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The

Autumn 2013

Park Gazette

by Astoria Park

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

Emily Coppola Scholarship Fund

September World Alzheimer’s Month Healthy Aging Month

On June 19, 2013 Janet Bigger, BSN, RN received the Annual Emily Coppola Scholarship Award at a luncheon given in her honor.

October Breast Cancer Awareness

Emily Coppola, who established the scholarship fund, presented Janet with the award in recognition of demonstration of excellence in her level of practice as well as her motivation to advance in the field of nursing. Janet will be using the scholarship to get a certificate in Preventing Infection in the health care setting.

Alzheimer’s Care 2-3 -----------------------------Healthy Eating for Seniors 4-5 -----------------------------What’s Cookin’ Breast Cancer Awareness 6 -----------------------------Word Search Resident Art Gallery 7 -----------------------------Resident Special Events 8 ------------------------------

Janet is the Assistant Director of Nursing Services and Infection Preventionist at the facility. We congratulate her on her accomplishments.

Welcome Dr. Naik Please welcome Dr Harsha Naik to our Medical team at Astoria Park. Dr. Naik attended Medical School in India and did her residency in NY and her fellowship where she specialized in Geriatric Medicine. Dr. Naik is excited to meet all the residents.

Become a fan on facebook! Receive updates about the facility, upcoming events, special interest article, wellness information, and pictures. 725 Park Avenue, Bridgeport CT 06604 (203) 366-3653 • www.astoriapark.com


Alzheimer’s Care:

Simple tips for daily tasks

Alzheimer’s caregiving takes patience and flexibility. To reduce frustration, consider these tips for daily tasks — from limiting choices and reducing distractions to creating a safe environment. In the early stages of Alzheimer’s, your loved one might still be able to live and function independently. As the disease progresses, however, his or her ability to handle daily tasks will dwindle. Consider practical tips to help your loved one maintain a sense of independence and dignity as he or she becomes more dependent on you or other caregivers.

Reduce frustrations: A person who has Alzheimer’s might become agitated when once-simple tasks become difficult or impossible. To limit challenges and ease frustration: ◆ Schedule wisely. Establish a routine to make each day more predictable and less confusing. Schedule the most difficult tasks, such as bathing or medical appointments, for the time of day when your loved one tends to be most calm and agreeable. ◆ Take your time. Expect things to take longer than they used to. Schedule more time to complete tasks so that you don’t need to hurry your loved one. ◆ Involve your loved one. Allow your loved one to do as much as possible with the least amount of assistance. For example, perhaps your loved one can dress alone if you lay out the clothes in the order they go on. ◆ Limit choices. The fewer the options, the easier it is to decide. For example, provide two outfits to choose between — not a closet full of clothes. Eliminate belts or accessories that are likely to be put on incorrectly. ◆ Provide simple instructions. When you ask your loved one to do something, do it one step at a time. Reduce distractions. Turn off the TV and minimize other distractions at mealtime and during conversations so that your loved one can better focus on the task at hand. Page 2


Be flexible: Your loved one’s ability to function and cope will steadily decline. It might even vary from day to day. Try to stay flexible and adapt your routine as needed. For example, if a favorite food suddenly becomes unappealing to your loved one, adjust the menu. If your loved one starts insisting on wearing the same outfit every day, consider buying a few identical outfits. When your loved one is bathing, switch the worn outfit for a clean one. You might also relax your standards a bit. Bathing, for example, might not be necessary every day — especially if it’s upsetting for your loved one. Try sponge baths between showers or tub baths

Create a safe environment: Alzheimer’s disease impairs judgment and problem-solving skills, increasing your loved one’s risk of injury. To keep your loved one safe: ◆ Prevent falls. Avoid scatter rugs, extension cords and any clutter that could cause your loved one to trip or fall. Install handrails or grab bars in critical areas. ◆ Use locks. Install locks on cabinets that contain anything potentially dangerous, such as medicine, alcohol, guns, toxic cleaning substances, dangerous utensils and tools. ◆ Check water temperature. Lower the thermostat on the hot-water heater to prevent burns. ◆ Take fire safety precautions. Keep matches and lighters out of reach. If your loved one smokes, make sure he or she does so only with supervision. Make sure a fire extinguisher is accessible, and the smoke alarms have fresh batteries.

Focus on individualized care: Each person who has Alzheimer’s will experience its symptoms and progression differently. Consequently, care giving techniques need to vary. Tailor these practical tips to your loved one’s individual needs. Remember, your loved one’s responses and behaviors might be different from what they used to be. Patience and flexibility — along with good self-care and the support of friends and family — can help you deal with the challenges and frustrations ahead. Page 3


Healthy Eating for Seniors A protein rich, vitamin, and mineral rich diet is ideal and helps foster a healthy body. Eating a variety of fresh fruits, vegetables, dairy-products, and lean meats each day is the best nutritional regime. Drinking 6 to 8 cups of fluids like juice, milk, water, or herbal teas are important to maintain a healthy level of hydration. As your loved one grows older, however, he or she has uniquely different needs for adequate nutrition. These needs are often the result of medications or treatments he/she may be taking, symptoms your loved one may experience as a result of certain conditions, or just individual likes or dislikes for food. As we age, our bodies tend to dehydrate more easily. We, also, need water to protect our skin from cracking and our throats from becoming hoarse; and to prevent headaches, fatigue, and muscle weakness. In addition, elderly people may become dehydrated and not even know it. Drinking water helps prevent many conditions and symptoms associated with dehydration. Aside from water, here are some basic nutritional guidelines to consider:

Calories - When one becomes less mobile, less daily calories are needed to maintain a healthy system, therefore it’s important to make smart food choices, that are packed with all the nourishment you need in fewer calories. Smart protein sources are: Eggs (and egg whites) Turkey, chicken, and fish Beans, peas, tofu

Suggestions for smart snacks include: Peanut Butter on sliced apple Cottage Cheese with whole-wheat toast Yogurt with diced fresh fruit

Add some spices, if you like. Cinnamon is always great with fruit. Garlic powder, dill, or chives are tasty mixed into cottage cheese.

Fats - In general, fatty foods, like desserts and fried foods should be considered a special treat and eaten only occasionally. Incorporate some “good” fatty foods that are high in fats but have numerous other benefits including helping to lower cholesterol levels. “Good” fatty foods are: Avocado

Nuts and nut butters Olive oil Coconut Oil

Vitamin B - The intake of vitamin B aids our body in numerous ways including supporting the immune, metabolic and nervous systems. A poor diet or a less than optimal appetite may cause an elder to have a vitamin B deficiency. Be sure to prevent this by regularly eating the following foods. Vitamin B rich foods are: Whole-grain and enriched breads and cereals Milk, yogurt, cheese Dark-green vegetables Page 4

Dried beans and peas

Meats and eggs


Iron - Anemia occurs when one has low iron levels. This may occur due to the use of certain drugs, a poor diet, blood loss, or poor absorption of nutrients. Anemia can make one feel tired and lethargic. Foods rich in iron consumed with vitamin C foods helps with the iron absorption, and can ward off an anemic condition. Iron rich foods include: Liver, red meats Raisins, prunes, dates, dried apricots and figs Iron-fortified cereals Pumpkin seeds Vitamin C is plentiful in: Orange Grapefruits Cabbage Lemon

Strawberries

Cantaloupe

Spinach, kale, collard greens

Broccoli

Tomatoes

Zinc - An important mineral that supports wound healing (bed sores, leg ulcers); bone health, and the immune system, zinc is an essential component of a healthy diet. Some of the best sources of zinc are: Oysters Red meats Poultry

Cheese (ricotta, swiss, gouda)

Shrimp and crab

Calcium & Vitamin D - Eating a calcium rich diet, especially as we enter middle age, can slow down the natural occurrence of the loss of minerals from your bones, and maintain teeth and bone health. Consuming vitamin D along with calcium enables the body to metabolize the mineral easier. Vitamin D is absorbed in the body from the suns’ rays however aged folks may infrequently be out of doors. Without the appropriate amounts of vitamin D our bones can soften and become distorted. Sources for Calcium are: Milk, cheese, yogurt Spinach and broccoli

Sardines and canned salmon

Dried beans and pea Tofu

Vitamin D can be found in: Egg yolks Saltwater fish like stripped bass, swordfish, & canned tuna Liver Vitamin D-fortified dairy products

Fiber - It’s not uncommon to experience constipation as we age especially when we are less active. Fiber-rich foods such as whole grain breads and fruits assist our bodies in the healthy functioning of the bowel system. Raw bran and very high-fiber foods are not “perfect foods”, since they can cause bloating and diarrhea. Be sure to drink plenty of fluids, about 6-8 glasses a day or more, to aid our stomach in the digestive processes. Try these “fiber-ific” foods as snacks, in salads or as dessert: Strawberries Blueberries Raspberries Cherries Lentils Beans Artichoke

Apple

Cooked Peas

Page 5


What's Cookin’ Healthy & delicious recipes

Baked Italian Style Cauliflower Ingredients: 1 tbsp olive oil 1 c chopped onion 6 ozs lean ground sirloin 1/4 tsp kosher salt Cooking spray 1 1/2 lbs cauliflower, cut into florets 1/4 c grated fresh Romano cheese

4 garlic cloves, minced 1/4 tsp black pepper 1/4 tsp crushed red pepper 1 1/2 c low sodium marinara sauce 2 oz pitted kalamata olives, coarsely chopped 1 oz French bread baguette, torn into 1-inch pieces

Preparation: 1. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil to pan; swirl. Add onion; sauté 4 minutes. Add garlic; sauté for 30 seconds, stirring constantly. Stir in beef. Sprinkle with salt and peppers, and sauté 3 minutes or until browned, stirring to crumble. Stir in sauce and olives. 2. Preheat broiler. Steam cauliflower 4 minutes or until crisp-tender. Place cauliflower in an 11 x 7-inch broilersafe baking dish coated with cooking spray; top with sauce mixture. 3. Place bread in a mini chopper; pulse until coarse crumbs form. Combine crumbs and cheese; sprinkle over cauliflower mixture. Broil 4 minutes or until browned.

National

Breast Cancer Awa r e n e s s

Month

The best defense is early DETECTION. American Cancer Society recommends that women age 40 and older should have a screening mammogram and breast exam every year and should continue to do so for as long as they are in good health.

and PREVENTION

Tips to reduce breast cancer risk:

1. Eat lots of fruits, veggies, fiber and reduce intake of processed chemical filled foods 2. Reduce exposure to xenoestrogens from non-organic animal products, beauty products, plastics and pollutants 3. Do not smoke 4. Drink minimal amounts of alcohol 5. Exercise 6. Minimize the amount of stress in your life 7. Maintain a healthy body weight 8. Drink green tea 9. Get enough Vitamin D Page 6


Astoria Park Resident Art Gallery Our therapeutic art program is designed to give residents an opportunity to be involved in a creative and visual activity which renews their sense of accomplishment while building self esteem. Residents also enjoy the natural therapeutic benefits of the creative painting experience. Our art therapy program is taught by Leonardo Franco, an art educator with a master’s in art education, an art therapy background, and experience in the health care setting. Donations towards the art therapy program can be made to the resident council.

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Word Sunflower Candy Ghost Leaves Pumpkin Autumn Corn Crisp Orange Cider Rake Pie Wind October Oak

Search Squash Fall Costume Apple Hay Spider Harvest Witches Black Football Orchard September Stew Brisk Page 7


The

Park Gazette

Autumn 2013

by Astoria Park

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: Alzheimer’s Care - Page 2-3 • Healthy Eating for Seniors - Pages 4-5 • What’s Cookin, Breast Cancer Awareness - Page 6 Word Search, Resident Art Gallery - Page 7

Astoria Park is a 135 bed rehabilitation and skilled nursing center with a secured Dementia unit and separate rehab unit that offers private and semi-private accommodations. We are a family owned business that has been serving the Greater Bridgeport area since 1985.

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For more info call 203-366-3653 and ask for the Admissions Department.

eptember

Resident Special Events

“Back to school month” September 4th at 2:15 p.m. - 100th Birthday Celebration September 10th at 2:30 p.m. - Musical Entertainment by George Gall September 18th at 2:45 p.m. - Resident Council Meeting “The Courage to Speak” DVD September 19th at 11:00 a.m. - Trip to Captain’s Cove September 24th at 2:30 p.m. - Astoria Park Spelling Bee Check the activity calendar for: “BACK to SCHOOL” Themed programs Pet Therapy Visits with Christine and Tanner Art Therapy with Leonardo - Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. The Park Gazette is designed and published by Astoria Park. The content in this newsletter is for informational purposes only and is not to be construed as medical advice © PARCC, Inc., dba Astoria Park. All rights reserved.


September october 2013 newsletter