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History of U.S. 30 U.S. 30 Coalition of Iowa U.S. 30, the Lincoln Highway, was the first transcontinental hard-surfaced road in the United States, extending nearly 3,400 miles from New York to San Francisco. The success of the improved transportation corridor between centers of commerce led to the involvement of the federal government in building roads. Communities along the route grew and prospered as a result of the people and commerce that were carried across this route. Recognizing the importance of transportation in the state’s economy, the Iowa Department of Transportation has identified U.S. Highway 30 as part of the National Highway System and part of Iowa’s Commercial and Industrial Network (CIN). The CIN is comprised of 2,275 miles of existing primary highway identified to enhance opportunities for the development and diversification of the state’s economy.

Promoting a modern four-lane highway through Iowa for

U. S . 3 0 C OA L I T I O N O F I OWA

improved public safety and economic growth

Counties Harrison

Boone

Benton

Crawford

Story

Linn

Carroll

Marshall

Cedar

Greene

Tama

Clinton

U.S. 30 Coalition of Iowa

Cities Missouri Valley

Scranton

Toledo

Logan

Jefferson

Cedar Rapids

Woodbine

Grand Junction

Mount Vernon

Dunlap

Beaver

Lisbon

Dow City

Ogden

Mechanicsville

Arion

Boone

Stanwood

Denison

Ames

Clarence

Vail

Nevada

Lowden

Westside

Colo

Wheatland

Arcadia

State Center

Calamus

Carroll

Marshalltown

Grand Mound

Glidden

LeGrand

DeWitt

Ralston

Tama

Clinton

Working together with the Iowa Department of Transportation, the U.S. 30 Coalition of Iowa has formed a partnership to meet the ever-changing transportation needs for today, while planning for the transportation needs of Iowa’s future.

U.S. 30 COALITION OF IOWA Edith Reiss Pfeffer—Chairperson P.O. Box 221 Mechanicsville, Iowa 52306 Phone: (563) 243-7751 www.fourlane30.com

Developed by:


4–Lane

U.S. Highway 30 in Iowa U.S. Highway 30 is the longest road in the State of Iowa, running a distance of 331 miles from the Mississippi to Missouri River. The U.S. corridor spans 12 counties and 39 cities. According to the 2000 U.S. Census, over 513,000 people live in the 12 counties along the U.S. 30 corridor; representing nearly 20% of the population of the State of Iowa. The population of these 12 counties increased over 7% from 1990 to 2000 and this growth trend is continuing. Each of the communities along the corridor have seen positive changes in population and positive things are happening in these communities in terms of economic and community development that will enable these areas to grow and prosper in the future. Traffic volumes on U.S. 30 range from over 32,000 vehicles per day in the City of Cedar Rapids to slightly under 3,000 vehicles per day in Harrison County. Several segments of twolane U.S. 30 carry between 5,000 and 10,000 vehicles per day. The U.S. Highway 30 Coalition is a group of concerned citizens, local and state officials, economic development organizations, freight shippers and transportation stakeholders that are devoted to the future improvement of U.S. Highway 30. Improvements and four-laning U.S. 30 will make for safer and more efficient travel across Iowa; while creating increased economic activity statewide.

Traffic •

Annual Average Daily Traffic on the rural segments of U.S. 30 averages 6,667 vehicles per day according to IDOT.

Annual Average Daily Traffic on the municipal segments of U.S. 30 averages 11,094 vehicles per day.

Average Daily Vehicle Miles Traveled on U.S. 30 in 2004 was 1,817,234, of which nearly 13% was truck traffic.

Growth and development from Chicago westward is impacting the demand on U.S. 30 today and will continue to increase the need for solutions to transportation bottlenecks.

Increased traffic counts on several segments of U.S. 30 are a direct result of increased connections to U.S. 30: IA 330 from Des Moines to Marshalltown, I-380 from Waterloo to Cedar Rapids, U.S. 218 from Mt Pleasant to Cedar Rapids, U..S. 61 south from Dubuque to Muscatine, I-29 from Kansas City to Sioux City, and I-35 from Kansas City to Minneapolis.

Safety •

Segments of U.S. 30 have more the 175 crashes per hundred million vehicle miles traveled, while the statewide average is 122 crashes per hundred million vehicle miles traveled. Safety of travel to and from the communities along U.S. 30 as well as travel across the entire State is a concern for communities along the corridor. Improvements and upgrades to U.S. 30 will relieve traffic congestion and improve safety on Interstate 80.

Economic Factors •

Improve U.S. 30 will allow communities efficient access to other modes of transportation including rail, water and air.

Safe and efficient 4-lane highways are among the top 4 priorities for industry to determine relocation sites and expansion plans.

Balance U.S. 30 is the central corridor through Iowa and parallels the mainline of the Union Pacific Railroad from Chicago to California. Rural and urban interests are served throughout the State by U.S. 30 access. G r e a t e r accessibility to services, shorter distances for shipping and marketing goods, livestock, and agricultural products, are only a few of the benefits that 4-lane enhancements provide to the people and businesses of Iowa.


U.S. 30 Facts and Figures