHIC Snapshot  Year‐round popula on ............................... 13,288  Seasonal popula on ..................................... 5,754   Median age..................................................... 47.9  Less than age 5 .............................................. 5.8%  Less than age 18 .......................................... 18.7%  Age 65 and over .......................................... 28.5%  Race: White ................................................. 88.7%  Race: Black .................................................... 4.9%  Hispanic/La no (any race) .......................... 10.4%  Speak English less than "very well" ............... 2.1%  Households ................................................... 5,875 

At public workshops for the Sustainable Zephyrhills  plan, community stakeholders expressed desire to  learn more about sustainability, and saw educa on as  a key element to a successful sustainability initiative.   Workshop par cipants said they wanted ‘hands‐on’  learning opportuni es  ed to ac ve and passive recre‐ a on (e.g., green asset bike tours, interpreta ve signs  in nature parks, and building a community garden).  Other community awareness‐related ideas from the  workshops can be framed by the three spheres of    sustainability:  •

Social. Create opportunities for intergenerational pro‐ jects so better relationships could be forged between  youth and seniors while each learn about sustaina‐ ble prac ces.  • Economy. Provide workshops on the cost‐savings and  environmental benefits of going green and buying  green, including use of alternative energy and home  weatherization.  • Ecology. Expand awareness about ways to reduce air  and water pollution by using active transportation  (i.e., walking and biking) and planting trees.  Community‐Based Learning  Residents, businesses, institutions, visitors, and anyone  that calls Zephyrhills home (or home away from home)  can have greater impact on sustainability through com‐ munity‐based learning.  This approach taps into local  knowledge, skills, crea vity, and energy to expand and  improve educa onal opportuni es in the community.  Local organiza ons, such as the Pasco County Cooper‐ 2 ‐4  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   

a ve Extension, schools, colleges, clubs, ins tu ons,  neighborhood groups, and businesses could demon‐ strate environmental stewardship by sponsoring       sustainability‐themed  workshops, seminars, discussion  groups, or community participation projects.   To leverage resources, community‐based learning  efforts could occur in partnership with the city, especially  when efforts compliment Sustainable Zephyrhills ini a‐ tives (e.g., raising awareness about water conservation).  Example Sustainability Discussion Topics:     • • • • •

Impact of lifestyles and alterna ves to                        unsustainable prac ces   Conscious consumerism  Sustainable development principles  Interconnectedness of spheres of community        sustainability—ecology, economy, society  Sustainability on local, regional, and global levels 

The essen al ingredients of community‐based learning  include:  • Community groups motivated to deal with local issues  • Leaders who are commi ed and able to facilitate        dialogue within the group  • Local issues that unify community members to learn  and take ac on  • Local data that is relevant, current, and accurate  • Available resources (e.g., financial, human, technology,  me) 


Ac ve/interac ve teaching methods that promote  cri cal thinking, awareness, and problem‐solving  • Planned outcome (e.g., new skill, completed project) 

TARGET 1  community awareness + ac on  Provide at least one learning opportunity annually  for each of the Sustainable Zephyrhills focus areas. 

“Many hands make light work.” 

OUTREACH TOOLS 

A side benefit of community‐based learning is enrichment  of community life. Community members that come  together to learn make new acquaintances and become  more familiar with other areas of the city. People share  their stories, interests, and aspira ons, establishing  new networks and partnerships in the process. Conse‐ quently, the community’s social fabric gets stronger,  more diversified, and sense of belonging and community  deepens. Special efforts should be made to involve  young people in the community’s sustainability pro‐ grams and projects for they stand to benefit the most  from the outcomes.  

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Email listserv  U lity billings  Partner websites  Green web portal  Green city map  Green  p of the day  Video story telling  Media kit  Green calendar of events  Online green marketplace  Community bulle n boards  Green surveys 

INITIATIVES GET THE WORD OUT ABOUT SUSTAINABILTY  Community Outreach Tools  Email Listserv. Invite people to register for informa on  by providing an email address or other contact infor‐ ma on. Use the email addresses to create a listserv  that allows  mely and low‐cost communica ons from  the city to interested par es. Send e‐no ces about  Sustainable Zephyrhills initiatives, events, and activities.  No ces may also be sent cost‐effec vely along with  paper or electronic u lity billings.  Web Links. Provide website links, widgets, and video  public service announcements from agencies partners  (e.g., Chamber of Commerce and Facebook) providing  green educa on and awareness on the city website.  Green Portal. Highlight sustainable initiatives, programs,  projects, and policies on a dedicated city green web‐ site (portal).   Green Assets Map. Create a downloadable e‐map  showing the loca ons of green community features  such as parks, fresh markets, walkable districts and  neighborhoods, bicycle and pedestrian ways.  

Green Tips. Offer a daily or weekly green  p on the city  website, green portal, or direct email (i.e., email  listserv).   Video. Post short videos about sustainability ini a ves  on the city website. Videos could be created by the  community as part of a community project or compe ‐ on.  Media Kit. Maintain a website media kit for Sustainable  Zephyrhills including fact sheets, past media coverage,  logos, high‐resolu on photographs and other images,  and contact informa on.  Calendar of Green Events. Create a 12‐month sustaina‐ bility calendar highligh ng at least one local sustaina‐ bility‐related event each month. The calendar could  feature city or partner‐sponsored events (e.g., Pasco  County Coopera ve Extension class offered in the  Zephyrhills area).  Green Marketplace. A green marketplace is an online  forum that promotes sustainability‐related community  TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐5    


ac vi es such as farmers markets, community gardens  that residents may join, local foods in season with reci‐ pes, “grow local” or “buy local” campaigns, and green  topic discussion groups or training classes. The green  market place could be offered by the city or through  partnership with another en ty.   Bulle n Boards. Community bulle n boards are ideal  for pos ng informa on on sustainability happenings.  Community centers, recrea on centers, park kiosks,  libraries, storefronts, and churches usually have com‐ munity bulletin boards that are viewed by many people  on a regular basis.  Surveys. Surveys can be administered to evaluate the  community’s knowledge of and/or support for green  ini a ves, and inform people about the ini a ves at  the same  me. Surveys can be sta s cally valid or not,  depending on circumstances. Mini‐surveys may be  conducted at community events like expos or fairs as a  polling method. Par cipa on may be incen vized  through drawings or small giveaways (e.g., compost  bins, reusable tote bags).    

Community Video Contest  Sponsor a sustainability video contest with a sustaina‐ bility theme. For example:  • “Why green is good for Zephyrhills” or “What makes  you happy about a sustainable future?”  • “How do you live sustainably?” or “What are some  awesome examples of sustainability in your commu‐ nity?”   Poster Contest   Partner with local schools or clubs to sponsor a poster  contest with a sustainability message such as water  conserva on, recycling, and energy conserva on (e.g.,  Drop Savers Poster Contest).  “Biggest Loser” or “Biggest Saver” Contest  Partner with a home improvements business to launch  a “Biggest Loser” or “Biggest Saver” competition focusing  on the benefits of reducing energy and/or water use in  the home. The contest asks par cipants (individuals,  groups, or neighborhoods) to monitor energy/water  use in their homes through u lity billings over a period  of  me. Results are reported and winners are awarded  a sustainable prize (product or home improvement).   Community Project “Idea Bags”   Provide small paper bags at places where residents  frequent, like a community center, library, school,  church, etc., and invite people to write a community  project idea on the bag. Others who like the idea and  want to help develop the project put their contact   informa on in the bag. School idea bags could be done  separately and coupled with a youth innova on  awards program. Ideas for intra‐genera onal projects  could arise from the process. . 

Everything can't be done right away, so start where you  are, use what you have, and do what you can.  

COMMUNITY‐BASED LEARNING  Intergenera onal Community Project  Engage different age groups in community projects to  encourage exchange of knowledge, skills, and values  while learning about their environment. Such projects  promote inclusiveness and collabora on to build a  stronger community.  

2 ‐6  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   

Green Collage + Mural Compe ons  Create a pictorial dialogue of a green prac ce or  achievement (e.g., community garden, eco‐fes val, or  a green building) in prominent loca ons in the city.    Promote these works of art in an e‐brochure on the  city or a partner website.  Best Prac ce Community Programs  Explore programs that have been successful in increasing  sustainability awareness in other communi es.  

EXPLORE OUR HOME  Green Walking + Biking Tours  Partner with a local business or community organization  to offer self‐guided or tour guide‐led walking or biking 


tours with stops along the way for observa on and  discussion about green community features.  Signs + Interpreta ve Displays  Install interpreta ve signage for green features in the  city to inform residents and visitors about such things  as na ve vegeta on, green transporta on (e.g., bike  trails and bus service), recycling facili es, electric vehi‐ cle charging sta on, etc. 

CULTIVATE VOLUNTEERS & ADVOCATES  Sustainable Zephyrhills Advisory Board  Establish an advisory group or board of city residents  represen ng a cross‐sec on of community interests  (e.g., seniors, youth, minority group, business, etc.).  The group or board would meet regularly to discuss and  offer recommenda ons on city projects and ini a ves  having the poten al to influence the implementa on  of the Sustainable Zephyrhills Plan.    Green Government Partnership  Advocate for a Green Government Partnership among  Pasco County local governments to facilitate idea sharing,  information exchange, and project collaboration among  elected officials and local government sustainability  coordinators. This group could work with the educational  community to incorporate stewardships principles into  school curricula.   UF/IFAS Program for Sustainable Living  County Extension offices typically offer programming  that reflects the needs of its residents. Advocate for  bringing the UF/IFAS Program for Sustainable Living to  the Pasco County Coopera ve Extension. The program  provides educational and training programs promoting  sustainable prac ces in the community, such as the  Sustainable Floridian program. Those completing the  Sustainable Floridian curriculum maintain cer fica on  by providing 30 hours of service to the community on  an annual basis. 

 

Greening Zephyrhills Matching Grants  Provide small matching grants (e.g., $1,000) to neigh‐ borhood organiza ons for green projects or programs  mee ng certain criteria. Seek program sponsors from  the business community.      

TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐7    


A Good Place to Start  Buildings consume 40 percent of  all energy used in the U.S. and 72  percent of all electricity generated.  

2 ‐8 | SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS 


State of Florida budget ‐ $60 billion  Florida’s energy imports ‐ $60 billion 

Market opportunity ‐ $60 billion 

green buildings + clean energy 

Cradle to Grave—Designed to Save  Since the dawn of mankind, people have sought shelter  to keep harsh weather out and comfort within. Even  though gathering wood to keep home fires burning is  not as much a necessity these days, energy efficiency is  s ll a goal for most of us. One could say it is in our  DNA.   Simple ac ons such as reducing air leaks and replacing  incandescent lighting with compact fluorescent lighting  (CFL) or light emi ng diode (LED) varie es can save  households a bundle in annual energy costs.  

Miscellaneous 13% 

Stove 5% 

Dryer 6% 

Heating 16% 

Lighting 11% 

5%

Hot Water 18% 

10%

Cooling 19% 

15%

Refrigeration 12% 

Another poten al area of long term savings is clean  energy technologies. In Florida, efforts are underway  to advance our ability to capture and use energy from  sunlight (solar), plants (biomass), and the earth’s interior  (geothermal). As fossil fuel energy costs con nue to  rise, so should the viability of clean energy technologies. 

Where Energy is Used in the Home  20% 

Keeping more green in our wallets is one of the benefits  of going green. By making homes, schools, and com‐ mercial buildings more energy efficient, we save money  and also reduce use of fossil fuel energy. Buildings    account for almost three‐quarters of electricity use in  the U.S., and most buildings waste energy needlessly.  From energy efficiency retrofits in exis ng buildings to  whole system technologies in new buildings, green  buildings provide solid returns on investments.  

Source:  Home Energy Ra ng System (HERS) Index  (3 bedroom, 1,500 SF home, North Florida). 

By design, new and renovated green buildings use less  energy and other natural resources, reduce stress on  the natural environment, and promote human health  and productivity. These benefits area accomplished  through appropriate building location, site preparation  prac ces, designing for natural ligh ng, and use of   renewable and less toxic building materials, among  other things. Green buildings also mean less cost to  the building owner or tenant because fewer resources  are used throughout the life of building.   Value Added  Building ra ng systems are becoming popular tools to  confirm a new or renovated building’s green credentials.  TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐9    


20%

LESS     ENERGY 

The U.S. Department of Energy  es mates that homes that receive  weatheriza on see a reduc on of  their energy consump on by an  average of 20%. 

The primary ra ng systems in the U.S. include:   •

Florida Green Building Coalition (FGBC)  • U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy &  Environmental Design (LEED)  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Energy Star  • The Green Globe Rating System  A 2007 study examined 100 buildings that achieved  LEED certification. When compared to a random sample  of tradi onally‐designed buildings and controlling for  me, loca on, and cost, the study found no significant  difference in average building costs for green buildings  as compared to non‐green buildings. Other related  studies found:  •

One dollar of savings in energy costs from increased  thermal efficiency yields roughly $18 in the increased  valuation of an Energy‐Star certified building. 

Green office buildings with a green rating command  rental rates roughly 3 percent higher per square foot  than otherwise identical buildings. Premiums in effec‐ tive rents were above 6 percent. Selling prices of  green buildings were higher by about 16 percent.  

Green schools show significant impact on community  image. Well‐regarded schools increase property values,  encourage business investment and job crea on,  and serve as the cornerstone of vibrant communities. 

In addi on to being less costly to  operate and having  excellent energy performance, sustainably designed  green building occupants were more sa sfied with    the overall building than those in typical commercial  buildings.   Demand for green building construction and renovation  provides opportuni es for workers to develop needed  skills for the new green economy.  Homegrown Energy  What if energy‐efficient homes in Zephyrhills were also  powered with clean, renewable energy? What if some  of that energy could be produced on home sites and   other loca ons within the community?  2 ‐10  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   

Clean energy refers to  energy which comes from natural  resources such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, geothermal  heat, and plants that are renewable (naturally replen‐ ished).1 Rising oil prices, environmental impacts of    extrac ng and burning fossil fuels, (e.g., petro oil, coal,  and natural gas) and advancing  technologies are some  of the reasons that the long range market outlook for  clean energy is posi ve.   Foreseeing a  me in the near future when the cost of  clean energy is compe ve with fossil fuel energy, and  to achieve other community objectives, electric utilities  listed below have invested in clean energy  produc on.  Customers are given the option to purchase electricity  from clean sources at a premium that offsets the current  higher cost per kilowa .   • • • • •

City of Tallahassee/Sterling Planet  Gainesville Regional Utilities  Keys Energy Services/Sterling Planet    Tampa Electric Company (TECO)    U li es Commission City of New Smyrna Beach 

Florida Power & Light Company launched three solar  power plants in 2009 and 2010, making Florida the  second largest supplier of u lity‐scale solar power in  the country.  Producing clean energy here at home could be signifi‐ cant to local economies. Florida has one of the highest  rates of home electricity consump on in the country.  But the source of Florida’s heat is also its most promising  source of renewable energy—sunshine. Florida's climate  also bodes well for fast‐growing energy crops such as  sugarcane and sweet sorghum. With 47,500 farms,  Florida could become an important producer of biofuels.  Biodiesel and renewable diesel are synthe c diesel  fuels produced from vegetable oils, including soybean  and canola oils, animal fats, and recycled cooking  grease. They can be blended with conven onal diesel  fuel and used in diesel engines with few or no modifi‐ ca ons. With some engine modifica ons, biodiesel can  be used in a nearly pure form. There are currently cost  barriers to biodiesel due to higher produc on costs  over conven onal diesel.  


State of Florida, 2009 

ENERGY FACTS  U.S. Energy Informa on Administra on 

Florida’s per capita residen al electricity demand is  among the highest in the country, due in part to  high air‐condi oning use and the widespread use of  electricity for home hea ng during the winter  months.  

Electricity genera on in Florida is among the highest  in the U.S.. 

Natural gas and coal are the leading fuels for elec‐ tricity produc on, typically accoun ng for about 40  percent and 30 percent of net generation, respectively.  Nuclear and petroleum‐fired power plants account  for much of the remaining electricity produc on.  

Due to its large popula on, Florida’s total energy  consump on is among the highest in the country.  

Despite high demand from the residen al and com‐ mercial sectors, total per capita electricity consump‐ on in Florida is not high, because industrial elec‐ tricity use is rela vely low. 

There are no coal mines in Florida. Coal‐fired power  plants rely on supplies delivered by railroad and barge,  mostly from Kentucky, Illinois, and West Virginia. 

Florida’s transporta on and residen al sectors      account for most of the State’s energy demand. 

Due in part to Florida’s tourist industry, demand for  petroleum‐based transportation fuels (motor gasoline  and jet fuel) is among the highest in the U.S. Traffic  at the interna onal airports in Miami and Orlando is  among the heaviest in the country. 

Florida has more petroleum‐fired electricity generation  than any other state. Florida is also a leading pro‐ ducer of electricity from municipal solid waste and  landfill gas, although genera on from those sources  contributes only minimally to the electricity grid.  

While the State does not have a renewable por olio  standard, u li es in Florida are required to adopt  net metering to credit customers' u lity bills for  electricity they provide to the grid from renewable  sources. 

Florida has no oil refineries and relies on petroleum  products delivered by tanker and barge to marine  terminals near the State’s major coastal ci es.  

TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐11    


TARGET 2 

green buildings + clean energy  a.  Reduce city government electricity consumption  by 20 percent by 2015.  b.  Increase clean energy use citywide by 5 percent  by 2015, and by 25 percent by 2025, using 2012  as a baseline. 

INITIATIVES INCREASE STOCK OF RESOURCE‐EFFICIENT   BUILDINGS CITYWIDE   Community Awareness about Green Buildings  Increase community awareness of resource‐efficient  building technologies. Partner with homeowner/ neighborhood organizations and business sponsors for  a green neighborhood challenge. Provide par cipants  with informa on and tools for success (e.g., water‐ saving best practices or online energy calculator). The  challenge could be an early ac on project for an Eco‐ Neighborhood or Eco‐District community planning effort.  Partner with a local business organiza on, such as the  Greater Zephyrhills Chamber of Commerce or Pasco  County Economic Development Council, and one or  more local businesses to sponsor a “Going Green”  business challenge.  Sponsor energy efficiency seminars during Energy  Awareness Month (October) in partnership with the  Pasco County Cooperative Extension to provide infor‐ ma on on best prac ces for saving energy in homes  and businesses. A giveaway, such as a starter kit of  energy efficiency products, would provide an incen ve  for seminar participation and immediate action to save  energy.   Establish kilowatt meter lending and education program  to increase awareness of the energy demand of appli‐ ances and small electronics in the home and at work.  Work with local builders and realtors to inform con‐ sumers about the benefits of green buildings to house‐ hold budgets and the environment. Compile evidence  of the returns on investment to builders, building owners  and end‐users of green buildings.  2 ‐12  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   

Increase city staff knowledge about sustainable design  and its role in reducing costs and improving environ‐ mental quality.   Greening Exis ng + New Structures  Increase the resource efficiency of new and existing  structures throughout the city. Work with developers  and builders early in the permitting process to encourage  green building prac ces in the design, construc on,  maintenance, and operation of new and renovated  buildings and building sites.   Use a Sustainable Development Index to determine  bonuses (e.g., density and height) for development  incorpora ng a wide range of sustainable design tech‐ niques.  Promote the use of green building performance stand‐ ards, such as the Florida Green Building Coalition  (FGBC), U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy  & Environmental Design (LEED), U.S. Environmental  Protec on Agency Energy Star, and Green Globe Ra ng  System. Refund 50 percent of building permit fees for  buildings that receive any of these cer fica ons. To  fund this green incen ve, consider increasing other  building permit fees.  Amend the Land Development Code to define “cool  roofs” and considering making cool roofs a require‐ ment for new buildings, except for those with a green  roof or solar energy system.  Amend the Land Development Code to define “green  roof” and to allow a building’s green roof area to  count toward a development’s required open space  under certain circumstances.  Establish a Sustainable Development Technical Advisory  Commi ee comprised of city departmental staff (e.g.,  Planning, Building, Finance and Public Works) to       periodically review exis ng city codes to iden fy       impediments to green building techniques and ways    to encourage these and other sustainable prac ces.   City Electricity Consump on  Reduce electricity consumption by city government.  Establish a Sustainable Development Technical Advisory  Commi ee comprised of city departmental staff (e.g.,  Planning, Building, Finance and Public Works) to identify  and evaluate ideas to increase energy efficiency and  overall sustainability of city facili es and opera ons.  Adopt a green building policy for new or significantly     renovated city buildings. 


Conduct energy audits of city‐owned buildings and  develop ac on plans and benchmarking protocol to  phase retrofits and measure performance over  me.   When purchasing new appliances or electronics, select  those that are ENERGY STAR‐cer fied, when feasible.  Use energy‐efficient lighting technologies in city facilities,  including passive (natural) lighting, compact fluorescent  lamps (CFLs), light emi ng diode (LED) lamps, and  room occupancy sensors, when feasible.  Use LED or other high‐efficiency lamps in city‐owned  traffic signals, streetlights, and pedestrian and school  crossing signals, when feasible. Request Progress Energy  to use high‐efficiency lamps for streetlights the u lity  leases to the city.  

INCREASE CLEAN (RENEWABLE) ENERGY USE  

partnerships; and funding mechanisms, including Federal  and State grants and low‐interest loans.  Engage Progress Energy, the electricity u lity in Zeph‐ yrhills, to help leverage local, state, and federal resources  to increase clean energy production in the city.  Make staff costs the basis of the building permit fee for  solar energy systems rather than the equipment cost.  Amend the Land Development Code to allow solar   energy systems as a permi ed accessory use in all   zoning districts and modest encroachments into building  setback areas to facilitate placement of solar equipment.  Amend the Land Development Code to allow small  wind turbines in all commercial, industrial and mul ‐ family areas, subject to noise specifica ons.    

Clean Energy City  Increase clean energy produc on citywide. Amend the  Land Development Code to provide for clean energy  produc on in the city and to include related standards  for permi ed, accessory, or condi onal use in zoning  districts; height, setback, visibility, and coverage stand‐ ards for roof‐mounted and ground‐mounted systems;  provision of solar‐oriented lots; provision of solar‐ ready construc on; provision of grid‐connected and  off‐grid systems; and solar installa ons.  Distribute solar‐access guidelines to developers, builders,  homeowners, and other building owners.   Implement a sustainable building permit expedite pro‐ gram for buildings that employ energy efficiency and  clean energy technologies.  Consider establishing a Property Assessed Clean Energy  (PACE) program to provide long‐term loans to proper‐ ty owners for energy efficiency, water conserva on,  renewable energy, and wind resistance projects.  

Sources:   U.S. Department of Energy (energy.gov). 

Consider use of solar photovoltaic (PV) and solar thermal  for city building, grounds, and equipment (e.g., street  and cross‐walk ligh ng and hot water hea ng).  

U.S. Environmental Protec on Agency (epa.gov/cleanenergy/index.html). 

Explore op ons for assis ng local schools in a success‐ ful applica on for the Progress Energy SunSense Schools  program, which awards solar photovoltaic (PV) system  to select schools that also serve as emergency shelters.   

Na onal Resources Defense Council (nrdc.org). 

Explore small‐scale clean energy projects that utilize  available resources to generate electricity or heat energy;  implementa on partners, including public‐private 

U.S. General Services Administra on, (gsa.gov).  U.S. Green Building Council (usgbc.org). 

Sustainability and the Dynamics of Green Building, Eichholtz, Kok, and  Quigley, 2010.  The Economics of Green Building, Eichholtz, Kok, and Quigley , 2010.  Green Noise or Green Value? Measuring the Effects of Environmental    Cer fica on on Office Property Values , Fuerst and McAllister, 2008.  Does Green Pay Off? Norm Miller, Jay Spivey and Andy Florance, 2008.   The Cost of Green Revisited, Davis Langdon, 2007. 

TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐13    


Across the country and here in  Tampa Bay, “buy local” programs  are increasing awareness of the  many benefits of suppor ng    local businesses. 

2 ‐14  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   


Moving toward a greener economy        means crea ng local opportuni

es for new             

technologies, investment, businesses, and jobs. 

green jobs + green businesses 

Improving the resource efficiency of buildings and  neighborhoods is a driver for green industry job creation.  A broadening array of green goods and services are  available to consumers for their quest for lower energy  and water costs and reduced environmental effects.  Where consumers choose to make their purchases can  have a direct impact on the local economy—its potential  for growth, diversification, and resilience to economic  cycles.      Dollars spent within the community circulate longer,  s mula ng business expansion, business startups, and  new jobs. Local support of green industry businesses  can strengthen existing business networks and establish  new ones to promote green job crea on.   Supporting local green businesses—businesses offering  green goods or services or adopting sustainable practices,  such as recycling and using recycled‐content products— creates multiple benefits to the community. In addition  to providing green jobs, these businesses make efforts  to reduce the business’ ecological footprint and also  that of their customers.  The New Green Economy  Economic conditions have changed the energy environ‐ ment. Traditional fuel costs are up while those for  clean energy/renewables are coming down, crea ng a  climate for business innova on and ac vity. State 

What is a green job?  A green job increases the conservation and sustain‐ ability of natural resources for the benefit of    Floridians. This includes jobs that reduce energy  usage or lower carbon emissions, and protect Flori‐ da’s natural resources. Green jobs should provide  worker‐friendly condi ons, pay sustainable wages  and offer opportuni es for con nued skill training  and career growth.                                                 ‐Workforce Florida  leaders are focusing on this moment as a one‐ me  opportunity to posi on Florida at the leading edge of  clean energy industries. Industrial clusters with sophis‐ ticated supply chains and labor distribution are shaped  as those industries are being developed and as new  economies shi  and magnets are drawn.  (Weatherman, 2010)  Renewable energy and energy efficiency industries  represented more than nine million jobs and $1.04 tril‐ lion in U.S. revenue in 2007, (American Solar Energy  Society). Domestic energy demand is expected to double  in 20 years. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Sta s cs projects  there will be 3.1 million clean energy‐related jobs in that  me versus 783,000 oil, gas, and coal industry jobs.  TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐15    


Florida is a natural contender in the green economy  with rich natural resources, diverse research and de‐ velopment assets and an available workforce. In 2009,  Pew Charitable Trust ranked Florida third in the na on  with 3,831 clean technology businesses and sixth in  the na on with over 31,000 clean technology jobs.   A study by the American Council for an Energy‐ Efficient Economy reports that by adop ng energy   efficient strategies Florida will save $28 billion, offset  the state’s en re future growth in electric demand by  2023, and create more than 14,000 jobs by 2023.   A rac ng Green Jobs & Businesses  Government policy together with private ini a ves  can foster the transforma on to a green economy and  job growth. The private sector will play the lead role,  but government can catalyze the transforma on by  fostering markets, a favorable investment climate, a  skilled workforce, and strong regional collabora on for  green economic development.  Markets. A key plank in a rac ng green jobs is raising  energy efficiency and use of clean energy in buildings  throughout the community. Home, business, and gov‐ ernment energy efficiency and clean energy projects  s mulate spending on green building products and  demand for skilled workers to implement those pro‐ jects. Industry experts report that $1 million invested   in energy‐efficiency creates 21.5 new jobs.   A main focus of Sustainable Zephyrhills is raising com‐ munity awareness about conserving natural resources  to reduce environmental impacts, maintain a viable  local economy, and sustain quality of life. A side benefit  of conserva on is reducing costs. Poten al savings will  generate demand for green products and services locally  along with economic opportuni es for Zephyrhills  businesses and workers.  Favorable Investment Climate. A favorable investment  climate exists when there is sufficient certainty of finan‐ cial return on investments. Investments in green busi‐ nesses, including clean energy production, will gravitate  to loca ons that are perceived to have less risks and  greater poten al for returns.   A factor in crea ng a favorable investment climate is  local government plans and regula ons that are com‐ plementary to green industry activities. Land use policy  and planned infrastructure expenditures, such as for  transporta on, water, and sewer, can be suppor ve of  green businesses—which may have opera onal char‐ acteris cs not an cipated by city codes.       2 ‐16  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   

SIZING THE CLEAN ECONOMY  In its Sizing the Clean Economy report, the Brookings  Ins tute and Ba elle examined a detailed database of  employment sta s cs pertaining to a sensibly defined  assemblage of clean economy industries in the U.S. and  its metropolitan areas between 2003 to 2010. The study  measurements and trends are presented below:  •

The clean economy grew more slowly in aggregate  than the na onal economy, but newer “cleantech”  segments produced explosive job gains and the  clean economy outperformed the na on during the  recession. Newer clean economy establishments— especially those in young energy‐related segments  such as wind energy, solar PV, and smart grid—added  jobs at a torrid pace, albeit from small bases. 

The clean economy is manufacturing and export   intensive. Roughly 26 percent of all clean economy  jobs lie in manufacturing establishments, compared  to just 9 percent in the broader economy. On a per  job basis, establishments in the clean economy export  roughly twice the value of a typical U.S. job ($20,000  versus $10,000).  

The clean economy offers more opportuni es and  be er pay for low‐ and middle‐skilled workers than  the na onal economy as a whole. Median wages in  the clean economy are 13 percent higher than median  U.S. wages. Yet a dispropor onate percentage of jobs  in the clean economy are staffed by workers with  rela vely li le formal educa on in moderately well‐ paying “green collar” occupa ons. Among regions,  the South has the largest number of clean economy  jobs. 

The clean economy permeates all of the na on’s  metropolitan areas, but it manifests itself in varied  configura ons. Metropolitan area clean economies  can be categorized into four‐types: service‐oriented,  manufacturing, public sector, and balanced.  

Strong industry clusters boost metros’ growth       performance in the clean economy. Clustering entails  proximity to businesses in similar or related industries.  Establishments located in counties containing a signifi‐ cant number of jobs from other establishments in the  same segment grew much faster than more isolated  establishments from 2003 to 2010. Examples include  professional environmental services in Houston, solar  photovoltaic in Los Angeles, fuel cells in Boston, and  wind in Chicago.  


Local government can provide incen ves that reduce business risk. Streamlined development permi ng can reduce the me it takes for a business to open and begin hiring and producing. More building square footage or addi onal housing units could be granted to help increase the viability of a targeted green industry or green development project. Local government can enter into public‐private partnerships to build infrastructure that fulfills a need of a new green business while also mee ng other important community objec ves. Financing is a key barrier to achieving energy efficiency retrofits in exis ng buildings. Local government can ease household and business entry to new building technologies by authorizing new financing tools for retrofits (e.g., PACE‐Property Assessed Clean Energy).

Building connec ons with outside resources in support of green industry clusters provides another layer of support for green industry investors in Zephyrhills. Collabora on with regional economic development partners is a strategy that has been successful across the county in leveraging state and federal funding for economic development. In the Tampa Bay region, regional collabora on could lead to be er integra on of the green economy in the realms of energy efficiency and conserva on, power genera on, and transmission and distribu on. Skilled Workforce. Equipping young people entering the labor market and older workers mid‐way through their careers with skills required for the green economy is essen al to future green industry growth in Zeph‐

State of Florida, 2010 

GREENEST OCUPATIONS Top 25 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Solar Photovoltaic Installers Conserva on Scien sts Hazardous Materials Removal Workers Biochemists and Biophysicists Foresters Tex le, Apparel, and Furnishings Workers, All Other Produc on Workers, All Other Plant and System Operators, All Other Environmental Scien sts and Specialists, Including Health Environmental Science and Protec on Technicians, Including Health Insula on Workers, Floor, Ceiling, and Wall Environmental Engineers Geoscien sts, Except Hydrologists and Geographers Natural Sciences Managers Hea ng, Air Condi oning, and Refrigera on Mechanics and Installers Environmental Science Teachers, Postsecondary Environmental Engineering Technicians Forest and Conserva on Technicians Furnace, Kiln, Oven, Drier, and Ke le Operators and Tenders Computer‐Controlled Machine Tool Operators, Metal and Plas c Soil and Plant Scien sts Microbiologists Architects, Except Landscape and Naval Chemical Equipment Operators and Tenders Mining Machine Operators, All Other

% Green Jobs  100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 37.7% 35.5% 32.3% 30.0% 26.8% 25.5% 25.2% 24.2% 19.9% 17.4% 16.8% 16.3% 15.7% 14.9% 14.8% 13.7% 12.9% 12.9% 12.8% 10.7% 10.7% 10.4%

Note: Occupa ons were compared based on green jobs as a percent of total jobs. Source: Florida Department of Economic Opportunity Labor Market Sta s cs Center, 2010.

TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐17   


yrhills. While municipali es are typically not directly  involved in community education and training programs,  the quality of these programs nonetheless has bearing  on a community’s short‐ and long‐term economic  compe veness. The broad availability of good quality  educa on and training is of fundamental importance  to a rac ng green industries and jobs.   Ac on the city can take is to be a voice for expanded  educa on and training opportuni es in the community  at all levels. Sustainability awareness, star ng from  early childhood educa on, will lead to conscious con‐ sumer behaviors and corresponding markets that further  the community’s sustainability goals.   Buy Local First for Sustainability  Like blood in the body, money circula on is the life  force of a local economy. When people purchase goods  and services in local establishments, especially those  that are locally‐owned, the money spent there circulates  in the community for a longer period of  me, passing  from merchant to employees  then on to other mer‐ chants, and so on. Some of those dollars are invested  in new or expanded businesses in the community— crea ng new jobs—while other dollars are charitably  donated to meet community needs and desires.   Spending at green local businesses can have even  more impact. Green businesses are community partners  in protec ng, preserving, and sustaining our environ‐ ment, and the money these businesses save by being  green and efficient is more likely to be spent locally.  Suppor ng local green businesses s mulates the Zeph‐ yrhills economy and rewards these businesses for do‐ ing the right thing for the community, the environment,  and the bo om line.    

green building and renewable energy projects. Reuse  brownfield lands for renewable energy projects. Con‐ sider establishing financing tools for residents and  businesses for energy efficiency, water conserva on,  renewable energy, and wind resistance projects.   Green City Purchasing  Promote sustainable purchasing within city govern‐ ment. Establish a policy requiring considera on of the  economic, social, and environmental benefits and  costs associated with city purchases. Considera ons  would correspond to city’s guiding principles for water  conservation, energy conservation, solid waste reduction,  economic development, natural resource protec on,  and community quality of life, and include product  lifecycle assessments when appropriate. The analysis  would also inform decision‐making for capital expendi‐ tures (e.g., infrastructure).  Establish a city policy for environmentally preferable  purchasing and ins tute a recogni on program for city  departments that promote environmentally preferable  purchasing prac ces.  Develop and promote green event planning guidelines  for city events.   Purchase renewable energy for public buildings, when  feasible.   Local City Purchasing  Maximize purchasing of local products and services by  city government. Establish a Local Business Certification  Program offers city purchasing preference to local  businesses, with addi onal preference for locally sold  green goods and services. 

INITIATIVES

“Buy Local” Programs   Increase community awareness and patronage of local  businesses. Develop a “Buy Local First” campaign that  promotes local businesses, as defined in the program.  Establish an annual “Buy Local Day First” Day. Explore  the feasibility of implementing a local currency program.  Host a business/ins tu onal buyers and sellers “match ‐making” event to increase exchange of local goods  and services. Develop and promote a Zephyrhills green  business  directory.    

CATALYZE DEMAND 

SKILL THE WORKFORCE 

Consumer Demand  Accelerate consumer demand for green goods and  services and clean energy. Expedite permi ng for 

Workers for the Clean Economy  Foster development of a skilled workforce prepared  for the clean economy. Advocate for school and training 

TARGET 3 

green jobs + green businesses  Ten new or expanded green businesses by 2015. 

2 ‐18  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   


curricula that prepares students and workers for jobs  in emerging green sectors. Green job training partners  could include the District School Board of Pasco County,  Pasco Hernando Community College, St. Leo University,  University of South Florida, Agency for Workforce Inno‐ vation, Pasco‐Hernando Workforce Board, and others. 

INSPIRE A SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS SECTOR   Local Green Businesses  Recognize local green businesses. Develop a monthly  or quarterly “Green Business Spotlight” that recognizes  the sustainable, environmentally sound business prac‐ ces and green goods and services of local businesses.  Posted on the City or partner website, the Green Business  Spotlight would highlight aspects of businesses that  result in environmental, economic, and social benefits  to the community, including achievement of cer fica‐ ons from Leadership in Energy and Environmental  Design (LEED), the Florida Green Building Coali on  (FGBC), the Florida Green Lodging Program, and the  Green Restaurant Associa on. An emphasis of the  spotlight would be on the business returns on invest‐ ment for “going green.”  

Business Engagement Program  Deliver a business engagement program. This program  would help Zephyrhills businesses improve their envi‐ ronmental performance, produc vity, and compe ‐ veness. The City or a community partner would in‐ form and encourage businesses to improve efficiencies  with respect to energy, waste, and water; develop sus‐ tainable management prac ces such as green purchas‐ ing standards; and re‐imagine and redesign products  and services to give them a compe ve edge.  

PLAN FOR GREEN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT  Long‐Range Planning  Address green economic development and sustainabil‐ ity in general in the city’s long range plans. Iden fy  opportuni es, needs, and policies for green economic  development through a strategic planning process and  corresponding amendments to the Comprehensive  Plan. Consider local and regional economic develop‐ ment strategy, economic forecasts, land availability  (e.g., brownfields and greyfields), mul ‐modal connec‐ vity, sustainable community design, consistency with  the city’s Airport Master Plan, and best prac ces from  other communi es (e.g., green business clusters,  green business corridors, and green enterprise zones).  Reinforce the community’s commitment to becoming  a sustainable city by referencing this commitment in  the City of Zephyrhills Mission Statement.   Green Industry Clusters  Partner with the Greater Zephyrhills Chamber of Com‐ merce, Pasco County, Pasco County Economic Council,  and Tampa Bay Partnership to iden fy and a ract  green business clusters to the greater Zephyrhills area  and region.  

TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐19    


2 ‐20  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS  


Sustainable places are las ng places returned to genera on a er genera on in spite of shi ing demographics, economic cycles, and transporta on costs.

land use, design + connectivity

Land use, development design, and connec vity in a community are cri cal pathways to sustainability affec ng natural resources (e.g., land, water, energy, and biodiversity), environmental and public health, housing, employment, economic development, and social equity. The density, mix, and arrangement of land uses heavily influence the amount and method of travel and related energy use in a community. These same land use charac‐ teristics also affect energy needs for heating and cooling buildings, building and operating public infrastructure, and water use. Changing demographics, evolving technologies (e.g., instant connec vity), peak oil, climate change, globali‐ za on, and rightsizing in response to personal and governmental budgets are driving the need to rethink how we plan and accommodate future development, redevelopment, and transporta on in Zephyrhills. Shaped by an Era of Cheap Energy Developed areas in Zephyrhills and much of the Tampa Bay region mostly exhibit a suburban pa ern where land uses are generally segregated, low density, and accessible predominantly by automobile. Limited walking and biking facili es, coupled with distance and barriers (e.g., wide highways) separa ng des na ons in the community, make green transporta on (e.g., walking

and biking) inconvenient and imprac cal. Low density development in automobile oriented environments also affects the viability of transit and potential for future transit investments. The local building stock, much of which was constructed under earlier, less energy‐focused building codes than exist today, will have to compete with efficient modern buildings that are less costly to heat and cool. This condition has implications for urban sprawl, as most new buildings are going up in greenfield locations (e.g., agricultural lands) of the city. Sustainable Places ‐ Great Places Great neighborhoods, centers, and corridors are the building blocks of a sustainable community. They are where people can find good places to live, work, and shop to meet household needs. Streets and paths offer convenient ways to travel even if one does not drive. Places and spaces are designed for life enrichment, offering opportuni es for interac on socially, cultural‐ ly, and with nature. Buildings and public infrastructure are designed to be resource efficient and use ecosystem services—resources and processes supplied by natural ecosystems—for power and also to absorb and break‐ down waste. These sustainable places are also las ng places that are returned to genera on a er genera on in spite of shi ing demographics, economic cycles, and transpor‐ TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐21


ta on costs. Neighborhoods and mixed use centers weather changing mes by offering a range of housing types, sizes, and affordability levels to accommodate families, young adults, empty nesters, and seniors. To reduced costs, more consumers are choosing to live in smaller dwellings or larger households (e.g., extended families), or are renting instead of purchasing a home. To be sustainable, future and exis ng neighborhoods and centers must offer existing and future Zephyrhills residents more housing choices.

across a metropolitan area might lower household VMT by about 5 to 12 percent, and perhaps by as much as 25 percent, if coupled with higher employment con‐ centra ons, significant public transit improvements, mixed uses, and other supportive transportation demand management measures such as bicycle‐ friendly environments and carpooling (Transporta on Research Board 2011).

Sustainable Places Create Value  With the average price of gasoline in Florida reaching close to $4 a gallon in 2012, the case for energy efficient One‐third of the occupied dwelling units in the  communi es grows stronger. The Center for Neighbor‐ city are occupied by one‐person households.   hood Technology (CNT) reported in February 2012 that the typical Tampa Bay area family spends about $13,800 on transportation, equal to the amount spent on housing. A City of Short Distances  The combined expenses represent 56 percent of the When goods, services, educa on, recrea on, and average family income, exceeding CNT’s recommended transit are within walking distance of homes, residents threshold of 45 percent. have the option of walking, biking, or using transit instead of driving—reducing transporta on costs (and Residents of sustainable communi es engage in more sustainable travel than residents of other communities, health costs) in the process. even controlling for demographics and the effects of Compact, walkable places offer greater independence the built environment (Kahn & Morris, 2009). Owning to younger and older members of the community and a home in a walkable neighborhood can save residents also to those with disabili es or that do not own a car. $300 to $400 a month, up to $4,800 a year, on gas Per the 2006‐2010 American Communi es Survey, 9.8 expenses alone (Congress for the New Urbanism). percent of the city’s 5,977 households have no vehicle. In 2010, the 65 years or older group represented over When comparing tax revenue per acre, compact, 28 percent of the Zephyrhills population and 19 percent mixed‐use development pays be er dividends than its suburban mall counterpart. The cost of public services were 18 years or younger (U.S. Census Bureau). In to accommodate the needs of a large mall develop‐ Florida, the 65 years and older popula on is projected ment is higher when compared to a dense downtown to increase by 49 percent between 2010 and 2020, area (Sonoran Ins tute, 2011). increasing the number of non‐drivers statewide and locally. What happens to money savings when a community invests in resource efficient and value adding sustaina‐ Compact development pa erns can be effec ve in reducing motor vehicle miles traveled (VMT). The most ble places? Savings become disposable income for reliable studies estimate that doubling residential density households, working capital for businesses, and tax

2 ‐22  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS  


cu ng opportuni es for government. When spent  locally, the injection of new dollars in the local economy  protects existing jobs and possibly creates new ones.        Cooling down for Energy Efficiency  Urban heat island effect describes built up areas that  are ho er than nearby rural areas. Heat islands affect  communi es by increasing summer me peak energy  demand, air condi oning costs, air pollu on and  greenhouse gas emissions, heat‐related illness and  mortality, and water quality. Ac ons to reduce urban  heat islands—some with stormwater management  benefits—include increasing tree and vegeta ve cover,  installing green roofs (e.g., roo op gardens), installing  cool (e.g., reflective)—roofs, and using cool pavements.    Energy Efficient Driving  The transporta on sector accounts for 34 percent of  all U.S. greenhouse gas emissions and approximately  75 percent of all U.S. oil use, consuming more than 9  million barrels of oil per day. Highway vehicles dominate  energy consump on and CO2 (a greenhouse gas) emis‐ sions in the transporta on sector, making alterna ve fuel  vehicles and alternative fuels promising for reducing de‐ pendence on foreign oil and greenhouse gas emissions.   Alterna ve fuel vehicles (AFV) are vehicles designed to  operate on alterna ve fuels such as compressed and  liquefied natural gas, propane, ethanol, biodiesel,   electricity, and hydrogen. Current barriers to wide‐ spread adop on of AFVs include lack of fueling and  charging infrastructure, few product choices, and cost.  However, rising gas prices and increasing consumer  demand should resolve these barriers.  Motor vehicle fuel economy can also be increased  through improving traffic flows on city streets (e.g., grid  street pa ern, traffic signal  ming, and roundabouts)  and reducing motor‐idling via an ‐idling policies or  campaigns .   Planning for Sustainable Places  Sustainable places require city plans and regulations that  are supportive of integrated land use and transportation,  infill development, redevelopment, and reinvestment in  existing developed areas of the city (e.g., downtown and  U.S. 301 corridor), compact development that makes  walking, biking, and transit viable forms of transportation,  balanced space for jobs and housing, and other land‐

U.S. vehicle fuel efficiency has increased only  three miles per gallon (mpg) in 80 years. 

Opposite page le : Compact neighborhood that encourages walk‐ ing and biking.  Opposite page right: A visually prominent crosswalk that increases  safety.  Photo above: Electric vehicle (EV) charging sta on. 

TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐23    


related  elements of sustainability (e.g., land for grow‐ ing food).   The City of Zephyrhills has an existing policy framework  for sustainable community design and development by  way of the Zephyrhills Comprehensive Plan and city  codes. The Comprehensive Plan, which addresses  growth management and community development  issues and goals, includes policies encouraging compact  development in Village Centers and Neighborhoods  and a citywide mul modal transporta on system. City  land development and building codes contain regulations  and standards pertaining to the built environment.  The Zephyrhills Mul ‐Use Trail Master Plan envisions a  robust on and off‐street trail system serving schools,  parks, and other community focal points. The Community  Redevelopment Area Plan directs new developments  to areas where infrastructure is available to support  walkable urban redevelopment and infill development.  

TARGET 4  land use, design + connec vity  By 2015, develop a form‐based code to guide the  development of walkable neighborhoods and  centers and construct three miles of mul ‐use  trail. 

INITIATIVES CREATE SUSTAINABLE LAND USE PATTERNS  Pedestrian/Bicycle‐Oriented Village Centers   Foster walkable/bikeable Village Centers and Neigh‐ borhoods with short distances (5‐ to 10‐minute walk)  between homes, jobs, and daily needs des na ons.  Incen vize pedestrian–oriented infill development/ redevelopment within targeted areas of the city and  discourage suburban sprawl development on green‐ fields at the city periphery.   Con nue implementa on of city plans to iden fy,    prioritize, and incentivize redevelopment of underutilized  areas within the Community Redevelopment Area to  make efficient use of exis ng public infrastructure.  Develop a Sustainable Development Index reflec ve of  the city’s sustainable development goals to evaluate  2 ‐24 |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS  

proposed annexa ons and associated Future Land Use  Map amendments. Use the Sustainable Development  Index to ensure that publicly‐funded capital projects  support and further the city’s sustainable development  goals.   Implement clear and effective land development regula‐ tions, and offer shorter development review timeframes  within the city’s infill/redevelopment target areas.   Implement policies that promote nonresidential intensity,  job accessibility, and jobs‐housing balance in village  centers.   Scale the density and intensity of development and  transportation fees in Village Centers to the availability/ access to transit and opportuni es for internal trip  capture.   Educate developers and the public about the ways sus‐ tainable, energy‐efficient land use patterns, urban design,  and complete streets benefits the economy, ecology,  and community.   Develop partnerships to improve the marke ng of infill  development, matching developers to exis ng sites  and buildings.   Renewable Energy  Provide for renewable energy power genera on and  transmission systems in City land use plans and regula‐ ons. Develop land use policies designa ng lands that  are suitable for renewable energy power genera on  and transmission systems (e.g., solar farms and electric  vehicle charging sta ons). 

FOSTER SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH DESIGN  Village Centers and Neighborhood Design  Design unique and special Village Centers and Neigh‐ borhoods that facilitate sustainability through walkable/  bikeable, mixed use places. Develop form‐based land  development regula ons that visually and textually  illustrate the arrangement and scale of buildings along  various street types (e.g., arterial, collector, and local)  and other place‐making, walkability elements such as  sidewalks, ‘complete streets’, shade trees, rear/side‐ yard vehicle parking areas, and a rac ve stormwater  facili es.   Use the Sustainable Development Index reflec ve of  the city’s sustainable development goals to evaluate  proposed development and redevelopment projects.  Create a mechanism to require developer and city staff 


coordina on early in the project development phase to ensure the incorporation of sustainable development principles. Establish incen ves for new development and redevelopment that scores higher on the Sustainable Development Index. Assist residents, business owners, and other stake‐ holders in the development of Eco‐Neighborhood and Eco‐District plans that iden fy issues, opportuni es, targets, and initiatives aimed at improving neighborhood sustainability and quality of life. Establish standards for cluster subdivisions to preserve ecologically sensi ve areas, biodiversity, and other unique characteris cs of land to be subdivided. Urban Heat Island Effect  Decrease urban heat island effect. Develop a city‐wide plan for reducing urban heat island effect from expansive paved surfaces, such as streets and parking lots. Com‐ munity cooling techniques include tree plan ngs to create shaded parking lots, sidewalks, future canopy streets, decreasing the area required for a standard parking space, reducing the required paving width for local streets, green roofs, and rain gardens. Amend the Land Development Code to allow green roofs and rain gardens to satisfy a portion of the open space requirement. Amend the Land Development Code to ensure that street and site trees are planted to allow root structure development. Facilitate reforestation of the city by hosting an annual tree giveaway on Na onal Arbor Day (last Friday in April).

FURTHER SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH PLANS &  CODES  Sustainable Community Plans and Codes  Ensure that the adopted plans and codes of the City of Zephyrhills support sustainable development principles. Amend the Comprehensive Plan and Land Development Code as necessary and appropriate to address the guiding principles, targets, and initiatives of Sustainable Zephyrhills. Once established, iden fy Eco‐Districts and Eco‐Neighborhoods in the Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use Map series .

EXPAND SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION  Complete Streets and Green Streets  Design and build Complete Streets integrating pedestrian, bicycle, and transit facili es to accommodate all users of the transporta on system—pedestrians, bicyclists, transit riders and motor vehicle drivers—and empha‐ sizing comfort and safety for people of all ages and abili es. Design Green Streets as an integral component of a Complete Streets strategy. Incorporate trees and other green infrastructure into street planning with the same importance given to u li es infrastructure. Bioswales, green gutters, and stormwater infiltration planters can be incorporated into streets to manage stormwater without creating conventional retention ponds. Reduced pave‐ ment widths slow traffic and reduce heat island effect. Develop a Central Greenway Corridor with limited auto‐ mobile conflicts traversing Downtown and connecting Photo above le : Func onal green space in West Park Village, a walkable mixed use neighborhood in west Hillsborough County. Photo above right: Pinellas Trail extension in downtown St. Peters‐ burg, a compact mixed use center.

TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐25   


major des na ons in the city and pathways in Pasco  County. The corridor could follow underu lized pla ed  alleyways and minor streets.  

Par cipate in the Safe Routes to School Program and  seek funding for enhancements to designated routes  for safe walking or bicycling to school.  

Bicycle and Pedestrian Culture  Foster a bicycle and pedestrian‐friendly environment  and culture in Zephyrhills. Con nue to secure grants  and other funding to implement the Zephyrhills Mul ‐ Use Trail Master Plan, which envisions a well‐designed,  citywide network of trails and bike lanes.  

Explore the feasibility of a bicycle loan program in  Downtown and other parts of the City, including       opportuni es for public/private partnerships.  

Con nue to expand the sidewalk network to enhance  pedestrian mobility. Establish a hierarchy of sidewalks  and establish standards (e.g., sidewalk width, crosswalks,  and ligh ng) for arterial, collector and local streets.   As part of a neighborhood planning process (e.g., Eco‐ Neighborhoods), engage the community in assessing  the walkability of City neighborhoods and recommend‐ ing improvements where deficiencies exist. The assess‐ ment should consider if goods and services are within  an easy and safe walk so as to allow residents and      employees access to daily needs without using a car.  Recommenda ons could include zoning changes to  allow development that has mixed land uses and com‐ pact, pedestrian‐oriented design.    Control traffic speeds on key pedestrian streets (e.g.,  traffic calming and law enforcement).  

Establish a policy requiring, where appropriate and  safe, pedestrian and bicycle connec ons between new  and exis ng developments, and especially between  single use residen al development and commercial/ retail uses.   Encourage local businesses and organizations to provide  bicycle racks.   Place a multi‐modal map on the City’s website to inform  residents of pedestrian and bicycle trails, transit routes  and stops, parking lots and garages and loca ons of  bike racks.  Transit Connec vity  Foster land use pa erns that make transit service in  Zephyrhills more viable and advocate for transit invest‐ ments that result in better connectivity within the city  and the region. Consider establishing rubber‐tire trolley  service connec ng Village Centers and higher density  neighborhoods to major commercial and employment  centers.  

“GREEN STREET” CROSS‐SECTION 

Image: Ekis cs Design Studio.  2 ‐26  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS  


Partner with Pasco County Public Transit to install  transit shelters providing transit riders protection from  the elements and direct connect to the sidewalk network.   Continue to incorporate transit considerations into the  development review process.  Ride‐Sharing and Vanpooling   Encourage single‐occupant commuters to car‐pool or  vanpool to reduce costs, energy use, pollu on, and  highway conges on by publicizing commuter services  offered by TBARTA on the City website.  

REDUCE ENERGY USE + AIR POLLUTION  Vehicle Miles and Idling  Reduce motor vehicle miles traveled and idling to reduce  energy use and associated air pollu on. Employ inte‐ grated land use and transportation planning and sprawl  reduc on policies to create pedestrian, bicycle and  transit‐friendly village centers and neighborhoods.   Encourage commuters to use rideshare programs and  employers to offer telecommu ng.   Consider the connec vity of street networks in all site  plan, pla ng, and right‐of‐way vaca on applica ons.  To increase route choices, new street networks should  conform to a grid‐pa ern to the extent possible with  respect to ecological resources.    Synchronize traffic signals with speed limits to mini‐ mize vehicle stopping and idling. Consider energy‐ efficient roundabouts in lieu of traffic signals, where  feasible.   Implement a “no idling” policy for City vehicles. Educate  residents and businesses about the adverse impacts of  unnecessary vehicular idling. 

Energy Efficient Outdoor Ligh ng  Reduce energy costs of street lights and traffic signals  through use of energy efficient, solid‐state lamps, such  as LED.   

SUPPORT ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLES + FUELS   Energy Efficient City Fleet  Expand the city fleet of energy‐efficient and lower  emission vehicles. Include considerations for alternative  fuel vehicles, including electric vehicles, when replacing  or adding city fleet vehicles.   Explore the feasibility of conver ng City fleet vehicles  for electric, compressed natural gas, or biodiesel use.  Explore the feasibility of storage and use of biodiesel  or other alterna ve fuels for the City fleet, including  opportuni es for public/private partnerships.   Infrastructure for Advanced‐Fuel Vehicles  Expand infrastructure to support alterna ve vehicle  technologies. Partner with private, government, or  non‐profit sectors to provide fueling/charging infra‐ structure to support alterna ve vehicle technologies.   Seek funding for addi onal electric vehicle plug‐in    sta ons to meet future demand.   Explore the designation of certain streets for low‐speed  Neighborhood Electric Vehicles (NEV).  Community Awareness of Available Technologies  Expand community awareness of alternative fuel vehicles  and infrastructure availability in the city. Promote the  benefits of alterna ve fuel vehicles with a focus on  commercial fleets.   Explore incentives for drivers of alternative fuel vehicles,  such as reserved parking.  TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐27    


ALMOST HALF‐WAY THERE  In 2010, Bill 7243 was passed by the Florida  Legislature se ng a recycling goal of 75%     by 2020 for Florida coun es.  

Combusted (14%) 

Recycled (31%) 

Landfilled (55%) 

FLORIDA MUNICIPAL   SOLID WASTE, 2010 

2 ‐ 28  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   


By reducing, reusing, and recycling  waste, our community can save money, lower  the risks of environmental hazards, and help  preserve resources for future genera ons.  

waste reduction + reuse 

Reducing solid waste is important to a sustainable  community. All items consumed require natural        resources, consume energy, and generate pollu on  during produc on and transport to market. Items  ‘thrown away’ become waste that must be hauled to  disposal facili es using more energy and genera ng  more pollu on in the process.  Saving energy is an important benefit of reusing and  recycling items that would otherwise become waste.  Collecting recyclables to create useful materials requires  energy, but usually far less than needed to make the  same products from newly extracted materials. 

accounts for about 9 percent of the city’s solid waste— the third largest component after paper (34 percent)  and yard trimmings (16.5 percent).   

ENERGY COST OF WASTE COLLECTION  Waste is collected from city residential and commercial  customers  twice a week. Recyclables in blue bags are  collected every two weeks. The residential pick up route  is roughly 106 miles which requires approximately 51  COMPOSITION OF SINGLE‐FAMILY RESIDENTIAL WASTE         DISPOSED AT RRF (% BY WEIGHT), CITY OF ZEPHYRHILLS 

WASTE PRODUCTION + RECYCLING  In fiscal year 2010/2011, the city’s Sanitation Department  collected 11,445 tons of solid waste—4,915 tons from  households, 6,463 tons from businesses, 4.68 tons of  waste  res, and 63 tons of recyclable materials (i.e.,  aluminum cans,  n/steel cans, #1 and #2 plas cs, and  glass bo les/jars).  Based on these figures and the  city’s 2010 popula on of 13,315, 4.7 pounds of solid  waste are generated per resident per day. Less than  one‐tenth of a pound of waste per resident is recycled  even though recyclables make up a significant portion   of the city’s solid waste stream (see figure at right).     A Pasco County waste and recyclables composi on  study conducted in 2011 indicated that food waste 

Source: Pasco County 2010/2011 Waste & Recyclables Composi on Study,  May 2011. 

TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐ 29    


gallons of petro diesel fuel. The commercial route is  134 miles, using 54 gallons of diesel. Over the course  of a year, city trash pick up and transport to the Pasco  County Resource Recovery (waste‐to‐energy) Facility  (RRF) in Shady Hills consume 21,191 gallons of diesel  at an annual cost of $67,053 at $3.16 per gallon as of  March 2012.  

Ask employees to print hardcopies only when necessary  and to use double‐sided prin ng when they do print.   

Coupled with opera onal costs, the price tag of the  solid waste collection in the city is $1,186,804 annually. 

An ‐Li er Campaign  Raise community awareness about li er‐preven on  and reduce risks to community health, water quality,  and wildlife habitat. Partner with Keep Pasco Beau ful,  a non‐profit organiza on, for the Great American  Cleanup. This na onwide event takes place every year  on the third Saturday in April. 

POLLUTION FROM WASTE 

INCREASE RECYCLING 

While the waste‐to‐energy process reduces the amount  of solid waste disposed of in landfills, it also produces  pollutants from burning plas cs and  res. Compound‐ ing the problem is proper disposal of hazardous materials  such as chemicals, ba eries, electronics, and pharma‐ ceu cals that can contaminate water and soil if not  handled properly.   

Recycling at Home and Work  Make recycling easier at home and at work. Provide  recycling bins to customers in place of the blue bag  system and increase curbside recycling pick from      biweekly to weekly. The City of Dade City made these  changes and saw recycling par cipa on rates increase  from 3 percent to over 20 percent. 

TARGET 5  waste reduc on + reuse  By 2015, increase the city’s resident recycling  par cipa on rate by 10 percent. 

INITIATIVES REDUCE SOLID WASTE  Customer Incen ves for Reducing Trash  Provide incen ves to encourage waste reduc on (and  recycling). Offer customers opportunities to save money  on their solid waste bill by paying for the volume (i.e.,  bin size) of waste generated. The premise of this    incentive system, known as Pay As You Throw (PAYT),  is that customers will want to divert more waste to  recycling. Note: PAYT should be paired with a suitably  scaled recycling program.   In conjunc on with PAYT, implement once per week  solid waste pick‐up instead of twice per week.  Paperless Office  Reduce paper use in city government. Ins tute policies  and prac ces to reduce the amount of paper used in  city government. Poten al areas of paper (and money  savings) include electronic  mecards, payroll, u lity  billing/payments, and development plan processing.  2 ‐ 30  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   

The average home can easily accumulate as much as 100  pounds of household chemicals. 

Recycling Incen ves  Provide incen ves for recycling. Consider establishing  an incen ve program to increase recycling in the City.  Incentive‐based recycling programs, such as RecycleBank  or Rewards for Recycling, award points to residents  based on the frequency or weight of their recyclables.  Points can be exchanged for free or discounted goods  and services from local businesses.   Recycling Drop‐Off Centers  Expand the reach of the city recycling ini a ve.  Install  large recycling bins or dumpsters in convenient locations  in Zephyrhills. Partner with local organiza on, such  Meals on Wheels East Pasco, for collec on recyclables. 


Recycling drop‐off centers should be monitored to deter  disposal of unwanted materials and contaminates.  Recycling at City Facili es  Make recycling easy, efficient, and comprehensive at  municipal buildings and grounds. Establish a purchasing  policy that favors products made with recycled or  plant‐based, biodegradable materials, when feasible.   Ask contractors working for the city to recycle a specified  percentage of their construc on and demoli on waste  (e.g., wood, glass and metals).   Publicize city projects and accomplishments rela ve to  waste reduc on and recycling in a Sustainable Zeph‐ yrhills Annual Report.  Recycling “On the Go”  Locate recycling receptacles in high‐traffic public spaces  and at city events. Consider using innova ve technolo‐ gies, such as solar‐powered, compac ng receptacles  that require less emp ng and do not use electricity.  Compos ng  Local urban agriculture and other hor cultural groups  value compost as an organic soil amendment. Encourage  composting by partnering with the Pasco County Coop‐

erative Extension to provide composting workshops.  The Florida Department of Environmental Protec on  states that backyard compos ng and grass clipping  management are two of the best methods to recycle  organic waste.  Sponsor a compos ng demonstra on project at a  community garden, local school, or municipal building.  Consider implemen ng a curb‐side food and yard  waste recycling program.   Partner with businesses for processing, sale, and distri‐ bu on of compost to consumers.   Recyclables Markets   Markets for recyclable materials are essential to closing  the recycling loop and channeling resources back into  use. Encourage recycling business start‐ups in Zephyrhills,  including collectors or haulers; processors (material  recovery facili es); brokers; and end‐users (manu‐ facturers).   Partner with the Greater Zephyrhills Chamber of Com‐ merce to promote businesses that buy recycled mate‐ rials. Pasco County partnered with U.S. GreenFiber for  a turnkey opera on to collect waste paper for manu‐ facturing cellulose insula on. Over 100 "Bring It from 

THE PRODUCT LIFECYCLE  Every step in a product’s life uses energy and generates waste.  By re‐using and recycling products one or more  mes before  disposal, the ecological loop is shortened—less raw materials, less energy, less waste. 

TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐ 31    


Home!" recycling bins are located across the county,  including public schools and county facili es in the  Zephyrhills area.  Recycling Fundraisers  Assist organiza ons in holding fundraisers that build  community awareness about recycling while diver ng  materials from the solid waste stream.   Partner with local nonprofits, schools, clubs, and other  organizations to initiate recycling drives for fundraising  (e.g., “cash for cans”).    Electronics Recycling  Increase awareness about the proper disposal of e‐waste.  Partner with Pasco County Solid Waste and Resource  Recovery Department to increase community awareness  of the hazards of improperly disposed of electronic  waste (e‐waste).  

such as the annual “Pasco Art of Recycling Contest” or  “Dream Machine Recycle Rally”—a recycling program  offering schools a chance to earn rewards, compete for  prizes, and support post‐9/11 disabled U.S. veterans.  The District has received awards and recogni ons for  its recycling programs and is considered a model  school district for increasing student (and family)  awareness about solid waste issues.  

WASTE TO ENERGY  Explore Waste to Energy Alterna ves  Explore op ons for using waste to produce energy   locally. Explore the feasibility of a biofuel recycling  center and partnerships with the private sector to   produce biofuel for the city’s fleet. The City of Talla‐ hassee’s biodiesel facility is capable of producing 300  gallons of biodiesel per day using waste vegetable oil.  

Partner with local groups to locate e‐cycling receptacles  in the city and organize annual e‐waste recycling days.  

REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLING AWARENESS  Partnerships for Awareness  Offer public awareness and public educa on programs  about waste reduc on, reuse, and recycling. Partner  with Pasco County Solid Waste and Resource Recovery  Department, Pasco County Coopera ve Extension, or  other organiza ons to provide informa on and         encourage broad par cipa on in the City’s waste         reduc on and recycling programs.   Ask residents to submit sugges ons  on ways to make  recycling easier in Zephyrhills.  Partner with the District School Board of Pasco County  for additional educational opportunities and community  service projects targeted to the Zephyrhills community  2 ‐ 32  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   

Photo above le : Pasco County partnered with U.S. GreenFiber to  collect waste paper for manufacturing cellulose insula on.   Photo above right: Project T.G.I.F. (Turning Grease into Fuel) stu‐ dents recycle used cooking oil into biodiesel to help heat homes of  the needy in Westerly, RI. 


BREAKING IT DOWN   Compos ng is a way to recycle yard and food wastes back  into the soil to increase soil fertility and decrease solid waste.  

TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐ 33    


A BIG THIRST—FLORIDA’S 2030 POPULATION  EXPECTED TO REACH 23,877,889  The state’s popula on jumped 17.6% between  2000 and 2010 (U.S. Census Bureau), and is    projected to  grow by 253,829 residents a year  between 2010 and 2030 (UF BEBR 2011).   2 ‐ 34  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   


Water is essen

al for all dimensions of life.  

water conservation + protection 

Clean, fresh water is key to community sustainability‐‐ indeed, we could not survive without it. Of all the water  on Earth, only a  ny frac on is fresh and available. Yet  overuse and pollution threaten our fragile water supplies.  This is especially true in Florida, where the population— currently 18.8 million—is likely to reach 24 million by  2030.1 Increasing demand, limited supplies, and pollu‐ on from lawns, agriculture, roads, and industry will    profoundly affect water resources if not managed well.  In Zephyrhills, "City of Pure Water," protecting this vital  resource is a top community priority. Residents can do  their part by using water wisely and reducing the  effects of pollu on.   Zephyrhills has always been known for good quality  drinking water tapped from a vast underground aquifer  system. Over the years, this natural resource has  a racted residents and industry to the city, helping  build community health and prosperity. But steadily  rising demand for groundwater in the northern Tampa  Bay area has lowered water levels in lakes, wetlands,  and the aquifer, threatening the future of this water  supply.  Our Water Budget  One response to lessening the environmental damage  caused by pumping large quan es of water out of the  ground has been to limit groundwater withdrawals.  The City of Zephyrhills—along with other public and 

private water suppliers that share a dwindling water  supply in the Hillsborough River Basin—is allo ed a  specific amount of groundwater by the Southwest  Florida Water Management District, a state agency  responsible for water supply, water quality, flood    protec on, and protec ng the environment.   Before new development can be built in Zephyrhills,  there must be enough water in the city’s water budget  to meet the needs of new residents and businesses.  Current water use in Zephyrhills accounts for about 86  percent of the allo ed 2.9 million gallons of water per  day, making water a limi ng factor for future develop‐ ment prospects in the city.   The Cost of Cheap Water  Because groundwater is rela vely inexpensive, there is  li le economic incen ve to use less. Why else would  so many households in Florida spray more than half of  the potable water they consume for irriga ng lawns.  For any other product,  one would expect reduc ons in  supply to result in higher prices (e.g., gasoline).  Once this cheap supply of water has been fully allocated,  the only op ons available to a community that desires  future growth are to develop alterna ve sources of  water, such as reservoirs, seawater desaliniza on, or  piped water from distant places, which are very costly.  Another op ons is to stretch the exis ng water supply  by using the resource more efficiently.   TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐ 35    


RESIDENTIAL AVERAGE WATER USE 

pumping, trea ng and delivering potable water alone  accounts for $71 million in annual energy costs. Also,  fossil‐fuel‐powered electric plants consume more than  132 billion gallons of fresh water per day in the U.S. 

Dishwasher 1% 

Bath 1% 

Faucet 6% 

Leaks 6% 

10%

Shower 7% 

20%

30%

Clothes Washer 9% 

40%

Toilets 11% 

50%

Outdoor 59% 

60%

Source: American Water Works Associa on Research Founda on. 

Public awareness campaigns and rebates for water‐ efficient fixtures have spawned some voluntary water  conservation, but households, industry, and government  need to do more to ensure that high quality, low cost  water in Zephyrhills will be available for future city  residents and businesses.  Pure Water  The Floridan aquifer, which supplies 100 percent of the  drinking water in Zephyrhills is vulnerable to pollution.  In freshwater springs, which are hydraulically connected  to the aquifer, the effects of groundwater pollu on is  evident. The primary pollutants are nitrates—byproducts  of wastewater treatment, sep c tanks, and fer lizers  used on lawns and agricultural crops.  Typical developments of the last few decades tend to  generate massive amounts of stormwater run‐off     because they contain so much hard, impervious surface  area (e.g., roofs on sprawling one‐story buildings, vast  parking lots, and extensive networks of wide roads).  Direct channeling of stormwater by pipes into streams  bypasses the cleansing effect of percola on through  the soil or slow movement through wetlands. Impervious  surfaces also drama cally reduces the rate at which  stormwater replenishes groundwater.   A Sustainable Community is Water Smart  It is possible to have a future in which all of our basic  water needs are met, healthy ecosystems are sustained,  and the local economy can grow and diversify. To realize  this future, the Zephyrhills community must reassess  how they value and use water, and take necessary   ac ons at home, school, work, and play.  The Water—Energy Connec on  Water and wastewater systems together represent up  to 35 percent of municipal energy use. In Florida,  2 ‐ 36  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   

Public space with a “Celebrate the Aquifer” message. 

TARGET 6  water conserva on + protec on  Reduce daily per capita water use from 119 gallons  to 113 gallons (5 percent) by year 2015 and 107  gallons (10 percent) by year 2018 through a mul ‐pronged water conserva on campaign. 

INITIATIVES STRETCH OUR WATER SUPPLY  Water Saving Campaign  Phase 1: Partner with local businesses to sponsor a  water‐saving compe on between neighborhood/ homeowners associa ons.  Phase 2: Perform indoor and outdoor water audits of  the largest water users in the city, such as schools and  large businesses. Based on the findings, suggest ways  to reduce water use .   Phase 3: Expand upon the City’s high‐efficiency toilet  rebate program to include other water‐saving devices  such as rain barrels and sensor irriga on systems.  Phase 4: Challenge everyone in the City to save six gallons  of water each day through simple water‐saving ac ons 


publicized via the City website and other community  outreach (Phase 4). Under a similar campaign, the City  of Cooper City saw water use drop by 9.26 percent in  one year, nearly double its goal of 5 percent.   Community Awareness  Raise community awareness about the limits of our  fresh water supply and value of conserving this vital  resource. Distribute educa onal materials produced  by government partners including the Southwest Florida  Water Management District Water and U.S. Environ‐ mental Protec on Agency.  Partner with local schools for the American Water  Works Associa on annual Drop Savers’ Poster Contest.  Possible partners could be the Zephyrhills High School  Earth Patrol Club and a local elementary school. Par c‐ ipa ng K‐12 students use their own ideas, designs, and  slogans to create a poster about the importance of  conserving water. The poster contest winners are  acknowledged during na onal Drinking Water Week  and on the associa on website.   Install sustainable water use demonstra on projects in  accessible, high‐traffic loca ons to serve educa onal  purposes and promote the City’s green brand. Demon‐ stra on projects could include rain barrels or cisterns  and a community garden at Alice Hall Community Center;  gray water toilet flushing system in the library rest‐ rooms; Florida‐Friendly yard landscaping at the Mul ‐ Purpose Center/YMCA; and new genera on waste‐ water treatment/re‐use technologies such as Living  Machines©.  

Price water to reflect the true cost of the service and  encourage water conserva on.  Achieve community support for water rates through  education and water conservation opportunities. Water  rates seldom reflect the full financial costs of providing  the service—rarer s ll is recovery for environmental  costs. Although full costs are ul mately paid one way  or another—most commonly through property taxes— shi ing the full cost into water prices encourages con‐ serva on by revealing the true cost to customers.  

REPLENISH THE AQUIFER  Groundwater Recharge  Increase groundwater recharge in the exis ng built  environment. Promote Low Impact Development (LID)  techniques in exis ng developed areas. LID maximizes  capture of rainwater for onsite reuse and groundwater  recharge to replicate the natural hydrologic func on of  the predevelopment landscape. Techniques include  minimizing impervious surfaces (e.g., pavement/ building footprint) and maximizing capture and reuse  of stormwater onsite via vegetated areas, infiltra on  trenches/swales, permeable pavement, green roofs,  ver cal gardens, and underground and above‐ground  cisterns.  

Serve as a model for landscape water conserva on  through incrementally replacing turf grass that is purely  ornamental with drought‐tolerant "Florida‐Friendly"  landscaping.   Partner with local garden clubs, Florida Na ve Plant  Society, and Pasco County Coopera ve Extension to  create a "Florida Friendly Yard of the Month" recognition  program that emphasizes minimal use of irriga on.  Reuse Water  Con nue to expand the City’s reclaimed water system  to serve more neighborhoods. As part of a water saving  campaign, promote the groundwater saving benefits  of using reclaimed water for landscape irriga on. Seek  grant funding for expansion of the reclaimed water  system. 

Florida‐Friendly Landscaping™  

OUNCE OF PREVENTION OR GALLON OF CURE?  Groundwater Quality  Preserve the high quality of the City’s groundwater.  Develop a program for the elimina on/abatement of  sep c tanks use within the City. Educate homeowners  and other property owners about ac ons they can take  TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐ 37    


to protect groundwater water, including decreasing the  use of water pollu ng chemicals such as cleaning  agents, pes cides, herbicides, and fer lizers and  properly disposing of hazardous waste.   Surface Water Quality  Increase protec on of surface waters within local  drainage basins. Educate homeowners and other prop‐ erty owners about ac ons they can take to protect the  water quality of area streams and lakes, including  maintaining vegeta ve buffers around water bodies,  decreasing the use of water pollu ng chemicals such  as cleaning agents, pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers,  and properly disposing of hazardous waste.   Install a solar‐powered aeration fountain in Lake Zephyr  to  improve water quality, increase the viability of the  lake to support aqua c animals and water cleansing   bacteria, along with educational interpretative signage  about the fountain and other efforts to restore water  quality in the lake.  

WATER‐WISE BUILDINGS, PLACES & SPACES  New Construc on   Ensure that all new construc on makes use of the best  available water conserva on technologies. Through  educa on and/or incen ves (e.g., accelerated site plan  review), encourage use of water conservation standards  such as Florida Water StarTM—a voluntary cer fica on  program for new construc on and exis ng home     renova on—in new construc on. Require Low Impact  Development techniques when issuing building permits.  In coordina on with the Southwest Florida Water  Management District, explore the feasibility of providing  stormwater credits for onsite rainwater capture and  direct onsite use/recharge. 

Source: 1. Bureau of Economic & Business Research, University of Florida, 2011. 

2 ‐ 38  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   

Image: Ekis cs Design Studio. 


Community gardens are vibrant gathering  places that produce fresh, healthy food    and support neighborhood livability. 

urban agriculture 

Agriculture has been a part of North American ci es  for centuries. From colonial se lements that gave    agriculture a central place in the town commons to  20th century Victory and Depression gardens—the  largest‐scale urban garden ini a ves in the U.S. to  date—local food systems have addressed issues of  food security, public health, social well‐being, and    environmental stewardship. In Zephyrhills, farming  was the backbone of the community through the  1930s and 1940s, ul mately succumbing to the freezes  of 1982 and 1983.  Today, agriculture is making a comeback in urban places  as a way to achieve greener ci es. Through backyard  and schoolyard gardens, farming coopera ves, and  ‘buy local’ movements, communi es are reconnec ng  with their food, enjoying the taste and nutritional value  of fresh‐picked produce, reducing the energy costs of  food, and learning (and relearning) about gardening,  composting, canning, and community‐building.  Field to Fork—Shortening the Distance  Conventional food production and distribution requires  a tremendous amount of energy. It is es mated that  10 percent of energy consumed annually in the U.S.  was by the food industry. To produce one calorie of  edible food, seven to 10 calories of energy are used. A  significant portion of that energy is for transport. It is  common practice for food to be shipped around the 

country or around the world prior to reaching consum‐ ers.  As a result, the average American foodstuff trav‐ els approximately 1,500 miles before being consumed.  Growing a Healthy Community  Urban agriculture contributes to community health in  a host of ways. Gardening provides opportuni es for  recrea on, physical ac vity, social interac on, and  community building. Increased green space, improved  air quality, enhanced soils, reduced heat island effects,  and greater urban biodiversity benefit the natural    environment. Local economies stand to gain from urban  agriculture. Increasing consumer interest in healthy,  local foods can create or expand local markets,          s mula ng new businesses and jobs.   Local food produc on can help address food security  issues in a community. Food security exists when all  people at all  mes have access to enough food for an  active, healthy life, a necessary condition for a nourished  and healthy popula on. In 2008 and 2009, almost 15  percent of U.S. households had very low food security.  Urban agriculture can increase local supply and accessi‐ bility of affordable fresh food.   Who’s Your Farmer?  Urban agriculture and other local foods ini a ves can  be supportive of local farmers by strengthening linkages  between communi es, processors, distributors, and   TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐ 39    


farmers. Greater availability of local products in local  markets provides revenues to Florida farmers, reduces  transport costs, and helps preserve farms and farmlands.   Agriculture in the City  In 2008, 82 percent of the U.S. popula on resided in  ci es and suburbs, o en far removed from food‐yielding  farms. Growing food in cities is not only possible, it is  viable. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture,  urban commercial gardens produce yields that can be  13  mes greater per acre than from rural farms. A  study found that if the City of Cleveland converted 80  percent of its vacant lots into gardens, the city could  produce 22 percent to 48 percent of demand for fresh  produce, 25 percent of demand for poultry and eggs,  and 100 percent of demand for honey. Food production  in Cleveland would keep $29‐115  million in the local  economy. 

semi‐public land (schoolyards and church yards).    A successful urban agriculture program depends on  many partners—residents, gardeners, farmers,       merchants, consumers, restaurants, and government.  Although it is ideal to have a wide range of partners  contributing to an urban agriculture initiative, a    successful program can start small, with only a few  ac ve par es. 

TARGET 7  urban agriculture  One‐acre of community garden space per 2,500  households.  

INITIATIVES INCREASE LOCAL FOOD PRODUCTION 

City Harvest in Philadelphia helps feeds families in need. 

Planning for Urban Agriculture  City government plays a vital role in local food produc‐ on through the adop on of suppor ve policies and  regula ons. The defini on of urban agriculture varies  from city to city but is generally defined as the growing,  processing, and distribution of food and other products  through intensive plant cultivation and animal husbandry  in and around ci es. Depending on local condi ons  and preferences, a community decides which agricultural  ac vi es and loca ons are appropriate.   Urban agriculture ac vi es could include community  and private gardens, edible landscaping, fruit trees,  food‐producing green roofs, aquaculture, farmers   markets, small‐scale farming such as Community       Supported Agriculture (CSA), hobby beekeeping, and  food compos ng. Possible loca ons for urban agricul‐ ture are central areas of the city and at the periphery;  on homesteads; on private land (owned or leased),  public land (parks, open spaces, or rights‐of‐way), and  2 ‐ 40  |  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS   

Community Awareness  Increase community awareness about urban agriculture  methods and ini a ves. Partner with the Pasco County  Coopera ve Extension, UF/IFAS Cer fied Master Gar‐ deners, and other agriculture experts to provide work‐ shops and courses for individuals interested in garden‐ ing or small‐scale agricultural produc on. Use public  buildings or land for an urban agriculture demonstra‐ on project that could include a greenhouse, an aqua‐ culture/biponics project, a roo op vegetable garden.  Urban Agriculture Policy  Establish suppor ve policies, standards, and guidelines  for urban agriculture uses, structures, and ac vi es  deemed appropriate for Zephyrhills. Consider allowing  community gardens in all zoning districts and farmers  markets in commercial and other zoning districts.        Integrate urban agriculture into the site planning process  for new residen al and commercial developments and  consider provisions for open space credit for land set‐ aside for gardens within new developments.   Urban Agriculture Sites   Inventory city‐managed lands to determine poten al  open spaces suitable for community gardens or other  urban agriculture ac vi es. Create a pilot program  fostering the development of community gardens on  public and other lands. Convene a task force to assist  with these and other urban agriculture related         projects and tasks.  


THE FORGOTTEN AGRICULTURAL INPUT  Pollina on can be a limi ng factor in  growing our food. Every other necessary  cultural need may be met, but pollina on  failure can limit the quality, the quan ty,  or even deny the yield altogether. 

Sustainable Urban Agriculture Prac ces  Promote sustainable food growing techniques that use organic fer lizers and pest control, conserve water, and  return garden waste to the soil in the form of compost.   Beneficial Insects  Develop a beneficial garden insect program to nurture pollina ng insects such as honey bees, dragonflies,  bu erflies, spiders, praying man s, and lightning bugs. Establish pes cide no‐spray zones around beneficial  garden insect and organic gardening programs. 

SUPPORT THE LOCAL “FOOD SHED”  Local Food Shed Linkages  Create or reinforce linkages between local farmers, consumers, businesses,  and organiza ons. Establish a “Buy  Fresh Buy Local” campaign that encourages local residents to buy food produced within 300 miles of Zephyrhills.  Explore job and business creation opportunities associated with growing, processing, storing, and selling local  food. Partner with volunteer organizations to harvest and distribute unwanted produce from private properties to  local food banks.  Local Food Culture  Foster a local food culture in Zephyrhills. Collaborate with individuals, groups, organizations, and institutions to  hold fes vals and events that celebrate local food (e.g., community gardens “best salsa” contest). Publicize a  link to a directory of area farmers markets on the City website. Establish a farmers market featuring fresh food  produced by local farmers and businesses.  TARGETS + INITIATIVES | 2 ‐ 41    


SECTION THREE     

               

tools + timeframes  

S U S TA I N A B L E ZEPHYRHILLS 


ORGANIZING FOR ACTION 

action plan  The Ac on Plan in this sec on organizes the ini a ves and ac ons iden fied in Sec on 2 by iden fying who  (lead  and  support  en es),  when  (short‐,  medium‐,  and  long‐term  meframes),  and  by  what  means  (implementa on tools) ac ons may be carried out.   The es mated  meframes shown in the Ac on Plan are reflec ve of community priori es as well as a gen‐ eral assessment of city government’s capacity—in terms of staff and fiscal resources—to be directly or indi‐ rectly involved in comple ng ac ons. The Ac on Plan will inform the city’s annual budge ng process when  all iden fied city needs are priori zed and matched to available resources. The actual  ming of Sustainable  Zephyrhills ac ons will be determined in conjunc on with this budge ng process.     A general assessment of available resources also applies to the community partners iden fied in the Ac on  Plan. The Ac on Plan serves to suggest ways to be involved, such as sponsoring a “green” event or hos ng  an educa onal program, but does not obligate the organiza on to act.  Lastly, the Ac on Plan is a flexible document that may be modified to respond to changed condi ons. For  example, a financial grant award may cause a project to occur sooner or a new method or technology for  achieving a desired end result may be more feasible than one iden fied previously. 

POTENTIAL PLAN IMPLEMENTATION TOOLS  Long‐Range  Plans 

Short‐Range Plans 

Land & Building   Regula ons 

Departmental Work   Programs 

GOVERNMENT ACTION TOOLS   ▪  Comp Plan  ▪  CRA Redevelop‐ ment Plan 

▪ Mul ‐Use Trail  Master Plan 

▪ MPO LRTP 

▪ CIP  ▪  MPO TIP  ▪  FDOT 5‐Year  Work Program  ▪  Other Agency  Work Programs 

▪ LDC  ▪  Technical      Manuals 

▪ Building Code 

Community Partner   Ini a ves  COMMUNITY ACTION TOOLS  

▪ City Programs or  Services  ‐  Staffing  ‐  Equipment  ‐  Materials 

▪ Advocacy  ▪  Projects 

▪ Programs  ▪  Events 

EXAMPLE ACTIONS   ▪  Vision  ▪  Land Use, Fiscal  or Program      Policies  ▪  Policy Maps 

▪ Infrastructure   ‐  Planning  ‐  Design  ‐  Construc on 

LEGEND: CG ‐ Community Group  CIP ‐ Capital Improvement Program  COMP PLAN ‐ Comprehensive Plan  CRA ‐ Community Redevelopment Plan  DEV ‐ Development Services Department  FDOT ‐ Florida Department of Transporta on 

▪ Form‐based 

▪ Greening Zeph‐

Zoning ▪  Low‐Impact  Development  Design Stand‐ ards  ▪  Site & Building  Plans Review 

yrhills Mini‐ Grant Program  ▪  Sidewalk        Program  ▪  Recycling        Program 

▪ Community 

▪ Pasco County  Garden Project  Extension       Programs  ▪  Sustainability  Topic Discussion  ▪  Keep              Group  Hillsborough  Beau ful An ‐ ▪  Recycling  Li er Campaign  Events 

PCPT ‐ Pasco County Public Transporta on  LDC ‐ Land Development Code  LRTP ‐ Long Range Transporta on Plan  MPO ‐ Pasco County Metropolitan Planning Organiza on  TIP ‐ Transporta on Improvement Program  TDP ‐ Transit Development Plan   

TOOLS + TIMEFRAMES | 3 ‐1     TOOLS + 


ANY CITY  DEPT 

PARTNERS

ESTIMATED TIMEFRAME SHORT‐RANGE MEDIUM‐RANGE  LONG‐RANGE (0‐3 YEARS)  (3‐5 YEARS)  (5‐10 YEARS) 

Marketing/  Communications 

IMPLEMENTATION TOOL(S) 

Overall Plan  Implementation 

PRIMARY BENEFITS 

PAGE 3‐2 

Use a variety of outreach tools to inform  the community about sustainability.  ACTIONS:   a. Email Listserv. Invite people to register for information by providing an email address or other contact information. Use the  email addresses to create a listserv that allows timely and low‐cost communications from the city to interested parties. Send e‐ Note:   This initiative is intended to support the  notices about Sustainable Zephyrhills initiatives, events, and activities. Notices may also be sent cost‐effectively along with  paper or electronic utility billings.  achievement of all of the Sustainable  Zephyrhills initiatives and targets by  b. Web Links. Provide website links, widgets, and video public service announcements from agencies partners (e.g., Chamber of  informing the community of ways to be  Commerce and Sustainable Zephyrhills Facebook) providing green education and awareness on the city website.  involved in city‐ and partner‐sponsored  c. Green Portal. Highlight sustainable initiatives, programs, projects, and policies on a dedicated city green website (portal).   sustainability projects and programs. As  d. Green Assets Map. Create a downloadable e‐map showing the locations of green community features such as parks, fresh  such, the timeframe for this initiative is  markets, walkable districts and neighborhoods, bicycle and pedestrian ways.   on‐going.  e. Green Tips. Offer a daily or weekly green tip on the city website, green portal, or direct email (i.e., email listserv).     f. Video. Post short videos about sustainability initiatives on the city website. Videos could be created by the community as part of  a community project or competition.  g. Media Kit. Maintain a website media kit for Sustainable Zephyrhills including fact sheets, past media coverage, logos, high‐ resolution photographs and other images, and contact information.  h. Calendar of Green Events. Create a 12‐month sustainability calendar highlighting at least one local sustainability‐related event  each month. The calendar could feature city or partner‐sponsored events (e.g., Pasco County Cooperative Extension class  offered in the Zephyrhills area).  i. Green Marketplace. A green marketplace is an online forum that promotes sustainability‐related community activities such as  farmers markets, community gardens that residents may join, local foods in season with recipes, “grow local” or “buy local”  campaigns, and green topic discussion groups or training classes. The green market place could be offered by the city or through  partnership with another entity.   j. Bulletin Boards. Community bulletin boards are ideal for posting information on sustainability happenings. Community centers,  recreation centers, park kiosks, libraries, storefronts, and churches usually have community bulletin boards that are viewed by  many people on a regular basis.  k. Surveys. Surveys can be administered to evaluate the community’s knowledge of and/or support for green initiatives, and  inform people about the initiatives at the same time. Surveys can be statistically valid or not, depending on circumstances. Mini‐ surveys may be conducted at community events like expos or fairs as a polling method. Participation may be incentivized  through drawings or small giveaways (e.g., compost bins, reusable tote bags). 

Community Outreach Tools 

SUPPORT

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

1.

LEAD

ACTING ENTITIES

GET THE WORD OUT ABOUT SUSTAINABILTY 

INITIATIVES

COMMUNITY AWARENESS + ACTION SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 

COMMUNITY AWARENESS + ACTION 


“Idea Bags” Community Projects 

“Biggest Loser” or “Biggest Saver”  Contest 

Poster Contest 

Community Video Contest 

Intergenerational Community Project  PARTNERS 

Project 

Overall Plan  Implementation &  Community Building 

PARTNERS

■ Project

Overall Plan  Implementation &  Community Building 

PARTNERS

Project

Overall Plan  Implementation &  Community Building 

PARTNERS

Project

Overall Plan  Implementation &  Community Building 

PAGE 3‐3 

ACTION: Partner with a home improvements business to launch a Biggest Loser” or “Biggest Saver” competition focusing on the benefits of  reducing energy and/or water use in the home. The contest asks participants (individuals, groups, or neighborhoods) to monitor  energy/water use in their homes through utility billings over a period of time. Results are reported and winners are awarded a  sustainable prize (product or home improvement).   Resource: http://www.sustainablesaratoga.com/about‐us/initiatives/biggest‐looser‐energy‐challenge/  Overall Plan  ANY CITY  PARTNERS  Project  Implementation &  DEPT  Community Building  ACTION: Provide small paper bags at places where residents frequent, like a community center, library, school, church, etc., and invite  people to write a community project idea on the bag. Others who like the idea and want to help develop the project put their  contact information in the bag. School idea bags could be done separately and coupled with a youth innovation awards program.  Ideas for intra‐generational projects could arise from the process. 

ANY CITY  DEPT 

ACTION: Partner with local schools or clubs to sponsor a poster contest with a sustainability message such as water conservation,  recycling, and energy conservation. Resources:  http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=9dqtfgiab&oeidk=a07e5g75vfmef2e5447  http://www.fortlauderdale.gov/dropsavers/index.htm 

ANY CITY  DEPT 

ACTION: Sponsor a video contest with a sustainability theme such as:  • “Why green is good for Zephyrhills” or “What makes you happy about a sustainable future?”  • “How do you live sustainably?” or “What are some awesome examples of sustainability in your community?”   Resource: http://www.ci.issaquah.wa.us/Page.asp?NavID=2859 

ANY CITY  DEPT 

ACTION: Engage different age groups in community projects to encourage exchange of knowledge, skills, and values while learning about  their environment. Such projects promote inclusiveness and collaboration to build a stronger community.   Resource: http://www.epa.gov/aging/ia/examples.htm 

ANY CITY  DEPT 

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

6.

5.

4.

3.

2.

COMMUNITY‐BASED LEARNING 

COMMUNITY AWARENESS + ACTION 


Best Practice Community Programs 

Green Collage + Mural Competitions 

Green Walking + Biking Tours 

■ Policy

PARTNERS

■ Policy, Program or  Project 

Overall Plan  Implementation &  Community Building 

PARTNERS

Program 

Overall Plan  Implementation 

Overall Plan  Implementation 

PARTNERS

Project

Overall Plan  Implementation 

RESIDENTS

Policy 

Overall Plan  Implementation 

PASCO GOV’TS 

Policy

Overall Plan  Implementation 

PAGE 3‐4 

ACTION: Advocate for a Green Government Partnership among Pasco County local governments to facilitate idea sharing, information  exchange, and project collaboration among elected officials and local government sustainability coordinators. This group could  work with the educational community to incorporate stewardships principles into school curricula. 

DEV

ACTION: Establish an advisory group or board of city residents representing a cross‐section of community interests (e.g., seniors, youth,  minority group, business, etc.). The group or board would meet regularly to discuss and offer recommendations on city projects  and initiatives having the potential to influence the implementation of the Sustainable Zephyrhills Plan.  

DEV

ACTION: Install interpretative signage for green features in the city to inform residents and visitors about such things as native vegetation,  green transportation (e.g., bike trails and bus service), recycling facilities, electric vehicle charging station, etc. 

PW & PR 

ACTION: Partner with a local business or community organization to offer self‐guided or tour guide‐led walking or biking tours with stops  along the way for observation and discussion about green community features. 

ANY CITY  DEPT 

ACTION: Explore programs that have been successful in increasing sustainability awareness in other communities. 

ANY CITY  DEPT 

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

12. Green Government Partnership 

11. Sustainable Zephyrhills Advisory Board 

PARTNERS

ACTION: Create a pictorial dialogue of a green practice or achievement (e.g., community garden, eco‐festival, or a new green building) in  high‐traffic locations in the city. Promote these works of art in an e‐brochure on the city or a partner website. 

ANY CITY  DEPT 

CULTIVATE VOLUNTEERS & ADVOCATES 

10. Signs + Interpretative Displays 

9.

EXPLORE OUR HOME 

8.

7.

COMMUNITY AWARENESS + ACTION 


PASCO GOV’TS 

Policy 

Overall Plan  Implementation 

PARTNERS

■   Program 

Overall Plan  Implementation 

http://www.neighbourhoodsmallgrants.ca/greenest‐city/small‐grants

PAGE 3‐5 

ACTION: Provide small matching grants (e.g., $1,000) to neighborhood organizations for green projects or programs meeting certain  criteria. Seek program sponsors from the business community. Resource: 

DEV

ACTION: Advocate for bringing the UF/IFAS Program for Sustainable Living to the Pasco County Cooperative Extension. The program  provides educational and training programs promoting sustainable practices in the community, such as the Sustainable Floridian  program. Those completing the Sustainable Floridian curriculum maintain certification by providing 30 hours of service to the  community on an annual basis. 

DEV

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

14. Greening Zephyrhills Matching Grants 

County Extension offices typically offer  programming that reflects the needs of  its residents.  

13. UF/IFAS Program for Sustainable Living 

COMMUNITY AWARENESS + ACTION 


LEAD

SUPPORT

ACTING ENTITIES

PARTNERS

PRIMARY BENEFITS 

Marketing/ Money Savings,  Communications &  Resource Conservation  Programs & Pollution Reduction 

IMPLEMENTATION TOOL(S) 

PARTNERS

Policy, Programs,  Incentives &  Marketing/  Communications

Money Savings,  Resource Conservation  & Pollution Reduction 

PAGE 3‐6 

ACTIONS: a. Work with developers and builders early in the permitting process to encourage green building practices in the design,  construction, maintenance, and operation of new and renovated buildings and building sites.   b. Use a Sustainable Development Index to determine bonuses (e.g., density and height) for development incorporating a wide  range of sustainable design techniques.  c. Promote the use of green building performance standards, such as the Florida Green Building Coalition (FGBC), U.S. Green  Building Council Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Energy Star, and  Green Globe Rating System. Refund 50% of building permit fees for buildings that receive any of these certifications. To fund  this green incentive, consider increasing other building permit fees.  d. Amend the Land Development Code to define “cool roofs” and considering making cool roofs a requirement for new  buildings, except those with a green roof or solar energy system. 

DEV &  PARTNER 

ACTIONS: a. Partner with homeowner/neighborhood organizations and business sponsors for a green neighborhood challenge. Provide  participants with information and tools for success (e.g., water‐saving best practices or online energy calculator). The challenge  could be an early action project for an Eco‐Neighborhood or Eco‐District community planning effort (see Action 31.c below).  b. Partner with a local business organization, such as the Greater Zephyrhills Chamber of Commerce or Pasco County Economic  Development Council, and one or more local businesses to sponsor a “Going Green” business challenge.  c. Sponsor energy efficiency seminars during Energy Awareness Month (October) in partnership with the Pasco County  Cooperative Extension to provide information on best practices for saving energy in homes and businesses. A giveaway, such  as a starter kit of energy efficiency products, would provide an incentive for seminar participation and immediate action to  save energy.   d. Establish kilowatt meter lending and education program to increase awareness of the energy demand of appliances and small  electronics in the home and at work.  e. Work with local builders and realtors to inform consumers about the benefits of green buildings to household budgets and the  environment. Compile evidence of the returns on investment to builders, building owners and end‐users of green buildings.  f. Increase city staff’s knowledge about sustainable design and its role in reducing costs and improving environmental quality. 

DEV &  PARTNER 

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Increase the resource efficiency of new  and existing structures throughout the  city. 

16. Greening Existing + New Structures 

Increase community awareness of  resource‐efficient building technologies. 

15. Community Awareness about Green  Buildings 

ESTIMATED TIMEFRAME SHORT‐RANGE MEDIUM‐RANGE  LONG‐RANGE (0‐3 YEARS)  (3‐5 YEARS)  (5‐10 YEARS) 

INCREASE STOCK OF RESOURCE‐EFFICIENT BUILDINGS CITYWIDE 

INITIATIVES

GREEN BUILDINGS + CLEAN ENERGY  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 

GREEN BUILDINGS + CLEAN ENERGY 


PARTNERS

Policy 

Money Savings,  Resource Conservation  & Pollution Reduction 

PAGE 3‐7 

ACTIONS: a. Amend the Land Development Code to provide for clean energy production in the city and to include related standards for  permitted, accessory, or conditional use in zoning districts; height, setback, visibility, and coverage standards for roof‐ mounted and ground‐mounted systems; provision of solar‐oriented lots; provision of solar‐ready construction; provision of  grid‐connected and off‐grid systems; and solar installations.  b. Distribute solar‐access guidelines to developers, builders, homeowners, and other building owners. Resource:   http://www.santabarbaraca.gov/NR/rdonlyres/102D3AE0‐4AB4‐4BBA‐925C‐59C00723375D/0/Solar_Access_Packet.pdf  c. Implement a sustainable building permit expedite program for buildings that employ energy efficiency and clean energy  technologies.  d. Consider establishing a Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) program to provide long‐term loans to property owners for  energy efficiency, water conservation, renewable energy, and wind resistance projects. Loans are backed by an assessment on  the improved property and the assessment is enforced by a lien. The program is currently applicable to commercial properties  in Florida. Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) objections over lien holder positioning and lender risk and Federal court  action have stalled PACE for residential properties. Resource: http://dsireusa.org/solar/solarpolicyguide/?id=26   

DEV

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Increase clean energy production  citywide. 

18. Clean Energy City 

INCREASE CLEAN (RENEWABLE) ENERGY USE 

Reduce electricity consumption by city  government. 

17. City Electricity Consumption 

e. Amend the Land Development Code to define “green roof” and to allow a building’s green roof area to count toward a  development’s required open space under certain circumstances.  f. Establish a Sustainable Development Technical Advisory Committee comprised of city departmental staff (e.g., Planning,  Building, Finance and Public Works) to periodically review existing city codes to identify impediments to green building  techniques and ways to encourage these and other sustainable practices.  Money Savings,  ALL CITY  ‐ ‐ ‐  Policy  Resource Conservation  DEPTS  & Pollution Reduction  ACTIONS: a. Establish a Sustainable Development Technical Advisory Committee comprised of city departmental staff (e.g., Planning,  Building, Finance and Public Works) to identify and evaluate ideas to increase energy efficiency and overall sustainability of  city facilities and operations.  b. Adopt a green building policy for new or significantly renovated city buildings.  c. Conduct energy audits of city‐owned buildings and develop action plans and benchmarking protocol to phase retrofits and  measure performance over time.   d. When purchasing new appliances or electronics, select those that are ENERGY STAR‐certified, when feasible.  e. Use energy‐efficient lighting technologies in city facilities, including passive (natural) lighting, compact fluorescent lamps  (CFLs), light emitting diode (LED) lamps, and room occupancy sensors, when feasible.  f. Use LED or other high‐efficiency lamps in city‐owned traffic signals, streetlights, and pedestrian and school crossing signals,  when feasible. Request Progress Energy to use high‐efficiency lamps for streetlights the utility leases to the city. 

GREEN BUILDINGS + CLEAN ENERGY 


SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

 

PAGE 3‐8 

e. Consider use of solar photovoltaic (PV) and solar thermal for city building, grounds, and equipment (e.g., street and cross‐walk  lighting and hot water heating).   Explore options for assisting local schools in a successful application for the Progress Energy SunSense Schools program, which  awards solar photovoltaic (PV) system to select schools that also serve as emergency shelters. RB Stewart Middle School was  among the 2011 SunSense recipients. Schools are chosen based on criteria such as commitment to energy efficiency and  renewable energy education, location that maximizes geographic distribution throughout Progress Energy’s service territory,  number of students, and school shelter capacity. Resource:   https://www.progress‐energy.com/shared/segment‐selectors/sunsense.page  g. Explore small‐scale clean energy projects that utilize available resources to generate electricity or heat energy;  implementation partners, including public‐private partnerships; and funding mechanisms, including Federal and State grants  and low‐interest loans. Resource: Galena, Illinois launched the construction phase of a 368‐kilowatt solar energy project that  will provide half the energy required to operate its wastewater treatment facility. The $1.2 million project (partially grant  funded) will save the city more than $50,000 per year.  http://www.sustainablecitynetwork.com/topic_channels/energy/article_19546158‐9f6a‐11e1‐9657‐0019bb30f31a.html  h. Engage Progress Energy, the electricity utility in Zephyrhills, to help leverage local, state, and federal resources to increase  clean energy production in the city.  i. Make staff costs the basis of the building permit fee for solar energy systems rather the equipment cost.  j. Amend the Land Development Code to allow solar energy systems as a permitted accessory uses in all zoning districts and  modest encroachments into building setback areas to facilitate placement of solar equipment.  k. Amend the Land Development Code to allow small wind turbines in all commercial, industrial and multi‐family areas, subject  to noise specifications. 

GREEN BUILDINGS + CLEAN ENERGY 


PUR

ALL DEPTS 

SUPPORT

ESTIMATED TIMEFRAME SHORT‐RANGE MEDIUM‐RANGE  LONG‐RANGE (0‐3 YEARS)  (3‐5 YEARS)  (5‐10 YEARS) 

Policy 

IMPLEMENTATION TOOL(S) 

Local Economy Building,  Resource Conservation  & Pollution Reduction 

PRIMARY BENEFITS 

PAGE 3‐9 

ACTIONS: a. Expedite permitting for green building and renewable energy projects.  b. Reuse brownfield lands for renewable energy projects.  c. Consider establishing financing tools for residents and businesses for energy efficiency, water conservation, renewable energy,  and wind resistance projects.  Local Economy Building,  Policy  Resource Conservation  PUR  ALL DEPTS  & Pollution Reduction  ACTIONS: a. Establish a policy requiring consideration of the economic, social, and environmental benefits and costs associated with city  purchases. Considerations would correspond to city’s guiding principles for water conservation, energy conservation, solid  waste reduction, economic development, natural resource protection, and community quality of life, and include life‐cycle  assessments when appropriate. The analysis would also inform decision‐making for capital expenditures (e.g., infrastructure).  b. Establish a city policy for environmentally preferable purchasing and institute a recognition program for city departments that  promote environmentally preferable purchasing practices. Resource: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency provides an  index to find and evaluate information about green products and services; identify federal green buying requirements;  calculate the costs and benefits of purchasing choices; and manage green purchasing processes. www.epa.gov/epp/  c. Develop and promote green event planning guidelines for city events.  d. Adopt green building policies for new city buildings while continuing retrofit programs for existing buildings.  e. Improve the fuel efficiency of the city fleet through use of clean vehicles and clean fuels.  Local Economy Building,  Policy  Resource Conservation  PUR  ALL DEPTS  & Pollution Reduction  ACTION: Establish a Local Business Certification Program offers city purchasing preference to local businesses, with additional preference  for locally sold green goods and services. Resources: The City of Tallahassee Local Business Certification Program offers bid  preferences on a sliding‐scale to vendors depending on business location (e.g., Leon County or surrounding counties) and city  certification status. A key component of the Tallahassee program is participation goals designed to increase the opportunities  available for local businesses to bid on city contracts. City departments would be encouraged to award more of their purchases  and contracts to local businesses, while prime contractors would likewise be urged to use local smaller firms for subcontracting 

LEAD

ACTING ENTITIES

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Maximize purchasing of local products  and services by city government. 

21. Local City Purchasing 

Promote sustainable purchasing within  city government. 

20. Green City Purchasing 

Note:   Also see initiatives under Green Buildings  + Clean Energy. 

Accelerate consumer demand for green  goods and services and clean energy. 

19. Consumer Demand 

CATALYZE DEMAND 

INITIATIVES

GREEN JOBS + GREEN BUSINESSES  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 

GREEN JOBS + GREEN BUSINESSES 


SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Establish and promote a green  community brand. 

23. Green City Branding 

Increase community awareness and  patronage of local businesses. 

22. “Buy Local” Programs  

PAGE 3‐10 

The City of Tampa began a Green Business Designation Program in 2009, to reward private businesses that have become or want  to become more environmentally‐friendly. Businesses seeking to participate in the program are reviewed against a list of criteria  to evaluate their level of sustainability including green policies and practices. Businesses that receive the designation are  provided a certificate to post at their business location and included on the city’s website under Tampa’s Green Pages. The city  does not administer the program but instead partners with a non‐profit local sustainability group. Based upon number of  employees, businesses pay $99 to $499 annually to participate in the program (a fraction of typical marketing expenses). Savings  from energy efficiency and waste‐reduction measures should reduce the cost impact of the program. Participating companies are  subject to an audit to confirm their green practices. http://sustany.org/gbdp/  Program &  DEV or  DEV or  Communications/  Local Economy Building  PARTNER  PARTNER  Marketing ACTIONS: a. Develop a “Buy Local First” campaign that promotes local businesses, as defined in the program. (0‐3 YEARS)  b. Establish an annual “Buy Local Day First” Day. (0‐3 YEARS)  c. Explore the feasibility of implementing a local currency program. (3‐5 YEARS)   Example: www.paulglover.org/hours.html  d. Host a business/institutional buyers and sellers “match‐making” event to increase exchange of local goods and services.           (0‐3 YEARS)  e. Develop and promote a Zephyrhills green business directory. (3‐5 YEARS)  Example: http://www.napachamber.com/green_business.html  Program &  DEV or  DEV or  Communications/  Local Economy Building  PARTNER  PARTNER  Marketing ACTIONS: a. Create a branding and marketing plan to promote Zephyrhills as a community with green infrastructure, green businesses, and  ongoing sustainability initiatives. (3‐5 YEARS)  b. Publish and publicize a Sustainable Zephyrhills Annual Report. (0‐3 YEARS)  c. Use conferences, other presentation opportunities, and published articles to increase local, regional, state, and national  awareness about the sustainability initiatives, best practices, and achievements of the Zephyrhills community.  (0‐3 YEARS)  d. Seek opportunities to apply/nominate the city for sustainability awards and rankings. (0‐3 YEARS)  e. Investigate the feasibility of becoming a certified Green City under the Florida Green Building Coalition (FGBC) Green Local  Government Standard. The FGBC Green Local Government Standard designates Green Cities and Green Counties for  outstanding environmental stewardship. (3‐5 YEARS) 

needs. http://www.talgov.com/dma/procurement/businesscert.cfm

GREEN JOBS + GREEN BUSINESSES 


DEV or  PARTNER 

Advocacy 

Local Economy Building 

Program &  Marketing/  Communications

Money Savings,  Resource Conservation  & Pollution Reduction 

PARTNER

Policy 

Overall Plan  Implementation 

PAGE 3‐11 

ACTIONS: a. Identify opportunities, needs, and policies for green economic development through a strategic planning process and  corresponding amendments to the Zephyrhills Comprehensive Plan. Factors to consider include local and regional economic  development strategy, economic forecasts, land availability (e.g., brownfields and greyfields), multi‐modal connectivity,  sustainable community design, consistency with the city’s Airport Master Plan, and best practices from other communities  (e.g., green business clusters, green business corridors, and green enterprise zones).  b. Reinforce the community’s commitment to becoming a sustainable city by referencing this commitment in the City of  Zephyrhills Mission Statement. 

DEV

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Address green economic development  and sustainability in general in the city’s  long range plans. 

27. Long‐Range Planning 

PARTNER

ACTION: Develop a monthly or quarterly “Green Business Spotlight” that recognizes the sustainable, environmentally sound business  practices and green goods and services of local businesses. Posted on the city or partner website, the Green Business Spotlight  would highlight aspects of businesses that result in environmental, economic, and social benefits to the community, including  achievement of certifications from Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), the Florida Green Building Coalition  (FGBC), the Florida Green Lodging Program, and the Green Restaurant Association. An emphasis of the spotlight would be on the  business returns on investment for “going green.”  Local Economy Building,  Program &  DEV or  DEV or  Money Savings,  Marketing/  PARTNER  PARTNER  Resource Conservation  Communications  & Pollution Reduction  ACTION: This program would help Zephyrhills businesses improve their environmental performance, productivity, and competitiveness.  The city or a community partner would inform and encourage businesses to improve efficiencies with respect to energy, waste,  and water; develop sustainable management practices such as green purchasing standards; and re‐imagine and redesign  products and services to give them a competitive edge. 

DEV or  PARTNER 

PLAN FOR GREEN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

Develop and deliver a business  engagement program. 

26. Business Engagement Program 

Encourage local businesses to go green  through recognition and promotion.  

25. Local Green Businesses 

ACTION: Advocate for school and training curricula that prepares students and workers for jobs in emerging green sectors. Green job  training partners could include the District School Board of Pasco County, Pasco Hernando Community College, St. Leo University,  University of South Florida, Agency for Workforce Innovation, Pasco‐Hernando Workforce Board, and others. 

CITY COUNCIL 

INSPIRE A SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS SECTOR 

Foster the development of a skilled local  workforce that will be prepared to  support a local green economy. 

24. Workers for the Clean Economy 

SKILL THE WORKFORCE 

GREEN JOBS + GREEN BUSINESSES 


PARTNER

Policy 

Local Economy Building 

PAGE 3‐12 

ACTION: Partner with the Greater Zephyrhills Chamber of Commerce, Pasco County, Pasco County Economic Council, and Tampa Bay  Partnership to identify and attract green business clusters to the greater Zephyrhills area and region. A green business cluster is a  geographically concentrated and self‐sustaining network of businesses, specialized suppliers, service providers, and associated  institutions from many disciplines, including green building, energy efficiency and clean technology. 

DEV

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Partner with local and regional  organizations to attract green industry  clusters. 

28. Green Industry Clusters 

GREEN JOBS + GREEN BUSINESSES 


LEAD

Policy 

IMPLEMENTATION TOOL(S) 

Social Equity, Resource  Conservation &  Pollution Reduction 

PRIMARY BENEFIT(S) 

‐ ‐ ‐ 

Policy

Resource Conservation  & Pollution Reduction 

PARTNERS

Policy 

Social Equity, Resource  Conservation &  Pollution Reduction 

PAGE 3‐13 

ACTIONS: a. Develop form‐based land development regulations that visually and textually illustrate the arrangement and scale of buildings  along various street types (e.g., arterial, collector, and local) and other place‐making, walkability elements such as sidewalks,  ‘complete streets’, shade trees, rear/side‐yard vehicle parking areas, and attractive stormwater facilities.  

DEV

ACTION: Develop land use policies designating lands that are suitable for renewable energy power generation and transmission systems  (e.g., solar farms and electric vehicle charging stations).  

DEV

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Design unique and special Village Centers  and Neighborhoods that facilitate  sustainability through walkable/bikeable,  mixed use places. 

31. Village Centers and Neighborhood Design 

PARTNERS

ESTIMATED TIMEFRAME SHORT‐RANGE MEDIUM‐RANGE  LONG‐RANGE (0‐3 YEARS)  (3‐5 YEARS)  (5‐10 YEARS) 

ACTIONS: a. Incentivize pedestrian–oriented infill development/redevelopment within targeted areas of the city and discourage suburban  sprawl pattern development.   b. Continue implementation of city plans to identify, prioritize, and incentivize redevelopment of underutilized areas within the  Community Redevelopment Area to make efficient use of existing public infrastructure.   c. Develop a Sustainable Development Index reflective of the city’s sustainable development goals to evaluate proposed  annexations and associated Future Land Use Map amendments. Use the Sustainable Development Index to ensure that  publicly‐funded capital projects support and further the city’s sustainable development goals.   d. Implement clear and effective land development regulations, and offer shorter development review timeframes within the  city’s infill/redevelopment target areas. Also see 28.a below.   e. Implement policies that promote nonresidential intensity, job accessibility, and jobs‐housing balance in village centers.   f. Scale the density and intensity of development and transportation fees in Village Centers to the availability/access to transit  and opportunities for internal trip capture.   g. Educate developers and the public about the ways sustainable, energy‐efficient land use patterns, urban design, and complete  streets benefits the economy, ecology, and community.   h. Develop partnerships to improve the marketing of infill development, matching developers to existing sites and buildings. 

DEV

FOSTER SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH DESIGN 

Provide for renewable energy power  generation and transmission systems in  city land use plans and regulations. 

30. Renewable Energy 

Foster walkable/bikeable Village Centers  and Neighborhoods with short distances  (5‐ to 10‐minute walk) between homes,  jobs, and daily needs destinations. 

29. Pedestrian/Bicycle‐Oriented Village  Centers 

SUPPORT

ACTING ENTITIES

CREATE SUSTAINABLE LAND USE PATTERNS 

INITIATIVES

LAND USE, DESIGN + CONNECTIVITY  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 

LAND USE, DESIGN + CONNECTIVITY 


Policy 

Overall Plan  Implementation 

DEV

Social Equity, Resource  Policy & CIP Projects Conservation &  Pollution Reduction 

PAGE 3‐14 

ACTIONS: a. Design and build “Complete Streets” that integrate pedestrian, bicycle, and transit facilities to accommodate all users of the  transportation system—pedestrians, bicyclists, transit riders and motor vehicle drivers—and emphasize comfort and safety for  people of all ages and abilities.   b. Design "Green Streets" as an integral component of a Complete Streets strategy. Incorporate trees and other green 

PW

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

“Complete” and “green” city streets.  

34. Complete Streets and Green Streets 

‐ ‐ ‐ 

ACTION: Amend the Comprehensive Plan and Land Development Code as necessary and appropriate to address the guiding principles,  targets, and initiatives of Sustainable Zephyrhills. Once established, identify Eco‐Districts and Eco‐Neighborhoods in the  Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use Map series (see Action 31.c above). 

DEV

EXPAND SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION 

Ensure that the adopted plans and codes  of the City of Zephyrhills support  sustainable development principles. 

33. Sustainable Community Plans and Codes 

FURTHER SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH PLANS & CODES 

Decrease urban heat island effect. 

32. Urban Heat Island Effect 

d. Establish standards for cluster subdivisions to preserve ecologically sensitive areas, biodiversity, and other unique  characteristics of land to be subdivided. Resource: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw254  Money Savings,  DEV  ‐ ‐ ‐  Policy & Program  Resource Conservation  & Pollution Reduction  ACTIONS: a. Develop and implement a city‐wide plan for reducing urban heat island effect from expansive paved surfaces, such as streets  and parking lots. Community‐cooling techniques may include tree plantings to create shaded parking lots, sidewalks, future  canopy streets, decreasing the area required for a standard parking space, reducing the required paving width for local streets,  green roofs, and rain gardens. (3‐5 YEARS)  b. Amend the Land Development Code to allow green roofs and rain gardens to satisfy a portion of the open space requirement.  (0‐3 YEARS)  c. Amend the Land Development Code to reduce the standard parking space dimension to 9’x 18’ and to establish parking space  maximums for mixed use projects. (0‐3 YEARS)  d. Amend the Land Development Code to ensure that street and site trees are planted to allow root structure development.       (0‐3 YEARS)  e. Facilitate reforestation of the city by hosting an annual tree giveaway on National Arbor Day (last Friday in April). (3‐5 YEARS) 

c. Assist residents, business owners, and other stakeholders in the development of Eco‐Neighborhood and Eco‐District plans that  identify issues, opportunities, targets, and initiatives aimed at improving neighborhood sustainability and quality of life. 

b. Use the Sustainable Development Index reflective of the city’s sustainable development goals to evaluate proposed  development and redevelopment projects. Create a mechanism to require developer and city staff coordination early in the  project development phase to ensure the incorporation of sustainable development principles. Establish incentives for new  development and redevelopment that scores higher on the Sustainable Development Index.  

LAND USE, DESIGN + CONNECTIVITY 


CITY &  PARTNERS 

■ Policy

Social Equity, Resource  Conservation &  Pollution Reduction 

City

City or  Partners 

Policy

Social Equity, Resource  Conservation &  Pollution Reduction 

ACTIONS: a. Continue to secure grants and other funding to implement the Zephyrhills Multi‐Use Trail Master Plan, which envisions a well‐ designed, citywide network of off‐street trails and on‐street bike lanes. (ONGOING)  b. Continue to expand the sidewalk network to enhance pedestrian mobility. Establish a hierarchy of sidewalks and establish  standards (e.g., sidewalk width, crosswalks, and lighting) for arterial, collector, and local streets. As part of a neighborhood  planning process (e.g., Eco‐Neighborhoods), engage the community in assessing the walkability of city neighborhoods and  recommending improvements where deficiencies exist. The assessment should consider if goods and services are within an  easy and safe walk so as to allow residents and employees access to daily needs without using a car. Recommendations could  include zoning changes to allow development that has mixed land uses and compact, pedestrian‐oriented design. (3‐5 YEARS)  c. Control traffic speeds on key pedestrian streets (e.g., traffic calming and law enforcement). Participate in the Safe Routes to  School Program and seek funding for enhancements to designated routes for safe walking or bicycling to school. (0‐3 YEARS)  d. Explore the feasibility of a bicycle loan program in Downtown and other parts of the city, including opportunities for  public/private partnerships. (0‐3 YEARS)  e. Establish a policy requiring, where appropriate and safe, pedestrian and bicycle connections between new and existing  developments, and especially between single use residential development and commercial/retail uses. (0‐3 YEARS)  f. Require new development to install bike racks. Encourage existing non‐residential building owners to provide bicycle racks.   (0‐3 YEARS)   g. Place a multi‐modal map on the city’s website to inform residents of pedestrian and bicycle trails, transit routes and stops,  parking lots and garages and locations of bike racks. (3‐5 YEARS) 

CITY &  PARTNERS

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

PAGE 3‐15 

Foster land use patterns that make transit  service in Zephyrhills more viable and  ACTIONS: advocate for transit investments that  a. Consider establishing rubber‐tire trolley service connecting Village Centers and higher density neighborhoods to major  result in better connectivity within the  commercial and employment centers. (5‐10 YEARS)  city and the region.  b. Partner with Pasco County Public Transit to install transit shelters providing transit riders protection from the elements and    direct connect to the sidewalk network. (ONGOING)  c. Continue to incorporate transit considerations into the development review process. (ONGOING) 

36. Transit Connectivity 

Foster a bicycle and pedestrian‐friendly  environment and culture in Zephyrhills. 

35. Bicycle and Pedestrian Culture 

infrastructure into street planning with the same importance given to utilities infrastructure. Bioswales, green gutters, and  stormwater infiltration planters can be incorporated into streets to manage stormwater without creating conventional  retention ponds. Reduced pavement widths slow traffic and reduce heat island effect.   c. Develop a Central Greenway Corridor with limited automobile conflicts traversing Downtown and connecting major  destinations in the city and pathways in Pasco County. The corridor could follow underutilized platted alleys and minor streets.  

LAND USE, DESIGN + CONNECTIVITY 


PARTNERS

Resource Conservation,  Pollution Reduction &  Money Savings 

Policy 

Money Savings,  Resource Conservation  & Pollution Reduction 

PROGRESS ENERGY 

Policy

Money Savings,  Resource Conservation  & Pollution Reduction 

PARTNERS

Policy 

Money Savings &  Resource Conservation 

PAGE 3‐16 

ACTIONS: a. Include considerations for alternative fuel vehicles, including electric vehicles, when replacing or adding city fleet vehicles.  Explore the feasibility of converting city fleet vehicles for electric, compressed natural gas, or biodiesel use.   b. Explore the feasibility of storage and use of biodiesel or other alternative fuels for the city fleet, including opportunities for  public/private partnerships.  

PW & DEV

ACTION: Reduce the energy costs of street lights and traffic signals through use of energy‐efficient solid‐state lamps (e.g., LED).  

PW

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Expand the city fleet of energy‐efficient  and lower emission vehicles. 

40. Energy‐Efficient City Fleet 

■ Policy

ACTIONS: a. Employ integrated land use and transportation planning and sprawl reduction policies to create pedestrian, bicycle and transit‐ friendly village centers and neighborhoods. (ONGOING)  b. Amend the Land Development Code to allow accessory live/work spaces in all residential and mixed use zoning districts. (0‐3  YEARS)  c. Encourage commuters to use rideshare programs and employers to offer telecommuting. (0‐3 YEARS)  d. Consider the connectivity of street networks in all site plan, platting, and right‐of‐way vacation applications. To increase route  choices, new street networks should conform to a grid‐pattern to the extent possible with respect to ecological resources.  (ONGOING)  e. Synchronize traffic signals with speed limits to minimize vehicle stopping and idling. Consider energy‐efficient roundabouts in  lieu of traffic signals, where feasible.  (3‐5 YEARS)  f. Implement a “no idling” policy for city vehicles. Educate residents and businesses about the adverse impacts of unnecessary  vehicular idling. (0‐3 YEARS) 

SUPPORT ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLES + FUELS 

Reduce the energy costs of street lights  and traffic signals. 

39. Energy Efficient Outdoor Lighting 

Reduce motor vehicle miles traveled  (VMT) and idling to reduce energy use  and associated air pollution. 

DEV & PW

REDUCE ENERGY USE + AIR POLLUTION 

38. Vehicle Miles and Idling 

DEV OR  PARTNERS 

Encourage single‐occupant commuters to car‐pool or vanpool to reduce costs, energy use, pollution, and highway congestion by  publicizing commuter services offered by TBARTA on the city website. 

DEV OR  Encourage single‐occupant commuters to  PARTNERS car‐pool or vanpool.  ACTION:

37. Ride‐Sharing and Vanpooling 

LAND USE, DESIGN + CONNECTIVITY 


PARTNERS

■   Policy 

Money Savings,  Resource Conservation  & Pollution Reduction 

PARTNERS

PAGE 3‐17 

Money Savings &  Marketing/  Communications &  Resource Conservation  Policy

ACTIONS: a. Promote the benefits of alternative fuel vehicles with a focus on commercial fleets.   b. Explore incentives for drivers of alternative fuel vehicles, such as reserved parking. 

DEV

c. Explore the designation of certain streets for low‐speed Neighborhood Electric Vehicles (NEV). 

b. Seek funding for additional electric vehicle plug‐in stations to meet future demand.  

ACTIONS: a. Partner with private, government, or non‐profit sectors to provide fueling/charging infrastructure to support alternative  vehicle technologies.  

PW & DEV

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Expand community awareness of  alternative fuel vehicles and  infrastructure availability in the city. 

42. Community Awareness 

Expand infrastructure to support  alternative vehicle technologies. 

41. Advanced‐Fuel Vehicle Infrastructure 

LAND USE, DESIGN + CONNECTIVITY 


SW

‐ ‐ ‐ 

SUPPORT

ESTIMATED TIMEFRAME SHORT‐RANGE MEDIUM‐RANGE  LONG‐RANGE (0‐3 YEARS)  (3‐5 YEARS)  (5‐10 YEARS) 

Policy 

IMPLEMENTATION TOOL(S) 

Money Savings,  Resource Conservation  & Pollution Reduction  

PRIMARY BENEFIT(S) 

‐ ‐ ‐  

Policy

Money Savings &  Resource Conservation 

SW

Marketing/ Communications 

Pollution Reduction 

SW

PARTNERS 

CIP, Operations &  Marketing/  Communications

Money Savings,  Resource Conservation  & Pollution Reduction  

PAGE 3‐18 

ACTION: Provide recycling bins to customers in place of the blue bag system and increase curbside recycling pickup from biweekly to  weekly. The City of Dade City made these changes and saw recycling participation rates increase from 3% to over 20%. 

ACTION: Partner with Keep Pasco Beautiful, a non‐profit organization, for the Great American Cleanup. This nationwide event takes place  every year on the third Saturday in April.  

PARTNER

ACTION: Institute policies and practices to reduce the amount of paper used in city government. Potential areas of paper (and money  savings) include electronic timecards, payroll, utility billing/payments, and development plan processing. Ask employees to print  hardcopies only when necessary and to use double‐sided printing when they do need to print.  

CITY   DEPTS 

ACTIONS: a. Offer customers opportunities to save money on their solid waste bill by paying for the volume (i.e., bin size) of waste  generated. The premise of this incentive system, known as Pay As You Throw (PAYT), is that customers will want to divert  more waste to recycling. Note: PAYT should be paired with a suitably scaled recycling program. Resources:    http://www.lakecountyfl.gov/pdfs/solid_waste_task_force/agendas/031411/031411_pay_as_you_throw.pdf  http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/tools/payt/index.htm  b. In conjunction with PAYT, implement once per week solid waste pick‐up instead of twice per week (also see recycling‐related  initiatives 46 ‐ 54 below).  

LEAD

ACTING ENTITIES

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Make recycling easier at home and at  work. 

46. Recycling at Home and Work 

INCREASE RECYCLING 

Raise community awareness about litter‐ prevention and reduce risks to  community health, water quality, and  wildlife habitat. 

45. Anti‐Litter Campaign 

Reduce paper use in city government. 

44. Paperless Office 

Provide incentives to encourage waste  reduction (and recycling). 

43. Customer Incentives for Reducing Trash 

REDUCE SOLID WASTE 

INITIATIVES

WASTE REDUCTION + RECYCLING  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 

WASTE REDUCTION + RECYCLING 


PARTNERS

CIP, Operations &  Marketing/  Communications

Money Savings,  Resource Conservation  & Pollution Reduction  

PARTNERS

Marketing/ Money Savings &  Communications &  Resource Conservation   Projects

PAGE 3‐19 

ACTIONS: a. Encourage composting by partnering with the Pasco County Cooperative Extension to provide composting workshops. Food  waste accounts for about 9% of the city’s trash, the third largest component after paper and yard trimmings. The Florida 

SW

http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/rrr/rogo/index.htm

Consider establishing an incentive program to increase recycling in the City. Incentive‐based recycling programs, such as  RecycleBank or Rewards for Recycling, award points to residents based on the frequency or weight of their recyclables. Points can  be exchanged for free or discounted goods and services from local businesses. The Township of Grand Blanc, Michigan, saw its  recycling rate increased exponentially after adoption of the Rewards for Recycling program. The City of Sunrise recently instituted  RecycleBank and saw a 70% increase in recycling during the first six weeks of operation. North Miami was the first Florida city to  adopt RecycleBank and Tampa and Seminole are currently considering the program. Resources:  www.rewardsforrecycling.com  http://www.northmiamifl.gov/departments/public_works/sanitation/index.asp  Money Savings,  CIP  Resource Conservation  SW  PARTNERS  & Pollution Reduction   ACTION: Install large recycling bins or dumpsters in convenient locations in Zephyrhills. Partner with local organization, such Meals on  Wheels East Pasco, for collection recyclables. Recycling drop‐off centers should be monitored to deter disposal of unwanted  materials and contaminates.  Money Savings,  ALL CITY  Policy & Marketing/  SW  Resource Conservation  DEPTS  Communications  & Pollution Reduction   ACTIONS: a. Establish a purchasing policy that favors products made with recycled or plant‐based, biodegradable materials, when feasible.   b. Ask contractors working for the city to recycle a specified percentage of their construction and demolition waste (e.g., wood,  glass and metals).   c. Publicize city projects and accomplishments relative to waste reduction and recycling in a Sustainable Zephyrhills Annual  Report.  Money Savings,  Policy  Resource Conservation  SW  PARTNERS  & Pollution Reduction   ACTION: Consider using innovative technologies, such as solar‐powered, compacting receptacles that require less empting and do not use  electricity. Resource:  

ACTION:

SW

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Local urban agriculture and other  horticultural groups value compost as an  organic soil amendment. 

51. Composting

Locate recycling receptacles in high‐ traffic public spaces and at city events. 

50. Recycling “On the Go” 

Make recycling easy, efficient, and  comprehensive at municipal buildings  and grounds. 

49. Recycling at City Facilities 

Expand the reach of the city’s recycling  initiatives.  

48. Recycling Drop‐Off Centers 

Provide incentives for recycling. 

47. Recycling Incentives 

WASTE REDUCTION + RECYCLING 


Marketing/ Communications 

Money Savings &  Resource Conservation 

SW

■  

Marketing/ Communications 

Money Savings,  Resource Conservation  & Community Building 

PARTNERS

Marketing/ Communications 

Money Savings &  Resource Conservation 

PARTNERS

Marketing/  Communications 

Money Savings &  Resource Conservation  

PAGE 3‐20 

ACTIONS: a. Partner with Pasco County Solid Waste and Resource Recovery Department, Pasco County Cooperative Extension, or other  organizations to provide information and encourage broad participation in the city’s waste reduction and recycling programs.  Ask residents to submit suggestions on ways to make recycling easier in Zephyrhills.  b. Partner with the District School Board of Pasco County for additional educational opportunities and community service 

SW

ACTIONS: a. Partner with Pasco County Solid Waste and Resource Recovery Department to increase community awareness of the hazards  of improperly disposed of electronic waste (e‐waste).  b. Partner with local groups to locate e‐cycling receptacles in the city and organize annual e‐waste recycling days. 

SW

ACTION: Partner with local nonprofits, schools, clubs, and other organizations to initiate recycling drives for fundraising (e.g., “cash for  cans”).  

PARTNERS

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Offer public awareness and public  education programs about waste  reduction, reuse, and recycling. 

55. Partnerships for Awareness 

PARTNERS

ACTIONS: a. Encourage recycling business start‐ups in Zephyrhills, including collectors or haulers; processors (material recovery facilities);  brokers; and end‐users (manufacturers). Resources:  www.wasteexchange.org  http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/rrr/rmd/intro.htm  http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/rrr/rmd/finance.htm  b. Partner with the Greater Zephyrhills Chamber of Commerce to promote businesses that buy recycled materials. Pasco County  partnered with U.S. GreenFiber for a turnkey operation to collect waste paper for manufacturing cellulose insulation. Over 100  "Bring It from Home!" recycling bins are located across the county, including public schools and county facilities in the  Zephyrhills area. 

SW

REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLING AWARENESS 

Increase awareness about the proper  disposal of e‐waste. 

54. Electronics Recycling 

Assist organizations in holding  fundraisers that build community  awareness about recycling while  diverting materials from the solid waste  stream. 

53. Recycling Fundraisers 

Markets for recyclable materials are  essential to closing the recycling loop  and channeling resources back into use. 

52. Recyclables Markets 

Department of Environmental Protection states that backyard composting and grass clipping management are two of the best  methods to recycle organic waste.  b. Sponsor a composting demonstration project at a community garden, local school, or municipal building. Consider  implementing a curb‐side food and yard waste recycling program.   c. Partner with businesses for processing, sale, and distributed of compost to consumers. 

WASTE REDUCTION + RECYCLING 


WASTE TO ENERGY 

PARTNERS

CIP 

Money Savings &  Resource Conservation 

http://www.talgov.com/fleet/bio.cfm

PAGE 3‐21 

ACTIONS: Explore the feasibility of a biofuel recycling center and partnerships with the private sector to produce biofuel for the city’s fleet.  The City of Tallahassee’s biodiesel facility is capable of producing 300 gallons of biodiesel per day using waste vegetable oil. Fleet  vehicles operate on various blends of biodiesel and conventional ultra‐low sulfur diesel fuel. Resource:   

SW

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Explore options for using waste to  produce energy locally. 

56. Explore Waste‐to‐Energy Alternatives 

projects targeted to the Zephyrhills community such as the annual “Pasco Art of Recycling Contest” or “Dream Machine  Recycle Rally”—a recycling program offering schools a chance to earn rewards, compete for prizes, and support post‐9/11  disabled U.S. veterans. The District has received awards and recognitions for its recycling programs and is considered a model  school district for increasing student (and family) awareness about solid waste issues. 

WASTE REDUCTION + RECYCLING 


UTL

PARTNERS 

SUPPORT

ESTIMATED TIMEFRAME SHORT‐RANGE MEDIUM‐RANGE  LONG‐RANGE (0‐3 YEARS)  (3‐5 YEARS)  (5‐10 YEARS) 

Marketing/  Communications,  Program & Grants

IMPLEMENTATION TOOL(S) 

Resource Conservation 

PRIMARY BENEFIT(S) 

PARTNERS

Marketing/ Communications 

Resource Conservation 

PAGE 3‐22 

ACTIONS: a. Distribute educational materials produced by government partners including the Southwest Florida Water Management  District Water and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Resources:   Publications and materials: http://www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/publications/search.php?subject=conservation  Classroom challenge: http://www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/education/classroom_challenge/  Broadcast advertisements: http://www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/conservation/ads/  Request a Speaker: http://www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/education/speakers/  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency WaterSense campaign provides information on water‐efficient products, services,  and everyday actions  Public service announcements: watersense@epa.gov  Website widget: http://www.epa.gov/widgets/#watersensetip 

UTL

ACTIONS: a. Phase 1: Partner with local businesses to sponsor a water‐saving competition between neighborhood/homeowners  associations.  b. Phase 2: Perform indoor and outdoor water audits of the largest water users in the city, such as schools and large businesses.  Based on the findings, suggest ways to reduce water use.   c. Phase 3: Expand upon the city’s high‐efficiency toilet rebate program to include other water‐saving devices such as rain barrels  and sensor irrigation systems.   d. Phase 4: Challenge everyone in the city to save six gallons of water each day through simple water‐saving actions publicized  via the city website and other community outreach. Under a similar campaign, the City of Cooper City saw water use drop by  9.26% in one year, nearly double its goal of 5%. Resources:  http://icma.org/en/Article/101120/Cooper_City_Floridas_Water_Conservation_Efforts_Show_Outstanding_Success  http://www.youwin‐weallwin.com/gimme5.html  e. Phase 5: Apply for Southwest Florida Water Management District and other agency grants to fund water conservation projects  and programs. Resource:   www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/business/communitygrants/ 

 

LEAD

ACTING ENTITIES

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Note:   This initiative is intended to support the  achievement of the Water Conservation  + Protection target and initiatives by  informing the community about ways to  conserve and protect water resources.  As such, the timeframe for this initiative  is on‐going. 

Raise community awareness about the  limits of our fresh water supply and  value of conserving this vital resource. 

58. Community Awareness 

Reduce citywide water use through a  multi‐pronged water conservation  campaign. 

57. Water Saving Campaign 

STRETCH OUR WATER SUPPLY 

INITIATIVES

WATER CONSERVATION + PROTECTION SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 

WATER CONSERVATION + PROTECTION 


SWFWMD

CIP Projects &   Policy 

Resource Conservation 

PAGE 3‐23 

ACTIONS: a. Assess the water‐loss performance of the municipal water system and schedule appropriate improvements to conserve water  resources and avoid costly operating and capital costs.  b. Consider establishing a goal for unaccounted‐for water (the American Water Works Association recommends less than 10%)  and monitoring unaccounted‐for water volumes each billing period. Implement water audit, leak detection, and repair  programs when unaccounted‐for water is higher than the goal.  Marketing/  Communications &  Resource Conservation  UTL  SWFWMD  CIP Projects ACTIONS: a. As part of a water saving campaign, promote the groundwater saving benefits of using reclaimed water for landscape  irrigation.   b. Seek grants funding (e.g., Southwest Florida Water Management District Cooperative Funding Initiative) for reclaimed water  system expansion projects. 

UTL

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Continue to expand the city’s reclaimed  water system to serve more  neighborhoods. 

60. Reuse Water 

Identify sources of unaccounted‐for  water in the municipal water system. 

59. Water System Losses 

Twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/EPAWatersense and https://twitter.com/#!/ripthedrip ENERGY STAR, a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy, helps building  owners manage water (and energy) consumption through a Portfolio Manager.   http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=evaluate_performance.bus_portfoliomanager_benchmarking  b. Partner with local schools for the American Water Works Association annual Drop Savers’ Poster Contest. Possible partners  could be the Zephyrhills High School Earth Patrol Club and a local elementary school. Participating K‐12 students use their own  ideas, designs, and slogans to create a poster about the importance of conserving water. The poster contest winners are  acknowledged during national Drinking Water Week and on the association website. Resource:   http://fsawwa.org/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=282  c. Install sustainable water use demonstration projects in accessible, high‐traffic locations to serve educational purposes and  promote the city’s green brand. Demonstration projects could include rain barrels or cisterns and a community garden at Alice  Hall Community Center; greywater toilet flushing system in the library restrooms; Florida‐Friendly yard landscaping at the  Multi‐Purpose Center/YMCA; and new generation wastewater treatment/re‐use technologies such as Living Machines©.  Resources:   http://www.tappwater.org/download‐guides/RainGarden.pdf  http://www.mywinterhaven.com/documents/RainGardenManual2010Nov.pdf  http://www.livingmachines.com/portfolio/  d. Serve as a model for landscape water conservation through incrementally replacing turf grass that is purely ornamental with  drought‐tolerant "Florida‐Friendly" landscaping.   e. Partner with local garden clubs, Florida Native Plant Society, and Pasco County Cooperative Extension to create a "Florida  Friendly Yard of the Month" recognition program that emphasizes minimal use of irrigation. 

WATER CONSERVATION + PROTECTION 


■   Policy 

Resource Conservation 

DEV

PARTNERS 

Policy & Marketing/  Resource Conservation  Communications  & Pollution Reduction 

EXTENSION

Marketing/ Communications,  Operations & Policy

Pollution Reduction  

PAGE 3‐24 

ACTIONS: a. Educate homeowners and other property owners about actions they can take to protect groundwater and surface water  quality, including decreasing the use of water polluting chemicals such as cleaning agents, pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers  and properly disposing of hazardous waste. (0‐3 YEARS)  b. Investigate and apply sustainable golf course management practices for the Zephyrhills Municipal Golf Course. (0‐3 YEARS)  c. Install a solar‐powered aeration fountain in Lake Zephyr to improve water quality, increase the viability of the lake to support  aquatic animals and water cleansing bacteria, along with educational interpretative signage about the fountain and other  efforts to restore water quality in the lake. (3‐5 YEARS)  d. Consider establishing a stormwater utility fee to generate revenue to specifically fund stormwater management operations,  construction, and maintenance. Effective stormwater management reduces the amount of contamination flowing into local  waters and flooding in accordance with Comprehensive Plan Policy PUB‐4‐1‐3. (3‐5 YEARS)  http://www.cityofdoral.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=153&Itemid=347  http://fl‐stcloud2.civicplus.com/index.aspx?nid=227 

UTL & PW

b. Amend the Land Development Code to allow minor encroachments by rain barrels and cisterns in side and rear yard setbacks. 

ACTIONS: a. Promote Low Impact Development (LID) techniques in existing developed areas. LID maximizes capture of rainwater for onsite  reuse and groundwater recharge to replicate the natural hydrologic function of the predevelopment landscape. Techniques  include minimizing impervious surfaces (e.g., pavement/building footprint) and maximizing capture and reuse of stormwater  onsite via vegetated areas, infiltration trenches/swales, permeable pavement, green roofs, vertical gardens, and underground  and above‐ground cisterns. Resources:  http://www.scgov.net/EnvironmentalServices/Water/SurfaceWater/LowImpactDevelopment.asp  http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/agecon/WECO/lid/documents/NC_LID_Guidebook.pdf  http://www.stormh2o.com/SW/Articles/Choosing_a_Green_Infrastructure_Framework_Consider_13838.aspx 

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Preserve the quality of groundwater that  is the source of drinking water in  Zephyrhills and improve the quality of  surface waters such as Lake Zephyr. 

63. Water Quality 

‐ ‐ ‐ 

ACTIONS: Achieve community support for water rates through education and water conservation opportunities. Water rates seldom reflect  the full financial costs of providing the service—rarer still is recovery for environmental costs. Although full costs are ultimately  paid one way or another—most commonly through property taxes—shifting the full cost into water prices encourages  conservation by revealing the true cost to customers. 

UTL

OUNCE OF PREVENTION OR GALLON OF CURE?   

Increase groundwater recharge in the  existing built environment. 

62. Groundwater Recharge 

REPLENISH THE AQUIFER 

Price water to reflect the true cost of the  service and encourage water  conservation. 

61. Water Pricing 

WATER CONSERVATION + PROTECTION 


SWFWMD

Policy 

Resource Conservation  & Pollution Reduction 

PAGE 3‐25 

ACTIONS: a. Through education and/or incentives (e.g., accelerated site plan review), encourage use of water conservation standards such  as Florida Water StarSM, a voluntary certification program for new construction and existing home renovation, in new  construction. Resource:  http://www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/conservation/florida_water_star/  b. Amend the Land Development Code to require Low Impact Development practices when issuing building permits, including  requirements for porous pavement or open cell concrete blocks for new parking spaces provided in excess of code  requirements.  e. In coordination with the Southwest Florida Water Management District, explore the feasibility of providing stormwater credits  for onsite rainwater capture and direct onsite use/recharge. 

DEV

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Ensure that all new construction makes  use of the best available water  conservation technologies. 

64. New Construction  

WATER‐WISE BUILDINGS, PLACES & SPACES 

WATER CONSERVATION + PROTECTION 


DEV

SUPPORT

ESTIMATED TIMEFRAME SHORT‐RANGE MEDIUM‐RANGE  LONG‐RANGE (0‐3 YEARS)  (3‐5 YEARS)  (5‐10 YEARS)  Communications,  Programs & Projects

IMPLEMENTATION TOOL(S) 

Community Health,  Community Building &  Resource Conservation 

PRIMARY BENEFITS 

EXTENSION

 

Marketing/ Communications 

Community Health &  Resource Conservation 

PAGE 3‐26 

ACTION: Increase community awareness about the benefits of organic fertilizers and pest control, water‐wise irrigation, and composting  for urban agriculture.  Policy, Program & Community Health &  TF & DEV  EXTENSION  Marketing/  Resource Conservation  Communications ACTIONS: a. Develop a beneficial garden insect program to nurture pollinating insects such as honey bees, dragonflies, butterflies, spiders,  praying mantis, and lightning bugs. 

TF & DEV 

ACTIONS: a. Partner with the Pasco County Cooperative Extension, UF/IFAS Certified Master Gardeners, and other agriculture experts to  provide workshops and courses for individuals interested in gardening or small‐scale agricultural production.   b. Use public buildings or land for an urban agriculture demonstration project that could include a greenhouse, an  aquaculture/biponics project, or a rooftop vegetable garden.  Community Health,  TF &  Policy  Community Building &  DEV  EXTENSION  Resource Conservation  ACTIONS: a. Consider allowing community gardens in all zoning districts and farmers markets in commercial and other zoning districts.   b. Integrate urban agriculture into the site planning process for new residential and commercial developments and consider  provisions for open space credit for land set‐aside for gardens within new developments.  Community Health,  TF &  DEV  Policy & Program  Community Building &  EXTENSION  Resource Conservation  ACTIONS: a. Inventory city‐owned properties to identify suitable open spaces for community gardens or other urban agriculture activities.   b. Create a pilot program for development of community gardens on public lands.   c. Convene a task force to assist in establishing urban agriculture‐related policy, projects, and programs. 

EXTENSION

TF & 

LEAD

ACTING ENTITIES

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

Develop a beneficial garden insect  program to nurture pollinating insects. 

69. Beneficial Insects 

Promote sustainable food growing  techniques. 

68. Sustainable Urban Agriculture Practices 

Identify suitable sites for community  gardens and other urban agriculture  activities. 

67. Urban Agriculture Sites 

Establish supportive policies, standards,  and guidelines for urban agriculture  uses, structures, and activities deemed  appropriate for Zephyrhills. 

66. Urban Agriculture Policy 

Increase community awareness about  urban agriculture methods and  initiatives. 

65. Community Awareness 

INCREASE LOCAL FOOD PRODUCTION 

INITIATIVES

URBAN AGRICULTURE  SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN 

URBAN AGRICULTURE 


DEV or  PARTNERS 

Policy, Program &  Marketing/  Communications 

Local Economy,  Community Health,  Community Building &  Resource Conservation 

ACTIONS: a. Establish a “Buy Fresh Buy Local” campaign that encourages local residents to buy food produced within 300 miles of  Zephyrhills.   b. Explore job and business creation opportunities associated with growing, processing, storing, and selling local food.   c. Partner with volunteer organizations to harvest and distribute unwanted produce from private properties to local food banks.  Local Economy,  Marketing/  TF &  DEV or  Community Health,  Communications &  PARTNERS PARTNERS  Community Building &  Programs  Resource Conservation  ACTIONS: a. Collaborate with individuals, groups, organizations, and institutions to hold festivals and events that celebrate local food (e.g.,  community gardens “best salsa” contest).   b. Publicize a link to a directory of area farmers markets on the city website.   c. Establish a farmers market featuring fresh food produced by local farmers and businesses. 

TF &  PARTNERS

SUSTAINABLE ZEPHYRHILLS COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN| JUNE 11, 2012 

PAGE 3‐27 

ACTION PLAN LEGEND:  BLD ‐ City of Zephyrhills Building Department  CITY COUNCIL ‐ City of Zephyrhills City Council  DEV ‐ City of Zephyrhills Development Services Department  DG – Discussion Group  EXTENSION – Pasco County Cooperative Extension Office  FIN ‐ City of Zephyrhills Finance Department  LIB ‐ City of Zephyrhills Library  PW ‐ City of Zephyrhills Public Works Department  PARTNER ‐ Individual, group, organization, institution, or combination thereof willing to put forth resources (human, financial, etc.) to help the community accomplish a  sustainable project or program. Partners could include the Zephyrhills Chamber of Commerce, Main Street Zephyrhills, Pasco County Extension Office, Pasco County  Schools, Pasco County Government, Pasco County local governments, professional organizations, service organizations, fraternal organizations, health organizations,  religious organizations, neighborhood organizations, homeowners associations, special interest groups, clubs, and businesses.   P&R ‐ City of Zephyrhills Parks & Recreation Division  PUR ‐ City of Zephyrhills Purchasing Department  SW ‐ City of Zephyrhills Solid Waste Division  SWFWMD ‐ Southwest Florida Water Management District  TF ‐ City of Zephyrhills Task Force   UTL ‐ City of Zephyrhills Utilities Department 

Foster a local food culture in Zephyrhills. 

71. Local Food Culture 

Create or reinforce linkages between  local farmers, consumers, businesses,  and organizations.  

70. Local Food Shed Linkages 

SUPPORT THE LOCAL “FOOD SHED” 

b. Establish pesticide no‐spray zones around beneficial garden insect and organic gardening programs.

URBAN AGRICULTURE 


appendix (Under separate cover)

S U S TA I N A B L E ZEPHYRHILLS 


www.ci.zephyrhills.fl.us

Sustainable Zephyrhills Community Action Plan  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you