Page 1

High School Curricular and Co-Curricular Offerings 2011-12

The Westminster Schools


HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12 The Westminster Schools Introduction Curricular Offerings Foreword.......................................................................................................... 1 Academic Policies............................................................................................. 2 Arts.................................................................................................................. 6 Biblical and Religious Studies......................................................................... 11 Computer...................................................................................................... 12 English........................................................................................................... 13 History........................................................................................................... 15 Modern and Classical Languages.................................................................... 18 Mathematics.................................................................................................. 23 Science........................................................................................................... 27 Physical Education......................................................................................... 30 Special Programs............................................................................................ 31 Co-Curricular Offerings Foreword........................................................................................................ 37 Clubs............................................................................................................. 37 Honor Societies & Programs.......................................................................... 41 Leadership...................................................................................................... 42 Performing Arts.............................................................................................. 46 Publications................................................................................................... 48 Religious & Faith Organizations.................................................................... 49 Service........................................................................................................... 51 Study Abroad, Exchange, Travel & Off-Campus Programs............................. 53 Teams............................................................................................................. 58


FOUNDED in 1951, Westminster is a Christian, independent day school for boys and girls from prefirst through high school. Westminster’s express mission is “to develop the whole person for college and for life through excellent education.� The oustanding faculty and challenging curriculum cultivate within each student the knowledge and skills necessary for successful continuing education, sound personal values, and a commitment to service. The school is also committed to providing the finest possible co-curricular and athletic programs, which help students discover and improve their individual talents. With its traditions and philosophy rooted in the Christian faith, Westminster encourages each student to develop an informed and personal religious belief. Westminser actively seeks and welcomes students from various racial, ethnic, religious, and economic backgrounds.


High School Academic Policies and Course Offerings 2011-12 FOREWORD The high school course of study at Westminster concentrates on a core curriculum in the traditional liberal arts, but it has sufficient flexibility to allow students to work in subjects and at levels appropriate to their interests and abilities. This booklet is designed for use by students and their families in making choices for the current year and for developing a 4-year academic plan. It contains the required courses for each grade, additional courses offered by each department, and electives. Students are encouraged to work closely with grade chairs in selecting courses. Based upon their understanding of a student’s performance and ability, grade chairs, along with the Director of Studies, are able to provide sound guidance for making decisions. Student schedules are developed on this same basis, with reliance on the professional judgment and concern of our teachers and administrators. Consequently, while we approach this process from the perspective of building a strong overall program which meets the academic needs and individual style of each student, we do not place students based on personal requests. Occasionally, the number of students requesting a course is insufficient to justify formation of the course. Therefore, it is important to choose alternative courses when considering elective programs. Graduation Requirements Graduating Class 2012 4 English *3 Mathematics 3 History *3 Science 3 Language 2 Bible ½ Arts 1 Physical Education/ Discovery ½ Electives

**20

A B C F

Grading Scale 90-100 (Excellent) 80-89 (Good) 70-79 (Satisfactory) Below 70 (Failing)

Total Credits

* The University of Georgia and Georgia Tech require three years of history/social studies and four years of science for admission. The University of Georgia system requires four years of mathematics and science for admission. ** The NCAA Clearing House has approved all of Westminster’s academic offerings as core courses except Bible.

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

1


Academic Policies Course Load Requirements • •

• • • •

Students must take at least 5 courses per semester. Physical Education is always taken as a sixth course. Students may not take more than 5 academic or “exam” courses per semester. Students may take Introduction to History, Introduction to Political Thought, a non-AP computer semester elective, a non-AP studio art or performing arts semester elective, Symphonic Band, Chamber Orchestra, Choral Music, or Peer Leadership (seniors only) as a sixth subject Students may not take more than 6 courses per semester. All seniors must earn 5 credits which satisfy graduation requirements during the senior year to receive a Westminster diploma. A senior who does not qualify for a Westminster diploma but who wishes to participate in commencement exercises must be no more than 1½ credits short of meeting requirements for graduation. Students who fail 2 or more courses in the first semester may not receive re-enrollment material until satisfactorily completing the second semester.

Course Distribution Requirements

English: All students take 4 years of English. Mathematics: 3 years are required. The minimum requirements include Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II; however, most students will begin High School with Geometry and thus must take Algebra II and Precalculus/Trig.* History: 3 credits are required: History of the Ancient World (½), History of the Modern World (1), American History (1), 1 semester history elective (½). Science: 3 credits in a laboratory science (1 life science, 1 physical science, and 1 other lab science).* Language: The minimum requirement is 3 High School credits in 1 foreign language. A student who completes only 2 High School credits in a foreign language may qualify for a certificate of graduation. Bible: The minimum requirement is 1 credit in Old Testament in grade 9 and 1 credit in New Testament in grade 12. The Old Testament requirement is waived for students entering Westminster after grade 9. Arts: The minimum requirement is ½ credit (1 semester). Any course offered by the Performing and Visual Arts Department will satisfy the Arts graduation requirement.

2

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


Transfer Students

Students transferring to Westminster from other high schools must meet the minimum graduation requirements as outlined above. There are 2 exceptions. The Old Testament Bible requirement is waived for students entering Westminster after grade 9. Under certain circumstances the Discovery requirement may be waived for students entering Westminster after grade 9.

Summer School

All forward-credit summer courses must be taken at Westminster Summer School; the limit is 1 forward credit per summer. Any student who fails 1½ credits in 1 academic year must attend summer school and earn at least ½ credit. Should subsequent failure(s) occur, the credit(s) must be made up. A student who fails 2 credits in one year will be considered in academic jeopardy and will have to make up at least 1 credit in summer school. His/her academic progress in the following year will be closely monitored, and if in the judgment of the school the student does not make sufficient improvement, he/she may be asked to withdraw from Westminster. Students who wish to take makeup courses at a summer program other than Westminster’s must obtain permission from the Principal and/or the Director of Studies. Grades from forward-credit summer courses taken at Westminster will be included in the student’s cumulative high school average, but not in the average of any one semester.

Eligibility Requirements

In accordance with Georgia High School Association (GHSA) regulations, students who do not pass 5 subjects in a given semester and/or who fail to meet the following cumulative credit minimums are ineligible for interscholastic competition during the succeeding semester: • 5 credits entering the 10th grade • 11 credits entering the 11th grade • 17 credits entering the 12th grade (beginning with Class of 2012) These minimums are subject to change based on GHSA policy. Students who become ineligible at the end of the first semester may not participate in any tryouts or spring practices (e.g., spring football, cheerleading) that occur before the end of the school year. A student who fails in the second semester may make up the credit in Summer School and be eligible the following fall. Summer School courses taken for forward credit do not apply to eligibility the following spring.

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

3


Grades and Exams

With the exception of semester courses, subjects in the High School are taken as yearlong courses. No semester credit is given in these courses. To receive credit for a yearlong course, a student must attain a 2-semester average of 70.0 or higher and pass the second semester. End of term exams count 1⁄5 of the final semester average for first semester and ¼ of the final average for second semester. Exam grades are not recorded on the transcript. A student who earned a passing grade in a course first semester, but who fails the course because he/she failed the second semester exam, is eligible for a re-exam if the pre-exam average is 70 or higher and the exam grade is 50 or higher. If a student passes the re-exam, both the exam grade and the semester average recorded on the transcript will be 70. The same rule applies to exams in semester courses.

Extended Time for Tests and Exams

Students with learning disabilities that are documented by a Westminsterapproved psychologist may be allowed extended time for major tests and final exams. The High School seeks to keep students with learning disabilities in the regular classroom with as little identification or intervention as possible; therefore, families interested in pursuing extended time on tests should raise the issue with the school counselor early in the academic year.

Extended Time for National Standardized Tests and Exams

If a student has a current psychological evaluation on file in the high school and has been utilizing extended time for tests and exams for four months at Westminster, he or she is eligible to apply for extended time for standardized tests administered by College Board (PSATs, SATs, AP Exams) and ACT. Qualification for extended time at Westminster does not guarantee extended time with College Board or ACT. Eligibility for extended time with College Board and ACT is not automatic and involves a separate application process. To apply for extended time, you must contact Westminster’s High School Director of Testing who will send you the necessary application paperwork. Please note that the extended time application process must begin eight weeks before the registration date for the test that the student seeks to take with extended time. Note: Westminster does not provide school-based testing on all national testing dates.

Grade Weighting and Academic Honors

Unweighted grades are placed on report cards and the transcript. A weighted semester average is used to determine honor roll status, which requires an 88 (not including summer school courses). The weighted cumulative average for all of a student’s courses (High School Average) and for a student’s CPCs (College Prep Courses determined by the NCAA) will be recorded on the transcript. + 2 added to each regular course grade + 5 added to each Honors + 7 added to each AP course grade 4

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


Valedictorian and Salutatorian will be determined by the High School Average. To be eligible for recognition as Valedictorian or Salutatorian a student must attend the Westminster High School for three years. To be eligible for election to the National Honor Society and/or the Cum Laude Society a transfer student must be in residence at the Westminster High School during his/her junior year.

Honors and Advanced Placement Courses

Honors and AP courses represent both a challenge and a distinction for the exceptionally talented and motivated student. Placement in such courses is based upon both objective and subjective criteria established by each department. Students who meet these criteria will be recommended by their teachers in the spring for the appropriate Honors or AP courses in the following year. Students should check individual course descriptions for prerequisites for Honors and AP courses. A recommendation from the teacher and permission of the department head are required for enrollment in all AP and Honors courses. Honors courses are advanced courses which, while generally covering the same material as regular courses, involve more intensive study of topics and require the student to take more responsibility for learning the material. Advanced Placement courses are college-level courses which terminate in an Advanced Placement Examination offered by the College Entrance Examination Board. Students may be awarded college credit or college course exemption on the basis of AP exam scores.

Interdisciplinary Programs

In an ongoing effort to provide our students with the broadest and deepest education, Westminster continues to seek ways to maximize interdisciplinary opportunities in the High School. Interdisciplinary work allows students to see the complexity of their world while gaining a sharper perspective on traditional disciplines. Students seeking the challenges of cross-disciplinary work should pay particular attention to several specific course offerings. As one of the required courses for ninth graders, Discovery (p. 31) provides an excellent introduction to the complexity of the natural world as well as exposure to the many ways human beings learn. Each year interdisciplinary programs use assembly meetings as well as class time to provide opportunities for all four grade levels to cultivate an appreciation of the linkages between disciplines. Juniors, while in the process of building a solid foundation in the traditional course of study, may further their pursuit of interdisciplinary work through the Chewonki Semester School (p. 33) or School Year Abroad (p. 32). Westminster in France (p. 34) is a summer program which helps students develop their language skills as well as a broader and deeper appreciation for other cultures. Appropriately, the senior year offers the greatest range of interdisciplinary work. Students can approach these challenges from a variety of perspectives. Peer Leadership provides the opportunity to integrate traditional scholastic learning with service, introspection and leadership. More traditional classroom programs include New Testament Bible taught in French, Spanish, or Latin (p. 11), as well as American HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

5


Studies (p. 15). Finally, Running Through History (p. 34) offers a unique combination of physical and mental education for those who enjoy summer programs.

Drop/Add Procedures

Because class schedules and teacher assignments are determined on the basis of information provided during registration the previous spring, students should carefully consider their selections in registering for the following year. Although student choices of electives will be honored to the greatest extent possible, balance in class size and number of requests may preclude granting a first choice in all instances, and students may not be able to change their registration card selections after May 20, 2011. Westminster recognizes that family circumstances and the college application process might create situations which require students to make minor adjustments in their schedule once the fall semester begins. Consequently, with the permission of the Director of Studies, students who wish to drop/add an elective course may do so during the first 2 weeks of school if course enrollment numbers permit the requested move. There is no drop period during the second semester. Electives may be added at the discretion of the administration and the teacher during the first week of second semester. After the second week of the first semester, a student who wishes to change a course must make a request in writing to the Director of Studies, who will meet with the student’s grade chair and the student’s teacher to determine whether the proposed change is in the student’s best interest. The student is strongly encouraged to be a part of these meetings. Changes are made this late in the semester only under extraordinary circumstances. A student may not drop a yearlong course or change course levels after the tenth week of the first semester.

Arts A semester art course is required for graduation. A full year’s participation in Portfolio, AP Art History, AP Studio Art, Chamber Orchestra, Chorale, or Symphonic Band also satisfies the Arts requirement.

Performing Arts Performing Arts courses offer students the opportunity to master technical skills in music, public speaking, and theater. In addition, students develop abilities in the areas of critical thinking, discipline, self-confidence, and creativity. Chorale, 1 credit. Freshman, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Yearlong course in the study of vocal techniques, ensemble singing, music theory, and music history. This class will be split into two sections based on enrollment. No audition required.

6

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


Symphonic Band, 1 credit. Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Permission of the instructor required. Yearlong course in small ensemble and large band performance; study of theory, form, and music history. This class will be split into two sections based on enrollment. Chamber Orchestra, 1 credit. Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Permission of the instructor required. This is a yearlong course in orchestral performance and chamber music; study of theory, form, and music history. This class will be split into two sections based on enrollment. Public Speaking, ½ credit. Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Semester elective. Introduction to communication theory and skills including rhetoric, research, organization, and delivery. Variety of speeches studied and delivered. Advanced Acting, ½ credit. Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Semester elective. Prerequisite: students must have completed the arts requirement. The student will study character and script analysis, interpretation, vocal and physical development, and performance. Play Analysis and Acting Styles, ½ credit. Juniors, Seniors. Semester elective. Prerequisite: Advanced Acting or permission of the instructor. This course is designed to introduce the student to tools for and methods of analyzing scripts for the purpose of production and performance. The course focuses on the development of critical skills which can aid in future research and analysis of literature for the stage. The course will also introduce the student to different styles of acting. It will include the examination and performance of scenes from plays of various genres and historical periods. Theater Production, ½ credit. Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Semester elective. Prerequisite: students must have completed the arts requirement. The student will study lighting, sound, makeup, scenic design, scene painting, directing, and general production. Directing and Producing the Play, ½ credit. Juniors, Seniors. Semester elective. Prerequisite: Introduction to Theatre, Advanced Acting, Play Analysis and Acting Styles. Students will study the fundamentals of directing with the continuation of their acting studies. Production and design of the play will also be covered. Advanced Placement Music Theory, 1 credit. Juniors, Seniors. Yearlong course. Permission of the instructor required. Traditional study of harmony; use of theory (18th, 19th centuries); ear training and composition.

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

7


Dance, ½ credit. Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Semester elective. This course is an exploration of culture and history through the medium of a variety of dance genres and styles including hip hop, street dancing, break dancing, ballroom, ballet, jazz, tap, step and clogging, native dance from the countries of Southeast Asia, and dance from the Renaissance and Middle Ages. Daily work will involve improving strength, stamina and style using a variety of dance techniques, as well as examining what dance reveals about a particular culture and its effect on the history of that culture. No previous dance experience is necessary, but all experienced dancers are welcome and will find the class equally as challenging as the newcomers.

Visual Art Development of an understanding and study of artists and cultural styles through a broad range of art experiences and enriching personal encounters is the aim of the visual art program. Essential skill development and practice in a variety of media along with experiences in criticism, history, and aesthetics, provide multiple avenues of learning. With the exception of Advanced Placement Studio, second level courses, and as noted, no prior experience is expected. All courses combine studio work, homework, selected readings, writing, and a portfolio review. Semester electives may be taken as a sixth course. Ceramics I, ½ credit. Semester elective. Ceramics I is an introductory course designed to promote individual expression and ideas while gaining an understanding of the nature of clay and the ceramic process. Wheel-thrown work, a variety of hand built methods, decorative techniques and firing methods provide a basis for gaining insight into design principles, and historical and contemporary work. Ceramics II, ½ credit. Semester elective. Prerequisite: Ceramics I or comparable experience. Further exploration of the media; more complex problems in handbuilding and wheel throwing; greater emphasis on personal directions in content and form. Students are expected to develop a more self-directed learning program with faculty guidance. Drawing and Painting I, ½ credit. Semester elective. This course offers students an opportunity to explore a variety of processes including drawing, painting, mixed media and printmaking. Emphasis will be on the development of images drawn from observation, imagination, and memory. Students will apply the elements of art and principles of design to images that reflect personal interests. Drawing and Painting II, ½ credit. Semester elective. Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting I. Emphasis on the application of visual language and concept development in drawing, painting, mixed media, and printmaking.

8

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


Sculpture I, ½ credit. Semester elective. This course offers students the opportunity to explore three-dimensional art making through using a variety of materials, techniques, and processes. Students will apply the elements of art and principles of design to sculpture projects that reflect their personal interests. Sculpture II, ½ credit. Semester elective. Prerequisite: Sculpture I. Emphasis is this course is placed on the application of visual language and concept development to advanced forming processes in casting, carving, constructing, plaster, clay, cardboard, metal, and found objects. Portfolio, 1 credit. Yearlong elective. Juniors. Prior experience in the visual arts is desirable. This course will provide students with in-depth experience in drawing, painting, mixed media, and critical analysis. Over the course of the year, students will develop a portfolio of works that reflect breadth and depth in media and content along with a start to a personal concentration. Photography I, ½ credit. Semester elective. In this course students are introduced to the camera and basic darkroom procedures as a means for learning design principles and visual skills. There is no better way to learn photography than by using manual cameras and black and white film. With this hands-on approach they gain an intimate knowledge of all camera types, techniques, and equipment still used by photographers today. Students learn how to deliberately compose images and being limited to black and white, are sensitized to the effects of light. Students are also taught formal portraiture lighting techniques. Photography II, ½ credit. Semester elective. Prerequisite: Photography I or comparable photography and darkroom experience. In this course students add digital and color photography to their repertoire while continuing the study of darkroom and film procedures. In early projects, an emphasis is placed on the meaning behind images. Students are encouraged to more actively create or influence the subjects of their photographs in place of a more passive and documenting role. They are introduced to various darkroom tricks and techniques which allow for the manipulation and multiplication of images. They are also introduced to basic color theory and encouraged to start thinking about how to compose with color. The course culminates with in class use of high end digital cameras and advanced photo editing techniques in the Paul Fraser Digital Design Lab. (Access to 35mm Manual film camera and any type of digital camera required) Digital Darkroom, 1 credit. Yearlong elective. Prerequisite: Photography I and Photography II. This course provides an opportunity for students to independently continue the study of photography and digital media. They work with a faculty member and are given assignments but a major part of the course relies on advanced knowledge and self-motivation. It may be taken before, after, or instead of AP TwoDimensional Design. HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

9


Digital Imaging, ½ credit. Semester elective. Digital Imaging is a creative thinking course which is approached through the lens of technology. Using the resources provided by the Paul Fraser Digital Design Lab, students are introduced to the world of imaging. Students are taught the technical skills necessary to work in Photoshop, however, an emphasis is placed on expression and creative problem solving. At the beginning of the semester we study typography and color associations.

Advanced Placement Studio Art Advanced Placement courses in the visual arts are offered in three distinct portfolios. Each portfolio is designed to explore a particular visual art form. Enrollment requires permission of the instructor. These courses are also the only art courses considered to be an exam course due to work load, and thus may not be taken as a 6th course. Students will create a Breadth portfolio of 12 pieces showing a range of ability and techniques. Some of this work may be pulled from previous courses. They will also be responsible for executing a concentration. This is a body of 12 works which explore a common idea or theme. Early assignments are designed to help prepare students for this creative endeavor in the second half of the year. At the end of the year, students will participate in the annual AP Art Show in Broyles gallery. They will also submit their portfolios to the AP College Board for consideration of college credit. AP Drawing Portfolio, 1 credit. Yearlong course. Juniors, Seniors. Prerequisite: instructor approval of previous coursework and portfolio. Students working to complete the Drawing Portfolio are able to work with all painting and drawing materials. An emphasis is placed on realistic rendering, mark making, and surface manipulation, in the assessing of works. AP Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio, 1 credit. Yearlong course. Juniors, Seniors. Prerequisite: instructor approval of previous coursework and portfolio. Students working to complete the 2D Design Portfolio are able to work with all 2 dimensional media including drawing, painting, printmaking, and film and digital photography. An emphasis is placed on the elements and principles of design in assessing work. At Westminster, students may complete the AP 2 D design portfolio in two tracks:

10

Those interested in focusing on painting and drawing are required to have taken Portfolio.

Those interested in focusing on photography and digital media are required to have taken Photography I and II. Experience in digital imaging is preferred.

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


AP Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio, 1 credit. Yearlong course. Juniors, Seniors. Prerequisite: instructor approval of previous coursework and portfolio. Prior experience in sculpture and/or ceramics is required. This course is for advanced students in sculpture. Students in this course must be self-motivated, commit significant time outside of class to complete projects, and have advanced skills in the medium of their choice to work independently. Students prepare portfolios to be submitted for Advanced Placement evaluation. AP Art History, 1 credit. Yearlong course. Juniors, Seniors. The AP Art History course offers a survey of the art of the Western world with an introduction to art beyond the Western tradition. Works of art from pre-history through the 21st century are examined within their cultural contexts. Students with an interest in world history, and visual arts will find this course challenging and enlightening. Significant reading, writing and participation in discussion are a course expectation.

Biblical And Religious Studies One of the goals of a Westminster education is to assist students in developing their own personal faith and in understanding the concept of Christian community. To these ends, the department offers courses that expose students to the elements of our Judeo-Christian heritage through intensive, rigorous study of the Bible and related literature. In their work, students learn how others have responded to God’s call for a personal relationship with the Creator and for the creation of a community that is responsive to His will. It is hoped that, through this study, students will gain a deeper appreciation of their religious heritage as well as an increased awareness of their responsibility for all God’s creation. Old Testament Bible, 1 credit. Freshmen. One year required course for ninth graders. Introduction to critical reading of the Hebrew Scriptures. Study of historical background and theology of texts emphasizing the concepts of sacred history, covenant, and religious community. Suggested applications of principles studied. First Semester: Intensive examination of Genesis – I Samuel focusing on creation, patriarchal history, the exodus and wilderness experiences, and the period from the judges through the early monarchy. Second Semester: Survey of II Samuel – Malachi, stressing the historical writings connected with the monarchy and divided kingdoms, the prophets, and wisdom and apocalyptic literature. New Testament, 1 credit. Seniors. One-year course required for Seniors. Survey of the New Testament and related Christian literature that focuses on the historical background, theology, and critical methods used in explicating the texts. Intensive study of the life and teachings of Jesus and the faith claims of the early church communities. Consideration of such topics as the synoptic question, the historical Jesus, and Christian ethics. Students write personal faith statements at the beginning and end of the course. HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

11


First Semester: Intensive study of the four canonical Gospels and Acts. Students acquire the tools for careful textual analysis by writing exegesis papers and other critical exercises. Second Semester: Careful analysis of the form of Christian letters. Readings in the Pauline epistles and other letters and study of apocalyptic literature and thought.

Computer The computer department’s objective is for all students to be comfortable in using technology to access, analyze, and communicate information and ideas. This is achieved by integrating the instruction and practice of computer skills throughout the regular academic curriculum as well as through some technology specific courses. Students will enhance both critical thinking and creative design through the use of modern technology. Some of the tools used include laptops, digital camera, wireless devices, computer labs, and other modern technologies. Multimedia Design, ½ credit. Semester elective for Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Prerequisite: course instructor’s approval. This course develops skills in multimedia design, providing an in-depth exploration of the following: Video Editing; Audio Editing; Still Graphics; and Animation. Emphasis is placed on the creative organization and delivery of ideas using computer media. Creative Programming, ½ credit. Semester Elective for Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. This is an introductory course for learning to program with animation and robots. Students will create programs by dragging and dropping program elements in a mouse based editor that prevents syntax errors. The emphasis will be on creativity and problem-solving rather than coding. In the first half of the course, students will learn to program using Lego robots. The emphasis is on developing algorithms, solving problems, creating solutions, and teamwork. In the second half of the course, students will create animation projects using Alice, a user-friendly, modern programming environment for creating 3D animated interactive virtual worlds. By creating their own Pixar- and Disney-style animations, students will develop an understanding of basic programming concepts, including object-oriented programming, conditional execution, looping structures, event handling, arrays, and recursion. AP Computer Science, 1 credit. Prerequisites: students who take this course should be good at abstract reasoning, such as that done in mathematics courses, and should have completed algebra and must qualify for an honors math course. This is a conceptually advanced course in computer programming, focusing primarily on the Java programming language. Prior experience with computers and programming is not required but is strongly recommended. This course leads to the Advanced Placement examination in computer science, and the content of the course is set by the topics chosen by the College Board. Topics covered include data structures, control structures, object-oriented programming, and standard computer algorithms such as searching, sorting, and recursion. 12

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


ENGLISH The English department encourages students to think independently, read critically, write clearly, and have fun. We strive to develop in our students the habits of curiosity, imagination, tolerance, compassion, and honesty. In order to understand ourselves and our world better, we read classic and contemporary literature by men and women from a variety of racial, ethnic, and cultural groups of the past and present. In class discussions, we stress listening and responding to one another and to the voices in literature. Through varied writing assignments, we encourage students to engage the literature they read and to recognize its relevance to their lives. The English department does not track its students (i.e., no honors/regular distinction) in any of the grade levels. All courses at the eleventh and twelfth grade level have Advanced Placement designation. Yearlong courses in the ninth, tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grades place students in communities of learners who keep the same teacher all year. The structure and content of these courses are the same for everyone at each level. Reading, writing, and reflection are stressed, beginning with an exploration of the self and steadily moving outward into an awareness of others and their cultures. English 9, 1 credit. Characters in conflict: defining oneself and developing voice. Literature: fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry. Composition: descriptive, narrative, and expository writing with emphasis on revising drafts to expand content and the development of the personal essay. Grammar: intensive review through sentence combining and study of student writing. Vocabulary studied in context. Introduction to methods of literary research. Test-taking skills. English 10, 1 credit. Characters in communities and cultures: understanding how people are shaped by the lenses through which they view the world. Noteworthy voices in global and contemporary works; established as well as emerging modes of expression. In-depth analysis of the ways particular genres make meaning. Composition: personal reflection and the personal essay; rhetorical forms and modes of development. Grammar: review of punctuation; use of student writing. Vocabulary development, primarily through context. Methods of research and exhibition. Testtaking skills. English 11, AP Literature: Visions and Revisons, 1 credit. “Vision is the art of seeing what is invisible to others.” – Jonathan Swift Juniors will learn to understand English literature as a dynamic series of perspectives, visions and subsequent revisions of the human story. They will explore fundamental visions of the English tradition–linguistic, aesthetic, historical–and then put those traditions in conversation with contemporary voices that variously HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

13


question, further, and revise the perspectives of the past. These conversations will grow out of the juxtaposition of traditional and contemporary authors. Some possible pairings are Charlotte Bronte and Jean Rhys, Joseph Conrad and Chinua Achebe, William Shakespeare and Tom Stoppard, Virginia Woolf and Michael Cunningham, or W.B. Yeats and Derek Walcott. Juniors will join these conversations through both class discussion and written responses to the texts, potentially considering questions like these: If Shakespeare were alive today, how would he respond to Stoppard’s plays? Would Yeats and Caribbean-born Walcott agree about what makes a poem great? Would Woolf approve of Cunningham’s fictional telling of her life story? Would Achebe let his children read Conrad? English 12, AP Language: Endings and Beginnings What we call the beginning is often the end And to make an end is to make a beginning. The end is where we start from. [. . .] We shall not cease from exploration And the end of all our exploring Will be to arrive where we started And know the place for the first time. T.S. Eliot, “Little Gidding” Seniors will spend their final year in English exploring the ideas of transition, transformation, and change, themes that emerge as increasingly relevant during this exciting time in their lives. Through the study and practice of writing as a craft, seniors will explore the various approaches writers take to develop such themes as well as the techniques writers employ to establish voice. All seniors will study two common American texts, one work of fiction and one work of non-fiction. Outside of these two texts, content will vary from teacher to teacher, but all seniors will also examine drama, poetry, film, and art. In their study of all these genres and forms, students will work to understand writing as a discipline that informs the transition that awaits them. As a culminating experience in the course, every senior will be expected to submit an original work of writing that demonstrates an emerging voice, a developing mastery of the craft, and an implicit and/or explicit response to questions central to the course: Who am I? How have I changed? How have I stayed the same? What is ending for me? What is beginning? AP English Language and Composition: School for the Common Good, 2 credits: 1 AP English; 1 regular American History. This two-period block course is an interdisciplinary and experiential course in American history and literature that focuses on citizenship and the democratic ideal of civil society. The course defines and practices civil society as the place where we come to acknowledge, to learn, and 14

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


to live out the assertion of Martin Luther King, Jr.: “We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny.” One afternoon each week, students meet to talk, to learn, and to serve. Our work takes us out into city to meet new people, to see ourselves and the city of Atlanta anew, and to practice the ideas we encounter in the classroom. Through our experiences with one another and with strangers, and through our reflection on those experiences, we mean to foster, develop, and nurture in one another those habits and practices necessary for citizenship, practices that, in Democracy in America, Alexis de Toqueville calls “habits of the heart.” Juniors entering the course must read over the summer a required text to be determined by the History department. Not offered in 2011-12. AP English Language and Composition: American Studies, 2 credits: 1 AP English; 1 AP American History. This two-period block course combines the study of American literature with AP American History to provide an interdisciplinary learning experience. Guided by a traditional chronological framework, students will work with primary historical documents, literary texts, art, music, and film to gain a more sophisticated awareness of selected periods in U.S. history. Similarly, the study of the historical context in which works of literature appeared and their role in mirroring and/or shaping their times will enrich the students’ understanding and appreciation for those texts and their reflection of the American experience. The course requires an AP history recommendation. Not offered in 2011-12.

HISTORY DEVELOPMENT of perspective on many facets of human experience is the aim of the study of history. Skills essential to this study are emphasized and reinforced at every grade level: gathering and interpreting data; analyzing concepts; synthesizing disparate material; and supporting generalizations. Since critical evaluation and intelligent expression are an essential part of the learning process, each student is expected to learn to read perceptively and write in a lucid, logical manner that involves advocacy and evidence. Responsible citizenship in the modern world has its foundation in awareness of the complexity of problems that confront society. Therefore, one function of the department is the study of contemporary issues with a view toward placing them in a world-historical context.

Required Courses & AP Courses History of the Ancient World, ½ credit. Semester required course. Sophomores. Common heritage of humankind (5th century B.C.-A.D. 1350); study of ideas, institutions, and individuals of ancient Rome, India, China, Japan, Africa, the Islamic empire, Byzantium, and/or medieval Europe through primary and secondary sources; techniques of analysis and interpretation. HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

15


History of the Modern World, 1 credit. One year required course. Juniors. Survey of world history since 1500 A.D. The rise of the Western world (development of nation-states, economic theory and practice, science and technology, war and revolution, imperialism, religion, cultural and intellectual growth); emergence of and contributions by the non-Western world (India, China, Japan, Africa); primary and secondary sources; techniques of analysis and interpretation. American History, 1 credit. One year required course. Seniors. Special issues and topics from every major period (1607 to present); primary and secondary sources; current affairs in historical context through newspapers and periodicals. Advanced Placement Designation: The department uses both objective and subjective criteria to determine student placement in Advanced Placement courses in lieu of History of the Modern World or American History: Objective: 90 average in the first semester of the previous required non-AP history courses; 85 average in the first semester of the previous AP history course. Subjective: Recommendation by the student’s current history teacher, based upon the student’s achievement in that course and upon the teacher’s assessment of the student’s potential to benefit from and contribute to a demanding APlevel history course. Summer School: Summer School courses typically are not used to recommend students for AP History. In exceptional cases, with the recommendation of the teacher, a student receiving a 92 or higher after taking History of the Ancient World in summer school may be recommended for AP European History in his/her junior year. The teacher is authorized to require additional evidence of reading comprehension and writing abilities in every case where a student wishes to qualify for the AP course. If a student receives a 92 or higher in the Summer School History of the Modern World course and has earned at least a 90 in History of the Ancient World during the regular school year, he or she may be eligible to take AP American History. AP European History, 1 credit. Juniors. This course covers the same time period as History of the Modern World, but with the additional goal of preparing students for the AP European History exam; different textbook, more attention to historiography, greater emphasis on critical analysis of primary sources. AP United States History, 1 credit. Seniors. Covers same topics and time period as American History with a different textbook, more attention to historiography, greater emphasis on critical analysis of primary sources; additional goal of preparing students to take the Advanced Placement test in American History. AP United States History: American Studies. See course description, AP English Language and Composition: American Studies (p. 15). Not offered in 2011-12. 16

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


AP Art History. Juniors, Seniors. Fulfills requirement for students taking three years of history. Course description under Visual Studies on p. 11.

Elective Courses for Freshmen & Sophomores Introduction to History, ½ credit. Semester elective. Freshmen, Sophomores. Introduces skills of analysis and interpretation of evidence, using primarily the history of the Ancient Near East. Topics include: The Language and Methods of History; Prehistory; Mesopotamia; Law in the Ancient Near East; Egypt; the Assyrian and Persian Empires; the Hebrews; Ancient Asia; The Ancient Greeks. No student may take both Introduction to History and Introduction to Political Speech and Thought (see following). Introduction to Political Thought and Speech, ½ credit. Semester elective. Freshmen, Sophomores. This course introduces students to current politics by engaging them in research, writing, public speaking, and role-playing in a Model Congress. With a moderate workload, students learn methods of advocacy, extemporaneous speaking, oral presentations, and analysis of current events. No student may take both Introduction to History and Introduction to Political Thought and Speech during their high school career.

Elective Courses for Juniors & Seniors United States History: SCG. See course description, AP English Language and Composition: School for the Common Good (p. 15). Not offered in 2011-12. History and Economics of Philanthropy in the U.S., ½ credit. Semester elective. Juniors, Seniors. This course explores the historical and philosophical roots of American philanthropy as well as the mission, economics, and function of the nonprofit sector in a civil society. Students learn how philanthropy (voluntary action, giving, and associations) builds community, addresses social problems, and catalyzes social movements. In addition to traditional classroom-based study and discussion, an experiential component includes onsite visits to nonprofits and student service experiences. This approach provides students opportunities to explore philanthropy as an expression of an individual citizen’s values, place in community and responsibilities to society. Co-sponsored by the History Department and the Glenn Institute for Philanthropy and Service Learning. Politics, ½ credit. Semester elective. Juniors, Seniors. A study focusing on the institutions of our national government and the major political problems facing our society. Students focus on both foreign and domestic issues and propose solutions to current problems. Will be offered every year. Macro- and Microeconomics, ½ credit each. Two 1-semester electives. Juniors, Seniors. Overview of the free market economic system; discussion of assumptions; HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

17


key concepts; market structures; overview of U.S. economy; international trade theory. Both will be offered every year (Micro first semester; Macro second semester) Most students take these in tandem. History of Civil Rights, ½ credit. Semester elective. Juniors, Seniors. Beginning with the post-Reconstruction disfranchisement of the African-American and the proliferation of “Jim Crow” laws, this course analyzes the Civil Rights Movement, especially between the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brown vs. Board of Education and the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The course examines the relevance of the Civil Rights Movement in today’s society as well as related issues of other minorities and women’s rights. This course will be offered every year.

Modern And Classical Languages WESTMINSTER’S philosophy states that a complete education includes reasonable proficiency in a foreign language. The study of a foreign language has social, personal, and pragmatic implications. Communication skills in a second language broaden individual perspective and enhance the development of international understanding. Knowledge of another culture provides a reference point for appreciating, evaluating, and expanding one’s own life. A solid foundation in foreign language also gives added credentials to a student for college work, increases competency in English, and provides an essential skill in a growing number of professions. An extended sequence of study in foreign language is essential to the attainment of these goals. Introduction to language study at an early age and emphasis on communication skills facilitate this acquisition. The long sequence also enables students subsequently to use the language in academic endeavors and diverse life settings. The High School language requirement is three years of the same foreign language, and we highly recommend extending the language begun in the Junior High years through High School when feasible. This ensures that qualified and interested students will be able to reach the fifth-year level where the Advanced Placement courses are offered. Students in the regular courses are also able to use the language for studying other subject matters in the foreign language. Honors sections exist in most courses beyond the first year. Admission into these courses is based on the following criteria: outstanding participation in class, cumulative average of 90, and the recommendation of the teacher. To continue in Honors, a student must have an average of at least 85 and the recommendation of the Honors teacher. To go from an Honors class to Advanced Placement, or from an Advanced Placement to another Advanced Placement class, a student must have an average of 85 and the teacher’s recommendation. To go from a regular class to an Advanced Placement, a student must have an average of 92 and the teacher’s recommendation. These averages must be maintained for both semesters. In the case of a student going from a regular class to an Honors or Advanced Placement class, a placement test may be required. 18

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


Chinese Chinese I, 1 credit. This is a beginning Mandarin Chinese language course for students with no prior knowledge of this language. This course is designed to help students reach the following objectives: a) to build a solid foundation of the “Pinyin” (Chinese pronunciation) system; b) to accumulate an inventory of 250-300 characters; c) to gain a rudimentary knowledge of grammatical structures and the character writing system; d) to acquire the communication skills in contextualized situations; and e) to develop an appreciation of Chinese culture. Chinese II, 1 credit. This is a second year Mandarin Chinese language course for students who have passed Chinese I or its equivalent. The focus of this course is to help students enlarge vocabulary to 500-600 characters, continue to build their knowledge in grammar, develop reading ability, and improve their writing skills. This course will also enable students to engage in longer interactions on various topics such as student’s life, after school activities, family relationships and history, and daily routines, etc. Chinese III, 1 credit. This is a third year Mandarin Chinese language course for students who have passed Chinese II or equivalent. At this level, the course is designed to reach two major goals: a) while continuing with the study of vocabulary and grammar, students will be using the knowledge acquired from Chinese I and II to study simple but varied topics about Chinese culture: holiday customs, geographic conditions, major ethnic groups, different cooking systems, etc.; b) students will be engaging in extended discussions on a particular topic, telling stories, and expressing their opinions in Chinese.

French French I, 1 credit. For students with little or no French experience. An introduction to the French language and French-speaking countries. Students will develop oral and aural skills through coursework done predominately in French. Limited reading and writing in French reinforce acquisition of language skills for communication. French II, 1 credit. For students continuing from French I or students with equivalent experience to French I. Following the same format as French I, students gradually read and write more extensively as their skills progress. Dialogues and roleplaying are used to continue development of communication skills. French III, 1 credit. For students continuing from French II. Students will be exposed to authentic French speakers and situations covering most forms of the spoken language, and will read short literary passages and poetry, write more extensively, and develop some academic understanding of the language’s grammar.

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

19


French III Honors, 1 credit. For students continuing from French II. Experienced course and/or for those with teacher recommendation based on exceptional ability with the language. Students will learn from a range of authentic French speakers and situations covering most forms of the spoken language. Thirdyear honors students read literary passages, including Le Petit Prince, read and write poetry, and develop composition writing skills. All basic verb tenses will be covered by the end of this course. Themes include daily life, literature, cinema and theatre. French IV, 1 credit. For students continuing from French III. This course further emphasizes listening and speaking, reading and writing. The curriculum integrates literary works, film and grammar. French IV Honors, 1 credit. For students with outstanding ability and special interest in French. This course covers complete works of French literature (16th-20th centuries), in-depth grammar study, speaking, listening comprehension, reading and composition. One complete work from the AP Literature list is studied (Voltaire’s Candide). Prerequisite for AP French Literature course. French V Civilization: France and the French-Speaking World, 1 credit. Yearlong course. One of the semester-long components of the French V Civilization course focuses on regions of France. Topics covered include history, geography, customs, the arts, cooking and cultural attractions. For each region, students will choose one area of focus, for an oral report (blog) presented to the class. The course features a cooking component, in which culture of the various regions is explored through specialties that are prepared as part of the class. Regions studied may include: l’Ile-de-France (Paris), le Centre, la Vallée de la Loire, la Bourgogne, la Bretagne, la Normandie, la Provence, and l’Alsace. The contemporary French-speaking world is the other semester-long component of the course. Students study the many French-speaking countries of the world (other than France) known collectively as “Francophonie.” These are countries in Africa (Congo, Rwanda, Côte d’Ivoire, Mali, Senegal, Benin, etc.), the South Pacific (Tahiti, New Caledonia, the Seychelles), and the Caribbean (Haiti). The course will feature collaborative and project-based learning, using Web 2.0 to facilitate exploration of the history, issues, and challenges of the contemporary French-speaking world. As part of an ongoing service learning initiative, students also will participate in a website project with our sister-school in Haiti, the Collège Saint François d’Assise on the island of La Gonâve. AP French Language, 1 credit. Yearlong course. Teacher recommendation required. This course strives for a high level of proficiency in listening comprehension, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing. The curriculum consists of extensive readings in literature, current events and cultural topics, and includes an in-depth grammar review. The course prepares students for the AP Language Exam in May. 20

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


French VI Honors Advanced Literature, 1 credit. Yearlong course. First semester, students will read masterpieces of classical French theatre, including works by Molière, Racine, Corneille. Complete works will be read and interpreted from literary and theatrical perspectives. Authors will be studied in their historical, political and literary contexts. Research will be conducted in French, using a variety of sources. While the Internet is accepted as one source, preference will be given to publications available in JSTOR, our library, or inter-library loan. Second semester, the course will explore some of the major contemporary movements of the modern era, including existentialism, the literature of the absurd, and the end of colonialism. Albert Camus, Eugene Ionesco, Jean-Paul Sartre, Samuel Beckett and Aimé Césaire may be included. Students will read complete works in French, make oral presentations and write literary compositions. All work will be conducted in French. Prerequisite: French IV Honors and/or teacher’s recommendation.

Latin Latin I, 1 credit. Beginning language skills: listening, pronouncing, reading, writing; acquisition of vocabulary, syntax, and grammar through inductive approach; basic studies in etymology, Roman history, civilization, and mythology. Latin II, 1 credit. Review of materials studied in Latin I; study of more advanced vocabulary, syntax, and grammar with stress on similarities and differences between Latin and English; simple readings in prose and poetry; additional studies in etymology, Roman history, civilization, and mythology. Latin III, 1 credit. Study of advanced syntax, grammar, and vocabulary. First semester readings in the history of the late Republic and early Empire; second semester readings based on time periods: 3rd century BC comedy, Augustan Age prose and poetry, and ecclesiastical and medieval Latin; advanced study of mythology and etymology. Latin III Honors, 1 credit. More advanced study for students with proven aptitude and performance. Besides the Latin III curriculum, readings in Latin poetry, written reports based on readings and a special project. Latin IV, 1 credit. Roman Elegy and Love poetry. Thorough review of vocabulary, grammar, and syntax; first semester readings from the pre-Augustan poet Catullus, second semester readings from two works of the golden age author, Ovid. Emphasis on the development of the genre and literary theory. Latin IV Honors, 1 credit. Rapid review of advanced syntax and grammar; study of selections from Catullus and Horace, Ovid or Cicero against background of political, social and cultural ideals of Republican and Augustan Rome; emphasis on reading comprehension and literary appreciation. HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

21


Latin V, 1 credit. Roman epic. Thorough review of vocabulary, grammar, and syntax; readings include selections from Books I, II, IV, VI, X and XII of Vergil’s Aeneid. Emphasis on Roman political and social institutions and customs, mythology, folklore, and literature. AP Latin: Vergil, 1 credit. Rapid review of advanced syntax and grammar; study of classical epic with reading in Books I, II, IV, VI, X, and XII of Vergil’s Aeneid; examination of political, social, and cultural ideals of Augustan Rome; emphasis on reading comprehension and literary appreciation. (This course replaces Latin IV Honors).

Spanish Spanish I, 1 credit. Basic foundation of the language through vocabulary for speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Spanish. Emphasis on structure and communication. Conversational proficiency-oriented program. Based on the Vistas series. Spanish II, 1 credit. Continuation of the first year program with more emphasis on grammar, speaking proficiency and listening comprehension. Students gradually read and write more extensively and practice situational activities which encourage creativity with language and use of problem-solving skills. Based on the Vistas series. Goals are speaking proficiency and cultural understanding. Spanish II Honors , 1 credit. Advanced study for students who have demonstrated excellent ability in Spanish. In addition to the Spanish II curriculum, students read a selected group of stories for further development of vocabulary and language skills. Spanish III, 1 credit. Emphasis on grammar in conversation and writing. More student-centered activities give opportunities to strengthen spoken and written skills. More in depth study of Hispanic culture and literature. Spanish III Honors, 1 credit. Advanced study for students who have demonstrated both outstanding ability and special interest. Emphasis on grammar, conversation, reading, writing, and culture. Study of selected literary works. AP Language, 1 credit. Advanced study for students continuing from III Honors, or those with teacher recommendation based on exceptional ability with the language. Proficiency in listening comprehension, speaking, reading comprehension, writing; reading in contemporary literature and journalistic selections. Films, videos, and songs included. AP Literature, 1 credit. Advanced study for students continuing from AP Language. Masterpieces of Spanish literature, including a variety of genres, historical periods, and geographical areas are studied. Selected films, in-depth class discussions 22

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


in and compositions at the advanced level. Literary criticism techniques are also developed as part of college-level work. Spanish IV, 1 credit. Review of basic structure, vocabulary, and syntax from previous years in a variety of communicative activities. Integration of cultural and literary material. Contemporary topics promote cultural understanding and stimulate conversation. Use of videos and songs. Spanish V: Business and Economics, 1 credit. Using language and technology related to the world financial community, students will analyze the impact of Hispanic companies in the United States on global and U.S. markets. Following a communicative model, the course will engage students in personalized projects that are linked to the stock market. A service component will also be featured as students directly engage Atlanta’s Hispanic community. Stressed skills will include media literacy, collaborative competency, creative and critical thinking, and problem solving. Spanish V: The Hispanic World, 1 credit. Based on major historical, cultural, and literary milestones of the past century and today, this course will challenge students to analyze and synthesize information they gather through research in the form of projects and presentations. Consequently, heavy emphasis will be placed on oral and written proficiency. Global awareness will be stressed as the course explores issues as diverse as NAFTA, the Spanish Civil War, and the Latin American “Boom� in literature. Connections will also be made with the local Hispanic community as students explore volunteer activities and various other opportunities to interact with local Hispanics. Spanish VI Honors, 1 credit. Film, Art and Literature. An advanced Language class that develops proficiency in all skills. Examines major films of the Hispanic world in an artistic, literary and social context. Class materials will include selections from films, paintings as well as contemporary literary readings.

MATHEMATICS THE DEVELOPMENT of skills in critical thinking, problem solving, written and verbal mathematical communication, and mathematical modeling is the driving force behind the mathematics program. These skills will help prepare Westminster graduates for a world that will require them to make decisions using mathematical reasoning. In all mathematics courses, real-world applications are emphasized, and projects allow for exploration and extended independent work. Students use technology to help visualize and solve problems, explore and experiment, as well as develop, enhance and expand their understanding of mathematics. Although the High School requirement is three years of mathematics, competitive college entrance requirements suggest that each student complete four years beginning with Geometry. The University of Georgia system requires four years of math for admission.

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

23


To meet the needs of students with different ability levels and interests, the Mathematics Department offers regular, Honors, and Advanced Placement courses. The Honors and Advanced Placement programs are designed for the student who possesses a demonstrated achievement in previous mathematics courses, the ability to understand concepts quickly, motivation to work diligently and independently, and an intellectual curiosity in the development of mathematical ideas. Unless otherwise noted below, admission into an Honors or Advanced Placement course from a regular course is based on the following criteria: an average of 90 or higher in the fall semester of the regular course and recommendation by the student’s current math teacher. Unless otherwise noted in a course description, students must have an average of at least 80 in the fall semester of the Honors course and the recommendation of the Honors teacher to continue in Honors. Algebra I, 1 credit. Intended for students new to Westminster who have not taken Algebra I. Introduces the basics of algebra including algebraic expressions, graphs of linear equations and inequalities, solving linear, quadratic, and rational equations, systems of linear equations and inequalities, second degree polynomial functions, exponential functions, and properties of exponents. Emphasizes fundamental skills as well as applications involving probability, geometry, and real-world problems. Introduces basic right triangle trigonometry. Geometry, 1 credit. Covers right triangle trigonometry, vectors, solving triangles, two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures and their properties, logical reasoning and the development of formal proof using theorems and postulates, transformations, congruence, symmetry, and linear functions. Emphasizes visualizing and understanding Euclidean geometric properties and mathematical relationships, making and verifying conjectures, and applying geometric concepts to real-world situations. Makes extensive connections between geometry and algebraic properties learned earlier. Extensive use of dynamic geometry software to discover, investigate, and verify geometric concepts and properties Geometry Honors, 1 credit. Covers all of the topics in the Geometry course in greater depth and at a more abstract level. Greater attention to making and verifying conjectures and using algebraic techniques to develop geometric concepts. Explores non-Euclidean geometries and gives an introduction to circular trigonometry. New material is introduced through student investigation. Students who are: critical thinkers, self motivated, willing to accept challenging problems, comfortable taking risks when they both ask and answer questions, and curious to discover alternative methods will enjoy this course. Algebra II, 1 credit. Emphasizes the development, understanding, and practical applications of algebraic expressions, equations, inequalities, relations, and functions. Covers linear, quadratic, higher-degree polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational both for their abstract properties and as tools for modeling real-world situations. Investigates systems of equations, linear programming, matrices, conic sections, and 24

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


sequences and series. Relates and applies algebraic concepts to geometry and data analysis. Algebra II Honors, 1 credit. Covers all of the topics in the Algebra II course in greater depth and at a more abstract level. New material is introduced through student investigation. A major component of the course is a focus on problem solving. Problem solving, by definition, involves investigating unfamiliar situations. Students will be asked to combine and apply ideas, tools and reasoning from across their educational experiences to address a variety of questions. Working both from the “real world” and from purely mathematical settings, student will be asked not only to produce solutions but also to evaluate potential solutions. Precalculus/Trig, 1 credit. Further study of the algebra, properties, graphs, and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, absolute value, and piecewise-defined functions. Intensive study of trigonometric and circular functions, including solving triangles, transformations on graphs of trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions, verifying and applying trigonometric identities, and solving trigonometric equations. Additional topics covered include parametric and polar functions, and vectors. Precalculus/Trig Honors, 1 credit. Includes all topics in the Precalculus/Trig course presented in a more theoretical approach. Additional topics are: logistic functions, parametric equations, polar equations, trigonometric form of complex numbers, DeMoivre’s Theorem, vectors in 2D and 3D, polar equations of conics and rotation of conics. Honors Calculus, 1 credit. Prerequisite: a grade of 88 or better in Algebra II Honors and the Algebra II Honors teacher’s recommendation. The course is designed for students who have already mastered the topics in Algebra II Honors and is considered the first half of a two-year course culminating in AP Calculus BC. It finalizes the exploration of precalculus topics with deeper investigations of trigonometric inverses, identities, and equations; extended representations of functions and relations through piecewise, parametric, polar, hyperbolic, and vector forms; and more abstract use of transformations to understand power, exponential, transcendental, logistic, rational, and other functions in solving and modeling. The second half of the course includes a college-level treatment of differential calculus through graphical, numerical, analytical, and verbal representations. Some elementary series calculus and differential equations are explored. Calculus & Statistics, 1 credit. Elective. Usually a senior course. Prerequisite: Precalculus/Trigonometry or Precalculus/Trigonometry Honors. This course will spend a semester focusing on the conceptual meaning of the derivative and integral through investigations and explorations. Students will utilize technology, including the TI-Nspire, to examine the meaning of the derivative as a rate of change and the definite integral as an accumulation of rates of change. Additionally, the indefinite HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

25


integral as a process to solve differential equations will be studied. When possible, the concept being studied will be re-enforced through real-world problems and their solutions, which require calculus to solve. This course will spend a semester studying statistics: the science of collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Topics include: Univariate Descriptive Statistics, Bivariate Descriptive Statistics, Sampling and surveys, Experiments, Probability and Inferential Statistics. Students will explore the widespread use of statistical analysis in our world today. AP Calculus AB, 1 credit. A college-level treatment of both differential and integral calculus. Emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems expressed geometrically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Covers limits, concept of the derivative, computation and applications of derivatives, techniques and applications of antidifferentiation, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, separable differential equations and slope fields, interpretations, properties and numerical approximations of the definite integral, and applications of integrals. All students take the AP Calculus AB Exam. AP Calculus BC, 1 credit. Prerequisite: Honors Calculus and the Honors Calculus teacher’s recommendation. Completes all the topics of Calculus AB not already covered in Honors Calculus. In addition, the course covers the calculus of polar, parametric, and vector forms, differential equations, slope fields, Euler’s Method, more advanced techniques of antidifferentiation, improper integrals, and continues the study of series calculus. All students take the AP Calculus BC Exam. AP Statistics, 1 credit. A yearlong elective course for students who have successfully completed Algebra II. Usually a senior course, AP Statistics may also be taken concurrently with any precalculus or calculus course. Emphasizes student explorations of statistical problems in the real world. Major themes are exploratory analysis of data, design of data collection, including experiments and observation studies, probability as a descriptor of the patterns which emerge in random phenomena, and statistical inference. All students take the AP Statistics Exam. Multivariable Calculus, ½ credit. A semester elective for students who have completed AP Calculus BC. Extends the concepts of AP Calculus BC to other topics in differential calculus including vectors and curves in two or more dimensions, nonrectangular coordinate systems, functions of more than one variable, and Lagrange multipliers. Integral topics include multiple integration, vector fields, line and flux integrals and concludes with the connections between Green’s, Divergence, and Stoke’s theorems. Emphasizes both theory and applications of all topics. Math Seminar, ½ credit. A semester elective. Juniors, Seniors. Students are encouraged in a seminar setting to explore areas of expertise presented by interested faculty. Topics vary according to interests and personnel; possibilities include, but are not limited to: Cryptography: Code Writing and Breaking; Linear Algebra; Discrete Math; Dynamical Systems: Chaos and Fractals; and Math Modeling. 26

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


Department Of Physical And Life Sciences The science department at Westminster seeks to ignite students’ curiosity for the complexities of the natural world, while helping them learn the fundamental skills and knowledge necessary to continue their education in the sciences as well as to understand future scientific issues. Through the study of science, students deepen their understanding and capacity to responsibly and effectively engage in their world. Students participate in creative approaches to scientific inquiry, including hypothesis development, experimental design, and data collection and analysis. In addition to grounding students in the fundamentals of physical and life sciences, the department emphasizes incorporation of technology and cutting-edge research tools into each course. Our laboratory-based courses meet 6 hours each week, allowing time for discussion and open-ended investigation. The course sequence begins with physics in the freshman year, which provides students with a solid foundation for subsequent science courses. Students should take chemistry in their sophomore year in order to build a solid foundation for biology as part of their junior curriculum, given that modern cellular biology is based on understanding chemistry. For most students, completion of physics, chemistry, and biology will meet Westminster’s graduation requirement of three laboratory sciences as well the Georgia Board of Regents requirement of four years of laboratory science for admission to schools in the University System of Georgia. The Board of Regents recognizes Westminster’s 8th grade physical science course as one of these four required laboratory courses. Westminster offers a full array of Advanced Placement (AP) science courses that mimic the traditional introductory college level courses both in pace and rigor. If a student chooses to take one of these AP courses as their first experience with a particular subject, these classes can be especially challenging. Students who enroll in an AP course are required to take the AP exam in May. The science department offers many extracurricular opportunities for students to further explore their interests and investigate a wide range of topics that span all science disciplines. The Robotics Team, the Science Bowl Team, and the Science Olympiad Team all compete throughout Georgia and the nation. Clubs include the Dirt Catz, which maintains the organic garden and the Campus Conservation Corps, which promotes environmental sustainability. The Summer Research Internship allows interested students to engage in research with scientists and physicians at local universities and health care facilities. Physics, 1 credit. Prerequisite: Algebra I. This is a laboratory-based course that will include all or most of the following topics: measurement theory, kinematics, Newton’s Laws, gravitation, energy, electrostatics, electric circuits, waves: sound and light, optics, and topics in modern physics. A thorough conceptual understanding of these topics is emphasized. Meets 6 hours per week.

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

27


Physics Honors, 1 credit. Prerequisite: Algebra I. Enrollment in Geometry Honors recommended. This is a rigorous laboratory-based course that will include all or most of the following topics: kinematics, Newton’s Laws, gravitation, energy, torque, electrostatics, electric circuits, magnetism, waves: sound and light, optics, and topics in modern physics. Meets 6 hours per week. Chemistry, 1 credit. Prerequisite: Physics. This is a laboratory-based course that covers all or most of the following topics: stoichiometry, nomenclature, atomic structure, periodicity, bonding, states of matter, gas laws, kinetics, equilibrium, acidbase, and thermodynamics. Meets 6 hours per week. Chemistry Honors, 1 credit. Prerequisite: Physics. Enrollment in Honors Algebra II recommended. This is a rigorous laboratory-based course that will include all or most of the following topics: stoichiometry, nomenclature, atomic structure, periodicity, bonding, states of matter, gas laws, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear and organic chemistry. Meets 6 hours per week. AP Chemistry, 1 credit. Prerequisite: Physics. Co-requisite: Honors Algebra II or higher-level mathematics course. This may be taken as a first year chemistry course for sophomores, or as a second year chemistry course for seniors. This is a rigorous laboratory-based course that includes the following topics: atomic structure, nomenclature, nuclear, stoichiometry, gas laws, peroidicity, bonding and molecular structures, states of matter, equilibrium, acid-base, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Meets 6 hours per week. Biology, 1 credit. Prerequisite: Physics and Chemistry.. This is a laboratory-based course that emphasizes an exploration of scientific inquiry, including developing experiments, analyzing data, and writing effectively. Other course objectives are to understand the importance and relevance of biology to everyday life, recognize the relationship between form and function, and to establish knowledge of fundamental biology concepts. This is a survey biology course including an introduction to biological chemistry, cell physiology, classical and molecular genetics, evolution, plant and animal physiology and reproduction, and ecology. Meets 6 hours per week. Honors Biology, 1 credit. Prerequisite: Physics and Chemistry. This is a fast-paced and dynamic laboratory-based biology course that seeks to engage students actively in the process of scientific inquiry and discovery while simultaneously encouraging students to obtain mastery of basic tenants of biological chemistry, energetics, cell physiology, classical and molecular biology, evolution, plant and animal physiology, and ecology. The course focuses on synthesis of information within the political, historical, and technological constraints of the time period in which the discovery was made and utilized. Students will be encouraged to think critically and to evaluate current advances in biological sciences, in addition to areas of ongoing ambiguity, in light of the rapidly changing world in which we live. Meets 6 hours per week. 28

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


AP Biology, 1 credit. Prerequisite: Physics and Chemistry. This may be taken as a first year biology course for juniors, or as a second year biology course for seniors. Topics of study and laboratory work fall within eight major themes required for a deep understanding of the biological sciences. These themes include Science as a Process, Biological Evolution, Energy Transfer, Continuity and Change, Relationship of Structure to Function, Regulation, Interdependence in Nature, and Science, Technology, and Society. Meets 6 hours per week. Science Research Elective, ½ credit. Prerequisite: Physics, Chemistry and Biology (or Marine Biology). All great scientific discoveries begin with simple curiosity, and historically, many are made by people without extensive scientific training. Antony van Leeuwenhoek had a passion for little things and accidentally discovered microorganisms. Gregor Mendel, a monk, tended pea plants and eventually discovered fundamental principals of genetics. The Science Research Elective begins at the forefront of scientific inquiry; students simply observe and ask questions. Then, through semester long research projects, they explore topics of their own interest, ranging from ecological or health science to earth or physical science-related questions. This process will allow students to develop the basic skills of formulating questions and designing studies as well as analyzing data and communicating findings. They will learn to make sense of the unexpected. Students who participate in a summer research internship may enroll in this course to continue their research and/or data analysis while reflecting on their projects within a broader research context. Meets 4 hours a week. Human Anatomy and Physiology, ½ credit. Prerequisite: Physics, Chemistry and Biology (or Marine Biology). The structure, function and interactive dynamics of human systems are discussed within the context of case studies, diseases, and developmental anomalies. A series of dissections are required. Meets 4 hours per week. Environmental Science: Problems and Solutions, 1 credit. Prerequisite: Physics, Chemistry and Biology (or Marine Biology). This full year laboratorybased course will be modeled after the AP Environmental course but will cover fewer topics, allowing for more time spent investigating particular issues of students interest. Students will research and generate solutions to environmental problems, emphasizing the motto “Act Locally, Think Globally.” Students will integrate the relationships between ideas from many disciplines into persuasive essays and laboratory reports. Topics to be covered include: humans impact on and the interdependence of earths systems (including energy, matter, soil, air, water, and organisms), the health of living systems (from a range of levels such as chemical, organism, population, and ecosystem), population dynamics and human population growth, renewable and nonrenewable resources, pollution, global changes, and the role of society, culture, politics, and economics in affecting environmental and human health. Meets 6 hours per week. HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

29


AP Environmental Science, 1 credit. Prerequisite: Physics, Chemistry and Biology (or Marine Biology). This full year laboratory-based course is equivalent to an introductory college course, and students are expected to engage in a mature level of discussion and analysis. Topics to be covered include: interdependence of earth’s systems including energy, matter, soils, air, water, and organisms; health of living organisms from molecular, genetic, cellular, organism, population, and ecosystem levels; population dynamics (human fertility issues will be covered), renewable and non-renewable resources, pollution, global changes (acid rain, greenhouse effect, ozone layer depletion), and the role of society and culture in affecting environmental and human health. Students will be involved in laboratory and field investigation, write essays and laboratory reports, and draw relationships between topics from many disciplines. Meets 6 hours per week. AP Physics C: Mechanics, 1 credit. Seniors. Prerequisite: Physics, Chemistry and Biology (or Marine Biology). Co-requisite: AP Calculus AB or AP Calculus BC. This option is intended to encourage seniors to continue their AP science studies by allowing for more flexibility in the class schedule. The course provides a rigorous treatment of the principles of classical mechanics, including kinematics, dynamics, conservation of energy, momentum and angular momentum, torque and rotational dynamics, oscillations, and universal gravitation. Students take only the first section of the AP Physics C exam. Meets 4 hours per week. AP Physics C: Mechanics and Electricity & Magnetism, 1 credit. Prerequisite: Physics, Chemistry and Biology (or Marine Biology). Co-requisite: Calculus BC. The laboratory-based course serves as the foundation for students majoring in the physical sciences or engineering in college. Course covers kinematics, dynamics, rotation, Maxwell’s Equations in integral form, and L-R and R-C circuits. Students take both sections of the AP Physics C exam. Meets 6 hours per week.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION The program of Physical Education contributes to the basic purposes of education by promoting an understanding of the development of the body as an integral aspect of the total individual. As a part of the overall school program, Physical Education provides the necessary health and movement experiences to enable each student to reach his or her fullest potential as an individual in a physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual environment. Physical Education fosters an appreciation for a strong, healthy body and helps individuals realize the importance of maintaining an optimum level of fitness throughout life. The Physical Education program also helps students develop self-confidence, self-improvement, individual initiative as well as responsibility to self and society, while they learn how to interact and identify with their peers. 30

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


Fitness for Life, ½ credit. Freshmen, Sophomores. Required semester personal fitness course; fulfills ½ of PE/Discovery requirement for graduation. Includes training in cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, muscular strength, muscular endurance, body composition, stress reduction, nutrition, Georgia’s Alcohol Drug Awareness Program, and adult CPR certification. Consists of classroom lectures, weight room project, discussions, lab work, and a final written exam. Discovery, ½ credit. Freshmen. Required adventure-based experiential education program; fulfills one-half of PE/Discovery requirement for graduation. Led by student instructors and professionals through a progression of challenging activities such as rock climbing, rappelling, backpacking, and spelunking. Objectives: self-awareness, responsibility, compassion, and environmental awareness.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS (FOR ACADEMIC CREDIT) Westminster’s special programs are designed to provide students with a range of activities not found in the traditional school year curriculum. These offerings are an important component of the Westminster experience, but they require the student to plan carefully and make some important choices. Consequently, we encourage students and their parents to meet with their Grade Chair and/or the Director of Studies to clarify the ramifications of participating in these activities.

REGULAR ACADEMIC YEAR Peer Leadership, 1 credit. Seniors. Yearlong elective. Must be taken as a sixth course. Peer Leadership is an opportunity for 30 seniors to receive training in group dynamics, leadership, and problem-solving skills. It also provides the seniors with firsthand opportunities to utilize these skills while leading a small group of freshmen in weekly discussion. A complement to the traditional academic courses, Peer Leadership concentrates on students’ personal development. Students interested in this course need to apply during the spring of their junior year. Independent Study, ½ credit. Seniors. First-semester elective. An opportunity for students to work in depth on a project or topic of serious interest to them not offered in the regular curriculum. A student submits a written proposal approved by a faculty advisor, chosen by the student, in the spring of the junior year to the faculty Independent Study Committee. Approval by the Committee requires the student to pursue summer work in preparation for the fall program of study. AP English Language and Composition: School for the Common Good, 2 credits: 1 AP English; 1 regular American History. This two-period block course is an interdisciplinary and experiential course in American history and literature that focuses on citizenship and the democratic ideal of civil society. The course defines and practices HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

31


civil society as the place where we come to acknowledge, to learn, and to live out the assertion of Martin Luther King, Jr.: “We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny.” One afternoon each week, students meet to talk, to learn, and to serve. Our work takes us out into city to meet new people, to see ourselves and the city of Atlanta anew, and to practice the ideas we encounter in the classroom. Through our experiences with one another and with strangers, and through our reflection on those experiences, we mean to foster, develop, and nurture in one another those habits and practices necessary for citizenship, practices that, in Democracy in America, Alexis de Toqueville calls “habits of the heart.” Juniors entering the course must read over the summer a required text to be determined by the History department. Not offered in 2011-12. School Year Abroad (SYA), Juniors. Westminster is an associate member of School Year Abroad, which offers students the opportunity to spend their junior year abroad. The program offers students the opportunity to live for an academic year with a European or Chinese host family, while pursuing a course of studies that guarantees Westminster graduation credit and preparation for top American universities. Programs are offered in Rennes, France; Zaragoza, Spain; Viterbo, Italy; Beijing, China; Ichinomiya, Japan; and Hanoi, Vietnam. English and math classes are taken in English with American teachers. Students major in language and culture with courses in grammar, literature, history, art history, and civilization courses taught in the language of the host country by native teachers. Extracurricular activities and organized travel round out the year, while language proficiency is increased by life with the local host family. There is a separate cost for this program. Students apply in January of their sophomore year and attend during their junior year. Chewonki Semester School–Wiscasset, Maine, Juniors. Westminster is a member school in this semester-long college preparatory program for motivated high school juniors. The location is a 400-acre peninsula surrounded by a tidal estuary with a pine forest and farm pastureland. The academic program is designed to support the junior year high school curriculum at the home school, while at the same time emphasizing connection and interdependence. In addition to attending classes, students live in cabins, share responsibility for work on the farm and cooking in the kitchen, and eat meals family style in dining hall. There is a separate cost for this program. Students apply in February of their sophomore year and attend either fall or spring semester of their junior year.

SUMMER SCHOOL These programs may or may not be offered every year and/or may be modified depending on student demand and/or the availability of qualified instructors. Students should communicate with their Grade Chairs, the Director of Studies, or the Director of the Summer School.

32

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


Marine Biology Institute, 1 credit. Marine Science is a summer program that incorporates a classroom and a field experience that will allow the student to earn one full year academic credit in biology. This program will demonstrate the interaction between land and sea including geology with a strong emphasis on marine ecology. During the five-week summer program the Institute will begin on the Westminster campus, where students will have marine science lectures, laboratory work and research projects. After completion of classroom work, approximately two weeks will be devoted to hands-on field studies. The program includes four days of study at the Olympic Park Institute (OPI) in Seattle Washington and 10 days in Hawaii. Activities will include tide pool and coral reef activities that will consist of multiple snorkeling excursions. Cultural programs and service programs will also be part of the field experience. Participants will be accompanied by faculty chaperones and the Institute director. Junior or senior standing and permission of the director are required for enrollment. Geological Science Institute, ½ credit. Freshmen. Students enrolled in Geological Science will have an opportunity to become involved in geological studies in Georgia and several Western states. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be awarded credit in physical science. The Institute will begin with 4 days of intense classroom work and conclude on the Westminster campus with a final exam. During the 4-week summer institute, approximately 3½ weeks will be devoted to field studies. The program includes a week-long tour of Georgia and 14-18 days in Wyoming and Utah. Accompanying the students will be faculty chaperones and the institute directors. High school standing and permission of the Institute directors is required for enrollment. Introduction to Organic Chemistry, 1/2 credit. Juniors, Seniors. Summer elective. Prerequisite: Successful completion of a high school chemistry course. This course will benefit students considering a college major in any science- or medicalrelated field. Topics to be covered will include nomenclature of organic compounds, isomerism, reaction mechanisms, reactions of organic compounds, organic synthesis, and structure determination. Running Through History: A Study of England and Europe, ½ credit. Seniors. A summer program, this course examines specific historical topics from the Roman Age through the 20th century. Research and lectures, in conjunction with on-site visitations, will engage and instruct the students with the aim of increasing both their knowledge and appreciation of the past through experiential, interdisciplinary learning. Requirements include a research paper, an on-site oral presentation, a final exam, a reflections paper, and a journal. Further educating the whole person, the course will require students to participate in daily runs which afford a unique view of rural and urban settings. Some work required during the preceding school year. Counts as a 1 semester History elective. Westminster in South America, ½ credit. This is a conversation and culture course, which helps students further develop proficiency in speaking and writing in Spanish and a greater understanding of Latin American culture. The course engages HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

33


students in constant practice as they explore themes related to Chile and Argentina through class readings, discussions, presentations, debates, journaling, and projects centered on cultural topics. Students will meet during the first week of June for 12 hours of class instruction at Westminster in preparation for travel. While in South America, students will live with families and attend Spanish classes. (Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish III.) This course will be offered contingent on student enrollment, and does not meet the graduation requirements in Language. Westminster in France Exchange, ½ credit. Rising Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors may participate. Our exchange school is the Gymnase Jean Sturm, a private protestant school (k-12) in Strasbourg (Alsace). Strasbourg was an active intellectual and cultural center in the Renaissance, and is today home to the Council of Europe. Its university is well-known for the sciences, as well as theology. Students spend two and a half weeks in Strasbourg (homestay with families of the school), then four days in Paris. Jean Sturm is one of the top schools in France, and has a mission very similar to Westminster’s. Sites of interest in and around Strasbourg will be studied and visited. Students meet at school every morning, and in addition to attending classes with their host students, they will have their own special classes to prepare vocabulary, history and culture which will be coordinated with excursions. There is a separate cost for this program. Students apply beginning of second semester, and travel to France in June. This credit is purely elective and does not fulfill any portion of the three year language requirement for graduation

34

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

35


36

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


High School Co-Curricular Offerings 2011-12 FOREWORD Beyond the courses that they take, Westminster students are engaged participants with one another, shaping the School, their communities, and the world. Through a wide variety of co-curricular offerings, Westminster students begin to connect the knowledge of the classroom with the world and the people of the world. They learn about human interdependence: a sense of connection and responsibility to one another. For many students, it is the place of their most enduring and transformative experiences in which knowledge ceases to be something of the mind only and becomes something of the heart. Learning about one’s self, about how to work with others who are both like one’s self and different than one’s self, and about one’s own capacity for action, empathy, and humility through the co-curriculum go hand in hand with traditional classroom learning at Westminster. We hope that through thoughtful planning and choice of both curriculum and co-curriculum that students will acquire the knowledge and develop the habits of heart and mind that will make them active and engaged citizens of their communities. We hope that they will discern the work toward which they are called.

CLUBS Curiosity and initiative are important postures toward the world that Westminster students seek to develop in themselves. As is important as what one learns is learning how to learn, how to seek out and pursue one’s passion. Clubs at Westminster provide students an opportunity to seek out a particular area of passion or interest, to nurture that passion in themselves and others, and to develop the skills and habits needed to be lifelong learners. Art Club, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Art Club is an informal gathering of students who are interested in art, but who may not have time for a course in their schedule. It is organized by students and typically meets several times a semester for a session on drawing, painting, and simple sculpture. (Jen Marie Wentzel) Bridge Club, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Bridge Club offers students a chance to learn the game of Bridge, as well as develop their skills and strategies as players. Students meet during regular club periods, with additional activities as planned by the clubs officers. (Pete Davenport)

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

37


Campus Conservation Corps (CCC), Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Campus Conservation Corps is concerned with all things dealing with resource and environmental conservation. Activities range from water, paper, and electricity conservation to school leadership, organic gardening on campus, recycling, sustainable dining, and carpooling. (Jen Harper, Frank Finsthwait, Heather Bergstedt) Chess Club, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Chess Club is for students of all skill levels interested in the game of chess. It offers opportunities for group play and individual matches. Chess sets and chess books may be borrowed from the faculty advisor. (Tony Souza) Community Service Club, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Community Service Club helps carry out the major school service projects. It provides students an opportunity for involvement beyond a single service experience, and helps moves students toward larger projects that require increased initiative, responsibility, and time. Members make a commitment to participate in at least three projects during the year. (Stan Moor) Culinary Society, Juniors, Seniors. The Culinary Society is open to Juniors and Seniors with an interest in learning how to cook. The club sponsors monthly farmto-table dinners drawn from different cultures, with an emphasis on understanding the importance of food to culture and identity. In addition the club emphasizes local, organically grown fruits and vegetables and humanely raised meat. The club grows at least one ingredient for each dinner in Westminster’s organic garden. (Penney Sconzo) Dirt Catz, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Dirt Catz is an association of students, staff, and faculty dedicated to achieving a sustainable environment through fostering earth-friendly projects. From planting organic seeds in the greenhouse to adjacent gardens on campus, Dirt Catz members will maintain and eventually harvest the crops produced and then share these organic foods with the community. In addition, compost from cafeteria scraps will serve as earth-friendly fertilizer, thus feeding back into the circular sustainable system. One of the club’s focuses each year includes participation in the alterative gift fair to sell garden products such as sweet potato pies, and hollowed gourds for winter birds. Both academic classes and extracurricular involvement are instrumental in serving as a model for sustainable living. (Maureen Miller, Emily Horne) Economics Club, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The goal of the Westminster Economics Club is to educate its members by showing what various financial professionals do for a living and their effect on our nation’s economy. The club sponsors monthly speakers involved in different areas of economic activity, which all students and faculty are invited to hear. The speakers share insight into how they gained their expertise, how what they do relates to their specific industry, and how that industry relates to the national economy as a whole. Club members meet 38

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


as a group to identify possible speakers, develop plans for contacting those speakers, and prepare questions for scheduled speakers. (Sally Finch) Equestrian Club, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Using a local barn, two trainers work with the equestrians to compete against other schools in the southeast. Eligible equestrians compete in regional and national shows. The high school members serve as mentors for the Junior High Equestrians. (Judy Gale, Scoot Dimon) Far Out Far East (FOFE), Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Far Out Far East is a club dedicated to exploring that which is traditionally referred to as the “Far East” while providing a relaxed yet educational atmosphere. The club is a faculty-sponsored and student-run organization that hosts meetings and events for High School students. It sponsors games, films, parties, and community service to help promote awareness and participation, to provide opportunities for students with similar interests to broaden their horizons, and to enlarge students’ knowledge of Asian societies and cultures. (Lily Liu, Nurfatimah Merchant) French Club, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The French Club is open to students who want to pursue French-related activities beyond the classroom. In addition to the traditional gastronomic events such as crepes and nutella, the club sponsors service projects with other French clubs in the area, as wells as outings to movies and plays. Officers establish the priorities each year based on student interest. (Anna Boller, Patrick Mourjan) Latino Club, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Latino Club is a place where Spanish students from all grades have the opportunity to experience and enjoy the language outside the classroom. The club sponsors several activities throughout the year that support students in their learning of language and culture, such as community service projects, cultural events and festivals, museum visits, attending the Latin-American Film Festival, a variety of food tasting, and social interaction within the Hispanic Westminster community. In addition, the Latino Club publishes Diario Latino, a newsletter written entirely in Spanish by Westminster students. (Maria Russell, Sofia Walcott) Multi-Media & Animation Club, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Multi-Media and Animation Club members explore software used to create multi-media content. The group’s main focus is learning Flash and Action Script 3, used to create animation and games. (Mike Withers) Spectrum, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The purpose of Spectrum is to create an environment in which students feel comfortable in both their whole selves and the Westminster community through discussions of issues that connect to our identities, such as gender, race, religion, ethnicity, and sexuality. (Mary Grace DuPree, Brooks Batcheller, Jennifer Dracos-Tice, Wade Boggs) HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

39


Tea Club, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Tea Club gathers twice per month to try new teas, eat cookies, and enjoy each other’s company. (Liesel Kreuger) WCAT, Freshmen, Sophomores, Junior, Seniors. WCAT is live webcasting, announcing, directing, editing video, working cameras, producing shows, interviewing key people and much more. As Westminster’s primary webcasting source, WCAT offers freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors the opportunity to work in the broadcasting industry. The goal is exposure all elements of broadcasting with the ultimate goal of producing live events such as football games, Halloween Parade, the Messiah, graduation and more. The level of commitment is flexible and can be adjusted according to the student’s extracurricular schedule. (Daniel Searl) Wildcat Table Tennis Association (WCTTA), Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The WCTTA is an informal group that meets to play table tennis. Club play is during late lunch–from 12:50 until 1:35–on one designated day each week. In addition, each year the club sponsors two tournaments, the fall Holiday Classic and the Spring Ping, which run for about six weeks each. These are typically in doubleelimination format, with seeding based on previous play. (Landy Godbold) Wildcats, Seniors. The Wildcats’ primary purpose is to increase school spirit and support for Westminster’s extracurricular activities. The Wildcats work to achieve this goal through costumes, pep rallies, and attendance at school affiliated events. Students apply spring of their Junior year. (Kamille Harless) Writers Club, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Writers Club is an organization devoted to reading, studying, writing, and discussing works of literature–both poetry and prose. Members meet bi-weekly before school to discuss pieces of writing and critique each other’s work. Bagels and coffee are served. (High School Faculty) Young Democrats, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The goal of the Young Democrats is to inform students on current issues, encourage civic engagement, and provide a forum for the discussion of ideas and action. In addition to sponsoring speakers, the group frequently partners with the Young Republicans on voter registration drives, issues forums, and other projects. (Mary Grace DuPree) Young Republicans, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The objective of the Young Republicans is to inform our students about current events and political developments, the Republican or conservative viewpoint on those developments, as well as to provide opportunities for the student body to become politically active in the community. The club is entirely student-run, with presentations, assemblies, field trips, and volunteering all organized by the student leadership. (Joe Tribble)

40

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


HONOR SOCIETIES & PROGRAMS TO SUPPORT, ENCOURAGE, AND CELEBRATE STUDENTS in their endeavors, Westminster annually recognizes students through induction and membership in a variety of honor organizations. These organizations honor students in a variety of disciplines for their hard work, their leadership, and their character. Cum Laude, Seniors. Cum Laude is a national honor society whose motto is “Areté (excellence), Diké (justice), Timé (honor).” Students in the top twenty percent of their class are eligible for membership. Induction takes place during the fall of the academic year. (Rick Byrd) National Honor Society, Seniors. The National Honor Society promotes recognition for students who reflect outstanding accomplishments in the areas of scholarship, character, leadership, and service. To qualify for consideration for membership in NHS, a rising senior must carry a Westminster high school average of at least 88. During the summer before senior year, each academically qualified candidate completes an activities form listing his/her leadership roles, community service, job experience, any awards or honors, and all extracurricular activities both on and off campus. Based on input from the high school faculty, evaluation of the activity form, and endorsement by a Selection Committee appointed by the high school principal, a candidate is chosen to become a member of NHS. Induction into the National Honor Society is scheduled in the fall of each academic year. (Jim Justice) Mu Alpha Theta, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Mu Alpha Theta is a nationally recognized math honor society for high school and junior college math students. Students must be in Algebra II or higher and maintain a B+ average in their math class. Mu Alpha Theta members regularly participate as peer tutors to elementary, middle, and high school students on campus. In addition, the group meets occasionally during club periods to work on non-traditional math problems and discuss interesting math topics. (Ellen Vesey) Sociedad Honoraria Hispánica (SHH), Juniors, Seniors. Sociedad Honoraria Hispánica is an honor society for high school students enrolled in Spanish, and is sponsored by the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese. At present there are over 2,000 national and international chapters. The purpose of the society is to recognize high achievement of high school students in the Spanish and Portuguese languages and to promote a continuing interest in Hispanic and Portuguese studies. Any Westminster junior or senior student who has maintained an honor average in the study of Spanish or Portuguese for a minimum of three semesters is eligible to apply. (Agnes Matheson, Marta Miller)

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

41


Governor’s Honors Program, Sophomores. The Governor’s Honors Program is a six-week summer instructional program designed to provide intellectually gifted and artistically talented high school students with challenging and enriching educational opportunities not usually available during the regular school year. Activities are designed to provide each participant with opportunities to acquire the skills, knowledge and attitudes to become independent, lifelong learners. The Georgia Governor’s Honors Program is fully funded by the Georgia General Assembly and operates at no cost to the participant. (Anna Boller) International Thespian Society, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The International Thespian Society was founded over 75 years ago to recognize excellence in high school theater. The society hosts annual state and national conferences where students present plays and musicals, compete in individual events such as monologue, solo musical, and technical events like costume design. Students also have the opportunity to participate in workshops given by theater professionals. Students receive points for performances and work on tech crew, which enables them to receive special honors during their high school career. (Eric Brannen)

LEADERSHIP THERE ARE MANY OPPORTUNITIES to lead and to serve at Westminster. Some of those opportunities are positional. Some of those opportunities have no titled position within a group, such as working with Campus Corps, but nonetheless demand initiative, persistence, an ability to work with others, and a sense of humor. All of these groups are different in some ways, yet there is a thread that ties them together. All are concerned with nurturing our common life together. All are concerned with calling us to live in relationship with one another, counseling us how to do that more effectively, challenging us to do that more thoughtfully and more intentionally. Candidates for these groups must maintain a satisfactory academic record and conduct record, at the discretion of each group. Candidates with previous honor or discipline incidents should express interest for all positions. Sometimes, that is the very experience in which a student has forged the character and a way of being in the world that will make him or her a strong member of a council or group. Advisors of groups will review those honor or discipline incidents, and decide what that means for a candidate’s eligibility. Westminster asks students to listen for their calling and honor the work toward which they are called. They may seek to serve in two groups, with an understanding that there is no guarantee of selection to either group, and that if selected it will be to one group only, not both. Emerging leaders need time to reflect on the work they are doing, and students are asked to maintain time to reflect so that they might learn from their successes, as well as from those initiatives they undertake that prove less than successful despite their best efforts. For Sophomore and Junior years, students 42

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


may apply to any two of the following, but not more than two: Student Government, Class Officer, Christian Life Committee (CLC), Student Diversity Leadership Council (SDLC). For Senior year, students may apply to any two of the following, but not more than two: Bi-Line editor, Lynx editor, Student Government, Class Officer, Peer Leader, Honor Council, Discipline Council, Service Council, Christian Life Committee (CLC), Student Diversity Leadership Council (SDLC). Campus Corps, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Campus Corps fosters a sense of community by planning and coordinating how the High School uses its common time and common spaces. In particular, the Campus Corps coordinates Assemblies, as well as work to promote stewardship of the Campus Center, Malone Dining Room, our hallways and classrooms, and our campus. All students with initiative and perseverance are welcome to join. There are no titled positions with the group, and the group arrives at decisions through dialogue and consensus. (Frances Fondren) Christian Life Committee, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Christian Life Committee is dedicated to the encouragement of Christianity outside the classroom. It seeks to combine spiritual development with leadership enhancement in order that a wide variety of Christian activities and interests are implemented and encouraged and a consideration of how to live out one’s faith is nurtured. A major focus each year is the planning and implementing of a variety of Christian related activities, such as Friday Morning Fellowship, Bible Studies, monthly Fellowship of Christian Athletes, quarterly Retreats, service projects, Mission trips, and general dialogue. The Committee is open to all interested high school students, and students apply during the spring of the year before serving. (Woodrow Barnes, Jan Allen, Sue Davenport) Class Officers, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Class Officers provide leadership, nurture spirit, and foster unity for each of their respective genders and grades through a variety of special projects. Students are elected by gender and grade, in the spring of the year before serving. (Grade Chairs) Discipline Council, Seniors. The Discipline Council is charged with enforcing school rules governing student conduct. Under the supervision of the faculty advisors, council members convene to provide a fair and consistent way to identify and address infractions of the conduct policies at Westminster. Council members thus play a key role in shaping school culture. Students apply in the spring of their junior year. (Tiffany Boozer, Robin-Lynn Clemmons, Ryan Sample) Discovery Leader, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Discovery Leaders are the primary facilitators of the 9th grade Discovery experience and work closely with Discovery faculty to plan and implement a complete Discovery experience, including the Expedition. Once they have completed their 9th grade Discovery requirement, students apply to be Discovery Leaders through written application and an interview process with Discovery staff and current Discovery Leaders. Accepted students must HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

43


complete New Staff Training. Once students have completed New Staff Training, they are then expected to sign up to lead at least one Discovery expedition per year. Students apply at various times during the year, depending on offerings of New Staff Training sessions. (Meghan Brown, Emily Horne, David McMahan) GERLS, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. GERLS stands for Girls Empowered in Relationships, Leadership, and Service. Its goal is to address the social and emotional world of adolescents through a focus on relationships, values, and culture. In becoming student leaders, GERLS students are challenged to reflect on their roles within the school community and learn effective measures to create positive change. The group works with the high school counselors and their faculty advisors to impact their community by developing and leading health and wellness assemblies and mentoring younger students. Some of the topics addressed include: relational aggression, friendship, cultural pressures and influence, media literacy, body image, competition, and social standards. Female students may apply to the GERLS group the fall of their Sophomore year by submitting an application to the high school counselors. Work begins sophomore year, continues Junior year, and at the discretion of each cohort may continue Senior year. (Alicia Davis, Rose Harper, Agnes Matheson, Maria Russell, Emily Horne, Kristin Hunter) GUISE, Juniors. GUISE, a group of eight junior boys and two male teachers, explores the performance and definition of masculinity in three areas: the formation of personal identity, the initiation and maintenance of interpersonal relationships, and the participation in teams, cohorts, institutions and society at large. The group meets once a week to discuss current events through one of these lenses and also, on occasion, meets with groups of younger male students to help them better negotiate the process and experience of being boys and men. The name is not an acronym, but rather a condition of unexamined masculinity which the group attempts to interrogate, understand, and dismantle. Students apply in their Junior year. (David McMahan) Honor Council, Seniors. The honor system at Westminster ensures a fair and consistent approach to identify and address infractions of the Honor Code. As such, the Honor Council has two precise functions: 1) to protect the Westminster community against honor violations, and 2) to provide the intervention and remediation that will nurture those who have violated the Honor Code. The Honor Council thus exists to strengthen both the community and the individual transgressor. Students apply spring of their Junior year. (Kay Solomon, Kristin Hunter) Peer Leadership, Seniors. As a class, Peer Leadership is an opportunity for 15 senior boys and 15 senior girls to receive training in group dynamics, leadership, group facilitation, effective communication, and problem-solving skills. The class focuses on self-awareness, communal identity, personal honesty, and service through an exploration of topics including family dynamics, spirituality and religion, race and ethnicity, relationships, gender, healthy choices, and risky behaviors. It also 44

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


provides the seniors with firsthand opportunities to utilize these skills while leading a small group of freshmen in weekly discussion. Working in pairs, seniors lead weekly discussion groups of 13-15 freshmen, providing a venue in which freshmen can identify and discuss personal concerns, get to know classmates, and feel that they belong to a supportive peer group. Every freshman is required to participate. A complement to traditional academic coursework, Peer Leadership concentrates on students’ personal development as members of the Westminster community and the world. Students apply spring of their Junior year. (Dave McMahan, Judy Osborne, Alicia Davis) Service Council, Seniors. The Service Council is comprised of students who help plan, organize, and recruit for all of the service programs and projects in which we participate. They are selected for their commitment to serve and leadership abilities. Students apply spring of their junior year. (Stan Moor) Service-Learning Leadership Council (SLLC), Juniors, Seniors. The Service Learning Leadership Council works directly with Westminster’s Service Learning Coordinator in promoting all aspects of youth philanthropy and service learning initiatives at Westminster. Students assist the Glenn Institute in developing curriculum and programs that encourage civic engagement and increase opportunities for students to connect their academic interests and talents to service. SLLC serves as a youth grant advisory board and assists the Glenn Institute in the decision-making process regarding funding of faculty and student grant proposals, and serves as the actual decision-makers regarding the funding of the eighth grade LEAP homeroom service initiatives. (Leitzel Schoen) Student Diversity Leadership Council (SDLC), Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Student Diversity Leadership Council serves as a campus resource and support network for the school community. Council members are primarily facilitators of constructive dialogue around issues of diversity, social justice, and privilege. The group organizes and hosts a variety of on-campus community centered activities to help foster conversations around issues of race, religion, ethnicity, socio-economic class, disability status, gender, and sexual identity. SDLC works collaboratively with other student clubs and initiatives along with faculty and administrators to help energize and sustain a more diverse community. Students apply spring of the year before serving. (Judy Osborne, Jen Dracos-Tice) Student Government, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The purpose of the student government is to represent the student body in communications between the administration, faculty, and students; to promote interest in school-wide activities; to interpret school policy to the student body and to encourage support of this policy; to recommend possible changes in policy to the administration; and, to assist the administration in developing a plausible program to implement these changes. (Ralph Geeza) HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

45


Student Library Advisement Committee, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Student Library Advisement Committee is open to students wishing to play an active role in the continuation of the library as an integral part of the academic community. Students are encouraged to share their ideas about how the library can better serve students, including student selection of resources and events planning. (Liesel Krueger) Summer Camp Leadership in Training (LIT), Freshmen. The two-week Leader in Training Program, which runs in conjunction with the third session of Summer Day Camp, prepares 14- and 15-year-olds to be successful counselors in Westminster’s Summer Programs. Through a series of team building initiatives training, and hands-on practical experiences, participants learn how to lead small and large groups, become better communicators, and discover more about themselves. (Walter DuPriest)

PERFORMING ARTS A commitment to the arts has long been one of the traditions of a Westminster education. Through music, acting, lighting, and stage design and construction, students learn a way of expressing themselves that draws in others, a way that invites a live audience to be part of their creativity. Students learn the perseverance and teamwork that undergirds any live performance. Dance Corps, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Dance Corps is a high school club led by senior and junior dance captains that hosts workshops, dance events, and an annual Dance Show featuring student choreography. The Dance Corps is entirely student run and explores a variety of different styles of dance, including modern, hip hop, jazz, ballet, tap, Irish stepdancing, classical Indian dance, urban step team, ballroom dancing, and many other styles. In addition to sponsoring activities on campus, the Dance Corps strives to reach out to after-school organizations, creating opportunities for children to receive dance instruction and to perform. (Chelsea Kolff) Ensemble, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Westminster Ensemble is a select choral group of 24 singers, whose members are drawn from the Performing Arts music organizations. The Ensemble performs a wide spectrum of musical styles, both sacred and secular, from madrigals and spirituals to popular music. The Ensemble has toured extensively in the United States and abroad. Auditions for Ensemble are held each year. (William Fred Scott) Jazz Band, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Jazz Band allows band students with a particular interest in jazz to deepen their knowledge of this type of music through practice and concert performance. (Scotty Jones)

46

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


Men’s A Capella, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Men’s A Cappella is completely organized and operated by high school students. Competitive auditions are held each spring for the group, which practices one night a week. The group performs one concert during assembly each semester, as well as other concerts and special events. The group has enjoyed sensational reviews from fellow students, faculty members, and parents. Though independent, it works in close coordination with Women’s A Cappella on numerous concerts. (William Fred Scott) Pep Band, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Pep Band is an opportunity for band students to contribute to the spirit of Westminster. The Pep Band plays at athletic events and pep rallies. (Tim Howard) Pit Orchestra, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Pit Orchestra is an integral part of the musicals staged by the Westminster Players. Students practice and perform from the pit, supporting their peers on stage. (Linda Cherniavsky, et. al.) Summer Musical Theater Intensive, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Summer Musical Theatre Intensive is offered during the month of June. It consists of two classes based on age groups: 10-12 and 13-18. Classes are taught in voice, acting, and dance. There are two consecutive two week sessions for the younger group and one three week session for the older students. Summer Musical Theater Intensive brings in outstanding instructors who are experts in their field. Each session concludes with a Broadway Musical Review featuring some of Broadway’s biggest hits. (Eric Brannen) Tech Crew, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Westminster Tech Crew offers students an opportunity to get involved behind-the-scenes on all Westminster Players’ productions. The crew strives to make each production in Kellett Theater and McCain Chapel run as smoothly and seamlessly as possible. The students handle the coordination and operation of lighting and sound systems; the manipulation and management of scenery; and the backstage organization of properties and wardrobe. Crew is open to all High School students, and requires a 1-2 week intensive commitment on any production. (Hudson Adams) Westminster Players, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Westminster Players are Westminster’s theater performance group. Each year, the Westminster Players perform one musical, two full length dramas, and a one act play. In addition, the group participates in the International Thespian Society, the national honor society for secondary and junior high theater, as well as various competitions. Over the years, Westminster students have performed eleven plays at the International Thespian Festival and attend the State Thespian Festival each year, where they also present plays and participate in individual events. Plays are open to all High School students through auditions. (Eric Brannen)

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

47


Women’s A Capella, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Women’s A Cappella, like Men’s A Cappella, is completely organized and operated by high school students. The group holds auditions each spring for the group, with practices occurring weekly. The group performs one concert during assembly each semester, as well as other concerts and special events—often working closely with Men’s A Cappella. (William Fred Scott)

PUBLICATIONS expressing one’s Self And Creating Community through writing, photography, and visual art is at the heart of Westminster’s student publications. Through these publications, students hone a variety of skills, from writing and reporting to layout to the business aspects of production. Students learn to connect with an audience of their peers, teachers, parents, and alumni through a broad spectrum of media, ranging from the school newspaper to a variety of arts publications. Bi-Line, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Bi-Line, the High School newspaper, presents the news of the whole community with as wide a perspective as possible through the publication of seven issues each year. The Bi-Line is written, edited, and produced by students and for students. Students serve as writers, regular columnists, cartoonists, photographers, section editors, business managers, layout editors, and head editors. Head Editors are significant leadership positions open to seniors, and students apply spring of the junior year. Other positions are open to sophomores and juniors, who should apply spring of the year before serving. Freshmen may apply to be writers fall of their freshmen year. (Ryan Sample, Mary Grace DuPree, Jere Link) Crossroads, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Crossroads is a literary publication that showcases original student work in the foreign languages offered at Westminster. It also highlights original student artwork. Student editors design the layout of the magazine and help to proof and select the works to be included. Additionally, student photographers are responsible for taking pictures of and cataloguing the artwork to be included. High school students in any grade may work as readers, language editors, layout editors, and photographers. (Anna Major) Diario Latino, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Latino Club runs the publication of Diario Latino, a newsletter written entirely in Spanish by Westminster students. (Sofia Walcott, Maria Russell) Embryo, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Embryo is Westminster’s visual, musical, and literary arts publication that emphasizes and showcases the various artistic talents of students from all grades. All High School students are welcome and encouraged to submit their original work to the Embryo throughout the year for review by the staff and possible selection for publication. The Embryo staff is drawn 48

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


from all grade levels. Students apply for positions in spring of the year before working with the publication. (Ben Steele) Evolutions, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. An offshoot of the English Department, Evolutions highlights the process and product of student, faculty, and staff creative writing at Westminster. All contributions are accepted and work-shopped with faculty or student editors. Evolutions is published twice a year. Publication is celebrated with a variety of Open Mic events. Student editors and contributors represent grades 9-12. (Mary Heald, Jen Dracos-Tice) Lynx, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Lynx is Westminster’s yearbook, and serves a critical role in documenting our life as a community each year for current students and faculty, as well as for generations to come. Students involved with the Lynx create the theme and design the layout for each year’s book. Students are assigned jobs as either section photographers or section editors. They work together to complete their sections, following a deadline schedule set by the head editors and advisor. Head Editors are significant leadership positions open to Seniors, who should apply spring of their Junior year. Other positions are open to students by application in the spring for the next year’s book. (Mike Withers, Nurfitimah Merchant, Chris Bishop)

RELIGIOUS & FAITH ORGANIZATIONS At the heart of a Westminster education is a deepening knowledge of one’s spiritual life and the discernment of the work to which one is called. In fellowship with one another, in worship with one another, and in dialogue with one another, Westminster students seek to hear that call. All students are encouraged to reflect thoughtfully about their own faith, as well as learn about the faith of others. Bible Study, Freshmen, Sophomore, Junior, Seniors. High School Bible Studies offer students the opportunity to both participate in and lead small group discussions surrounding their Christian faith. Typically meeting in the morning before school, Bible studies provide a safe place for students to ask questions and share a time of fellowship under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Students should express interest in the early fall. (Woodrow Barnes) Christian Life Committee, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Christian Life Committee is dedicated to the encouragement of Christianity outside the classroom. It seeks to combine spiritual development with leadership enhancement in order that a wide variety of Christian activities and interests are implemented and encouraged and a consideration of how to live out one’s faith is nurtured. A major focus each year is the planning and implementing of a variety of Christian related activities, such as Friday Morning Fellowship, Bible Studies, monthly Fellowship of Christian Athletes, quarterly Retreats, service projects, Mission trips, and general dialogue. The HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

49


Committee is open to all interested High School students, and students apply during the spring of the year before serving. (Woodrow Barnes, Jan Allen, Sue Davenport) Club W, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Club W (“Dub”) is an opportunity for students to gather on Wednesday afternoon for music and Christian worship. This student-led group is open to all High School students who have met the requirements of Extra Help/Backwork. (Woodrow Barnes) Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA), Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA) meets monthly and provides an opportunity for any interested High School student to hear a special speaker and to have fellowship with other students. The meeting is held at a student’s home and all High School students are invited. (George Berry, Woodrow Barnes) Friday Morning Fellowship (FMF), Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Friday Morning Fellowship (FMF) is a time of Christian Fellowship which is led by students for students. FMF meets every Friday morning of school at 7 a.m. for fellowship, singing, and a student message. All High School students are welcome and invited to attend. (Woodrow Barnes) Jewish Scripture Study and Jewish Scripture Study Leaders, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. This group meets once a week before school, and is a fellowship group focused on the reading and study of Jewish texts from the Tanakh and elsewhere. Both High School and Junior High students attend, and High School students are encouraged to lead the study of a particular text they are interested in. (Mary Grace DuPree) Junior High Bible Study Leader, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Junior High Bible studies are led by two or three High School students in partnership with a faculty advisor. Students have the opportunity to lead Bible Studies of different ages and genders. Students should express interest in the early fall the year before serving. (Woodrow Barnes, Tina McCormick) Junior High Fellowship Leader, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Junior High Fellowship Leader positions provide an opportunity for High School students to get to know and support Junior High students through group devotionals, musical fellowship, and creative experiential activities that tie in with the Christian-based message delivered at the Junior High Fellowship gathering. Students apply spring of the year before serving. (Katie Plomgren, Jan Allen, Lydia Hansen, Tina McCormick) Fellowship Retreats, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Christian Life Committee and Friday Morning Fellowship leaders sponsor retreats each fall, winter, and spring. Retreats are open to all High School students. The retreats provide students with an opportunity for fellowship and spiritual growth and development. (Woodrow Barnes) 50

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


Tikkun Olam–Jewish Junior High Fellowship Leader, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. This group meets during club periods, and is an outreach of High School students to Junior High students. The focus is on a fun celebration of Jewishness through music, games, and food. All Jewish High School students are welcome to take a leadership role and to come up with ideas for meetings. (Mary Grace DuPree) Treehouse of Knowledge/Nosh, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Treehouse of Knowledge/Nosh is a student-driven club which meets weekly to discuss theological, spiritual, ethical, school-related, or current event issues of interest. The focus of the group is on asking questions and discussing issues from a theological or ethical perspective. (Ralph Geeza)

SERVICE A desire to serve in the wider community rests within each of us, and Westminster students have a tradition of service to their community and school. Since service is a critical outgrowth of Christian faith as well as other faiths, opportunities for community service are provided to help develop students as whole persons and to nurture their own faith through service to others. The active involvement of each student acknowledges responsibility to the community and builds a strong foundation to encourage lifelong personal commitment to service. Sensitivity to, knowledge of, and responsiveness to their fellow human beings—including people who lead lives very different from their own—point students to realities beyond the corners of the campus. Through civic knowledge and active involvement, students prepare to undertake leadership roles in their future communities. Community Service, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. In coordination with local agencies, Westminster’s Community Service Program works to connect students and families to service opportunities. Its goal is to encourage a commitment to social responsibility as an outgrowth of faith in action, to give students opportunity to become involved in the needs and concerns of others, to help students gain insight into their own value and worth as individuals, and to educate students by acquainting them with the needs of the community and the organizations that attempt to meet those needs. Opportunities are well-publicized in the announcements and online, as well as posted in the Community Service office. (Stan Moor) Community Service Club, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Community Service Club helps carry out the major school service projects. It provides students an opportunity for involvement beyond a single service experience, and helps moves students toward larger projects that require increased initiative, responsibility, and time. Members make a commitment to participate in at least three projects during the year. (Stan Moor)

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

51


East African Childrens Education Foundation–Westminster Chapter (EACEF), Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. EACEF is not-for-profit organization founded by a group of High School students in October 2007. It is entirely staffed by students. EACEF seeks to improve educational environments in East Africa by constructing school buildings and implementing learning programs. Volunteering is open to all grades, and juniors and seniors can apply for leadership positions within the organization. (Leitzel Schoen) Guatemala Service Learning Trip, Sophomores, Juniors. The Guatemala program offers Westminster sophomores and juniors a service learning opportunity that includes finding out about the ties between the United States and Guatemala, working as a team to raise funds to purchase materials, building a new home, and ultimately connecting with the people in Guatemala. The program culminates with a trip to Antigua where the students will see how improper building materials, a lack of appropriate resources, and unsustainable architectures all impact the stories and lives of other human beings. With the direction of From Houses to Homes, an organization based in the U.S., the students will see how flourishing homes and thriving communities begin with improving actual home structure. Using materials purchased from the fund-raising, Westminster students will work with Guatemalan families to build houses, making them strong, safe, culturally appropriate, and affordable to maintain. These homes in turn become the foundation for a community building process. The cost of the program is minimal to the participants thanks to an endowed fund that will cover travel and lodging. The sixteen students commit to raise at least $8,500 and to meet eight times throughout the spring to prepare for the ten day trip in mid-July. Students indicate their interest in the fall. (Daniel Searl) ¡Inspira! at Westminster, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. ¡Inspira! is a summer outreach program serving Latino boys and girls in grades 1 through 8 over six weeks in June and July. Westminster students serve as volunteers to help implement a curriculum that combines athletic participation with an educational intervention that focuses on reducing and preventing the potential hazards of dealing with adolescent issues in unhealthy ways. It further focuses on teamwork, goal setting, positive adult and peer mentoring, and leadership training. The Westminster volunteers essentially serve as mentors for the participants. Volunteers may serve during any portion of the program and do not have to work for the entire six-week period. Students apply during the spring. (Sofia Walcott) Odyssey, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Odyssey is an independent non-profit program, held on Westminster’s campus, which promotes academic achievement and a love for lifelong learning for motivated public school students for whom these opportunities might not otherwise be available. Serving students in grades 3-12 from Atlanta’s Project GRAD schools, Odyssey offers a comprehensive six-week summer program supplemented by Odyssey Quest, a Saturday school-year program, for almost 300 students. It focuses on a core academic curriculum, the arts, and exposure to critical thinking skills, and it encourages students to embark 52

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


upon a quest for knowledge and a journey towards higher education. Odyssey offers opportunities for Westminster High School students to serve as volunteers for Odyssey Elementary or Odyssey Adventure during the summer, or Odyssey Quest during the school year. Volunteer applications are available in January each year for the upcoming summer. (MJ Thorne) Philanthropy 101, Juniors. Philanthropy 101 is a four-week summer program for students who have completed their junior year that brings the principles of philanthropy to life. Students become more keenly aware of society’s growing needs and begin to develop the understanding, desire, ability, and instincts for philanthropic service. Through classroom learning and hands-on experiences, the course helps students answer these questions: “Who am I in relationship to my community? In what ways can I give? How can I make a difference?” Real-world learning is central to this course. Students visit a variety of non-profit agencies and foundations and hear speakers from a number of charitable organizations. As part of the curriculum, students learn how to analyze a nonprofit’s annual financial statement and how a tax-exempt, non-profit organization operates. While they earn no school credit for completing the course, students receive a stipend of which they are required to donate a set amount to a nonprofit organization and present an informed rationale for their choice. They are also required to submit a 500-word essay to the Association of Fundraising Professionals, which awards a prize for the best essay. Students apply during their Junior year. (Stan Moor, Sally Finch) Service Council, Seniors. The Service Council is comprised of students who help plan, organize, and recruit for all the service programs and projects in which Westminster participates. They are selected for their commitment to serve and leadership abilities. Students apply spring of their Junior year. (Stan Moor) Service Learning Leadership Council (SLLC), Juniors, Seniors. The Service Learning Leadership Council works directly with Westminster’s Service Learning Coordinator in promoting all aspects of youth philanthropy and service learning initiatives at Westminster. Students assist the Glenn Institute in developing curriculum and programs that encourage civic engagement and increase opportunities for students to connect their academic interests and talents to service. SLLC serves as a youth grant advisory board and assists the Glenn Institute in the decision-making process regarding funding of faculty and student grant proposals, and serves as the actual decision-makers regarding the funding of the eighth grade LEAP homeroom service initiatives. (Leitzel Schoen)

STUDY ABROAD, EXCHANGE, TRAVEL, & OFF-CAMPUS PROGRAMS Students learn outside of the classroom as much as they learn in the classroom at Westminster. Through a variety of programs, Westminster students have the opportunity to learn and to experience the diversity of people and HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

53


cultures in the United States and around the world—our similarities, our differences, and ultimately our interconnectedness. These programs push students beyond a vague and abstract knowledge of that interconnectedness, such that they begin to feel that interconnectedness through the relationships they develop. In this way, for each student knowledge of the mind is carried to the heart. Belize Mission Trip, Freshmen, Sophomores, and Juniors. The Belize Mission trip offers Westminster students an opportunity to serve and develop relationships with the people in Belize while growing in their own personal spiritual development. The mission trip is coordinated through Christian Service International (CSI), a nonprofit organization that has been promoting mission trips world-wide since 1963. While in Belize, students will build a house for a family or provide other type of construction repairs. They will also lead devotionals, help in the classrooms, and interact with children in a local school. On the first day, the team will attend a local church and then spend the afternoon visiting Xunantunich to see the Mayan Ruins. The team will also have a “fun” day towards the end of their time in Belize. On this day, they will visit Caye Caulker, a nearby island, for beach and snorkel time. Each day will end with devotional and worship time among the team members as they reflect on their experiences while in Belize. (Alicia Davis) CloseUp, Sophomores. Through a partnership with the CloseUp Foundation, Westminster sophomores have the opportunity to spend a week in Washington, D.C. with other students from around the United States studying American government, civic engagement, and current events. The program involves study and site visits to monuments, visits to the offices of members of Congress, and the opportunity to learn civics and civic engagement in our nation’s capital. Students express interest in the fall, and students must have an 80 or above in all classes at the end of the prior spring semester during their freshman year. There is a separate cost for this program. (Christine Wight) Experiment in International Living (EIL), Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors. EIL’s international summer High School programs feature opportunities in Europe, the Americas, Africa, Oceania, and Asia. For three to five weeks, participants focus on themes such as community service, language study, travel, peace studies, ecology, the arts, or outdoor adventure as they enjoy daily life with their host families and participate in activities with their group. Through homestays, adventure travel, experiential learning, and language immersion, students build leadership and communication skills, gain essential international experience, increase their selfconfidence, and enhance their global awareness. Whatever their destination and focus, all Experiment summer abroad programs engage students in a profoundly moving educational journey of cultural exploration and discovery. There is a separate cost for this program. Students apply in January and participate during the summer. (Agnes Matheson)

54

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


Geological Science Institute, Freshmen. ½ credit. Students enrolled in Geological Science will have an opportunity to become involved in geological studies in Georgia and several Western states. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be awarded credit in physical science. The Institute will begin with 4 days of intense classroom work and conclude on the Westminster campus with a final exam. During the 4-week summer institute, approximately 3½ weeks will be devoted to field studies. The program includes a week-long tour of Georgia and 14-18 days in Wyoming and Utah. Accompanying the students will be faculty chaperones and the Institute directors. High school standing and permission of the Institute directors is required for enrollment. There is a separate cost for this program. (Jason Vuckovic) Guatemala Service Learning Program, Sophomores, Juniors. The Guatemala program offers Westminster sophomores and juniors a service learning opportunity that includes finding out about the ties between the United States and Guatemala, working as a team to raise funds to purchase materials, building a new home, and ultimately connecting with the people in Guatemala. The program culminates with a trip to Antigua where the students will see how improper building materials, a lack of appropriate resources, and unsustainable architectures all impact the stories and lives of other human beings. With the direction of From Houses to Homes, an organization based in the U.S., the students will see how flourishing homes and thriving communities begin with improving actual home structure. Using materials purchased from the fundraising, Westminster students will work with Guatemalan families to build houses, making them strong, safe, culturally appropriate, and affordable to maintain. These homes in turn become the foundation for a community building process. The cost of the program is minimal to the participants thanks to an endowed fund that will cover travel and lodging. The sixteen students commit to raise at least $8,500 and to meet eight times throughout the spring to prepare for the ten day trip in mid-July. Students indicate their interest in the fall. (Daniel Searl) Chewonki Semester School–Wiscasset, Maine, Juniors. Westminster is a member school in this semester-long college preparatory program for motivated High School juniors. The location is a 400-acre peninsula surrounded by a tidal estuary with a pine forest and farm pastureland. The academic program is designed to support the junior year High School curriculum at the home school, while at the same time emphasizing connection and interdependence. In addition to attending classes, students live in cabins, share responsibility for work on the farm and cooking in the kitchen, and eat meals family style in dining hall. There is a separate cost for this program. Students apply in February of their sophomore year and attend either fall or spring semester of their junior year. (Jim Justice, Emily Horne) Marine Biology Institute, Juniors. 1 credit. Marine biology is a summer program that incorporates a classroom and a field experience that will allow the student to earn one full year academic credit in biology. This program will demonstrate the interaction between land and sea, including geology, with a strong emphasis on marine ecology. During the five-week summer program, the Institute will begin on HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

55


the Westminster campus, where students will have marine science lectures, laboratory work, and research projects. After completion of classroom work, approximately two weeks will be devoted to hands-on field studies. The program includes four days of study at the Olympic Park Institute (OPI) in Seattle, Washington and 10 days in Hawaii. Activities will include tide pool and coral reef activities that will consist of multiple snorkeling excursions. Cultural programs and service programs will also be part of the field experience. Participants will be accompanied by faculty chaperones and the Institute director. Junior or senior standing and permission of the director are required for enrollment. There is a separate cost for this program. (Jason Vuckovic) Mount Kenya Academy–Westminster Exchange, Juniors. In this exchange program, students from Mount Kenya Academy and Westminster spend two weeks in each other’s home country. The Westminster cohort visits MKA’s boarding school in Nyeri, Kenya in March. Then, in April, the MKA cohort visits Westminster and lives with our cohort and other host families. The program focuses on leading, serving, reflection, and global awareness. Our hope is that the exchange helps students understand that “we are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny.” (Martin Luther King, Jr.) In late fall, the Westminster cohort begins meeting once a week to prepare for the exchange. They learn about Kenya through readings and dialogue. They help to design and execute the itinerary for students and teachers from MKA, which includes service projects. In Kenya, they live on campus and participate in classes, excursions, safaris, and service projects with MKA students. There is a separate cost to the program. Students apply in early fall of their junior year. (Mary Heald) Running Through History: A Study of England and Europe, Seniors, ½ credit. A summer program, this course examines specific historical topics from the Roman Age through the 20th century. Research and lectures, in conjunction with onsite visitations, will engage and instruct the students with the aim at increasing both their knowledge and appreciation of the past through experiential, interdisciplinary learning. Requirements include a research paper, an on-site oral presentation, a final exam, a reflections paper, and a journal. Further educating the whole person, the course will require students to participate in daily runs which afford a unique view of rural and urban settings. Some work required during the preceding school year. Students apply fall of their Junior year, attend lectures, complete reading, and write their research paper during Junior year, and travel to Europe early summer after Junior year. Counts as a 1 semester History elective. There is a separate cost for this program. (Joe Tribble) School Year Abroad (SYA), Juniors. Westminster is an associate member of School Year Abroad, which offers students the opportunity to spend their junior year abroad. The program offers students the opportunity to live for an academic year with a host family while pursuing a course of studies that guarantees Westminster graduation credit and preparation for top American universities. Programs are offered in Rennes, France; Zaragoza, Spain; Viterbo, Italy; Beijing, China; Ichinomiya, Japan; 56

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


and Hanoi, Vietnam. English and math classes are taken in English with American teachers. Students major in language and culture, with courses in grammar, literature, history, art history, and civilization courses taught in the language of the host country by native teachers. Extracurricular activities and organized travel round out the year, while language proficiency is increased by life with the local host family. There is a separate cost for this program. Students apply in January of their sophomore year and attend during their junior year. (Agnes Matheson) Summer Economics Institute (SEI), Juniors. Summer Economics Institute is a unique partnership between Atlanta’s public schools, independent schools, and businesses. SEI offers students a chance to learn about the American free-enterprise system by “doing.” SEI combines one day of classroom instruction with four days of on-site business internship that helps the most talented and motivated rising seniors in Atlanta learn economics through experience. Students apply in January of their junior year and participate in the summer after their junior year. (Scott Snyder) Westminster in France Exchange, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. ½ credit. Rising sophomores, juniors, seniors may participate by application. Our exchange school is the Gymnase Jean Sturm, a private protestant school (k-12) in Strasbourg (Alsace). Strasbourg was an active intellectual and cultural center in the Renaissance, and is today home to the Council of Europe. Its university is well known for the sciences, as well as theology. Students spend two and a half weeks in Strasbourg (homestay with families of the school), then four days in Paris. Jean Sturm is one of the top schools in France, and has a mission very similar to Westminster’s. Sites of interest in and around Strasbourg will be studied and visited. Students meet at school every morning, and in addition to attending classes with their host students, they will have their own special classes to prepare vocabulary, history and culture which will be coordinated with excursions. Students apply at the beginning of second semester, and travel to France in June. There is a separate cost for this program. This credit is purely elective and does not fulfill any portion of the three year language requirement for graduation. (Anna Boller) Westminster in South America, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. ½ credit. This is a conversation and culture course open to students who have completed Spanish III, which helps students further develop proficiency in speaking and writing in Spanish and a greater understanding of Latin American culture through both coursework and travel to South America. The course engages students in constant practice as they explore themes related to Chile and Argentina through class readings, discussions, presentations, debates, journaling and projects centered on cultural topics. Students will meet during the first week of June for 12 hours of class instruction at Westminster in preparation for travel. While in South America, students will live with families and attend Spanish classes. There is a separate cost for this program. This credit is purely elective and does not fulfill any portion of the three year language requirement for graduation. (Sofia Walcott) HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

57


Teams Working with one another, Westminster students compete against other schools through a variety of teams. Through these teams, students learn the power of drawing on their own gifts and talents as well as those of others, how to be part of a group, and how to work together toward a common goal. Academic Quiz Team, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Academic Quiz Team fields both a Varsity and Junior Varsity squad for regional and state wide meets. Participation is open year round to all High School students based on interest and dedication to the sport of academic quiz competition which involves quick responses to a range of multi-disciplinary questions. AQT meets once a week to practice and usually competes in four to five Saturday competitions a semester. Competitions are mainly one day trips, but some do involve overnight stays. (Chris Bishop) Debate Team, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Westminster’s Debate Team is a nationally competitive policy debate team. Students compete in pairs against schools from all over the United States. Freshmen generally attend Georgia tournaments, sophomores usually compete at regional tournaments in places such as Kentucky or North Carolina, and juniors and seniors usually compete nationally at tournaments ranging from Texas to Nevada to Illinois. Regular attendance at practice is expected, though students can take time off occasionally for other activities. Debate students gain in-depth research, critical thinking, and public speaking skills. (Jenny Heidt) Math Team, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. Math Team allows students to work together and to compete in many forms—from quick single-team six-question short answer “GML’s” taken here at Westminster, to Monday afternoon four-team “GAME’s” at a variety of schools around metro Atlanta, to weekend hundred-team invitational meets at colleges and universities around the Southeast. In addition, students have the opportunity to participate in the Modeling Contest, a 36-hour real-life problem-solving adventure. All are designed to provide students with opportunities to learn new things and challenge themselves, all while making and enjoying new friends. (Landy Godbold, Charlotte McGreaham) Model United Nations, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Model United Nations prepares students to participate in local and regional conferences, which are an authentic simulation of the meetings held by the U.N. General Assembly and other multilateral bodies. Participation is open year round to all High School students based on interest and dedication to international relations. MUN meets once a week to practice, and usually competes in one conference per semester. Competitions are generally over three days—Friday, Saturday, and Sunday—and some conferences require overnight stay. (Agnes Matheson) 58

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12


Science Bowl & Science Olympiad, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Westminster Science Olympiad and Science Bowl team is for High School students interested in working with other students on a wide range of science topics. Each participant specializes in several of the 23 events possible, which range from astronomy to microbiology. Some events are written, some are lab based, and some require constructions of devices. Westminster hosts an invitational tournament in November and competes at a regional tournament in February as well as the state tournament in March. In addition, Westminster has often represented Georgia at the National Tournament in recent years. (Penney Sconzo, Ken Gibson) Wired Cats Robotic Team, Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors. The Robotics Club, known as the Wired Cats, provides students with the opportunity to learn valuable teamwork skills through the construction of robots and the participation in several Robotics Competitions, many of which are through FIRST: For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology. Students learn how to use cutting-vedge engineering tools and software currently used in industry. The Wired Cats participate in at least two competitions a year, both in and out of state, experiencing the FIRST spirit of gracious professionalism and the satisfaction of collaborating with engineers, judges, student mentors, coaches, and other high school students around the world. The Build Team designs, constructs and programs the robots, while Team Operations handles outreach, communications, finance, team strategy, marketing, and other business aspects. The team is committed to the principles of conservation, recycling, and sustainability. (Valerie Bennett, Terry Decker)

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR AND CO-CURRICULAR OFFERINGS 2011-12

59


The Westminster Schools

1424 West Paces Ferry Road, NW Atlanta, Georgia 30327 404-355-8673


High School Course Offerings  

High School Course Selection

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you