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JANUARY 2017

SMART, SEXY STYLE @MARIECLAIREMAG

Fresh Start!

HOW TO GET THE HAIR, SKIN, SEX, BODY & JOB YOU’VE ALWAYS WANTED

TUNE IN: OUR FIRST-EVER AWARDS SHOW! P. 94

Gina Rodriguez on finding love and dreaming BIG

PLUS

THE MOST BADASS WOMEN OF 2016

We found the ultimate life detox! P. 108

Your 2017

Beyoncé Simone Biles Michelle Obama Emma Watson Zendaya & more!

Style Guide All the trends you’ll need, wear & LOVE for the year ahead


Live Case by FriendsWithYou Designer phone cases you can make your own


©2016 P&G

Olay Total Effects fights 7 signs of aging. Revives skin with VitaNiacin to look up to 10 years younger in 4 weeks. So your skin won’t show your age.

#AGELESS


JANUARY contents VOLUME 24 ISSUE 1

ON THE COVER 25 YOUR 2017 STYLE GUIDE All the trends you’ll need, wear & LOVE for the year ahead

56 THE MOST BADASS

WOMEN OF 2016 Beyoncé, Simone Biles, Michelle Obama, Emma Watson, Zendaya & more!

69 FRESH START!

How to get the hair, skin, sex, body & job you’ve always wanted

88 GINA RODRIGUEZ

On finding love and dreaming BIG

108 PLUS: WE FOUND THE

ULTIMATE LIFE DETOX!

FIRST 8

WHAT WE LOVE ABOUT JANUARY

16 BEHIND THE

COVER: FASHION

18 BEHIND THE

COVER: BEAUTY

20 WHAT NINA LOVES

PHOTOGRAPH BY JAN WELTERS

MC’s Creative Director finds inspiration at home (in Colombia, to be exact)

88

TOP $395, Joseph; (212) 570-0077.

OUR NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION? LIVE (AND LOVE) LIKE GINA RODRIGUEZ January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 5


Bold, boosted color

that nourishes hair

3 NOURISHING FRUIT OILS. AVOCADO, OLIVE & SHEA Up to 4-levels of lift, even for darker bases NOURISHED HAIR. BOLDER COLOR.

©2016 Garnier LLC.

20 VIBRANT SHADES

garnierusa.com


JANUARY contents

25–45

YOUR A-TO-Z FASHION TREND CHEAT SHEET FOR 2017; MORE

74 WHAT I LOVE

80 STRAIGHT TALK

Hollywood’s lookyounger secret? It's all in the teeth

@WORK 47 IN YOUR DREAMS

Ditching your desk for crazy-amazing jobs

82 NEXT BIG THING

Major breakthroughs in makeup, hair, and skincare

50 FREE ENTERPRISE

Charm your boss in these bohemian pieces

51 LIGHTS, 360°

CAMERA, ACTION! Preview this year’s coolest new gadgets

SILICON VALLEY An exclusive book excerpt gives an insider view of life in the tech capital

88 DREAMS OF GINA

Jane the Virgin star Gina Rodriguez isn’t just inspiring—she’s tough as hell, too

@PLAY RICHARDSON’S 2017 #GOALS; MORE

94 MARIE CLAIRE’S

YOUNG WOMEN’S HONORS MC celebrates eight women daring to change the world

BEAUTY 72 VANITY FILES

Mani rehab; more

73 INSPIRATION BOARD Finding #fitspo with gym-friendly beauty

COURTESY OF THE DESIGNERS

WIN THE COVER LOOK BEAUTY PRODUCTS WORTH $495: To enter and for official rules, go to marieclaire.com/ winthecoverlook and complete the online entry form. See Shopping Directory for details. MAKEUP PRODUCTS: From Clinique, a year’s supply worth $242. HAIR PRODUCTS: From Aveda, a year’s supply worth $253. COVER: Dress, Emilio Pucci.

3

52 ALPHA GIRLS OF

56 THE YEAR’S BEST:

63 ACTRESS HALEY LU

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FASHION & FEATURES

NEWS FEED 100 MOMENTS WOMEN KILLED IT IN 2016

2

ABOUT ME Portland, Maine, locals flaunt their favorite assets

@PEAK 112 HEALTH NEWS Grace Space hypnotherapy app; more

115 THE PROFILE

102 CALL OF THE WILD

POLISHER Stop swiping: Our online-dating pro ups your profile game so you can finally sign off

Animalistic accessories for the new year LOUIS VUITTON

101 IDEAS

108 PARADISE FOUND Break free of the daily grind in these IRL utopias

IN EVERY ISSUE

4

10 MARIECLAIRE.COM 11

EDITOR’S NOTE

ALL THAT GLITTERS

12 WHAT YOU SAID 15 CONTRIBUTORS 116 SHOPPING

DIRECTORY

5

Dress up all your Inkwell-filter basics with graphic prints, zipper details, and lots of gold.

117 HOROSCOPES 118 BACKPAGE

1. RING price upon request, David Yurman; (212) 752-4255. 2. BAG $1,190, Tom Ford; tomford.com. 3. DRESS $3,150, J.W.Anderson; modaoperandi.com for similar styles. 4. EARRINGS $1,950, Mateo New York; mateonewyork.com. 5. SHOES $1,050, Casadei; us.casadei.com for stores.

January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 7


FIRST

WHAT WE LOVE ABOUT JANUARY 1. ALL THAT GLITTERS

Ring in the new year with a little sparkle (sans sequin dress) with Burberry’s limited-edition Festive Collection. Dab the loose gold and holographic-black Shimmer Dust glitter on your face and body for some serious, zero-effort party vibes. (Burberry Shimmer Dust in Gold Glitter, $25; burberry.com)

1

2. CAUGHT ON FILM

The biggest (and coldest) week in entertainment happens January 19 through 29 in Park City, Utah: the Sundance Film Festival. Check out the indie and blockbuster feature films we’ll be talking about all year long.

3. CHANGE MAKER

Read the life story of civil-rights activist Coretta Scott King in My Life, My Love, My Legacy (Henry Holt and Co.), by the late icon herself as told to her friend The Rev. Dr. Barbara Reynolds, hitting stores on January 17.

4. WITH EXTRA BUTTER

Fact: It’s not movie night if you’re not eating fistfuls of popcorn. National Popcorn Day is January 19.

3

Spencer, and Janelle Monáe, is yet another superhero flick. Except this one tells the real-life story of real-life superwomen: the African-American female NASA mathematicians who helped America win the space race.

7. AMERICAN CLASSIC

Put a stamp on your style game: Polo Ralph Lauren is launching a personalized crest program that allows you to add custom crests to iconic pieces like the brand’s navy knit blazer, oxford shirt, and knit hat. (Blazer, $265; ralphlauren.com)

8. CHEERS TO THAT

Toast Gianvito Rossi’s 10th anniversary with the champagne-bottle-inspired Fizzy Mule, in boutiques this month. ($745; gianvitorossi.com for stores)

5. WATCH THE THRONE

The term “queen bee” takes on whole new meaning in Victoria on Masterpiece on PBS, premiering January 15. The seven-part drama stars Jenna Coleman as the 18-year-old girl who became England’s queen with a history-making 63-year reign. All hail your Sunday nights.

6. OUT OF HIDING

Hidden Figures, in theaters January 6, starring Taraji P. Henson, Octavia

8 MA R I E C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

Coretta Scott King in the Boston apartment of futurehusband Martin Luther King Jr., circa 1952

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5

Jenna Coleman rules, literally and figuratively, on PBS’ Victoria

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2

4

6

ABOVE: Watch (from left) Janelle Monáe, Taraji P. Henson, and Octavia Spencer take a giant leap for womankind in Hidden Figures

1, 7 & 8: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. 2. MICHAEL SMITH/GETTY IMAGES. 3. COURTESY OF THE ESTATE OF CORETTA SCOTT KING. 4. JASON DOIY/GETTY IMAGES. 5. COURTESY OF ITV PLC FOR MASTERPIECE. 6. HOPPER STONE

WHAT YOU NEED TO DO, SEE, HEAR, AND TALK ABOUT THIS MONTH


©2016 L’Oréal USA, Inc.


FIRST

MARIECLAIRE.COM Gina RODRIGUEZ GO BEHIND THE SCENES OF OUR COVER SHOOT WITH THE INSPIRING ACTRESS AND HOST OF MARIE CLAIRE’S YOUNG WOMEN’S HONORS. RODRIGUEZ TALKS EMPOWERMENT, RAPPING SKILLS, AND HER HOLLYWOOD SUPERSTITIONS.

M A R I E C L A I R E .C O M /G I N A- R O D R I G U E Z

INSTA-BEAT

1

1. Jenna Blaha Tech & Fashion Editor/ @jennadangerblaha Oh New York, I miss you even before I’m about to leave you, again. 2. Jessica Pels Digital Director/ @jessica_pels Not a painting, but I’d frame it if it were. #puppy #rescue #GeorgePels 3. Nina Garcia Creative Director/ @ninagarcia My Friday NYC camouflage

POWER SNACKING

Fuel reigns king when it comes to getting through a midday slump, but finding healthy office fare can be challenging (we’re looking at you, vending machine). Reach for these good-tasting, good-for-you alternatives instead. marieclaire.com/healthy-snacks-for-work STAY IN TOUCH SHARE YOUR LATEST STREET STYLE, BEAUTY PICKS, AND MORE!

10 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: KI WILLIAMS, COURTESY OF THE PHOTOGRAPHERS (3), STOCKSY. ON RODRIGUEZ: SWEATER, $395, SKIRT, $415, JOSEPH; JOSEPH-FASHION.COM

OUR PHOTO-HAPPY EDITORS HASH(TAG) IT OUT


FROM LEFT: Liz Lutz has a high-flying job as an aerial photographer; physicist and MC’s Young Women’s Honors recipient Sabrina Gonzalez Pasterski; Gina Rodriguez in Emilio Pucci

Tour de FORCE FULENWIDER: SHARON SUH. FOR ALL OTHER IMAGE CREDITS, SEE INSIDE STORIES

EDITOR’S NOTE

i

’ve said it before, but, hands down, my favorite thing about this job is meeting the extraordinary women we cover at Marie Claire. Sure, I can’t complain about the rush of chasing a great story, or the buzz of creative collaboration, or the fun of watching a brand-new collection walk the runway—but if I’m being completely honest, nothing excites me more than meeting women I admire. No matter the story, I am always amazed by how much I learn from their narratives. From our cover star, Gina Rodriguez, I can say I’ve truly learned the power of dreaming big. We started working together almost a year ago on Marie Claire’s Young Women’s Honors, our first-ever televised awards show, airing December 19 on The CW network. From hearing her stories of growing up with parents who pushed her to pursue education to teaming up over the past year on our shared dream of creating an awards show honoring young women, I have been blown away by Gina’s unflagging energy and positive spirit. And we’re thrilled to announce that Michelle Obama’s Let Girls Learn is our exclusive foundation partner for the show, ensuring that young girls around the world have access to education.

OK, NOW TALK TO ME!

This issue is filled with women who have made outsize impacts on their respective fields, altered history, or changed the world. Check out “100 Moments Women Killed It in 2016” (p. 56). Or Eleanor Freeman, whose taste buds are insured for $3.7 million (“In Your Dreams,” p. 47). And I invite you to get inspired by our honorees (p. 94), including Madison Maxey, who founded a company that creates “smart” fabrics that will change what our clothes can do; Sabrina Gonzalez Pasterski, a physics superstar who, at 16, became the youngest person to build a plane herself and then fly it; and 25-year-old Amanda Nguyen, who wrote a bill protecting sexual-assault survivors that sailed through Congress (unanimously!) and was enacted into federal law. When my daughter asked Nguyen what she wanted to be when she “grew up,” she replied that she wanted to be either an astronaut or president of the United States. Talk about inspiration.

Anne Fulenwider EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

annefulenwider@marieclaire.com

Tell me what you love, don’t love so much, or want to see more of in Marie Claire. I want to hear it all! Bear with me if I don’t respond immediately.

January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 11


FIRST

WHAT YOU SAID

IN OUR INBOX

Super Girls

I just finished reading the November issue and thought it was great! I was so impressed with the blend of beauty with brains, and women elevated and extolled for their achievements. All the rhetoric about women’s issues—particularly in this election cycle—suggests that we haven’t come very far, but I beg to differ when a women’s magazine so evidently gets how powerful we really are. —Debbi Frank, Longport, NJ

Green Light

As a professional who works in the climate-change field, I can’t express how happy I was with the article “On Thin Ice” in the September issue. In the fashion industry, which is often perceived as being on the opposite side of sustainability, there are actually a lot of improvements that can be made in terms of energy efficiency and pollution control. Thus, it is really important for someone who has an impact on the industry to stand up and spread the message. Thank you so much for doing that by covering a great story. —Qiuhua (Cho) Lu, alumna, Columbia University Earth and Environmental Engineering department, New York City LET IT OUT!

Reader of the Month!

Janelle Miranda of Anaheim, California, wins this month’s beauty bag for supporting awesome women: “Ahhhhh, Slay! So excited to see happy, talented, and diverse women share the Power Issue in November. I loved reading about why these 50 women were honored, and I appreciated that they were not just a bunch of stereotypical model types.”

Nicki Minaj in MC’s November issue

THE FANS HAVE SPOKEN @iamkeyvajo: My Friday Night Situation…Decompressing after a long work week #nickiminaj #marieclaire @freeblackgirl: Wait. @janetmock wrote Nicki Minaj’s @MarieClaire cover story? It matters when Black women write about Black celebs. @Piinkslam: I’m in love with Nicki. I can’t handle this. #MarieClaire @slimmgoodie310: @nickiminaj killed that interview with #MarieClaire latest issue! The photo work is #awesome @KaharaMMonroe: I’m really impressed with this November #MarieClaire, Nicki on the cover, Liya Kebede in a 6 page Giorgio Armani piece… @susanmcp1: Beautiful, Inspiring & Incredibly Diverse! [“The New Guard”] via @MarieClaire @BarbaraDiGangi: SO many women on here inspire me every day! The New Guard: America’s 50 Most Influential Women via @MarieClaire @tashereeee: @marieclaire Thank you for the November issue, I damn near cried as I watched my 12-year-old daughter excitedly read the New Guard piece.

Tell us what you really think about this issue. Visit marieclaire.com to join the fray, or send your feedback directly to annefulenwider@marieclaire.com. Letters may be edited for space or clarity. If you’re chosen as Reader of the Month, you’ll win a free beauty bag!

12 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

FROM TOP: KAI Z FENG, COURTESY OF THE PHOTOGRAPHER, MELANIE TEPPICH

WHEREVER YOU’RE TALKING ABOUT MC—INSTAGRAM, TWITTER, FACEBOOK, OR E-MAIL—WE’RE LISTENING. HERE’S HOW YOU RESPONDED TO OUR NOVEMBER 2016 ISSUE


FIRST

CONTRIBUTORS WRITER

Laurie SANDELL @LaurieSandell

Take it from the L.A.-based writer who interviewed Gina Rodriguez for “Dreams of Gina” (p. 88): No one represents MC’s “smart, sexy style” motto like the actress does. “Gina watched her parents sacrifice everything to give their three daughters an education. All three have achieved great success, and Gina credits education as the driving force behind it,” she says. LISTENING TO: The podcast My Favorite Murder. WORST PART OF THE JOB: “Deadlines!” SENIOR MARKET EDITOR

PHOTOGRAPHER

Brittany KOZERSKI

Jan WELTERS

@brittanykozerski

The California resident drove from Topanga to L.A. to help readers “get to know the real Gina Rodriguez” for this month’s cover story, “Dreams of Gina” (p. 88). The actress (above) and the photographer got along so well, they were reluctant to wrap at day’s end. “We got really into it. In the end, she wanted me to do one more picture,” he says. MOST PLAYED SONG: “‘Old Man’ by Neil Young. My 6-yearold is always asking me to play it.” FAVORITE ACCESSORY: “My big, black boots.”

Styling two of the inaugural Young Women’s Honors award winners (p. 94) was a welcome change of assignment for the New York City– based fashion editor. “I always love styling shoots where I get to meet women out of the celebrity world who are also impacting us all. I wanted to capture their personalities, strength, and dignity in power,” she says. SECRETLY OBSESSED WITH: Home decor. FAVORITE MEAL: “Cupcakes, anything sweet.” FASHION EDITOR-AT-LARGE

Alison EDMOND @edmondalison

The MC veteran had a productive day in her current home of L.A., styling Young Women’s Honors award winners (p. 94) and cover star Gina Rodriguez (p. 88). “As energized as Gina was, she was so relaxed. I wanted the pictures to feel simple and easy. She can’t help but send out good energy, and I think we captured that on film,” Edmond says. HIDDEN TALENT: “I’ve played piano since age 5.” FIRST CONCERT: The Southern Death Cult, in Yorkshire, England. WRITER

Christian WITKIN

While writing her latest book, Valley of the Gods (excerpted in “Alpha Girls of Silicon Valley,” p. 52), the NYC-based WSJ reporter struggled to keep up: “The tech world changed faster than I could write!” She hopes that West Coast ambition encourages readers: “If you have a new idea, go to Silicon Valley and try it out!” FAVORITE VACATION DESTINATION: Malibu, California. LISTENING TO: Ahmet Kilic.

Witkin, who grew up in Amsterdam and lives in NYC, shot Young Women’s Honors award winners (p. 94) Jessica O. Matthews and Fereshteh Forough—“two confident and striking young women, each with her own beautiful presence”—against a simple background in daylight to “allow their personalities to come out,” he says. STYLE ICON: Steve McQueen. READING: Luc Sante’s Low Life.

@AlexandraWolfe COURTESY OF THE SUBJECTS

PHOTOGRAPHER

Alexandra WOLFE

@witkinphoto

January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 15


FIRST 4

1 2

3

LEFT: Emilio Pucci dress & top

BEHIND THE COVER: FASHION

GINA RODRIGUEZ

THE ACTRESS AND PRODUCER OF MARIE CLAIRE’S YOUNG WOMEN’S HONORS DOESN’T MISS A BEAT AT HER L.A. SHOOT AGE: 32. OCCUPATION: Actress. HOMETOWN: Chicago. CURRENT RESIDENCE: Los Angeles. JUMP START: Rodriguez arrived in a Madewell denim jumpsuit, slip-on sandals, and a low-slung ponytail. SOUND CHOICE: She queued up the playlist she curated for Spotify’s “Latinos Trending” series. When Rachel Platten’s “Fight Song” came on, she pumped her fists in tempo. POWER HOUR: Rodriguez bounced between her own cover shoot and an adjoining studio to say hello to a few Young Women’s Honors winners also being photographed that day. She high-fived Amanda Nguyen of Rise, who wrote a bill supporting sexual-assault survivors—which President Barack Obama later signed into law. OWN IT: For her final shot, the actress slipped into a pair of oversize pin-striped pants. “I always want to wear these,” Rodriguez said, laughing. “I never want to take them off.” FOLLOW: @hereisgina. —Sara Holzman

BLING RING

5

9

8

10

BALENCIAGA

SOLE SEARCHING

How about a strappy suede heel for New Year’s Eve?

7

1. EARRING $1,570, Ileana Makri; net-a-porter.com. 2. BAG $950, Sam by Lancel; lancel.com. 3. SHOES $850, Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci; (212) 650-0180. 4. DRESS $598, Diane von Furstenberg; modaoperandi.com for similar styles. 5. NECKLACE price upon request, Messika Paris; messika.com for stores. 6. SHOES $995, Pierre Hardy; pierrehardy.com. 7. EARRINGS price upon request, Forevermark by Jade Trau; forevermark.com for stores. 8. BAG $820, Sam by Lancel; lancel.com. 9. RING price upon request, Djula; djula.fr for stores. 10. DRESS $1,195, Prabal Gurung; modaoperandi.com for similar styles.

16 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

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RODRIGUEZ: JAN WELTERS. ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY OF THE DESIGNERS

A double-band style packs twice the shine.


I spy, with my little eye, something beginning with “S.” Who knows what you’ll see in the backup camera1 of your new 2017 Corolla, but that’s kind of the point, isn’t it? That’s why it comes standard, along with Toyota Safety Sense™ P.2 Because, even though you might see almost anything, one thing we think you should definitely see is safety. How many things can you spy that start with the letter “S”?

Toyota Safety Sense™ Standard

Prototype shown with options. Production model may vary. 1. The backup camera does not provide a comprehensive view of the rear area of the vehicle. You should also look around outside your vehicle and use your mirrors to confirm rearward clearance. Environmental conditions may limit effectiveness and view may become obscured. See Owner’s Manual for details. 2. Drivers should always be responsible for their own safe driving. Please always pay attention to your surroundings and drive safely. Depending on the conditions of roads, vehicles, weather, etc., the system(s) may not work as intended. See Owner’s Manual for details. ©2016 Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc.


FIRST

BRING THE HEAT

Subtle shades of brown and peachypink warmed up the actress’s eyelids and cheeks. CLINIQUE Lid Pop in Cocoa Pop (left), $17. CLINIQUE Cheek Pop in Ginger Pop, $23.

BEHIND THE COVER: BEAUTY

GINA RODRIGUEZ

Boss dress

LASH OUT

One coat of Clinique’s volumizing mascara was enough to open up Rodriguez’s eyes and complete the look. CLINIQUE Lash Power Flutter-to-Full Mascara in Black, $21. For information on where to buy, see Shopping Directory.

HAIR: Hairstylist Jenny Cho wanted to convey an organic, undone vibe with Rodriguez’s textured look. First, she worked in mousse and diffused strands dry; then she used hairspray on small sections and curled alternate pieces with a flatiron. Cho finished by misting a shine spray all over. MAKEUP: For makeup artist Pati Dubroff, the focus was Rodriguez’s skin. “I didn’t want to mask her natural beauty, so I kept it simple,” she says. Dubroff applied a thin layer of foundation with a damp sponge, swiped on dusty-pink blush, and lightly dotted brown eyeliner along the lashlines. She then mixed plum and brick-red lipsticks to create a color just a few shades darker than Rodriguez’s lips. NAILS: Manicurist Karen Gutierrez chose a milky, semi-sheer beige for Rodriguez’s mani-pedi. “There’s this light about Gina,” Gutierrez says. “We were going for a clean style that would let her shine.” —Heather Furlow Behind the scenes at the L.A. shoot

“The clothes were very bright and structured. Soft hair counterbalances that really well.” —H A IRST Y LIST JE N N Y CHO

18 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

PRODUCT SWIPES: JEFFREY WESTBROOK/STUDIO D. ALL OTHER STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANY. RODRIGUEZ: JAN WELTERS. BEHIND THE SCENES: KI WILLIAMS. ON RODRIGUEZ: EARRINGS, $2,100, ELSA PERETTI FOR TIFFANY & CO.; (800) 843-3269

ACCENTED WITH BARELY-THERE MAKEUP AND TOUSLED STRANDS, THE STAR’S NATURAL BEAUTY TAKES CENTER STAGE ON SET


PROMOTION

Marie Claire Young Women’s Honors Presents

Red Carpet Ready Host and executive producer Gina Rodriguez shares her getting ready checklist for the first-ever Marie Claire YWH primetime event. Presented by Clinique

3 WEEKS BEFORE

2 WEEKS BEFORE

3 DAYS BEFORE

Shop for the perfect dress & accessories

Get my skin red carpet ready with the help of the Clinique 3-Step System

Practice my opening speech

The right outfit is essential to making me feel confident and beautiful.

Taking care of my skin every day gives me a natural glow.

Once I am onstage, the reality of the event comes to life!

DAY OF

1 DAY BEFORE

Apply Clinique Pop™ Matte Lip Colour + Primer, which will keep up with me all night long

Make a statement with a mani/pedi

Fresh nail polish leaves me feeling polished and ready for the big day.

Clinique helps me glam up while still feeling like myself.

Discover the very best in skincare and cosmetics at Clinique.com and don’t miss this exclusive television event: MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 9/8 CST ON THE CW. YoungWomensHonors.com @youngwomenshonors


FIRST

2

SPHERES OF INFLUENCE

1

In her Bogotá workshop, Paula Mendoza crafts yellow-gold treasures that resemble tiny sculptures. «Earrings, $250; paulamendoza.com»

PACK A PUNCH

Mola Sasa’s vibrant handbags are modeled after the mola fabric-layering technique used on the indigenous Kuna community’s traditional dress. «$420; mola sasa.com»

TAKE WING

3

Jet-setters need a clutch that captures their on-the-go spirit. «$2,150, Nancy Gonzalez at Bergdorf Goodman; 212-753-7300»

8

HAPPY TRAILS

6

NINA 7 WHAT LOVES

¡Hola, Cartagena! MC Creative Director Nina Garcia calls on talents from her native Colombia to channel the city’s colorful charm

INN CROWD

You won’t find better views of the Caribbean than those from the penthouse at Hotel Charleston Santa Teresa. «From $290 per night; hotel charlestonsantateresa.com»

20 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

COSTUME DRAMA

Casa Chiqui’s folkloric masks— inspired by the famed carnival in nearby Barranquilla—look great on a wall or atop a bookshelf. «$75 each; casachiqui.com for information»

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Aquazzura sandals. «$850; aquazzura. com»

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CARTAGENA’S STREETS: GREG HILLS. ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

Wear this Johanna Ortiz top on its own, or layered over a dress or white tee. «$850; moda operandi.com for similar styles»

ESTEBAN CORTAZAR

TOP FORM

Brightly painted colonial buildings along Cartagena’s streets make nearly every spot in the city an ideal Instagram backdrop.


for

intensely hair Pantene Expert Collection Get ready for our most intense PRO-V Formula ever. Because stronger is even more beautiful. Š2016 P&G

strong is


BAG $2,980, Gucci; gucci.com for stores.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Anne Fulenwider

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

@annefulenwider

Nina Garcia @ninagarcia

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COURTESY OF THE DESIGNERS

EXECUTIVE EDITOR


VI CE PRE SID ENT / P UBL I S HER/ CHIEF REV ENUE OF F I C ER

Nancy Berger Cardone @nymaggirl ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/INTEGRATED MARKETING

Brent Allen @brentsallen Stacy Lyn Bettman @stacybettman

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/INTEGRATED ADVERTISING GENERAL MANAGER

Kathy Riess

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF INTEGRATED MARKETING Erin

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IDEAS From A to Z

CLASS IS IN SESSION! WE’RE SPELLING OUT SPRING’S TOP TRENDS SO YOU CAN KICK OFF THE YEAR IN STYLE CREATIVE DIRECTOR NINA GARCIA


101 IDEAS

FAUSTO PUGLISI

CRUCIFIXES

Gothic-feeling cross jewelry, seen at Fausto Puglisi and Dsquared2, is worth worshipping. EARRINGS $1,945, Dolce & Gabbana; modaoperandi.com for similar styles. 26 MA R I E C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

TORY BURCH VICTORIA BECKHAM

DISCO

Slinky metallic frocks that plunge in the front or slash at the shoulder put you right back on the dance floor (bonus points for a slicked-back, side-part ’do). SAINT LAURENT

SAINT LAURENT

d

ALTUZARRA

Details like dragon embroideries and mandarin collars show that the East is a veritable Eden of inspiration. BAG $3,500, Gucci; gucci.com for stores.

BALMAIN

ASIA

BRA TOPS Dare to bare in the season’s flirty cross between a crop top and a bra.

PRADA

GUCCI

A

B


Make your eyes the prize in uniquely shaped or flashily embellished specs. GLASSES $1,380, Gucci; gucci.com for stores.

EYEWEAR

MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION

ALTUZARRA

JASON WU

E

f

FLORALS

Petal motifs in bright, sunny colors are a throwback to carefree childhood days.

GEMS

CHRISTOPHER KANE

GUCCI

GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI

h

GUCCI

ITTY-BITTY

HARNESSES

G

Belts aren’t the only way to strap in this spring—harnesses lend romantic dresses a medieval edge that’s still modern. HARNESS $2,100, Gucci; gucci.com for stores.

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

VALENTINO

I

Teeny-tiny bags prove too cute to resist, meaning it’s time to Marie-Kondo your essentials.

TORY BURCH, VICTORIA BECKHAM, MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION, CHRISTOPHER KANE & ALEXANDER MCQUEEN: ESTROP/GETTY IMAGES. PRADA: PIETRO D'APRANO/GETTY IMAGES. GUCCI (HARNESSES): ANTONIO DE MORAES BARROS FILHO/WIREIMAGE. ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY OF THE DESIGNERS

Let agate prints and natural-stone jewelry rock your world. BAG $1,195, Christopher Kane; modaoperandi.com for similar styles.


R

SH

ES N

IE ET OC

HS

STELLA MCCARTNEY

VERSACE

HERMÈS

KHAKI Head-to-toe tan is the new black (just ask Kim K.).

MESSAGES Word on the

street? Designers are letting their bags do the talking. CLUTCH $880, Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci at Barneys New York; (212) 826-8900.

NECKLACES

k

The choker still reigns supreme, this time in spiky shapes and mixed materials.

DION LEE, CREATURES OF THE WIND & CUSHNIE ET OCHS: ESTROP/GETTY IMAGES. PHILIPP PLEIN: VICTOR VIRGILE/GAMMA-RAPHO/ GETTY IMAGES. PACO RABANNE: CATWALKING/GETTY IMAGES. ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY OF THE DESIGNERS

VERSACE

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

JUMPSUITS

Simplify your morning routine with the one-and-done favorite—the latest are slouchy and zippered, with a drawstring waist.

nude patterns that create the illusion there’s nothing on underneath.

N

LOUIS VUITTON

WIND

CÉLINE

THE

CU

EA TU

EE OF

GUCCI

CR

N

L

DIOR

DI O

J 101 IDEAS

L LACE Ladylike lace takes a darker turn in ornate black-and-


PERSIAN RUGS Let the runways’ tapestry designs take you on a magic carpet ride. SHOES $995, Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello; (212) 980-2970.

DOLCE & GABBANA

PHILIPP PLEIN

DOLCE & GABBANA

BALENCIAGA

O

P

LOEWE

Extra-large totes, exaggerated shoulders, wideleg trousers— silhouettes at Balenciaga and beyond pump up the volume.

SAINT LAURENT

OVERSIZE

QUIRKY CARRYALLS

S

ALEXANDER WANG

RING BAGS

Designers from Chloé to Givenchy put a ring on it and—no surprise—we’re smitten with the wristlet-style results. FROM TOP: BAG $390, Simon Miller; simonmillerusa.com. BAG $1,550, Chloé at Bergdorf Goodman; (212) 753-7300. BAG price upon request, Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci; (212) 650-0180 for special order.

Q

DIOR

urban-beach-bum wave in sporty neon shades.

SURFER Ride Alexander Wang’s

R

PACO RABANNE

It bags get eccentric disguised as drums, boom boxes, and baskets.

t

T-SHIRTS

Whether provocative or politically charged, slogan tees are making a statement.

January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 29


Y

30 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M

Sheer chiffon layers turn your once-hidden underpinnings into daytime layering pieces.

X-HIBITIONIST

There were bustier tops, pelmet skirts, and gold lamé, but the real ’80s flashback at Anthony Vaccarello’s first Saint Laurent show were pumps playing on the decade’s logo mania. SHOES $995, Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello; (212) 9802970.

YSL LOGO

X

BALENCIAGA

J.W.ANDERSON

Cargo pockets and strap fastenings riff on utilitarian workwear.

UTILITARIAN

COURRÉGES

MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION

LOUIS VUITTON

W

Z Animal prints, fuzzy textures, creature features—look to Noah’s ark to find your next go-to accessory. BAGS $398 each, Furla; furla.com.

ZOO

FENDI: ESTROP/GETTY IMAGES. YSL LOGO PHOTOGRAPH: JONAS GUSTAVSSON/NAMEFACE/SIPA USA. ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY OF THE DESIGNERS

cross-palm cuffs give you the upper hand.

WACKY JEWELRY Chunky baubles like twisted metal bracelets and

LOEWE

PRADA

CHLOÉ

V

Plant retro-wallpaper-style florals into your spring wardrobe, and watch the outfit envy grow. BAG $3,300, Fendi; (212) 897-2244.

VINTAGE BLOOMS

COACH 1941

FENDI

PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI

U

101 IDEAS


Build up & sweep out for a perfect winged look.

The new false lash look: Now, lashes flaunt the winged effect. NEW ®

TM

bare lashes

Maybelline.com Simulation of actual product results. ©2016 Maybelline LLC.

I say, if you’ve got it, flaunt it.

#FALSIESANGEL

Falsies Angel


101 IDEAS

1

“I ALWAYS TRAVEL WITH A LITTLE BOX THAT HOLDS TAPE, FABRIC, AND BUTTONS FOR MY UPCOMING COLLECTION, TO REFERENCE WHEN I NEED TO THINK ABOUT THE STORY.”

3

2

Designer Marco de Vincenzo

4

1. DRESS $2,240. 2. BAGS $1,500 each. 3. TOP $755. 4. TOP $825. All items, Marco de Vincenzo. Clothing; modaoperandi.com for similar styles. Bags; matches fashion.com.

Q&A

Double FEATURE

As his namesake label debuts menswear and its first bag, Marco de Vincenzo—Fendi’s longtime accessories designer—and MC’s Nina Garcia talk balance, passion, and keeping it personal

NG: WHAT’S YOUR RELATIONSHIP LIKE WITH SILVIA VENTURINI FENDI? MDV: Fendi was my first job after graduating from design school. Everything I know about fashion I learned from Silvia. She has such an interesting life. She was the first person I talked to about wanting to launch my own ready-to-wear line. I invited her to lunch, and she said, “You have to do it, because I understand how important freedom and creative expression is for a designer.” But she also said, “I hope you stay with us and can find a balance, because I need you.” NG: IS IT HARD BALANCING TWO JOBS? MDV: I travel a lot because I have a double life working for Fendi in Rome and running my own brand out of Milan. It’s a hurricane, but I enjoy it. I think fashion needs new names. When a customer chooses you because she likes what you’re doing and it doesn’t matter if you aren’t Gucci, Fendi, or Valentino, it’s the best feeling—because she was free to choose anything, and she chose you. NG: WHAT WAS YOUR INSPIRATION FOR SPRING? MDV: I thought about vacation, starting from a 1950s postcard print I found at a shop in

32 MA R I E C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

Italy. It was very joyful—this day at the beach with the sea, a villa, and a boat—and I thought, What if the landscape changed color? I tried to think about the moment when you are in the same place and the light changes from morning to night, and how that, in turn, makes your mood change. NG: YOUR FAVORITE THING TO SEE A WOMAN WEAR? MDV: A skirt. But what is elegant and cool today would be to pair it with a sneaker. NG: HOW DID YOU GO ABOUT DESIGNING YOUR FIRST BAG? MDV: I always thought if I couldn’t be a designer, I would be a cartoonist. I love Disney World. The little paw shape on the flap reminds me of my childhood, which is exactly the part of me I channeled while designing it. I wanted a strong shape, because I think that’s important to be recognizable in a world full of bags—something very fun and very “pop,” but with a luxurious silhouette that’s beautiful even if it’s just a solid color with nothing else. If my woman wears something very colorful and maximalist, I want her bag to be the inverse: very plain. NG: WHAT ABOUT YOU MIGHT SURPRISE PEOPLE? MDV: I sometimes give off an impression of being very serious. I am not serious ever! For example, I play a lot with shoes. Women don’t joke around about shoes—it’s like an obsession for them. So every season, to be sure every one I design is perfect, I try them on and wear them around the office for an hour. At work, my eccentric side comes out and surprises even me!

COURTESY OF THE DESIGNER

NINA GARCIA: WHAT WAS YOUR CHILDHOOD LIKE? MARCO DE VINCENZO: Growing up in Messina, Sicily, I dreamed of becoming a designer. The Internet didn’t exist then, and fashion, for a Sicilian boy— where we had only one store in town—felt like a dream. I would close my eyes with paper and a pencil and just escape and imagine my future.


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101 IDEAS

3

Archival sketches of brooches served as inspiration for the designer

1. NECKLACE. 2. NECKLACE. 3. EARRINGS. 4. BRACELET. 5. RING. 6. RING. 7. RING. 8. EARRINGS. All items, prices upon request, Boucheron; (212) 421-0445.

4

1 2

5

JEWELRY NEWS

JET SET

8

7

Colonnades lining Paris’ Palais Royal, where Frédéric Boucheron opened his first boutique. RIGHT: The collection’s graphic design mimics the black-and-white pattern of cabochon tiling

Fashion editor: KYLE ANDERSON

34 MA MARIECLAIR RE E .C O M Month January 2016 2017

“I love how just a little touch of onyx is enough to make other stones stand out,” says Claire Choisne, creative director of French jeweler Boucheron. Not that they need any help. Since its founding in 1858, Boucheron has turned out ever-evolving Art Nouveau creations that have sparkled on some of the most reputed wrists (King Leopold II of Belgium preferred a ruby-and-sapphire watch; French chanteuse Édith Piaf thought the house’s pieces brought her good luck) and décolletages (New York society doyenne Madeleine Astor survived the sinking of the Titanic, but most of her Boucheron jewels did not) of the past two centuries. Now, with a new slew of onyx-paved designs— additions to its 26 Vendôme haute joaillerie range, named for the address of Boucheron’s headquarters—Choisne draws on the starker architectural details of the early 20th century for a collection that has a “more graphic, modernist effect,” she explains. Among the creations? A geometric cuff crisscrossed with white diamonds and onyx, a 7.75carat yellow-sapphire ring that echoes the bold lines of a 1920s granite skyscraper, and a necklace finished with diamonds and yellow sapphires, moonstones, and white mother-of-pearl inspired by the parquetry flooring of Boucheron’s very first store at Paris’ Galerie de Valois. “A touch of black gives a piece dynamism,” says Choisne. “It awakens the creation.” Time to rise and shine. —Hilary Elkins

6

COURTESY OF THE DESIGNER

Boucheron explores its dark side with an onyx collection that takes hints from Art Deco architecture


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101 IDEAS

FIRST BLUSH

ACCESSORIES NEWS

Hermès’ latest jewelry range channels the kaleidoscopic colors of daybreak.

Pierre Hardy discovers new horizons at Hermès with a jewelry line inspired by the light of day

1 Sketches of the collection, which, Hardy says, is modeled after the “transition from shade to light”

“Only that day dawns to which we are awake,” Henry David Thoreau once wrote. If he was right, you might say Hermès arose the day it put Pierre Hardy in charge of its jewelry division. During his 15-year tenure in the position, Hardy—who, being allergic to horses, laughs about the irony of working for a brand synonymous with equestrian chic—has crafted inventive, structural designs that find inspiration in feelings, as he puts it, rather than the material. The best example may well be his latest: The Parisian-born designer tackled perceptions of time with Feux du Ciel, one of four mini collections in the house’s high-jewelry line, this one representing the cycle of day to night. In the four-piece assortment—which includes bangles, a ring, and a tiered necklace that comes apart to create two alternate styles—stones like iolites, garnets, tourmalines, and topazes undulate from faint pink to purple to orange to channel the shifting light of sunrise. “The collection evokes perpetual renewal,” explains Hardy, who studied contemporary dance before majoring in fine art at France’s prestigious École Normale Supérieure. “It’s the repetition and infinite variation of the colors of dawn.” The result is nothing short of a waking dream. —Hilary Elkins

2

Pierre Hardy

Fashion editor: KYLE ANDERSON 1. BRACELET. 2. BRACELET. 3. NECKLACE. 4. RING. All items, prices upon request, Hermès; (800) 441-4488.

3

36

4

STILL LIFES & SKETCH: COURTESY OF THE DESIGNER. PHOTOGRAPHS, FROM TOP: AUSCAPE/UIG/GETTY IMAGES, ALEXIS ARMANET

MORNING GLORY


RIGHT: Moroccan spices, which Milgrom often uses to cook tagine

BAG $295, Maje; maje.com.

Maje creative director Judith Milgrom

Milgrom at work in Maje’s Paris studio

brands each have their own DNA. Because my parents left Morocco to start from scratch in France, we learned to always work hard and support each other. She’s my best friend—we talk on the phone several times a day. 5. WHAT DOES “MAJE” STAND FOR? “M” is for Moyal, my maiden name; “A” is for Alain, one of my brothers; “J” nods to my first name; and “E” stands for my sister Evelyne. The Hassan Tower outside of the Mausoleum of Mohammed V in Rabat, Morocco

SPICES: WESTEND61/GETTY IMAGES. HASSAN TOWER: VISITMOROCCO.COM/MOROCCAN NATIONAL TOURIST OFFICE. SAHARA: GALLO IMAGES - HERMAN DU PLESSIS/GETTY IMAGES. ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY OF THE DESIGNER

10 QUESTIONS WITH

JUDITH MILGROM

6. WHERE DO YOU LOOK FOR IDEAS? The street. I love watching how women dress and walk. I also love vintage. I have old Yves Saint Laurent shirts, Azzedine Alaïa dresses from his first collections, an early ’90s Chanel tweed jacket. Fashion, like history, repeats itself, so it’s fun to pick up influences here and there, and twist them in a modern way. 7. WHAT WAS YOUR INSPIRATION FOR SPRING? I imagined a journey through Africa, from Maghreb to the Sahara to Tanzania. I wanted lots of colors for a feminine, bohemian (yet clearly urban) wardrobe. 8. WHAT SHOULD EVERY WOMAN HAVE IN HER CLOSET? This winter, I would say a comfortable knit top, a long under-theknee skirt, and a military coat.

Get to know the Moroccan-born, Paris-based designer taking bohemianchic ready-to-wear label Maje global

9. YOUR PASSIONS OUTSIDE OF DESIGN? Cooking and hosting dinner parties at home. I love inviting guests who’ve never met and seeing them laugh and get to know each other.

1. WHERE DID YOU GROW UP? Rabat, near the ocean in the northwest of Morocco. Life was simple: I remember the smells, the light, the food. I was 10 when we moved to France, and it was like an emotional tsunami. I’m still very connected to the country.

10. YOU TRAVEL A LOT. ANY PACKING TIPS? I travel light with just the essentials: jeans, men’s shirts, sweaters, and at least one dress, maybe a lace one suitable for cocktails. If you don’t bring too much, you have an excuse to shop!

2. WHAT WAS THE FIRST THING YOU EVER MADE? I started making dresses for my dolls from my grandmother’s scrap fabrics at an early age. In school, I put a lot of effort into my outfits. I would often steal my grandfather’s shirts to customize them! 3. WHY FASHION? My mother and grandmother made everything themselves, from bread to curtains to clothes. My father was always impeccably dressed, without fail, in a suit and tie. Fashion is a family affair—first my father, then my sister, Evelyne, who founded Sandro. 4. ARE YOU COMPETITIVE WITH YOUR SISTER? In a safe and healthy way. We share the same passion, even though our

Africa’s Sahara desert, which helped inspire Maje’s spring collection MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 37


101 IDEAS

The LOOK

Give fashion’s reigning ’80s trend a downtown refresh in a shoulderbaring top, boyfriend jeans, and sleek, ankle-strap stilettos

1

The Top

A LONG-SLEEVE TOP IS SEDUCTIVE WHEN IT SHOWS SOME SKIN. Price upon request, Chanel; (800) 550-0005.

$1,250, Ellery; modaoperandi.com for similar styles. $1,050, Jimmy Choo; net-aporter.com.

2

The Accessories

SAINT LAURENT

$420, Rosetta Getty; net-aporter.com.

Price upon request, Messika Paris; neiman marcus.com for stores.

ASYMMETRICAL EARRINGS, A LEATHER CUFF WATCH, AND SIMPLE HEELS COMPLETE THE LESS-ISMORE UPDATE. $1,630, Vetements; stylebop.com.

$108, Guess; shop.guess.com.

The Denim

SLIP ON A STYLE WITH A DIY-FEELING FRAYED HEM.

38 MA R I E C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

$245, 3x1; modaoperandi.com for similar styles.

3

COURTESY OF THE DESIGNERS

$3,725, Mugler; modaoperandi.com for similar styles.


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101 IDEAS 1. CARDIGAN $1,050, Max Mara. 2. SKIRT $765, Max Mara + Liu Wei Capsule Collection. 3. TOP $625, Max Mara + Liu Wei Capsule Collection. 4. SUNGLASSES $375, Max Mara. All items, (212) 879-6100.

The Shanghai Exhibition Centre, site for the December 15 show

1

A Max Mara–clad model in the studio

2 Artist Liu Wei in his Beijing studio with models wearing looks from his capsule collection

FASHION NEWS

URBAN RENEWAL

“We envisaged a performance,” says Max Mara creative director Ian Griffiths. “Liu Wei would build an imaginary city, and we would dress its inhabitants.” The master plan for the brand’s pre-fall collection—showing at the Shanghai Exhibition Centre this month—was hatched in 2010, after Griffiths was wowed by Wei’s exhibit at Paris’ Centre Pompidou of building molds made entirely from dog chews. “[Wei] perfectly captures this dystopian vision of a city as an organism—one that’s constantly changing, growing, decaying,” he says. “Our clothes are luxurious urban armor for women who want to make it to the top in the concrete jungle, so I felt an immediate dialogue.” Over countless meetings and cross-global video conferences, Griffiths, Wei, and Italian art curator Francesco Bonami came up with the idea of casting models as film noir heroines (think Veronica Lake and Rita Hayworth) in a futuristic metropolis, with Wei’s sweeping sculptures emerging out of a fog—a nod to landscapes in traditional Chinese paintings. Among the collection’s 50 looks, 11, codesigned by Wei, can be shopped right off the runway. Geometric skirts 3 were crafted by translating city maps onto laser-cut silks, while architectural plans were traced with a sewing machine onto patchwork dresses and printed blouses. “WE IMAGINED “It’s about losing yourself in THE MODELS your own world,” explains AS FILM NOIR HEROINES IN A Wei. We don’t ever want to be GRITTY URBAN found. —Carolina O’Neill METROPOLIS.” —Ian Griffiths, Max Mara creative director 40

4

Max Mara’s mood board included images of Daryl Hannah and Sean Young in Blade Runner, plus views and maps of Beijing and Shanghai

COURTESY OF THE DESIGNER. MAX MARA SHOOTING FEATURING THE CAPSULE COLLECTION AT LIU WEI’S STUDIO, BEIJING

Chinese artist Liu Wei lends a conceptualist eye to his capsule collection with Max Mara


©2017 P&G

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Kat Perry wears Outlast All-Day Katy Concealer and Outlast All-Day C Matte Finishing Powder in Light. Ma


101 IDEAS

1

Warsaw’s historic Castle Square

STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE DESIGNERS. PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: LUIS DAVILLA/GETTY IMAGES, TAMARA SAVIDI, PIOTR BEDNARSKI/COURTESY OF ZACHĘTA NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, EWA KRASUCKA, SCHON & PROBST/GETTY IMAGES

2

PACKING LIST

“It’s very chilly yearround, so you must dress warm! I wear a lot of black and always bring my own jewelry.”

ON THE TOWN

All of my jewelry is handmade in Warsaw, and I keep an apartment there to visit at least once a month. The city is very cool—like a young Berlin. There are lots of young people and underground things happening. I go back to see family and friends in Gda´nsk, my hometown, over the holidays. As a child there, I was a bit of a tomboy, always running around and climbing trees.

Magdalena Frackowiak

the GETAWAY

WARSAW

3 The Zachęta National Gallery of Art’s dramatic architecture

Gda´ nsk-born, New York-based model and jewelry designer Magdalena Frackowiak plays tour guide in the Polish city she calls a second home CHEF’S TABLE

Polish pierogi

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4

Mokotowska Street is renowned for its chic boutiques and cafés. But if you want traditional Polish food, I love Dyspensa. My favorite thing is pierogi—ravioli stuffed with meat or cabbage. My mother used to make them. And Weles Bar is great for drinks. I never leave Poland without Ptasie Mleczko (4), chocolatecovered meringue sweets that remind me of my childhood.

CULTURE FIX

The Polish National Ballet performs The Tempest

I go to Lazienki Park to run or picnic with friends—it’s the best place to get an Instagram shot! The nearby Zachęta National Gallery of Art and Warsaw Rising Museum (about the rising of 1944) both have amazing exhibitions. For pampering, I’ll get a facial at the SkinClinic or a manicure at Manièra. At night, I have a tradition of going to the Polish National Ballet. 1. JACKET $2,690, Saint Laurent; ysl.com. 2. BOOTS $995, Saint Laurent; (212) 980-2970. 3. EARRINGS $2,285, Magdalena Frackowiak Jewelry; magdalenafrackowiak.com. 4. PTASIE MLECZKO price upon request, Wedel; wedel.com for information. 5. NECKLACE $1,780, Magdalena Frackowiak Jewelry; magdalenafrackowiak.com. 6. EARRINGS $2,400, Magdalena Frackowiak Jewelry; magdalenafrackowiak.com. 7. BAG $1,190, Proenza Schouler; (212) 420-7300.

42 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

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PROJECT RUNWAY

Sky’s the LIMIT

Tasked with designing a dynamic dress for today’s power woman for Project Runway’s Marie Claire challenge, season 15’s Cornelius Ortiz created a standout look

HAIR: TAKUYA SUGAWARA FOR AVEDA AT WALTER SCHUPFER MANAGEMENT. MAKEUP: SUZY GERSTEIN FOR YSL TOUCHE ÉCLAT AT HONEY ARTISTS. MODEL: CHARLOTTE STEVENS AT MUSE MANAGEMENT

Photographs by CHRISTIAN HÖGSTEDT Fashion Editor: BRITTANY KOZERSKI

ABOVE: Designer Cornelius Ortiz. TOP AND RIGHT: Ortiz’s winning dress design

Sometimes inspiration comes from pulling back and seeing the big picture. For this season’s Marie Claire challenge, the eight remaining Project Runway contestants were given a bird’s-eye view of New York City via helicopter to spur their design process. Their mission? Create a fashion-forward look for a high-powered woman. “We flew over a golf course, and I was inspired by the curved lines,” says Cornelius Ortiz, who beat out the rest with a sinuously tailored wool dress elevated by bright leather accents that referenced the city’s bold architecture. “Landscapes inspire me, so this was the challenge that I was really excited about.” It also gave him the chance to show off his knack for complex tailoring. “I nicknamed myself ‘The Segmentator’ because I seam every little bit of my creations,” says the 24-year-old, laughing. “I once did a bodysuit that was, like, 34 pieces!” His formula seems to be working. “I loved this dress immediately,” says Marie Claire Editor-in-Chief Anne Fulenwider, who served as a guest judge for the challenge. “I can absolutely see myself wearing it.” The Boston-based designer, a self-described “junkfood junkie,” first auditioned for the show with friend and fellow Framingham State University classmate Nathalia Castrillon (nickname “JMag”), who also made the cut. “Every time I needed someone to vent to, she was there,” Ortiz says of his colleague. At the start of the season, he managed to rankle some competitors in the workroom with his unsolicited opinions. But he showed a bighearted side during the judging of a team challenge when he tearfully stated that he was ready to be eliminated rather than call out his teammates’ failings. “It was at that point where I could honestly say that I made true friends,” admits Ortiz. Asked what defines a powerful woman, he cites his mother, who works as a case manager for the homeless, as “one of the biggest influences in my life.” One day, Ortiz hopes to be dressing some of his other influences. “I would die if Janelle Monáe wore one of my outfits,” he says. “Or Solange—I’m obsessed with her new album.” Judging from his ambitious work this season, Ortiz won’t need a helicopter ride to reach new career heights. —Carl Kelsch

January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 43


101 IDEAS

1

2

DISPATCH

ZANNA DAYS Senior Fashion Editor ZA NNA ROBE RT S R A SSI

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ait—what?! You undo your entire bodysuit every time you pee?” You never forget the first time Khloé Kardashian laughs at you, loudly, in a room full of cameras for E! News and Keeping Up with the Kardashians. “Just pull to the side!” she exclaims. The reason Khloé is such a success is because she always tells it how it is. The same philosophy is part and parcel of what makes her new Good American denim line, which I was chatting with her about in L.A., so brilliant. It’s a collection of smart denim for sizes 0 to 24, because as they say, “Fashion should be made to fit women, not the other way around.” Amen! Back in NYC, my husband and I went to a cocktail party hosted by the inspiring Sienna Miller to learn more about the International Medical Corps (for which she’s a global ambassador). It was a powerful evening with Hollywood heavyweights such as Harvey Weinstein, Robin Wright, and Jon Hamm, all of whom pledged to contribute to the organization, which provides health care and medical training around the world. From there, it was off to the Beautycon Festival at Pier 36 in New York, which was filled with about 6,000 girls

6

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CLUTCH PLAY

Even in deep winter, Louis Vuitton’s diagonal-striped bag keeps my spirits bright.

3 4 5

who were there to learn about what’s new in beauty. I love seeing young girls who are passionate and enthusiastic when it comes to deciding the products right for them. As cofounder of Milk Makeup, I moderated a talk with Drew Barrymore (Flower Beauty) and YouTube fashion sensations Niki and Gabi DeMartino. A couple of weeks later, when The Outnet asked me to throw a dinner party, I jumped at the opportunity. We held an intimate dinner at New York’s cool coworking space NeueHouse to support Glam4Good, which grants fashion and beauty wishes to women and girls. What better way to spend an evening than surrounded by friends and having a blast for a good cause? Last year, I made a ton of unrealistic New Year’s resolutions. So this year, I’m vowing to NOT make any promises I can’t keep, which means I won’t be going to SoulCycle every week, I won’t stop drinking wine, and I definitely won’t stop bingeing on Haribo gummy candy. I’m setting my sights on holistic wellness and trying to be a little more balanced in mind, body, and spirit. One step toward that is signing up for SereneBook, a new site that lets you meet with private practitioners for $150 per month (you get three sessions each month). Bring on the acupuncturist, nutritionist, and mysticist! I’ll let you all know how I’m feeling next month. @zannarassi

1. Why wear one stone when you can wear seven? Spinelli Kilcollin’s ring has rubies, emeralds, and sapphires. 2. Upgrading my manis with Christian Louboutin Beauty’s polish in Rouge Louboutin. 3. Rainbow shoes backstage at Jeremy Scott’s spring 2017 show. 4. Tapping into my inner psychic with The Wild Unknown’s tarot deck and guidebook, by Kim Krans. 5. Wearing an Opening Ceremony dress and Marchesa shoes to host The Outnet’s dinner at NeueHouse in NYC. 6. When boulders are Instagram-worthy: Seven Magic Mountains, an installation by Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone in the desert just south of Las Vegas = Stonehenge 2.0. 7. Because this season your bag should look like a treasure chest à la Louis Vuitton. 8. Taking the stress out of jeans shopping with denim line Good American cofounders Khloé Kardashian (center) and Emma Grede

44 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

2. JEFFREY WESTBROOK/STUDIO D. 3. MICHAEL STEWART/WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES. 5. ABRAMS/BFA/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK. 8. COURTESY OF ROBERTS RASSI. ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

w

Getting schooled by a Kardashian and hanging with Drew are just part of the job


1 “I’m all about accessories: simple jewelry or shoes and bags with special details.”

Model Clémentine Desseaux in a Zara men’s jacket and Monki jumpsuit

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Big Girl in a SKINNY WORLD 5

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Body-positive model/blogger Clémentine Desseaux makes her own rules

STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE DESIGNERS. PHOTOGRAPHS, FROM LEFT: COURTESY OF THE ALL WOMAN PROJECT, HEATHER HAZZAN/COURTESY OF THE SUBJECT

9

“I love coats and jackets! I have so many in different prints and colors.”

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How many of us have fantasized about moving somewhere on a whim to go after a dream—and actually done it? Clémentine Desseaux, for one. “I left my job, my boyfriend, and my family in France, and booked a one-way ticket to Miami,” says the 28-year-old, who got her master’s in international “A tight dress marketing and business before pursuing modeling full-time. “There’s a lot of is most pressure to fit the French-girl stereotype: cute, skinny, with a certain style. flattering on my figure, but That’s not me,” says Desseaux, who was bullied for her freckles and weight I would never growing up. “In Miami, girls walked proudly in the street barely clothed, and wear that nobody cared. It was a wow moment.” In the past few years—during which every day. I’m very boyish— she launched a fashion blog (Bonjour Clem) and her own branding agency I love boyfriend (Les Mijotes), and went viral in an Instagram beauty video regrammed by jeans.” Christian Louboutin (stirring up conversation about the lack of plus-size brand ambassadors)—the now Queens, New York–based Desseaux has had some wow-worthy moments of her own. Her favorite? The All Woman Project: an editorial, video, and social media campaign (#IAmAllWoman) she launched with fellow model Charli Howard to champion unretouched models of all shapes, sizes, and ethnicities, during last September’s New York Fashion Week (the website racked up more than 500 million views in six weeks). Desseaux’s no-shame attitude extends to her fashion choices, as well: “When you’re plus-size, it’s ‘hide your fat rolls and show off your boobs.’ But I think being a little old-school is sexy.” Her go-to look is a vintage Saint Laurent blazer thrown over a bodysuit, boyfriend jeans, and loafers. “Women try to hide their 7 fat, but we’re going to see it anyway,” says Desseaux. “If you’re big, you’re big. It’s when you own it that people’s perceptions change.” —Carolina O’Neill

1. SKIRT (up to size 4X), $79, Melissa McCarthy Seven7; melissamccarthy.com. 2. TOP (up to size 22), $90, Jette; navabi.us. 3. BAG $2,550, Marni; modaoperandi.com for similar styles. 4. BRACELET price upon request, Shay Fine Jewelry; shayfinejewelry.com. 5. TOP (up to size 4X), $89, Melissa McCarthy Seven7; melissamccarthy.com. 6. JEANS (up to size 24), $205, Good American; goodamerican.com. 7. BOOTS $1,115, Isabel Marant; net-a-porter.com. 8. EARRINGS price upon request, Daniela Villegas; justoneeye.com. 9. JACKET (up to size 4X), $169, Melissa McCarthy Seven7; melissamccarthy.com.

January 2017 MA R I EC L A I R E. COM 45


WORK

@

In Your DREAMS HOW DO YOU PURSUE A LINE OF WORK YOU DIDN’T EVEN KNOW WAS POSSIBLE? MEET THREE WOMEN WHO SHUNNED DESK JOBS TO BUILD CAREERS IN THE TREES, THE KITCHEN, AND THE SKY By YAEL KOHEN

HIGH FLIER

LIZ LUTZ, Aerial Photographer,

FROM LEFT: ANGEL DELCUETO, COURTESY OF LIZ LUTZ (2)

LOCKHEED MARTIN

L

ast year, Liz Lutz strapped herself inside a high-G training centrifuge. Fans of space movies know the machine: It spins wouldbe aviators and astronauts round and round while they pray they don’t pass out from the nine Gs of pressure crushing their bodies. (For perspective, roller coasters typically unleash less than four Gs on riders.) “It feels like an elephant is sitting on you,” Lutz says. She left the capsule dizzy, queasy, and more prepared than ever to ride shotgun in an F-16 jet. Such Top Gun–style training is required for Lutz’s job: aerial photographer at aerospace company Lockheed Martin, where she helps secure government contracts and document flight tests by taking pictures of the company’s most impressive jets. To capture the planes surfing the clouds, Lutz also has asked pilots

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: Lutz photographs aircraft from the backseat of an F-16; a photo she shot of two F-16s from the Minnesota Air National Guard; Lutz at a Lockheed Martin hangar

ferrying her to fly upside down, climb the sky vertically at over 550 miles per hour, and travel as far as Dubai—all to get the perfect shot. But Lutz, 35, who’s based in Fort Worth, Texas, is quick to tell you that she’s not an adrenaline junkie, though she does love roller coasters. “I have no desire to jump out of a perfectly good airplane,” she says of skydiving. She stumbled into aerial photography as a multimedia intern at Lockheed. “I didn’t know this job existed,” she explains. “I was young, 21, and it sounded exciting.” That was 14 years ago. Of Lockheed’s nine aerial photographers, Lutz is the only woman. “Honestly, I don’t feel that being a woman makes it harder or easier,” she says. There are physical challenges—the plane’s

g-force can make Lutz’s camera feel like it weighs 25 pounds, and she regularly carries a sick bag (“as a safety blanket,” she says)—but Lutz says the greatest challenge was “learning and understanding the military culture, the pilot speak, and being able to hold my own in that environment.” When she first started, she had countless meetings with pilots who spoke in acronyms while describing their flight plans. “It felt like a foreign language,” she recalls. Today, Lutz still can’t believe she landed such an ideal gig. The F-16’s bubble canopy offers unobstructed views of her aweinspiring surroundings. Citing a trip to Hawaii’s Molokai coast, she says she found herself “taking a moment to put the camera down and take in the beauty of flight.” She adds: “I’m in 1 percent of 1 percent: Not a lot of people get to see and experience what I do.”

January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 47


WORK

@

IN YOUR DREAMS

LEFT: Kentish in front of a multilevel tree house built by Blue Forest. Rope bridges are a common addition to many of the company’s projects

NATURAL WONDERS

Here are a few of the coolest ideas Kentish and her team have brought to life (or have in the works)

UNDER THE STARS

MAGIC MAKER FLO KENTISH

O

Interior Designer, BLUE FOREST

n any given workday, Flo Kentish, 29, can be found outdoors whizzing down a slide, wandering through a wooden maze, or floating from point A to point B via zip line. Kentish isn’t slacking. She gets paid to play: As luxury tree-house company Blue Forest’s interior designer, Kentish is simply testing her team’s creations. That sort of merriment is encouraged, and reliving her childhood is a big part of Kentish’s job (she cites Pete’s Dragon, a 1977 Disney movie about an orphan raised by a dragon, as a film that sparks her creative juices). “It’s about nostalgia. It’s remembering what we, as a design team, would really love if we were kids,” she says. “Like, Oh, we loved Nerf guns, so why don’t we make a Nerf gun secret room with secret hatches and fingerprint entry?” The Magic Home, a recent Blue Forest project, encapsulates such whims. Kentish gets giddy as she details some of her favorite additions to the multifloor tree house: the marble-countered kitchenette, the bookcase that doubles as the entrance to a spiral staircase lined with cedar shingles, the Narnia-inspired armoire that hides a slide—all complemented by cozy custom furniture. “There’s not much we can’t make,” Kentish says of her five-person design team. “The client will say they want a slide, and we’ll say, ‘OK, let’s hide it.’”

48 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

ABOVE: The Magic Home, one of Kentish’s favorite and most elaborate projects. LEFT: A sketch by Kentish

Kentish doesn’t have to dig too deep to find inspiration. Growing up in Hampshire, England, she says her older brother tricked out the plank platform in their backyard with a homemade zip wire. “My sisters and I looked at him in awe,” she remembers. Memories of that simplistic tree house crept back into her head when she found job listings for Blue Forest—which counts J.K. Rowling as a client— in 2014. “I kind of did a double take. What was this job? This can’t be real,” she says. Kentish had spent the previous two years designing lumber-heavy interiors for English restaurant chain Bill’s, and she was looking for a change: “I felt it was my dream job.” As much as Kentish enjoys the brainstorming, the sketching, and the testing, nothing beats seeing the client’s face when the finished product is unveiled. “Even now, after nearly three years, it still takes my breath away,” she says.

FLAME GAME

Despite the tree houses’ largely wood interiors, Kentish loves a good fire pit.

BEACH BUMS

Oceanside cocktails, anyone? Kentish and her team recently designed a beach bar with a stone-style canopy.

HIDDEN TREASURE

Narnia-esque doors hide a metal slide that winds around the tree house.

MAGIC MAKER, FROM TOP: ALEXANDER WHITTLE (2), FLO KENTISH. NATURAL WONDERS, FROM TOP: BLUE FOREST CGI VISUAL, MATT LIVEY, ALEXANDER WHITTLE (2). OPPOSITE PAGE: FLAVOR MASTER: COURTESY OF THE COMPANY (3). OPEN WIDE, FROM LEFT: FOODCOLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES, BURAZIN/GETTY IMAGES, SHUTTERSTOCK

Movie night gets a serious upgrade: Decorative glow-in-the-dark nets take this outdoor cinema to the next level.


FROM LEFT: Freeman prepares Vietnamese lettuce wraps; the team tries various bakery products; a “tea master” schools Freeman on brewing to help her perfect Graze’s Afternoon Infusion tea

FLAVOR MASTER

E

ELEANOR FREEMAN

Chief Taste Expert, GRAZE

leanor Freeman’s taste buds are insured for $3.7 million. As a kid, Freeman and her mom, who trained as a chef before staying home full-time, used to spend hours creating healthy family dinners from scratch. “She’d have all this weird food in the fridge, like kombucha, before it was a thing,” Freeman says with a laugh. “I tried quinoa for the first time with her.” The duo was unknowingly fine-tuning Freeman’s superpower. Graze, the London-based snack company Freeman joined six years ago, insured her taste buds in 2011. Freeman, 32, oversees product development there, and her sensory powers are famous in the office (she’s known as “The Taste”). Despite her mastery of the

OPEN WIDE

Freeman has tried a slew of flavors throughout her career. She shares her reactions to three of the craziest

four key taste regions—previous employer Innocent Drinks had her buds tested; she’s able to thoroughly identify sweet, salty, sour, and bitter flavors (many people are “blind” to a category)—Freeman was shocked when Graze’s cofounders said they wanted to insure her tongue. “I was like, ‘Really, are you sure?’” she says. Freeman now must keep her taste buds in tip-top shape: She’s forbidden from eating super-hot chilies or licking a knife. Being a professional taster is as fun as it sounds. During “creative days,” Freeman’s team of four brainstorms ideas for holiday or seasonal snack packages, shops, meets with potential ingredient suppliers, and messes around in the kitchen. And there was the day that involved chocolate. Lots and lots of chocolate. Freeman and her team brought in prospective suppliers and tested some 20 types of cocoa. “Everyone in the office was very jealous,”

CLAM JUICE

Stay away, says Freeman: “Absolutely vile. I think it made me wretch. On its own, it’s totally vile.”

she says. But Freeman adds that snacking for multiple hours does have a downside, noting that her team “felt slightly sick at the end.” Freeman has sampled more than 10,000 ingredients and approved 1,000 for the company. She’s concocted around 1,600 original snacks, which helped Graze recently expand to the United States. For salt lovers, her team invented Spicy Thai Sriracha Crunch, which combines sriracha peas, popcorn kernels, and salted corn. Prefer something sweet? There’s Eleanor’s Apple Crumble, a trail mix combination of soft apple pieces, caramelized honey, cinnamon almonds, and raisins. The one food group her current team continues to avoid: bugs. “There was one member of the team who was really into insects,” she says, “but it’s a hard sell.” On this one, we’ll trust the woman with the multimillion-dollar taste buds.

CAMEL MILK

“Not so bad,” says Freeman. “It was creamy and rich.” It just may make its way into a future Graze snack.

CRICKETS

She may aim to avoid bugs, but Freeman dared to try these guys, and it wasn’t too painful. “Pretty crunchy,” she says.

January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 49


WORK

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4 TOP KNOT

A prim bow-tie neckline balances the relaxed look of a handkerchief hem.

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WHAT TO WEAR

Free ENTERPRISE

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Floaty florals and beatnik-style boots turn up the bohemian charm 10 8

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POLISHED TOUCH

Sleek card cases and silver accents keep things professional

SMYTHSON

$335; smythson.com.

VACHERON CONSTANTIN

Price upon request; www.vacheronconstantin.com for stores.

VALEXTRA

$240; valextra.com.

TUMI

$1,095; tumi.com.

1. NECKLACE $1,410 (not including center stone), Tacori; tacori.com for stores. 2. BOOTS $129, Guess; shop.guess.com. 3. BAG $2,950, Chloé; saks.com. 4. DRESS $2,600, Marni; net-a-porter.com. 5. RING $3,000, Bulgari; (800) BULGARI. 6. BOOTS $650, Chelsea Paris; chelseaparis.com. 7. COAT $1,495, Coach 1941; coach.com. 8. EARRINGS $3,905, Forevermark by Mémoire; forevermark.com for stores. 9. SHOES $625, Emporio Armani; (212) 209-3500. 10. TOP $298, Nanette Lepore; nanettelepore.com. 11. BAG $2,650, Céline; (212) 535-3703. 12. BRACELET price upon request, Roberto Coin; us.robertocoin.com. 13. DRESS $325, Ulla Johnson; barneys.com.

50 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. OPPOSITE PAGE: 1: SCREEN: NIKADA/GETTY IMAGES. ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

LOUIS VUITTON

11


TECH TRENDS

LIGHTS, 360° CAMERA, ACTION!

1

This month, tech luminaries flash their newest innovations at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES), the industry’s hottest conference. With exclusive behind-the-scenes access, Marie Claire talks to Living in Digital Times founder Robin Raskin, a CES producer, to preview this year’s buzziest products By JENNA BLAHA

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FIRST LOOKS

MAGIC HOUR

Artificial intelligence will deepen its infiltration into our homes in 2017. Think Amazon’s Alexa, only inside your alarm clock. “I know it sounds crazy, but that’s where we’re headed,” says Raskin. Who doesn’t want a robotic best friend that will be able to read them headlines first thing in the morning? «Holi Bonjour Smart Alarm Clock, $249; holi.io»

4

MULTI TALENTED

In the era of do-it-all devices, expect more like this all-in-one speaker, thermos, charger, and key holder. “This water bottle does everything,” says Raskin. “Maybe too many things, but it’s certainly a trend.” «Next Bottle audio dock and water bottle, $89; getnextbottle.com»

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GREEN SCREEN

Technology can help bolster arguments against climate-change naysayers. This tiny environment monitor, for example, tracks nearby toxicity levels. It can also analyze the cleanliness of the air you’re currently breathing. “It’s got medical implications for folks,” adds Raskin. «Eco Sensors Sparrow Air Monitor, $99; amazon.com»

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ROAD WARRIOR

See what’s happening behind your car from your phone’s screen.

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Perfect Corp.’s YouCam Makeup app scans 3,000 facial-feature points per second to create a 3-D version of users’ faces, allowing them to see what makeup will look like once applied. Raskin quips: “Imagine what it takes to do the full body.” «YouCam Makeup app, free; App Store & Google Play»

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MOTION PICTURE

Last year, stand-alone 360-degree cameras stole the show at CES. They’ll continue to play a starring role—this time, within other products. This tablet snaps 360-degree panoramic photos via dual rotating cameras. “This upgrade will open the floodgates to the future of smart cameras,” says Raskin. «Olive Oil CT4, price upon request; oliveoilcomputer.com»

DRIVER’S SEAT

“If you have a smartphone, you can now have a smart car,” says Raskin. Inexpensive add-ons—like this camera-equipped licenseplate frame—will transform your phone into your car’s rearview eyes and ears. «Pearl RearVision camera, $500; pearlauto.com»

January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 51


DISPATCH

Women in Silicon Valley often find themselves surrounded by tech bros


ALPHA GIRLS OF

SILICON VALLEY

YOU’VE HEARD ABOUT THE STARTUPS, THE 25-YEAROLD CEOS, AND THE FREE LAUNDRY AND PING-PONG, BUT WHAT IS WORKING, DRESSING, AND DATING FOR WOMEN IN TECH-LAND REALLY LIKE? IN AN EXCLUSIVE EXCERPT FROM HER UPCOMING BOOK, ALEXANDRA WOLFE GIVES AN INSIDER LOOK

LAURA MORTON

Alexandra Wolfe spent two years charting the experiences of young men and women starting out in Silicon Valley for her book Valley of the Gods. One such subject is Laura Deming, 22, a partner and founder of The Longevity Fund, a venture capital firm focused on aging and life extension. Wolfe follows Deming as she moves from Boston to California to take part in the prestigious Thiel Fellowship, which gives $100,000 to young people to pursue big ideas and start companies instead of attending college. Laura Deming soon realized that being female in Silicon Valley was different than it was on the East Coast. The conversations women had with one another and with men were different, to start—as were the clothes they wore and the social circles they aspired to join. Deming found that walking through Mountain View, Sunnyvale, or Palo Alto in

a dress was akin to getting ready for the prom at noon—or it would label a woman as an East Coast visitor or maybe a costume-party guest. Few women wore heels, and walking down University Avenue, Palo Alto’s main drag, you’d be hard-pressed to find a single lingerie shop. Most ready-towear clothes were for camping. Wrap or shawl? Forget it. Polar fleeces were for throwing on after the sun went down. The more that brand logos were replaced with company logos, the better. Instead of flaunting big-name brands—a big no-no—any logo or slogan should refer to a tech company (preferably one like Facebook, Google, or Apple, that was, by its bank accounts, bigger than the brands it was replacing). The earlier in the company’s history the T-shirt was made, the more preferable it was—2005 was almost nascent, for example—because that would signify how much equity you might have and how wealthy you could indirectly say you were.

January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 53


DISPATCH

Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park

Wearing a Facebook T-shirt made in 2007 was a stronger symbol than driving a Ferrari, since a Ferrari costs about $150,000, while an earlystage employee at Facebook in 2007 could have made tens of millions of dollars after the IPO. Some men even wore Steve Jobs’ favorite New Balance sneakers to prove that they had something in common with the tech master—whose legacy lived on in his stock price and user interface.

T

he less cutesy, feminine, and frilly you could be as a Silicon Valley woman, the better; proving that you were not a slave to stereotypes of sexuality was essential. Jeans were the uniform for both sexes. Women’s jeans could be loose or tight, but pants were a must. Skirts were only OK if they had pockets, similar to jeans, or somehow resembled construction-type attire, showing one’s toughness. Of course, all women like to feel attractive, which you are allowed to do, as long as it is mostly through toning, rather than an expensive dress. “Someone told me I was dressing like an idiot because I was parading around in a bunch of teenager-ish dresses from college without thinking about how I looked,” Deming remembered. “The advice was basically to look more professional—lose the short skirts and start wearing blazers and stuff.” She followed the advice for the most part, tossing out anything delicate, lacy, or detailed, which could make her look weak, but she kept the miniskirts and a pair of combat boots. The androgyny extended to mating behavior. Silicon Valley was a sexual wasteland, many coders found at first. Men, who made up roughly 60 percent of the population, were too busy coding to do anything else. When they were really working—in “flow”—coming up with a program, racing against the clock to build something before the next person did, their physicality was basically irrelevant. They acted nothing like the testosterone-fueled bankers on the East Coast. Their feet were planted. Their sexual rage didn’t come out in boozy pool parties, but on late-night online “dates,” if they were lucky. Instead of attractive athletes or suave businessmen, the most desirable men in Silicon Valley for women looking at that kind of thing were numbers five, six, and seven employees at big tech companies. Standing in line at University Café, a popular hangout in Palo Alto, one day, a girl nearby pointed to a pudgy redhead ahead of her and squealed, “He was number five!” Deming found that women commonly mated with younger men because of the social demographics. The young men were the wealthy ones, having grown up working as early-stage employees at big tech companies. Single women preyed upon them at places like the Rosewood Sand Hill hotel in Menlo Park. While Deming didn’t mind the gender imbalance—she never felt out of place being the only woman at a party, or in her house, which she shared with six male Thiel Fellows—she soon realized that many women around her were angry about the role reversal. The women complained that men were “beta,” while women were “alphas”—especially those who followed Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In cause, the movement inspired by her best-selling book that encouraged women to take control of their careers. It led

54 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

THE LESS CUTESY, FEMININE, AND FRILLY YOU COULD BE AS A SILICON VALLEY WOMAN, THE BETTER; PROVING YOU WERE NOT A SLAVE TO STEREOTYPES OF SEXUALITY WAS ESSENTIAL. other women to feel that they should act like they could play with the boys and not have to dress like they wanted to attract them. The über-go-getter female cabal of Silicon Valley women working in tech and VC worshipped some women and despised others—often the more feminine ones overshadowed by their husbands. As a result, many of the women who were married never talked about their husbands. They didn’t want to be the “wife of.” But while these women may have seen themselves as the alphas, they weren’t so sure they were happy with the results at cocktail parties, where the more feminine wives seemed to stand out. Early on, Deming heard about Aileen Lee, a partner at the influential venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers (KPCB). One night, in 2014, sitting in jeans and a T-shirt outside on the deck behind the Rosewood, Lee told me: “I’m obviously thinking a lot about gender. People are racially sensitive and disability sensitive, but they’re just not gender sensitive. I mean, the Tinder situation?” She was talking about Whitney Wolfe, the Tinder cofounder and vice president of marketing who sued the company for sexual harassment in 2014. The case was ultimately settled, and Wolfe left the company to start Bumble, a competing dating app, that same year. Then there was Ellen Pao, the KPCB partner who had charged the VC firm with gender discrimination in 2012. Pao famously said she was routinely passed over in favor of male partners, excluded from all-male company ski trips, and subjected to harassment from a male partner. Pao lost her case in 2015, but she ended up opening a conversation about gender equality in Silicon Valley. On top of those scandals was Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel,


Inside Facebook’s offices

The offices of Palantir, a software company in Palo Alto

At Café Venetia in Palo Alto

Google’s home base in Mountain View

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: MOE ZOYARI/REDUX, PETER DASILVA/THE NEW YORK TIMES/REDUX, TIMOTHY ROPER, MOE ZOYARI/REDUX, JUSTIN SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES, JASON HENRY/THE NEW YORK TIMES/REDUX

At the HUB, a coworking space for startups, in San Francisco

whose female-denigrating fraternity rant was leaked to Valleywag in 2014. (Spiegel promptly apologized.) Lee started her own firm, Cowboy Ventures, in 2012. Its mission would be to seed early-stage companies that improve daily life through technology. Leaning in over the lounge table between us, she said she found herself tougher on women, because she thought they needed to be tougher in this world. “There’s an attitude that is, ‘Boys will be boys,’ and there’s no societal consequences,” Lee complained. She argued that women were responsible for much of the online purchasing on the Internet. They shopped more at e-commerce companies. They played more social and casual games online than men. She saw them as responsible for the success of many tech companies. In a widely shared article on TechCrunch, Lee said that female users drove most traffic and made most companies successful—a feat for which they weren’t properly recognized. “Women are the routers and amplifiers of the social Web, and they are the rocket fuel of e-commerce,” she wrote in the article. “The ongoing debate about women in tech has been missing a key insight. If you figure out how to harness the power of female customers, you can rock the world.” Such power could be harnessed to force companies to treat women better, both their employees and their customers. Lee had a friend who thought the public should boycott companies that treated women badly, the same way people boycotted South African companies during apartheid. Two years later, though, Lee told me Silicon Valley had made some improvements in its attitude toward gender. In part because

of the dustup over Pao, Lee thinks companies are now more sensitive to the problem. “The number of women in venture capital has actually decreased in the past decade, but the awareness and sensitivity has hopefully improved in the past five years,” Lee said in the fall of 2016. “If you look at tech companies, they are starting to report their diversity numbers publicly.” But there’s still more work to be done. “We’re very far as an industry from being a reflection of our country and from reflecting the college graduate population, however,” she added. In Silicon Valley women’s conversation, gone were the light, feminine mysteries of the non-tech set. Here, boys would be boys, and girls would be boys. Husbands’ last names were often not taken, and girls stuck together. To Deming, it felt like such a small world. Everyone seemed to know everyone else. She never knew who she would meet there or who would give her the next break. These people she met, weirdos for sure, existed to break every rule and disrupt every institution: automotive, with electric cars and sharing apps; relationships, with loose definitions of fidelity; and politics, with pervasive libertarianism. Here she could do whatever she wanted, she thought. Copyright © 2017 by Alexandra Wolfe. From the forthcoming book Valley of the Gods: A Silicon Valley Story by Alexandra Wolfe, to be published by Simon & Schuster, Inc., on January 17. Printed by permission.

January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 55


NEWSFEED Ieshia Evans, a 35-year-old nurse, at a July 9 Black Lives Matter demonstration protesting police brutality in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in front of two heavily armed police officers in riot gear

100 Moments

WOMEN KILLED IT IN 2016 The last 365 days was one of the most thrilling and, for many, heartbreaking years ever. We slayed at the Olympics, took on sexism everywhere from the boardroom to the red carpet, and cheered on the first female presidential candidate backed by a major party (and held our heads high when she lost). Here’s to some of the most awesome moments in 2016 By JEN ORTIZ

1

JANUARY

VIRGINIA’S NEW OPEN-CARRY LAW TAKES EFFECT. A GROUP OF MOMS GETS A LOCAL CHARLOTTESVILLE WHOLE FOODS TO BAN GUNS SHORTLY THEREAFTER. NEVER FORGET: DON’T MESS WITH MOM.

56 MA R I E C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

JAN

4

A brief, signed by 113 attorneys sharing their abortion stories ahead of Whole Women’s Health v. Hellerstedt, is delivered to the U.S. Supreme Court. On June 27, the court ruled to prohibit restrictions on abortion that place “undue burden” on women.

FROM TOP: REUTERS/JONATHAN BACHMAN, COURTESY OF NATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR WOMEN. OPPOSITE PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: ALEX GOODLETT/GETTY IMAGES, KEVIN FRAYER/GETTY IMAGES, LIZ BEDDALL/METRO, MARC WARD/STOCKTREK IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES, MIKE COPPOLA/GETTY IMAGES, PABLO BLAZQUEZ DOMINGUEZ/GETTY IMAGES, GETTY IMAGES

WHAT INFORMED, SAVVY WOMEN NEED TO KNOW NOW


JAN

5

JAN

5

JAN

6

Hasbro includes Rey (Daisy Ridley’s character in Star Wars: The Force Awakens) in the Monopoly: Star Wars game after public outcry from fans that she was left out.

JAN

San Francisco swears in Vicki Hennessy as the city’s first female sheriff.

JAN

Laurie Cumbo, Brooklyn city councilwoman, schools a CNN reporter on victimblaming on-air (“We shouldn’t talk about whether she was drunk … properly dressed … the time of evening that it happened … ”) while discussing a horrific gang-rape case.

8

11

Comics creators boycott international lifetime achievement prize Grand Prix d’Angoulême because no women were nominated. There were 30 nominees. Seriously. Stephanie Ready and Ann Meyers make history as the first-ever pair of female NBA analysts to call a game.

JAN

13

JAN

15 A MODERN-DAY

JAN

20 JAN

13

7

JAN

Spanish parliament member Carolina Bescansa “causes stir” by bringing 5-monthold son Diego to work to care for and gasp! breast-feed him.

A CLASS OF NASA ASTRONAUTS IS HALF FEMALE—FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER. BONUS: THEY COULD BE ON THE FIRST TEAM TO GO TO MARS AS EARLY AS 2030.

27 JAN

MASTERPIECE: THE TATE MODERN APPOINTS ITS FIRST FEMALE DIRECTOR, FRANCES MORRIS.

JAN 7

Feminist and IRL superhero Emma Watson continues her global femaleempowerment mission and launches feminist book club Our Shared Shelf.

Luisa Fernanda Urrea, a policewoman in La Marina, Colombia, saves the life of an abandoned newborn baby found in the Colombian forest by breast-feeding her.

The NFL hires a fulltime female coach for the first time: Kathryn Smith for the Buffalo Bills. (She’s a special teams qualitycontrol coach, so she analyzes video to come up with ways for her team to dominate.)

JAN

The Coxless Crew, a six-person team of female British rowers, spends 257 days rowing more than 9,200 miles across the Pacific Ocean from California to Australia.

JAN

Following a blizzard, only female senators show up to the Senate Tuesday morning. Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) credits the “hardiness of women.” We credit their getshit-done-ness.

25

25

JAN

26

Aisholpan, a Mongolian teen, breaks a 2,000-year tradition to hunt on horseback— with help from an eagle(!). A documentary about the huntress premieres at the Sundance Film Festival.

The New York Jets’ cheerleaders win $325,000 in a class-action lawsuit against the NFL team for low wages and forcing them to work for free and pay for expenses out of pocket. V-I-C-T-O-R-Y, ladies!

FEBRUARY

1

Owing largely to the efforts of Brazilian obstetrician Dr. Adriana Melo, who first connected Zika to possible birth defects, the World Health Organization declares the virus a global public emergency.

FEB

3

A meet-up in Toronto organized by the professional troll, rape defender, and blogger behind the misogynistic website Return of Kings is canceled after the Toronto Newsgirls Boxing Club threatens to show up.

FEB

3

Karen Bernstein, cofounder and chairman of biopharmaceutical news site BioCentury Publications, and Kate Bingham, managing partner of SV Life Sciences Advisers, together pen an open letter to the industry about sexism in the field.

January 2017 MA R I EC L A I R E. COM 57


BADASS EDITION

A GROUP OF YAZIDI WOMEN, SOME FORMERLY HELD AS SEX SLAVES BY ISIS, WHO ARE PART OF AN ALL-FEMALE MILITIA KNOWN AS THE “SUN LADIES,” PLANS TO LAUNCH AN ATTACK IN MOSUL, IRAQ, AGAINST THE TERRORIST ORGANIZATION.

FEB

8

FEB

14

FEB

17

FEB

17

Samantha Bee becomes the first female host of a late-night satirical news show. We add Full Frontal with Samantha Bee (TBS) to our nighttime routine. A lesbian couple leaves a tip for the chef who insulted them, writing on their check: “Don’t tell lesbians they need a man on Valentine’s Day.” The couple’s photo of the note goes viral.

FEB

24

FEB

26

Channing Dungey is named ABC Entertainment president, making her the first African-American person to head programming at a major broadcast network. The Metropolitan Opera plans to stage its first opera by a woman since 1903. About time, no?

58 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

Jessica Chastain, Queen Latifah, and others join production company We Do It Together to create films and TV that empower women. We’re watching. Warning: This will make your heart burst. Eleven-year-old activist Marley Dias exceeds her #1000blackgirlbooks (promoting diversity in children’s literature) goal, collecting 4,000 books from donors as a resource for educators.

8

FEB

MARCH MAR

Loyola University undergraduate Emily TempleWood writes a Wikipedia entry about a female scientist for every harassing e-mail she gets.

MAR

President Barack Obama nominates Lori Robinson, the U.S. military’s first female combatant commander, to head U.S. Northern Command.

MAR

Fourteen-year-old rock climber Ashima Shiraishi becomes the youngest person, and the first female, to ever climb a V15 boulder problem (translation: it’s damn difficult) on Japan’s Mount Hiei.

8

18

22

MAR

Wonder Woman, played by Gal Gadot, debuts (and steals the spotlight) in superhero blockbuster Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice.

MAR

Five star players on the U.S. women’s soccer team file a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission against the U.S. Soccer Federation for being paid less per game and getting less money for expenses while traveling than their male Team USA counterparts.

25

29

APRIL APR

Hilde Lysiak, the 9-year-old crime reporter who won the Internet’s heart, breaks news of a murder in Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania.

APR

Tailor Kathryn Sargent becomes the first woman to open a bespoke shop on London’s Savile Row.

APR

SESAME STREET INTRODUCES ITS FIRST AFGHAN MUPPET, ZARI (SHE’S ALSO A ROLE MODEL FOR GIRLS).

APR

Boston Marathon bombing survivor Adrianne Haslet finishes the race three years after the professional dancer lost her leg to the terrorist attack.

APR

Destiny Watford wins the Goldman Environmental Prize for work to prevent construction of the largest incinerator on the Eastern Seaboard.

2

6

7

18

18

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NEWSFEED


MAY

26

APR

20

APR

23

APR

25

MAY

It’s all about the Tubmans, baby: Harriet Tubman bumps President Andrew Jackson as the face on the $20 bill (following backlash after the proposed idea of pushing Alexander Hamilton off the $10 bill was criticized by fans). Look out for the final redesign in 2020!

Beyoncé drops powerfully cathartic visual album Lemonade. This “Formation” lyric pretty much sums it up: “You know you that bitch when you cause all this conversation.” Captain Kristen Griest becomes the first woman able to lead an infantry unit into combat.

1

Activist Tess Asplund, 42, is photographed protesting, unflinchingly standing face-to-face, against 300 neo-Nazis at a Nordic Resistance Movement rally in Borlänge, Sweden.

MAY

3

MAY

6

Female tech activists, including Ellen Pao, launch Project Include to change the white-brodominated tech culture in Silicon Valley. Comedian Ali Wong delivers a hilarious, raunchy, critically acclaimed, justinsanely-damngood comedy special on Netflix— while seven and a half months pregnant.

Three women in a Santa Monica, California, restaurant prevent a potential date rape by warning another woman that her date poured something in her drink. (The jerk was arrested.)

JUNE JUN

JUN

Human-rights lawyer Amal Clooney announces an International Criminal Court investigation against ISIS for sexual violence and genocide of the Yazidi population in Iraq.

JUN

Twenty-eight (and counting!) big businesses, including L’Oréal USA and Spotify, sign the White House’s Equal Pay Pledge.

JUN

Mattel reveals Game Developer Barbie. (She can code!)

JUN

21st Century Fox names Stacey Snider its studio chief. (She’s one of only two female execs running a major Hollywood studio.)

JUN

Rome elects Virginia Raggi as its first female mayor.

JUN

Though they didn’t win, two trans women run for Congress on a major party ticket for the first time (Utah’s Misty K. Snow and Colorado’s Misty Plowright).

9

14

2

15 Ugh alert: Brock. Turner. (The Stanford University student found guilty of rape and sentenced to a measly six months in jail while we screamed into the abyss. You might remember his smiling class photo, which was often frustratingly used over his actual mug shot.) But it was the words of Turner’s victim—the rape survivor penned a letter to her attacker and read it aloud to him in court—that deserve attention, applause, all the feels.

16

20 29

JUN

29

Two female players are signed by a minor league baseball team (the Sonoma Stompers) for the first time since three women played on a coed professional baseball team in the 1950s Negro Leagues.

JULY

JUL

Lavish Reynolds live-streams her boyfriend’s death at the hands of police; it becomes a rallying cry for police violence protests.

JUL

Marvel’s Iron Man is recast as a black woman named Riri Williams in the comics series.

JUL

Emily Ratajkowski shuts down Piers Morgan (and his sexist antics) in a tweet-gone-viral.

6

6 7

JUL

9

Serena Williams wins her 22nd Grand Slam title; she continues to rock her queen-ofeverything title.

MA R I EC L A I R E. COM 59


NEWSFEED BADASS EDITION

31

The all-female reboot of Ghostbusters— starring Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, Kate McKinnon, and Leslie Jones— opens in theaters despite the desperate sexist pleas of fanboys on social media. It’s awesome, obviously.

9

JUL

11

JUL

13

Carla Hayden is named the first woman (and the first African-American) to head the Library of Congress in its 216-year history.

JUL

21

Then-GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump tells NBC reporter Katy Tur to “be quiet” during a press conference; she ignores the request. Later, on MSNBC, she says: “I’m not good at being quiet.”

1 AUG

10

JUL

25

AUG

12 First Lady Michelle Obama delivers her “when they go low, we go high” speech at the Democratic National Convention, sending chills down America’s spine.

JUL

18

JUL

19

CodePink (the women-led antiwar organization) activists stage protests inside the Republican National Convention.

JUL

29

SNL star Leslie Jones fights off trolls on Twitter, spurring the social-media company to ban Milo Yiannopoulos, the biggest troll of ’em all.

60 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

Equity, the first femalecentric (starring, directed, written, and produced by women) Wall Street movie, opens to rave reviews. RIGHT: Sandra Bullock (left) and Cate Blanchett are set to star in the all-female remake of Ocean’s Eleven

AUG

21

YURIKO KOIKE IS ELECTED TOKYO’S FIRST FEMALE GOVERNOR BY A LANDSLIDE, GRANTING HER AUTHORITY TO MAKE AND INSTILL POLICY CHANGE. Casting news for the all-female Ocean’s Eleven remake hits the Internet: Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett, Anne Hathaway. The Internet, in turn, loses its mind. Local Syrian women rip off their burkas and smoke cigarettes as residents of Manbij celebrate their rescue from ISIS by U.S.-backed forces. Women at the Olympics: More medals (61 to 55) for Team USA’s women, including more gold (27 to 18), than the guys, check. Breaking records (hi, Katie Ledecky) and making history (two words: Simone. Biles.), check.

The NHL hires its first full-time female coach: Dawn Braid for the Arizona Coyotes.

AUG

28

AUGUST

The world watches as Ieshia Evans stands up to police during a protest. (For more, turn to page 56.) Erykah Badu donates concert proceeds to help clear Detroit’s rape-kit backlog.

25 Ghazala Khan, mother of Muslim American war hero Captain Humayun Khan, fires back at Trump (who said she had “nothing to say … maybe she wasn’t allowed to have anything to say” during her husband’s speech at the Democratic National Convention) in a Washington Post Op-Ed.

JUL

JUL

AUG

Alicia Keys goes makeupfree at MTV’s Video Music Awards; the Grammy Award winner leads the #NoMakeup movement, announcing she’ll no longer wear makeup, both in private and public.

AUG

Vice chairwoman of Hillary Clinton’s campaign, Huma Abedin, leaves youknow-who.

AUG

Hewlett Packard Enterprise chief executive Meg Whitman, a Republican, hits the campaign trail for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

29 29

SEPTEMBER SEP

Six-time marathoner Rahaf Khatib becomes the first woman to wear a hijab on the cover of Women’s Running magazine.

SEP

The House of Representatives passes the Survivors’ Bill of Rights Act of 2016, protecting sexualassault survivors— thanks to activist Amanda Nguyen. (See page 98.)

SEP

After Gretchen Carlson files a harassment suit against then–Fox News chairman/CEO Roger Ailes, Fox settles: $20M.

1

6

6

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11

JUL


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SEP

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SEP

SEP

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SEP

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SEP CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: DARYL SOLOMON/GETTY IMAGES, APHEE MESSER, JOSEPH CLARK/GETTY IMAGES, GETTY IMAGES, JIM WATSON/GETTY IMAGES, JUSTIN SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES, TREVOR COLLENS/AFP/GETTY IMAGES, DAVIES AND STARR/GETTY IMAGES

7

SEP

8

Miss Missouri 2016 Erin O’Flaherty becomes the first openly gay contestant to compete in the Miss America pageant. Oscar-nominated director Ava DuVernay’s new series Queen Sugar debuts with female directors for Every. Single. Episode. University of Richmond student Cecilia Carreras goes public about the university’s alleged mishandling of her sexual-assault complaint against an undergraduate athlete. Zendaya speaks out on Snapchat about being discriminated against at a supermarket by a store clerk.

SEP

20

SEP

21

27

OCTOBER OCT

9

OCT

10

SEP

Gigi Hadid elbows an attacker when he grabs her from behind while leaving a fashion show in Milan.

SEP

#IAmMyOwnGuardian: Almost 15,000 Saudi women sign a petition calling for an end to male guardianship.

26

Anne Lehane, 18, protests a Trump rally in the Best. Shirt. Ever. It reads:

OCT

Wonder Woman is named a United Nations Honorary Ambassador for the Empowerment of Women and Girls.

OCT

Thousands of women around the globe wear black and flood the streets for “Black Wednesday” protests demanding an end to violence against women.

13

Tashala Dangel Geyer, a black woman from Daytona Beach, Florida, Facebook live-streams herself painting her body white to protest police brutality; the video goes viral.

Tamika Cross, an ob-gyn from Houston, is questioned by a flight attendant when helping a sick passenger. Her Facebook post goes viral and inspires black female doctors to tweet #WhatADoctorLooksLike.

OCT

Miss Iceland Arna Ýr Jónsdóttir drops out of the pageant after the owner of Miss Grand International tells her to lose weight.

OCT

At 2:38 p.m., women across Iceland walk out of work to protest the country’s are-youkidding-me-18-percent gender pay gap.

24 24

NOVEMBER NOV

CoverGirl names popular YouTube beauty vlogger Nura Afia, 24, its first CoverGirl in a hijab.

NOV

Native American women stand out as leaders in the Dakota Access Pipeline protests in North Dakota.

3

GRAB MY PUSSY. I DARE YOU.

19

22 9

Iranian women hop on their bikes and defy Ayatollah Ali Khamenei one month after he bans women from cycling. #IranianWomenLoveCycling

Before a playoff game, the WNBA’s Indiana Fever kneel during the national anthem to protest race-motivated police violence.

21

Sixteen-year-old Natalie Hampton launches the Sit With Us app to help teens find lunch buddies and avoid bullying. Sorry, Mean Girls.

U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren lays the smackdown on John Stumpf, the now-former CEO of Wells Fargo, telling him he should resign for scamming customers (he did on October 12).

21

SEP

SEP

Fifteen-year-old Rayouf Alhumedhi sends Unicode Consortium, the organization that develops emojis, a proposal for a hijab emoji. Fingers crossed!

SEP

Indian acid attack survivor Reshma Qureshi walks New York Fashion Week for Archana Kochhar to promote the #TakeBeautyBack campaign.

Former Miss Universe Alicia Machado calls out Trump’s racist, body-shaming remarks during her reign.

SEP

4

9 NOV

Hillary Clinton ends her history-making campaign as the first female presidential nominee of a major party. (There were some wins, too, like Catherine Cortez Masto of Nevada, the first-ever Latina senator, and Pramila Jayapal, the first Indian-American woman elected to the House.) But the fight isn’t over. In the words of Clinton: “I know we have still not shattered that highest and hardest glass ceiling, but someday, someone will, and hopefully sooner than we might think right now.” January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 61


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YEAR EVER

DANI BRUBAKER. FASHION EDITOR: SEAN KNIGHT. HAIR: MAKIKO NARA FOR BUMBLE & BUMBLE AT WALTER SCHUPFER MANAGEMENT. MAKEUP: JEN FIAMENGO FOR LAURA MERCIER AT WALTER SCHUPFER MANAGEMENT

HALEY LU RICHARDSON IS KICKING OFF 2017 BY MAKING YOU SCREAM. (SEE HER IN M. NIGHT SHYAMALAN’S SPLIT.) BUT OFFSCREEN, HER NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION IS TO DANCE ALL NIGHT LONG AGE 21. LIVES IN L.A. YOU KNOW HER FROM The Edge of Seventeen (2016). GOOD VIBES ONLY I want to appreciate everything great that is happening and not dwell on the stuff that isn’t perfect. Once you get into a habit of thinking positively and not expecting, quality of life is just way better. INTO THE WILD I made a resolution last year to find a healthy place to live. I found a cool place outside of the city. It’s in the mountains; I feel like I’m camping all the time. NEXT BIG THING I did competitive contemporary dance for a billion years. But I’ve been so busy with acting that whenever I have time off, all I want to do is sleep. My New Year’s resolution: to get my butt back into dancing regularly. In fact, you know what? I’m going to go to a dance class tomorrow. KISS AND TELL Two years ago, my boyfriend and I went on a cruise to the Bahamas, and that was the first time I ever had a legit New Year’s kiss. It was pretty epic. E AT, DRINK, AND BE MERRY I do the diet thing every year where I’m like, You’re not going to have carbs. And then I’m eating mac and cheese. If we can’t eat fun, amazing, scrumptious, fattening foods, then what’s the point? THE BIG NIGHT I might go home to Phoenix and celebrate New Year’s Eve with family. Or maybe a hiking trip. But who knows? I might just go to Vegas. FOLLOW HER @haleyluhoo. —Jen Ortiz

SHORT-SLEEVE TOP $495, LONGSLEEVE TOP $350, 3.1 PHILLIP LIM; 31PHILLIPLIM.COM.

@PLAY YOUR GUIDE TO GOING OUT, STAYING IN, AND GETTING AWAY

January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 63


PLAY

@

#GOALS

CLEAN YOUR PLATE

Eat better while still indulging? Think vegan. Just ask chef Chloe Coscarelli, whose café, By Chloe (in NYC and L.A.), feeds both herbivores and carnivores By PRIYA KRISHNA Being vegan isn’t hard, really! “You’d be surprised how many vegan meals you already eat,” says Chloe Coscarelli. “And going vegan isn’t extreme, like cutting out carbs or drastically dropping your calorie intake. It’s not going to shock your body.” Plus, you’ll eat better. “Because you need a level of transparency when it comes to ingredients, vegan food will naturally steer you away from processed foods or artificial flavorings. You make better choices. Because I’m vegan, for example, I would never find myself eating ranch dressing out of a bottle or Cheetos.” But you can still indulge. “It’s not the strictest diet in the world. I can still eat doughnuts, pancakes [see recipe below], cake, waffles, and creamy pastas. Bonus: You can eat cookie dough without worrying about the raw egg needed to make actual cookies. Even dark chocolate is vegan!”

YOUR VEGAN SECRET-WEAPON KIT

Veganism is now a full-blown, #foodporn-worthy movement, counting followers like Beyoncé and the Kardashians

The guilty pleasure: CHEESE The vegan version: NUTRITIONAL YEAST

“Full of B vitamins, low in calories, and it has a nutty, cheesy flavor.”

The guilty pleasure: WHIPPED CREAM The vegan version: COCONUT MILK

“A great ingredient for replacing just about any kind of dairy.”

CHLOE COSCARELLI’S OLIVE OIL PANCAKES Ingredients 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 tbsp. baking powder ½ tsp. salt ¾ cup water 3 tbsp. pure maple syrup, plus extra for serving Olive oil

64 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

The guilty pleasure: ALFREDO SAUCE The vegan version: ALMOND CREAM

Next Stop: Cape Town This year, you’re taking your far-flung dream vacay— here’s your guide to Africa’s southernmost metropolis, Cape Town, South Africa By AND R EW R IC H DALE

STAY La Grenadine has a private courtyard garden and six rustic rooms that feel a bit like you’ve taken a wormhole to Provence. From $110 per night.

DRINK The Power & the Glory is the cool-kid coffee shop that transitions to a wine bar with pours from the local better-than-Napa wine country.

“Avoid a food coma, and you’ll be able to do a yoga class after.”

(SERVES 2–3)

Method In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, and salt. In a separate small bowl, whisk water and syrup. Add to flour mixture and whisk until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should have lumps. Drizzle a large nonstick skillet with olive oil over medium-high heat. For each pancake, pour ¼ cup of batter onto the skillet, and when small bubbles appear in the center of the pancake, flip it. Cook on the other side until lightly browned, about 1 minute. Repeat with the remaining batter, adding more oil to the skillet as needed. Serve with maple syrup or a light drizzle of olive oil.

CHILL Take a 45-minute drive to Noordhoek, an old Dutch colony with a secluded beach for sunbathing, horseback riding, and views.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: SAM GILLESPIE/EYEEM/GETTY IMAGES, COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES (2), PANORAMIC IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES, EMILY SUZANNE MCDONALD/GETTY IMAGES, AARON GRAUBART/TRUNK ARCHIVE

Make a RESOLUTION

It’s ’bout that time. Here are some New Year’s plans worth sticking to. (Pancakes included!)

Cape Town International Airport


ADOPTED. The Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption is committed to finding permanent, loving families for the 107,000 children waiting to be adopted from foster care in the United States.

Help us find forever.

davethomasfoundation.org/marieclaire


PLAY

@

MOVIES

Blockbusters You’ll

WATCH THIS YEAR

A guide to 2017’s buzziest box-office titles from two experts (the hosts of the crazy-popular podcast Who? Weekly) on what’s a BFD—and what isn’t By LIN DSE Y WE BE R and BO BBY F I N GE R

WHO’S IN IT? Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan. WHO CARES? Everyone who read the books, people curious about BDSM (but not curious enough to actually try it), and fans of the first movie who felt like Rita Ora didn’t have enough dialogue. WILL WE SEE IT? As Ora’s most staunch admirers, we’ll be there opening night.

Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson in Fifty Shades Darker Emma Watson in Beauty and the Beast

THE GREAT WALL

(February 17) WHO’S IN IT?

Matt Damon, Pedro Pascal, Willem Dafoe. WHO CARES? Lovers of historical epics, Ben Affleck, and all those who associate China with Matt Damon. WILL WE SEE IT? Do you like apples? Wait, don’t answer that.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (March 17)

WHO’S IN IT? Emma Watson,

Luke Evans, Gugu MbathaRaw. WHO CARES? Fans of singing tableware, Gaston truthers. WILL WE SEE IT? Of course. Don’t believe us? Ask the dishes. Gal Gadot in Wonder Woman

66 MA R I E C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (July 7)

WHO’S IN IT? Tom Holland, Donald Glover, Zendaya. WHO CARES? The same people who always see superhero movies. Yes, you. WILL WE SEE IT? If past is really prelude, we’ll be seeing this, Spider-Man: Graduation, and all the way up to Spider-Man: Retirement.

WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES

(July 14) WHO’S IN IT? Judy Greer, Woody Harrelson, Chad Rook, Steve Zahn. WHO CARES? Lovers of CGI, people who are secretly afraid of their pets. WILL WE SEE IT? Zahn and Greer? It’s a sidekick’s paradise! We’re there.

IT (September 8) WHO’S IN IT? Bill Skarsgård. WHO CARES? Fans of scary clowns. WILL WE SEE IT? Do we look

like fans of scary clowns to you?

STAR WARS: EPISODE VIII (December 15) WHO’S

WONDER WOMAN

IN IT? Daisy Ridley, Adam Driver, Oscar Isaac, Carrie Fisher, Gwendoline Christie. WHO CARES? Everyone, apparently. WILL WE SEE IT? Yes, apparently.

Gal Gadot, Chris Pine, Robin Wright. WHO CARES? Those of us who asked for a Harley Quinn standalone feature and instead got Suicide Squad. WILL WE SEE IT? With Monster’s Patty Jenkins as director, count us in.

(December 22) WHO’S IN IT? Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson, Hailee Steinfeld. WHO CARES? Karaoke enthusiasts looking for the next thrill. WILL WE SEE IT? Of course, but that doesn’t mean we’re not still grappling with the existence of Pentatonix.

(June 2) WHO’S IN IT?

PITCH PERFECT 3

Your new music obsession: Red Rosamond

MUSIC

QUEUED UP NEXT

Meet Red Rosamond: the 31-year-old L.A.-based pop-meets-soul singer with serious pipes set to drop her debut album this year HER SOUND “Cinematic and soulful.” IF LOOKS COULD KILL “Bold and daring and sexy. That’s what I aim for every day when I open up my closet.” GOOD VIBES “I hope people feel powerful when they listen to my music—like a boss bitch, whether it’s a man or a woman.” I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DOES IT “When I create music, I start with visuals. I’ll collect imagery (think: film stills, art and fashion photography) and make an image map on a wall. And I’ll let the images dictate what songs want to come. For this record, I looked at a lot of Helmut Newton and Hans Feurer.” HELLO, LOVER “All of my songs are either about heartbreak or being in love.” SHOW GIRL “I want a Red Rosamond show to feel like a Tina Turner show in the ’70s: energetic, costumes, the whole shebang.” PLANS FOR 2017 “Basically, world domination.” —J.O.

FROM TOP: LILY CUMMINGS, COURTESY OF UNIVERSAL PICTURES, COURTESY OF DISNEY, CLAY ENOS/© DC COMICS. OPPOSITE PAGE: GAY: JAY GRABIEC. ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

FIFTY SHADES DARKER (February 10)


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BOOKS

What We’re READING By S T E P H O P I T Z

1. IDAHO by Emily Ruskovich (Random House) Ann; her husband, Wade; and Wade’s first wife, Jenny, tell this eerie story about what the heart is capable of fathoming and what the hand is capable of executing. The mystery surrounding Jenny’s prison sentence and Ann and Wade’s coupling haunts the Idaho woods where they live in this mesmerizing debut.

2. EVERYTHING YOU WANT ME TO BE by Mindy Mejia (Atria/Emily Bestler Books)

Hattie Hoffman has her sights set on the bright lights of New York. Until, in the spirit of The Lovely Bones and Everything I Never Told You, the high school senior turns up brutally murdered the night after starring as Lady Macbeth in the school play. You’ll race through the

glimpses into Hattie’s past that lead to a compelling, unfortunate end.

3. THE RIVER AT NIGHT by Erica Ferencik (Gallery/Scout Press)

A girls’ trip, to middle-of-nowhere Maine, to shoot rapids—what could go wrong? Did we mention that one of the friends has an insatiable attraction to danger? This novel quickly becomes a dark, moretwisted-than-the-river tale of secrets as night falls in the wilderness.

4. FEVER DREAM by

5. THE FUTURES by Anna

Samanta Schweblin (Riverhead)

Pitoniak (Lee Boudreaux Books)

The title says it all. It also says: Never have I ever been so afraid to read a book right before bed. In this translated work, a small town is probably being poisoned by its water supply. But the absence of conventional medicine means the residents are relying on something more sinister for a cure. And then vacationers enter the picture …

This winter’s cathartic read: a story that feels familiar yet wholly original, like every heartbreak ever. Follow Julia and Evan from freshman year at Yale to their postgraduation lives in New York City. As they get older, the sum of tough decisions, flippant actions, and destructive behavior determines the course of their own hearts.

BEHIND THE PAGES

EARTH GIRLS AREN’T EASY

Prolific author and culture critic Roxane Gay isn’t interested in being likable—and neither are the women in her new short-story collection, Difficult Women (Grove Press) MARIE CLAIRE: Why the title “Difficult Women”? ROXANE GAY: The collection was originally called Strange God, and then I thought about what connects all of the stories: women who are not necessarily likable and who do not always make the best choices. MC: Why is “unlikable women” such a literary buzzword right now? RG: The expectation we have culturally for women is that we’re supposed to show up and look pretty, to be pleasant and demure—unless, of course, we are in the bedroom, where we’re supposed to do whatever a man

wants. We have the same expectations for women in fiction as we do in the real world. I wrote about likability and gender in Bad Feminist [Gay’s 2014 New York Times best seller], and I think it’s nonsense. Women need to be allowed to be complex and to be whole. Our cultural definition of likability is designed to constrain women. MC: Tell us about your next project: the Marvel Comics series World of Wakanda. RG: It’s a lot of fun to make things up in the Marvel Universe and to write a story about black women, which is such a rarity in comics. It’s very different from things that I’ve done, and yet there are similarities. Storytelling is storytelling. —S.O.

January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 67


1. ULTRA-THIN TIP RECREATES TINY BROW HAIRS

2. PRECISION SPOOLIE BRUSH BLENDS AND GROOMS

BROW DEFINER

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DEFINE YOUR BROWS, EXPRESS YOURSELF. ULTRA-THIN TIP, SUPER-PRECISE RESULTS. BECAUSE YOU’RE WORTH IT.™

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AUTOMATIC PENCIL IN 3 NATURAL-LOOKING SHADES

©2017 L’Oréal USA, Inc.


BEAUTY BEAUTY/HEALTH DIRECTOR ERIN FLAHERTY

JASON LLOYD-EVANS

At Ferragamo, neon shadow gets a fresh update

BRIGHT FUTURE +THE NEXT BIG THINGS IN HAIR, SKINCARE, AND MORE +THE NEW YEAR’S HOTTEST #FITSPO +HOLLYWOOD’S BEST-KEPT ANTIAGING SECRET REVEALED

January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 69


Olivia Holt ©J&JCI 2017


If your acne’s seen it all, it’s time to see what light can do.

New Neutrogena Light Therapy Acne Mask Turn it on and this revolutionary mask does what no ordinary acne treatment can. With the clinically proven light therapy technology dermatologists use, blue light penetrates just beneath the skin’s surface to kill acne-causing bacteria, while red light goes deeper to reduce inflammation. Turn on the light. Turn acne off.™ See what’s possible. Explore more at acnemask.com


BEAUTY 1

ROOT CONCEALERS

New products for hiding root regrowth look more believable than ever. Eufora’s powder goes on dry, so there’s no risk of the color smearing on your scalp or clothes. L’Oréal Professionnel’s spray has a slightly reflective finish—like natural hair—thanks to makeup-grade pigments in a silicone base. And Rita Hazan’s cult-favorite root concealer now comes in a chubby pencil for precision camouflaging. 1. EUFORA Conceal, $29. 2. L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL Hair Touch Up, $25. 3. RITA HAZAN Root Concealer Temple + Brow Touch-Up Stick, $25.

1

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Mani Rehab

2

Who: London-based

Voyage must-have:

3

VANITY FILES

THE LATEST IN HAIR, FRAGRANCE, AND SKINCARE By Jennifer Goldstein

VIKTOR&ROLF Sage Spell Eau de Parfum, $220.

LIFT YOUR SPIRITS

Viktor&Rolf’s studio is a 17th-century Amsterdam town house that’s said to be haunted. “There’s a phone in one room that rings, but no one is ever on the other line,” explains Viktor Horsting, one-half of the designer duo. “We had a woman come to cleanse with sage, but I can’t tell if it worked.” The smudging process did, however, offer inspiration for a new fragrance: Sage Spell, a blend of sage, pink pepper, and grapefruit, is one of six scents in Viktor&Rolf’s Magic collection, which launches next month. Enchanting, no?

72 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

makeup artist and Lancôme global makeup creative director.

New concealers hide regrowth— especially along your part

These strengthening, moisturizing treatments are disguised as polish— Sally Hansen’s is creamy and bold; Essie’s is a sheer color wash— so your tips look good while they grow. 1. SALLY HANSEN Color Therapy in Reflection Pool, $9. 2. ESSIE Treat Love & Color in Sheers to You, $10.

LISA ELDRIDGE

BETTER SKIN OTC

Doctors prescribe Differin to treat acne because the topical retinoid gel reduces inflammation and normalizes skin exfoliation. (Insider secret: Shown to reduce wrinkles and fade spots caused by sun damage, it’s sometimes used off-label as an antiager.) Now you can get those benefits without a trip to the derm, because the gel has been approved for over-the-counter sale. The application rules remain the same: A pea-size dab is all you need for your entire face. DIFFERIN Gel Acne Treatment, $30 for 90-day use. For information on where to buy, see Shopping Directory.

“If you wear a sheet mask on a plane, you look like a crazy person. I do Lancôme’s Hydra Zen mask because it’s clear but really moisturizing. You leave it on the whole flight—no need to rinse.”

1

Post-travel recovery: “If I’m sore after a flight, This Works’ In Transit Muscle Therapy, a rollon oil, totally relaxes my shoulder muscles. It gets a bit warm, like Tiger Balm.”

International find:

“New Zealand was doing organic and natural way before the rest of the world, and it’s known for beauty products made with manuka honey. The brand Living Nature makes good ones.”

Discovered abroad:

“Austria has magnesiumrich salt mines, and you can get the salts for a lovely soak. Stress eats up magnesium in your body; a bath with magnesium flakes— Kneipp’s are great—really helps with replenishing, because you absorb the mineral transdermally.”

Local favorite:

“Priestlands Birch makes a birch water and creams with birch sap. I discovered them at the farmers market in Hampstead Heath, near where I live in London.” 1. LANCÔME Hydra Zen Masque, $59. 2. THIS WORKS In Transit Muscle Therapy, $33.

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STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. PHOTOGRAPHS, FROM LEFT: NICHOLAS ONG/THELICENSINGPROJECT.COM, THIBAULT DESPLATS FOR LANCÔME

HAVING A MOMENT

BEAUTY PASSPORT


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STILL LIFES: JEFFREY WESTBROOK/STUDIO D. PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: JULIA NONI/TRUNK ARCHIVE, MELODIE JENG/GETTY IMAGES, ALO CEBALLOS/GETTY IMAGES, WAYNE TIPPETTS/BLAUBLUT-EDITION.COM

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Model Binx Walton. LEFT: Ataui Deng in Adidas

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10 Model Lineisy Montero. RIGHT: Bella Hadid sporting Nike athleisure

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INSPIRATION BOARD

#FITSPO

Once upon a time, supermodels subsisted on champagne and cigarettes. No more, my friends! The most beautiful people in the world are adding insult to injury by blasting their insanely healthy, super­ human devotion to boutique fitness and macrobiotic diets across social networks. Of course, you may be inspired to hole up Beauty Director in front of Netflix with a Shackburger, or, ER IN F LAH ERT Y sigh, get with the program. Personally, I’m sticking with this (crazy­easy) plan: I don’t work out every day, but I do make physical activity happen every other day. It’s not foolproof. Travel and work and the bananaspalooza of life often make it tricky. But for the most part, anyone can keep this noncommittal commitment, even if some days it’s just 30 minutes on a treadmill as opposed to a one­and­a­ half­hour Bikram session. This has made me an expert on gym­friendly beauty regimens. Dove’s excellent dry shampoo is my bestie (I do hot yoga Monday night, then get a blow­ out the next morning and rock it all week). Face wipes— Neutrogena’s rule—are a must. Oh, and thanks to Glossier’s Super Glow Serum, I can fake that model­fresh­from­ Spinning­class look on those aforementioned lazy days off. 1. BED HEAD Mini Series Line Up Straightener, $20. 2. DOVE Refresh+Care Detox & Purify Dry Shampoo, $4. 3. PLANT Re:Fresh Organic Toning Facial Mist, $12. 4. GILLETTE Venus Snap Razor, $13. 5. CLARISONIC Mia Fit, $219. 6. L’ORÉAL PARIS Revitalift Bright Reveal Brightening Peel Pads, $20. 7. GLOSSIER Super Glow Serum, $28. 8. SUPERGOOP! Barre to Bar Beauty Set, $25. 9. PACIFICA Underarm Deodorant Wipes, $9. 10. SAKARA Classic Superfood Granola, $16. 11. L’ORÉAL PARIS Voluminous Feline Mascara, $9. 12. BIORÉ Baking Soda Cleansing Scrub, $10. 13. NEUTROGENA Naturals Purifying Makeup Remover Cleansing Towelettes, $8. 14. MILK MAKEUP Cooling Water, $24. For information on where to buy, see Shopping Directory.

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BEAUTY

What I Love ABOUT ME In the city known for its Victorian architecture and rich history, these Portland, Mainers keep it modern and fresh

INTERVIEWS BY CLAIRE FONTANETTA PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOEL BARHAMAND

STEPHANY CASANOVA, 23

“My almond-shaped eyes show a ton of emotion; you can pretty much read me like a book.”

Guest Editor: GRACE FOXEN, 27

MARADI TRAY, 22

“Having hair this long goes back to the cultural roots of my Cambodian family. It’s a major part of my identity.”

CHANEL LEWIS, 25

“When I was young, someone told me to own my big lips. Now, I make them the focal point of my entire look with a bold red lipstick.”

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The trendy fashion student gives us the in on what to do in the New England waterfront town. Good eats: Drifters Wife (drifterswife.com) is the perfect spot for an easy dinner with friends or a romantic date night. The wine list alone is worth the trip, and the fresh-baked sourdough bread isn’t bad, either. Trust. Cool digs: Built in 1897, the Inn at St. John (innatstjohn.com) is one of Portland’s oldest hotels still in operation. Night out: The Bearded Lady’s Jewel Box (thebeardedladysjewelbox.com) is a favorite stop for drinks. All of its cocktails are delish, but try one featuring the house-made “leather” bitters. Must-do: America on Tap (January 28; americaontap.com) is a great chance to sample more than 100 craft beers from across the country—including many varieties from breweries in Maine. Retail therapy: Jen Burrall’s (jenburralldesigns.com) ocean-inspired jewelry pieces have a whimsical vibe to them— they’re totally gorgeous!

FOR YOUR CHANCE TO BE A GUEST EDITOR, POST A PHOTO OF YOURSELF IN YOUR CITY ON INSTAGRAM USING #MCTRAVELS.


LET LIFE IN

©2017 P&G

to your hair and your head


BEAUTY WHAT I LOVE ABOUT ME

HUNTER WISE, 31

“The pop of color in my hair elevates all of my outfits to a whole other level.”

HAILEY DAHLBERG, 21 (left) “I love my short hair and its mermaidesque light-turquoise hue.”

CLAIRE FREDERICK, 20

“Maybe it’s the painter in me, but I tend to stick to a specific palette of muted tones, like this lavender lipstick.”

Hoping can’t keep your kids from using drugs. But you can. And we can help.

ABIGAIL JOHNSONRUSCANSKY, 22

“To me, beauty is being genuine and caring. I try to be the best person I can be every single day.”

JUDICAELLE IRAKOZE, 21 “My hair is very fragile and requires a lot of moisturizer. These twists help protect it in the winter.”

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FOR YOUR CHANCE TO BE A GUEST EDITOR, POST A PHOTO OF YOURSELF IN YOUR CITY ON INSTAGRAM USING #MCTRAVELS.

Call our toll-free helpline, 1-855-DRUGFREE. Or visit us at drugfree.org.

© Partnership for a Drug-Free America, Inc. Partnership is a nonprofit, 501(c)(3) charitable organization.


themix PROMOTION

january 2017

Marie Claire’s monthly concoction of all things you will be trying, sharing, shopping, and talking about TRY

STASH SJP Come and Find It. The addictive new fragrance from Sarah Jessica Parker is an absolute rule breaker. STASH is Sarah Jessica Parker’s most personal and provocative fragrance. The secret is out. First 200 readers who enter at MarieClaire.com/promotions will receive a complimentary sample of STASH. Exclusively at ULTA stores and ulta.com/stash. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. SJP January Sweepstakes. Sponsored by Hearst Communications, Inc. Beginning December 13, 2016 at 12:01 AM (ET) through January 9, 2017 at 11:59 PM (ET), go to marieclaire.com/ promotions on a computer or wireless device and complete the entry form pursuant to the on-screen instructions. Two hundred (200 ) winners will receive a sample of the SJP STASH Eau de Parfum. ARV: $1.13. Total ARV: $225. Important Notice: You may be charged for visiting the mobile website in accordance with the terms of your service agreement with your carrier. Odds of winning will depend upon the total number of eligible entries received. Must have reached the age of majority and be a legal resident of the 50 United States, including the District of Columbia. Void in Puerto Rico and where prohibited by law. Sweepstakes subject to complete offi cial rules available at marieclaire.com/promotions.

EVENT

From the Studio to the Streets to the Timberland® Store On Thursday, November 3, Marie Claire joined Timberland® to host a night of art, fashion, and footwear with the talented street artist and designer Renée Snelson (XORS) at the Timberland® store in SoHo, New York City. Guests mingled and watched Renée create a SHOEFITI masterpiece live. Four guests won a one-of-a-kind SHOEFITI design along with the Timberland® footwear that inspired them! timberland.com/womens @Timberland #ModernTrail

!

CONNECT

Get Career-Connected Searching for that perfect job? Looking for professional advice from like-minded women? Expand your career community and join the Marie Claire Career Network today. Join at linkedin.com/groups/4075205/profile.

CAREER NETWORK

For more exclusive offers, special events and promotions, and up-to-the-minute mc updates, visit: MARIECLAIRE.COM/PROMOTIONS

FACEBOOK.COM/MARIECLAIRE

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INSTAGRAM.COM/MARIECLAIREMAG

@MARIECLAIREMAG


STRAIGHT ANTIAGING NEWS

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BEAUTY

TALK

FOR THE GRIN

STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. PHOTOGRAPHS, FROM LEFT: SGRANITZ/WIREIMAGE, GARY GERSHOFF/WIREIMAGE, ERIK HEIN/ABC/GETTY IMAGES, BILL DAVILA/FILMMAGIC/GETTY IMAGES, KMAZUR/WIREIMAGE, FREDERICK M. BROWN/GETTY IMAGES, PATRICK MCMULLAN/GETTY IMAGES, JASON MERRITT/GETTY IMAGES. OPPOSITE PAGE: LAURENT DARMON/TRUNK ARCHIVE

No A-lister is blessed with naturally perfect teeth. Courtney Dunlop dissects Hollywood’s biggest antiaging secret—and it has nothing to do with needles

t

here is endless talk of celebrities and their forever-youthful faces and toned bodies. But being well on the other side of 30 with nary a wrinkle or bulge in sight is only part of the story: A much-less-discussed weapon in the aging arsenal? Their dental work. Teeth naturally show wear and tear over time— stains, chips, and flattened shapes from chewing and grinding are all equal-opportunity signs of aging. No one—not even genetically blessed models and celebrities—can avoid it, so you can pretty much guarantee that anyone past 29 with a “perfect” smile has had cosmetic dentistry work done, most likely in the form of porcelain veneers. Just add it to the list of status symbols, up there with injected foreheads, barre-sculpted bums, and blown-out hair. In this era of women striving to have it all and look good while doing it, we want in on the megawatt smile game, too. At his chic NYC office, superstar cosmetic dentist Dr. Michael Apa tends to the pearly whites of stars such as Chloë Sevigny and Lea Michele, and even jetsets to his thriving practice in Dubai on the regular, where he treats members of the royal family. “We can do just about anything with veneers,” says Apa, who uses the thin pieces of tooth-shaped porcelain that are bonded to existing teeth to reshape ground-down teeth, cover stains and cracks, and even reposition crooked teeth and relieve the crowding that most people assume can only be treated with braces or clear aligners. “Shifting starts to appear in your late 20s and early 30s, just as you’re beginning the prime of your career,” says Apa. In other words, just as you start killing it at the office and needing to look especially polished, “you’re clenching, grinding, putting more pressure on your teeth,” he explains. Veneers

can also reset your bite so you’re not further pushing your teeth into misalignment. But it’s not just about the teeth. People subconsciously associate gum loss with aging—without really understanding what they’re seeing. “Starting in your 30s, you begin to lose the triangle of gum between the teeth and you get what I call black triangles,” Apa says. A telltale sign is if you’re noticing food getting stuck in your teeth where it didn’t before. “The way that we place the veneers, we pinch off the black triangle so it looks like where the gum meets the tooth is thick and full like it was when you were 20,” he says. The overall effect of this smile makeover wizardry is profound—Apa’s Instagram feed (@doctorapa) is an endless scroll of remarkable before-and-afters. But, of course, the key is getting natural-looking veneers. You must—must!—see pictures of a dentist’s work before committing, and if you see flat, white, Chicletlike teeth, run far away. “Master ceramist” Jason Kim hand-creates gorgeous porcelain veneers for Apa and other top dentists to install. The best veneers, Kim says, are milky-white like expensive china; he layers ceramics so there’s a density on the bottom and translucency on top, just like real teeth. All this work and attention to detail comes at a cost—we’re talking $1,000 to $3,500 per tooth. But Kim points out that it’s not just about vanity: “Enamel wears away; the tooth structure changes. Eventually, it leads to tooth loss in old age. It’s better to rebuild the teeth into normal shapes and with the best functionality when you still have natural tooth structure to work with. It gets harder and harder to restore the longer you put it off.” Hmm, maybe that Bali vacation can wait—suddenly we want to put our money where our mouth is.

Instant, at-home antiaging tooth boosters

APA BEAUTY Pink Oral Gel, $25.

TULIP Paste in Coconut Mint, $6.

QUIP Metal Electric Toothbrush and Refill Plan, $40 for starter set.

GLO SCIENCE Brilliant Personal Teeth Whitening Device in Glitter Gold, $250.

For information on where to buy, see Shopping Directory.

BRIGHT STARS

In Hollywood, A-list cosmetic dental work is as ubiquitous as green juice and selfies. Here, a gallery of (potentially-altered) pearly whites

Hilary Duff, 2016. BELOW: In 2002

Demi Moore, 2003. BELOW: In 1982

Alessandra Ambrosio, 2015. BELOW: In 2002

Jennifer Hudson, 2015. BELOW: In 2006

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BEAUTY

NEXT Big THING

The future (of lips) looks golden at Manish Arora’s spring show

MAJOR BREAKTHROUGHS

A LITTLE LIFE ADVICE THAT ALSO APPLIES TO YOUR BEAUTY REGIMEN: DON’T BE BASIC. HERE, THE NEWEST ADVANCES IN MAKEUP, HAIR, AND SKINCARE THAT MAKE LOOKING GORGEOUS EASIER AND QUICKER (NOT TO MENTION MORE FUN) 1

3 2

LIP TRANSFORMERS

There are almost as many new ways to apply lipcolor as there are shades to choose from. Take Berrisom’s Oops My Lip Tint: Apply a thick layer, wait five to 10 minutes as it dries to a Fruit Roll-Up–esque sheen, then peel off the rubbery gel to leave a stain that lasts up to 12 hours. Winky Lux’s clear balm reacts to the pH level of your lips to turn a custom shade of pink, but the real excitement is the perfectly preserved natural flower levitating inside the bullet (how cool is that?). And Lime Crime has developed a liquid lipcolor that gives major color payoff with the chrome-like finish of a luxury sports car. —Jennifer Goldstein 1. BERRISOM Oops My Lip Tint Pack in Pure Pink, $5. 2. WINKY LUX Flower Balm in Yellow, $15. 3. LIME CRIME Metallic Matte Velvetines Liquid Lipstick in Lana, $20.

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POLISH ON POINT

LAST YEAR’S SPRAY-ON NAIL POLISHES MAY HAVE BEEN COOL IN THEORY, BUT THEY WEREN’T EXACTLY EASY TO USE— OR PRECISE. WE’RE MORE PSYCHED ABOUT THIS MANI MARKER. NOT ONLY DOES THE CHISELED TIP LAY DOWN LACQUER NEATLY AND ACCURATELY, BUT THE FORMULA REQUIRES ONLY ONE COAT FOR COVERAGE AND DRIES IN ABOUT 10 MINUTES, WHICH IS FASTER THAN MULTIPLE COATS OF TRADITIONAL POLISH. —J.G. CIATÉ Mani Marker in Lady Luck, $12.


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SKINCARE BRUSHES

With celebrities going barefaced on the red carpet, skincare is getting as much attention as makeup these days. To wit: the latest applicators, which help you get the most out of your lotions and potions. ELF’s tool spreads on masks evenly and is great for mixing up DIY concoctions. The It Cosmetics brush buffs in serums and primers before you apply makeup. (Bonus: The bristles are infused with antiaging peptides and antioxidants that won’t wash off.) And the synthetic fibers of the Artis applicators are designed to pick up and deposit serums and creams without wasting product. —J.G.

1

ROAD TEST 3

1. ELF COSMETICS Pore Refining Brush & Mask Tool, $5. 2. IT COSMETICS Heavenly Skin CC+ Skin-Perfecting Brush #702, $48. 3. ARTIS Digit Skincare 5 Brush Set (Oval 6 brush shown), $225.

SPRITZ FINDER SEPHORA IS MAKING PERFUME SHOPPING EASIER WITH ITS NEW FRAGRANCE STUDIO (SELECT STORES; SEPHORA.COM FOR LOCATIONS). STEP UP TO ONE OF THE KIOSKS TO SUSS OUT YOUR OLFACTORY PREFERENCES. NOT SURE IF YOU LIKE WOODSY OR CITRUSY FRAGRANCES BETTER? THE INSTASCENT SYSTEM WILL SHOOT OUT PUFFS OF SCENTED AIR TO GUIDE YOU (“HMM, CITRUS IS DEFINITELY BETTER”). LAST STEP: GET SAMPLES OF PERFUMES TO TRY. —J.G.

STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. PHOTOGRAPHS: GORUNWAY.COM

BLONDE WAND

Anyone who has ever sat under the torture device known as a salon hood dryer (or steamer) while getting dyed has probably wondered if there’s a better way. Now, for certain color processes, there’s Pravana’s Blonde Wand. How it works: A colorist paints Pravana’s crème bleach on sections to be lightened, wraps them in foil, and then uses the tool to apply targeted heat that helps lift the color in less time. “What might have taken 30 minutes with a traditional method is now ready in 30 seconds,” says Justin Anderson, a colorist at Chris McMillan Salon in Los Angeles. “You also get more even results.” Better color in less time? Count us in. —J.G. Going as blonde as the models at Alexander Wang’s spring show is about to get easier

PRAVANA Blonde Wand (service prices vary; visit pravana.com for salon locations).

MC1 CREAM

THE DEAL Beauty extremists can’t stop talking about “blood cream,” a blend of traditional antiaging ingredients, like hyaluronic acid, mixed with your own healing plasma under the direction of Barbara Sturm, a skin expert in Germany. THE TRYOUT Sturm only offers the MC1 cream formulation at her Düsseldorf and Munich clinics, but the gorgeous, glowy-skinned doctor agrees to an “office call” in NYC. I feel like a cow going to slaughter as she whips out a syringe, plunges it into my vein, and obtains a vial of blood. A couple of days later, I receive a jar of white—not scarlet— unscented moisturizer. I’m skeptical, but commit to using it morning and night. Unlike many antiagers, it sinks right into my skin. It feels neither here nor there in terms of texture; it just is. (Like, me.) THE VERDICT After a few days, my complexion looks and feels different. It’s even-toned (I start skipping foundation), and my forehead lines look blurred out. When I visit a friend, her toddler strokes my cheek and says, “You skin soooo swoft.” (Seriously.) So … MC1 costs $1,400—not counting the trip to Germany. I know, crazy. But if you can’t swing it, Sturm’s hyaluronicacid-packed Super Anti-Aging Serum ($350; spacenk.com) is almost as amazing. —Erin Flaherty

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BEAUTY MAJOR BREAKTHROUGHS

ROAD TEST

SKIN-ANALYZING MIRROR

Everything is illuminated—and hydrated— on Jason Wu’s spring runway

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HIMIRROR $189.

HIGH-TECH HYDRATION

3

ENVIROSCREENS

Move over, SPF—well, maybe just make some room for these other complexion protectors that help defend (and repair) skin harmed by pollution and light. Murad’s night cream contains antioxidants, which scavenge free radicals, and vitamin C to brighten environmentally damaged skin. Junetics’ tinted lotion shields skin from infrared radiation and light emitted by electronic screens (it has SPF, too). And the Wei antipollution spray has antioxidants from botanical sources like Fumaria officinalis, also known as earth-smoke—pretty much the coolest plant name ever. —J.G. 1. MURAD City Skin Overnight Detox Moisturizer, $70. 2. JUNETICS Screen Tinted HEV Protector, $44. 3. WEI Golden Root Multi-Action Anti-Pollution Mist, $38.

84 MA R I E C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

lowest score. If I had scanned in all my skincare products, the program would tell me which ones to apply today (it bases recommendations on the photos). But I’m already late for work, so I save that step for another day. THE VERDICT I worry that a daily skin score will cause me to obsess unnecessarily. But if you want to see how well your pricey skincare regimen is working over time, the HiMirror would be a great investment. —Claire Fontanetta

Moisturizers have come a long way in the past few years, spurred on by the K-beauty movement that introduced women outside of Korea to watery lotions and gels that were still highly effective. Now, scoring one of these elixirs doesn’t require a trip to Seoul or international shipping rates; it’s as simple as popping into a drugstore. The new Hydra Genius moisturizers from L’Oréal Paris feature a “liquid care” complex—infused with water-binding hyaluronic acid as well as soothing, nutrient-rich aloe vera—that penetrates skin faster than traditional moisturizers for deep, continuous hydration that lasts up to an unheard-of 72 hours. And because one size—er, formula—doesn’t fit all, the technology is available in three textures, each suited for a different skin type. —Lauren Valenti L’ORÉAL PARIS Hydra Genius Daily Liquid Care for Normal/Oily Skin, $18.

CUT AND DRY SHEET MASKS ARE GREAT, BUT SOMETIMES (SAY, IN MIDWINTER) THE IDEA OF SLAPPING WHAT FEELS LIKE A TINY COLD, WET BLANKET ON YOUR FACE JUST ISN’T APPEALING. ENTER NANNETTE DE GASPÉ’S REUSABLE “DRY” SHEET MASKS. THEY’RE LINED WITH ANTIAGING TETRAPEPTIDES AND ANTIOXIDANTS ENCAPSULATED IN PLANT OILS THAT REMAIN SEMISOLID AT ROOM TEMP, BUT MELT ON CONTACT WITH SKIN—DELIVERING COMPLEXION GOODNESS RIGHT WHERE YOU NEED IT. —J.G. NANNETTE DE GASPÉ Face Masque, $120.

STILL LIFES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES. PHOTOGRAPH: GORUNWAY.COM. OPPOSITE PAGE: STILL LIFES: JEFFREY WESTBROOK/STUDIO D. PHOTOGRAPHS, FROM TOP: FRANK ROTHE/GETTY IMAGES, COURTESY OF THE COMPANY

1

THE DEAL HiMirror is a 14-inch screen with an integrated high-res camera that analyzes the condition of your complexion and then offers personalized skincare suggestions based on your results. THE TRYOUT It takes an hour to set up the “mirror,” install the accompanying app, and go through a tutorial. Instead of a touch screen, the display relies on hand motions to initiate commands. I feel like a Jedi warrior attempting to move through the menus, but, hey, at least I get my arm workout in for the day! Eventually, I manage to reach the “skincare” program and take a photo of my face (the company recommends doing it every day so you can see your improvements over time). A few seconds later, I get a slightly traumatizing slide show of my results, with scores for my wrinkles, pore size, red spots, dark spots, etc. Under-eye circles are my


NATURAL WONDER

A key ingredient in Herbal Essences’ new line is derived from fermented corn sugar.

REINVENTING THE WASH Game-changing shampoos and conditioners leave hair healthier—and help color last longer

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iquid shampoo didn’t change all that much during the 20th century. From its invention in 1927 until the 1960s, the basic recipe was water, surfactants to lather away dirt and oil, emulsifiers to keep the formula from separating, and fragrance. Eventually, haircare companies began to add ingredients like strengthening proteins and smoothing silicones, but even in 1972, when Herbal Essences shampoo launched, its major point of differentiation was the scent. It smelled like “dawn in the Garden of Earthly Delights,” a “primeval forest after a spring rain,” and/or the “green essence of mysterious herbs and enchanted flowers,” according to the ads (see one from 1973, below right). It also claimed to make hair “very, very excited,” a proposition the brand doubled down on in the ’90s with TV ads depicting a woman having an arousing and totally “organic” experience in the shower. That’s all well and good—really good, if your experience was anything like the one in the commercial—but chemistry advances onward. To keep up, Procter & Gamble (the parent company of Herbal Essences) continually finds new ways to update its formulas. More than a decade ago, its researchers began to study what comes out of the showerhead, instead of just what goes into the bottle. “Tap water contains trace amounts of minerals and metals picked up from your pipes and the ground,” explains Maria Buck, a chemical engineer at P&G. Copper ions—found in almost all water—are particularly gnarly for hair. Left behind after washing, they damage the fibrous proteins that make up strands, accelerate the negative effects of UV light, and cause color

changes, weakness, and dryness. “We realized that if we could neutralize the copper in water, hair would be healthier, softer, shinier—even the color would be more vibrant,” says Buck. The breakthrough: They found a way to do it using natural ingredients. P&G scientists combined the antioxidant histidine—an amino acid derived, in this case, from fermented corn sugar—with sea kelp and aloe to create an ingredient complex that neutralizes copper, counteracts the negative effects of other free radicals, and helps remove buildup. The concoction has a starring role in Herbal Essences’ new line of bio:renew shampoos and conditioners, coming out this month. All nine varieties are designed to stop the strip-and-coat cycle many women fall into when they use shampoos with harsh surfactants to cleanse and heavy conditioners to counteract the resulting dryness. A standout is the silicone-free Golden Moringa Oil shampoo formulated with biolipids. “Instead of just coating the hair fiber, the biolipids penetrate to moisturize from the inside out,” explains Rachel Zipperian, a chemist on P&G’s scientific communications team. “Your hair is replenished and still retains its bounce.” Naturally, the line has revamped packaging (with a nod to the brand’s “Garden of Earthly Delights” heritage) and fresh new fragrances. But don’t worry, the scents are still inspired by botanical extracts, fruits, and flowers—this is Herbal Essences, after all. —J.G.

HERBAL ESSENCES bio:renew Shampoos and Conditioner, $6 each. For information on where to buy, see Shopping Directory.

January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 85


JANUARY 2017 CREATIVE DIRECTOR N INA GA R CIA

TOP of the LINE

+THE UNSTOPPABLE GINA RODRIGUEZ +EIGHT WOMEN CHANGING THE WORLD (AND ROCKING OURS) +ACCESSORIES FOR THE URBAN JUNGLE

TOP $395, BELTED PANTS $495, TIBI; TIBI.COM. SHOES $695, GIANVITO ROSSI; GIANVITOROSSI.COM.

86 MA R I E C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

PHOTOGRAPH BY JAN WELTERS

+BUST A MOVE: THE RISE OF WELLNESS COMMUNITIES


Š Clinique Laboratories, LLC

Matte makeover. Drama without the dry-out. New Clinique Pop™ Matte and Liquid Matte Lip Colour + Primer deliver pigment-packed mattes with a fresh look, comfortable feel. clinique.com

Allergy Tested.100% Fragrance Free.


dreamsof

GINA The word can’t has never been part of Gina Rodriguez’s vocabulary. And when the Golden Globe–winning star of Jane the Virgin goes for it, she goes all in

Gina Rodriguez makes her way across The Tasting Kitchen, a popular hot spot on trendy Abbot Kinney

Boulevard in Venice, California. Wearing a vintage white flowing crocheted maxi dress, her black hair tousled, she looks carefree and happy, but as soon as she slides into the booth, she immediately bends over, clutching her side. “I just had an IUD placed, and I’m in incredible pain,” she admits. “I legitimately want to just keep squeezing my pelvis right now.” It’s that kind of refreshing honesty that has elevated the 32-year-old Jane the Virgin star to cult status among her fans. She may be in pain, but more than anything, Rodriguez is a fighter. Growing up in a largely Polish and Latino neighborhood on the Northwest Side of Chicago, Rodriguez was raised by dad Genaro, a teamster rep who rose to union vice president, and mom Magali, a secretary who worked her way up to director of interpreters at Cook County court. Theirs was the classic story of the immigrant experience: They were close to their neighbors, worked all the time, and lived in a neighborhood that was both family-oriented and limited in opportunities. In their community, where many boys ended up in gangs and girls as teenage mothers, education wasn’t always a priority—survival was. Rodriguez’s parents, who came from Puerto Rico, were determined to provide a better life for their three first-generation daughters, making “total and utter sacrifices” to send her and her two older sisters to private schools. “There were no extras,” Rodriguez recalls of her upbringing, which involved battling giant rats in their basement apartment. “Only one of my parents graduated from high school. Everything we had was funneled to education. My parents were both very aware that education was our only means of escaping [our circumstances].” Every morning,

By LAURIE SANDELL 88

Photographs by JAN WELTERS


Open Secret “YOU GOTTA KEEP WORKING HARD. BECAUSE THAT’S HOW YOU GOT HERE,” RODRIGUEZ SAYS. “AND THAT’S HOW YOU STAY HERE” COAT, $4,750, THE ROW; DRESS, $525, ADAM SELMAN; NAIL RING, $4,050, CARTIER; BAND RING, $1,200, BULGARI. ON HAIR: AVEDA SMOOTH INFUSION NOURISHING STYLING CREME. FASHION EDITOR: ALISON EDMOND


her father lined his girls up and had them repeat the mantra Rodriguez made famous during her 2015 Golden Globes (best actress in a TV comedy or musical) acceptance speech: “Today is going to be a great day. I can and I will.” Today, Rodriguez runs a production company called I Can and I Will Productions. Eldest sister Ivelisse, a Harvard Business School graduate, is a partner at a private-equity firm; middle sister Rebecca attended USC Medical School and became a doctor. “When I was 15 years old and the opportunities I have now didn’t seem so accessible, I still knew that I was capable of going after anything I wanted—whether or not I accomplished my goal,” Rodriguez says. “The only thing that can stop you is you. And how powerful is that? You are going to fail, but hopefully you have the opportunity to fail big. How great is it that I am given the chance to fail miserably? How awful would it be if I sat by, never touching the opportunity, never taking the chance? I want to eat life. I want to try.” Now, she wants to inspire other young women and men to dream big. Last year, when she paid tribute to Oscar winner Rita Moreno (later cast as her grandmother on Jane) at the 38th-annual Kennedy Center Honors in Washington, D.C., Rodriguez had an epiphany. “I saw incredible human beings of all ethnicities honored for a lifetime of work,” she says. “I was floored. And I thought, Why doesn’t this exist for girls—for younger people, period?” So the actress started to make calls; the result, Marie Claire’s Young Women’s Honors, airs on The CW on December 19, in a ceremony that will spotlight a range of remarkable young women (see page 94). “We are highlighting people who are going after their dream so that others feel they have the right to go after theirs,” says Rodriguez. The actress first got a glimpse of her own dream at age 13, when she saw an ad asking, “Do you want to be in a television commercial?” Her parents declined to take her to the audition, but Rodriguez got a teacher to sign her permission slip and hopped on local public transportation. She booked the commercial, seen only on cinema screens. “It was noth-

“I’M AN ADRENALINE JUNKIE. I WANT TO DO SOMETHING THAT SCARES ME EVERY DAY.” ing, but it gave me the awareness that if I tried, I could do more,” says Rodriguez, who landed an agent soon afterward. She promised her parents that every bit of money she made—an AOL commercial here, a Walmart catalog there—would go toward college. By 16, Rodriguez knew what she wanted but didn’t have a blueprint to make it happen. “My path wasn’t laid out for me in my family or my culture, because there are so few of us in the industry,” she says. So she turned to the only person who had been mapping a path for her to follow: Ivelisse, then living in New York City. Ivelisse said, “Oh, my God, you need to dream! You want to be an actor? Let’s make you an actor.” The two researched programs, and Rodriguez was one of 13 teenagers accepted into Columbia University’s Theatrical Collaboration. “Boom, now I’m in New York, and I’m thinking, This is where I have to go to school,” recalls Rodriguez, who later attended NYU’s prestigious Tisch School of the Arts. “That’s how my whole career happened. Your eyes are open; you don’t know what the next answer is going to be, but you’re open. And you take every opportunity that comes your way.” After college, the opportunities kept coming: theater, playing Frida Kahlo in a production in Florida, a few TV movies. In 2011, she was scouted by an agent while shooting the indie film Go For It! in L.A. This is it, she thought. Now is my time to move to L.A. Soon after, she booked 90 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

2012’s Filly Brown, in which she played a rapper from East L.A. When it premiered at Sundance, she became the festival’s It girl, celebrated at every screening. Though Rodriguez had turned out a stellar performance, she was eking out a living from guest roles on TV shows and the occasional commercial. To pay her rent, she was a “twin specialist” nanny and a waitress at Sushi Roku. Yet something happened during Filly Brown that would change the course of her career: Rodriguez discovered her voice. “I decided I was going to take roles that progressed the image of Latinos in the industry, and I was going to choose those roles over money,” she says. “I wanted to make sure I was contributing positively and not allowing limitations to dampen my experiences and my journey.” She turned down any more roles that perpetuated gang life, teen pregnancy, or general stereotypes of Latinos. “I was looking to play a girl who was independent and smart and going after what she loved,” she says. “A girl who was taking risks and going up against challenges. Just a girl.”

E

nter Jane Villanueva. Rodriguez admits that when the pilot script for Jane the Virgin landed in her lap, she thought she was auditioning for the best friend or the person in the office—“wherever the Latina fit into the script. But that was exactly the mind-set I want to break down. Even I was susceptible to it.” After inhaling the script in 40 minutes, Rodriguez immediately decided she wanted the part. A few weeks after her audition, she was in the middle of a half-marathon-training run when she got the call from show creator Jennie Urman: “You’re Jane, baby.” The pilot was made, the show was picked up by The CW network, and nine episodes in, Rodriguez won the Golden Globe. Most viewers didn’t recognize the breathless woman who took the stage and paid tribute to her family, acknowledging the now-famous phrase: “This award is so much more than myself; it represents a culture that wants to see themselves as heroes. My father used to tell me to say every morning, ‘Today is going to be a great day. I can and I will.’ Well, Dad—today is a great day. I can and I did.” The world fell in love with her during that speech, which she made off the cuff. “I didn’t have the guts to write anything down,” recalls Rodriguez, “but my heart knew what it wanted to say all along. My father always says that if you don’t lie, you never have to remember anything. When I’m honest or real, that’s when life goes best for me.” With the success of the show, which returns to The CW on January 23, bigger-budget scripts landed on her desk, like 2016’s Deepwater Horizon, about the BP oil disaster (Rodriguez plays the only female oil rig worker, opposite Mark Wahlberg), and sci-fi thriller Annihilation (out in 2017), directed by Ex Machina’s Alex Garland, in which Rodriguez costars with Natalie Portman. “[Gina] is very idealistic in an inspiring way,” Portman says. “She very much wants to make positive change and be a positive influence, and it permeates everything in her life. It’s a nice and rare energy to be around. The entire crew was obsessed with her.” Urman agrees: “She has the most incredible work ethic and so much respect for everyone involved,” she says. “Before a big scene with a lot of extras, she introduces herself and thanks everyone for being there and tells them that we couldn’t do the show without them. She always goes above and beyond to make sure everyone feels appreciated. She also likes to copy viral-video dances during breaks, and there is no dance she can’t master in under five minutes!” The day that Rodriguez was nominated for her second Golden Globe, in 2016, she finally paid off her college loans. “I was getting interviewed by all these outlets, and I was thinking, My God, what a beautiful day to celebrate where education has gotten me,” she says. [CONTINUED ON P. 116]


Last Laugh

RODRIGUEZ TURNED DOWN ROLES THAT PERPETUATED LATINO STEREOTYPES; THEN JANE THE VIRGIN CAME ALONG DRESS, $2,080, TOP, $490, EMILIO PUCCI; TWISTEDBAND RING, $2,700, HEARTS ON FIRE.

PRODUCTION: ALICIA ZUMBACK AT CAMP PRODUCTIONS

ON EYES: CLINIQUE LID POP IN COCOA POP. FOR STORES, SEE SHOPPING DIRECTORY. HAIR: JENNY CHO AT STARWORKS ARTISTS MAKEUP: PATI DUBROFF AT FORWARD ARTISTS USING CLINIQUE ON BRAND AMBASSADOR GINA RODRIGUEZ MANICURE: KAREN GUTIERREZ AT NAILING HOLLYWOOD


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Allergy Tested.100% Fragrance Free.


Change Agent. Our 3-Step System seems so basic. But give it 10 days, and the change will astound you. Skin looks clear, smooth, glowing. Dermatologist-developed, custom ďŹ t and sonically charged, it’s anything but routine. Can one change make a difference? Find out how at clinique.com #DifferenceMaker


Marie Claire’s

YOUNG WOMEN’S

Honors

Build a single-engine airplane at 14. Win an Olympic medal in a sport you took up a mere 12 months earlier. Write a bill that sails through Congress. These are just a few remarkable achievements by the women we will recognize, in partnership with Gina Rodriguez, on The CW on December 19. It is our first awards ceremony celebrating inspirational women of grit, grace, and greatness, but given just how many women out there are daring to dream and then making things happen, it certainly won’t be our last. B Y B RO O K E H AU S E R


The Clinique Difference Maker Award

The Dynamo

Bona fides: After winning four gold medals and a bronze at her debut Olympics in Rio (not to mention three World Championship titles), Biles, 19, is the most decorated American gymnast of all time. Early drive: “I was a very hyper kid, energetic, loud, excited all the time,” says the talented Texan. “I remember being on the playground. I would always be flipping because most kids could not do it, so I thought it was unique that I could.” Name check: She’s been compared to Michael Jordan, LeBron James, and Tom Brady, but prefers to just be herself. “I’m not the next Usain Bolt or Michael Phelps,” she told a reporter in Rio. “I’m the first Simone Biles.” Fan club: Girls want to be her; boys want to date her. Recently, while Biles was traveling for Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions, an Iowa high schooler asked her to prom. “He tweeted me his proposal,” says Biles. “We were practicing at our last show in Omaha, Nebraska, and I look up in the audience, and I see him holding a sign.” (It read: “Number 1 in the World, Number 1 in my Heart, Simone Biles, PROM?”) Will she go? “I don’t think I’ll be able to make it,” she says. “I’m so busy.” Dream friend date: “Zendaya, Demi Lovato, and Zac Efron. He’s hot—I think he’s everyone’s celebrity crush,” says Biles, who got a surprise visit, and a friendly kiss, from Efron in Rio. “And where would we go? A pizza place because I love pizza.” Tweet her: @Simone_Biles.

SIMONEBILES

WORLD & OLYMPIC CHAMPION GYMNAST

Photograph by CHRISTIAN WITKIN

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VANESSA KERR

Life’s work: Kerry is the brains behind Seed, which sends U.S. doctors and nurses to train health-care workers in places where such professionals are scarce. (Think of it as a medical Peace Corps.) Since its founding in 2011, Seed has taught more than 8,000 doctors, nurses, and midwives in Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, Swaziland, and Liberia. “I don’t think there’s a single health problem in the world that can’t be solved without some creative and intelligent thinking,” says Kerry, 40. Now that’s the kind of person you want on the front lines of the global health-care crisis. Paging Dr. Kerry: Somehow she manages to continue pulling shifts as an attending physician in the ICU at Boston’s Massachusetts General Hospital. Biggest challenge: Closing the gap between the “two standards of care in the world.” What she means is, getting a safe surgery in the U.S. is all but guaranteed, but in countries where Seed works, “Volunteers do glove counts at the beginning of the week to figure out how many C-sections they’re going to be able to do versus how many breech births they’re going to have to try to deliver vaginally.” Success story: After a Seed volunteer taught Tanzanian student Aliasgar Khaki how to resuscitate infants, he encountered a baby in a pediatric ward who had stopped breathing. “Everyone said the baby was dead,” recalls Kerry, but Khaki discovered that the baby still had a pulse and said, “Actually, we can save this child.” They did, and Khaki now leads neonatal resuscitation trainings around the country. “That’s the kind of impact,” Kerry says, “we’re looking to have.” Get involved: seedglobalhealth.org. BLAZER, $3,495, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI; EARRINGS, KERRY’S OWN.

Photograph by JAN WELTERS

FASHION EDITOR: ALISON EDMOND. HAIR & MAKEUP: MICHELLE MUNGCAL AT JED ROOT

The Pioneer CEO & COFOUNDER OF SEED GLOBAL HEALTH


JESSICA O. MATTHEWS

The Innovator

INVENTOR & FOUNDER OF UNCHARTED PLAY

MC’s YOUNG WOMEN’S

Honors

Passion project: As a 19-year-old Harvard University student, Matthews invented the SOCCKET, a soccer ball that generates energy as it’s kicked around. In 2011, she founded Uncharted Play and began distributing the ball and a jump rope called PULSE in developing countries with spotty grids, whose residents can use the toys to power their homes. Bragging rights: Everyone from Bill Gates to Ashton Kutcher is a fan, and in 2012, President Barack Obama invited her to represent small businesses at the signing of the America Invents Act. Honorable mentions: U.S. Chief Technology Officer Megan Smith once called her “the Elon Musk of kinetic energy,” but Matthews, now 28, has other bold-facers in mind. “I always tell people that I want to be the perfect balance of Bill Nye the Science Guy and Beyoncé,” she says, adding, “but I really should be saying Marie Curie and Beyoncé.” New guard: “It’s my prayer that I can be successful enough that when people think about the pattern for a CEO, they’re not just looking for a Mark Zuckerberg—they’re looking for a Jessica Matthews, too,” she says. “Can you imagine being able to walk around as a black girl and people being like, ‘I’m going to assume that you’re going to run a $5 million business’?” To-do list: Integrating the technology into anything that moves, from suitcases to baby strollers: “Imagine a world where everything around us is a source of power.” Get involved: unchartedplay.com. TOP, $540, KENZO; EARRINGS, $3,500, ROSE-GOLD RING, PRICE UPON REQUEST, CARTIER; SILVER RING, MATTHEWS’ OWN.

Photograph by CHRISTIAN WITKIN

COMPUTER SCIENTIST & FOUNDER OF CODE TO INSPIRE

FASHION EDITOR: BRITTANY KOZERSKI. MATTHEWS: HAIR: AMANI N. NADIR. MAKEUP: MAI THOMAS. FOROUGH: MAKEUP: BANK AT FACTORY DOWNTOWN

The Google Made With Code Award

Passion project: In 2015, Forough, a former professor of computer science at Herat University, opened the first all-female coding school in Afghanistan. Its first graduating class of 50 women collected their certificates in December. For the win: “All the girls at our school were raised during the Taliban regime, and most didn’t have access to computers,” says Forough, 29. “It’s a huge accomplishment to see girls who didn’t even know how to use the Internet now writing code.” To-do list: Open branches beyond Herat in Kabul and Mazar-iSharif, and eventually, throughout the Middle East and Africa. Dream dinner party: “I would invite three of the most influential people in tech: Mark Zuckerberg, Sheryl Sandberg, and Elon Musk,” she says. “They’re visionaries, and they made something happen that people thought was impossible.” What’s on the menu? “I would serve qabuli: rice with meat, raisins, carrots, and almonds—it’s a very famous dish in Afghanistan.” Learn more: codetoinspire.org. TOP, $425, MICHELLE MASON; RING, $2,634, DJULA; SCARF, FOROUGH’S OWN.

Photograph by CHRISTIAN WITKIN

FERESHTEHTheFOROUGH Revolutionary

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AMANDA NGUYEN

The Trailblazer

SURVIVOR ACTIVIST & FOUNDER OF RISE

Bona fides: In 2014, Nguyen launched Rise, a nonprofit of Millennial activists fighting for the civil rights of rape victims. In October, President Barack Obama signed the sexual-assault Survivors’ Bill of Rights—which Nguyen wrote—into law. “I’m proof that you can change your country,” says Nguyen, 25, who celebrated the victory with friends on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. The impetus: “This law was born from my experience with the broken justice system,” says Nguyen, who was raped in 2013 in Massachusetts, where evidence from her rape kit could be destroyed after six months unless she kept filing to preserve it. “Survivors are continually victimized by the very system that was built to seek justice for them. I had a choice: I could accept the injustice or rewrite the law.” Best advice: “The most important thing is just showing up,” says the former deputy White House liaison for the State Department. “People don’t realize how powerful their own voices can be. We asked people to call or tweet at their member of Congress. Elected officials see that, and it makes a difference.” Maybe that’s why her legislation received zero opposition votes in both the House and the Senate. To-do list: The two-time NASA intern dreams of becoming an astronaut: “Astronauts often experience what’s called ‘the overview effect,’ which happens when they see Earth for the first time. They leave as technicians but return as humanitarians with the understanding that we’re all on this Earth together.” If that doesn’t pan out? She’d like to be president of the United States. You go, girl. Sign on: risenow.us. DRESS, $2,483, JIL SANDER; EARRINGS, $1,600, HEARTS ON FIRE.

PARALYMPIC GOLD MEDALIST Bona fides: McFadden won six medals in wheelchair-racing events at the Rio Paralympics. Her trophy case boasts a total of 17 Paralympic medals and 15 World ParaAthletics medals, plus she’s won 16 major marathons. Backstory: Born in St. Petersburg, Russia, with spina bifida, McFadden, 27, spent her first six years in an orphanage without a wheelchair. “I wanted to be just like all the other kids and go everywhere they were going,” she says. “So I learned how to walk on my hands and to scoot on the ground.” She was adopted at age 6 by an American woman in Maryland. Sweetest victory: In 2011, she tracked down her birth parents in Russia. Soon after, she learned that the 2014 Winter Olympics would be held there, in Sochi. “I wanted my birth family and my [adoptive] family to [see me compete],” McFadden says. Minor detail: She didn’t compete in any winter sports. But within a year, she’d transformed herself into a cross-country ski racer and went on to win silver. Role model: “When you think of tennis, you think Serena Williams—I hope to do the same for wheelchair racing.” Follow her: tatyanamcfadden.com.

The Champion

TATYANA McFADDEN

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MCFADDEN: SEAN M. HAFFEY/GETTY IMAGES. NGUYEN & MAXEY: FASHION EDITOR: ALISON EDMOND. HAIR: JENNY CHO AT STARWORKS ARTISTS. MAKEUP: PATI DUBROFF AT FORWARD ARTISTS. MANICURE: PILAR NOIRE AT NAILING HOLLYWOOD. PRODUCTION: ALICIA ZUMBACK AT CAMP PRODUCTIONS

Photograph by JAN WELTERS


CREATIVE TECHNOLOGIST & FOUNDER OF LOOMIA

MC’s YOUNG WOMEN’S

Honors

Passion project: Imagine wearing electricity-conducting clothes capable of heating themselves, sensing when the wearer is lifting something too heavy, and telling parents if their kid is being pushed around at school. Maxey’s Brooklyn-based company, Loomia, is heading toward that future with electronic textiles, or “smart fabric.” Early drive: “I loved making things, especially stuffed animals and clothes, when I was in high school,” she says. But what other teenagers intern for Tommy Hilfiger and Nylon magazine? Such experiences led Maxey to study fashion design in college, but she dropped out after a semester when she won a Thiel Fellowship, which famously awards $100,000 to fellows to skip college and pursue their big ideas instead. Best advice: “Learn skills,” says Maxey, who also writes code. “If you learn how to build or sew or code or design something, you’ll always have a place.” Bragging rights: In 2015, the now 23-year-old built the electronics for an LED dress by Zac Posen for Google’s Made With Code initiative. Maxey now counts North Face and Topshop among Loomia’s partners and collaborators. Even the Obama administration has tapped her for wearable-tech advice. Secret talent: “I play the saxophone. A lot of jazz, especially jazz improv, is about learning skills, notes, and rules, and how you can break them. I think that’s why I like this industry so much—there aren’t many rules yet, so it’s a great chance to create my own.” Learn more: loomia.co. DRESS, $375, HALSTON HERITAGE; EARRINGS, MAXEY’S OWN.

Photograph by JAN WELTERS

The Futurist

The Lord & Taylor Rose Award


MC’s YOUNG WOMEN’S

PHYSICIST & HARVARD PH.D. CANDIDATE

Bragging Rights: The 23-year-old has been name-checked by Stephen Hawking and called “the next Einstein” by her Harvard mentors; she has a standing job offer from Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos. Early drive: “When I was little, I wanted to design spacecraft,” says the Chicago native, who did the next best thing and took flying lessons at age 9. When she was 12, she began building a single-engine airplane from a kit in her garage; it took two years to complete. Once it was certified as airworthy, she took it for a spin, becoming the youngest person in history, at age 16, to build and fly her own plane. That same year, she was admitted to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Words of advice: “Be optimistic about what you believe you can do,” says Pasterski, who in 2013 was the first woman in two decades to graduate from MIT at the top of her physics class. (And she did it in just three years while she was still in her teens.) “When you’re little, you say a lot of things about what you’ll do or be when you’re older—I think it’s important not to lose sight of those dreams.” Motivating motto: “What have you done lately?” Check her out: physicsgirl.com. JACKET, $498, POLO RALPH LAUREN. Photograph by JAN WELTERS

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FASHION EDITOR: ALISON EDMOND. HAIR: JENNY CHO AT STARWORKS ARTISTS. MAKEUP: PATI DUBROFF AT FORWARD ARTISTS. MANICURE: PILAR NOIRE AT NAILING HOLLYWOOD. PRODUCTION: ALICIA ZUMBACK AT CAMP PRODUCTIONS

The Genius

SABRINA GONZALEZ PASTERSKI

Honors


“THERE ARE GIRLS ALL OVER THE WORLD WHO ARE HUNGRY TO LEARN AND WHO TAKE EXTRAORDINARY RISKS JUST TO HAVE A CHANCE TO FULFILL THEIR POTENTIAL.” RIGHT: Michelle Obama, who founded Let Girls Learn in March 2015

FROM TOP: ART STREIBER/AUGUST, AP PHOTO/CAROLYN KASTER, BURAK AKBULUT/ANADOLU AGENCY/GETTY IMAGES, NEIL BRANDVOLD/USAID

The Role Model

MICHELLE OBAMA

MARIE CLAIRE ’S YOUNG WOMEN’S HONORS IS ALL ABOUT INSPIRATION. WHAT BETTER PARTNER THAN THE FIRST LADY’S LET GIRLS LEARN?

FROM TOP LEFT: Obama with girls on International Women’s Day in March 2016; the first lady at a Let Girls Learn presentation in Madrid; Albertha, 19, is studying business in Liberia thanks to Let Girls Learn

Michelle Obama knows how much work it can take for a girl to get an education. Growing up in a cramped, noisy apartment on the South Side of Chicago, she often woke up at 4 a.m. to study in peace. “I can tell you, my education has been the key to everything I’ve been able to achieve in my life,” the first lady told MC. “So for me, this issue has always been personal.” Which is why, in March 2015, she launched Let Girls Learn (LGL), a bold initiative to raise awareness about the fact that, worldwide, 98 million girls are out of school. “There are girls all over the world who are hungry to learn and who take extraordinary risks just to have a chance to fulfill their potential,” Obama says. “I knew I wanted to make it my mission to help them get the education they deserve.” Nearly two years later, LGL has invested more than $1 billion in new and ongoing government programming in over 50 countries; signed on 11 nations—from the U.K. to Mexico to South Korea—with some pledging an additional $600 million; and enlisted more than 100 companies and organizations to pitch in supplies, expertise, and financial support. Such investments are already making an impact in Pakistan, where 12-year-old Sana Sufiyan, who used to work eight-hour shifts in a shoe factory, is now learning to read and write after an LGL grantee persuaded her parents to enroll her in school; and in Malawi, where Halima Robert, who was forced to drop out of school to wed at 15, had her marriage annulled and continued her studies thanks to an LGL program that discourages child marriage. “I carry the stories of the girls I’ve met with me every day,” Obama says. “Their passion, intelligence, and determination are an inspiration to me, and I plan to keep speaking out on their behalf, not just for the rest of my time as first lady, but for the rest of my life.” Take action to help girls around the world get an education. Go to letgirlslearn.gov to find out how to get involved. —Kayla Webley Adler January 2017 MA R I EC L A I R E. COM 101


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paradise

FOUND The residents of Costa Rica’s Finca Bellavista live in a village of interconnected tree houses


MATT BERGLUND

E Like nature? Neighbors? Looking to make a change? You may want to check out life in one of the many highdensity, health-focused sustainable communities sprouting up around the country. Kiera Carter considers leaving the city for greener pastures

liza Bacot first visited the ecofriendly planned community of Serenbe three years ago. She had heard there was an organic farm and went with her husband in hopes of finding a new local source of produce. The day they visited, there was a block party happening all throughout the tree-lined streets of the neighborhood, located 45 minutes south of Atlanta. “It was surreal—we ended up spending hours chatting with people and later made our way to the farmhouse restaurant for a farm-sourced meal,” says Bacot, 36, a nurse practitioner. On the way out, the couple bumped into a Serenbe real estate agent and made an appointment to return and learn more. Six weeks later, they were in contract to build an energy-efficient house near the farm. And 10 months later, to the surprise of all their city friends, they actually made the move. “When we told people we were moving to a green, sustainable community south of the city—which is serious country territory, not the usual Atlanta suburbs—they’d look at us like we said we were moving to M. Night Shyamalan’s The Village,” says Bacot. The couple was nervous, too. “We actually kept our town house closer to Atlanta for a while and split our time between the two,” she says. Eventually, it became clear where they wanted to live long-term. “We were so much more stressed when we were in Atlanta, while life in Serenbe felt effortless and natural,” Bacot explains. “A year later, I switched hospitals to one closer to Serenbe; then we sold the town house and never looked back.” Now her commute is the same distance as it was when she was living near Atlanta. Bacot isn’t the only young, professional urbanite trading concrete for community. Around the world, and especially in the U.S., development of neighborhoods focused on sustainable, healthy living has increased. These range from places like Pringle Creek Community, a sustainable development in Salem, Oregon, that was founded by a local family, to Kukui’ula, a resort-like island paradise run by a Hawaiian development company, to Mueller, a “new urban village” three miles from downtown Austin, Texas, that’s home to 5,000 people. Self-proclaimed modern utopias have been around since the 1960s, but they used to have a hippie vibe and tended to attract people who wanted to get away from the world. Now, the appeal seems to be the opposite. “There’s an instinctive urge to create small communities surrounded by nature,” says William Forbes, Ph.D., associate professor of geography and sustainablecommunity development at Stephen F. Austin State University. He notes that this trend has been on the rise for decades, in part as a response to the isolating whitepicket-fence suburbanization of the 1950s. “On top of that, sustainable, organic lifestyles have become more mainstream and desirable, especially as we see things like [the water crisis in] Flint, Michigan, in the news.” Makes sense—in theory. But who really lives in these places? Can an office-going, lipstick-wearing woman actually fit in? And do the communities have enough culture

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there’s not a lot of diversity,” she says. “Critics will compare it 1. Finca Bellavista homeowners can rent out to Pleasantville or Stepford, and that’s not totally inaccurate.” their tree houses to vacationers. 2. The front Mueller, located on the site of Austin’s old airport, is less patios of Garden Court homogeneous. Janeka Rector, a development specialist who homes in Mueller, near Austin, Texas, face a lives there, says her neighbors are racially and ethnically diverse. shared open space. Plus, 25 percent of the residences are reserved for households 3. Most villas in Kukui’ula, a luxury resort community that make less than 80 percent of the area’s annual median in Koloa, Hawaii, have income ($43,600 for a single-person household; $62,250 for a an open-living design. 4. Kukui’ula residents family of four). But it can still feel movie-set strange at times. can harvest vegetables from the community’s “Google is testing self-driving cars in our neighborhood,” says Upcountry Farm, which Rector, 38. “And influential people, like the mayors of other also hosts monthly outdoor dinners cities, have their eye on Mueller to see if this way of life can be replicated in other places, which kind of makes it feel like you’re living in a surreal experiment.” But for many, the upside of being part of a social experiment on a grand scheme is, well, the socializing. “All of the houses in Mueller are pretty close together, and we have front porches, so we congregate on someone’s patio every Friday and hang out,” says Rector. Adds Bacot, “I can’t tell you how many times I’ve taken a ‘quick’ walk around the lake only to end up having wine on someone’s porch for hours, sometimes a stranger’s.” Meanwhile, I’ve been living in New York for a decade, and I’ve never once befriended a neighbor—something that’s starting to sound a lot sadder. But, hey, I have easy access to everything I could possibly want: museums, theaters, bars, restaurants, and friends I can visit without getting in a car. Why give all that up for a porch?

B

acot tells me she didn’t have to: “I’m more connected to arts and culture now than when I lived in Atlanta. Serenbe has a theater and an artists-in-residence program that puts on plays, concerts, and poetry readings every week.” And, according to Farrell, “Pringle Creek is about three miles from downtown Salem, 60 miles from the coast, and 65 miles from the mountains. It lets you do any activity you want.” And that’s where my husband’s argument comes into play: These places have easy access to activities—the kind that happen off the porch. If you’ve ever been to New York’s Penn Station on a Friday night or sat in summer-weekend traffic, you know how hard it can be to leave a city and get into nature. Sometimes, it almost doesn’t seem worth it—so maybe you pop some wine on your fire escape and convince yourself that the city is the best place in the world, even though you only go to the theater twice a year and don’t have time for the renowned restaurants anyway. That’s why I got a serious pang of longing when Bartlett told me that she hikes with her friends almost every morning: “We’re right on the Boise foothills, so we can literally walk out the door and go on a hike.” On Saturdays, Bacot often takes pop-up yoga classes on the lake dock near her house: “Afterward, I’ll walk home, make breakfast using eggs from the farm, and eat on my porch overlooking the lake.” My post-yoga experience? Sipping a $12 smoothie on the subway, hoping I get a seat when my legs are sore. In lots of ways, these places seem like little cities: You have access to organic food the way you might in a more cosmopolitan area, you can walk everywhere, and you’re constantly interacting with other people. But with all these similarities, I wondered if there was the same sense of exclusivity and types of requirements that co-ops in large urban areas are known for. (A few years ago, my husband and I attempted to buy an apartment in New York City—a process in which we prepared 300 pages of references and documentation, only to be rejected for reasons we’ll never know. They never even met with us.) Turns out, it’s not like that at all. Some communities do require you to pay neighborhoodassociation fees (at Mueller, they’re $47.50 a month) or adhere to eco-friendly building

1: JAMES LOZEAU. 2: THOMAS MCCONNELL. 7. J. ASHLEY. ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY OF THE COMMUNITIES

to rival city life? I have a personal investment in these questions. My now-husband has been making a case for leaving New York City ever since we got engaged a year and a half ago. He’s a freelance writer who focuses on the outdoors—hiking, camping, you name it. That means (a) he can work anywhere, and (b) access to green space would work to his advantage. (True story: He once set up a tent in our tiny Brooklyn apartment and slept in it.) To be fair, I see the appeal, too, especially as someone who loves organic food and running trails—and hates having tents set up in her living room. Still, I need a little more than “nice neighbors” and organic food to persuade me to accept a longer commute to work—and a potentially creepy commune vibe. So I went straight to the source: women, like me, who had already moved to these places. As it turns out, they all agreed: nope, not a hippie commune. When 35-year-old communications manager Mckenzie Farrell first moved to Pringle Creek, where there is zero rainwater runoff to the surrounding city’s storm-water system and all buildings must be certified as eco-efficient, she says she worried that if she didn’t recycle her trash correctly, she would be banished. “There actually are some folks here who produce one grocery bag of garbage in a whole year, but others are nowhere close to that level of green,” she says. “No one judges each other.” That said, not all communities are as flexible. Just take a look at the directory on ic.org—the Fellowship for Intentional Community, which helps hook people up with planned communities and cooperatives, large and small—and you’ll see postings that say things like “vegan only” and “organized around sharing almost everything.” There are villages of multiple homes with guiding principles that are not enforced, and then there are communities where everyone lives in one house, shares the same religion and/or diet, and splits childrearing responsibilities. As an introverted meat eater, I’ll be avoiding the latter. But I still worry that these places attract a lot of the same types of people, which would be a problem, since I really like the diversity of a city. Would I feel like I’m living in a bubble? Michele Bartlett, a 46-year-old director of career development, says she loves living in Hidden Springs, Idaho, a rural community with a shared barn, farm, and orchard that was designed to preserve open space and minimize car travel. But, she admits, there is a downside. “It’s a very upper-middle-class place, and


3 1

2 4

5. From one Pringle Creek home with a green roof, a neighboring home with solar panels is visible. 6. The labyrinth on the grounds of Serenbe, a community near Atlanta, was designed with stones from around the world. 7. Serenbe’s organic farm has a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program that offers members a share of the weekly harvest

5

6

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practices, but none of the ones I checked out had an interview process to get in. And the houses are typically affordable for the areas. A three-bedroom home in Pringle Creek will set you back $345,000, which is comparable to prices in nearby Portland. For her house in Serenbe, Bacot says she paid slightly more than she would have for a similar place in the Atlanta suburbs. “But we have built-in water conservation and a floor plan that optimizes light, so we don’t use as much electricity,” she says. “It also has more efficient geothermal heating and air-conditioning.” Even with arguments like that, I don’t know if I’m ready to make the move. We are, however, planning a trip to an eco-friendly community in Costa Rica this spring. Finca Bellavista is a 600-acre village in the rain forest that also allows you to rent tree houses for a vacation. Even better, if we were to buy one (land starts at $35,000 for half an acre; then we can build a “studio” tree house for about $30,000), we could rent it out to vacationers when we’re back in New York. Best of both worlds, maybe? Regardless, I will be applying some of the lessons I’ve learned to my life in New York City: There’s no farm, but I have farmers markets I could visit more often. I may not have a porch, but I have friends I should stop flaking on in favor of working late. And I most certainly have neighbors I could invite over for a glass of wine. I might just make that last one my New Year’s resolution.

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MIND OVER MATTER

A new study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association found that participants who didn’t wear fitness trackers lost more weight than those who did. So what actually works if you want to drop pounds? Mindfulness activities like logging food or engaging in positive reinforcement, according to research published in the British Medical Journal. Food for thought.

HEALTH NEWS

FLASH GURUS

KATRINA SCOTT (left) AND KARENA DAWN

THE LATEST IN FITNESS, NUTRITION, AND MORE By C LAI R E F O NTAN ET TA

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Box It Up

Getting your brown-bag lunch plan together can be a challenge, but it just got easier thanks to Prepd. The San Francisco company’s genius upgrade of the humble lunch box—a sleek, bento-box-like, modular design helps you control portions— includes an app that suggests nutritionist-approved recipes based on your preferences, then automatically uploads nutritional data to your phone. Basically, it does everything but make your lunch. PREPD Pack Set, $60; getprepd.com.

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Key to success:

TEST THE WATERS

You don’t have to live in Flint, Michigan, to worry about what’s coming out of your faucet: According to a recent Harvard University study, more than 6 million Americans are exposed to tap-water contamination every year. Ecomo, a new water bottle, can help. Just fill it up and shake, and it automatically detects and informs you (via a free app) of harmful pollutants like pesticides and petrochemicals that may be present. Then, it uses a three-step purification process to filter them out. We’ll drink to that. ECOMO Water Bottle, $139; ecomo.io.

Consistency is key if you want to get fit. Have a friend keep you accountable—you’ll be way more likely to wake up for that earlymorning sweat sesh.

Best advice: As

women, we have a natural tendency to put others first, but don’t forget to take care of yourself, too.

Travel tip: Research

the area you’re visiting ahead of time to find healthy restaurants and local gyms. That way, you’re ready to go when you get there!

TOP: STOCKSY. ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

Danielle Bernstein, the influencer behind fashion blog We Wore What, is adding one more notch to her belt of fashion partnerships. She’s collaborated with athleisure brand Strut This on a five-piece collection inspired by “the creativity and invention of high-fashion streetwear.” Her favorite item from the line? Ultra-chic, lace-up leggings adorned with gold hardware, which, she says, she’d even wear out on the town. We’re in.

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1. POUND

BORED OF YOUR SAME OLD YOGA CLASS? TRY ONE OF THESE COOL WORKOUTS TO COMBAT YOUR MIDWINTER BINGEING-NETFLIXIN-BED RUT

2. IMAXSHIFT

An indoor-cycling class (above) where you can virtually ride through the solar system, along a gorgeous beach in Hawaii, or in front of the Eiffel Tower, thanks to a movie-theaterquality sound system and a gigantic Imax screen? Yes, please! (Brooklyn, $34 per class; imaxshift.com)

Smith guided me through a 10-minute session that included visualization exercises and lots of soothing affirmations. What felt like two short minutes later, her voice stopped and I “woke up” from what I can only describe as a deeply relaxed state. Every morning for a week, after each session, I felt my tension ease and noticed my muscles unclench, but by end of day, the stress would return. THE VERDICT I definitely felt more relaxed while I was following the program, but it wasn’t a permanent change. Like other forms of therapy, it only works if you work it.

3. ANIMAL FLOW

Something wild: This primal-style workout mimics animalistic movements (like frog jumps and bear crawls) to build strength, endurance, and flexibility—with nothing but your own body weight. (animalflow.com for class locations and DVD info)

TURN OVER A NEW LEAF In the new year, make the gym your oasis with island-inspired fitness gear

4 5

2 1

THROW SHADE

Water that stays cool for 24 hours … in the palm of your hand.

EMANUEL UNGARO

3

114 MA R I E C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

1. S’WELL Waikiki Bottle, $35 for 17 oz.; swellbottle.com. 2. ULTRACOR Level Miami Crop Top, $97; bandier.com. 3. REEBOK InstaPump Fury JG in Jungle Gurl, $150; reebok.com. 4. TEREZ X DEBBY HYMOWITZ Printed Capri, $115; bandier. com. 5. FABLETICS Diana Bomber Jacket in Malibu Print/Hot Coral, $90; fabletics.com.

COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

Class in Session

Rock out and tone up with this full-body cardio workout (left) that uses weighted “drumsticks” while incorporating isometric and plyometric moves (like squats, lunges, etc.) to the actual beat of your own drum. (poundfit.com for class locations and DVD info)

THE DEAL Grace Space (memberships from $17 per month; gracespace.co) lets you get hypnotherapy without leaving your home. The site and app feature audio courses—like a 21-Day Mental Bootcamp and a threeminute Profound Relaxation recording—that help you subconsciously adjust the way you think so you can make lasting changes in your life. THE TRYOUT I signed up for the seven-day Ultimate Anxiety Relief program during a particularly stressful month, when the mental benefits of my usual yoga and meditation practices just weren’t cutting it. On day one, the voice of famed hypnotherapist Grace


@

PEAK

LOVE & SEX

The Profile Polisher

Having trouble finding love online? It’s not you—

but it could be your profile, says dating expert Lisa Hoehn (left), the author of You Probably Shouldn’t Write That: Tips and Tricks for Creating an Online Dating Profile That Doesn’t Suck. We asked her to help MC reader Alice Kinsland Howell update her OkCupid profile (some of her suggestions are below) and then checked in to see if the changes made a difference MY SELF SUMMARY:

ALICE_NYC 28 / F / Straight / Single

Southern girl with a big-city frame of mind! I moved to Manhattan from the South and am pretty much in love (1) with this place. I know what I want and I’m not afraid to take risks, work hard, and make my goals happen! You only live once, and what’s a life worth living if you aren’t going to take every opportunity and live it to the fullest? (2)

WHAT I’M DOING WITH MY LIFE: Professional theater

performer, and stylist and project manager for a fashion company.

I’M REALLY GOOD AT:

BOOK: COURTESY OF RUNNING PRESS. PHOTOGRAPHS: COURTESY OF THE SUBJECTS

Tip: Swap the order of your photos each week; it keeps you identified as an “active user” on many sites (meaning you’ll get a bump in visibility)

Loving what I do! Games like Catch Phrase—you definitely want me on your team! Being incredibly goofy and finding the fun in just about anything. Being a night owl, but it’s a curse! Persuading you to finish the day with dessert! Huge sweet tooth! (3)

go on! Lover of Thai, Italian, and Mexican food—and if I had to choose one, it would be the hardest decision of my life! Favorite musicians: Frank Sinatra, Nat King Cole, and Judy Garland, but Sam Smith, Sara Bareilles, Tori Kelly, Adele, The Lumineers, and Coldplay, too. (4)

THE SIX THINGS I COULD NEVER DO WITHOUT:

Genuinely good coffee; staying in shape; music; chocolate; a good red wine; cooking.

I SPEND A LOT OF TIME THINKING ABOUT: How to

keep building on my career! Why NYC can’t have two lanes for sidewalk traffic: one for tourists, one for real New Yorkers! Going back to travel more in Europe, just packing up and leaving for a month with no cares or worries!

1. 2. 3. 4.

ON A TYPICAL FRIDAY NIGHT I AM: A glass of wine

FAVORITE BOOKS, MOVIES, SHOWS, MUSIC, AND FOOD: I’m a Netflix/Hulu

and cooking a homemade meal sounds like a party, but I know how to enjoy an evening out. If there’s a live band, even better.

Plus kinda gal. House of Cards, Broad City, Orange Is the New Black, The Killing, the list could

a gentleman. (5)

YOU SHOULD MESSAGE ME IF: Just know how to be

5.

Keep this. Research shows that people who use the word love in their profile, no matter the context, are more likely to find a match. You may as well like Piña Coladas and getting caught in the rain for all this says about you. Avoid generalities and clichés, and give examples, like a time you lived life to the fullest or a risk you took. Your writing and punctuation offer personality clues, and you’re coming off way too enthusiastic. Lay off the exclamation points and avoid gushing so you seem positive, but not manic. Experiment with small changes to your profile to see if you attract better prospects. This is a good place: Give three examples for each category, and swap in others sporadically to see how they affect matches. “Just know” makes it seem like you’re complaining— and that’s a huge turn-off. Try: “You’re a goofy guy with great manners.”

The Results

Alice updated her profile and also started messaging guys first, on the advice of Hoehn, who says women are almost twice as likely as men to get responses to their messages. After making those changes, she noticed she was attracting more polite and sophisticated guys—and fewer crappy pickup lines—which has led to conversations with more substance. Dates have gotten better, too. “Before, I wrote what I thought guys wanted to see, but now my profile really lays it all out there,” says Alice. “And the fact that guys are still responding has given me the confidence to be more myself on dates.” 115


[CONTINUED FROM P. 90]

Fame, of course, has brought some drawbacks. “When I cut my hair this summer, it was like I had committed a mortal sin,” she recalls of the buzz cut she got for Annihilation. In February, her month-old relationship with actor Ben Schwartz was splashed across the tabloids (they’ve since split). Now dating a professional Muay Thai fighter she prefers not to name, she’s learning how to balance the openness that makes her who she is with the desire to protect what’s most precious to her. Rodriguez has also plunged into selfimprovement: “I’m currently working on accepting love. I’m constantly working on the part of myself that doesn’t feel like ‘enough.’ This relationship has been possible because, for the past six months, I have vowed to work on loving myself. I want to know that I don’t need another to be full. So that whenever another person, an endorsement, or a project comes into play, they are an addition, not filling a need for value or fulfillment or worth or love. Because if I do that, I will forever be hungry.” She offers an example of a recent fitting for Annihilation. Rodriguez stood in front of a mirror while the crew cast various body parts for special effects. “I’m telling this guy, ‘I’m going to freaking London and shooting this badass movie with these badass women,’ and the whole time there’s this little demon in my head, saying, ‘Ohh, you don’t look good. You’re fat. Your thighs are really big and you should probably do more abs,’” she says. “I tell him, ‘I’m going to turn to the unicorn who thinks I’m fucking great. That’s who wins.’” Rodriguez flashes that million-watt smile and shakes her head at the memory. “Dammit, you only have one life; you only get one experience,” she says. “Jane is going to end at some point. Maybe this relationship will or won’t work out. But what narrative am I going to tell? The one that is going to project my downfall or the one that is going to project love and appreciate the experience I’m having? You know what you’ve got. You’ve got your heart, you’ve got your education, and you’ve got your badass two feet. So come on!”

116 MA R I E C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

SHOPPING DIRECTORY COVER Dress, $1,850, Emilio Pucci; emiliopucci.com for stores.

BEAUTY Apa Beauty, apabeauty.com; Artis, artisbrush.com; Aveda, aveda.com; Bed Head, ulta.com; Berrisom, amazon. com; Bioré, biore.com; Burberry, burberry. com; Ciaté, ciatelondon.com; Clarisonic, clarisonic.com; Clinique, clinique.com; Differin, drug stores nationwide; Dove, walgreens.com; ELF Cosmetics, elfcosmetics. com; Essie, essie.com; Eufora, eufora.net; Gillette Venus, gillettevenus.com; Glo Science, sephora.com; Glossier, glossier. com; Herbal Essences, herbalessences. com; HiMirror, himirror.com; It Cosmetics, itcosmetics.com; Junetics, junetics.com; L’Oréal Paris, lorealparisusa.com; L’Oréal Professionnel, lorealprofessionnel.com; Lancôme, lancome-usa.com; Lime Crime, limecrime.com; Milk Makeup, milkmakeup. com; Murad, murad.com; Nannette de Gaspé, barneys.com; Neutrogena, neutrogena.com; Pacifica, ulta.com; Plant, plantapothecary.com; Pravana, pravana. com; Quip, getquip.com; Rita Hazan, ritahazan.com; Sakara, sakara.com; Sally Hansen, target.com; Supergoop!, sephora. com; This Works, thisworks.com; Tulip, tulipclean.com; Viktor&Rolf, saks.com; Wei, weibeauty.com; Winky Lux, winkylux.com DREAMS OF GINA 89: The Row Coat, barneys.com. Adam Selman Dress at Elizabeth Charles, (415) 440-2100. Cartier Nail Ring, (800) CARTIER. Bulgari Band Ring, (800) BULGARI. 91: Emilio Pucci Dress & Top, emiliopucci.com for stores. Hearts on Fire Twisted-Band Ring, (877) PERFECT. YOUNG WOMEN’S HONORS 96: Brunello

Cucinelli Blazer, (212) 334-1010. 97: Kenzo Top, fwrd.com. Cartier Earrings & Rose-Gold Ring, (800) CARTIER. Michelle Mason Top, fwrd.

com. Djula Ring, (646) 869-9585. 98: Jil Sander Dress, store.jilsander.com. Hearts on Fire Earrings, (877) PERFECT. 99: Halston Heritage Dress, halstonheritage.com. 100: Polo Ralph Lauren Jacket, ralphlauren.com.

CALL OF THE WILD 102: Gucci Bag, gucci.com for stores. 103: Valentino Garavani Bag, valentino.com for stores. 104: Dior Boots, (800) 929-DIOR. 105: Fendi Bag, (212) 897-2244. 106: Miu Miu Shoes, miumiu.com for stores. 107: Sergio Rossi Shoes, (702) 734-0991. All prices are approximate. For help finding the items in this issue, e-mail marieclaireshops@hearst.com. No subscription inquiries, please. For subscriptions, log on to subscribe.marieclaire.com. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. Cover Look Sweepstakes. Sponsored by Hearst Communications, Inc. Beginning 12/13/16 at 12:01 AM (ET) through 1/31/17 at 11:59 PM (ET), go to marieclaire.com/ winthecoverlook on a computer or wireless device and complete the entry form pursuant to the on-screen instructions. One (1) winner will receive a year’s supply of makeup products from Clinique (ARV: $242) and a year’s supply of hair products from Aveda (ARV: $253). Total ARV: $495. Important Notice: You may be charged for visiting the mobile website in accordance with the terms of your service agreement with your carrier. Odds of winning will depend upon the total number of eligible entries received. Open to legal residents of the 50 United States and the District of Columbia who are 18 years of age or older at time of entry. Void in Puerto Rico and where prohibited by law. Sweepstakes subject to complete official rules available at marieclaire.com/winthecoverlook.

Marie Claire (ISSN 1081-8626) is published monthly, 12 times a year, by Marie Claire/Hearst, a New York general partnership whose partners are Hearst Communications, Inc., 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019 U.S.A., and Comary, Inc., c/o Marie Claire Album S.A., 10 boulevard des Frères Voisin, 92130, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France. Hearst Communications, Inc.: Steven R. Swartz, President & Chief Executive Officer; William R. Hearst III, Chairman; Frank A. Bennack, Jr., Executive Vice Chairman; Catherine A. Bostron, Secretary. Hearst Magazines Division: David Carey, President; John A. Rohan, Jr., Senior Vice President, Finance. © 2017 by Marie Claire/Hearst. All rights reserved. Marie Claire is a registered trademark of Marie Claire Album S.A. Periodicals postage paid at NY, NY, and additional entry post offices. Canada Post International Publications mail product (Canadian distribution) sales agreement No. 40012499. Editorial and Advertising Offices: 300 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019-3797. Subscription Prices: United States and possessions, $19.97 for one year. Canada and all other countries, $39.97 for one year. Subscription Services: Marie Claire will, upon receipt of a complete subscription order, undertake fulfillment of that order so as to provide the first copy for delivery by the Postal Service or alternate carrier within 4–6 weeks. From time to time, we make our subscriber list available to companies who sell goods and services by mail that we believe would interest our readers. If you would rather not receive such mailings, please send your current mailing label or an exact copy to Mail Preference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Harlan, IA 51593. For customer service, changes of address, and subscription orders, log on to service.marieclaire.com, or write to Customer Service Department, Marie Claire, P.O. Box 6000, Harlan, IA 51593. Marie Claire is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or art. None will be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. Canada BN NBR 10231 0943 RT. Postmaster: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 707.4.12.5); Non-postal and military facilities: Send address corrections to Marie Claire, P.O. Box 6000, Harlan, IA 51593. Printed in the U.S.A.


JANUARY 2017

HOROSCOPES

This month sees Capricorn experiencing a personal epiphany (care to share, Sienna Miller?), Gemini putting herself first for once (right on, Riley Keough), and Pisces hanging with her besties (good times, Queen Latifah!) By E R IC F R A NC I S C OPP OL I NO

Capricorn

(December 22–January 19)

Don’t feel as if you need to arrive at a clear conclusion on short notice. Pause and observe, and you’ll hit upon essential information that will give you an advantage you might not have had otherwise. While this intel may seem like it’s coming from external forces, it’s really a personal revelation that emerges around the time Mercury retrograde ends on the 8th. Inner discoveries are the ones that change everything. POWER DAY: January 8

Aquarius

(January 20–February 18)

There’s only so much you want to be influenced by the opinions of others, particularly when a business or creative project is involved. Yet there’s only so much you want to filter out. It’s the unusual suspects—whose opinions you would normally dismiss—who will provide the keenest insights. As the old saying goes, God watches over drunks, fools, and children—and those are the very people to listen to most carefully. POWER DAY: January 19

Pisces

POWER DAYS BASED ON PLANETARY ALIGNMENTS. ZODIAC SIGNS: GETTY IMAGES

(February 19–March 20)

So many planets are crowding your sign right now, you might wonder how they all fit. But your mental and emotional bandwidth is expansive, and you contain great potential and much more. It seems what you’re craving most is connection with people you care about, despite other commitments that serve as diversions. So get together with those people, and hang out long enough for something interesting to happen. POWER DAY: January 3

Aries

(March 21–April 19)

Your power to achieve great things this year is limited only by your imagination, which means no limits at all. Make a conscious choice to dream of the possibilities, and then take action. You can see opportunity where no one else can. You can sense your talent, though others might not notice at first. Concentrate your efforts on your most cherished priorities, and nothing will stand in your way. POWER DAY: January 28

Taurus

(April 20–May 20)

Not challenging ideas about life is holding you back or slowing you down. It takes special vision and sensitivity to see beyond what was always so, and you currently have those in abundance. Sure, what you’ve done in the past is comfortably familiar, but it doesn’t require much thought, risk, or any sort of shift in patterns. Try this: Look at everything as being subject to improvement, then dig into the corners and get busy. POWER DAY: January 6

Gemini

(May 21–June 20)

One central question you’re dealing with is how much energy to invest in relationships versus how much to invest in independent activities. Liberate yourself from the distractions and excesses of other people, and expend longoverdue attention on your career instead, making sure to leave the door open for when you want to come back. And when you do, don’t take on their problems—no matter how much you care. POWER DAY: January 29

Cancer

(June 21–July 22)

Working relationships must take precedence over personal relationships at the moment. If your working relationships are personal, then balance the emotional aspects with the practical ones. You will need to be the one who sets and maintains that agenda. The easiest way to proceed is for everyone to agree on what must be done and play their part. Think of this as an organizing principle that focuses hearts and leads to tangible results. POWER DAY: January 11

Leo

(July 23–August 22)

Resist making final arrangements until the end of the month, especially on matters involving contracts and financial agreements. Different factors are clouding your judgment, namely what is and isn’t your responsibility. Under current conditions, you might be persuaded to pay or do far more than your fair share. A few weeks from now, you’ll have a much better understanding of why you need to be on the receiving end of the deal. POWER DAY: January 7

Virgo

(August 23–September 22)

If you’re feeling insecure, zero in on your well-being rather than relying on someone else to transform your life. Consider the thoughts of those you trust with a measure of detachment. The solution to whatever puzzles you is not intellectual—that is, not an idea about what’s right for you. What you need is a bold experiment in what you might find fulfilling. Instead of thinking it, live it. POWER DAY: January 16

Libra

(September 23–October 22)

People, circumstances, and issues that might have rattled you a few months ago are suddenly no big deal. In fact, what was previously an annoyance may now be an inspiration. What seemed incomprehensible may now make sense as necessary and helpful. You’re tapping into a deeper wisdom and recognizing once-elusive connections. This gives you access to resources and concepts you might have ordinarily missed. POWER DAY: January 12

Scorpio (October 23–November 21)

You have something to say, though you might try pictures or music in lieu of words to express yourself, because your solar chart is rich with creativity—more dancing than writing, more painting than arithmetic. This is an invitation to get out of your head and into your feelings. The moment you do, a whole world of potential will open up, and not only might you find yourself in the company of artists and revolutionaries, you might decide you are one of them after all. POWER DAY: January 21

Sagittarius

(November 22–December 21)

You’re on a quest to get paid more for what you do. That’s admirable, but make sure you’re thinking straight. Pushing motivation into an uncertain mind is like shining a light into a fog. Develop solid strategies, one of which is to sustain your drive for financial prosperity over the long run. We’re not talking greed here: It’s another kind of success you’re seeking. Your particular gifts deserve creative and spiritual rewards. POWER DAY: January 1

January 2017 MA R I ECL A I R E. COM 117


BACKPAGE

Kate

WINSLET

THE ACADEMY AWARD WINNER, WHO STARS IN THIS MONTH’S DRAMA COLLATERAL BEAUTY, RECOMMENDS BUBBLY FOR ALL AND A HOME-COOKED MEAL FOR HERSELF 1. IF I WEREN’T AN ACTRESS, I’D BE: Creating forest schools for children. The outdoors is such a crucial and special part of childhood, and I fear it is becoming harder and harder for children to access it.

2. FAVORITE PERK OF THE JOB: Comfortable air travel. 3. WORST PITFALL OF THE JOB: Family logistics. 4. CHANGE I’D LIKE TO SEE IN MY INDUSTRY: It would be incredible if acting lessons and performing-arts

schools and colleges could be more readily available to people who are financially struggling. Acting is and should be for all.

5. HOW I MADE MY FIRST DOLLAR: Selling sandwiches at a music festival. 6. WHO I ADMIRE MOST AND WHY: Single mothers everywhere. It’s obvious why. 7. BOOK THAT LEFT A LASTING IMPRESSION ON ME: Lee Miller’s War, edited by Antony Penrose. 8. SONG THAT ALWAYS MAKES ME CRY: “Somewhere” from West Side Story. 9. MOVIE WITH THE GREATEST ENDING: It’s a Wonderful Life. 10. SONG I WANT PLAYED AT MY FUNERAL: “Don’t Stop Me Now” by Queen. And don’t anyone forget that! 11. FIRST ALBUM I BOUGHT: Aerosmith’s Greatest Hits. (I’m quite impressed with that!) 12. IF I COULD LIVE IN A FOREIGN COUNTRY, IT WOULD BE: New Zealand. 13. WHAT EVERY WOMAN SHOULD TRY ONCE IN HER LIFETIME: Champagne. 14. MY PERFECT DAY WOULD BEGIN: All my children climbing into bed with me, followed by a long, lazy breakfast with great coffee. Followed by a long country walk. Followed by some ocean swimming.

15. MY PERFECT DAY WOULD END: With a lovely hot bath and a movie. And dinner that someone else has

cooked for me! Because I am always cooking, it would be a nice change.

16. ONE THING I’M EXCEPTIONALLY GOOD AT: Forward-thinking and remembering dates. 17. ONE THING I’M EPICALLY BAD AT: Being on time. 19. THE BEAUTY ESSENTIAL YOU’D HAVE TO PRY OUT OF MY COLD, DEAD HANDS: By Terry’s Baume de Rose. I’m obsessed. 20. THE THREE QUALITIES I THOUGHT I WANTED IN A PARTNER: Sense of humor, spontaneity, kindness. 21. THE THREE QUALITIES I KNOW NOW MATTER: All of the above. 22. CRAZIEST THING I DID FOR LOVE: I jumped out of a helicopter into the sea, where my husband [Ned Rocknroll] was waiting. We’d been apart for two weeks, and I couldn’t wait to get to him.

—FOR MORE KATE, GO TO MARIECLAIRE.COM/KATE-WINSLET 118 MA R IE C L A I R E .C O M January 2017

ART PARTNER LICENSING

18. IF I COULD COMPETE IN AN OLYMPIC SPORT, I’D LIKE IT TO BE: Diving.



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