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Outreach and Education 2 -----------------------------In Memory of Save the Date Word Search 3 -----------------------------High Blood Pressure Education Month 4-5 -----------------------------Hydration in Seniors 6 -----------------------------What's Cookin' Massage Week 7 -----------------------------Resident Special Events 8

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A free publication provided for your enjoyment by your friends at Talmadge Park.

Celebrating Resident Artists

Each week the residents of Talmadge Park look forward to Art with Leonardo, an oil painting class that allows residents to discover their creative side while renewing a sense of accomplishment. This spring we had the honor of displaying the residents artwork at the East Haven Town Hall. A beautiful reception was held to honor the artists in March, in which staff, family and friends attended.

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Spring/Summer 2014

Reflections

Talmadge Park Rehabilitation and Nursing Center 38 Talmadge Avenue - East Haven, CT 06512 - (203) 469-2316 - www.talmadgepark.com


Outreach & Education Each quarter Talmadge Park residents and staff participate in a cause that we feel passionate about and want to support.

Helen Bonaldo, Talmadge Park Resident Council President and resident Carmel Speranza present Yale with a check for Breast Cancer research. Money was raised by Talmadge Park Resident Council in October by selling various baked goods and from having a raffle.

In February we participated in American Heart Month. Residents and staff raised money for the American Heart Association, staff participated in activities such as paying $5.oo to have casual Fridays for the month of February.

In April, Maria Tomasetti of the Alzheimer's Association ran a workshop on Understanding Dementia. Topics discussed were the types of dementia, warning signs, diagnosis process, risk factors, stages and treatment. Staff, social workers and students nurses attended. Page 2


In memory of... Annie was a lady with a great sense of humor, always had a twinkle in her eye and a smile on her face; she lived to be the ripe age of 100. She was lucky enough to marry her true love, and they had three wonderful children. Annie was also a proud grandmother of seven, great grand-mother of thirteen and great-great grandmother of four. She grew up in West Haven, and while raising her children she worked at the Milford Automatic Assembly making butane lighters. Annie was quite well known for her cooking and baking skills, in fact her homemade pizza and delicious pies were the talk of the town. She really loved life and took time to enjoy hobbies; Annie loved to bowl, play setback and go to casinos for fun. When she was asked what her secret to a long healthy life was, she smiled and replied "beats me." Annie will be greatly missed by staff and residents.

Save

the date

May 11th-17th is National Nursing Home Week. Every year we plan lots of extra fun activities for staff and residents including our annual senior prom. T

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Word Search Health Matters Weight Calorie Nutrition Exercise Shape Active Health Food Water Fruit Vegetables Well Nuts Balance Diet Whole Fit Habit Strength Zen Relax Protein Eat Greens Body Page 3


High Blood Pressure Education Month Make control your goal! One in three American adults has high blood pressure, also called hypertension. That's 67 million people who have to work to keep their blood pressure in check each day. Unfortunately, more than half of people with high blood pressure do not have their condition under control. May is High Blood Pressure Education Month, and it's a good time to find out how to "make control your goal." Having the highest score is good in many things, but not with blood pressure—the higher your numbers, the more serious the condition. You may not have any symptoms of high blood pressure, but it can damage your health in many ways. For instance, it can harden the arteries, decreasing the flow of blood and oxygen to the heart and brain. This reduced flow can cause—

w A heart attack, which occurs when the blood sup-

ply to your heart is blocked and heart muscle cells die from a lack of oxygen.

w A stroke, which can occur when arteries that sup-

ply blood and oxygen to the brain become blocked or burst.

w Chest pain, also called angina. w Heart failure, which occurs when the heart can't pump enough blood and oxygen to other organs.

Make control your goal! Of the 67 million American adults who have high blood pressure, 16 million know that they have the condition and are getting treatment, but their blood pressure still remains higher than it should be. For these individuals, awareness and treatment are not enough—that's why CDC is asking patients, families, and health care professionals to "make control the goal." Page 4


What is blood pressure?

Blood pressure is the force of blood on the walls of your blood vessels as blood flows through them. Blood pressure has two numbers, systolic and diastolic, and is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg). Systolic pressure is the force on the blood vessel walls when the heart beats and pumps blood out of the heart. Diastolic pressure is the force that occurs when the heart relaxes in between beats.

If you have high blood pressure, there are steps you can take to get it under control, including—

w Ask your doctor what your blood pressure should be. Set a goal to lower your pressure with

your doctor and then discuss how you can reach your goal. Work with your doctor to make sure you meet that goal.

w Take your blood pressure medication as directed. If you are having trouble, ask your doc-

tor what you can do to make it easier. For example, you may want to discuss your medication schedule with your doctor if you are taking multiple drugs at different times of the day. Or you may want to discuss side effects you are feeling, or the cost of your medicine.

w Quit smoking—and if you don't smoke, don't start. w Reduce sodium. Most Americans consume too much sodium, and it raises their risk for high blood pressure. Learn about tips to reduce your sodium.

Here are other healthy habits, in addition to taking your medication that can help keep your blood pressure under control—

w Achieve and maintain a healthy body weight. w Participate in 30 minutes of moderate physical activity on most days of the week. w Eat a healthy diet that is high in fruits and vegetables and low in sodium, saturated fats,

trans fat, and cholesterol.

w Manage stress. w Limit the amount of alcohol you drink (no more than one drink each day for women and two

for men).

If you have a family member who has high blood pressure, you can help by taking many of the steps listed above with them. Go for walks together or cook meals with lower sodium. Make it a family affair! Information provided by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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HYDRATION

in Seniors

Why is hydration important? • Water is a nutrient and an essential component of the body for maintaining life. Water transports wastes, supports tissue and cell structure, and regulates temperature. • The lack of water in the body may result from either a decrease in fluid intake or an increase in fluid loss. Dehydration can be an important factor in illness and even death. • Older people are especially prone to dehydration because of age-related changes in how water is used in the body. • It is essential that caregivers understand how to identify, and prevent, this potentially life-threatening condition. Certain aging changes increase the older person's risk of developing dehydration. • The function of the kidneys, which helps to regulate fluid, declines with aging. • The ability to recognize thirst decreases with aging -- sometimes older people don't realize they are thirsty. • With aging, the amount of body water decreases. So even a small change in fluid in take can cause dehydration. The following factors can lead to fluid loss and dehydration: • Kidney problems or diabetes • Medications such as diuretics (water pills) increase the amount of fluid excreted from the body. • Conditions such as Parkinson's disease, stroke, or dementia may cause swallowing difficulties that can lead to a decrease in fluid intake. Signs of dehydration include: Dry mouth and nose, loose and/or dry skin, skin "tenting" in the forehead, increased tiredness and/or weakness, restlessness, sudden (acute) confusion, concentrated urine dizziness and orthostatic hypotension (standing causes sudden drop in blood pressure, feeling dizzy, and even fainting), increased heart rate, loss of appetite, constipation, nausea and vomiting. To help avoid dehydration, older adults should be encouraged to: • Identify medications that may cause fluid loss, e.g., diuretics (water pills). • Drink 1.5 – 2 liters (6 – 8 glasses) of fluids per day (unless medical conditions, such as congestive heart failure, rule out this amount). • Keep a variety of beverages available (that are okay with your specific diet, e.g., diabetes), as well as foods containing water (e.g., fresh fruits and vegetables, yogurt). • Drink frequently during the daytime, rather than drinking large amounts at one time. Seek medical attention: if symptoms of dehydration persist, or if you observe swallowing difficulties such as choking or coughing excessively after eating or drinking. Page 6


What's Cookin’ Healthy & delicious recipes

Zucchini Boats Ingredients:

2 zucchini, halved lengthwise 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 onion, chopped 2 cloves garlic, grated 1 eggplant, cubed 2 tomatoes, chopped 1/4 cup chopped parsley Salt and pepper 1/3 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

Directions:

-Scoop balls of flesh from the center of the zucchini to create boats, reserve the flesh balls. Preheat a grill to medium-high. -Heat 1 tbsp. olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat; add the onion and cook for 5 minutes. Stir in the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the remaining 2 tbsp. olive oil, the eggplant and zucchini balls; cover and cook for 8 minutes. Add the tomatoes and cook, stirring, until the mixture is thick, about 5 minutes. Stir in the parsley; season with salt and pepper. -Fill the zucchini shells with the ratatouille, sprinkle with the cheese and grill, covered, over medium-high until the cheese is melted and the shells are slightly softened.

July 14th – 20th

Every Body Deserves a Massage Week Why get a massage? It helps.... • Manage depression and anxiety • Raise alertness • Ease pain • Reduce inflammation • Improve sleep • Help manage headaches • Boost immunity

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Resident Special Events

Friends and Family welcome May 6th at 2:00 p.m. - Monthly Birthday Party with Tony Nuzzo May 11th at 2:00 p.m. - Mother’s Day Social with Paul Christopher May 12th at 2:00 p.m. - Mayor Joe Maturo Presents Proclamation for Nursing Home Week May 13th at 6:30 p.m. - Senior Prom - Entertainment by John Paolillo May 14th at 2:00 p.m. - Make your own Ice Cream Social May 15th at 12:00 p.m. - Resident Cookout May 15th at 2:00 p.m. - Entertainment by Bob Rissolo May 16th at 10:30 a.m. - Resident’s vs Staff Volleyball Game May 22nd at 11:30 a.m. - WTNH Traffic Reporter Teresa Dufour Visits May 27th at 9:45 a.m. - Melillo Middle School Chorus Performs Art Therapy with Leonardo - Every Monday and Wednesday at 3:00 p.m.

Talmadge Park

Rehabilitation and Nursing Center

Visit our website at: www.talmadgepark.com

Reflections is designed and published by Talmadge Park. The content in this newsletter is for informational purposes only and is not to be construed as medical advice. © Talmadge Park, Inc All rights reserved


Spring/Summer Talmadge Park Newsletter