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SKIN REHAB

ELLEUK.COM

THE RADICAL CHANGE YOU CAN MAKE TODAY

NOVEMBER 2016 £4.10

AMY ADAMS THE MODERN GENTLEWOMAN

75 NEW COATS TO BUY NOW PUFFA / TRENCH/ OVERSIZED/ SHEARLING/ EVENING (WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED)

11 9 770269 259235


THE MOOD 61 New maximalism More is more – be bigger, be bolder, be yourself 68 Send in the heavies Our edit of the best shearling and faux fur coats 81 The piece Stripes on your shoes? A thousand times yes 85 Into the wild Wear your hiking boots and sheepskin coat to work (trust us)

Photography: Roberto Patella, Lauretta Suter, Graham Walser at Hearst Studios, Winnie Au, Amarpaul Kalirai.

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93 Watches Square faces are timeless, elegant and classic 96 Fast and loose The trick to knitwear? Piling it on 109 The spoils Don’t wait for Christmas. Treat yourself right now! 111 The rise and rise of the slogan T-shirt Wear your heart on your sleeve. Fashion just got feisty 117 Take it easy Laid-back clothing just got even more relaxed 125 Age of insouciance Meet the labels making waves on the runways 127 Shine on Lurex: sequin’s older, more sophisticated sister

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CONTENTS

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NOVEMBER ELLE COLLECTIVE

ON THE COVER 198 Amy Adams Emma Brockes meets a very modern gentlewoman 222 75 new coats to buy now Whether it’s oversized or a trench, go on, protect yourself from the cold, cold world 254 Skin rehab: the radical change you can make today Would you sacrifice alcohol to cure your hangover face?

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131 Future sounds Three female musicians changing pop’s profile 140 Are you sitting comfortably? The new TV obsessions. It’s OK to get hooked 149 Lotte’s lexicon Is it really only boring people who get bored? 150 Street style How to rework evening wear for day 152 My world Model Marjan Jonkman’s most treasured items 154 My story Phiona Mutesi – the inspiration behind a new Hollywood film starring Lupita Nyong’o 157 ELLE Book Club Vivienne Westwood’s most-loved literature

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FEATURES

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BEAUTY

170 Love in translation When Lauren Collins fell in love with a Frenchman, her relationship with language had to change 176 Animal, vegetable, millennial How vegetarianism evolved from lifestyle choice to wellbeing trend 184 A woman walks into a bar… Hanging out with chardonnay-drinking, cabaret-singing, boob -baring Bridget Everett 188 Sex can be life-changing, self-affirming and sometimes completely underwhelming… Sexual encounters that transformed three writers

TRAVEL

247 Vibrant thing Curls are in and this time around they’re a whole lot more than a catwalk trend 261 Beauty CV Anthony Turner – the go-to session stylist 263 Sophie says ELLE’s Beauty Director collaborates with ghd for Breast Cancer Now 267 High contrast Step away from your usual colour palettes: make-up’s getting bolder and braver 275 Fit notes ELLE’s columnist Bangs pushes us out of our comfort zones

286 Made in Taiwan Road-tripping around this enchanting island, Miette L. Johnson uncovers a whole new side to Asia, embraces her wild side, and rediscovers how to be the Big Sister 290 Due south Head out to these sunny locales and postpone the start of winter 292 Hot hotel Think Cancún is all about Spring Breakers? Think again. Nizuc Resort & Spa is a haven of refinement and relaxation – a world away from the masses

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CONTENTS NOVEMBER REGULARS

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46 Powered by The creators and curators behind the November issue 51 Editor’s letter Lorraine Candy on today’s clean-living culture 52 Astrology The Saturn Sisters help you navigate the changes ahead this month 55 Behind the covers Revealing the inspiration – and Balenciaga’s new power dressing – behind this issue’s cover 285 The Clothes Show Britain’s biggest fashion festival is back, and it’s offering ELLE readers tickets for just £25 293 Join ELLE and Very at our first pop-up shop Enjoy discounts, meet the ELLE team and discover the V by Very collection

THE COVER On the cover: Photographer: Liz Collins. Styling: Anne-Marie Curtis. Hair: Rolando Beauchamp at The Wall Group using Bumble and Bumble. Make-up: Stephen Sollitto at TMG-LA.com using Synthetic de Chanel and Sublimage Le Teint. Manicurist: Deborah Lippmann for Deborah Lippmann. Set designer: Bette Adams at Mary Howard Studio. On the cover: Cotton coat, Balenciaga. Wool jumper and viscose skirt, both Balenciaga. Gold-plated earrings, Thomas Sabo. On the subscribers’ cover: Wool jacket and matching trousers, and silk shirt, all Balenciaga. Gold-plated and sterling silver earrings, Annelise Michelson. Rings, all Amy’s own.

ELLE/NOVEMBER

Photography: Miette L Johnson, Eva Roovers, Kai Z Feng.

FASHION 208 The get down Use velvet, glitter and bold clashing prints to channel your inner Bowie 234 Style out Russian model, Varya Shutova, shows us how to nail men’s tailoring


‘Black culture is a house with a thousand rooms, with windows looking out on so many views’

LONG READS BY AWARD-WINNING WRITERS PLUS EXCLUSIVE SHOPPING GALLERIES, CULTURE EDITS AND OPINIONS FROM THE SHARPEST VOICES TODAY ONLY ON ELLEUK.COM FOLLOW US @ELLEUK

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Editor-in-Chief / 14 Lorraine Candy @lorraineelle Editor-in-Chief ’s PA/ Editorial Assistant / 32 Rachel Macbeth @rachelmacbeth Creative Director / 15 Suzanne Sykes @suzannesykes25

FASHION fashion@elleuk.com

Illustrations: Viet Tran.

Executive Fashion Director / 28 Kirsty Dale @kirstyldale Senior Fashion Editor / 10 Michelle Duguid @michelleduguid1 Accessories Editor / 22 Donna Wallace @itsdwallace Associate Fashion Editor / 18 Harriet Stewart @harrietstewart Fashion Production & Bookings Editor / 19 Rachael Evans @littlerachael Bookings Assistant / 7 Zuzana Kostolanska @zuzkostol Fashion Assistants / 16 / 8 / 27 Billie Bhatia @billiebhatia Roberta Hollis @robertahollis Felicity Kay @felicitykay Fashion Interns / 9 / 34 Lulu Cooper @lulutyas Heather Gwyther @gwyther Contributing Fashion Editors Lila Roberts, Alison Edmond, Grace Cobb, Natasha Wray

ELLE VOICES

Fashion Director / 13 Anne-Marie Curtis @amcelle

Deputy Editor / 30 Lotte Jeffs @lottejeffs Content Director / 1 Hannah Swerling @hannahelleuk Fashion Features Director / 11 Kenya Hunt @kenyanhunt Beauty Director / 31 Sophie Beresiner @i_love_lipstick Entertainment Director (US) Lisa Hintelmann Workflow Director / 3 Imogen Van Zaane @imogenvz Managing Editor / 20 Debbie Black @deb_elle

CONTENT features@elleuk.com Travel & Lifestyle Director / 26 Susan Ward Davies @swdtravel Culture Director / 33 Lena de Casparis @lenadecasparis Commissioning Editor / 25 Hannah Nathanson @hannahlucy85

Art Director / 21 Andrew Barlow @andrewbarlow Senior Designer / 5 Elizabeth Cooney @lizzy_cooney Designer / 29 Viet Tran @iamviettran Picture Editor / 17 Lara Ferros @lara5678 Deputy Picture Editor / 12 Catherine Pykett @catpykett

BEAUTY Beauty Editor / 23 Joely Walker @joelygwalker

DIGITAL

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Deputy Chief Sub-Editor / 24 Emma King @emmakingelle With thanks to Cherry Casey, Jason Riley and Tracy Muller-King

Digital Content Editor / 2 Natasha Bird @littlebirdsword Digital News & Features Editor / 6 Bibby Sowray @bibbysowray Social Media Manager / 4 Unsah Malik @unsahmalik Digital Writer / 35 Katie O’Malley @katieomalley_

Politics Editor Ellie Gellard Literary Editor Sharmaine Lovegrove Technology Editor Robyn Exton New York Editor Scarlett Curtis Video Editor Grace Campbell Fitness Editor and ELLE Fit Columnist Muireann Carey-Campbell Contributing Fitness Editor Fern Ross Contributing Editors Edith Bowman, Anna Smith

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ART art@elleuk.com

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LAGARDÈRE GLOBAL ADVERTISING CEO Lagardère Global Advertising François Coruzzi SVP International Advertising Stéphanie Delattre stephanie.delattre @lagardere-active.com

ELLE is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation (which regulates the UK’s magazine and newspaper industry). We abide by the Editors’ Code of Practice and are committed to upholding the highest standards of journalism. If you think that we have not met those standards and want to make a complaint please contact complaints@ hearst.co.uk or visit hearst.co.uk/hearst-magazines-uk-complaints-procedure. If we are unable to resolve your complaint, or if you would like more information about IPSO or the Editors’ Code, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit ipso.co.uk. ELLE competition terms and conditions Only one entry per reader. Entrants must be 18 or older. Open to residents of the UK and the Republic of Ireland only. Photocopied, incomplete, defaced or damaged entries will not be accepted. Hearst Magazines UK accepts no responsibility for the loss of any entries. Proof of postage is not proof of entry. An independently supervised draw will be made on your behalf by an impartial third party one week after the competition closing date. The winner will be notified within four weeks of the closing date. Entries will not be accepted from employees of Hearst Magazines UK or their families (or those of the participating third party). The judges’ decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into. No purchase necessary. Should you wish to enter a promotion without buying a copy of ELLE, print your name, address and the name of the competition, plus any other information requested, clearly on a card and send it to ELLE, Hearst Magazines UK, 72 Broadwick Street, London W1F 9EP, by the closing date. No cash alternative. Prize is as stated, subject to availability. Not to be used in conjunction with any other offer.

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TO SUBSCRIBE, VISIT elleuk.com/subscribetoelle or call 0844 322 1767 and quote reference 1ES10756 Terms and conditions: Offer valid for new UK subscriptions by Direct Debit. *After your first six issues, your subscription will continue at £15 every six issues, unless you are notified otherwise. All orders will be acknowledged and you will be advised of the start issue within 14 days. Subscriptions may be cancelled by providing 28 days’ notice. Minimum subscription term is six issues. Free gift is available for the first 300 subscribers and is subject to availability. If stock runs out, you will be offered a gift of similar value. Please allow up to 28 days for delivery of your gift, which will arrive under separate cover to your subscription. All savings are based on the basic cover price of £4.10. Subscriptions may not include promotional items packaged with the magazine. This offer cannot be used in conjunction with any other subscription offer and closes on 14 November 2016. For UK subscription enquiries, please call 01858 438 796. For overseas subscription rates and enquiries, please call +44 1858 438794 or visit hearstmagazines.co.uk. All information is correct at time of going to press. For our data policy, visit hearst.co.uk/dp.

ELLE/NOVEMBER

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ELLE CONTRIBUTORS 2. MEGHAN MARKLE Star of the hit US TV drama Suits, Meghan says the best thing about her job is ‘being given the platform to make a difference in the world on a greater level.’ Receiving a standing ovation from UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon after her UN speech in 2015 was, says Meghan, ‘the best moment of my life.’ The greatest piece of advice she has ever been given is ‘don’t give it five minutes if you’re not going to give it five years.’ Meghan writes about how she combines her acting and activism on page 180. @MEGHANMARKLE

NOVEMBER ELLE

POWERED BY

1. VARYA SHUTOVA Varya started modelling three years ago, aged 23, after being scouted dancing in a band in St Petersburg, Russia. She has walked for Gucci, Louis Vuitton and Givenchy, but says that her greatest career achievement has been working with Marc Jacobs. Varya calls St Petersburg home but is currently living and working in New York. When she gets a day off, she likes to roam the city seeking inspiration for her art: ‘I love to draw,’ she says. Varya keeps a scented candle and a book by her bed, and her current read is Paulo Coelho’s The Diary Of A Magus. Varya stars in Style Out on page 234.

3. LAUREN COLLINS Lauren has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 2008. Born in North Carolina, she now lives in Paris with her husband and daughter. Her morning commute consists of brushing her teeth as she travels to her laptop in the kitchen. On her first day at work at American Vogue she wore a pair of slingbacks from T.K. Maxx: ‘Big mistake!’ Lauren’s greatest career achievement is ‘vomiting on Donatella Versace’ and her worst habit is ‘freestyling the recycling.’ Lauren explores love in translation on page 170. @LAURENZCOLLINS

@SYDHAYESHAIR

5. NAOKO SCINTU ‘Always assist and never say a negative word about anyone’ is London-based make-up artist Naoko’s advice to those starting out in the industry. Since graduating from the London College Of Fashion in 2002, Naoko has worked with Karlie Kloss, the Olsen twins and Eva Green, but says she would be star-struck if she met Jennifer Lopez: ‘She’s my childhood inspiration!’ See her work on page 208. @NAOKOSCINTU

FIVE THINGS THAT MADE THE NOVEMBER ISSUE ‘The song Youth by Glass Animals,’ VIET TRAN, DESIGNER ‘New-season television, from The Night Of to Strictly’ HANNAH SWERLING, CONTENT DIRECTOR ‘Frank Ocean’s Blonde and binges on Stranger Things,’ KENYA HUNT, FASHION FEATURES DIRECTOR ‘Early morning runs in Hyde Park,’ RACHEL MACBETH, PA TO EDITOR-IN-CHIEF AND EDITORIAL ASSISTANT ‘Nihilist memes,’ HEATHER GWYTHER, FASHION INTERN

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ELLE/NOVEMBER

Compiled by: Rachel Macbeth. Photography: Varya Shutova/courtesy of Premier Model Management.

4. SYD HAYES London-born hair stylist Syd Hayes started out ‘sweeping the floor in my dad’s salon, aged five.’ He’s since cut the hair of models Lara Stone, and both Bella and Gigi Hadid. The best thing about his job is being able to express himself creatively: ‘It truly is great for the mind.’ His dream date would be with his girlfriend and their dog Clive: ‘When you travel a lot, you look forward to being at home!’ Karaoke bars scare him, but Syd’s choice of song would be Shaggy’s Boombastic. See his work on page 247.


NOVEMBER

wo years ago my friend, the writer Hannah Betts, gave up drinking alcohol. Nothing dramatic prompted this decision, she had just become weary of her relationship with booze and was on a quest for a more fulfilling night’s sleep. Renouncing drink turned out to be the best solution for her own personal predicament. I was intrigued by Hannah’s resolution, having known her for many years, and having been an enthusiastic partner in what she calls ‘a lifetime of resplendent carousing’. One of the side-effects of her new cocktail-free evenings was the extraordinary rejuvenation of Hannah’s skin, which I witnessed first hand. Could giving up alcohol be the sole reason for this enviable new glow I wondered (secretly hoping not, given my own love of a Friday-night margarita)? So I asked Hannah, a beauty product enthusiast, to find out and on page 254 she writes about what she discovered. I won’t spoil the surprise for you, but I will say it has made me re-evaluate my own relationship with alcohol or, more importantly, the way I consume sugar in my daily diet. But Hannah’s piece presents an emotional dilemma for us all in this era of so-called ‘clean living’. Is the abstinence mindset a realistic way of being? What’s been great about Hannah’s journey is her non-judgemental approach to not drinking. It’s rare for those who have discovered what they deem ‘a better way’ not to demand we join their own personal revolution. When I looked into the possibility of a soberforever lifestyle (as everyone does after a long, wine-fuelled summer) I was overwhelmed by the evangelistic zeal of those who had already embraced it, the way they believed the rest of us were blindly living a worse life, that they were possibly better human beings with more willpower than us normals.

Photography: Georgia Devey Smith.

ELLE/NOVEMBER

It put me off joining them and frankly, it made me want to reach for an espresso martini with my toast and Marmite. Hannah’s piece caused quite a debate among team ELLE, with many of us wondering whether this all-ornothing way of life would be worth giving up whatever it is we feel has a bad effect on our health. I’d be fascinated to hear your thoughts on this because the generation I came from thoroughly enjoyed a much less clean-living culture in the Nineties – we’d never heard of juicing and there was only one form of yoga! Today I worry there is a swing towards a state of play where the occasional night that ends in a hot mess of unpredictable chaos is frowned upon rather than relished, that there is a downward pressure on young women to be so hyper-mindful of what they eat or drink that they lose the joy behind consuming their favourite things. I could be wrong and indeed my view may be warped by living in a big city where fads ripple through communities with speed. Moderation is probably the key here, as with all things in life, and Hannah’s piece is very much a reminder that we’re all individuals and what works for one doesn’t work for others. I’m not quite ready to forfeit the joy of a cold glass of wine or a refreshing beer, but the moment may come when something else takes its place – who knows! In the meantime, I’ll be relying on a host of exciting new developments in skincare to give me some of Hannah’s new-found glow. I hope you like our new-look beauty section, which we launched last month. Our directory pages on 268 are designed to show you exactly what’s on offer for your hair, makeup, fragrance and skin right now. It’s useful, practical and thoughtfully edited by Beauty Director Sophie Beresiner and Beauty Editor Joely Walker. And for those who love a beauty adventure, we are debuting some of the new Rouge Dior make-up range with its limited-edition colourful new products, on page 267. There are 37 lipsticks in the entire collection and we’ve tried them all at ELLE HQ!

LORRAINE CANDY EDITOR IN CHIEF

Twitter @lorraineELLE Facebook @lorraine.elleuk

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This month The Saturn Sisters predict… RELATIONSHIPS RULE THE WORLD THIS OCTOBER, WHETHER YOU’RE SINGLE OR INVOLVED. GET READY TO DATE, MATE AND RELATE AS THE PLANETS HOVER IN LIBRA (THE SIGN OF PARTNERSHIP) AND SCORPIO (THE SIGN OF SEX). CARNAL DESIRES DOMINATE IN THE DAYS LEADING UP TO THE UBER-PASSIONATE PRE-HALLOWEEN FULL MOON. WHETHER YOU’RE MASKED OR UNMASKED, AIM FOR MAXIMUM PLEASURE

to the next level on the 16th. The month closes on a quieter note than it began with – a dreamy new moon has you looking inward on the 30th.

wanderlust on the 30th. Treat yourself to a long weekend.

Date for your diary: 18th You’re glowing from within.

ARIES

CAPRICORN

LIBRA Your month to: Finally prioritise number one October is all about making time for the most important person in your life: yourself. Your modus operandi is taking care of others, but you need to make self-care a priority right now. Book that massage, now. Relationships hit fever pitch near the full moon on the 16th – for better or worse. When the new moon arrives on the 30th, financial issues are on your mind. If you want a pay rise, now is the time to ask. Date for your diary: 21st Go on a charm offensive with your boss.

SCORPIO Your month to: Trust your gut Listen to your intuition closely this October, Scorpio. It won’t let you down. By the time the full moon arrives on the 16th, you feel a bit burned out – don’t work so hard that you forget to breathe. This is really important as you approach the new moon in your sign on the 30th – preserve your energy so you can make this auspicious moment even more awesome. Date for your diary: 22nd Prepare to instantly magnetise everyone you meet – people can’t take their eyes off of you when you enter a room.

SAGITTARIUS Your month to: Socialise October is a great month to seek new adventures, and they’re better done in a pack. You certainly don’t want to go solo under these stars, so make sure your friends are available to join you. A fiery full moon takes your love life

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Your month to: Raise the stakes Your ambition is fierce, and your professional prospects are even fiercer during the first three weeks of October. Nothing can stop you now, Capricorn, not even the emotionally volatile full moon on the 16th. Attend to family matters mid-month before they blow up in your face. A new moon puts you in the mood to network near the 30th. End the month on a creative and collaborative note. Date for your diary: 27th Reconnect with an old friend.

AQUARIUS Your month to: Use your GPS You need to get away from home right now, Aquarius. Take a few weeks off if you can. A fiery, passionate full moon highlights communication issues on the 16th, so putting your foot in your mouth is a possibility – tread carefully. By the new moon on the 30th you’re back on track and crushing professional goals. Date for your diary: 14th Vent your troubles to a friend.

PISCES Your month to: Indulge in your desires Your libido is overwhelming for the better part of October, Pisces – make sure your lover is available during the first three weeks of the month (or find a new one). There could be a major development on the financial front as the full moon erupts on the 16th. The new moon stokes your

Date for your diary: 26th Relationships reach boiling point today.

Your month to: Love your lust The stars are asking you to delve into the nature of your past and present relationships. An intense full moon in your sign explodes on the 16th, offering powerful self-realisation. Sex is the main theme at Halloween thanks to an intensely libidinous new moon on the 30th. Date for your diary: 19th Channel your passion into a big work project.

TAURUS Your month to: Make it happen for yourself Nothing can stop you now, Taurus, especially on the professional front. The only cure for your current state of overdrive is running out of batteries. The full moon on the 16th means you can’t hide from reality any more. Deep breaths, it will all be OK. When the new moon arrives on the 30th, your love life hits fever pitch. Date for your diary: 25th Don’t make any big romantic decisions today.

GEMINI Your month to: Get away October is not meant for sticking around, Gemini – you’re ready to jet off on your next adventure. When the full moon arrives on the 16th, your social life is at the centre of everything. It’s time to make that collaboration happen. The new moon on the 30th releases the pressure valve on a very stressful work issue once and for all.

the full moon arrives on the 16th, you’re so enmeshed in a professional matter that you’ll barely have time to deal with anything at home. As October draws to a close, romance and creativity beckon loudly. The new moon on the 30th ensures neither are far away. Date for your diary: 12th You’re restless today – plan your next adventure.

LEO Your month to: Talk it out Communication is key this month, Leo. Make sure you put down your phone at some point. On the 16th, a powerful full moon stirs your wanderlust – this is an ideal moment to make travel plans for any time over the next six months. The new moon arrives at the very end of October, bringing a long-standing family issue to light – precisely so you can heal it once and for all. Date for your diary: 23rd You’re in demand this weekend but don’t say yes to everything.

VIRGO Your month to: Fine-tune your finances The planets are focused on your bottom line this month, Virgo, so let them help you generate all the cash you need. The vibe changes near the full moon on the 16th, when you’re suddenly obsessed with sex and intimacy – if you don’t have a current lover, fire up your Tinder account ASAP. A transformational new moon makes you brave enough to say exactly what’s on your mind on the 30th. Date for your diary: 13th Go for a run to take the edge off your anxiety.

Date for your diary: 20th Money changes everything.

CANCER Your month to: Huddle at home You can’t get away from it, Cancer – the stars are pushing you to resolve a family issue this month. But by the time

ELLE/NOVEMBER


BEHIND THE COVER THE NEXT TIME YOU SEE AMY

ADAMS IT WILL EITHER BE IN TOM FORD’S DARK THRILLER, NOCTURNAL ANIMALS, OR IN THE PROVOCATIVE AND BEAUTIFUL SCI-FI DRAMA

ARRIVAL – TWO OF THIS YEAR’S MOST IMPORTANT FILMS. A TRUE HOLLYWOOD MOVIE

STAR,

SHE IS ONE OF THE WORLD’S MOST BANKABLE ACTRESSES AND HAS THE RARE

TALENT OF MASTERING ANY ROLE SHE CHOOSES, FROM WIDE-EYED DISNEY PRINCESS TO MARVEL BLOCKBUSTER LEADING LADY AND COMPLEX INDIE HEROINE.

THE PLAYLIST Your Song by Elton John, Fuck You by Cee Lo Green, Angels by The xx, Destiny by Zero 7, Landslide by Fleetwood Mac, Bittersweet by Everything But The Girl, A Boy Named Sue by Johnny Cash

THE FASHION It’s a Balenciaga moment with exaggerated proportions, mannish shirting, long cuffs, and weighty silk-satin. This is the new power dressing.

BALENCIAGA

JIL SANDER

CÉLINE

THE DIGITAL See the soft side of our cover star, Amy Adams. For our exclusive and personal digital shoot of Amy, visit elleuk. com/amy-adams. THE LOOK Skin is in. The trick to getting a fresh and natural complexion like Amy’s is using a product that lets your real skin show through, such as Chantecaille Future Skin Oil Free Gel, £60.

ELLE/NOVEMBER

POWER OF AMY ADAMS.

BALENCIAGA

Compiled by: Lena De Casparis, Joely Walker. Photography: Liz Collins. Styling: Anne-Marie Curtis. Hair: Rolando Beauchamp at the The Wall Group using Bumble and Bumble. Make-up: Stephen Sollitto at TMG-LA using Synthetic de Chanel and Sublimage Le Teint. Manicurist: Deborah Lippman for Deborah Lippman. Set Designer: Bette Adams at Mary Howard Studio.

BEHOLD THE QUIET

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Model wears: Silk coat, £1,263, Zimmermann. Cotton-mix top, £395, and matching trousers, £350, both Paul Smith. Silk-mix scarf, £145, Liberty. Gold-plated brass and pearl earrings (worn throughout), £58 for a single, Cornelia Webb.

THE MOOD Less is no longer more. The runways are challenging you to be bigger, bolder and braver. The new maximalism is about turning up the dial on who you are, says Kenya Hunt Photography Roberto Patella Styling Michelle Duguid

ELLE/NOVEMBER

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Photography: Roberto Patella.

THIS PAGE LACE DRESS, £420, AND WOOL AND DIAMANTE SCARF (WORN THROUGHOUT), £456, BOTH PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI. RIBBON HAIR BOWS (WORN AS BRACELET), £25, FINERY. PLATED BRASS SILVER RING WITH BLUE STONES (WORN THROUGHOUT), £80, JOOMI LIM. ALL OTHER STERLING SILVER RINGS (WORN THROUGHOUT), £35 EACH, ALL PANDORA OPPOSITE PAGE SILK COAT AND SILK TROUSERS, AS BEFORE. LEATHER SHOES, £120, UNDERGROUND. COTTON-MIX SOCKS (WORN THROUGHOUT), £7.99 FOR THREE PAIRS, PRINGLE AT SOCKSHOP

ELLE/NOVEMBER


THE MOOD

ELLE/NOVEMBER

DRIES VAN NOTEN

GUCCI

‘It’s not about being flamboyant for Instagram likes. It’s aboutt turning up the volume on who you are’ CHRISTOPHER KANE

e’re not just living life. We’re living our best life. We’re doing the most. We are – to throw in all the internet speak – lit. And we’re lit AF. In an age where the internet has us communicating in all caps, WTFs and emojis all of the time, it’s not surprising that our clothes have evolved to become just as hyperbolic. If fashion is language – and in the world of ELLE, it certainly is – our means of speaking are becoming ever bigger and bolder by the day. Yes, maximalism is having a ance thanks to Alessandro Michele’s wildly popular, highly decorative and immensely sellable vision at Gucci. But this is a shift that feels even bigger than that; a general feeling of more-is-more that has permeated through the runways, no matter what the trend (grunge, Eighties, streetwear, you name it). I’m talking about the fashion of personal branding. From the gargantuan shoulders on a Marc Jacobs feathered cape for AW16 to the lush, elaborate braiding on a cavalry coat at Burberry, the rhetoric of the autumn season is loud and proud. You don’t have to be a ‘maximalist’ in the traditional sense, with your gilded loafers styled with your paisley trousers, to get it. Autumn’s new mood is less about covering yourself in crystals and more about the act of amplifying whatever your look of choice is to the highest degree. Perhaps it’s about distinguishing oneself from the noise. ‘In this current world of technology and social media, where everything runs faster each day, you want to keep that uniqueness that makes you different from the rest,’ says Rio Uribe, the designer behind the New Yorkbased label Delpozo known for its bold use of volume and meticulous, highly Instagrammable decoration.

But to be clear, this isn’t about wearing a flamboyant piece for the sake of likes on Instagram. It’s about turning up the volume on who you are: letting your unstraightened curls grow big and wild like models of the moment Damaris Goddrie, Luisana González and Natalie Westling, or in singer Alicia Keys’ case, swearing off make-up and committing to it in a blaze of publicity, even on red carpets. Come as you are. And then multiply that quality by 10. Do you like your tailoring relaxed and pared back? Then take it extra large and in charge as seen through Céline’s exaggerated flared legs. Do you love a plush velvet? Swathe yourself in it from head to toe as seen at Alberta Ferretti. A weakness for sequins? Wear them thick and densely layered as shown at Dolce & Gabbana and Preen. Ruffles? The bigger the better as proven by Ellery. Michelle Elie, the Haitian-born, Colognebased former model attributes the new mood to fashion’s renewed appreciation of individualism, an idea she’s long epitomised. She reached street-style icon status on the strength of her boldly out-there, go-to-hell wardrobe of challenging Comme des Garçons, Junya Watanabe and Prada pieces – she literally stops traffic during fashion weeks. ‘I think there is a lot of fashion meant to lift the mood this season. I personally like fashion that makes me feel a bit playful and fun. We tend to buy the way we want to feel, and I think designers are providing for the full range of emotions,’ she says. ‘The more,themerrier.’ ›

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LEFT POLYESTER DRESS, £75, ASOS. SILK SHIRT (WORN UNDERNEATH), £378, KATE SPADE NEW YORK. SUEDE SHOES, £125, UNDERGROUND BELOW FAUX FUR COAT, £185, GUESS. VISCOSE DRESS, £200, BIMBA Y LOLA

THE MOOD

‘The feeling of more-ismore has permeated through the runways, no matter what the trend’

‘We tend to buy the way we want to feel, and designers are providing for the full range of emotions’

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Photography: Roberto Patella.

ABOVE AND FAR LEFT POLY-MIX COAT, £350, KAREN MILLEN. COTTON JACKET, £434, PINKO. SILK SHIRT, £239, SANDRO. VISCOSE TROUSERS, £295, MOTHER OF PEARL. LEATHER SHOES, £140, UNDERGROUND. SILK-MIX SCARF (WORN THROUGHOUT), £145, LIBERTY. SILVER-PLATED EARRINGS, £70, FOLLI FOLLIE LEFT POLYESTER JACKET, £295, MICHAEL MICHAEL KORS. VISCOSE SHIRT, £325, VIVETTA AT LIBERTY. COTTON TROUSERS, £209, MAJE. LEATHER BOOTS, £290, ZADIG & VOLTAIRE OPPOSITE PAGE SILK-MIX DRESS, £625, COACH 1941. LEATHER BAG, £395, MOTHER OF PEARL ›

ELLE/NOVEMBER


ELLE/NOVEMBER

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THE MOOD

‘If fashion is language, and in the world of ELLE it certainly is, our means of speaking are becoming ever bigger and bolder by the day’

ABOVE COTTON JACKET, £70, AND MATCHING TROUSERS, £38, BOTH RIVER ISLAND. SILK SHIRT, £725, BALLY. LEATHER SHOES, AS BEFORE FAR RIGHT VISCOSE DRESS, AS BEFORE Q

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Photography: Roberto Patella. Additional photography: Imaxtree. Hair: Johnnie Biles at Frank Agency using Bumble and Bumble. Make-up: Jose Bass using Synthetic de Chanel and Sublimage Le Teint. Manicure: Veronica Butenko using MAC Cosmetics. Model: Evangeline Ling at Storm Models.

RIGHT LACE TOP, £1,140, AND LACE SKIRT, £3,558, BOTH ERMANNO SCERVINO. VISCOSE TROUSERS, £260, BIMBA Y LOLA. PATENT LEATHER BOOTS, £395, DORATEYMUR BELOW SILK DRESS, SILK SCARF AND LEATHER BAG, ALL AS BEFORE


SHEEPSKIN COAT, £699, JAEGER. COTTON TOP, £19.99, H&M. POLY-MIX TROUSERS, £150, MICHAEL KORS. LEATHER BOOTS, £1,165, VALENTINO. CASHMERE SOCKS, £45, JOHNSTONS OF ELGIN. MODEL’S RIGHT HAND: RHODIUM-PLATED RING (PART OF SET, WORN THROUGHOUT), £99, SWAROVSKI. MODEL’S LEFT HAND: 14CT GOLD HEART RING (WORN THROUGHOUT), £225, PANDORA

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ELLE/NOVEMBER


THE STYLING

SEND IN THE HEAVIES WE WANT OUR SHEARLING SHAGGY AND OUR (FAUX) FUR FUZZY. GIVE US A HUG: YOU KNOW YOU WANT TO Words and styling Donna Wallace Photography Lauretta Suter

COLOUR CODES

‘From Ellery and Marc Jacobs to Marques’Almeida, this is the shearling coat’s moment. My favourite way to wear it right now is in a fully saturated colour like a bright yellow or bold blue’

ELLE/NOVEMBER

TOP POLYESTER COAT, £350, KAREN MILLEN. POLYESTER BOMBER, £399, SANDRO. COTTONMIX TROUSERS, £255, ZADIG & VOLTAIRE. LEATHER AND SHEARLING SANDALS, £280, LONGCHAMP. CASHMERE SOCKS, £175, WILLIAM & SON. SHEARLING AND LEATHER BAG, £295, MICHAEL KORS ABOVE GOAT-SUEDE COAT, £149.99, H&M STUDIO. WOOL DRESS, £225, BY MALENE BIRGER. SHEARLING SCARF, £685, LONGCHAMP LEFT SHEEPSKIN COAT, £1,495, BA&SH. POLY-MIX TROUSERS, £140, KAREN MILLEN. SUEDE AND SHEEPSKIN TRAINERS, £315, MONCLER. COTTON SOCKS, £11, FALKE ›

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THE STYLING TOUCHING TRIBUTE

‘While outerwear seems like the obvious way to wear shaggy wool, I’m most intrigued by all the new bags. Imagine sinking your hands into something so cosy on a glacial day’

Photography: Lauretta Suter.

TOP RIGHT SHEARLING COAT, £2,610, PAUL SMITH. VISCOSE-MIX DRESS, £59.99, LINDEX. WOOL DRESS (JUST SEEN), £200, BY MALENE BIRGER. LEATHER SHOES, £615, TOD’S. MERINO WOOL SOCKS, £45, WILLIAM & SON ABOVE WOOL TROUSERS, £250, ZADIG & VOLTAIRE. CALF-LEATHER BOOTS, £875, LOUIS VUITTON. CASHMERE SOCKS, £175, WILLIAM & SON RIGHT COTTON-MIX TOP, £59.99, LINDEX. WOOL-MIX JUMPER (WORN UNDERNEATH), £195, MICHAEL KORS. COTTON SKIRT, £265, RAG & BONE. LEATHER-MIX BAG, £1,555, J&M DAVIDSON ›

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THE STYLING

Photography: Lauretta Suter. Styling: Donna Wallace. Make-up: Emma Osborne at One Represents using Chanel Le Rouge Collection No 1 and Le Lift V-Flash. Hair: Sofia Sjoo using Oribe. Manicure: Lauren Michelle Pires using Chanel Le Vernis in Particulière and Body Excellence Hand Cream. Model: Emily Delaloye at The Squad.

COMPLEX FEELINGS

‘Fashion loves contrast, so mix textures just as you clashed prints a few seasons back. Smooth and shiny with matte and shaggy, sweet and lacey with rough and leathery’

TOP RIGHT SHEARLING COAT, £1,795, MCQ. POLY-MIX BOMBER, £34.99, NEW LOOK. WOOL TOP, £200, AND COTTON TROUSERS, £220, BOTH BY MALENE BIRGER. LEATHER SHOES, £175, RUSSELL & BROMLEY. WOOL SOCKS, £15, SCOTT NICHOL. SHEARLING BAG, £2,370, FENDI ABOVE LEATHER COAT, £1,675, BIMBA Y LOLA. COTTON TOP £19.99, H&M. VISCOSE TROUSERS, £110, JAEGER. SHEARLING FUR SLIDES, £210, AVEC MODÉRATION AT AVENUE 32. WOOL SOCKS, £14, FALKE. MODEL’S RIGHT HAND: 14CT GOLD AND STERLING SILVER RING, £75, AND STERLING SILVER RING, £35, BOTH PANDORA RIGHT MODA ACRYLIC FAUX FUR COAT, £395, MICHAEL KORS. COTTON HOODIE, £70, CONVERSE. SHEEPSKIN BAG, £525, FURLA. MODEL’S RIGHT HAND: STERLING SILVER AND 14CT GOLD RING, £75, STERLING SILVER HEART RING, £35, BOTH PANDORA. MODEL’S LEFT HAND: STERLING SILVER HEART RING, AS BEFORE. STERLING SILVER TWIST RING, £40, PANDORA Q

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THE PIECE ‘Why should clothing have all the fun? I find stripes most interesting when they’re on the feet. And with plenty of colour pops please’ Photography Benjamin Swanson Words and styling Donna Wallace

SUEDE AND VELVET BOOTS, £1,350, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

ELLE/NOVEMBER

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THE GIRL FROM LEFT COTTONMIX LEGGINGS, £28, NEXT. LEATHER BUM BAG, £39, NICA. LEATHER BOOTS, £164.99, DR. MARTENS X ZALANDO MARNI COLLECTION BELOW PUFFA JACKET, £120, MONKI. WOOL-MIX JUMPER, £29, WAREHOUSE. SKINNY JEANS, £145, BA&SH

Still-life photography: Graham Walser at Hearst Studios.

INTO THEWILD Take it outside. Or at least dress like you are in rugged, stomper boots and the coziest sheepskin coats. Here are the ELLE takes on rustic dressing. The town is your country

CREATURE OF COMFORT Never mind that it has been months since Alexander McQueen, Marques’Almeida and Balenciaga showed quilted duvet coats on the catwalk. She still can’t believe her luck. Fashion’s trend cycle has finally aligned with her ultimate weekend guilty pleasures and she has been blissfully swathed in her puffa since. Life made.

Photography Ben Parks Styling Michelle Duguid

FROM LEFT WOOL-MIX SWEATER, £80, CANVAS BY LANDS’ END. METAL SUNGLASSES, £189, GIVENCHY. WOOL BEANIE, £95, RAG & BONE ›

ELLE/NOVEMBER

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THE GIRL BELOW SHETLAND COATING AND FELT COAT, £1,995, JOSEPH. SHORT WOOL COAT, £325, TOPSHOP UNIQUE. WOOL JUMPER, £280, STUDIO NICHOLSON. COTTON-MIX JEANS, £54.95, GAP. LEATHER BOOTS, £430, CARVEN

FROM LEFT COTTON JUMPSUIT, £45, ASOS. LEATHER BOOTS, £155, COMPTOIR DES COTONNIERS. LEATHER SUNGLASSES, £295, MONCLER BY MARCOLIN

Still-life photography: Graham Walser at Hearst Studios.

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY She mastered her personal uniform from the age of 18 – denim and an army coat – and never looked back. More than a decade later, it’s still serving her well with a few tweaks here and there. Her latest update, the addition of a pair of prize stomper boots in the spirit of Preen and Prada.

FROM LEFT POLY-MIX BOMBER, £39.99, H&M. BAG, £495, CHRISTOPHER RAEBURN. WOOL COAT, £525, MICHAEL MICHAEL KORS ›

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THE GIRL

ENGLISH PASTORAL She’s the woman who feels more comfortable at a country hotel than at any London nightspot. An expert in wardrobing, she may like practical sheepskin in elevated iterations from Coach and Burberry, but her denim is always vintage.

FROM LEFT WOOL-MIX JUMPER, £85, FRENCH CONECTION. LEATHER BOOTS, £149, NINE WEST. CORDUROY TROUSERS, £190, PAUL & JOE Q

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ELLE/NOVEMBER

Still-life photography: Graham Walser at Hearst Studios. Hair: Tomomi Roppongi. Make-up: Martina Lattanzi at One Represents using Make Up For Ever. Manicure: Tinu Bello at One Represents using Chanel Le Vernis in Organdi and Body Excellence Hand Cream. Model: Talia Mathers at Select Models.

FROM LEFT SHEARLING COAT, £350, COMPTOIR DES COTONNIERS. LEATHER AND SHEARLING BAG, £500, LONGCHAMP. SHEARLING HAT, £165, UGG BELOW SUEDE COAT, £149.99, H&M. WOOL-MIX JUMPER, £99, KAREN MILLEN. CORD TROUSERS, £89, WAREHOUSE


THE PIECES ‘The latest mood in watch design brings together the old with the new. It’s all about square faces, making every piece feel like a future classic’

Photography Benjamin Swanson Words and styling Donna Wallace

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: LEATHER STRAP AND STEEL FACE, £2,020, CARTIER. LEATHER STRAP AND SILVER FACE, £2,380, BOUCHERON. LEATHER STRAP AND SILVER FACE, £1,860, LOUIS VUITTON. LEATHER STRAP AND BEIGE GOLD FACE, £8,500, CHANEL. LEATHER STRAP AND STAINLESS STEEL FACE WITH GOLD NUMERALS, £2,850, TIFFANY. LEATHER STRAP AND 18CT WHITE GOLD AND DIAMOND FACE WITH MOTHER OF PEARL DIAL, PRICE ON APPLICATION, CHOPARD

ELLE/NOVEMBER

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WOOL COAT, £95, MONKI. POLY-MIX SLEEVELESS COAT, £99.50, BODEN. COTTON-MIX DRESS, £755, CALVIN KLEIN. CASHMERE TROUSERS, £299, JOHNSTONS OF ELGIN. FELT TRAINERS, £120, KURT GEIGER. WOOL SCARF, £137, ACNE

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ELLE/NOVEMBER


THE STYLING

FAST AND LOOSE FROM THE MULTI-LAYERS AT VICTORIA BECKHAM for autumn to Burberry’s elegant sweaters for spring, all-year-round knits have never been more relevant. The new styling trick is in the piling on. Think about the easy way you’d wear that sheer, gauzy slip over a T-shirt in summer, and apply that same method to your knitwear this fall. You’ll want your wool and cashmere as thin and breezy as your silks.

ABOVE LIGHT GREY WOOL-MIX JUMPER (WORN AROUND BODY), £119, BARBOUR. DARK GREY CASHMERE JUMPER (WORN AROUND BODY), £1,060, GABRIELA HEARST. ACRYLIC WOOL JUMPER (WORN UNDERNEATH), £85, FRENCH CONNECTION. WOOL-MIX TRACKSUIT BOTTOMS, £209, MARC CAIN. SATIN BALLET PUMPS,£9.80, FREED OF LONDON RIGHT JERSEY CORSET, £39, FINERY. WOOL-MIX CARDIGAN, £39.99, H&M. WOOL-MIX JUMPER (WORN UNDERNEATH), £80, MODERN RARITY AT JOHN LEWIS. WOOL TROUSERS, £185, TOPSHOP UNIQUE. SHETLAND WOOL JUMPER (IN HAND), £198, JIGSAW. SATIN TRAINERS, £160, KURT GEIGER LONDON ›

Photography Amarpaul Kalirai Styling Harriet Stewart

ELLE/NOVEMBER

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THE STYLING

LEFT COTTON-MIX JUMPER, £85, FRENCH CONNECTION. MERINO WOOL ASYMMETRIC JUMPER, £59, COS. POLYESTER TROUSERS (JUST SEEN), £220, PLEATS PLEASE BY ISSEY MIYAKE

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Photography: Amarpaul Kalirai.

ABOVE ACRYLIC-MIX JUMPER (WORN ON SHOULDERS), £29.99, LINDEX. CASHMERE SWEATER (WORN UNDERNEATH),£1,060, GABRIELA HEARST. WOOL-MIX SWEATER (WORN AROUND WAIST), £119, POLO RALPH LAUREN. WOOL-MIX SKIRT, £70, MODERN RARITY AT JOHN LEWIS. LEATHER BOOTS, £119.99, KENZO X H&M LEFT WOOL-MIX JUMPER, £165, TOPSHOP UNIQUE. CASHMERE JUMPER (IN HAND), £169, JIGSAW. CREPE TROUSERS, £230, CARVEN. LEATHER BOOTS, £150, G-STAR RAW. COTTON-MIX SOCKS, £3, ASOS ›

ELLE/NOVEMBER


Photography: Amarpaul Kalirai. Hair: Joana Neves using Oribe UK and Babyliss Pro UK. Make-up: Martina Lattanzi at One Represents using Estée Lauder, nails using Chanel Le Vernis in Ballerina and Body Excellence Hand Cream. Model: Olena at Next Models.

THE STYLING

LEFT PATENT LEATHER BUSTIER TOP, £349, JOSEPH. WOOL SWEATER, £274, ACNE

RIGHT WOOL-MIX JUMPER, £149, BARBOUR X WHITE MOUNTAINEERING. ALPACAWOOL JUMPER, £89, COS. NYLON TRACKSUIT BOTTOMS, £45, URBAN OUTFITTERS. LEATHER BOOTS, £655, TOD’S Q

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ELLE/NOVEMBER


THE BEAUTY EDIT

THE SPOILS SELF LOVE IS HAVING A MOMENT, which in our minds means buying lots of lovely things… for ourselves. Consider a collectable candle that evokes spiced oranges, an undeniably cool perfume with a create-your-own label or makeup bound in gold fabric. We deserve it.

Words: Joely Walker.

Photography Eva Roovers

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: GIVENCHY PALETTE ORS AUDACIEUX, £40.50. GIVENCHY PRISME LIBRE VOILE AUDACIEUX IN VOILE ROSÉ, £36. JO MALONE THREE-WICK ORANGE BITTERS CANDLE, £120. GIVENCHY LE ROUGE IN ROSE AUDACIEUX, £26. BYREDO UNNAMED EAU DE PARFUM, £135 FOR 100ML EXCLUSIVE TO LIBERTY

ELLE/NOVEMBER

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THE STORY

IN TIMES OF POLITICAL CHANGE AND SOCIAL UNREST, FASHION GETS FEISTY. ELLE’S HANNAH SWERLING LOOKS AT

THE RISE AND RISE OF THE SLOGAN T-SHIRT

Photography: Getty.

W

hen I was 14, in the Nineties, I had a black crop top from Miss Selfridge that had the word ‘Attitude’ emblazoned across it in bright white italics. (I also had one that said ‘Babe’ in glitter but let’s never speak of it). The irony is not lost on me that I was actually a mild-mannered, introspective teenager with approximately zero attitude, but I’m thankful to my mum for buying it and humouring me. Later that year, I ramped up my naive venture into rebellion by wearing a French Connection ‘FCUK fashion’ T-shirt. I know what you’re thinking: this kid was edgy. But it did feel transgressive to be so tantalisingly close to wearing a swearword out in public. I don’t remember that 1997 campaign sending out any particular message but the simple acronym, penned by an agency Creative Director Trevor Beattie, captured the mood of a generation of teens who wanted to experiment with anarchy (and I enjoyed a wistful moment of nostalgia when the campaign came back for SS16). According to Chief Executive of French Connection, Stephen Marks, that was the goal: ‘As we’re paying homage to the Nineties, this was the right time to bring back the FCUK logo.’ ELLE/NOVEMBER

Fashion has always been about self-expression but, in this moment of political upheaval, social unrest and ceaseless change, capturing a mood isn’t enough. We want a message to scream and shout. Sloganeering was all over the catwalk for AW16, from Alexander Wang to DKNY, and it’s making its presence felt on the high street, too (River Island, Topshop, H&M). The hashtags and captions have leapt from our smartphones and on to our clothes. Just in case you didn’t already know our political affiliation or where we stand on Justin Bieber (we’re looking at you, Vêtements), we’re spelling it out for all the world to see. But it’s not all righteous protest; fashion has a unique way of getting the message across, whether it be playful or poignant, while succinctly capturing a moment, too. The motivation and sentiment behind fashion slogans have evolved over time and according to the social climate. The Seventies and Eighties saw a rise in bold, provocative activist messaging under the radical eye of British designers such as Katharine Hamnett and Vivienne Westwood. In the Seventies, Westwood and her then partner Malcolm McLaren’s most ›

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THE STORY

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Sloganeering made a big comeback on the AW16 catwalks

century before women had the vote, they would use umbrellas that represented their preferred candidate,’ he says, ‘and the Suffragettes wore purple to demonstrate who they were.’ In an era of Brexit, Donald Trump, Everyday Sexism and Black Lives Matter, it may feel like we’re more politically engaged than ever, but conventional campaigning often fails to capture our attention. ‘One of the problems of any campaign group or political party is that people aren’t listening; they’ve switched off,’ adds Fielding. ‘Any form of communication that goes against expectation will make an impact.’ This year, Anna Cosgrave, 26, from County Wicklow launched her ‘REPEAL’ tops to campaign for a repeal of Ireland’s Eighth Amendment, a law passed in 1983 outlawing abortion in the country. ‘To wear your rights on your body has resonance,’ she says. ‘I find they act as statements of solidarity and unity, and embody what grass roots activism is all about.’ While some slogans can publicise a direct cause, there is fashion that is more subtle in its message; at Vêtements, phrases such as, ‘May The Bridges I Burn Light The Way’ denoted some undefined anger. Creative Director Demna Gvasalia said, ‘I remember the morning after the 2015 attacks, walking through Paris and it was zombie land. Maybe the anger somehow was present in our last show but it was subconscious. In the same way, before Charlie Hebdo, we had made all these security sweatshirts. You feel things and it filters through to the world.’ Gvasalia’s politics may be less self-conscious than his predecessors but the feeling of restless discontent persists. That’s what’s so brilliant about fashion: whatever your ‘thing’ is, there is clothing that can help you express it. And a T-shirt is much less painful than a tattoo. It’s nearly 20 years since I wore that ‘Attitude’ top and while I’m spoilt for choice with comparable options today, I’m not sure I’ll be wearing a ‘Where My Beaches At’ ASOS T-shirt any time soon. Having said that, sloganeering isn’t going anywhere and I’m excited to see what awaits us in upcoming seasons. Political uncertainty and seething emotion are powerful tools for creative inspiration. That and Donald Trump T-shirts saying ‘We Shall Overcomb’. Q ELLE/NOVEMBER

Photography: Getty.

popular design featured images of a swastika and Christ on the cross under the word ‘Destroy’, apparently making a stand against dictatorships. A decade later, Hamnett created the design that spawned a thousand imitators with her oversized T-shirts with black block capital slogans. In 1984, she famously stuck two fingers up at the establishment by wearing a top saying, ‘58% Don’t Want Pershing’ to meet Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher at a Downing Street reception (in protest against US Pershing missiles in the UK). The iconic ‘Frankie Say Relax’ and ‘Choose Life’ soon followed. Hamnett says the resurgence in sloganeering is the symptom of a newly frustrated generation. ‘There is a swing to the right and with that a loss of civil liberties,’ she explains. ‘People feel they have no voice, but they can wear it on a T-shirt and people can’t not read it.’ If the last few seasons have been an unapologetic Nineties fashion revival (combat boots, chokers, babydoll dresses, and so on), then it’s logical that we should witness a nod to Nineties-era logomania this season. The trend that DKNY helped to launch was resuscitated for AW16 with slogans like ‘Insert Logo Here’ and ‘Designers Know Nothing Yet’. And for SS17, hooded boilersuits were emblazoned with ‘New York Is The New York’. This more playful tone reminded me of the Noughties moment when the angry, political edge of the punk era gave way to more cheeky, spirited designs from the likes of Henry Holland – ‘Do Me Daily Christopher Bailey’ and ‘Flick Yer Bean For Agyness Deyn’. Holland has hit refresh on these T-shirts for SS17, enlisting the biggest models with enormous reach on social media to wear them before the catwalk show itself: ‘I’m Yours For A Tenner Kendall Jenner’ and ‘Give Us A Toss Karlie Kloss’. ELLE Designer Viet Tran recalls the first collection with an affectionate cringe. ‘Before university, a load of us were really into those T-shirts but we couldn’t afford them, so we came up with our own slogans such as, “He’s your man, Viet Tran”, “It’s all coolio with Nat Feruglio”. I think we liked that it was fun and you could wear clothing that referenced something or someone you associated with. It was an inside joke that united us as a group.’ ‘There is a woman who loves these iconic slogans, who has a sense of humour,’ says Natalie Kingham, Buying Director at matchesfashion.com. ‘It feels quite tribal, people recognise and embrace these pieces and it identifies them as part of a group.’ Whether you’re a designer broadcasting your philosophy on the catwalk or the woman on the street wearing a Beyoncé T-shirt, fashion offers a simple means by which you can tell the world what you’re about. Steven Fielding, Professor of Political History at University of Nottingham, argues that ‘display’ has always been important. ‘In the 19th


THE STORY

Our workwear is more casual than ever, but what does that mean for off-duty dressing? Judging by the runways, it’s time to unwind. A super-relaxed era has dawned and we’re taking it lying down f you’d have told me 18 months ago that a pair of £510 velvet-trimmed Haider Ackermann track pants would one day sit at the top of my wish list, I’d probably have shot you my steeliest side-eye. If you’d also said my justification for such a fantasy purchase would be, ‘They’re great for both work and weekends!’ I would have told you to stop being so silly. But here I am now, poring over a photo of Rosie Huntington-Whiteley wearing a similar £810 pair by Chloé as she strolls through LAX Airport. She’s channelling what we fashion writers rather uninventively call the ‘model off-duty’ look: her outfit, which also includes a grey tee and black blazer, combines comfort and style in equal measure. She is, of course, in no way ‘off duty’ – with her image being her fortune, she never truly is, especially at the paparazzi battleground that is an airport. Proof: she’s also wearing 5in heels. Even though I know all of the above, I’m still hooked on the idea of more frequently wearing the kinds of clothing that was once limited to Saturday dog walks in the park. That’s largely thanks to the runways, where sweatshirts (Burberry, Hood By Air, DKNY – the list goes on) and baggy denim (Balenciaga, Alexander Wang) rules. I’ve even contemplated creating a DIY version of my own track pants courtesy of John Lewis’ haberdashery department. This is the perfect example of the power behind those two little words: off duty. Initially a trend, it’s now a movement. It no longer pertains to our weekend wardrobes – it’s impacting how we dress for work. But why, and what does this mean for our actual off-duty wardrobes? ‘We’re dressing more comfortably because we’re seeking ease in our hectic lives,’ says Tamu McPherson, Founder of street-style website All The Pretty Birds.‘Ourproductivity demands are so much higher and life is more dynamic than it has ever been, so itnecessitatesless-formal clothes.’ It’s true; according to a study by the Trade Un-

Photography: Getty, Imaxtree.

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Words Bibby Sowray

ion Congress, the average UK working week now stands at 43.6 hours compared with a European average of 40.3 hours, while the number of people working excessive hours (more than 48 hours a week) has risen by 15% since 2010. The most recent British Social Attitudes Survey reveals we’re experiencing more work-related stress than ever, but conversely, those in professional jobs have more freedom and flexibility at work than they did a decade ago, suggesting we’re happy to work longer and harder for more autonomy. It’s little surprise then, that as our work life has percolated into our home life, we’ve reassessed the role our clothes play in helping us deal with it. For many of us, particularly those in the creative industries, this has blurred the line between workwear and weekend wear. ‘I remember a few years ago, the first time I saw somebody wearing trainers at work. I thought, “She looks really efficient,”’ says Lisa Aiken, Net-A-Porter’s Retail Fashion Director. ‘When you are comfortable, I believe you are more effective.’ Kate Unsworth, Founder of wearable tech startup Vinaya, says she can’t remember the last time she bought clothing just for work. ‘Everything has to be adaptable to my lifestyle. If I’m on a nine-hour flight, having meetings with investors or going to dinner with friends, I don’t want to have to think about whether my clothes are going to be able to keep up with my day.’ Having become aware that we’re now seeking multipurpose pieces that represent our busy lives but with comfort at the core, designers and brands are upping their off-duty game – and we’re playing along. ‘Previously, the off-duty wardrobe was an afterthought, but nowadays women are using them to express their personalities,’ Aiken says. ›

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It was a sensibility that struck a chord with women everywhere. Wearing workout clothes in our time off seemed like what we were searching for; the next step in ‘off duty’, it also went hand-in-hand with the way in which our attitude to health was changing. ‘Wellness culture definitely influenced a shift to athleisure in our downtime,’ says McPherson. ‘It’s so important for me to work out, but I don’t have time to change for whatever else I have going on ‘They’re able to have more fun styling the pieces, that day.’ so they are certainly willing to invest in it more.’ It may not have been innovative, but as he did As such, the sweatshirt – once a lesser-thought of with his simple-but-bold ‘off-duty’ look years ago, essential – has become a luxe statement piece we’re Wang lit the touch paper for the trend to influence willing to splash out on, whether it’s a signature Belother designers. And it’s still going strong. la Freud knit at just under £300 or an intarsia tiger Wearing gym clothes – something that not so number by Gucci for a £700 price tag. And hoodies long ago may have seemed lazy – now allows us to continue to rise in popularity: ‘Off-White and Vêtetell the world: ‘I’m busy but I’m in control and take ments are leading the way,’ says Aiken. care of myself.’ In an era where our brains are bomSo if off-duty dressing has taken over our workbarded with never-ending notifications, maybe we ing week, what do we actually wear when we’re, you need our clothes to reflect our increasingly hectic know, off duty? Natalie Kingham, Buying Director lives. It’s also worth noting that ‘off duty’ and athleiof matchesfashion.com, recommends the highsure are two movements that have undoubtedly low approach and investing in great outerwear. been strengthened by social media. Not just be‘I really like athleisure with a camel coat over the top. cause it has exposed us to thousands of ‘influencDesigners are doing more cargo and army jackets, ers’ who are showing us how to nail it, but also bewhich are good for transseasonal off-duty. The cause Instagram has altered our perception of how length, shape, fabric and colour go with everything.’ successful women dress now. Of course, this change is not simply down to our We’re presented with the likes of Leandra Medishift in work-life balance. It’s rooted in how fashion ne and Chiara Ferragni, both of whom preside over has progressed over the last decade. growing media empires in When Alexander Wang, a jeans and tees. ‘The suit is Parsons School Of Design ‘THE SWEATSHIRT, ONCE amazing, but you don’t have to dropout, arrived on the scene A LESSER-THOUGHTwear one to prove you belong in 2006, he introduced an antiOF ESSENTIAL, HAS at that table. You wear what dote to the trend treadmill: you want,’ says McPherson. inconsequential, slightly worn BECOME A LUXE Off duty really is at its most everyday items such as the STATEMENT PIECE WE powerful right now. oversized T-shirt and mothWILL SPLASH OUT ON’ But in a sea of athleisure and eaten jumper repurposed with built-for-comfort clothes, how a ‘don’t give a damn’ attitude. can we maintain our individuality and avoid becomThus, contemporary off-duty dressing was born. ing too casual? Of course, Wang didn’t invent casual dressing. ‘My advice is to always have one element that is ‘People have always changed into casual stuff when personal to you,’ says Aiken. ‘I’ll always have my they get home – it marks the transition between Hermès watch and multiple rings on no matter work and downtime,’ notes Kate Finnigan, The Telewhat I’m wearing.’ Meanwhile, I’ve found an alternagraph’s Fashion Features Director. But what he did tive to my dream tracksuit bottoms that won’t leave do was take it from being something of an afterme eating soup for six months: Adidas Originals’ thought to the catwalk and, more importantly, premium three-stripe cigarette trousers. Athleibeyond. If a trend is a holiday romance – you meet, sure with a bit of tailoring. I think we’re going to be you flirt, you say your goodbyes and, years later, very happy. Q you look back with a mix of nostalgia and ‘What was I thinking?’ – what Wang did was plant the seed for a love affair worthy of a Nicholas Sparks novel. Ten years on, off-duty dressing’s roots are anchored and its influence none more apparent. But it wouldn’t be fashion if things didn’t progress – again, we have Wang to thank for that. In 2014, he used his H&M collaboration to bring athleisure to the masses. ‘I live in gym clothes. When you go out on the street, it’s the uniform now,’ he told The New York Times when it launched, adding a major ‘but’: ‘I’m not an athlete.’

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Photography: Getty, Imaxtree.

THE STORY


DONNA’S DETAILS Give satin and rhinestones a sporty edge with jewel and army-green tones

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WITH FLYING COLOURS

Styling Donna Wallace Photography Victoria Adamson

1. SILK TOP (WORN THROUGHOUT), £575. MAGDA BUTRYM. SATIN TROUSERS, £445, JOSEPH. SATIN AND SWAROVSKI BAG, £895. ALEXANDER MCQUEEN. RINGS (FROM LEFT): BOTH STERLING SILVER AND WHITE ZIRCONIA (BOTH WORN THROUGHOUT), £199 AND £79, ALL SIF JAKOBS. 14CT GOLD, £265; STERLING SILVER, £50, ALL PANDORA 2. SATIN-MIX SHOES, £750, JIMMY CHOO. NYLON JUMPSUIT (WORN THROUGHOUT), £765, TOMAS MAIER 3. SATIN-MIX BAG, £1,100, LOEWE. YELLOW GOLDPLATED EARRINGS, £120, VIVIENNE WESTWOOD 4. SILK SHOES, £410, NINA RICCI. SILK SHIRT, £280, ZADIG & VOLTAIRE. STERLING SILVER RING, £60, PANDORA 5. POLYESTER COAT (WORN THROUGHOUT), £75, TOPSHOP. RAYON DRESS (WORN THROUGHOUT), £766, ALTUZARRA. CRYSTAL CHOKER, £300, GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI. RINGS: YELLOW GOLD AND DIAMOND (WORN THROUGHOUT), £525, LINKS. STERLING SILVER, £35, FOLLI FOLLIE. STERLING SILVER AND ZIRCONIA BRACELET, £159, SIF JAKOBS 6. METAL BAG, £1,350, BALLY. SATIN AND STRASS SHOES, £1,200, ROGER VIVIER 7. LEATHER BOOTS, £648, LORIBLU. METAL AND STRASS EARRINGS, £350, SONIA RYKIEL 8. DIAMANTÉ EARRINGS, £895, BALENCIAGA 9. SATIN BAG, £1,070, BOTTEGA VENETA. STERLING SILVER AND WHITE ZIRCONIA BRACELETS, £199 AND £159, ALL SIF JAKOBS

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THE LABELS

AGE OF INSOUCIANCE Meet three designers who are gaining cult status among fashion influencers, and are giving everyday dressing a maverick twist Words Billie Bhatia and Tina Chadha

DANIELLE ROMERIL

Photography: 3 Objectives, Graham Walser at Hearst Studios.

Above: Designer Danielle Romeril. From top: Wool jacket, £1,799, technical fabric shirt, £599, and technical fabric coat, £1,399, all Danielle Romeril

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When she was 15, Dublin-born Danielle Romeril’s career in fashion began when she created her very own trend. ‘I called it “festival bride,”’ she says, laughing. The look might not have taken off, but her work is every bit as singular now as it was then. With a following that includes singer FKA twigs and blogger Susie Bubble, Romeril riffs on a playful aesthetic, slashing her slouchy pieces at the joints in an Edward Scissorhands manner. ‘My style is modern, relaxed and teeters between girly but not too girly, and boyish but not too boyish,’ she says. Romeril left a degree in psychology and politics in Dublin for the Limerick School Of Art And Design, following it up with internships at Sharon Wauchob in Paris and Sinha-Stanic in London. After her graduate show at the Royal College Of Art in 2010, Romeril was chosen to work at Alberta Ferretti’s studio in Rimini, Italy. Then in 2013, she founded her own label and quickly won a NewGen sponsorship from the British Fashion Council for six seasons, joining a pantheon of past recipients including Christopher Kane and Erdem. Now, with a range of international retailers including Dover Street Market, and a newly launched e-commerce site, her bendy path from festival bride to London label-to-love hasn’t steered her wrong. ‘I don’t really have a 10-year plan,’ she admits. Somehow, we doubt that’s a problem. Prices start at £95

BEAUFILLE Sisters Chloé and Parris Gordon grew up on opposite sides of the fashion spectrum: ‘Parris would wear ball gowns to kindergarten, and I’d be rooting in my brother’s closet,’ says Chloé. Luckily for the Toronto-based designers, the contrast laid the foundation for a successful working relationship. Launched in 2013, their line Beaufille (‘handsome girl’ in French) merges masculinity and femininity to create elegant pieces with a boyish insouciance. Think one-shouldered tops, trousers with big flares and bold jewellery. The look has caught the attention of celebrities (Lady Gaga) and top retailers (Net-A-Porter) alike for their techniques. Look closely at what appears to be a shiny, oxblood leather coat and you’ll find it’s boiled wool treated with polyurethane. Meanwhile, a knitted lace creation is much more than meets the eye: Chloé sewed yarn on to a water-soluble bag, embroidered over it and then dunked it in a water bath until the plastic dissolved. The clothes sound complex, but they’re built for frequent use. ‘We want to invade your everyday rotation,’ says Parris. We’ll happily surrender for the oxblood flares please. Prices start at £125

Below: Cotton-mix coat, £1,510, and cotton-mix top, £250, both Beaufille at Net-A-Porter. Bottom: Chloé and Parris Gordon

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HARRIET STYLES IT

SHINE ON Words and styling Harriet Stewart Photography Victoria Adamson I AM A FASHION MAGPIE AND ALWAYS HAVE BEEN. When it comes to shopping,

no silver boots are safe, no sequined slip will be left untouched. But now, aged 30, there are new rules. Sequin mini-skirts are a no-no. They have been relegated to the festival box, along with bum-baring denim hot pants. Make that mini a midi however, pair it with a white T-shirt and simple trainers, and that works in my mind. Sequins have to look expensive, and that means no gaudy colours and strictly no bandage dresses. Which is where Lurex comes in. Think of it as the sequin’s older sister, which works just as well with daywear as it does partywear. While there is still cheaplooking Lurex out there, on the whole it tends to look more refined, and it featured pretty heavily on the autumn/ winter 2016 catwalks too, from Gucci to Roksanda. These Seventies-style Lurex trousers by Tibi would be welcomed by anyone who can only tolerate sparkle with a side-serving of boyish attitude. I’ve paired them with a gold sequin shirt from Very. Simple in shape and not overly skin-baring, it’s a case-study in how sophisticated sequins should be done. For a similar vibe, I suggest investing in a Lurex poloneck (of which I have more than could possibly be deemed necessary) for the ultimate partywear quick fix. Wear one with a pair of velvet palazzo pants or under an LBD to show an old classic some new tricks. Buy one now and you’ll never look back.

‘These Lurex trousers would be welcomed by anyone who can only tolerate sparkle with a side-serving of boyish attitude’ ABOVE POLYESTER SEQUIN SHIRT, £55, V BY

BALENCIAGA

TRY IT NOW PANTONE®

FOR A MORE DRESSED-DOWN APPROACH, LUREX WORKS PARTICULARLY WELL

WITH DENIM. THROW ON A PARTY KNIT WITH BEAT-UP BOYFRIEND JEANS, OR LAYER YOUR LUREX

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POLONECK UNDER A PAIR OF DUNGAREES FOR AN UNEXPECTED BLEND OF HIGH AND LOW.

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BALENCIAGA

Additional photography: Imaxtree.

VERY. POLYESTER LUREX TROUSERS, £530, SUNO

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IMMERSE YOURSE IN THESE LOVING CURATED, VISUAL INSPIRING NEW CULTURE PAGES. THE FIRST TO KN

Photography: Amarpaul Kalirai. Héloïse Letissier wears: Red wool-mix jacket, and matching trousers, both Gucci. White cotton shirt, Magda Butrym. Multicoloured leather shoes, Stella McCartney at Harvey Nichols.

Edited by Lena De Caspa aris

THIS MONTH Meet the women leading music’s new movement: MØ, Christine And The Queens and Kelsey Lu. Ugandan chess champ Phiona Mutesi tells her story, as Lupita Nyong’o prepares to star in a film of her life. Plus, Vivienne Westwood’s most-loved books.

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THIS PAGE WOOL-MIX JACKET AND COTTON SHIRT, BOTH AS BEFORE OPPOSITE PAGE BLACK WOOL-MIX JACKET AND MATCHING TROUSERS, BOTH STELLA MCCARTNEY. BLACK LEATHER SHOES, CHURCH’S FOOTWEAR

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FUTURE SOUNDS DARING TO BE DIFFERENT, THESE THREE WOMEN DEFINE POP’S SPIRITED NEW MOMENT. THIS IS EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE MUSICIANS SOUNDTRACKING TOMORROW Words Lena De Casparis

PROFILE / Christine And The Queens

Photography: Amarpaul Kalirai.

HOME TOWN: Nantes, France SOUNDS LIKE: Powerhouse synth-led pansexual anthems FOR FANS OF: Björk, Madonna, Miley Cyrus LISTEN TO: When you need to lose yourself – in a crowded train carriage, in the office, or on the dancefloor MAJOR MOMENT: Madonna’s levitating finale at the 2015 Grammys was inspired by Christine And The Queens’ Saint Claude music video, in which she dances while suspended in the air STANDOUT TRACK: Tilted

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THE CONVERSATION: ‘I’m often lost in my dreams,’ says 28-year-old Héloïse Letissier talking about her breakout album Chaleur Humaine, which translates into English as ‘human warmth’. ‘When I was young, I would write all the time,’ she says. ‘Novels, plays, and poems. It’s like a disease – my life is filled with fantasies and I have to write them all down.’ After a bad break-up in 2010, she came to London and inspired by a troop of drag queens she met at Soho nightclub Madame Jojo’s, she dreamed up the alter ego she now performs as: Christine And The Queens. ‘Christine was me wanting to break free. I was tired of being prissy, and shrinking, and apologising all of the time, so I created a character that could be daring for me.’ The Queens are her imaginary back-up drag dancers.

Back home, in France, Héloïse is already a huge deal. She’s spent most of the last two years in the top 40 of the country’s music charts, where Chaleur Humaine is already seven-times platinum. It was only this year when she brought out a translated English version of the album, and then won over a rained-on Glastonbury crowd with a magical acrobatic performance, that she became big here. Her sound mixes synth-filled electro productions with distinctive icy vocals, but what really sets her apart is her dancing style that crosses voguing with Michael Jackson moonwalking. ‘I call it a project more than an album because for me everything – the dancing, the performance, and the music – is linked.’ At the core of the music is Héloïse’s relationship with her sexuality. Identifying as pansexual, she rejects the stereotypes around femininity. ‘Before I created Christine, I was actually really girly. Maybe I was trying to hide something but I was trying too hard to be a girl and I didn’t know what it meant. I was afraid of being myself.’ One aspect vital for the creation of Christine was her style; her stage looks all centre around sharp tailoring. ‘Clothing is so closely related to how you present yourself to the world. Suits are now for me these neutral clothes – they can be feminine and sexy, but also really macho.’ Next, Héloïse will disappear to make the new album. ‘I’m ready to work on some new music. I want to plot who the next Christine will be.’ ›

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HOME TOWN: Charlotte, North Carolina SOUNDS LIKE: Soulful strings with otherworldly vocals FOR FANS OF: FKA twigs, Kelela, Dev Hynes LISTEN TO: During pensive moments at home alone with a large glass of pinot noir MAJOR MOMENT: Headlined this year’s most-hyped festival Afropunk in Brooklyn, New York, alongside Janelle Monáe and The Internet STANDOUT TRACK: Morning After Coffee

PROFILE / Kelsey Lu THE CONVERSATION: Making the classical cello cool is an

impressive feat, but it’s one that Kelsey Lu does with ease. The 27-year-old instrumentalist and singer is arguably the coolest new musician on the planet right now. Having grown up in a Jehovah’s Witness family in small-town US, surrounded by music, Kelsey began studying classical composition at six years old. ‘I grew up with a pretty strict religious background,’ she says. ‘But when I left to go to school, my life flipped upside-down and it all changed. I questioned everything and that’s when I started writing songs.’ She is now based in Williamsburg, New York, and in July Kelsey released her first EP, Church, recorded in a Brooklyn church with a loop pedal. Inspired by artists Alice Coltrane, Nina Simone and Billie Holiday, her sound still uses haunting

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strings from the cello but brings in echoing vocals to create songs with a potent emotional punch. She already boasts some high-profile fans; having played with Dev Hynes and Kelela, Kelsey opened for Florence And The Machine’s tour earlier this year. She also soundtracked designer Grace Wales Bonner’s first runway show in spring. Performing is everything for Kelsey. ‘I did my show recently and the front row was mainly composed of women of colour and I was like, “The universe has answered my prayers.” It was such a beautiful and diverse mix of people. It was electrifying.’ For now, she’s finishing her first full-length album and is looking forward to working with more women. ‘It’s a world full of men and being a female in music, it’s exciting to feel a part of something,’ she says. ‘It’s so important for our voices to be heard.’ ›

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Photography: Amarpaul Kalirai.

THIS PAGE BLACK VISCOSE DRESS, BEAUFILLE AT NET-APORTER.COM. BLACK LEATHER BOOTS, LOUIS VUITTON OPPOSITE PAGE LEATHER JACKET, PROENZA SCHOULER. NYLON BRALET, BARBARA CASASOLA AT NET-A-PORTER.COM. ALL JEWELLERY AND WATCH, KELSEY LU’S OWN

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HOME TOWN: Ejlstrup, Denmark SOUNDS LIKE: Feisty electro-pop with a punk attitude FOR FANS OF: Twin Shadow, Grimes and Pussy Riot LISTEN TO: When you need a kick of conviction – before a date, getting ready for a night out, gearing up to ask your boss for a pay rise MAJOR MOMENT: This summer's collaboration with Justin Bieber and Major Lazer on the track Cold Water STANDOUT TRACK: Final Song

PROFILE / MØ THE CONVERSATION: Age seven, Karen Marie Ørsted An-

derson, better known as MØ, discovered the Spice Girls and decided she wanted to be a pop star. ‘I wasn’t from a musical family but I was determined to be exactly like them.’ Growing up in a small town west of Copenhagen, the 28 year old knew she couldn’t conform to conventions: ‘I saw bands with perfectly choreographed performances and I was so awkward, I couldn’t do that’. Instead MØ started a punk band called MOR. ‘Playing with the band I learned to just say, “Screw that, you can let go and be weird.”’ In 2013, she went solo and released her debut EP Bikini Daze. Evocative of early Lana Del Rey with the defiance of Pussy Riot, she immediately garnered attention. Next came duets with Major Lazer, Iggy Azalea, Avicii, and this year,

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Justin Bieber – ‘I only met Justin one time but it was crazy. I mean, it’s Bieber!’ – followed by her second studio album Kamikaze produced by Diplo, out this October. Despite big chart success, MØ still refuses to conform. ‘I love pop music, but you need to give it some personality otherwise why bother doing it? I would never make a pop song that sounded just like an echo of everything that’s already going on. That’s just too boring.’ She sees now as a great time to be a woman in music. ‘There’s so much focus on women as victims in this industry and I’m like, “No! Women are doing great! Universities are full of women, there are so many women in music and so many more arriving.”’ Her next challenge is to get a raspy voice now that she’s quit smoking. ‘My voice got too angelic. I want that rawness, that’s what characterises me. I’ve got to find a way to do that.’ Q

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Photography: Amarpaul Kalirai. Stylist: Natasha Wray. Hair: Ben Jones using Bumble + Bumble. Hair Assistant: Nicola Harrowell. Make-up: Michelle Dacillo at Caren using YSL Beaute and Sunday Riley. Manicurist: Jessica Thompson at Frank Agency using Gelish (nailharmonyuk.co.uk).

THIS PAGE WOOL AND MOHAIR COAT, LOUIS VUITTON OPPOSITE PAGE BLACK LEATHER JACKET, JUST CAVALLI. BLACK COTTON SWEATSHIRT (JUST SEEN), VÊTEMENTS AT BROWNS. BLACK LEATHER BOOTS, MULBERRY

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ARE YOU SITTING COMFORTABLY?

We’re living in an era of great TV. From Stranger Things to The Night Of, the small-screen offerings have never been so strong. But what to watch next? We’ve scoured all the shows premiering this autumn to bring you the best. Welcome to the season’s new obsessions. Good Girls Revolt Based on a real-life story by journalist Lynn Povich. This Mad Men-style drama set in a 1969 newsroom tells the story of several female magazine researchers (one of whom is the legendary writer Nora Ephron) who make the revolutionary request to be allowed to write just like the men do. Amazon Prime, from 28 October Black Mirror With tales of cyber-terrorism, gaming addictions and dystopian societies, Charlie Brooker’s Black Mirror has a scary ability to predict our darkest fears for the future. It’s moved to Netflix from Channel 4 and now the award-winning science-fiction show is back for a six-part series starring Gugu Mbatha-Raw (Beyond The Lights) and Mackenzie Davis (Halt And Catch Fire). Netflix, from 21 October Crisis In Six Scenes Woody Allen’s first foray into TV is this six-episode romantic comedy set in the Sixties. During a time of political and social turbulence, a middle-class suburban family, including Miley Cyrus, are visited by a guest who turns their household completely upside down. Amazon Prime, out now Better Things Fans of Louis CK won’t want to miss his and Pamela Adlon’s single-camera sitcom. Sam (Adlon) is a working actress and divorced single mother who is struggling to balance her career, raise three daughters and stay sane. Raw, uncomfortable and brilliantly funny, it directly tackles the joys and the agonies of life. FX, out now The OA Actress Brit Marling and director Zal Batmanglij join forces for a new series. A blind woman who disappears for years, reappears with her power of sight returned. Netflix, from December

MAKE AN ENTRANCE A NEW VOICE IN FICTION, BRIT BENNETT, 26, WROTE HER FIRST NOVEL THE MOTHERS WHILE AT STANFORD UNIVERSITY. IT’S A COMING-OF-AGE STORY SET IN CALIFORNIA ABOUT TWO AFRICAN-AMERICAN FRIENDS STRUGGLING AFTER BEING ABANDONED BY THEIR MOTHERS. A FEARLESS DEBUT THAT SHOWS HOW PEOPLE CAN BE SHAPED BY THEIR LOSSES. OUT NOW

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ZADIE’S GIRL

Photography: Mary Stuart by Miles Aldridge, Rebekah Campbell, BBC/Mammoth Screen/Steffan Hill, Lukasz Wierzbowski.

Two queens Theatre writer and director Robert Icke (Oresteia, 1984) is shaking things up again at London’s Almeida with a version of Friedrich Schiller’s Mary Stuart, which tells the story of the Scottish queen’s final days as Elizabeth I’s prisoner. Actresses Juliet Stevenson and Lia Williams (pictured, above) will flip a coin each night to see who will play Mary and Elizabeth. ‘The two queens have blood claims to the same throne,’ Icke explains. ‘By having Lia and Juliet alternate the roles, this mirroring becomes the centre of the evening.’ With Laura Marling having composed an original score for the play, expect a spectacular Stuart/ indie-folk mash-up. But the biggest question of the night remains: heads or tails? From 2 December 2016 to 21 January 2017 at the Almeida, London

The woman on everyone’s radar this autumn? Zadie Smith. She releases her much-anticipatednewnovelSwingTime, andBBC2isairingadramatisationofher 2012bestseller,NW. NikkiAmuka-Bird,whostarsasNatalie intheadaptation,grewupinAntigua beforemovingtotheUK,andfirstcame acrossthebookwhenshewaslivingin northLondon:‘Zadiewasveryhonest abouttheexperienceoffeeling simultaneouslyEnglishandWestIndianin London,’shesays,‘andthattheyareequal partsofwhoyouare.’Shecouldidentify withthecharacterofNatalie,whohasa seeminglyperfectlifeasabarristeranda mother,butbeginstoquestionhowhappy shereallyis.‘Wecontinuallyassessthe

things that make us happy, whether it’s family or work or whatever our passions are,’ explains Nikki. ‘As a child, it’s very clear that you have to push yourself forward through education, getting a job, having a relationship and then you arrive at a point in adulthood where you achieve them and you think “What do I achieve now?”’ Nikki had to wait until the last day of shooting before meeting Zadie. ‘She came on set with her mother and the first thing she said was, “Doesn’t she look perfect for Natalie?” I cannot tell you what a relief that was.’ NW is on BBC2 in December

Powerful stage actress Nikki AmukaBird returns to TV

COOL BEANS GET TO KNOW NEW YORK’S COOLEST NEW BAND SUNFLOWER BEAN. FRONTED BY SINGER, BASSIST AND YVES SAINT LAURENT MODEL JULIA CUMMING WITH GUITARIST AND VOCALIST NICK KIVLEN AND DRUMMER JACOB FABER, THIS TRIO ARE MAKING SWEET MELODIC ROCK WITH BIG RIFFS AND PSYCHEDELIC THRILLS. DEBUT ALBUM HUMAN CEREMONY, RECORDED WHEN THEY WERE STILL IN THEIR TEENS, IS OUT NOW. ›

Brooklyn’s Sunflower Bean

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David Hockney features in coffee-table book, Speak Its Name!

Pride of place This month sees the release of Speak Its Name!, which is being published ahead of the 50th anniversary in 2017 of male homosexuality’s decriminalisation. Filled with quotations by and about gay icons throughout history, it’s Illustrated with images from London’s National Portrait Gallery. The funny and poignant coffee-table book touches on gay marriage, labels, sex and promiscuity to show how far the acceptance of the LGBT community has come in half a century. It’s also a rallying cry to continue the fight for equality. Out now

SUITE SUITE FANTASY November is all about beautiful spaces – it’s the grand reopening of London’s The Design Museum with the show, Fear And Love: Reactions To A Complex World in Kensington this month – so there’s no better time than now to get caught dabbling in a little interiors porn. Cue the new Terrace Suite at The Berkeley Hotel in Knightsbridge. After a hefty revamp by John Heah (the architect behind the Aman and the Four Seasons hotels), the suite has a terrace overlooking St Paul’s Church, a marble bathroom with a huge tub, and two Burberry trench coats hanging in the closet for guests’ personal use throughout their stay. the-berkeley.co.uk

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NORTH BY NORTHWEST NORWEGIAN SINGER ANNA LOTTERUD (PICTURED, ABOVE) AND HER PRODUCER, BRADY, AKA ANNA OF THE NORTH, WILL HAVE YOU DELVING DEEP INTO YOUR EMOTIONS. SO FAR, HER SONGS HAVE ALREADY BEEN STREAMED MORE THAN 30M TIMES, AND HER EARLY TRACKS HIT THE TOP SPOT OF INFLUENTIAL MUSIC BLOG HYPE MACHINE. SHE’S BEEN WINNING OVER LONDON WITH HER SENSITIVE SCANDIPOP DURING SHOWCASE APPEARANCES AT MOTH CLUB AND THE LEXINGTON. ›

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ELLIE BAMBER Havingmadeher big-screendebutinTheFallingwith GameofThrones’MaisieWilliams,this monththe19-year-oldfromBerkshire starsinherfirstHollywoodfilm,Tom Ford’sNocturnalAnimals,withJake Gyllenhaal.Thefilmhaditsworld premieretoravereviewsattheVenice FilmFestival.Incinemas4November

HALEY BENNETT With two big films coming this month – The Magnificent Seven opposite Denzel Washington and thriller The Girl On The Train – the 28-year-old (pictured, left) is about to become a household name. Watch out for her next in the cast of Terrence Malick’s musical drama Weightless opposite Christian Bale.

KATHERINE WATERSTON Having first made us swoon in Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice, English-born American actress Katherine Waterston, 36, makes her mark this month in JK Rowling’s screenwriting debut, Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them. She stars opposite Eddie Redmayne in the story of writer Newt Scamander and New York’s secret community of witches and wizards. Q

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Above: Cos makes workwear cool again

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Photography: Bjarne Jonasson, Alasdair McLellan, Kristopher McKay, Ward Ivan Rafik, , Fiesta 1985 2016 Agnes martin/Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York.

ON THE HORIZON

ART APPAREL FANS OF CANADIAN ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONIST AGNES MARTIN (1912-2004), FAMED FOR HER SQUARE CANVASSES, RENDERED GRIDS AND REPEAT STRIPES (UNTITLED #15, 1988), WILL WANT TO HEAD TO COS THIS MONTH. TO MARK A RETROSPECTIVE OF MARTIN AT THE GUGGENHEIM, NEW YORK, THE COVETED SCANDI BRAND HAS CREATED A 12-PIECE WORKWEAR CAPSULE COLLECTION INSPIRED BY HER GEOMETRIC COMPOSITIONS. PRICES START AT £68


IN OUR NEW COLUMN, DEPUTY EDITOR LOTTE JEFFS TAKES A SIDEWAYS LOOK AT A WORD THE FASHION WORLD CAN’T STOP SAYING AND ASKS: ‘WHAT DOES IT REALLY MEAN?’

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‘BORING’

Photography: Silvia Olsen. Speech bubble stick, £45, Anya Hindmarch.

Adjective: Not interesting; tedious low talkers, period dramas, ‘sports’, the reason you’re late, tax returns, yin yoga, other people’s dreams… The list of things that bore me goes on, and on, and on, and on… BORING! Sorry. In today’s world of instant gratification, where you barely have to think about needing something before it’s dropped by drone into your garden, and where brands such as Burberry are flinging looks straight from the catwalk on to the shop floor, we’re doing everything we can to stave off the dull thud of the diurnal. But it’s not good enough because still we find that sometimes, life just doesn’t have the range. Maybe if British politics hadn’t been so dry for so long, young people might have paid more attention to the EU referendum, and we wouldn’t be panic-buying macarons because we’re scared our new blue passports will make popping to Paris a thing of the past. By the time Brexit got interesting, it was too late. Human beings’ need to be entertained is also at the root of Donald Trump’s terrifying popularity; he may be a dullard, but he sure ain’t dull. Igrewupwithoutanysiblings, andmychildhoodwaspunctuated bythefearofcrashingboredom betweenactivities.FellowonlychildrenoftheNinetieswillrecall endlessrainyafternoonsplaying BamboozleonTeletextand

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watching the Neighbours omnibus. I was an expert at making my parents sit and watch me perform dramatic monologues that I had written, produced and directed. I’m pretty sure being forced to entertain myself has made me a more creative adult. ‘There’s no such thing as being bored, only boring people,’ my dad used to tell me, and I’m inclined to agree. In my opinion, the world comprises two types: those who

‘WHEN UBER ARRIVES IN THREE MINUTES AND NET-A-PORTER SHOPPING THE SAME DAY, THE ART OF BEING BORED IS DYING A DEATH’ knowhowtotellafunnystoryand thosewhodon’t.I’velittlepatience forpeoplewhoaren’tinstantly engaging,andI’msorryifyou’rea slowburner,butIwillhavecaught atleast25Pokémoninthetime ittakesforyourpersonality to shinethrough.Luckilyforme, workinginfashionmeansI’m alwayssurroundedbyweird andwonderfulpeople.Butthat’s nottosaykookydressersare automaticallyinteresting.Ionce satnexttoawomanatadinner partywhowaswearingataxidermy

owl on her head. She was one of the most insufferably dry people I’ve ever come across. ‘You’re wearing a dead bird on your head FFS,’ I almost screamed at her. ‘Your conversational gambits should extend beyond traffic on the M25.’ A few years ago, fashion got so bored of its own peacocking that looking bland was actually a thing. Normcore became an inside joke; what could be more mildly amusing than people who did know how to dress well wearing trousers that look like they’re from The Guardian’s classified pages? It didn’t last, of course, because Generation Snapchat was on to the next trend before it even started. And that’s the thing: these days, we’re all so quick to declare something boring. It’s why most millennials are ‘slashies’ – working several jobs so that no single career ever becomes tedious. When our Uber arrives in three minutes and our Net-A-Porter shopping the same day, the art ofbeingboredisdyingadeath. Butevenassomeonewiththe attentionspanofagnat,Ican’t helpthinking(forthemillisecond beforeIstartwonderingwhatto havefordinner)ifsittingquietly alone,inastateoftemporary boredom,withonlythemonotony ofourownthoughtsandnoiPhone forcompany,iswherethemost interestingideasmightbefound. Lotte Jeffs is the Writer Of The Year PPA Awards 2016. Follow her on Instagram @lottejeffs

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STREET STYLE DOUBLE THE POSSIBILITIES OF YOUR EVENING WEAR BY DRESSING IT DOWN FOR DAY. THESE STYLISH WOMEN SHOW YOU HOW

An oversized knit can turn a little-worn party piece,likestylist EstellePigault’s diaphanousskirt, intoastandoutlook

Frothy Valentino ruffles are too good to save for evening so blogger Charlotte Groeneveld pairs them with Gucci’s classic horsebit loafers and low-key make-up for day

A luxe velvet dress is one of the easiest pieces to transform for day. Wear with trainers and an oversized bag

Sequins can work in your everyday rotation when dressed down with a plain T-shirt and denim jacket like Miroslava Duma

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Channel the Nineties to perfection by layering a bias-cut slip over a T-shirt and trainers, like stylist Angelica Ardasheva

Words: Bibby Sowray. Photography: Getty.

Wear straight-leg denim underneath a dress for the perfect evening-to-day equation, just like Anna Borisnova

A sheer, embroidered, full-length gown may scream evening, but fashion editor Leaf Greener proves otherwise as she styles hers with biker boots and a long-sleeved layer

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A feathery dress and heels worn with an oversized tunic top? Yes you can. Street style icon Candela Novembre shows you how

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MY MOSCHINO PHONE CASE For the record, I don’t smoke but I still use this Moschino phone case anyway. If you follow me on Instagram, you’ll have seen it in most of my selfies.

WE LIKE STYLISH PEOPLE WHO FILL THEIR WORLDS WITH MEANINGFUL STUFF. SOME OF IT BRINGS THEM JOY, SOME OF IT IS JUST FASHIONABLE CLUTTER. EITHER WAY, IT MAKES THEM WHO THEY ARE

MY WORLD / Marjan Jonkman When Hedi Slimane books you for your first ever runway show, as happened for model Marjan Jonkman, 22, in February, it’s clear a meteoric ascent is imminent. Ever since, it’s been hard to pin down the Dutchwoman to one place for long – flitting between New York, London and her favourite hangout, Amsterdam. Being one of the most in-demand models (she walked 60 shows for AW), it can be hard to lay down roots. So Marjan and her housemate in New York, the emerging womenswear designer, Kimberley Jenneskens, have built a ‘memory wall’ in their apartment, where they can remind each other there is

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Model Marjan has found a home in New York despite travelling so often

a home to come back to. ‘It’s a communal wall where we hang pictures and photographs and write each other messages like “I miss you.”’ A self-professed vegetable lover, salad obsessive and good-girl vegan, it’s easy to see why staying healthy is essential to Marjan. ‘I flew back to New York to have an agency meeting and then tomorrow night I fly to Milan. And then I come back to New York for two nights, then to London and then to Paris for couture.’ Here, she talks us through the pieces that ground her.

MY CAMERA Maybe it’s because of my line of work, but I love taking Polaroid pictures. My apartment is covered in them.

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MORE ONE-OFFS As you’re probably gathering by this point, one of the perks of having a designer as a roommate is getting great clothes such as this jacket that Kimberley made me.

LIVE MORE MARJAN DRESS IT 'I don’t want to wear standard model clothes. It's cool to show your own personal style. I like to wear gym shoes and band tour T-shirts.’

MY DESIGNS

Words: Billie Bhatia. Photography: Winnie Au. All clothing worn by Marjan available at Claudie Pierlot.

This Claudie x Marjan rucksack is part of my design collaboration with Claudie Pierlot and I now carry it everywhere I go. I made it with my frequent traveller lifestyle in mind.

EAT IT 'I love to watch the Food Network – I am kind of a health freak. I'm obsessed with these paleo choc chip cookies from the show, The Kitchen.'

BESPOKE JACKET My roomie and I are closer than close so we designed this denim jacket together. It’s our version of a friendship bracelet.

READ IT 'I only read books about real life because it's a way of still learning. At the moment, I'm reading a history book about the Iraq war.’

MEMORY WALL This is like a scrapbook of our memories with Polaroids. Kimberley and I have shared so many experiences this year. We should write a book about it.

MY SNAPS Look at that pose, I was born a model (joking!).

GO-TO BLAZER I’m normally quite dressed down, but this blazer is what I wear when I want to look polished and classic.

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MY STORY / Phiona Mutesi GROWING UP IN ONE OF THE MOST DERELICT SLUMS IN KAMPALA, UGANDA, PHIONA MUTESI, 20, SAW NO ESCAPE FROM A LIFE OF POVERTY. BUT WHEN SHE JOINED A CHESS CLUB RUN BY A MISSIONARY, EVERYTHING CHANGED. AS WALT DISNEY PICTURES RELEASES A FILM ABOUT HER LIFE, QUEEN OF KATWE STARRING LUPITA NYONG’O, PHIONA IS TRAVELLING THE WORLD, PLAYING CHESS AND INSPIRING A GENERATION OF YOUNG WOMEN TO NEVER GIVE UP

y father died of Aids when I was three years old . From then on, everything in my life changed. My mother, Harriet [played by Lupita Nyong’o in the film] struggled to pay school fees for me, my sister and my brothers. Not only that, but we didn’t have enough money for food. I went to school until I was six, but then I had to drop out. I remember sitting at home alone, watching the other kids go to school in their uniforms. It made me sad to see them going and I was so bored; at school there’s always something interesting going on and you have friends to talk to. I began helping to bring money into the house by working for my mother’s business, selling corn to people living in Katwe. I hated the job because I had no choice but to do it. My mother needed help paying for our rent and food, which would usually be one meal a day of rice or bananas, if we sold enough. When I was nine years old, we were evicted from our house because we couldn’t afford to pay the rent, so we went to live on the streets. We didn’t have anything to eat or drink; I was always hungry and scared because young girls and women were raped a lot of the time. The most important thing for women to do on the streets is to produce kids, and that’s all. I didn’t want my life to be like that of my mother. I wanted it to be better, but it was hard to dream about life outside of Katwe. There was no one to inspire me because most of the people lived the same life, so it was difficult to think about a world outside of the slum. One day, my brother Brian told me that they were giving a cup of porridge to children at a local chess club set up by a sports outreach programme. I decided to secretly follow him to the dilapidated church where the club was held and discovered a dozen children playing this strange game I’d never seen before. The coach, a missionary called Robert Katende [played by David Oyelowo in the film], spotted me peering in and invited me to join. But I wasn’t interested in playing chess or making friends with the other children – they teased me for being dirty so I fought with them. All I wanted was the cup of porridge. There is no word for chess in my local language, Luganda, which is ironic because it is chess, a game that consists of just a board and 16 pieces, that saved my life. When I went back home that day and told my mother, she was not happy with me. She thought chess was another form of gambling, like all the other games people played in the slum, and she warned me not to go back.

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As told to: Hannah Nathanson.

But I did. The next day, I slipped away from my mother and went back to the church to get some more porridge. I behaved better and didn’t get into any fights so Coach Robert sat me down with Gloria, who was five years old, and asked her to teach me how to play. She went through the names of the pieces, which fascinated me. My favourite piece, even now, is the queen. She moves across so many different lines, which makes her the strongest player on the board. The Queen of Katwe: A Story Of Life, Chess, And One Extraordinary Girl’s Dream Of Becoming A Grandmaster became the name of the book that sports journalist Tim Crothers wrote about me in 2012. We settled on the name together with Coach Robert because by that time, I was moving all around the world playing chess and becoming a stronger player with every move. The first time I realised I was going back to chess club for the game, not just for the food, was when I won my first game against a boy called Joseph Asaba. He used to be able to beat me in just six moves using a tactic called Fool’s Mate. After two weeks, I got tired of being beaten like that so I asked Coach Robert how I could survive the opening – the first moves in a chess game – and he told me how to defend myself. When I went back to play him I managed to win and he was so ashamed that a girl had beaten him that he pushed the board over in protest and sobbed. Boys were thought to be stronger than girls at everything but my chess style was quite aggressive, so I suppose I played more like a boy. Thanks to Coach Robert, we started travelling to fancy boarding schools in Kampala, Uganda’s capital, to play in tournaments. It was very rare for children like us to leave the slums; we started to meet children who were much more exposed to life than we were in Katwe. We couldn’t even communicate through language because we could only speak Luganda. Our common language was chess, spoken across the board. When we got to the boarding school, everything was new for us; we didn’t know how to use the toilets, they had to show us. And when we were given our own dormitory with beds, we ended up sleeping together on the floor because that’s the only way we knew. At 11 years old, I became Uganda’s Junior Girls National Chess Champion and, when I got the prize money, I gave it to my mother. She was so happy because we still didn’t have enough money for food. The biggest change in my life, since going back to school and travelling the world through chess, was being able to build my mother a house that is

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‘CHESS IS LIKE LIFE: YOU HAVE TO PLAN AND BE ABLE TO STRATEGISE IN ORDER TO ACHIEVE WHAT YOU WANT. I NEED TO ENVISION MY NEXT MOVES AND LOOK AHEAD’ not in the slums, where she now lives. She is the strongest woman I know; I admire how hard working she is despite all the difficulties we’ve faced. The first time I left Uganda, I went to Sudan to play in Africa’s International Children’s Chess Tournament with two other children from the outreach programme, Ivan and Benjamin. The three of us, children from the slums, boarded a plane and we couldn’t believe what was happening. When we took off, I remember asking, “Are we on our way to heaven?” We stayed in a hotel and I slept in a room alone for the first time. I could never have imagined the world I was visiting. I felt like a queen. Against all odds, we won the tournament and took home a trophy that was bigger than all of us. None of us had wanted to leave the hotel, we wanted to stay where there were flushing toilets and we didn’t have to worry about going hungry. When we got back to Katwe, we faced a lot of problems. It was hard to readjust and go back to life in the slums. I tried to forget everything, forget all about the other children and how much they had and knew compared to us. What I liked most about the game of chess was that it involved thinking. You have to think a lot about your options, of which there are so many, if you want to win. In life, it’s the same. You are faced with a lot of decisions and you have to be confident that you’re going to make the right one. If you don’t, you find yourself swimming in the mess. In chess, you also have to have a plan and to be able to strategise in order to achieve what you want, just like in life. And you have to have a dream, like when I’m at the chessboard and I need to envision the next moves and try to look ahead to what I want to achieve. I’m now in my last year at St. Mbuga Vocational Secondary School in Kampala and taking my final exams. Before I started playing chess, surviving the day was my one aim. But now I have a plan ahead. When I leave school I’d like to study law so that I can fight for the rights of the kids from slums like Katwe. As for chess, I’d like to become a grandmaster. But I still have a long way to go and many moves to play, both on the chessboard and in life, before I do that. Queen of Katwe is out in cinemas from 21 October

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BOOK CLUB FASHION DESIGNER AND ENVIRONMENTALIST VIVIENNE WESTWOOD, 75, SHARES THE BOOKS THAT HAVE SHAPED HER LIFE Words Bibby Sowray

The Devils Of Loudun by Aldous Huxley To me, Huxley is the greatest English writer of the 20th century. He made me change intellectually. I would never have become the person I am or have the mind that I have had I not read his work. This is a riveting account of politics in 17th-century France: anybody who wants to know what Europe’s about should read it. You have to be a fit reader but don’t let that put you off. Often when I’m reading I don’t quite absorb the message, but I carry on and try to work it out.

Additional words: Anna James. Photography: Getty. Visit climaterevolution.co.uk for more on Vivienne Westwood.

Fashion designer Vivienne Westwood

The Grapes Of Wrath by John Steinbeck This book is about love and helping each other. It’s beautiful and monumental, and it follows the people who were ruined by the Dust Bowl – a period of severe drought and dust storms in the US during the Thirties. Steinbeck travelled and lived with the migrants and wrote their stories down within six months. It tells you so much about the US at that time, the suffering of the people and how they were exploited. I love the characters in this book. The protagonist Tom Joad is a real hero for me: he’s willing to sacrifice everything for the people because he sees how they’re being treated and he believes in democracy. The lesson I take from it is the potential to grow with your experience, to be open to it and up for it, and to stick your neck out.

‘THE LESSON I’VE TAKEN FROM THE GRAPES OF WRATH IS TO GROW WITH YOUR EXPERIENCE, BE OPEN TO IT AND UP FOR IT, AND TO STICK YOUR NECK OUT’ The Master And Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov This is the last full book I read. It has a Faustian theme to it, which I enjoyed because I want to rework Faust to explain climate change – how Mephistopheles, the fabled Faustian demon, would be in the media – so at the moment my reading is focused on that. It’s about a time in Russia when people disappeared without a reason and nobody asked where they went. It’s also about magic and the devil; it’s stunning but hilarious as well.

Stoner by John Williams My husband Andreas is a great reader. He recommends things to me that I probably wouldn’t choose and he bought me Stoner. It was written in the Sixties but unexpectedly became a bestseller in 2013. Some people think it’s sad that the protagonist, a farm boy who goes on to have an undistinguished career as a teacher, doesn’t recognise his full potential, but he does because he was absolutely true to himself throughout his life. It is the most amazing account of a human being and I’ve never seen such a testimony to the genius of the human race. It’s easy reading but still incredibly important and profound.

The Story Of The Stone by Cao Xueqin This was my most important reading experience. It’s as if I have lived two lives – my own and those of the characters. I read it until I fell asleep whenever I had the time. It’s one of China’s four great classic novels and was written in the 18th century. It charts the decline of an illustrious Chinese Buddhist family. At the centre is Jia Baoyu, who is born with a magical jade in his mouth, but it also contains probably the most romantic heroine of all time, his love interest Lin Daiyu. The things they say to each other and the things that they do! Get A Life: The Diaries Of Vivienne Westwood is out now (Serpent’s Tail, £16.99)

THE FIRST WORD AUTHOR TO WATCH As Features Editor at Slate Magazine, debut novelist Jessica Winter is no stranger to glorious observational writing. Her first book Break In Case Of Emergency (out now) is one of the smartest stories about friendship you’re likely to read this year. Jen, the protagonist, is on the brink of an early mid-life crisis and abandons a painting career to take a job at a feminist non-profit where she’s surrounded by passive-aggressive colleagues and an egomaniac boss. Winter takes in feminism and fertility issues while skewering celebrity philanthropy and celebrating friendship; it’s brilliantly funny and hugely moving.

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BLURRED LINES / Amalia Ulman WITH INSTAGRAM AS HER CANVAS, THIS ARTWORLD PHENOMENON HAS CONVINCED HER FOLLOWERS SHE’S AN ESCORT, AN UNHINGED EX, AN OFFICE DRONE, AND AN EXPECTANT MOTHER. WILL THE REAL AMALIA ULMAN PLEASE STAND UP? Interview Molly Langmuir

he 27-year-old conceptual artist Amalia Ulman was born in Argentina, raised in Spain, attended art school in London, and now lives in Los Angeles in a sparsely furnished one-bedroom apartment. When I meet her there in early May, white gauze is draped over the trundle bed, white daisies sit in a vase next to it, and six clocks on the wall show five time zones (none of them LA). Mounted in the middle of the bedroom is the metal pole Amalia uses to practise pole dancing, often to Bulgarian choral music. Where the pole meets the ceiling, cracks spread through the plaster like a neural network. Amalia has a pet pigeon named Bob and an ancient white Volvo named Alice; on a recent rare holiday, she went to North Korea. She describes herself as having the personality of a librarian, but was once a ‘circumstantial whore’, as she puts it – after art school, struggling to support herself, she spent five months as an escort. Yet even as the facts of her life form a series of unlikely juxtapositions, they also fit rather neatly into the outline of a specific, if narrow, trope – that of the ‘quirky’ artist. That is exactly the type of dichotomy she’s drawn to: the blurred lines between personality and performance, life and lifestyle, are the frequent focus of her art, which over the last few years she has often delivered via Instagram. ‘Is this the first Instagram masterpiece?’ wondered a 2014 article in The Telegraph, after Amalia appeared to shapeshift on social media from cute girly-girl to narcissistic sugar-baby to wellness-oriented green juicer – an is-she-or-isn’t-she story arc that viewers later learned was a performance entitled Excellences & Perfections. ‘Her genius is that she can understand, dissect, and embrace extreme polarities,’ says James Fuentes, the New York gallerist known for representing emerging artists. ‘She does this in both her life and her art. The boundary between the two is porous.’ On a desktop calendar, Amalia tracks her ovulation and her show schedule (she says her creativity and her cycle correspond). Since Excellences & Perfections was featured in two major London 2016 exhibitions, including the Tate Modern where it was presented alongside the work of Cindy Sherman (to whom Amalia is often compared) and Marcel Duchamp, the calendar has been increasingly packed. This month, Amalia appeared at Frieze London, followed by solo shows at Paris’s New Galerie, at the London gallery, Arcadia Missa, and next year at James Fuentes Gallery in New York. In 2013, Amalia was in a Greyhound bus accident

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Above: Images from Amalia’s latest Instagram performance, Privilege

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‘AMALIA APPEARED TO SHAPESHIFT ON SOCIAL MEDIA FROM CUTE GIRLY-GIRL TO NARCISSISTIC SUGAR-BABY IN AN IS-SHE-OR-ISN’T-SHE STORY ARC’

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that left her in chronic pain. Yoga helps – when I visit, she invites me to go with her to the daily class she takes across the street. ‘Endure,’ the teacher says a few times. ‘Endure here.’ It’s not unlike the request Amalia makes through her art. She takes on beauty, gender, power, money – all forces that structure our lives and shape our assumptions, yet often remain unquestioned – and reflects them back to us, tweaked just enough to become readily apparent, like a fun-house mirror that instead of warping the world, allows you to see it more clearly. How would Amalia like her work to make viewers feel? ‘Uneasy,’ she says. ‘Uneasy with the world as they know it. I think that’s my favourite feeling.’ In Excellences & Perfections, Amalia explored not only how authenticity and identity are distorted in the social media echo chamber but what this means, in particular, for women. The irony is that in using her appearance to reveal how we judge women who use their looks to get ahead, Amalia shot her own career into overdrive. As Fuentes puts it, ‘Most other artists can’t fathom messing around with half the things Amalia does.’ malia had her first show at 16 in a gallery in Gijón, the city in northern Spain where she grew up. By the time she moved to LA in 2014, two years after graduating from London’s Central Saint Martins with a bachelor’s degree in fine art, she’d created everything from installations featuring the sentimental sayings on cheap mugs to wire sculptures. She launched a $50 (£38) lingerie set – a choker, a vest top and briefs – on to which Swarovski crystals were stuck, spelling out the words ‘upper’, ‘middle’ and ‘lower’. But long before Excellences & Perfections, Amalia realised she’d been playing a role online. ‘I had been this cliché of an arty girl, which is so fetishised by certain people. So I thought, “What if I transform myself into something that is not allowed in the art world?”’ At first her followers posted happy faces and requested tips on platinum hair. But after about two months of

‘I THOUGHT, “WHAT IF I TRANSFORM MYSELF INTO SOMETHING THAT IS NOT ALLOWED IN THE ART WORLD?’’’

Photography: Instagram/AmaliaUlman.

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Left and above: Amalia honed in on the internet’s obsession with authenticity via social media, blurring the lines between life and art

near-daily posts, Amalia uploaded an image of herself with a guy, his face obscured, captioned ‘Don’t be sad because it’s over, smile because it happened.’ After the ‘break-up’, her poses became more explicitly sexual, her captions more aggressive: ‘Reasons I wanna look good / for myself / for myself / to plant the seed of envy in other bitch’s hearts / for myself,’ she wrote. In response, the comments became harsher. Followers critiqued her dancing (on a video of Amalia undulating her hips to Iggy Azalea, whom she was, in fact, coming to resemble) and her growing vanity (‘You’re beautiful… but borderline boring. #kindawhiney!’). This escalated as she hinted she was working as an escort, photographed her bandages after an apparent breast augmentation (‘#frankenboob lol’), then posted  two videos of herself red-faced and crying. ‘Que coño puta mierda?’ was the first comment, roughly translated as ‘What the fuck is this shit?’ This about summed up the response of the art world at large. A gallery Amalia had worked with advised her to stop posting, believing she was sabotaging her career. ‘I used to take you seriously as an artist until I found out via Instagram you had the mentality of a 15-year-old hood rat,’ wrote one follower. But on Amalia went, next documenting clean living shots of tea and avocado on toast, a meditation selfie (‘#thankful #gratitude #grateful #namaste #healthy’) followed by a single white square, then silence. By that point, five months had passed and she’d acquired 90,000 followers, though many transpired to be fake accounts bought by artist Constant Dullaart as part of a project that claimed to highlight the art world’s ‘superficial attention culture.’ Even Amalia’s close friends didn’t know what to think. In October 2014, Amalia appeared on a panel at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts, announcing that it had all been a performance intended, in part, to demonstrate how easy it is to manipulate an audience through images. ‘How is a female artist supposed to look?’ Amalia › asked the crowd. ‘How is she ›

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‘WHATEVER I DO HAS TO DO WITH MY OWN INSECURITIES. MUCH HAS TO DO WITH WANTING TO BE A TYPE OF WOMAN I DIDN’T FEEL I WAS ALLOWED TO BE’

malia grew up working class, the only child of parents in a volatile relationship, and never had the luxury of ‘playing around as an artist, then going home,’ she says. Her parents divorced when she was 16; she helps support her mum, whom she describes as ‘a Portlandia character’ but has no relationship with her dad, a tattoo artist. After graduating, she went on the dole and struggled to produce work. (‘It’s hard to make art with no material, no anything,’ she says.) Finally, she posted an advert on a sex-work website and got 200 responses. Sitting in a cafe after our yoga class, she puts her head in her hands. ‘Oh God,’ she says. ‘It was so depressing. I’d looked for a job for two years.’ The first time was relatively easy. But some men, she soon discovered, were prone to offering dresses instead of cash, trying to make the interaction less transactional. One guy took Amalia to Monaco and, mixed up on drugs, convinced himself she was his girlfriend and refused to pay her at all. Things worse than that occurred, too. ‘Though you can’t talk about them,’ she says, ‘because whatever happened, people assume it’s your fault.’ She stopped in late 2013, after the bus accident, but by then had conceptualised a piece that would

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explore the theatre of femininity, and people’s complicated responses. She’d done plenty of research, after all. ‘You’re straight-up performing,’ she says of being an escort. ‘I’d spend all day getting ready.’ The premise that identity is more prescribed than innate, that taste and class are linked, that gender is performed – these are not new ideas. But Amalia forged new ground by using Instagram as a medium, making people’s comments – the affirmations, the derision, the judgement, the jealousy – as much a part of the performance as the photos. Amalia’s studio is on the 17th floor of an office building in downtown LA; in the lobby, her name is listed between a law office and the consulate of Lebanon. Upstairs, in a small, brown room with a vertiginous view, is a red curtain, scarlet flowers and a wig, all props in Amalia’s second Instagram performance, which she plans to finish this month. Bob the pigeon appears frequently in the new piece, Privilege, along with references to pregnancy and office culture. Numerous videos show the artist reflected in the building elevator’s mirrored doors, saying, ‘It’s been a looong day.’ Privilege takes corporate blandness and the obsessive nature of pregnancy chat rooms as a starting point but is more than just a critique. It’s based upon Amalia’s insecurities, she says, but now they’re those of a slightly older woman. ‘I’m wondering if I can be an artist and also have kids, you know?’ she says during my visit in May. ‘Because if you’re a good artist, you’re supposed to be a shitty mum.’ As the summer progressed, the series became increasingly surreal. In one video, she appears in a clown shirt with the American flag superimposed on her face, and she unleashes a tirade about the citizenship of her unborn baby, inspired, she said later, by real-life Twitter user @rjoyourjoy1919, an ardent Donald Trump supporter. If it all sounds a bit strange, it is. And judging by the comments, at least some of her 121k followers still believe the fiction she’s creating. One wrote in July, ‘How many more months??? Can’t wait to see the baby!’ As with anything on social media, though, it’s hard to know if they’re any more earnest than she is. Q

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Photography: Instagram/AmaliaUlman.

supposed to behave? How do we consume images, and how do they consume us? Are we judgemental? Maybe? Or not at all? Or absolutely yes?’ She’d stuffed her bra with socks to fake the boob job; had temporary fillers in her face; bought clothes that she couldn’t afford, then returned them. She isolated herself, telling only a few people about the piece, along with some museums she’d previously interacted with, to protect her work. ‘I knew some people wouldn’t believe that it was a performance,’ she says. ‘I have enough experience as a woman in the art world.’ And it was true. Some didn’t. Amalia says now that one male artist she’d told about the concept lamented the effect LA was having on her. Why didn’t she escape that toxic life, he said, and become his muse instead? Afterwards, some still assumed that the whole thing had been a ruse to get sexual attention she was too coy to acknowledge she wanted. Others suggested she couldn’t have really understood what she was doing – that it was too accessible, too banal to be art. Her supporters dismiss these arguments out of hand. ‘It’s like how people originally said abstract expressionism wasn’t art,’ says Fiontán Moran, an Assistant Curator at London’s Tate Modern. ‘Her work is continuing the investigation others, especially female artists, have done into how women are represented in mass media. What’s new is that now, because of social media, mass media includes everyday people creating their fantasy selves.’ But what is perhaps most intriguing about Excellences & Perfections is that the persona is not entirely fake. Amalia had been an escort. She does enjoy spas and fashion and shopping at Whole Foods. ‘Her work could be seen as satirical, but she’s inhabiting something she understands to some degree,’ Moran says. Or, as Amalia puts it, ‘Whatever I do has to do with my own insecurities. I’m implicated. Much of that piece had to do with wanting to be a type of woman I didn’t feel I was really allowed to be.


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LOVE

Photography Lukasz Wierzbowski

IF YOU AGONISE ABOUT WHAT YOU TALK ABOUT WITH A PARTNER, IT’S TIME TO STOP. WE MAY BE A GENERATION OBSESSED WITH COMMUNICATION BUT LANGUAGE IS MORE INSTINCTIVE THAN YOU THINK. THE NEW YORKER WRITER LAUREN COLLINS EXPLAINS HER RELATIONSHIP

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RELATIONSHIPS

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tep away from the keyboard. In the end, it really doesn’t matter whether you reply now or three days later, ‘like’ or ‘heart’ the post, @ or DM. You won’t seem like a loser if the time stamp is 6:57am. Using full stops does not suggest you are bad in bed. Just bang out the first thing that comes to mind. Turn off spellcheck. Throw in some Xs. The person on the receiving end of your message, whoever they are, isn’t going to be swayed by your choice of adverb. Short of using an aubergine emoji, I am telling you: you cannot screw this up. What makes me so sure that how you say it is more important than what you say? Why am I an evangelist for getting hyper-articulate women to loosen up? Alors: it was the experience of falling in love with someone with whom I didn’t share a native language. Eventually having to learn his convinced me that if love’s gonna happen, it’s gonna happen, whether you can blow his mind with a perfectly crafted text message or not. I met Olivier at a party. Technically, I was a crasher, if by crasher you mean someone who was not invited by or even known to the host. I was 30. I had arrived in London exactly 24 days earlier, having fled a happyish but stagnating life in New York. Taking pity on a newcomer, a friend of a friend had invited me to tag along with her for the night. The theme of the party was wine and cheese. I had gotten my first passport when I was 19. I couldn’t have pronounced fourme d’ambert if Gérard Depardieu had been plopping great gloopy wedges of it into my mouth himself. For some reason – I still don’t know exactly why – I made a beeline for Olivier. I think I thought he somehow looked ‘European’, activating my adult-gap-year fantasy of becoming a sort of romantic locavore. (It was either the strong nose and the hooded eyes, or the shirt he was wearing that, I regret to report, read ‘Let’s rock’ spelled out in boulders, that gave off a continental air.)

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I was in a bold mood. I introduced myself and asked him where he was from. ‘France,’ he said. ‘A village about an hour outside Bordeaux.’ ‘I’m from Wilmington!’ I said, as though he would obviously be on a first-name basis with a random beach town in North Carolina. Crazily enough, he was: he’d once travelled there, while studying in California, for a classmate’s wedding. Other than that, Olivier and I had absolutely zero in common. I was American. He was French. I was a writer. He had a PhD in maths. If I’d been pressed to claim a hobby I might have said, not very ambitiously, reading. He was obsessed with aviation and had a pilot’s license. He traced aerobatic moves in the air as we continued talking, for longer than one might have thought. I remember the conversation, for some reason, turned to drugs and I was impressed – imagine knowinghowtosay‘pothead’inasecond

‘SHORT OF USING AN AUBERGINE EMOJI, I AM TELLING YOU: YOU CANNOT SCREW THIS UP’ language?Eventually,Olivierannounced that he was tired and had to go. He took my email address and sent me a message containing nothing but ‘hello’ in the subject line. A fairly unpromising start, in this era of slaved-over Instagram captions and Tinder profiles written by committee. As bicultural correspondents go, we weren’t exactly Anaïs Nin and Henry Miller. Nin, a novelist who was fluent in three languages, received countless letters from writer Miller that described their intense feelings as so: ‘We’re in Seville and then in Fez and then in Capri and then Havana,’ he wrote. ‘We’re journeying constantly, but there is always a machine and books, and your body is always close to me and the look in your eyes never changes. People are saying we will be miserable, we will regret, but we are happy, we are laughing always, we are singing. We are talking Spanish and French and Arabic and Turkish. We are admitted everywhere and they strew our path with flowers.’ They saw their affair as ›

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an opportunity, their differences as a superpower rather than a handicap. On our first date, we were admitted to a pub, where our path was not strewn with flowers but cigarette butts, and then to a Chinese restaurant. I loved his sharp mind and his understated sense of humour. He was emotionally elegant in a way that struck me as very French. But I had no idea what life with someone from another culture, and another language, would entail. A lifelong monoglot, my main takeaway from high school Spanish was the word sacapuntas [pencil sharpener] – I was ignorant of the risks and rewards of loving someone across a language barrier. Olivier was a skilled English speaker, but we couldn’t finish each other’s sentences. We were lucky, actually, if we got the gist of the first halves of them. As we got to know each other, I experienced this as a sort of liberation, a free pass from the expectation of being clever and well-informed and always having something

‘HE WAS EMOTIONALLY ELEGANT IN A WAY THAT STRUCK ME AS FRENCH. I HAD NO IDEA WHAT A LIFE WITH A MAN FROM A DIFFERENT CULTURE WOULD ENTAIL’ to say. When the time came for me to meet Olivier’s French-speaking family, I didn’t have to sing for my supper, or even speak for it. I could just be. The gaps in our communication seemed like proof of the primal authenticity of our connection: imagine being loved by someone to whom you couldn’t properly speak. Eventually, lust in translation gave way to love in translation. Olivier and I, like all couples, went from googly-eyed idealism to the nitty-gritty everyday. Amid the chaos, it was often hard to read each other’s signals. Olivier told me that always speaking to me in English felt like ‘touching me with gloves’. In addition, when trying to say that I’d accepted delivery of a gift his mother had

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sent to our apartment, I told her that I’d given birth to a coffee machine. A professional communicator, I was tongue-tied in my personal life. I finally faced up to it: I had to learn French. I’d tried before. A year or so into our relationship, I had enrolled in an evening class at the Institut Français du Royaume-Uni in South Kensington. There were maybe 10 of us: me, a South African who was dating a Frenchman, a Korean who was dating a Frenchman, a Turk who was dating a Frenchman, a Swede who was married to a Frenchman, and so forth. Intellectual curiosity is dead. Or at least, I can attest, it’s a non-starter when it comes to adult language learning. The only people desperate enough to spend their Thursday nights conjugating third-group verbs were the wives and girlfriends of an assorted bunch of Gallic men who, judging from the collective evidence, couldn’t be understood until you understood their language. With each of us mangling the language in our own unique way, I quit somewhere between ‘Je m’appelle’ [‘I am…’] and ‘J’ai dans mon sac’ [‘I have in my bag…’]. In our parents’ day, most people ended up with people who were very much like them. Even marrying outside of one’s religious denomination was enough to raise eyebrows: my maternal grandmother was known to comment on the fact that four of her five Protestant daughters had married Catholics. Today, 8.8% of British marriages include a foreign-born spouse*. We pick and mix across increasingly meaningless gender, race, religious, and cultural barriers with relative ease. We have babies with incredible skin tones and improbable names. The interestingness of our lives, for the most part, makes up for their occasional lack of context. This was six months into our marriage, and living in Switzerland’s francophone Geneva where Olivier’s job had moved, my lack of French bothered me in a way that earlier it hadn’t. I signed up for another class and got serious: flashcards, notebooks, listening to the radio at top volume every single morning until I at long last understood, one glorious morning, that the presenter was talking about un nid des oiseaux chanteurs [a nest of songbirds].

After the nest of songbirds test, my confidence rose. One night, I heard Olivier talking on the phone to his brother, and it was as though someone had turned up the volume on the previously muffled soundtrack to my life. ‘Elle n’est pas très mobile,’ he was saying [‘It’s not very mobile’]. Four years after that night at the party, I was hearing Olivier’s real voice for the first time. Even more miraculously, I soon discovered mine. One night, I found myself sparring with Olivier over his refusal to take more than a week of holiday a year. ‘C’est idiot!’ I barked [‘It’s silly!’ ], willing to sound like one myself, if it meant getting through on an emotional level. I felt like a different person in French – more credible, somehow, its formal locutions and regimented syllables buttressing my arguments. I also felt, by virtue of having bothered, like a properly loving wife. We live in Paris now and have been married for three years. I’m fluent in French, which is to say that I speak it well enough to know how many mistakes I’m constantly making. I’m 36. I doubt my French will ever catch up to Olivier’s English. Our daughter is set to overtake me at approximately two-and-a-half years old. The other day I looked up hanneton, a word I saw in an article, and the dictionary came back. confusingly, with ‘cockchafer’. Still, not having the language for all those years made me realise that words aren’t the tools of seduction I once thought they were. It made me learn to love, as a transitive verb, rather than simply trying to articulate my love, the common noun, all the time. And having it now makes me realise that if being able to communicate doesn’t bring us together then it keeps us together, trying to tune into each other’s needs and desires through all the static. We translate inside languages as much as we do between them. It doesn’t matter what your birth certificate says, or how you say fourme d’ambert: at some point, every couple has to put cleverness aside and learn how to talk. Q Lauren Collins is a staff writer at the New Yorker. Her new book, When In French: Love In A Second Language (4th Estate, £12.99) is out now

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Photography: Lukasz Wierzbowski. *economist.com, 2012

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Photography Rahel Weiss

ANIMAL, VEGETABLE, MILLENNIAL Vegetables have undergone a 21st-century rebrand and meat is no longer mainstream. Forget tired clichés about bland tofu dishes, says lifelong herbivore Nell Frizzell. Today, anyone who’s anyone is vegetarian(ish) nless you’ve sat down to a bowl of lukewarm soya, the colour and consistency of wet soil, cooked over a paraffin stove, on a campsite, as those around you tuck into sizzling sausages, you will never truly understand the horror of being a vegetarian in the Nineties. Until you’ve bitten into another near-raw lump of aubergine at a meat-smeared barbecue, or smiled sourly as you’re told

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to ‘just pick out the bacon’ by your waiter, you’ll never understand how far we’ve come. When Cara Delevingne posts pro-vegan propaganda photos on Instagram and your Facebook feed is littered with former party girls getting high off their allotment crops, you know vegetables are sprouting a new social status. When Berlin sex shops start selling vegan whips made from old bike inner tubes and Stella

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NEW VEGETARIANISM

McCartney soundtracks her Fall 2016 show with the ‘I’m a vegan, bitch!’ chorus from Snaxx’s Get Yo Tofu On, suddenly the tambourine-waving, patchouli-scented lentil-fest of your childhood seems a long time ago. I was brought up in a no-meat-and-eight-veg household where brown rice was the norm and aubergines were treated with much reverence. Both my parents are vegetarian – not enormously strict but ethical in their eating. So I grew up cooking vegetarian food and thinking of meat as something that should be eaten rarely and responsibly. I was enjoying hummus, avocado, kale, quinoa, pumpkin seeds and beetroot long before I could tie my own shoelaces. We were making our own bean sprouts on the windowsill when Michael Jackson was still number one. Then, of course, university happened, dinner parties happened, work happened, boyfriends happened and I found myself sliding away from my vegetarian roots and simply eating whatever was put in front of me. But eating vegetarian, if not actually being vegetarian, has now hit the mainstream. Pret A Manger has a veggie pop-up in London’s Soho that proved so popular it has extended its four-week tenure indefinitely and sales are up 70% on last year. I recently stood in the snaking queue with my avocado and egg sandwich on rye and the dairy-free chocolatey coconut bite (a bestseller), while standing behind a suit-clad businessman scanning the dating app Happn, and it dawned on me just how much the tectonic plates of vegetarianism have shifted. According to NatCen’s British Social Attitudes survey, published at the beginning of this year, 29% of Britons now say they have reduced the amount of meat they eat in the past 12 months, while 44% claim either to not eat meat, to have reduced the amount of meat they eat or to be considering doing so. The reasons for this shift are manifold; all those #eatclean Instagram posts full of superfood, super-status ingredients such as quinoa, kale and chia seeds make the prospect of a sausage roll the colour of a prosthetic leg seem less appetising. Celebrity chefs, including Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall and Anna Jones, have turned vegetables into television stars and littered Instagram with pictures of berry-topped porridge and more cauliflowers than you can count. High-profile caterers such as Tart London and The Cellar Society regularly dish up vegetarian feasts for celebrity parties, while Padma Lakshmi, Kate Moss, Gwyneth Paltrow and Mary McCartney have all got behind the ‘Meat-Free Monday’ movement. Our phones are rolling rallying cries of vegan breakfast bowls, mushroom and egg ramen, fruit smoothies and foraged vegetables. No wonder more and more of us are heaping our fridges, plates and pantries with beautiful roots, leaves, seeds and squashes. The internet age means we are better informed than ever before about what eating meat actually means on a global scale. In the face of climate change, financial insecurity and overcrowding, it seems less than sensible for half the world to be eating animals while the other half starve. And the evidence isn’t very palatable. According to a recent exposé in New York

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Magazine, almost a third of the world’s arable land is used to grow animal feed, rather than food for us, while the carbon emissions from producing just a kilogram of lamb are the same as driving a car for 90 miles. The food scares of the last three decades, from salmonella to BSE, made us appreciate that most meat is mystery meat – untraceable, untrustworthy and unsustainable. Even traceable meat is produced in such high-intensity conditions that you see pigs spending their lives standing in the dark on metal grid floors, while chickens are forced to grow so quickly they often haemorrhage, giving their meat the delicious-sounding ‘green muscle disease’. Not to mention the World Health Organisation’s report last year, which classified red meat as ‘probably carcinogenic to humans’ adding fuel to the existing fire that links animal protein with ‘increased mortality’. Suddenly chowing down on a hot dog seems as illicit as a B&H Blue Superking behind the bins of a plastics factory. And probably about as much fun. ll of which must be music to the ears of my poor, beleaguered parents who spent most of the Nineties hiding vegetables in cheese sauces, ‘getting creative’ with soy sauce and swearing blind to the imperceptible difference of veggie burgers. But, just as our sexual preferences are far more fluid, our food identities are now no longer just a matter of ‘to meat, or not to meat’. We ’re meat minimalist; we’ve incorporated being vegetarian into a low calorie 5:2 lifestyle, we eat meat as a treat or, put simply, we are vegetarian(ish). ‘I genuinely think people want to eat more veggies and be more healthy, regardless of whether they’re vegetarian, pescatarian, or any of the other definitions out there,’ Jamie Oliver, who is a vegetarian on average three days a week now, tells me. ‘Don’t get me wrong, I love meat and I still eat it, but for a sustainable future it has to be about quality over quantity. You can use vegetarianism as an excuse to have a few days off, then buy higher-welfare meat and sustainable fish.’ It is suddenly aspirational (as all the glossy pictures on Instagram will testify) rather than hypocritical to be vegetarian some of the time. We no longer have to berate ourselves for ‘falling off the wagon’ by eating a bacon sandwich in the small hours of the morning after a heavy night out. Or, in the case of ELLE’s Fashion Features Editor Kenya Hunt, breaking a two-and-ahalf-year vegetarian run after gutting an antelope with her bare hands (she was on a writing assignment in Colorado) and feeling her stomach growling uncontrollably. In this world of what prominent campaigner Brian Kateman has called ‘climatarian’ and ‘reducetarian’ (he supports a much more relaxed conversation around meat rather than all-or-nothing), it may be possible to eat some meat, without giving up entirely on a healthier, more ethical, more sustainable life. Way back in 2009, the author of Eating Animals, Jonathan Safran Foer, wrote: ‘Do I think there is any chance in the world that half of Americans will be vegetarians in 10 years? I would say there is virtually no chance in the world of that. Do I think ›

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there is any chance that half of the meals eaten in America will be vegetarian in 10 years? I think there is a good chance of that.’ For the first time ever, I am starting to agree. As well as a food trend, it is also tempting to see the ‘new’ vegetarianism as a lifestyle trend; and the second wave of clean eating. A sort of ‘eat clean, eat cleaner’ for the post-die-hard generation. ‘When I stopped eating meat it completely changed how I felt in myself,’ says Anna Jones, author of A Modern Way To Eat, which has found a place in the kitchens of even the most committed meat eaters. ‘I felt lighter and brighter but the main thing was that I felt much more excited about cooking.’ For Anna, what she calls her ‘flying under the radar thing’ is exactly what she’d hoped to achieve: that her food, which has been noticed by the fashion set, is healthy and delicious. That it also happens to be vegetarian is a bonus. I have also noticed in my own friendship group that the move towards meat-free eating often goes hand-in-hand with a more gutsy, celebratory life. My friend Jess, who smashes through actual ice with a hammer so she can swim in lakes throughout the winter, has been vegetarian for nearly

a month. Pick a British pea, grown in May, and that will be as delicious, as luxurious a dish as you can find,’ he tells me. ‘Better ingredients make better food. And that approach rolls into awareness of ethical issues, sourcing issues, food wastage. Without thinking or really noticing, we had six vegetarian dishes out of 11 on our menu this week.’ Bruno Loubet, the head chef at Grain Store, has swapped beef steaks for ox heart tomatoes, partly out of health, partly born from the joy of eating food grown on his own allotment: ‘We’ve been conditioned into thinking that if it doesn’t have meat or fish, then it isn’t a meal,’ Bruno tells me. ‘But we can be reprogrammed. Instead of having a lot of meat and bit of veg on the side, we can move to having a lot of vegetables and maybe a little bit of meat on the side.’ Never one to say no to a little bit of meat on the side, I wholeheartedly agree, banishing from my memory a recent encounter with a particularly phallic, deeply unappetising currywurst on the shores of Lake Wannsee in Berlin. I mean, sure, I’d been cycling for 10 hours, nothing was open, I still had 50km to go and so, suddenly, faced with the prospect of eating a sausage or fainting, I paid my two Euros and bit the wurst.

‘We’re on a high-energy protein kick with post-run nut-butter shots, hunks of sourdough bread, bowls of goji berries and smashed avocados all downed in an exercise-induced sweat haze’ a decade; my friend Katie, a bicycle courier and speed cyclist, hasn’t eaten meat for years despite covering hundreds of miles by thigh every week. That cliché of the wan vegetarian slouching in cardigans and complaining about the cold is long gone. Now we’re on a high-energy protein kick with post-run nut-butter shots, new foods, hunks of sourdough bread, bowls of goji berries and smashed avocados all downed in an exerciseinduced haze. There is also, of course, a health element to this fruit and veg revolution. A recent study published in the JAMA Internal Medicine journal found that substituting eggs for plant protein led to a 19% reduction in what they charmingly call ‘death risk’, while eliminating unprocessed red meat saw a drop of 12%. And, putting environmental and moral reasons aside for a moment, isn’t that the point of all this really? We are now so obsessed with prolonging our lives as much as humanly, and inhumanly, possible, that we will do anything to live longer. At the heart of this new vegetarianism, argues James Lowe, head chef at Lyles, and founding member of The Young Turks, is (perhaps unsurprisingly) vegetables. James has a thing about vegetables. Like, a serious thing about vegetables. ‘People think luxury is lobsters, caviar, beef fillets. But you can get those things at any time of the year; you can only get asparagus for

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Despite prominent male cheerleaders such as Marcus Eaves, Nigel Slater and Yotam Ottolenghi, the trend for veg-heavy living seems to have particularly taken root among young women. It is us who document so much of our lives through social media, who look to other cultures for inspiration, who feel free to build an identity beyond the monochrome of meat and starch, who have taken the carrot baton and run with it. For young Instagram food stars such as Rosie Birkett, eating vegetarian offers a creative challenge as well as a healthy dinner decision. ‘There is something so satisfying about taking something humble like a potato and using it in a clever way to make a delicious dish,’ says Rosie. ‘People are more clued-up about and interested in food full stop, and that’s what’s driving this.’ I, too, have come a long way from the soya slops and sosmix (yep, vegetarian sausage mix) surprises of my youth. These days, I describe myself as ‘British vegetarian’; vegetarian when it is polite and possible to be so. If a friend cooks me chicken at her house, I will eat it happily; if an elderly relative serves up a plate of sausage rolls, who am I to say no? But leave me to my own devices and I will trip lightly through a multicoloured world of every vegetable turned plump by sun and soil. I neither want, nor miss nor buy meat. I’ve got too much on my plate already. Q

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Photography Lukasz Wierzbowski

’m sitting in my trailer with my mom in Toronto, Canada, where we’re shooting the sixth season of US TV drama, Suits. This in itself is a novelty: my mom is sitting in my trailer, on a show in which I am a lead character, and that has a viewership of more than 1.7 million. It’s surreal. We never would have dreamed that this would be my reality. Our reality. Just a year ago, I was in a van heading back from Gihembe refugee camp in Rwanda. I was there as an advocate for UN Women; I had a week of meetings with female parliamentarians in the city’s capital, Kigali, celebrating the fact that 64% of the Rwandan government are women – the first in the world where women hold a majority. I was also speaking with grassroots-level female leadership at the refugee camp just outside the area. Driving back on the dusty roads that day, I received an email from my managers asking whether I’d attend the Baftas. I had never been and had always romanticised it. A high-end jewellery company was going to fly me in, dress me in the fanciest of gowns, and I would travel straight from Kigali to Heathrow, London, to the make-up chair and on to the red carpet. My brain, heart and spirit couldn’t shift gears that quickly, from the purpose-driven work I had been doing all week in Rwanda to the polished glamour of an awards show. ‘No,’ my heart said. And it wasn’t a soft whisper; it was a lion’s roar. I looked out the car window and saw a world of verdant beauty that had been riddled with genocide and unrest only 22 years ago, but had recovered with a decisive choice to overcome. The rolling fields, the goats and thump-thump of the ground as we drove – to me, it was bucolic bliss. It was love at its core. And in that moment, my gut said no because while my two worlds can coexist, I’ve learned that being able to keep a foot in both is a delicate balance. No, they are not mutually exclusive but guiding my heart through the swinging pendulum from Hollywood fantasy to third-world reality is challenging in its own way.

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In an exclusive essay for ELLE, star of TV show Suits Meghan Markle writes about how she reconciles two worlds – from the dusty streets of the developing countries where she works as a UN advocate, to the privilege and glamour of Hollywood’s red carpets. This is…

…HOW TO BE

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Additional photography: Getty, Instagram/meghanmarkle.

ELLE ESSAY

it gives people an escape, a catalyst to laugh and to balance the realities of life. Plus, my gig as a working actor is the hand that feeds me. Without that, I could never be the hand that feeds another at this level. Were it not for my show and website, I would never have been asked to be a global ambassador for World Vision or an advocate for UN Women, both of which are honours I relish. While most become star struck by A-list actors, you’ll Reflecting on where I came from helps me to apprecionly see me in awe of leaders effecting change. Politician and ate and balance what I have now. I was born and raised in diplomat Madeleine Albright, UN Secretary General Ban KiLos Angeles. My mother was a free-spirited clinical therapist moon. These are my heroes. These are my celebrities. and I had the most hard-working father, a television lighting When I gave a speech for International Women’s Day, and director by trade. My mum raised me to be a global citizen, with Ban Ki-moon led the standing ovation, I thought, ‘This right eyes open to sometimes harsh realities. We spent time travelhere is the point.’ To use whatever status I have as an actress ling to remote places, taking trips to Oaxaca in southern Mexito make a tangible impact. I’ve never wanted to be a lady who co where I saw children peddling Chiclets candy for a few extra lunches; I’ve always wanted to be a woman who works. And this pesos to bring home. type of work is what feeds my soul. The degree to which I can do My father worked behind the scenes of a soap opera and a that both on and off camera is a direct perk of my job. sitcom, surrounded by multimillion dollar budgets, and crew There is a myth that those who do humanitarian work have lunches that included filet mignon and enough sweets to make a saviour mentality, but the relationship is reciprocal. I returned you think you were at Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory. Twenty to Rwanda earlier this year as Global Ambassador for World years later, I would ask my show executives to ensure that our Vision and met a young girl named Claire, who was on the third extra filet mignon and sweets aplenty were donated to a soup hour of her walk to bring her father medicine. I was struck by kitchen I’d been volunteering at. And they said yes. My parents the steadfast nature in which she did it. There was no other opcame from little so they made a choice to give a lot: buying turtion, so she powered on. These simple acts of grace are the most keys for homeless shelters at Thanksgiving, delivering meals to powerful anchor to what’s important. And in the entertainment people in hospices, giving spare change to those asking for it. It’s industry, often riddled with superfluous what I grew up seeing, so it’s what I grew up being: a young adult with a social con‘With fame comes opportunity, demands, my barometer of what is valuable is validated on these trips. Not to sciousness to do what I could and speak but also a responsibility to mention, when I share my photos with up when I knew something was wrong. share, and to focus on pushing my friends, they note that I never look Sitting in a school classroom when happier than I do when I am on field misI was 11 years old, a dish-washing liqthrough glass ceilings ’ sions. It’s a different smile than the one uid commercial came on a TV with the for the paparazzi – it doesn’t require any retouching. tagline, ‘Women all over America are fighting greasy pots With fame comes opportunity, but it also includes responand pans.’ The boys yelled out, ‘Yeah, that’s where women besibility – to advocate and share, to focus less on glass slippers long. In the kitchen.’ My little freckled face became red with and more on pushing through glass ceilings. And, if I’m lucky anger. I went home and wrote letters to feminist civil rights enough, to inspire. A truly impactful moment for me was when lawyer Gloria Allred, plus a kids’ news programme host, and a teenage girl, Emily, shared a letter saying my aid work inspired Hillary Clinton (our first lady at the time). They all pledged supher to do a humanitarian trip to Costa Rica; she’s there as I write port. A few months later, the commercial was changed to ‘Peothis piece. I check her Twitter updates and see myself in her, reple all over America are fighting greasy pots and pans.’ membering my days volunteering on LA’s Skid Row when I was I spoke about this in a speech I gave for International Womher age. I see what Emily is doing and I think yes. This incredible en’s Day with UN Women. A testament to the fighting spirit young woman has decided to be the change she wishes to see in I had as a girl, and the responsibility I now feel as a woman and the world. Whatever small part I had to do with that is the most as an actress. The moment Suits became successful and I realaffirming and humbling part of my life. Q ised people (especially young girls) were listening to what I had to say, I knew I needed to be saying something of value. This is also, in part, why I started my website, thetig.com. I knew that girls were checking it for fashion tips, but by including thoughtful pieces about self-empowerment, or featuring dynamic womFrom left: en such as the Pakistani poet and writer Fatima Bhutto, I was Meghan on the hoping to integrate social consciousness and subjects of higher red carpet and value than selfies. A subtle means to pepper in what matters. her 2016 trip And don’t get me wrong – the entertainment industry matters: to Rwanda

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THERE IS ONLY ONE SHOE COLLECTION YOU’LL NEED TO SEE YOU THROUGH A/W 2016 AND BEYOND – INTRODUCING THE BLACK EDIT, FROM CLARKS

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ELLE PROMOTION

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ALKS INTO A BAR...

CABARET COMEDIAN WHO MAKES BOOB GAGS, DRINKS GALLONS OF CHARDONNAY WITH BEST FRIEND AMY SCHUMER AND ISN’T AFRAID TO TURN ANYTHING INTO A JOKE As told to Hannah Nathanson

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Photography: Mandee Johnson.

MEET BRIDGET EVERETT, THE 6FT-TALL ALTERNATIVE


THE STAND-UP

AMY SCHUMER CALLS HER ‘MY FRIEND, MY HERO’.

Comedian Jerry Seinfeld declared her ‘one of the greatest live performers I have ever seen in my life, and I have seen them all.’ Sarah Jessica Parker is such a fan she had a part written for her in the first Sex And The City film: you may remember her as the drunk party girl applying to be Carrie’s assistant (‘I never went to bed last night but I type like a motherfucker’). Alt-cabaret provocateur, Bridget Everett, 44, from Manhattan, Kansas (nicknamed ‘The Little Apple’), had performed in New York City for more than a decade, but really hit the big time after appearing in several episodes of Inside Amy Schumer. Now, she’s a star in her own right with a stage show that combines cabaret with candid songs, comedy and a lot of nudity. She introduces her show with the caveat ‘Some of you might not know me… but you won’t ever fucking forget me.’ And she’s right. Here she unveils the stories behind her best zingers. ‘I’M THE YOUNGEST OF SIX: Bridget, Brock, Brian, Brooke, Brad and Brinton, which is so ridiculous. People thought we were all pretty wild, but I thought of us more as smalltown Kennedys. My parents should have divorced before I was born, but they had me as a sort of “Hail Mary” to try and keep the family together, so it was already kind of rocky terrain when I came in. There was always verbal warfare at home and, since I was the youngest, I couldn’t keep up. Our fights would be full of wicked take downs and I would usually end up in bed in tears because they would make fun of me. I had one front tooth so they would call me Fang.

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‘The thing that gave me the edge was that I had the voice. My siblings could all sing but I was the star of the show and that gave me a seat at the table. Some of my fondest memories are of us huddling around the piano, either my brother or my mum would be playing, and we would all sing Lionel Richie. So that, I suppose, is how it all started. ‘AM I WEARING A BRA? NOPE, DON’T NEED ONE. Next question. I always go on stage barefoot and braless. When I first started performing the only thing I could find that was splashy enough to wear was from House of Deréon – Beyoncé and her mum Tina Knowles’ clothing line. They were on the seventh floor of Macy’s in New York, which also had a McDonald’s on it. People would see me there and just be like, “OK fat girl, get your cute dress then go and grab some french fries. We know that’s the real reason you came.” I decided it wasn’t really my style so I teamed up with my friend, the visual artist Larry Krone, and he made me my first tearaway muumuu dress. I didn’t want to wear a bra or any shoes with it, I just wanted it to be like my mum, walking around the house comfortably naked. ‘Larry really encourages me to celebrate my body. And by body, I mean my tits. We have a lot of names for the costumes: there’s titty top, quilt queef, pussy dress and pussy flowers. There aren’t a lot of fun, flowing clothes out there for a big girl that don’t make you look like you’re matronly or that you’ve given up. I’ve still got one foot in the game and I wanna play. ‘WHEN AMY [SCHUMER] AND I TEXT EACH OTHER, it’s not even like, “Hey, do you want to get a drink?” It’s like, “Rombauer?” [a vineyard in California]. The first time I met Amy, she told me to lighten up and I immediately liked her. We were performing at the same comedy festival in Montreal in 2010; I’m usually a bit of a shut-in at those big festivals because there are so many people. But Amy was in her element and she just suggested we grab some wine and go party. We went off like a rocket ship and have been friends ever since, we even call each other sister. Most people have an agenda – they’re always trying to get something and go somewhere with it – but Amy just wants to build people up and I needed that in my life at that point, starting out in comedy in my late thirties, so it was perfect timing for me. ‘When it comes to being funny, we help each other out and I appreciate her honesty. If Amy is on tour with me, she stands at the side of the stage, so when I hear her laugh I know to keep that part in. When we’re together, we’ll talk about boys, careers, thigh gaps, or whatever’s making us laugh. At the moment, we’re obsessed with TV show The Bachelor. The problem is that the show is such a lifeguzzler; neither of us has the time to watch three hours of TV, but there’s always time for The Bachelor. ‘MY MOTHER COULDN’T BE HERE TONIGHT but if she was she would tell you that there are three things in life ›

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THE STAND-UP

BFFS Amy Schumer and I live very near to each other in New York so we sometimes power walk around Central Park because physical fitness is first for us.

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Amy always asks me about my mum Freddie, and my great dog, Poppy. Poppy is a big part in all of our lives, but she can’t keep up on our walks so we don’t take her. When we’re not walking we’re watching The Bachelor or The Bachelorette but sometimes we just go to the cinema, sneak in a little wine and watch a Brad Pitt movie we don’t give a shit about.

‘I’m aware some people will make a narrow-minded judgement about me because of my size and what I have to say. But I want everyone to feel like they’ve been given a big hug at the end of my show. It’s not meant to make anyone feel like shit, but some people have to feel like shit when they see a 6ft-tall woman with her tits hanging out that don’t pass the pencil test anymore. Hey, they’re not what they used to be, but they’re mine. ‘HAS ANYONE BEEN SINGLE BEFORE?

I’ve been working at that shit for 39 years now. Say you go away for the weekend with a load of couples and they invite you because you’re “the funny one”. Then two by two, just like Noah’s ark, they disappear and then all of a sudden there are no bedrooms and they’re like, “That’s OK, she’ll just sleep in the yard…” ‘There’s no room for just one “funny friend” when I’m hanging out with Amy and other comedian friends, such as Nikki Glaser and Rachel Feinstein. Everybody’s hilarious. We usually pass around the spirit stick like in Bring It On, and everyone takes a turn to tell a story. Rachel has a story about a hard-drinking ex-boyfriend that I can’t hear enough times and I have one about a movie star I had sex with that they love to hear over and over again. ‘THE LABEL “FEMALE COMEDIAN” IS SHITTY but people just want to lump you into a certain category. I really like that when Serena Williams was asked whether she considered herself to be one of the greatest female athletes of all time she said, “I prefer ‘one of the greatest athletes of all time’.” The truth is that I am part-singer, part-cabaret performer, part-comedian and so if anyone wants to put me in any one category, it makes me feel a little uneasy. ‘I feel like I have a unique female voice – that I’d most accurately describe as “tits with a heart of gold” – that people want to hear. When I’m out there, I definitely feel that people are getting something from me that they aren’t getting anywhere else. Globally, there’s been a boom in women making comedy; there are so many outlets. Ten years ago, it was just Jennifer Aniston and Courteney Cox but now there’s a whole rainbow of people getting a shot. And that is no bad thing.’ Q

ELLE/NOVEMBER

Photography: Mandee Johnson, AmySchumer/Instagram.

that matter: living large, loving large and Barry Manilow. ‘My mum Freddie is accidentally funny and a real inspiration for my shows. She would walk around the house completely naked or go to the grocery store without a bra, in her pyjamas and slippers. Her sense of humour, and the pain that she felt through her very messy divorce, is a balance of something that I can really relate to. That immediacy of the humour and the hurt – that’s what I really get and it’s what I want to put across when I’m on stage. I want it to be all the colours of the rainbow: funny, outrageous and tits, but then also the pain. ‘I even wrote a song for my mum called Titties. When we were growing up we called her “Beaver Tails” because she has these long, flat, low-hanging titties. She always thought it was so funny, so when she was diagnosed with breast cancer I wrote a celebratory song about all the different types of titties out there. They’re just tits and it’s just your body. I hope my song encourages people, not just women, to embrace that. ‘I ONCE DRESSED UP IN A LADY GAGA meat dress, sucked down a hot dog, threw all the meat into the crowd and ended up naked. I’m a risk taker, but it’s hard to go wild on stage these days, maybe because the audience can film on their phones. I used to do a show called Our Hit Parade, where I’d play covers of songs in the charts at the time. That’s when the Lady Gaga meat dress scenario happened. I have no boundaries, physical or otherwise; the most outrageous thing I’ve done yet is shave my pussy on stage. I wasn’t doing it in a vulgar way, but in a sort of nuanced, tender way. I thought of it as part of a broader message about women’s bodies. There are so many restraints and rules; my message for women, and for anybody, is to just relax and enjoy yourself.


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Sex can be life-changing, self-affirming and sometimes completely underwhelming… THREE WRITERS SHARE THEIR STORIES OF TRANSFORMATIVE SEDUCTIONS Photography Lukasz Wierzbowski

AN ANTI-CLIMAX BY RACHAEL COMBE It was summer. I was 15; he was 17. We were virgins in love, alone in the woods, kissing on a picnic blanket. We had been talking about having sex for almost a year, spending all of our free time in his basement, his car or these woods, making out, our clothes coming off inch by inch, week by week. He had a condom his older brother had given him. We decided to unwrap it. Just to look at it. Then we decided to put it on. Just to see how it worked. And then, and then, and then… Oh. It was over. We had sex. Then we went to a milk bar and ate ice cream. I’d been led to believe that sex was the worst thing I could do – that it would wreck my life and possibly kill me. I’d bleed and be ushered into a whole new world of scary adult problems. I hit puberty in the late Eighties, the moment heterosexuals realised they, too, were at risk of HIV, but before the public was well-informed about the virus. Fear-mongering about the dangers of sex to girls is tradition, but AIDS gave fresh ammunition to the slut-shamers of the day (not that we had that term back then), and it made us girls more open to listening. Exactly how intimate you had to get to contract HIV was an active topic among my friends. Could you get it from kissing? From oral sex? From hand jobs? I mean, what if he came on your hand and you had a paper cut? It didn’t matter that the boys we were thinking about giving handies to were also inexperienced virgins. What if that hot guy in maths class touched

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SEXUALITY a girl at school camp when he had a cut, and that girl had HIV, and now he was infected? We were always told that when you fooled around with a boy, you were fooling around with everyone he’d fooled around with, and everyone they’d fooled around with and so on, until the whole world had their tongue down your throat, like you were some sort of drugged-up swinger. Making matters worse: I was Catholic, and so was my boyfriend. I started worrying about being an unwed mother at age six, after my Sunday-school teacher taught us about the virgin birth. (The idea that God would mess with you like that freaked me out. I mean, he’s God. He made the whole world; why the heck did he have to involve poor Mary at all to make Jesus?) In some ways, the sexual environment during that narrow slice of time, which happened to span my whole adolescence, had more in common with the sexual mores of the colonial era than with the times that immediately preceded and followed it. The Seventies had free love and the Nineties had sex-positive feminism, but all we had in the Eighties was Madonna – and now I think about it, she never shut up about Catholicism and AIDS. I was an A-grade student, a hypochondriac and a Godfearing gal. And yet… there was my boyfriend, as adorable as if drawn by a Japanese manga artist, and with the blond hair, unwavering devotion and soulful eyes of a golden retriever. I’d held out, but he was so hot and I was so in love. I brushed my teeth the night after losing my virginity, stared at my reflection and thought how strange it was that I looked the same; that life went on and my teeth still needed brushing. There was no punishment, no awful consequence. It was both exhilarating and disappointing. I wasn’t different; he wasn’t different. Just a different part of our bodies had touched. It was like having the curtain pulled back on everything I believed about God’s wrath, and the beginning of the end of my Catholicism. A few years and a few boyfriends later, I came across a quote by Yeats: ‘The tragedy of sexual intercourse is the perpetual virginity of the soul.’ That’s about right, but it’s also the comedy of sex. For better or worse, it doesn’t change your essential self, your value as a human – and thank God! That would take all the fun out of it.

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A FRENCH EDUCATION BY LS HILTON ‘Lezza’ was an abusive term at school when I was growing up during the late Eighties, but I don’t think anyone really knew what it meant. It seems extraordinary, looking back, but being gay wasn’t something anyone seemed to think about. It wasn’t exactly that people were prejudiced, more that it simply wasn’t part of the everyday landscape. Elton John was still married to a woman, there was Boy George but he was a pop star, and the groundbreaking gay kisses on popular soaps that were instrumental in changing British people’s perception of homosexuality were several years in the future. It seems quaint now, but my generation of teenagers mostly got their information about sex from books – furtive thumbings of our parents’ copies of D.H. Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover, or the racier goings-on in bonkbusters by authors like Jilly Cooper. I’d read revolutionary lesbian texts like Radclyffe Hall’s The Well Of Loneliness, and Émile Zola’s Nana, but I still didn’t have any idea of what lesbians actually did. Sex education at school consisted of an agonising science period when poor Miss Griffiths had to demonstrate unrolling a condom on a test tube, but I don’t recall that same-sex relationships were even mentioned. So when I met Aurelie on a beach in France when I was 17, I had no idea what was happening to me. I had lost my virginity – well, mislaid it, really – to a boy and I’d had a serious boyfriend, so I considered myself sexually sophisticated. But when I saw her for the first time, in a navy jumper over black bikini bottoms, dark blonde hair piled up with perfect Parisian insouciance, I was entirely unprepared for the great wave of lust that crashed over me. Proper, dry-mouthed, knee-trembling lust. Aurelie was sitting next to a guy who worked in the restaurant where we all hung out, so I thought maybe the radar had been diverted, but no, the lust was definitely throbbing at her, in a desperately confusing way. She knew, of course. There was a crowd of us, all working over the ‘AURELIE DIDN’T summer in the small seaside town, SAY MUCH, SHE JUST SMOKED AND STARED. and we’d meet every afternoon on the beach between shifts. With her HER EYES WERE TIPface bare of make-up except for a TILTED AND LAZY, slash of poppy lipstick, her bohemian LIKE A SPOILT CAT. silver earrings and just-so men’s “DO YOU WANT TO GO TO BED WITH ME?” 501s, Aurelie seemed like the acme SHE ASKED SUDDENLY’ of sophistication. Next to her I felt like an ungainly child, not helped by the fact that I blushed like a traffic light every time she spoke to me. But at the end of the summer, when I was headed to Paris to study, she suggested we meet up at her mother’s flat. Aurelie lived near Paris’ famous Père Lachaise Cemetery in a high-ceilinged, 19th-century building. She had her own little apartment above her mother’s and the afternoon I arrived, there were several ladies enjoying tea in the drawing room. To me, it was like something out of a novel. We sat on the windowsill, smoking and looking out at the Paris skyline. I had planned to suggest we go for a walk in the cemetery to see Oscar Wilde’s tomb, but what had seemed like a clever, intellectual outing on the way over on the Métro now seemed hopelessly naive. Aurelie didn’t say much, she just smoked and stared. Her eyes were tip-tilted and lazy, like a spoilt cat. Below, we could hear the teacups and the quick rap of French conversation. ›

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‘Do you want to go to bed with me?’ she asked suddenly. She knew the answer, even if I didn’t. Aurelie took off her clothes slowly, as unselfconscious as if she were alone. Then she lay on the bed and smiled. ‘So are you coming?”’ That was how I learned what girls did with girls. It was strange and wonderful and surprising, mostly in that it taught me so much about my own body. We went to bed every afternoon for about a month, as the endless tea parties rattled on below. Then one day, I arrived as usual, and Aurelie’s mother told me calmly that she had gone back to university. I never saw Aurelie again, but I had a lovely time in Paris with my broken heart, fulfilling all the chain-smoking, poetry-writing clichés as only a 17-year-old can. I decided in the end that I prefer sex with men, but never say never. I loved Aurelie for her physical generosity, for the lessons she taught me about pleasure and for the poignant beauty of those languorous Parisian afternoons. It’s very seldom that your own life feels like a movie, but in terms of pure romance, it was the most perfect sex of my life. Maestra by LS Hilton (Zaffre Publishing, £7.99) is out now

BEYOND THE BIKINI WAX BY LIZZY GOODMAN We met at a mutual friend’s birthday dinner. I was 28 and post-break-up. James, as I’ll call him, was an artist in his forties. Seated next to each other, we’d been making conversation about things he loved that I wanted to be able to say I loved, like composer Paul Bowles and the Hôtel du Cap, when he casually said, ‘I know exactly how you need to be fucked.’ I looked around, sure someone else had heard him. (No one had). Then I blushed. Then I met his gaze. For the next few weeks, we texted back and forth. I was baffled by his blend of authority and vulnerability. He’d describe in ‘I’D LOST MY VIRGINITY explicit detail what he wanted 10 YEARS EARLIER BUT to do to me, then admit that UNTIL JAMES, I HADN’T I made him nervous, as if REALLY HAD SEX. confidence and openness were I DIDN’T NEED TO GO one and the same. He liked me. THROUGH THE He didn’t hide it. But he had no MOTIONS BECAUSE plans to be my boyfriend, and I WAS ACTUALLY, I didn’t want him to play that TOTALLY OVERCOME’ role either. He was too weird, too wild, too not-of-my-world for the long run. And yet I felt completely invaded by him. The next time we saw each other was at an album release party. I told myself I didn’t care if he showed up, even as I dressed for him: my leopard-print, super-short silk Diane von Furstenberg wrapdress, suede Chloé platform

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boots, lots of eyeliner. I felt him walk in the door. He asked me to walk him to the newsagents for cigarettes. I wasn’t ready yet, I kept saying in a manic stream-of-consciousness rant as we made our way down the block. He listened attentively, said nothing and then, when we were safely out of view of our friends, grabbed both my wrists in one hand, shoved me into the shallow doorway of some grimy apartment building and slid his other hand up my dress. After that, it was on. We slept together for the better part of a year. When it began, I was one person; by the time it ended, I was someone else. I’d lost my virginity more than 10 years earlier, but until James, I hadn’t really had sex. I mean, I had, but with a few exceptions I approached it like everything else in my life: something to analyse, get good at, master. I avoided internet porn in my adolescence, but I’d still got the message that what I needed to be good at sex was a rigorously groomed bikini line, a toned, tanned body and the ability to chastely moan. James wouldn’t stand for that kind of soft-core posturing. With my arms pinned behind my waist and his hand firmly gripping the back of my neck, I didn’t need to go through the motions of being dominated because I actually was totally overcome, physically and, by extension, emotionally. He met my relentless stream of chatter with bemused silence, and in response I shut up, on the outside and inside. The voice in my head that nattered on during sex, wondering if my stomach looked fat in this position or if that noise I just made was gross, faded away. And because of his willingness to tell me what he wanted in bed all the while radiating alpha authority, I too started to be accountable for my desires. I had to show up and be myself rather than impersonate a girl having sex on Melrose Place. It reframed my perception of sex, from slick and stylised to rough and ragged, and the notion of being ‘good in bed’. We parted when the chemistry faded, about eight months in, and I wondered what mark he’d left on me. I’d never loved him; I’d known he’d leave my life as quickly as he entered it. That was part of the thrill; since I didn’t want him to be my man, I could try on a rowdier version of myself without feeling obliged to keep her. But a switch had been flicked. Before James, I thought good sex was about control, but it turns out for me it’s about release. The more I let go, the more he wanted me; the more I enjoyed myself, the more powerful I became. Q ELLE/NOVEMBER

Photography: Lukasz Wierzbowski.

SEXUALITY


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BREAKING THE MOULD The beauty of jewellery is that what you choose to wear and how you choose to wear it can redefine a whole look. So what happened when ELLE invited three emerging fashion talents to create a shoot for Pandora? Read on to find out...

RIGHT, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP PANDORA ROSE AND CUBIC ZIRCONIA EARRINGS, £55. PANDORA ROSE NECKLACE, £125. RING, £275, RING, £245, BOTH 14CT GOLD AND CUBIC ZIRCONIA. ALL PANDORA

When you look at a fashion shoot in a magazine like ELLE, what you don’t see is the preparation that goes into the final images that make their way on to the page. For this shoot, three emerging talents – a fashion designer, make-up artist and set designer – were invited to meet our brief to showcase the a/w 2016 Pandora jewellery range. The collections draw inspiration from both architecture and nature, and this duality is the thread that runs throughout the shoot: from a set that mixes hard with soft, to a debut fashion collection that pairs lustrous silk with hard-edged body ‘armour’, and subtle, natural make-up that is disrupted by stark lines of pure white. Lesson learned? Opposites attract. Beautifully.


ELLE PROMOTION

‘THE SET WAS KEPT DELIBERATELY SIMPLE: THE NATURAL MATERIALS CONTRAST BETWEEN HARD AND SOFT, AND ARE DESIGNED TO ACT AS A BRIDGE BETWEEN THOSE ELEMENTS IN THE FASHION AND JEWELLERY COLLECTIONS’

Photographs by Juliette Cassidy

CAROLINA MIZRAHI, SET DESIGNER

LEFT, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP 14CT GOLD AND CUBIC ZIRCONIA RINGS, £245 EACH. 14CT GOLD AND CUBIC ZIRCONIA RING, £265. STUD EARRING (HEART-MOTIF), £50, AND STUD EARRINGS, £55, BOTH PANDORA ROSE. NECKLACE, AS BEFORE. 14CT GOLD BANGLES, FROM £950 EACH ABOVE, FROM TOP STERLING SILVER RING, £45. STERLING SILVER AND CRYSTAL PEARL RING, £45. RING, £70, AND RING, £60, BOTH STERLING SILVER AND CUBIC ZIRCONIA. ALL PANDORA


ELLE PROMOTION

BELOW, LEFT TO RIGHT STERLING SILVER AND CUBIC ZIRCONIA BANGLES, £75 EACH. STERLING SILVER RING, £99. STERLING SILVER AND CUBIC ZIRCONIA BRACELETS, £50 EACH. STERLING SILVER AND PANDORA ROSE BANGLE, £65 RIGHT, LEFT TO RIGHT STERLING SILVER EARRINGS, £35. BRACELET AND BANGLE, AS BEFORE. ALL PANDORA

‘I DESIGNED THIS COLLECTION WITH JEWELLERY AS ITS ONLY ACCESSORY, SO IT WAS A PERFECT FIT FOR THIS SHOOT’ - JOANNA MELBOURNE, FASHION DESIGNER

ABOVE ALL RINGS AS BEFORE TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT 14CT GOLD, ENAMEL AND CUBIC ZIRONIA RING, £265 (ALSO ON RING FINGER). 14CT GOLD AND CUBIC ZIRONIA RING, £275. 14CT GOLD AND CUBIC ZIRONIA RING, £245 (MIDDLE AND TOP) OPPOSITE STERLING SILVER AND CUBIC ZIRCONIA EARRINGS, £35. ALL PANDORA


ABOVE STERLING SILVER STUD EARRINGS, £45. STERLING SILVER NECKLACES, FROM £70 EACH, (STERLING SILVER CHARMS, FROM £40, AND 14CT GOLD CHARMS, FROM £150 EACH). STERLING SILVER AND CUBIC ZIRCONIA RING, £60. ALL PANDORA

‘I DEVISED THE MAKE-UP TO BE SOFT AND NATURAL TO REFLECT THE FINE NATURE OF THE JEWELLERY, ADDING THE WHITE LINE AS A NOD TO THE BOLD ACCENTS IN THE COLLECTIONS’ JIHYE SIM, MAKE-UP ARTIST

STYLE THE SEASON WITH PANDORA Whatever style statement you want your jewellery to make, look no further than Pandora . The Danishborn brand has a reputation for creating covetable, fashion-forward pieces in fine metals and precious stones that are designed to be mixed or matched, pared-back or stacked as your mood (and the season) guides you. Every piece – from statement rings, earrings and necklaces to bracelets – is handfinished, marrying centuries-old craftsmanship with the latest jewellery trends. This season’s new ‘Vintage Allure’ and ‘Dazzling Droplets’ collections draw inspiration from nature and architecture . Discover them and the rest of the range at pandora.net


NO FRILLS FEMININITY. STRIPPED BACK. REAL

Be bigger. Louder…

Photography: Mattias Björklund, Liz Collins, Kai Z Feng, Kerry Hallihan.

…or find your own quiet power WHOEVER YOU CHOOSE TO BE TODAY. OWN IT

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The unbreakable Amy Adams ‘I can’t Lean In any more. I just want to fall back. And there’s such a great thing about release’ Interview Emma Brockes Photography Liz Collins Styling Anne-Marie Curtis

AMY ADAMS IS ON A STOPOVER IN NEW YORK, en route from the Toronto International Film Festival to her home in Los Angeles and, without her husband or six-year-old daughter by her side, is in that slightly giddy state travelling solo brings on. When she walks into the bar of a downtown hotel, dressed in a casual black suit and white shirt, it is with the stealth of someone expert in avoiding attention. She then plops down, exhales loudly, and orders a large gin and tonic. This version of Amy – chatty, informal, unguarded and game – is the one we are familiar with from her movies; the qualities for which people loved her in Junebug and Enchanted and that leavened more hard-bitten roles in American Hustle and The Fighter. It is an openness often wrongly identified as naivety but that, on closer inspection, turns out to be a kind of guilelessness brought on by the 42-year-old actor’s resolve not to be warped by success. By her own admission, she doesn’t play the Hollywood game of self-advancement and cynicism. ‘When you see people who behave that way get what they want, and you’re trying so hard to play by the rules, it’s tricky. At the end of the day, I can’t live with myself if I’m mean’ – but neither is she a pushover. She calls herself a ‘pragmatist’ who doesn’t see the point of unnecessary drama but will fight hard if she has to. ‘I let a lot slide because I have a slow burn,’ she says. ‘And because I’m not aggressive, people think I’m joking when I say something doesn’t work for me. I’m fairly easy going, but’ – and she looks momentarily steely – ‘people know where I stand.’ Amy is, perhaps, able to indulge the softer side of her nature because, with five Oscar nominations and some of the most memorable film roles of the last decade to her name, she has never been in more demand as an actor. In her two new films, Arrival, and Nocturnal Animals, she respectively plays Dr Louise Banks, an internationally renowned linguist hired by the US ›

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LEATHER COAT AND WOOL-MIX TROUSERS, ALL CÉLINE. SILK BLOUSE. CHLOÉ. GOLDPLATED EARRINGS, JENNIFER FISHER

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THIS PAGE WOOL-MIX DRESS, J.W.ANDERSON. GOLD-PLATED EARRINGS, JESSIE HARRIS. RINGS (WORN THROUGHOUT), AMY’S OWN

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THIS PAGE WOOLMIX DRESS, JASON WU. STERLING SILVER EARRINGS, SARA ROBERTSSON X GRETA GRAM. METAL CUFF, ELSA PERETTI FOR TIFFANY & CO OPPOSITE WOOL COAT, JIL SANDER. COTTON SHIRT, THEORY. WOOLMIX SKIRT, SPORTMAX. SUEDE SHOES, MANOLO BLAHNIK. GOLD-PLATED EARRINGS, DINNY HALL

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CASHMERE JACKET, AND TROUSERS, ALL BOTTEGA VENETA. GOLD-PLATED EARRINGS, HOLLY RYAN

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military to communicate with aliens, and Susan Morrow, a disenchanted gallery owner looking back over an unhappy life. The first film, directed by Denis Villeneuve and co-starring Jeremy Renner and Forest Whitaker, sounds like a sci-fi movie but is in fact a meditation on time, grief and the nature of humanity, in which Amy plays the kind of sympathetic role she does best. While in Nocturnal Animals, directed by Tom Ford and co-starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Amy plays against type as a brittle, disappointed woman trapped in a lifeless marriage. Of the two roles, it was this she found the greater stretch as an actor. The character’s sheer emptiness was a challenge; how does one animate a vacuum? ‘I felt connected to her journey but not to her,’ says Amy, ‘until I realised that she didn’t like herself. And then I started to have understanding for her character and stopped judging her.’ SUSPENSION OF JUDGEMENT is the starting point for any actor approaching a role but, in Amy’s case, it is also a personal philosophy. She grew up as the middle child of seven in a Mormon household in Castle Rock, Colorado. Her parents divorced when Amy was 11, and the family left the church, but she has retained a moral vigour that, by Hollywood standards, makes her seem practically otherworldly. Amy recalls arriving in LA for the first time in her mid-twenties, wanting to make it as an actor and being hopelessly unprepared for what she calls ‘the darkness’. ‘When I realised that people use other people, I was devastated. At one point, I walked to the 7-Eleven to get a Slurpee and this car took a right turn and almost hit me. And he was like, “Watch out you blonde bitch!” I remember standing there with my Slurpee and crying. I thought, why are people so mean here?’ As a teenager, Amy wanted to go into medicine (she once shadowed a doctor in the A&E for a role in the TV show Dr. Vegas, and says, ‘I realised that the way he evaluated a patient was almost the same as I would evaluate a character’). But without better grades at school, she couldn’t hope to win a scholarship to college, and her parents – father in the military, mother who worked in a gym – didn’t have the money to pay for tuition. ‘I just had to look at what I could do. I wasn’t very good at school – I was decent, I didn’t fail, but I didn’t excel. B-grade students don’t get scholarships. So

I just started working as a dancer and kept making decisions that let me continue doing it.’ For several years, this meant serving an apprenticeship dancing on the regional dinner theatre circuit, similar to the old repertory theatre system in Britain. Although she struggled with insecurity when she auditioned, Amy tended to be successful, so after a few years she began to think, “Oh OK, I can do this.’ In 1999, she won a role in the movie Drop Dead Gorgeous with Kirsten Dunst and Kirstie Alley. She moved to LA and her film career began. It was another three years before Amy had a breakthrough role – as Brenda Strong, opposite Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me If You Can. In the meantime, she met her husband, actor and artist Darren Le Gallo, whom she describes as the perfect ‘emotional’ counterweight to her pragmatism. ‘He’ll kill me for saying this, but he’s not very practical. He’s an artist. He paints and does music.’ Above all, he is secure about his wife’s fame. ‘He’s awesome about what I have to do in this job.’ Still, when one half of a couple is a movie star, it must put a strange burden on their relationship. ‘I think it helps that everybody likes him better than they like me. It’s true! It’s one of our arguments. He’s so nice.’ The promise of Catch Me If You Can to deliver other acting offers failed, something for which Amy blames herself. For almost a year, she choked, flubbing every audition she attended. ‘I was horrible! I was so upset and mad because I couldn’t show up for myself.’ What did she do in those auditions that was so bad? ‘It wasn’t what I did, it was what I didn’t do. I just didn’t live up to my potential. I was too concerned with what I thought I should be, as opposed to what I was. It wasn’t until I let that go…’ She trails off to indicate that it’s a mindset she’s still working on. Surprisingly, turning 40 helped. Where many actors seek to downplay their age, Amy says, ‘I think I say it at every interview. I’m really proud to have made it this far and to feel this happy about it.’ I ask if it’s hard to compete in an industry with women who look like, say, Charlize Theron, and she bursts out laughing. ‘I gave up wanting to look like Charlize when I was, like, 12. I have short legs, I’m athletic, I have pale skin that reacts to cold and hot and moisture. You just have to accept who you are. In those comparisons, I always lost.’ She shrugs. ‘I realised it was a pointless pursuit. I can only do my best.’ It is an admirable attitude, one that Amy says comes from looking at the example of other women she respects. ‘Not for being good actors, but as good activists, or mothers. I have a six-yearold daughter – I don’t want to teach her that she’s only valuable to a certain age.’ Among these, she lists Tina Fey, Meryl Streep and Judi Dench. ‘I’m so obsessed with Judi Dench. She has so much life and so much beauty. And the twinkle and the sparkle and the vibrancy. We’re not judging her by the standards of youth but by the standards of spirit and character. All these things I project onto her; I don’t know her at all! But I love her so much!’ She shrieks with laughter. ONE ADVANTAGE OF AGE is being able to lobby more forcefully on one’s own behalf. Amy is not confrontational. She is, she says, the ‘quiet, weird’ person at the party, who can’t speak to more than one person at a time. (Her husband, on the ›

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other hand, is the life and soul. ‘He’s extremely social, outgoing and curious. I feel like I’m just tired and antisocial.’). Equality of pay between men and women in Hollywood is something she believes in wholeheartedly, but thinks it’s more complicated than the headlines allow. Although her agents will ‘be mad at me for saying this, I feel like I would’ve acted for free, you know what I mean? And I feel incredibly grateful.’ ‘But you’re so talented,’ I reply. ‘Why should you feel grateful?’ ‘I feel grateful because gratitude sets you up. Gratitude is not the same thing as being naive or settling. It’s being in a position I never thought I’d be in – I never thought I’d travel out of the US. I was not raised with expectations of myself that were that grand. So I’m grateful for these experiences that I can share with my daughter.’ That doesn’t mean you should be a sucker about money, I say. ‘No. I know.’ ‘People in your business can always pay more.’ ‘I suppose.’ She looks uncomfortable. ‘What stops you from asking?’ ‘The negotiation comes to a standstill and I have to make a choice, which a lot of women do. I can walk away. But I choose not to.’ She laughs. ‘Now I’m stuck with that statement.’ What she means is that these issues are difficult and tied up with other considerations. ‘This is an issue not just about women’s pay; we need to work on how women are viewed in society and then the pay will be reflected in that.’ ‘Have you ever turned down a job because they didn’t come up with enough money?��� ‘No. Never. Right now, my time is more important to me. So that’s what I negotiate because any time I’m working, I’m not spending with my daughter.’ When Aviana, her daughter, was three, Amy decided to make a radical change to the way she worked, not in terms of hours, but of attitude. This was during the making of American Hustle, which she says, was the most intense filming experience to date that compromised her downtime at home. ‘I’d be distracted and left with my character or an experience from the day. Even though I was present with my family, there was a part of me that was still wrapped up in myself, and

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I didn’t like that. I couldn’t figure out what to do, but when it got crazy, it became clear.’ The answer was to ‘separate life and work’. ‘In that period, did your husband say, this isn’t working?’ ‘No, because I think I was pretty good at faking it up until then.’ I suggest that this is precisely the fear non-actors have of being involved with an actor: that you never know when they’re faking it. ‘No, not like that. But you wouldn’t know that I was distracted. I wasn’t fully enjoying my time on set because I wasn’t at home and I wasn’t fully enjoying my time at home. I just felt thin. My expectations of myself were so high. I needed to allow myself to be flawed, both at work and at home, and accept that I’m not perfect and am not able to do it all. There’s that book Lean In – did you read it?’ ‘Yes,’ I say. ‘And I’m like, oh, I can’t Lean In any more. I just want to fall back. And there’s such a great thing about release. And it doesn’t mean I’m giving up anything. I love the message of the book, I don’t want to make a political statement, but you know what I mean. I was putting in so much – I can’t do it all.’ ‘You need to be gross sometimes.’ ‘I’m gross a lot.’ THE PERSON WHO TAUGHT HER THAT IT’S OK for life to be messy was the late Nora Ephron, who directed Amy in Julie & Julia, a slight movie given real heft by the dual performances of Amy and Meryl Streep. Of Ephron, she says, ‘I was intimidated by her. I’m not as sophisticated. She was so smart, such a smart wit, and I’m so flawed. She gave an amazing voice to women – allowed us to be perfectly imperfect.’ Still, Amy continues to struggle with certain kinds of messy environments. I ask if there is a connection between the fact that she has chosen to have one child and the size of the family she grew up in. ‘Yes,’ she says emphatically. ‘If there’s a lot of chaos or noise or conflict, I get very anxious. I can manage it now, as a grown-up, but the family chaos I grew up in caused me a lot of anxiety.’ She occasionally worries about Aviana not having siblings, but also luxuriates in the fact that ‘she knows she’s my number one.’ Hillary Clinton’s run for president has been tremendous, she says. ‘It is beautiful to get to tell your daughter that a woman is running for President. I get emotional. England has had female leaders for generations, but we have not had that. She doesn’t know anything about Trump, other than that it’s a hotel we’ve stayed in in New York. Oh, and she asked me why he’s orange and why he’s so angry!’ Even Aviana is able to detect a certain innocence in her mother. ‘She defines herself differently to me and I like that,’ says Amy. ‘She said, mum, I’m more rock’n’roll than you. You’re not very rock’n’roll. And I said – you’re right!’ Amy laughs uproariously. So, does she feel powerful, heading towards her mid-forties? ‘I don’t know if I feel powerful as an actress, but I feel powerful as a mother, and more powerful than I did in my twenties. I don’t know what that means for my career – that’s yet to be seen.’ The steely look re-enters her eye. ‘But as a woman, if I lose something because of the honesty of who I am, then I don’t care.’ Q Nocturnal Animals is in cinemas 4 November Arrival is in cinemas 10 November

Liz Collins


LEATHER DRESS, CHLOÉ. GOLD-PLATED EARRINGS, JESSIE HARRIS. HAIR: ROLANDO BEAUCHAMP AT THE WALL GROUP USING BUMBLE AND BUMBLE. MAKE-UP: STEPHEN SOLLITTO AT TMG-LA. COM USING SYNTHETIC DE CHANEL AND SUBLIMAGE LE TEINT. MANICURIST: DEBORAH LIPPMANN FOR DEBORAH LIPPMANN. SET DESIGNER: BETTE ADAMS AT MARY HOWARD STUDIO

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GET DOWN

Photography Kai Z Feng Styling Anne-Marie Curtis

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A FAR-OUT DISCO DIVA CRASH LANDS IN THE FUTURE AMID A HOT MESS OF CLASHING PRINTS, VELVET AND GLITTERING EMBELLISHMENT. THIS IS THE SEASON TO CHANNEL YOUR INNER ZIGGY STARDUST THIS PAGE SEQUIN AND WOOL JUMPER, £735, SILK SHIRT, £455, AND VISCOSE TROUSERS, £425, ALL SONIA RYKIEL OPPOSITE PAGE EMBELLISHED SILK DRESS, £8,800, DIOR. LEATHER BOOTS (WORN THROUGHOUT), £1,995, MARC JACOBS

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THIS PAGE EMBELLISHED-SILK DRESS, PRICE ON APPLICATION, MARC JACOBS OPPOSITE PAGE COTTON-MIX TOP, £1,990, CHANEL. COTTON TROUSERS, £1,150, DELPOZO

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THIS PAGE WOOL JACKET, WOOL TROUSERS AND SILK TOP, ALL PRICE ON APPLICATION, ALL GARETH PUGH. LEATHER BOOTS (JUST SEEN, WORN THROUGHOUT), £1,075, MARC JACOBS OPPOSITE PAGE WOOL JACKET, PRICE ON APPLICATION, GUCCI. VISCOSE-MIX TROUSERS, £156, HEBE STUDIO. LYCRA BODYSUIT, STYLIST’S OWN

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WOOL JACKET, £2,775, CHLOÉ. WOOL-MIX CATSUIT, £1,500, SIBLING

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EMBELLISHED TULLE DRESS, PRICE ON APPLICATION, DOLCE & GABBANA

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THIS PAGE SEQUIN DRESS, £2,660, PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI OPPOSITE PAGE COTTON-MIX JACKET, PRICE ON APPLICATION, MAISON MARGIELA. SILKMIX TROUSERS, £425, VANESSA BRUNO. LYCRA BODYSUIT (JUST SEEN), STYLIST’S OWN

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THIS PAGE EMBELLISHED VELVET JACKET, £7,000, AND VELVET TROUSERS, £700, BOTH GIORGIO ARMANI OPPOSITE PAGE EMBELLISHED VELVET COAT, £6,335, MIU MIU. LYCRA BODY, PRICE ON APPLICATION, TATA NAKA

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THIS PAGE COTTON-MIX JACKET, £1,680, AND SILK HEADSCARF, £320, BOTH ROBERTO CAVALLI. COTTON-MIX CATSUIT, £38, AMERICAN APPAREL OPPOSITE PAGE EMBROIDERED CHIFFON CAPE AND EMBROIDERED TULLE DRESS, BOTH PRICE ON APPLICATION, BOTH ALEXANDER MCQUEEN. HAIR: ALI PIRZADEH AT CLM HAIR & MAKE-UP USING BUMBLE AND BUMBLE. MAKE-UP: NAOKO SCINTU AT THE WALL GROUP USING NARS COSMETICS. MANICURE: JESSICA HOFFMAN AT CAREN USING LE VERNIS IN ORGANDI AND BODY EXCELLENCE HAND CREAM. MODEL: MARIQUE SCHIMMEL AT SELECT. WITH THANKS TO JAGUAR (JAGUAR. CO.UK), THE BUSINESS DESIGN CENTRE AND CLASSIC HIRE CARS

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Not knowing when the dawn will come

I open every door

WHEN IT'S YOU AGAINST THE WORLD, CHANNEL YOUR INNER STRENGTH WITH OVERSIZED COATS, WELL-WORN STOMPER BOOTS AND HEAVY LEATHER. YOU'VE GOT THIS

Photography Kerry Hallihan Styling Michelle Duguid

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GREY WOOL CAPE, £1,700, GREY WOOL VEST, £1,005, AND BLACK WOOL TROUSERS, £1,700, ALL DSQUARED2. BLACK LEATHER BOOTS (WORN THROUGHOUT), £380, DIESEL BLACK GOLD

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THIS PAGE WOOL COAT, £2,880, WOOL JUMPER, £680, COTTON SHIRT, £785, SILK SKIRT, £1,840, AND LEATHER BOOTS (WORN THROUGHOUT), £1,165, ALL VALENTINO. METAL MILITARY VINTAGE BROOCH, STYLIST’S OWN OPPOSITE PAGE BLACK WOOL JACKET, £1,310, AND GREY WOOL SKIRT, £980, BOTH FENDI. BLACK LEATHER TOP, £1,170, DAVID KOMA. LEATHER TROUSERS (WORN THROUGHOUT), £925, HAIZHENWANG. COPPER EARRING (JUST SEEN), £425, LOEWE

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THIS PAGE WOOL JACKET, £640, AND WOOL JACKET, £360, BOTH SPORTMAX OPPOSITE PAGE DUVETINE CREPE COAT, £2,394, MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION. SILK SHIRT, £1,295, AND COTTON TROUSERS, £845, BOTH JOSEPH. COTTON BODYSUIT, £140, WOLFORD

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FELTED WOOL CAPE, £1,640, AND FLANNEL TROUSERS, £400, BOTH MULBERRY. LEATHER TOP, £1,170, DAVID KOMA. ALPACA SOCKS, £12.99, SOCKSHOP

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THIS PAGE TWEED LONG-SLEEVED JACKET, £4,180, TWEED JACKET (WORN UNDERNEATH), £2,500, AND TWEED TROUSERS, £1,200, ALL GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI. LEATHER TOP (JUST SEEN), AS BEFORE OPPOSITE PAGE WOOL JACKET, £4,750, AND WOOL TROUSERS, £695, BOTH DOLCE & GABBANNA. WOOL-MIX JUMPER, £468, LOU DALTON. SILK SCARF, £85, ROCKINS

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THIS PAGE COTTON-MIX COAT, £3,000, AND SILKMIX DRESS, £2,900, BOTH LOUIS VUITTON OPPOSITE PAGE COTTON COAT, £1,.695, BURBERRY. MERINO WOOL JUMPER, £297, RAG & BONE. LEATHER SKIRT, £2,990, TOD’S. LEATHER TROUSERS, £1,095, BELSTAFF. HAIR: TONY COLLINS AT EMMA DAVIES AGENCY. MAKEUP: SHINOBU AT CLM HAIR & MAKE-UP USING CHANEL LE ROUGE COLLECTION NO.1 AND LE LIFT V-FLASH. MANICURE: EMMA WELSH AT AUGUST MANAGEMENT. MODEL: STEPH SMITH AT PREMIER MODEL MANAGEMENT. WITH THANKS TO TOWN & COUNTRY CARS, HADLEIGH

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THIS PAGE BLACK VELVET JACKET, £280, GANNI. WHITE COTTON TOP, £39.99, H&M STUDIO. GREY RHODIUM-PLATED EARRINGS (JUST SEEN, WORN THROUGHOUT), £49, SWAROVSKI. WHITE COTTON HAT (WORN THROUGHOUT), STYLIST’S OWN OPPOSITE PAGE VELVET JACKET, £169.95, AND VELVET TROUSERS, £119.95, BOTH SCOTCH & SODA. SILK TOP, £213, FRAME. LEATHER SHOES (WORN THROUGHOUT), £125, UNDERGROUND. COTTON SOCKS (WORN THROUGHOUT), £3.50, CALZEDONIA

HOW TO WEAR THE TRENDS STARRING THE MODEL VARYA SHUTOVA, WEARING THE TREND MEN’S SUITING Photography Mattias Björklund Styling Natasha Wray

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THIS PAGE NAVY WOOL COAT, £479, MAJE. BLACK WOOLMIX TOP, £378, AND WHITE COTTON SHIRT, £560, BOTH ELLERY. GREY WOOL SKIRT, £1,100, RAEY. BLACK LEATHER BOOTS (WORN THROUGHOUT), £105, DR. MARTENS. BLACK AND RED LEATHER BAG, £295, FURLA OPPOSITE PAGE LEATHER JACKET, £2,599, POLO RALPH LAUREN. POLYESTER DRESS, £470, TOGA PULLA. VISCOSE TOP, £290, CARVEN. WOOL HAT, £40, FANCLUB

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THIS PAGE BLACK WOOL-MIX JACKET, £65, RIVER ISLAND. WHITE COTTON TOP, £25, V BY VERY. BLACK COTTONMIX TROUSERS, £395, MARGARET HOWELL OPPOSITE PAGE WOOL JACKET, £425, AND WOOL TROUSERS, £235, BOTH PAUL & JOE. LEATHER NECKLACE, £160, FLEET ILYA

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THIS PAGE VISCOSE TOP, £350, AND MODAL TROUSERS, £488, BOTH BEAUFILLE OPPOSITE PAGE SUEDE JACKET, £199, NEXT. VISCOSE-MIX TOP, £330, FILLES A PAPA

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THIS PAGE BLACK SILK-MIX JACKET, £99.99, AND MATCHING TROUSERS, £49.99, BOTH H&M STUDIO. LILAC SILK TOP WITH TIE, £258, KATE SPADE NEW YORK. METAL GLASSES, £225, CHLOÉ OPPOSITE PAGE WOOL GOWN, £490, MORPHO + LUNA. WOOL JACKET, £365, THE KOOPLES. COTTON TOP, £495, J.W.ANDERSON. WOOL-MIX TROUSERS, £150, LACOSTE

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THIS PAGE BLACK SILK JUMPSUIT, £1,285, MAGDA BUTRYM. WHITE COTTON TOP, £175, SANDRO. BLACK LEATHER SHOES, £200, UNDERGROUND OPPOSITE PAGE COTTON-MIX TOP, £175, CLAUDIE PIERLOT. WOOL SKIRT, £470, LE KILT. VISCOSE TROUSERS (WORN UNDERNEATH), £125, COMPTOIR DES COTONNIERS. LEATHER NECKLACE, AS BEFORE. HAIR: SHIORI TAKAHASHI AT STREETERS. MAKE-UP: SHINOBU AT CLM HAIR & MAKE-UP USING KIEHL’S SINCE 1851. MANICURE: AMI STREETS AT LMC WORLDWIDE. MODEL: VARYA SHUTOVA AT PREMIER MODEL MANAGEMENT

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Photography: Daniel Thomas Smith. Barbara wears: Cotton-mix top, David Koma. Cotton-mix bikini top, Lisa Marie Fernandez. 22ct gold-plate earrings, Dinny Hall.


VIBRANT THING Photography Daniel Thomas Smith Beauty Director Sophie Beresiner Fashion styling Natasha Wray

THIS IS SO MUCH MORE THAN A CATWALK COMEBACK: IT’S A BEAUTY REVOLUTION. CURLS ARE YOUR ROUTE TO INDIVIDUALISM. WEAR THEM YOUR WAY

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Words: Joely Walker.

CURLY HAIR IS A STATE OF MIND


‘ANY HAIR TYPE CAN EMBRACE A WAVE WHEN ARMED WITH THE RIGHT TOOLS’ THIS PAGE COTTON JACKET AND COTTON TOP, BOTH MARQUES’ALMEIDA. 22CT GOLD-PLATED EARRINGS (WORN THROUGHOUT), DINNY HALL AT JOHN LEWIS OPPOSITE PAGE COTTON JACKET, MARQUES’ALMEIDA. COTTON-MIX JACKET AND COTTON-MIX TROUSERS, BOTH ADIDAS AT NEXT. POLY-MIX BRA (JUST SEEN), Y-3. GOLDPLATED EARRINGS, THOMAS SABO


Hair: Syd Hayes for Babyliss at Art+ Commerce. Make-up: Naoko Scintu at The Wall Group using Synthetic de Chanel and Le Lift V-Flash. Manicure: Kate Cutler at Premier Hair and Make-up. Model: Barbara Maldonado at Premier Model Management.

‘THE KEY IS TO FIND A CURL TYPE THAT WORKS FOR YOU AND MAKE IT YOUR OWN’

THIS PAGE WOOL DRESS, LOUIS VUITTON OPPOSITE PAGE COTTON JACKET, MARNI. LYCRA-MIX BODY, LISA MARIE FERNANDEZ. COTTON TROUSERS, MARQUES’ALMEIDA

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IMAAN HAMMAM

and a 23% growth in sales of curlenhancing conditioners. Imagine how different those statistics would have looked 10 years ago when most of us were hell-bent on eradicating the slightest kink in pursuit of the pokerstraight look. Credit should be given to the AW16 catwalks and models such as Mica Arganaraz, Imaan Hammam and Frederikke Sofie for cementing curls as the year’s biggest hair trend, but what sparked it in the first place was much more organic. ‘When there’s such a huge shift like this on the catwalk, it’s almost always reacting to the times, and the times today are all about social interaction and immediacy,’ explains Syd Hayes, Babyliss’ frontman and the curator of the hairstyles on the previous pages. ‘It would be far too coincidental for so many fashion houses to champion natural curls all at once by taking inspiration from anywhere else other than the girl on the street. It’s how we interact now.’ This makes sense: searching for more ways to assert our uniqueness in a world of filters and ‘face tuning’ apps, we gravitate towards a hairstyle that celebrates rather than disguises quirks – and this trickles back down to us via all the usual channels. It trickled down fast: this season, the curl revolution settled in so comfortably that designers cast models specifically for

their curls, and hairstylists were even handing the reigns to the models, asking them to dry/style/tweak their own. Meanwhile, #CurlyHair has notched up 9m posts on Instagram while #StraightHair has just 3m. High demand equals speedy supply, so we’re in the middle of a massive spike in the number of curl-friendly formulations hitting the shelves – all of which are a far cry from the heavy-duty creams that contributed to our crunchy curl options of the past. These products feature advanced formulations with ingredients such as hyaluronic acid and collagen to offer unparalleled condition and control. It’s not just products getting in on the action; Selfridges recently launched the UK’s first Cuts for Curls service – dedicated to girls with curls. You don’t have a head full of natural curls? No bother. Anyone with any hair type can embrace a wave when armed with the right tools. ‘The key is to find a curl type that works for you and make it your own,’ says Syd. ‘Experiment and play around until you find one that reflects your personal style.’ But regardless of whether your curl is natural or customised, you’ll get the same feel-good results. It’s near-impossible not to be buoyed up by a hairstyle that is bouncy by its very nature. Here come the curls.

MICA ARGANARAZ

FREDERIKKE SOFIE

T

he ELLE beauty team makes the trends its business. We arrive on the fashion frontline season after season to fight our way around tiny backstage areas, carefully attuned to every hair flick and brow tweak, following super-stylists as if they were our messiahs. And for these few weeks they are, since they form the next six months of our fashion knowledge, our style cognisance. Except, not so much lately. There has been a notable shift in influencer versus influenced, and it all started with the girl on the street. Today, the models who come in for their catwalk turn are the ones calling the beauty shots, and our conversations backstage are suddenly quite different: ‘We’re embracing hair’s natural texture.’ Wait. What? No twisting up into a nouveau-Eighties romantic punk? No school-esque French girl double pony? ‘Nope. We’re just amping up what they come in with. Every girl is different,’ say the hairstylists. And lo, the curl revolution is upon us – and it’s spreading, too. Everywhere from the shop shelves to our social media feeds, curls have never been more prevalent. No strategically teased, laboredover ringlets here. Instead, it’s heads of naturally quirky, characteristic curls that have stolen the limelight and inspired a new age of beauty that puts individuality first. To prove our point, a survey by Redken claimed that 80% of us would now wake up with curly hair if we could, whereas only 16% would choose straight. Over the past year, feelunique.com reported a 10% increase in curl-styling products

ELLE/NOVEMBER

Words: Joely Walker. Photography: 3 Objectives, Jason Lloyd-Evans.

CURL KIT: 1. REDKEN CURVACEOUS CONDITIONER, £15.50 2. LIVING PROOF CURL ENHANCING STYLING MOUSSE, £22 3. L’ORÉAL PARIS ELVIVE EXTRAORDINARY OIL CURL NOURISHMENT OIL-IN-BALM, £6.99 4. L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL CURL CONTOUR HYDRACELL MASQUE, £11.15 5. FUDGE CURVE RECOVERY SOFT TOUCH CONTOURING FOR CURLY HAIR, £14.95 6. KÉRASTASE DISCIPLINE DEFINITION BOUNCE CURL MOUSSE, £20.90 7. BABYLISS THERMO-CERAMIC ROLLERS, £30 8. BABYLISS CURLING WAND PRO, £25 9. BABYLISS TIGHT CURLS WAND, £25 10. BABYLISS CURL SECRET STYLER, £120


If you knew it took your skin

30 days to recover

from one night’s drinking,

WOULD YOU YOUR HANGOVER SAYS MORE ABOUT YOUR SKIN THAN YOU KNOW. WRITER HANNAH BETTS FOUND OUT THE HARD WAY

Photography David Abrahams

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Additional photography: Shutterstock.

S

ometimes, when I was drinking, my skin would look good – for a while. The next morning, my complexion would boast a fetching plumpness. My lips would be pertly swollen. And, given how these things so often pan out, I might have had a post-coital glow. I came to regard this as a pickled prettiness. ‘Wow,’ I’d think, ‘things could be a lot worse.’ Give it a couple of hours and they invariably were. The plumpness would have given way to a bloated greyness, my pout deflated into bleeding cracks, a parched yet acnethreatening stubble rash emerged, and jet rings set in around my hollowed eyes. And it happens for a reason, says Dr Jairo Rodriguez, New York-based nutritionist to the fashion pack. ‘Alcohol is one of the worst, most aggressive compounds in destroying your skin. I always joke with patients, “If you want to get older, go ahead and drink!”’ Only the older a boozer gets, the less funny this is. London dermatologist Dr Michael Prager tells me: ‘Alcohol is basically sugar, with 50% more calories. A gram of fat has nine kilocalories, carbohydrates have four-and-a-half, and alcohol has seven. Sugar causes glycosylation (the attachment of sugars to proteins), ageing cells and tissues through higher levels of insulin, changes in the DNA and tissue oxidisation. This impacts upon cells in a multitude of ways: it can cause free radical damage, and reduce cell proliferation and collagen production, slowing everything down. ‘Alcohol is also a diuretic: it dehydrates you. You absorb nutrients less successfully and crave salt. In women it changes their hormones, creating higher levels of testosterone, leading to things such as spots and the taking on of a masculine guise, with a diminished waist, barrel-like middle, a bloated face, skinny legs and hair loss.’ Nice. Dr Prager sips green tea even when at London’s Dukes Bar, home of the martini. ‘So many women come and see me in their thirties to ask my advice about ageing,’ he eye rolls. ‘I point out that drink is sabotaging their looks. Then, in their forties, they come back in a panic. There are things that I can do [Dr Prager is known as the ‘Karl Lagerfeld of injectables’]. However, the damage is done.’ According to LA dermatologist Dr Harold Lancer, complexion guru to Scarlett Johansson, Victoria Beck-

ELLE/NOVEMBER

‘FOR MY FIRST WEEK ON THE WAGON, I WAS A NOT-SO-HOTMESS: RED FACED, SPOTS SPROUTING, MY NOSE SHINY WITH DETOXING GUNK’

ham and Kim Kardashian, it can take our skin up to a month to get over a single hangover – bad news as the party season lurches into gear. ‘When you have a hormonal jolt caused by a sugar fest – let’s say, a pizza party – there’s salt, dairy, carbohydrates and alcohol,’ he explains. ‘It will take about 30 days for that to calm down.’ ‘Celebrities don’t have chefs to control their weight – they have them to control their skin. When they’re on active filming, there is zero alcohol. Does this mean you can’t periodically have a glass of red wine? No. It means you can’t have three glasses.’ Meanwhile, he says of the traditional post-hangover fry-up: ‘You might as well paint blemishes on your face.’ Small wonder that those with serious skin goals choose to renounce booze. Personally, after a lifetime of resplendent carousing, I stopped drinking two years ago because I couldn’t sleep. Then, I realised I had an alcohol problem. However, the only thing other people noticed was the effect on my skin. Despite drinking ‘only’ the half-bottle-anight that many women consider normal – more, obviously, when I was on a roll – the impact was seismic. For my first week on the wagon, I was a not-so-hotmess: red faced, spots sprouting, my nose shiny with detoxing gunk. I got conjunctivitis, my tongue was permanently furred and my eyelashes fell out. However, compliments about my skin started pouring in after seven days. By day 10, I was happy to answer the door sans slap. Two weeks in, my cheekbones looked supermodel sharp. Three days later, a man at a party mistook me for 19 (19!) years younger. After a month I glowed, my face had lost its booze bloat, and even my nails were stronger. I also ditched the stone-and-a-half I had put on in six weeks after a spectacularly boozy summer. At this point, I happened to run into Dr Prager, who took one look at me and declared: ‘My God, Betts, you’ve stopped drinking!’ Renouncing the mother’s ruin was the best thing I have ever done for my appearance. Other than hopping into a time machine and preventing a lifetime of sun exposure, nothing is ever going to have the same impact. No serum, no facial, no superfood. (Sorry.) Going on the wagon may be standard in La-La Land. ›

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CURE YOUR HANGOVER FACE Bespoke Hybrid Facial at Michaeljohn Belgravia Medispa, from £150 A 90 minute collagenstimulating laser treatment; a hybrid facial (akin to microdermabrasion cold gel with hyaluronic acid infusing powers), followed by light therapy to propel product deep into hungover complexions. The Hangover Herbie at Bliss Spa, £195 A 105-minute reboot with a herbal body wrap, skin-saving face mask, a 15-minute foot massage, anti-migraine massage, and an electrolyte-rich fresh fruit smoothie. Hangover Infusion at Harvey Nichols’ Beauty Lounge, £147 A 60-minute IV drip containing vitamins, trace minerals, and antioxidants. The theory is that, by bypassing your digestive system, absorption occurs with instant effect.

Polisher with Fruit Extracts (£26); the fruit enzymes exfoliate even if you lack the energy to scour. I’d then deploy a Sisley Eye Contour Mask (£81.50) for a hydration hit. The Guerlain Midnight Secret Late Night Recovery Treatment (£69) – ‘sleep in a jar’ – worked its magic, although I used it pre-make-up, not the night before. Becca Shimmering Skin Perfector Liquid (£34) supplied fauxdewiness, panda eyes were concealed with Bobbi Brown’s Creamy Concealer (£19.50), and a constant lip balm supply was always to hand. Where a hangover once ‘needed’ flat Coke, now it wants coconut water, which is rich in electrolytes. Nutritionist Vicki Edgson advises: ‘Being hydrated is the key to skin repair. Drink water and avoid excess caffeine, which dehydrates it further. Have cinnamon or cayenne pepper in hot water – these are antioxidants, which can protect the organs and immunity. ‘Olive, walnut, pumpkin- and hempseed oils are rich in omega-3, -6 and -9 to help repair skin-cell damage. Avoid red meat – fish and eggs are the best animal proteins for reducing drink damage, being rich in choline that supports the liver.’ Dr Bunting favours wholegrain toast and honey as her morning-after restorative. She also proposes ‘an antioxidantrich green juice containing leafy spinach, stomach-settling ginger and vitamin Arich carrots.’ And, no, you’re not allowed a vodka shot in that. Q

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1. ORIGINS SKIN-BRIGHTENING FACE POLISHER WITH FRUIT EXTRACTS, £26 2. SISLEY EYE CONTOUR MASK, £81.50 3. BOBBI BROWN SOOTHING CLEANSING OIL, £32 4. BECCA SHIMMERING SKIN PERFECTOR LIQUID, £34 5. GARNIER SKINACTIVE MOISTURE BOMB TISSUE MASK, £1.49 6. CLARISONIC ARIA FACE BRUSH, £155 7. BOBBI BROWN CREAMY CONCEALER, £19.50

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DAMAGE LIMITATION The clearer the drink, the less vicious the hangover. Think vodka, gin and tequila rather than rum or scotch. Or enjoy a glass of red wine, which features resveratrol, a potent antioxidant. One drink each evening is preferable to binge drinking as the liver has problems metabolising big hits of alcohol. If you’re having more than one, then take it with food and have a glass of water between drinks. Nutritionist Ian Marber recommends: ‘Before you go to bed, eat a couple of mouthfuls of plain yoghurt, some diluted apple juice, and a 200mg magnesium tablet. A little protein and fat helps to balance glucose levels, while magnesium helps to offset the adrenalin hike that can wake you at 4am.’ ELLE/NOVEMBER

Photography: 3 Objectives. *drinkaware.co.uk/alcohol-facts

Here in boozy Britain, it continues to be viewed as a puritanical move too far. Government guidelines released in January this year proposed no more than 14 units a week – the equivalent of about seven 175ml glasses of wine*. Experts also suggest a three- or four-day gap between bouts to give the system a break. Skin-salve-wise, Harley Street dermatologist Dr Sam Bunting, heroine of YouTube channel Dr Sam In The City, counsels: ‘However excessive the night, try to remove make-up, even if that means micellar water on a cotton pad. Then use a retinoid, which will lessen the effects of alcohol by stimulating skin to renew and repair, leading to a brighter, glowier complexion than you deserve. ‘Intensify hydration in the morning by applying a moisturising sheet mask – the occlusion effect encourages the ingredients to penetrate more effectively. If used straight from the fridge, it will have the added benefit of reducing redness. Keep make-up light and dewy, apply brightening eye drops, and you may just get away with it.’ My personal kit – based on 30 years’ hard partying – featured water, liver-easing milk thistle tablets, and face wipes by the bed in the hope I had some motor control. Next morning, I’d whisk my trusty Clarisonic Aria (£155) over my skin, plus Bobbi Brown’s Soothing Cleansing Oil (£32). If this was too much effort, I’d apply a mask of Origins Never A Dull Moment Skin-Brightening Face


Beauty Movement

CRYSTAL CLEAR This kind of healing is so much more than ‘ohm’-ing over your rose quartz. Now it helps your skin, too Photography Jess Bonham

A DECADE AGO, MOST OF US would have scoffed at the idea of using crystals to realign our energy for better skin, but the wellness boom has made us less sceptical and heralded a new wave of gemstonebased products. However, new age brands can’t take all the credit – these stones have been used for beautifying and healing for centuries. Why? ‘Crystals vibrate at an elevated frequency, promoting increased cellular energy and microcirculation,’ explains Kristin Petrovich, Founder of holistic-meets-biotechnical skincare brand Själ. ‘This helps direct energy to specific areas of need, allowing for maximum performance and benefits.’ And while you’re at it, let your skincare boost your mind, too: ‘Using the correct gemstone helps to balance and stabilise our moods,’ adds Co-Founder of Prismologie, Fatima Al-Sabah, whose products incorporate crushed gemstones. Spiritual skincare just stepped up, and we want to reap the good vibes. Words: Joely Walker.

TRY THESE: PRISMOLOGIE BODY BALM WITH ROSE QUARTZ, £55. GOLDFADEN MD DOCTOR’S SCRUB RUBY CRYSTAL MICRODERM EXFOLIATOR, £65. SJÄL SAPHIR CONCENTRATE FACE OIL, £117

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Beauty CV

meditation. Give me a pen and paper, my favourite music and a good cup of tea, and for a couple of hours or so the world is quite a nice place.

ANTHONY TURNER

DREAM JOB

International session stylist and backstage legend, Anthony’s creative flair and attention to detail know no bounds (although he’s extremely modest about it). No wonder he’s the go-to for designers from Erdem to J.W.Anderson PROFESSION (AS ON PASSPORT)

SIGNATURE SKILL

Hairstylist. My bags often get searched at the airport, and it’s always amusing to see the face of the official who opens up my wig bag.

I’m inspired by artists such as Mark Ryden, Vania Zouravliov and Ray Ceasar, and their influence very frequently trickles into my work. I also make a killer cheese and beans on toast!

To be designing hairstyles for a movie – Pan’s Labyrinth comes to mind. I could flex my creative muscles and get carried away with the absolute fantasy of it all.

PLAN B CAREER When I was younger, I really wanted to be a horror-movie director. I was that kid who sat at the back of the class with long hair over my face, doodling bats on the back of textbooks. Gothic theatricality filters into my work.

BIG BREAK Being taken on by the prestigious Art Partner agency. To be included on a roster of insanely talented photographers such as Glen Luchford and Mario Sorrenti, whose work I would tear out and stick on my bedroom wall when I was a teen, is quite overwhelming. My agent Ayesha really is my fairy godmother.

Compiled by: Joely Walker. Photography: Instagram/AnthonyTurner.

CURRENT JOB As a full-time session stylist, my day-to-day involves everything from creating hair looks backstage at fashion week to advertising campaigns and magazine editorial shoots. I work with the most incredibly inspiring people, from designers and photographers to stylists, make-up artists and models, so every day brings new challenges and opportunities.

Above: A gothicinspired hairstyle sketch by Anthony (@anthonyturnerhair)

ELLE/NOVEMBER

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CAREER HIGH The moment that was a real milestone for me personally was having the pleasure of working with Cate Blanchett. She is someone I hugely admire.

INDUSTRY IDOL Guido [legendary hairstylist], of course! I followed him as a stylist from a young age, and I wouldn’t be where I am without him. Working with him was one of the best times of my life.

Clockwise from top: Anthony’s work

WHO’S THE NEXT BIG THING

6 KIT ESSENTIALS

Girlacne, a make-up artist I was introduced to via Instagram (@girlacne). Insanely talented.

HOBBIES AND INTERESTS Drawing is my main hobby. I’ve been doing it for as long as I can remember, and it acts as a form of

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1. L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL TECNI. ART PLI, £10.40. 2. BABYLISS PRO 32MM CURLING TONG, £50. 3. BUMBLE AND BUMBLE SURF SPRAY, £22. 4. L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL INFINIUM HAIRSPRAY, £5.80 5. JUNIOR MASON PEARSON BRUSH, £69. 6. L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL TECNI.ART MORNING AFTER DUST, £10.99.

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Sophie Says

CHEMOTHERAPY. The bastard. As if

Photography: Seb Engelmann, Graham Walser at Hearst Studios.

cancer wasn’t bad enough already, I also had to lose every hair on my body, to varying degrees of acceptance. Legs: WAHOO! No more waxing, flippy summer skirts at the drop of a hat! Bikini line and underarms: Likewise! Arms: Hmm, kind of strange. Slightly prepubescent, a big deal for me – it’ll grow out. Of course, I work in an industry where hair is big business, huge. but OK, I can deal. Eyebrows: oh well, there are eyebrow pencils and skills in my remit for that. Eyelashes: woah. Wait. What? I can’t stick false lashes on with nothing to anchor them to? Bigger focus on lips will partially compensate. Head: but, but… but my hair is my thing. It’s how people describe me first. ‘Sophie Beresiner? You know, long, curly brown hair?’ It’s my comfort blanket, my style versatility, my, well, my beauty. And I’m going to be without it for the foreseeable future. I went all in and shaved it off before the risk of clumps gathering sadly on my pillow presented itself. I didn’t look in a mirror for a good few days and when I did, I just did not look like me. I totally felt like me, but for that reason my reflection gave me a shock every time. But what is more important? The me I know about – the constant, familiar, stubborn, internal me? Or the changeable image of me? It took me a good while to realise it, but losing all my hair at 31 years old taught me a very important lesson: I am not defined by my hair. Now, five years later, I have a much more transient relationship with it. We’re not hugely committed to one another. Yes, we like each other, but I can be on my own if I have to. The boss making me dye it bright orange for a feature, say, is never

TRY IT OUT NOW SKINCEUTICALS (MY FAVOURITE)

Sophie Beresiner ELLE Beauty Director @ElleSophie

So imagine my surprise at getting a call from ghd. ‘Hi Sophie, we wondered if you’d be interested in working with us and Breast Cancer Now on a video tutorial campaign about hair loss through treatment?’ Me: ‘ghd? Don’t you need hair to use ghds?’ But then I remembered how I had relied on the mini straightening wand to tackle my own curly crop when it finally reappeared. How I alternated between sleeping in a head wrap and then teasing lengths of it with tongs once ‘I WENT ALL IN AND SHAVED IT it was a little longer. How I learned to OFF BEFORE THE cheat eyelashes and draw on a ‘happy’ RISK OF CLUMPS eyebrow where, had there been hair, it GATHERING SADLY would’ve been distinctly frownier. ON MY PILLOW So years later, I imparted my trialPRESENTED ITSELF’ and-error wisdom for the ghd pink campaign, showing my model Alex how to map her eyebrows and smudge kohl on her lashline to suggest lash-shadows. This was an opportunity to put my beauty knowledge to its best ever use. Women who live with cancer and its image-altering effects do not suddenly haemorrhage all style or interest in it, so where YouTube vloggers and the NHS (for all its brilliance, eyelashes come way down the priority list) fall short, it’s OK to worry about your looks in a time of illness, and this is the place to do it.

PHYTO CORRECTIVE MASQUE, £55, IS A COOL-

ING ANTI-REDNESS GODSEND. GHD PINK, £135 WITH 10% DONATED TO BREAST CANCER NOW = BIG TICK. CHARLOTTE TILBURY SCENT OF A DREAM, £68 FOR 50ML, IS LITERALLY SEX IN A PERFUME BOTTLE. ALMOST.

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Beauty CHANEL

TRIAL A TREND THETREND Anotherday,another internethaircraze. Denimhairhasquickly gainedcultstatus anditssuccessisall downtothedetail:less marinemermaid,more multi-tonalshadesof stonewasheddenim stippledwithsubtle silveryhighlights.It’s alwayscool,nevercute.

Oribe Glaze for Beautiful Color, £51

THERESULT

DENIM HAIR

‘It’smuchmorewearable thanIinitiallyexpected –awashed-outdenim ratherthanfullon blue,whichI’mtoldis downtothespecialised L’OréalProfessionnel dye.I’vealready bookedinformynext appointmentandI’m eventoyingwiththeidea ofgoingpermanent.’ DIFFICULTY RATING: 3/5

Compiled by: Joely Walker. Photography: Getty, Jason Lloyd-Evans, Instagram/KylieJenner, Instagram/LouTeasdale.

AS SEEN: ALL OVER OUR SOCIAL MEDIA FEEDS

Instagram’s latest hair obsession will have you donning double denim in an entirely different way. And, when done right, it’s one of the most flattering bold hair colours going THETRIAL ELLE’sSeniorDesigner, ElizabethCooneysays: ‘Intriguetempered withfearledmetoa consultationwithatop colouristatPercy& ReedwhereIdecided onasemi-permanent ombreeffect:dark rootsblendedwithcool ashentipsandpeppered withbluehighlights.’

ELLE/NOVEMBER

Anyone brave enough to try this at home? Bleach Super Cool Colour Washed Up Mermaid, £5, is noncommittal and comes out in around six to 10 washes, depending on your base colour.

‘L’Oréal Professionnel Série Expert Vitamino Color Masque, £13.99, has successfully kept my hair glossy throughout the whole colour transformation.’

‘The aim is to keep my colour from fading for as long as possible, so I’m washing my hair every other day with Percy & Reed Really Rather Radiant Divine Shine Shampoo, £14, and Conditioner, £16. Then I follow it with Wella Colour Protection Serum, £13.49, from my mid-lengths to ends.’

‘L’Oréal Paris Elvive Colour Protect Day Cream, £6.99, has UV filters to prevent fading, but is still so light that you can use it everyday.’

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Beauty Moment

HIGH CONTRAST STEP AWAY from your conventional make-up ideals. The most in-demand colours to covet right now are a little bit off. Brave, bold and unapologetically unusual, this is make-up that appeals to your Instagram feed first. On your face? Lilac will boost a tan, yellow is warming, and orange is universally flattering. And green? Well, it will get you noticed.

Words: Sophie Beresiner.

Photography Eva Roovers

EYES ILLAMASQUA POWDER EYESHADOWS IN CANCAN (LILAC), VULGAR (ORANGE), ANJA (BLUE) AND PIVOT (GREEN), £16.50 EACH LIPS ROUGE DIOR PASTEL MATTE LIPSTICKS IN CLOVER (GREEN), CLOUDY (LILAC), SUNNY (YELLOW), AND TENDER (ORANGE), £26.50 EACH. LIMITED EDITION, EXCLUSIVELY AVAILABLE AT SELFRIDGES

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Chanel is on a mission to infiltrate our beauty bag every month with yet another launch we can’t do without. This achieves the most glow-giving coverage you could ask for.

‘A LIPSTICK-FOUNDATION HYBRID. IMAGINE HOW RICH AND COMFORTABLE AND PIGMENTED IT WOULD BE’

Billed as a multitalented bronzing palette, we’ve tried it and we concur. Naturally warming.

Chanel Sublimage Le Teint Foundation, £98

Finally! Benefit, what took you so long? Creating a specialised bullet that has both a liner and a lipstick in one means all is forgiven, though.

Maybelline NY Bricks Bronzer in Blondes, £7.99

Having tried a lot of these contouring glowsticks, we can conclude that every make-up bag needs one. Creamy, light-reflecting, fun perfection.

Benefit They’re Real Big Sexy Lip Kit, £24.50

Another essential: we have to have this powder, bronzer, blush and highlighter complexion-flattering set in its never-beforereleased shades of ambient light.

MAKE-UP

Topshop Glow Stick in Play Up, £10

Hybrids, timesavers and ingenious innovations

A lipstick-foundation hybrid. Think about that for a minute. Imagine how rich and comfortable and longlasting and pigmented it would be. Clever Armani, very clever.

If you like everything in one place, then a pressed eyeshadow, liner and highlighter kit is going to rock your world.

Giorgio Armani Lip Magnets, £27 each

Rimmel London Magnif’eyes Styling Eyeshadow Palette, £7.99

La Mer’s The Powder, which is magnetically attracted to your skin, by the way, is as luxuriant and perfecting as you’d expect. You get what you pay for. La Mer The Powder, £65

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Compiled by: Sophie Beresiner, Joely Walker. Photography: 3 Objectives, Jason Lloyd-Evans.

Hourglass The Magic Hour Surreal Light Palette, £69


Beauty Directory For anyone (everyone) who is afraid of putting oil in their hair, this dry oil finishing spray conditions, gives an instant boost and makes it really soft.

You might think your travel hairdryer is perfectly fine thanks, but you haven’t tried this one yet.

Bumble and Bumble Invisible Oil Dry Oil Finishing Spray, £25

GHD Copper Luxe Travel Hairdryer, £49

The answer to peroxide woes or any damaging hair colourant because adding this protects the hair bonds and you can do it at home, too.

A fine-hair miracle worker (because it has different conditioning needs) – no heavy conditioning worries here. Pantene Pro V Airlight in-shower Foam Conditioner, £3.99

L’Oréal Professionnel Smartbond Conditioner, £16.49

HAIR Shape, style and super-boost ‘FOR ANYONE (EVERYONE) WHO IS AFRAID OF PUTTING OIL IN THEIR HAIR, BUMBLE INVISIBLE OIL IS GAME-CHANGING’

Charles, you had us at ‘all week’. This means fewer laborious blow-dries, which means more sleep.

Show Beauty Sublime Repair Treatment Mask, £40 at Selfridges

Charles Worthington Smooth & Control Sleek All Week, £6.99

Your scalp needs skincare just like the rest of your face, so exfoliating it gently and naturally can only be good for your hair growth.

We’re calling it: mousse is having another moment. For more structured styling that still moves.

Christophe Robin Cleansing Purifying Scrub With Sea Salt, £39

L’Oréal Paris Elnett Crème De Mousse Volume & Strong Hold, £5.99

ELLE/NOVEMBER

Like a quinoa and pea protein shake but for your hair. Super-boosting, nourishes from within and it builds tensile strength resulting in glossy locks. ›

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Beauty Directory ‘THIS SMELLS LIKE THE FANCIEST BONFIRE PARTY WE’VE NEVER BEEN INVITED TO: RESIN-LACED TREE TRUNKS AND SMOKY EMBERS’

Expect to see a lot more of D.S & Durga – the impossibly cool Brooklyn-born brand that has a knack for creating sophisticated, yet totally unexpected scents. Salt spray and lemon oil make this rose interpretation a unique one.

Rag & Bone does pretty androgyny excellently, so the fact it’s branching out into perfume with new scents that embody that aesthetic pleases us greatly. We love the smokiness of Encens.

This smells like the fanciest bonfire party we’ve never been invited to: resin-laced tree trunks and smoky embers. Obviously, such craftsmanship deserves an equally fancy bottle.

Rag & Bone Encens, £95

L’Artisan Parfumeur 26 Tenebrae, £140, exclusive to Selfridges

You’ll assume this is the original classic that launched eight years ago, but no. Subtle changes make this new variation richer, softer and that bit sexier, in the same carefree Chloé way.

D.S & Durga Rose Atlantic, £175 for 100ml exclusive to Liberty

Chloé Fleur Eau De Parfum, £65

FRAGRANCE Fresh, fruity, musky, mossy Tom Ford has dedicated a trio of new scents to those drawn to the fresh, earthy, unisex vibes of ‘green’ fragrances, which range from deep, grassy and smoky to mossy, light and lingering.

Photography: 3 Objectives, Jason Lloyd-Evans.

Tom Ford Vert Des Bois, Vert Bohème, and Vert d’Encens, £148 each for 50ml

If original Modern Muse is your daily go-to, consider this your evening scent. Creamier, darker but with the same musk and jasmine base.

The perfume equivalent of wrapping up in a Bella Freud slogan jumper, wearing this will result in a similar influx of compliments. Thank the mood-boosting mix of uplifting neroli, warming oud and soft sandalwood. ›

Estée Lauder Modern Muse Nuit, £70 for 50ml

Fruity at first sniff (that’ll be the raspberry), it then gives way to a much muskier base that works equally well with jeans and a biker jacket as it does with sharp tailoring.

Bella Freud Close To My Heart, £95 for 50ml at Fenwick

Coach The Fragrance, £49 for 50ml, £69 for 90ml

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Beauty Directory As close as you’ll get to finding that skin-smoothing Snapchat filter in a daily moisturiser – pore blurring, oil controlling and skin perfecting. Not only does this antioxidant-rich mask leave skin glowing, but it’s extremely satisfying to use. Mix the powder with water until it turns into a slightly fizzy foam, and slather on. Origins Rituali Tea Matcha Madness Revitalizing Powder Face Mask, £30

Clinique PepStart Hydroblur Moisturizer, £24.50

Shiseido is known for results-driven formulas, so this advanced antiageing, tech-savvy formulation is exciting stuff. Expect betterlooking skin as a prerequisite. Shiseido Bio-Performance LiftDynamic Cream, £90

SKIN & BODY

A proper cleanse sets your face up for everything you apply after, so you want to make sure you’re doing it right. This uses grapeseed oil to gently get rid of everything you want gone, while leaving skin feeling lovely and silky. Simple Hydrating Cleansing Oil, £6.99

Gently nuture and nourish

Bobbi Brown Extra Repair Nourishing Milk, £54

Fun fact of the day: most recycled plastic is rejected by manufacturers because of the green tint from milk bottle caps. That’s why all Soaper Duper has embraced the green shade. Environmentally friendly, this also leaves skin so supple you’ll want to bulk buy. Soaper Duper Fruity Green Tuberose Body Lotion, £8.50, at Liberty

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Sarah Chapman Skinesis Lash Boosting Eye Cleanse, £32

The original sleep spray is equal parts cult classic and godsend, so we needed no convincing with this diffuser, which radiates droplets of the same sleep-inducing oils into the air. Q This Works Deep Sleep Super Blend, £18, and Diffuser, £55, each sold separately

‘THIS WORKS SLEEP SPRAY IS A GODSEND, SO WE NEEDED NO CONVINCING WITH THE DIFFUSER’ ELLE/NOVEMBER

Photography: 3 Objectives, Jason Lloyd-Evans.

Instant benefits and long-term gains? We like the sound of that. Rapidly hydrating, this works on boosting the skin’s natural repair process over time, too.

An eye make-up remover that conditions lashes and brows so they grow thicker and healthier is the work of the beauty gods. Or, rather, super facialist, Sarah Chapman.


Fit Notes

GET COMFORTABLE WITH BEING UNCOMFORTABLE. OK – you put the hours

Photography: Georgia Devey Smith.

into your workout and it has paid dividends. You got good at it. Feels great, doesn’t it? But taking it to the next level feels even better. I won’t lie: it will hurt and that not-good-enough feeling might start creeping in, but pushing your limits is vital. Until you do, you’ll never know your full potential cheerleader. Find a mantra that works for in fitness or in life. you – I use, ‘I can. I am. I will. I do.’ Repeat it in your head as you push through the hardest During the course of any workout regime, you will part of your workout. plateau. Stepping up the pace, weight or intensity 3. Acknowledge it Learn to embrace sore, might feel like the last thing you want to do but, by wobbly muscles and sweat. Heck, feel thankful for doing so, you teach your body that discomfort is the them. That burn is your body noticing you’re putting key to breaking your fitness barrier. in extra effort. Once you realise that you’re feeling During the Olympics, you didn’t watch the it and still going, you can push through it. athletes finishing in breathless heaps and think, Acclimatising yourself to ‘Well, that looked like a cakewalk!’ They discomfort gives you the tools to got to the start line after years of testing ‘WHEN YOU STOP both their bodies and their mental TELLING YOURSELF manage tough situations in your everyday life. By achieving something limits, and, importantly, allowing YOU CAN’T DO themselves to fail. So what stops us THINGS, YOU LEARN you never thought you could fitnessfrom doing this? We’re scared of not YOUR POTENTIAL IS wise, all of a sudden it’s a lot harder to make excuses when it comes to being good enough. But you will never TRULY LIMITLESS’ other things you find challenging. know your true potential until you When you stop telling yourself you can’t do experience difficulty. So how do you do this? Read on: something and become more willing to take risks, 1. Baby steps Don’t try to do too much too soon. you learn that your potential is truly limitless. Aside from that being a pretty sure path to failure, Our whole lives are set up for us to be you’re also likely to injure yourself. If you want to improve your half-marathon time but all your training comfortable. There’s an app for everything now, to eliminate excessive effort for even the simplest sessions are steady-paced distance runs, add speed task. But I challenge you to bet on yourself, and work with sprint intervals and hills. Find a take the risk, push a little harder and go a little beginner-level workout and build it up. further. Don’t deny yourself the opportunity 2. It’s all in the mind Your brain will always give to find out exactly how amazing you can be. up before your body does, so you have to be your own

3 THINGS THAT HAVE INSPIRED ME 1. I AM NOT YOUR GURU,

Bangs AKA Muireann Carey-Campbell ELLE’s Fitness Columnist is a spinning instructor and fitness blogger. Read more of her motivational writing at elleuk.com

A DOCUMENTARY ABOUT SELF

-HELP AUTHOR TONY ROBBINS – HITS YOU RIGHT IN THE FEELS. 2. GOOD VIBE TRIBE TANK TOP BY SPIRITUAL GANGSTER, £35. 3. GREEN MACHINE PROTEIN SHAKE FROM BOOM CYCLE – THE PERFECT PICK-ME-UP.

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Fit Notes WORK IT OUT Team ELLE tests the latest workouts and gives you an honest verdict. This month: Animal Flow Words Natasha Bird

The kit Sweat bands, contour-hugging leggings and no-budge tops: this is the workout gear you need to release the beast 1. BANGS BACK HEADWRAP, £20, LULULEMON 2. SUPERIOR WORKOUT CROP TOP, £50, SWEATY BETTY 3. HIGH LINE LEGGINGS, £70, MANDUKA AT YOGAMATTERS 4. REFLECT 800ML WATER BOTTLE, £26, KLEAN KANTEEN 5. ULTRA BOOST SHOES, £169.95, ADIDAS BY STELLA McCARTNEY

WHAT IS IT? Think yoga, but more primal.

Ingredients (serves two) 1 mango (fresh or frozen) 1 frozen banana 1 avocado 1 large handful of spinach 200ml almond milk Suggested toppings: coconut flakes, seeds, nuts, granola, dried or fresh fruit Method Place the ingredients into a blender and whizz until smooth. Pour into two bowls, add toppings and eat. If you want to drink it, add almond milk until you get your desired consistency.

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DO YOU NEED TO BE SUPER FIT TO DO IT?

Team ELLE picked up the moves pretty quickly, and the routines were simple and instinctive. If you’ve done pilates or yoga before, and the odd press-up, you’ll be fine. IS IT ACTUALLY ENJOYABLE? Let’s be frank: we had to pretend to be monkeys in one of London’s busiest parks. But once you block out tourists’ stares, it’s easy to get into the athleticism and acrobatics of the whole thing. BEST THING ABOUT IT? It’s hard not to feel happy when you’re rolling around in the grass doing cartwheels and crab walks. AND THE WORST? At points it felt like an am-dram improv class.

Compiled by: Fern Ross. Photography: Ester Grass Vergara, Graham Walser at Hearst Studios.

Soul food YOGA TEACHER, PERSONAL TRAINER, WELLNESS BLOGGER AND LULULEMON AMBASSADOR ANNIE CLARKE, AKA MINDBODYBOWL.CO.UK, SHARES A POST-WORKOUT RECIPE: MANGO AND AVOCADO SMOOTHIE BOWL

With moves such as ‘basic beast’ (on all fours with your knees slightly off the ground) and ‘scorpion’ (a downward dog but with one leg stretching upwards, bent at the knee), the animal-esque postures are designed to increase flexibility, mobility and strength. HOW MUCH DOES IT COST? £16 a class at Local Motion in Wandsworth, London. HOW DOES IT WORK? Animal Flow is all about continuous movement, leveraging your body weight with your core muscles and transitioning into a series of key positions while staying close to the ground. WHAT DOES IT DO? This one is a great all-rounder. The more you do it, the more physically aware you become: strong and coordinated with better posture.

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WOULD YOU DO IT AGAIN?

I might not adopt the Animal Flow lifestyle, but I’d happily give it another go. For more information and to find your nearest class, visit animalflow.com

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‘IT’S HARD NOT TO FEEL HAPPY WHEN YOU’RE ROLLING AROUND IN THE GRASS DOING CRAB WALKS’

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very year, I have a tantrum over my tax return. To the casual observer, I may look like a grown-up but even when you have a job, a bank account and you’ve started using eye cream, you’re capable of kicking off when your emotional response goes beyond reason – punching a pillow, pounding the treadmill until it shakes, sobbing into your MacBook Air. Tax, I have realised, is my trigger. It presses all my childhood-fear buttons: maths, making a mistake, getting ‘in trouble’ with some distant authority. I can’t trace these triggers back to my parents, so I guess I acquired them at primary school. It was an oddly old-fashioned school for the Nineties, run by a Maggie Thatcher lookalike called Miss ByrneCooper. There was a draconian emphasis on being neat, obedient and ladylike. Anything rowdy, eccentric or messy was unwelcome – we even had to walk ‘in a genteel and orderly fashion’. Maths was the one subject that didn’t come naturally to me. I hated not being good at something. Most of all, I feared getting ‘told off’. Psychologists call this kind of recurring baggage our Inner Child. It’s the fragile, vulnerable part of us that adapted to fit our childhood, and repeats those patterns into adulthood. She may whisper in your ear that you need to be ‘a good girl’ to be accepted, sabotage a job interview by convincing you to get drunk the night before, or destroy relationships by demanding incessant reassurance. We all sit on a spectrum of how far our Inner Child ›

E Photography: Sonny Vandevelde.

Whether it’s the spoiled brat demanding attention or the perfectionist seeking reassurance, there’s a six year old in all of us, and accepting her might be the secret to happiness Words Francesca Hornak

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dominates our adult behaviour, depending on how our needs were met in childhood. If we had secure childhoods, we’re unlikely to be dogged by a tricky Inner Child. If not, she may still ‘drive the bus’. And I want to know how I can make this work to my advantage, personally and professionally. I start by putting my tax phobia to psychologist Glenys Yaffe, author of Self-esteem And Your Inner Child. ‘Your fears might well fit with the Inner Child model’, she agrees. ‘What we call our Inner Critical Parent stems from our childhood environment – usually our parents but also teachers. This might have been via blatant criticism, or it might have been our subtle awareness of expectations. Or the good girl may have learned that she got approval through doing well at school. In your case, the external authority figure has now been replaced by your own critical internal authority, so you experience your Vulnerable Inner Child in the form of anxiety when you do your tax.’ Looking at it like this, I can see other ways that my school shaped me, despite mostly happy times there. It was a bubble of privilege, so much so that it wasn’t unusual to be collected by a driver. Knowing no better, I thought I was odd for breaking this mould. I remember coveting my classmates’ diamanté-studded underwear when we changed for gym, and pulling off my hand-me-down, grim grey vests from my brother before they could be seen. One even had a mortifying ink stain. I’m sure this sense of not measuring up made me preoccupied with pristine femininity for years afterwards. As a novice journalist, I wrote about fashion and beauty despite my heart not being in it. I thought the key to alluring men was to be immaculate (down to perfect underwear). It wasn’t, of course, but it didn’t even stop me when my first boyfriend said, ‘I don’t want the perfect girlfriend, I want you.’ Still I know that, comparatively, I got off lightly. One of my dearest friends lost her father when she was 10. Not surprisingly, her romantic relationships with men have been shaped by a fear of the man vanishing. Sometimes, she chooses someone she isn’t into, so there’s less at stake. It doesn’t take Freud to see how a bereaved Inner Child rules her heart. Another friend acknowledges that ‘feeling like a disappointment’ to her parents has hampered her career, making her deliberately underachieve to meet their low expectations. Another suspects that her distant mother has made her ultra-needy – testing friendships by sending SOS texts at 2am, or crying on third dates to see how the man responds. Not very well, as a rule. But the Inner Child can help as well as hinder.

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CHILD’S PLAY How to make your Inner Child work for you by Susan Krauss Whitbourne, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst

VULNERABLE In childhood, you may have experienced criticism or neglect that left you feeling weak. As an adult, tap into this Inner Child to see why you may overreact to criticism or seek approval. Focus on your strengths, not flaws, and aim to get rid of that harsh inner voice as you shore up your sense of self-worth.

CREATIVE The Creative Inner Child is unbounded by daily life. If, for example, you were a musical child, but now find you can’t play without sheet music, try banging out a tune you know well. Give yourself the freedom to improvise, channel the Creative Inner Child and tap into your talents.

SPIRITUAL The practice of mindfulness comes naturally to children but as adults we forget how much of our past we bring to bear on what’s going on in the moment. To return to your spiritual Inner Child, stop and examine each experience for what it is, instead of the way you expect it to be.

PLAYFUL As adults, we don’t ‘play’ with the kind of abandon we did as children. Free yourself from your preoccupations and sit down to play with a young child, or find someone to play frisbee with. By immersing yourself in play even for a little while, you’ll be able to return to your obligations with a renewed spirit.

‘Our Creative Inner Child is important,’ says Yaffe. ‘If we can retain a child’s immersion in creativity and focus on the task itself rather than the end product, we get greater enjoyment. Our Playful Inner Child is our sense of fun. It’s important in work, friendships, intimate relationships and sexuality. Our Spiritual Inner Child is our experience of awe: appreciating beautiful music or nature. Being present enhances our appreciation of living.’ My theory is that the years between seven and 10 hold the key to adult happiness. At that age we are fully formed, but puberty has yet to quash our enthusiasms with self-consciousness. For me, aged nine, my pride and joy was a huge, meticulously furnished dolls’ house. Every day I arranged it with an obsessive, all-consuming delight, oblivious to time, pins and needles and the homework I should have been doing. But in my teens, I abandoned the dolls’ house and replaced it with things I felt I ‘should’ enjoy – parties, drinking, smoking, water-skiing – anything to prove I wasn’t that cautious little girl immersed in her miniature world. A decade later, I moved into my first flat. It was a revelation. As I did it up, all alone, I felt the same giddy joy that I had arranging my dolls’ house all those years ago. I also realised that I hadn’t felt this happy in years. It was only then, at 27, that I let my Inner Child back in. I finally accepted that I prefer a weekend to myself, seeing friends oneon-one or just hanging pictures, to a party. At 31, I wrote a book, having previously shunned fiction as ‘less glamorous’ than magazines, and finally felt fulfilled at work. No surprise, considering I was always writing stories as a child, but it’s not necessarily about re-enacting our childhood hobbies. It’s just that, if you can find adult equivalents of your childhood passions, they’ll probably make you happier than Instagram, Tinder, yoga or whatever it is you feel you ‘should’ enjoy today. All of which reminds me of the day, aged 11, I was summoned to the headmistress’s office for ‘a little talk’. ‘Francesca,’ she said. ‘I’d like to discuss your habit of leaving things to the last minute. I know it serves you well now, but in future, you’ll need to be more methodical.’ She had a point. Doing all my homework at 5am was rash (if quite Sheryl Sandberg). It worked for me then, and has continued to work ever since. So I’m afraid, Miss Byrne-Cooper, I still haven’t taken your advice. I’ve just finished writing this at 6.50am, and I’m wearing a grubby T-shirt of my husband’s. So much for pristine femininity. Maybe some things never change.Q History Of The World In 100 Modern Objects by Francesca Hornak is out now (Portico, £12.99)

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Photography: Sonny Vandevelde.

INNER YOU


ELLE PROMOTION

INTO THE BLUE Legendary comfort and fit, beautifully updated for a/w 2016 – introducing the new collection from Triumph SOME THINGS JUST WORK. THE CLASSIC ‘Amourette’ bra by Triumph is surely one of those. Luxurious stretch lace crafted for ultimate comfort and fit – no wonder it’s been a favourite for women all over the world for decades. Now the classic ‘Amourette 300’ bra (as seen on Daisy Lowe, right) is also available featuring Triumph’s innovative Magic Wire technology, or as a minimiser – perfect fit and maximum style points, whatever the occasion. Find out more at triumph.com; and learn how to get your perfect fit with #findtheone

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ELLE EVENT

THE CLOTHES SHOW IN ASSOCIATION WITH ALCATEL Britain’s largest fashion festival, The Clothes Show in association with Alcatel, is back with five days of catwalk shows, beauty demos, talks from industry experts, shopping from more than 350 brands, and meet and greets with your favourite celebrities. It’s returning to the NEC Birmingham from 2-6 December 2016.

FASHION, HAIR AND BEAUTY Stroll along Boutique Boulevard, where you’ll find pop-up stores, such as Sugarhill Boutique and Lavish Alice. The Designer Outlet is back with the most sought-after labels and the famous Hair and Beauty Hall will give you the chance to stock up on the best brands, including Rimmel, Elemis, Barry M and Lee Stafford.

Photography: The Alcatel Fashion Theatre at The Clothes Show/Justin Glynn.

ALCATEL FASHION THEATRE Take a seat to watch the reinvented catwalk show, Rock The Runway, a music-meets-fashion performance with more than 40 models and dancers. Presenter Laura Whitmore will host alongside Made In Chelsea’s Jamie Laing, and TV presenter Laura Jackson. Meanwhile, GMTV’s Mark Heyes will offer insight into the AW16 must-haves to be found on the high street.

DISCOVERED CATWALK The Discovered Catwalk in association with Cosmopolitan will showcase collections from the Boutique Boulevard as well the latest trends from graduate designers. A host of bloggers and vloggers will take to the stage for Q&A sessions including Sarah Ashcroft AKA That Pommie Girl. The Style Studio will present exclusive trend presentations and interviews from leading designers as well as a host of fashion, beauty and health experts, plus some

ELLE/NOVEMBER

of the UK’s leading magazine editors. Head Make-up Artist and Brow Expert for Benefit Cosmetics, Lisa Potter-Dixon, will show you how to create the latest beauty looks.

VIP TREATMENT Why not make your day extra special and book a Diamond ticket? New for 2016, the package offers: a unique VIP experience, exclusive meet and greets with our talent line-up, an extraspecial goody bag, access to the Diamond Lounge, a glass of fizz and much more. Available on Saturday and Sunday only, watch this space for further talent announcements as we count down to the largest event on the fashion calendar…

TICKETS ON SALE NOW When: 2-6 December 2016 Where: NEC Birmingham Tickets from £26.65 at clothesshow. com. For groups of 10 or more, call 0800 358 0058.

EXCLUSIVE £25 TICKET OFFER for Elle readers*. Quote ELLE25 at the checkout *Tickets are standard tickets only and subject to availability

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TRAVEL MADE IN TAIWAN On a road trip around Asia’s off-the-radar island with her younger sister, Miette L Johnson found that rugged adventure and an alluring new culture were just what she needed to see their relationship in a new light

‘B Above: Food vendors in Kenting. Top: The dizzying Central CrossIsland Highway

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ye-eeee.’ My kid sister is getting smaller and smaller, dangling from a piece of string above the river valley that leads to Lisong. As I watch her repel down the escarpment, the old rope tightening and slacking, I wonder if what we’re doing is stupid. What if something really bad happens, like in a 127 Hours sort of way? If she were to slip, our last mortal exchange would be a South Park reference. I’d have to explain to our parents why we were scrambling deep into the mountains of central Taiwan, unburdened by safety measures. I know this particular endeavour seems… risky. But prior to this, we had almost driven straight off a cliff. So in the moment, it didn’t seem like that big of a deal. It takes 21.5 hours from my flat in London to get to my sister Courtney’s apartment in southern Taiwan. For most of our adult lives, Courtney and I have lived worlds apart from each other. Toronto and Montreal, Brooklyn and London, South Korea and Amsterdam. Now she lives, along with her partner Jenner, almost a day away in Kaohsiung. And I’ve spent a disproportionate amount of time trying to get to her.

As far as Asia goes, Taiwan lies slightly off the beaten track; a less obvious choice among the full-moon parties of Thailand or India’s eat/pray/love exoticism. A diplomatically complex relationship with mainland China (180km across the Taiwan Strait), coupled with our inaccurate western perception of it as an industrial, smog-pumping behemoth, it’s easy to understand why it’s been off our travel radar. But unmarred by global tourism, its climate, free-thinking attitude (universal suffrage, freedom of the press), otherworldly landscapes and beguiling culture make it an enchanting little island. Kaohsiung is Taiwan’s second most populated city after Taipei, and the unofficial scooter capital of the world; locals whizz around town with entire families haphazardly balanced on two wheels. The blend of old world architecture, towering, earthquake-proof condos and neon lights give the town a futuristic feel, but its life as a port city

Top and above: One of the many winding curves of Central CrossIsland Highway

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Travel Left: Taroko Gorge. Below: Sun Moon Lake temple. Right: A Taiwanese sunset. Far right: Kaohsiung Lotus Pond

Photography: Getty, Miette L Johnson.

Above: Kaohsiung potstickers (dumplings); Below left: The giant Buddha at Fo Guang Shan Memorial Centre; Below right: Sun Moon Lake

keeps the vibe friendly. People here are curious about outsiders, and appearance in particular; at 5ft 9in tall, with long blonde hair and grey eyes, I feature heavily on the iPhones of Taiwan. The inquisitiveness is charming and goes both ways; there is an openness to the Taiwanese character that makes for interesting, if at times comical, exchanges. It’s easy to see why my sister, after initially planning on teaching here for 10 months, has stayed for more than three years. When we were little, Courtney and I created our own worlds in the ravines behind our house in suburban Toronto, Canada. The youngest of three girls, she was so sweet; she looked like a movie baby, with blonde ringlets and blue eyes. I was older, street smart (read: less adorable), and Courtney looked up to me. I watched out for her, from the time I gave her chickenpox so we could stay home from school together, through to university where she met Jenner during her first year, so he now feels like part of the family.

Even from afar we’d ‘OTHERWORLDLY managed to maintain the LANDSCAPES sibling pecking order, but AND BEGUILING something happens when you CULTURE MAKE spend long swathes of time TAIWAN AN apart. By being uninvolved in ENCHANTING the daily minutiae, it’s easy to LITTLE ISLAND’ miss someone moving on from one phase of life to another. On the back of Courtney’s scooter, clinging to her waist as she glides through hectic traffic, she is totally in control and I am not. Out on the open road, we speed past the enormous Buddha at the Fo Guang Shan Memorial Centre and into the Maolin National Scenic Area. She laughs off my nerves as we zip over a pedestrian bridge, suspended high above a rocky riverbed, down through the paths that lead to Cingren, known locally as Lovers’ Gorge Waterfall. After a short hike, we arrive at a beautiful sliver of water, cascading 50m down into a deep indigo pool. And just like that, she’s shown me something new that she’s discovered, not the other way around. Strolling through Ruifeng Night Market, past stalls selling stinky tofu (don’t) and tiny fried eggs in paper bags (do), I observe Courtney and Jenner from a few paces back. I’d spent the afternoon with her primary school class of 20 and they blew my mind. They were so bright, funny, and engaged… and my little sister; my › Top: Miette (right) and younger sister, Courtney. Above: Chilling at Lovers’ Gorge Waterfall

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little sister teaches them. Now Jenner is ordering food in Mandarin, rattling away like baby’s first words were, ‘Ni hao’. (That’s ‘hello’). Who are these grown-ups? Halfway through my stay, the three of us set out on a road trip from Kaohsiung to the scenic Provincial Highway 61 that leads down to the southern tip of the island. On our right, the sea is blinding in the sun; to the left the mountainside, dense with tropical jungle, is visible through the heat haze. The trip to Kenting takes around two hours, and the ride is easy. Baishawan is a pretty white sandy beach where local boy, director Ang Lee, filmed scenes for the movie, Life Of Pi. We spend the day watching the waterAbove: Taipei’s shy Chinese and Taiwanese stand at the skyline. Below ocean’s edge, with trousers rolled up just left: A roadside food feast. Below below the knee, daring to dip their toes right: Silks Place in the South China Sea. Some still cling to exterior an ancient superstition that malevolent ghosts will drag them under if they enter the water and they get a real kick out of three foreigners swimming out of our depth. As the sun sets, the waters change from electric cerulean to blush to black, and we ‘LOOKING ACROSS wander the back roads to THE VALLEY, the Ipanema Surf House, run I SEE A FIELD OF by a Brazil-loving Taiwanese MOUNTAINTOPS. surfer named Max, and a I WONDER HOW favourite among western MANY HALLOWED expats for £12-a-night PLACES ARE HIDDEN beach breaks. In the lot AMONG THEM’ behind our room there’s another house, with a sort of metal frame tacked to the side covered in tarpaulin. A light inside casts a glow on to the pavement. We can hear people chanting, while the silhouette of a little girl plays with the shadow of a dog. As the only guests, we have the porch to ourselves

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Left: Kaohsiung Lotus Pond; Below: Jenner in Taroko; Right: Lisong’s hot spring; Inset: Cloudcovered Central Cross-Island Highway

and we sit sipping wine as we would after a long summer’s day at the lake in Canada. Heading out of Kenting, the road takes us down around the tip of the island and up towards Hualien. The Provincial Highway 11 is flanked by dramatic cliffs and jewel-toned sea, the colour of which deepens when storms roll in. Wild weather can make this route nerve-racking, particularly during typhoon season (May to October). Heavy rains wash out roads and the occasional rockslide tumbles into traffic. On our way to the old, hotspring town of Zhiben, we hit a stone and it tears a hole in the fuel line. Somewhere between the car breakdown and the next day, fuelled by countless Taiwan Beers, we will spend 2.5 hours on the side of a highway, be towed 40 minutes by rope, spend an hour up to our necks in Zhiben’s hot-steam barrels (mixing booze and heat is clever, no?), running down a pitch black highway in search of a 7-Eleven, eat something squiggly with bits in it, and argue over which Beatles song to perform for an audience of confused truckers. The antidote to the sickness that followed lay 60km further up the coast in Chenggong, a wharf town with the freshest seafood in Taiwan. Tuna sashimi, the punch of wasabi and cool crunch of shredded radish bring us back to life. The next morning, we turn into the mountains for Taroko Gorge. One of the world’s most beautiful and dangerous roads, the sheer scale of the environment is arresting. The road clings to the side of jagged cliffs, high above the fast-moving rivers of the gorge. There’s only one luxury hotel in Taroko, Silks Place (silksplacetaroko.com.tw, doubles from £190 a night), and I have booked it. After a dip in the rooftop hot tubs and a decadent east-meets-west feast, we head to our room and push our beds up against the floor-to-ceiling windows; it’s as if we are camping in the wilderness.

Above: A ‘secret beach’ in Kaohsiung

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Travel

Photography: Courtesy of Silks Place/Calvin Chen, Miette L Johnson.

People come to Taroko mostly to explore the canyon on foot. The arduous hike to Lianhua Pond atop a steep mountain takes about two hours and brings us close to nirvana – and near nakedness as we strip off layers in the jungle heat. Out of respect, we are careful not to disturb the pond waters, considered sacred by some, lest its spirits punish us for interfering with the perfect harmony. Looking out across the valley, I expect to take in all of Taiwan. Instead, I see a field of mountaintops, extending in every direction, and I wonder how many hallowed places are hidden among them. I turn back to ask Courtney, but she’s at the far edge of the pond with Jenner. After a decade of adventures together, we’re close. But now they’re engaged, I can’t help but feel jealous of their oneness. For a fleeting moment, I wonder if they’d rather be alone, without me. Taiwan’s Central Cross-Island Highway ranks highly on my list of nausea triggers. Almost 200km from Taroko in the east, to Taichung in the west, it climbs ELLE/NOVEMBER

endlessly, winding up to above the cloud line and takes at least eight hours to cross, if the roads are even open. Cautious drivers are fine, but blind corners, speeding trucks and landslides add a whole other layer of anxiety. After hours crammed into the back seat, I can’t decide if the butterflies in my stomach are motion sickness or my niggle from the hike that won’t go away. Maybe I am excess baggage. Even here, I’m relegated to economy, while Courtney and Jenner sip champagne in first class. OK, maybe not champagne, but they are definitely hogging the Pringles up front. Eventually, we arrive at Hehuanshan; a 3,416m-high mountain. It is beautiful, and from here, I think I really can see all the island. As we approach its summit above the clouds, our car just… stops. We roll backward, picking up speed towards the cliff edge; Jenner jerks the handbrake and we shudder to a halt. Engine out, we can do nothing but roll backwards, down the curving road to a layby, while Courtney and I direct him, within inches of the sheer drop. Jenner saves us. Or we save us. And then a local really saves us, somehow starting the engine and driving our car to the peak, where he leaves us in neutral to let gravity take us the rest of the way. After our descent into Lisong valley, we clamber over boulders to reach the hot spring. Courtney reaches for Jenner’s hand, and he helps her down into the river. Watching this, I get a happy-and-sad heartache. It’s hard to share my sister, to know there’s someone else to guide her and keep her safe. Then again, I’m still here. It takes a few close calls and brutal hangovers to get it right, but somewhere deep in the mountains of Taiwan, I find a new way of being an older sister. Q

Above: Scooters dominate in Kaohsiung. Below: A mist-obscured Central Cross-Island Highway. Below left and inset: Taroko

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FINCA DE ARRIETA, LANZAROTE Where: Lanzarote is all about the beautiful landscape: rich black lava fields filled with bright green plants, whitewashed houses, tiny churches, deep caves, wild beaches and, of course, the (dormant) volcano. Stay: A small, self-catering, off-grid eco resort of yurts, huts and cottages, Finca de Arrieta has views of the mountains behind and the sea in front. We were in the spacious eco yurt, with a kitchen, dining area and shower room, plus a gated outdoor deck surrounded by huge plants, bright flowers and tall palm trees, leading to the white stone pool. What’s hot? There’s a communal area designed for lounging, with books, a guitar and space for yoga

classes. Each room has a kitchen with an oven, and you can buy basics on-site and collect eggs from the finca’s chickens. Too chilled to cook? Order in from local restaurants or take a short walk to lovely fish tavernas. Further afield, artist César Manrique’s work is all over the island. Finca de Arrieta, Calle Diseminado, Haria 35542, Arrieta, Lanzarote; 0034 928 826720; lanzarote retreats.com/eco. Doubles from around £84, room only. easyJet (easyjet.com) has return flights to Lanzarote Airport from London Gatwick, from around £120

A private garden at Finca de Arrieta

DUE SOUTH LANZAROTE/MOROCCO/CYPRUS/DUBAI We’re putting off autumn for as long as we can

I Above: The seafront of Arrieta, Lanzarote

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used to hate autumn. To me, it signified the End Of Fun. It was the Sunday night of the seasons, or the seasonal equivalent of the second of January (the worst day of the year, surely?), when people say treasonous things like they’re ‘looking forward to getting back to normal, post-holidays’. I never wanted to get back to normal. Autumn meant the end of adventure, the end of months spent backpacking around wherever I could afford. The end of the excitement of the unknown, of picking up summer jobs abroad in bars or youth hostels or vineyards, spinning out my meagre travel money by any means possible. And particularly the end of those exquisite, intense brief encounters that flare up out of nowhere and end on a high, because one of you is always heading back to the airport. And now, even though I don’t get those months of travelling any more, I still want to eke out my favourite season to postpone that end-of-summer melancholy for as long as possible and fly south like the swallows.

LA SULTANA OUALIDIA, MOROCCO Below: Finca de Arrieta’s huts. Right: La Sultana’s peaceful beach

Where? Oualidia is a southern Morocco fishing village around two hours’ drive from Casablanca, known for its oysters, pretty lagoons and road-lesstravelled vibe. Stay: Just outside the village is La Sultana, a fortress-like building with 12 rooms, including one in a treehouse, looking over the lagoon and a peaceful stretch of beach. Inside it’s all grand archways,

ELLE/NOVEMBER


Travel ANASSA, CYPRUS

Words: Chris Caldicott, Heather Gwyther, Billie Bhatia, Viet Tran, Imogen Van Zaane. Photography: Chris Caldicott, Viet Tran.

Above: Whitewashed elegance at Anassa

domed windows and pale interiors, with a Jacuzzi on each room’s terrace that is filled with filtered lagoon seawater. What’s hot? Go flamingo watching, take surfing lessons, swim in one of two ionised pools (infinity outdoors or indoor heated), or treat yourself to a Royal Hammam treatment at the spa. Food-wise, nothing beats sitting on the jetty with a platter of oysters, and a glass of El Mogador. La Sultana Oualidia, Parc à Huitres N3, Bled Gaïlla, Oualidia; +212 524 388008; lasultanahotels.com. Doubles from £251, B&B. Royal Air Maroc (royalairmaroc.co.uk) flies to Casablanca from London Gatwick, from around £209 return. For more, go to visitmorocco.com

ELLE/NOVEMBER

Where? In Cyprus’s unspoilt Akamas peninsula, on the remote north-western tip of the island, you’ll find beautiful Chrysochous Bay, where temperatures are still hitting 22°C well into November. Stay: The temple-like Anassa may have 175 rooms, suites and villas, but it feels more like a boutique hotel, with its cream-onwhite décor and sun-bleached stone walls. Whitewashed villas are dotted among gardens of pink bougainvillea, lavender and cypress trees, while the tiny

orthodox church and outdoor taverna create a village feel. What’s hot? It’s all about relaxation here, with three pools (one indoors), a brilliant Thalassotherapy spa, and pristine rows of white beach loungers set up by dawn, when the sea is mirror-calm and already warm enough for a dip. Anassa, 40, Alekou Michailidi Road, Neo Chorio 8852, Cyprus; +357 26 888000; anassa.com. Doubles from around £280, B&B. Two-night packages from around £474pp, B&B, including return British Airways (ba.com) flights and private transfers

Above and below: Old-fashioned elegance at the Brasserie Quartier in St. Regis Dubai

THE ST. REGIS, DUBAI ‘IT’S ALL GRAND ARCHWAYS, DOMED WINDOWS AND PALE INTERIORS, WITH A JACUZZI ON EACH ROOM’S TERRACE THAT IS FILLED WITH FILTERED SEAWATER FROM THE LAGOON’

Where? Dubai might be a bit bling for some, but with guaranteed sun, designer shops a-go-go and desert thrills, it’s a no-brainer for a quick escape. Stay? Here, opulence is king and in that respect the St. Regis won’t disappoint, with 234 lavish rooms and suites (including the 913sq m Sir Winston Churchill Suite with its rooftop pool), ornate architecture, marble floors and some serious chandeliers. What’s hot? Being part of the new Al Habtoor City complex means St. Regis guests get to use all pool facilities across the W and Westin, too. And don’t miss the

‘HERE OPULENCE IS KING, WITH ORNATE ARCHITECTURE, MARBLE FLOORS AND SOME SERIOUS CHANDELIERS’ full body massage that ends in a sensational shower experience. Tropical thunderstorm button? You got it. April showers? No problem. And did we mention the butlers? Well, every room has one, of course. The St. Regis Dubai, Al Habtoor City, Sheikh Zayed Road, Dubai +971 4 435 5555, stregisdubai.com. Doubles from around £250, room only. British Airways (ba.com) has return flights from London Heathrow to Dubai from around £540

Top left: Cypress trees line the gardens at Anassa. Left: The spa’s outdoor pool at La Sultana Oualidia

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Travel

THE LOOK With its contemporary Mayan styling, earthy tones, exposed wood that looks like it drifted in from the sea, high ceilings and templelike interiors, Nizuc attracts a stylish clientele. Bag one of the 44 ocean suites and you’ll find ample space, with a deep bath on a raised platform open to the room, so you can soak in the tub while watching the waves. Upgrade to one of the 29 villas and you’ll also get a private patio, dipping pool and palatial bathroom.

Just a 15 minute drive from Cancún’s airport makes this one of the world’s speediest transfers. Cancún can be a bit ‘spring break’ so head an hour in the other direction for boho Tulum, with its Mayan ruins and

Ibiza-style beach scene, and spot dolphins at eco-marine park and world heritage site Sian Ka’an. Between Nizuc and Sian Ka’an is Xel Ha, a natural water park – all swooshing through caves and rope-swinging over water. Touristy, but the most fun ever.

THE SPA

HOT HOTEL

NIZUC RESORT AND SPA YUCATÁN / MEXICO Above: The resort’s Café de la Playa restaurant. Below: The blissful adults-only pool

GETTING THERE British Airways (ba.com) has return flights from London Heathrow to Cancún from around £606

THE VIBE Undiscovered areas of the Yucatán Peninsula are thin on the ground now that the Riviera Maya is a swanky hotel hotspot and nearby Cancún is package-holiday central. But Nizuc Resort and Spa has nabbed a quiet corner on a ribbon of land with a peaceful protected lagoon on one side and the

twinkly Caribbean on the other. It is surprisingly chilled for a resort of 303 villas and suites, but then with 109 pools (purified by reverse osmosis, so no dehydrating chlorine), 29 acres of gardens and mangroves, and a long, bleached-white beach, there is more thanenoughhideaway space for everyone.

THE FOOD If you never left the resort you wouldn’t get bored of the food, with six world-class restaurants including Peruvian, Asian and a beachside grill. Menus range from tuna tataki to pizza, and if you’re here with a significant other, they’ll sort a candlelit dinner on the beach: clichéd, but a starlit treat just the same.

Wellbeing is a big deal in the Yucatán’s upscale hotels, with ancient rituals practised alongside the usual pampering. Nizuc has Mexico’s first Espa spa, a 30,000sq ft haven where you can try anything from algae body wraps to cellular enzyme facials. The Nizuc Life Program is all holistic health with fun-but-good-for-you stuff such as kayaking and sound meditation.

NIZUC RESORT AND SPA Blvd Kukulcan Mz 59 Lote 1-03 Km 21.26, Punta NIZUC, 77500 Cancún, Quintana Roo, Mexico. +52 998 891 5700, nizuc.com. Doubles from £470, room only

Top left: One of Nizuc’s 29 villas. Top right: La Punta Grill and Lounge. Above: Nizuc’s lobby

WHAT’S HOT ELLE Fashion Assistant Felicity Kay loved that Nizuc offered to unpack all her luggage. The resort runs free boat trips to the Museo Subacuático de Arte (Underwater Museum of Art – the world’s first) where you can snorkel among the artificial reefs in the form of artworks by Karen Salinas Martinez and Roberto Diaz Abraham in the Mesoamerica (the world’s second-largest barrier reef).

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ELLE/NOVEMBER

Words: Susan Ward Davies. Photography: Quentin Bacon.

HANDY FOR…


ELLE EVENT

The ELLE Fashion Cupboard has partnered with Very to bring you lots of styling and shopping content. Now’s your chance to see this brought to life at our exclusive pop-up shop in central London on 19 November. Meet the ELLE team, preview and see ELLE’s top picks from the new V by Very collection (available at very.co.uk), enjoy discounts and styling advice, and receive a VIP shopping experience*. All while DJ Blonde Ambition hits the decks WHEN: SATURDAY 19 NOVEMBER, 10AM TO 6PM WHERE: ROOK & RAVEN, 7 RATHBONE PLACE, LONDON W1T 1HN BOOK YOUR PLACE AND FIND OUR MORE: ELLEUK.COM/VERY-POP-UP * Tickets will need to be purchased for the VIP shopping.


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AUTUMN ACCESSORIES SAY IT WITH MEANING Find the perfect gift for every occasion at www.tienne.co.uk. Whether it’s good fortune, prosperity, intuition, protection, positivity, harmony or strength you need, our collection of Muru jewellery reminds you of your aspirations. Wear classically on its own or stylishly layered. We are sure you’ll find a piece that suits your needs. Use code ELLE20 for an amazing 20% discount off all jewellery at www.tienne.co.uk valid until 31.12.16.

DEEASJER AND GOLDGENIE LAUNCH 24K GOLD HEEL COLLECTION The ‘Pure Gold’ capsule collection marks the launch of Deeasjer in the Middle East. Deeasjer is delighted to announce a further collaboration with luxury brand Goldgenie, renowned for its decadent plating techniques, crafting deluxe gifts covered in 24k gold. For the first time in its history, Goldgenie will collaborate on a designer shoe collection, working with Deeasjer to create lavish heels plated in 24k gold. Available in three stylish designs, the classic court, sling-back and mule sandal. Shop. Deeasjer.com

RELLECIGA SWIMWEAR The “Victoria’s Secret of swimwear”, RELLECIGA is a swimwear brand launched by RIDI (RELLECIGA Industry Design Institute) located in Paris, France. RELLECIGA is an anagram representing our ideas and values: RE stands for focusing on the end goal despite hardships faced, ELLE represents the beautiful female form in French, while CIGA is short for: Confidence, Inspiration, Glamour, and A class. Italian Singer Jessica Brando Wears Lace Bikini www.relleciga.com

CHANNEL SERENITY Discover the eclectic collection of natural gemstones and exquisite silver with the new Bohemia collection exclusively from John Greed. Add a touch of boho chic to your wardrobe with these gorgeous bracelets, ideal for stacking! Prices from £34.95 at johngreed.com. ELLE readers get free next day delivery with £50 spend. Use code ELLENDD1. Ends 30/11/2016. T&Cs apply.


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THE FASHION EDIT

BRAVE+TRUE A stunning new collection imbued with the spirit and aesthetic of its Australian design. Think soft suedes and leather, beautifully draped basics, stunningly soft knitwear and covetable fur pieces to wrap yourself in this season. Be winter ready with a luxe palette of moss, fossil, charcoal and warm white. The brave+true range is imbued with the essence of adventure and discovery. Don't be afraid to try a new direction and pick an uncharted path. Find us at www.holidaydesign.com.au @braveandtruelabel

PUBLIC DESIRE Public Desire is the one-stop, online shop for the fashion forward female with a serious shoe addiction. Treat your feet with all the latest styles and on-trend pieces at the click of a finger. Born out of a desire to give girls what they want, Public Desire has shoes that make a statement without breaking the bank and provide a mix of wardrobe staples and key, new season styles that you’re going to want to add-to-bag. www.publicdesire.com

SAMPSON & CHRISTIE Sampson&Christiecreatesbeautifulleather bags and accessories using the latest techniques. All the bags and accessories combine premium leather, with innovative design to create luxury accessories at affordable prices. For the sophisticated, style conscious woman who loves to make a statement with a bold but beautiful fashion choice, a Sampson & Christie accessory is the perfect investment. Shop the full collection at www.sampsonandchristie.co.uk


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HEALTH & BEAUTY SHINE YOUR LIGHT! Beauty Bakerie Cosmetics Brand, a cruelty-free brand well-known for their smudge-free, vegan, liquid matte lipsticks (better known as Lip Whips) has announced that this autumn we can expect them to add a new product to their menu – their ’So Icy’ illuminator. Coming in five colours, it promises to leave you with an incandescent glow as you go from ordinary to extraordinary after one stroke of your brush. Leaving a prismatic effect, you’re sure to glow in any lighting. The packaging alone is to die for but it is what happens once the cap is removed-the imparting of a fine, luminous powder that will complement the structure of your face, your eyes or…your décolletage. To find out more, visit BeautyBakerie.com

LOOK YOUNGER LONGERTM REGENTIV’S THE SPECIALIST SERUM (WITH RETINOL) Lines, wrinkles, crepey eyes, neck, sun and skin damage can all benefit from this potent formula. Developed by leading Harley Street specialists with concentrated Retinol, Vitamin E, Aloe Vera and sunscreen. Users say, “Since starting with The Specialist Serum my friends have asked what I am using and my skin has never looked better”. To order visit www.regentiv.co.uk. Tel: 01923 212555. 30ml £29.95, 50ml £44.95, 100ml £79.95, 200ml £149. Free P&P. Regentiv Specialist Skin Care.

SILKY PERFECTION Get silky soft hair with the Natural World Argan Oil of Morocco Moisture Rich haircare range. Containing 95% naturally derived ingredients, this luxurious range is infused with certified organic Argan Oil and an uplifting blend of essential oils, leaving hair replenished and deeply nourished. Free from parabens, phosphates, phthalates, dyes and gluten. Shampoo 1L, Conditioner 1L, Hair Oil 100ml, available at Tesco from £5.00. For more information visit www.natural-world.com.


ELLE BOUTIQUES

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ELLE BOUTIQUES

ITALIAN FASHION LABEL ENNEMENOUNO

CONTACT

conveys a return to exacting sartorial workmanship, Mediterranean luxury and sensuality together with a unique, unconventional creative vision. Based on experimentation and stylistic originality, the result is a mysterious and contrasting world of sensations and textures, at once provocative, elegant and chic. Demure, structured and bold silhouettes adorned with captivating embroidered designs and striking prints form the brand’s signature style which, season after season, celebrates innovative aesthetics with a passion for detail.

www.ennemenouno.com | info@ennemenouno.com @ennemenouno on Instagram @Nmenouno Couture on Facebook

GILY ILAN

CONTACT

The perfect gift for the holidays and the best way to keep warm yet in style this winter. A young and innovative accessories label founded by ceramic and textile designer Gily Ilan. In her Tel Aviv based studio, Gily designs artisanal scarves and necklaces in limited editions. A unique knitting technique and original one of a kind magnetic clasps that elegantly seal each piece in the collection, have enabled this fast growing label to be coveted by fashionistas from Japan to NY.

We ship our items world wide Visit our website WWW.GILYILAN.COM and on Instagram @GILYILAN to learn about our collections, design philosophy and just to be inspired . Holiday special sale - coupon code in Instagram page.

NOMI

CONTACT

Nomi is a clothing company based in Brooklyn with a passion for bold design, sustainable practices and a belief in the importance of embracing one’s unique identity. We also like color, glitter and bows, please! We collaborate on our designs, with Normandie designing textiles and Michon sewing each garment with love.

Nomiwear.co Instagram: @nomiwear Shirt modeled by rapper @flapjak_ick Photo courtesy of @stetsonhayes_

MUSTARD STUDIOS

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Mustard Studios, where 60’s cool meets 70’s chic. Resulting in a modernist effortless style, with classic silhouettes and a British aesthetic. Mustard boasts British made clothing, mindfully produced in small batches. (Photographer: Liz Rose Ridley, Model: Lauren Marshall)

enquiries@mustardstudios.co.uk www.mustardstudios.co.uk Instagram, Facebook & Twitter: @MustardStudios

WOOD TIME FASHION

CONTACT

Founded in 2014, Wood Time Fashion is a Berlin based wooden watch brand re-conceptualizing classic design through contemporary streetstyle perception, creating harmony between sustainability, art and precision. Simple but special. Natural, like all urban-ers do.

www.woodtimefashion.com info@woodtimefashion.com Instagram: @woodtimefashion Facebook: wood time fashion

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ELLE BOUTIQUES

HARDLY EVER ORDINARY BUY, SELL & SAVE UP TO 90% OFF LUXURY DESIGNER FASHION

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ELLE COLLECTIONS

LAVENDER & SLATE

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Founded by Stephanie Dabrowski in 2016, LAVENDER & SLATE, is a boutique accessories brand based in New York City with an eco-friendly focus. Inspired by the beauty of nature, the debut collection features tonal embroidery and beading on bracelets, choker necklaces, and mini pouches in easy to coordinate shades of denim. Products are handcrafted from up-cycled fabric and locally sourced materials.

www.lavenderandslate.com Follow us on Instagram: @lavender.and.slate Comments & Questions: lavender.and.slate@gmail.com

PANTY DROP

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For those short on time, Panty Drop’s subscription panty boxes deliver a delectable treat every 3 months. Each box is a surprise with gorgeous styles for everyday sexy and everynight sassy, selected based on the customer’s panty profile. Panty Drop inspires women from the bottoms up with great undies and a nonprofit giving program that supports women in leadership.

www.pantydrop.me Instagram: @pantydropme Facebook: /pantydrop Twitter: @pantydropme

SOM’OR?

CONTACT

Inspired by the fable Aladdin and the Arabian Nights, Som’or? launch limited edition Christmas Wish Bracelets in Cranberry Red for Love, Green Holly for Peace and Gingerbread for Joy. Make your wishes online by creating a truly beautiful and mystical personalised bracelet for yourself or someone you love. Then allow the magic to happen.

From £88 and available on somor.com info@somor.com @somorjewels

SU MISURA

CONTACT

Su Misura - the Norwegian jewelry brand with the Italian name. Their handmade collections includes bracelets, pendants and earrings, using only the finest materials that are carefully hand-picked, each piece is handmade to the very highest standard. Drawing on inspiration from everywhere their jewelry is feminine, fun and easy to use individually, or in combination with other accessories.

Shop at: www.wolfandbadger.com Twitter: @agamundsen, Instagram: @sumisura, Facebook: /sumisurasmykker

THE NOCES

CONTACT

The Noces are a fashion brand that combines handcraft and traditional know how to create delicate and exclusive accessories, including bags, pouches, jewels, scarfs and detachable collars. All items are handmade from cotton, leather, silk and zebu horn. We work exclusively with Malagasy artisans to design trendy and multifunctional pieces that reveal our true selves and that celebrate love and friendship.

www.thenoces.com hello@thenoces.com Facebook: /thenoces2015 Instagram: @the_noces Twitter: @the_noces

To advertise here please call the ELLE team on 020 3728 6260


ELLE BEAUTY BAG

KATE RYAN SKINCARE

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Boost your Skin-Esteem. We all deserve beautiful skin. Kate Ryan’s formulas combine the best of science and nature to help you achieve it — it’s serious skincare for noticeable results. No single ingredient can provide all the nutrition your skin needs for clarity, radiance, antioxidant protection, moisture balance and healthy regeneration. We’re committed to using only what’s good for you in every small batch we formulate—and leave out fillers, fragrances, parabens, and anything else that isn’t essential. Empower your skin. You deserve it.

Visit us at: www.KateRyanSkincare.com or Amazon.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/KateRyanSkincare/ Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/krskincare/ Instagram: @krskincare Twitter: @KRSkincare

MADE BY FRESSKO

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Getting your daily dose of H2O has never been more exciting! With the ‘made by Fressko’ range of BPA free, stylish & extremely versatile flasks, you can now brew teas, create fruit infused detox waters, or enjoy coffees & smoothies all in the one flask. Available in a range of sizes and styles, all featuring leak proof lids, Fressko infusers and insulated bodies, your brew will stay hot or cold for hours. So say goodbye to plastic takeaway cups and brew as you go, with Fressko.

madebyfressko.com hello@madebyfressko.com Facebook: /Made-by-Fressko Instagram: @ madebyfressko_official Twitter: @madebyfressko

COVERMARK

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Never hide your legs away again. Don’t let varicose veins, stretch marks or any other imperfection steal your confidence. Covermark’s Leg Magic flawlessly conceals any blemish or imperfection on the legs and body, even the most severe discolouration. This creamy make up offers natural looking, 24-hour coverage that stays on without breaking or streaking even under extremely harsh conditions, including swimming. With SPF16.

RRP £26.75 www.klmbeauty.co.uk 01892 750850

FRESHEN AND PROTECT YOUR TOOTHBRUSH!

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Steripod® clip-on toothbrush protector freshens & protects for up to 3 months with active vapours. Fits manual & electric tootbrushes. No cables or batteries. Ideal for home, travel and the gym!

Available at Boots, Superdrug and Asda. www.steripod.co.uk #getyourpodon

OMG DETOX Reduce bloating, clear skin and boost energy with our revolutionary superfood detox powder. Add to water, smoothies or meals daily!

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Take 10% off with ELLE10.

Visit www.omgdetox.com hello@omgdetox.com Instagram Facebook, Twitter: @omgdetox

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ELLE BEAUTY BAG

SAMPLE BEAUTY – BEAUTY SAMPLES DELIVERED Sample Beauty provide a ‘try-before-you-buy’ service by selling beauty samples. From high end skincare samples to full size products, including perfectly pigmented eyeshadow palettes, we have everything you could want and need.

CONTACT

Use the code ELLE-O to save money off your first order!

www.samplebeauty.co.uk Twitter: @beautysample Instagram: @makeupsamplesuk Facebook: /makeupsamplesuk #SampleBeauty #TryItYourself

BELLA AURA SKINCARE

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Bella Aura Skincare offers pristine natural skincare infused with ground breaking Emulsion technology so one’s complexion radiates their pure inner glow. The line combines our signature Kamilah Oil Complex with active Swiss botanical technology to create targeted skincare solutions. The natural botanicals provide high levels of hyaluronic acid that help to increase moisture levels in the skin and elastin boosters to help minimize the signs of aging.

www.bellaaura.com Facebook: @BellaAuraSkin Instagram: Bellaauraskin Twitter: @BellaAuraSkin

GLAMOROUS EYES

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Bring out the sparkle in your eyes during the festive period with Nu Colour’s must-have trio of eyelash primer, mascara and eyeliner. Firstly, add shape to your eyes with a flick of Defining Effects smooth eyeliner. Then, the real trick to beautifully big eyes is in magnificent eyelashes. Priming your lashes with Nutriol® eyelash Treatment is the first step towards outrageously long lashes as this clear gel strengthens delicate lashes from root to tips. Lastly, style your lashes with lashings of all-new Black Curling Mascara. Its light, natural looking formula has long-lasting curling power.

Nu Colour® by Nu Skin® available at www.nuskin.com

CHARLOTTE’S SECRET FOR FLAWLESS SKIN

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The NEW skin product celebrities are raving about! Laviish Skin contains 20 skin loving nutrients, essential for healthy skin.

Buy at www.laviish.com Use Charl20 for discount and you too can #daretobare like Charlotte. www.instagram.com/laviish_uk twitter.com/laviishuk

MICROCELL Start your journey from tearing nails to tantalising talons with the Micro Cell Nail Repair, specifically designed to intensely rehabilitate neglected nails.

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A cult favourite in Germany (selling over 10,000 bottles a week), Micro Cell’s Nail Repair specialises in restoring the health and vitality of nails, strengthening damaged nails and protecting against tearing and splitting of nail tips, as well as encouraging growth. Results in as little as 2 weeks.

Enjoy 25% off with voucher code ELLE25 RRP £18.50 www.micro-cell.uk.com 01892 750850

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ELLE CLASSIFIEDS

HEALTH & BEAUTY

Australia’s No.1 Teeth Whitening Brand

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MISS UNIVERSE AUSTRALIA 2015 MONIKA RADULOVIC.


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ELLE CLASSIFIEDS

FASHION, LIFESTYLE & PERSONAL

REDUCED RENTS AT T N: FEM A L E FA S H I O N DESIGNERS

www.helenreynolds.net

BOUTIQUE RETAIL UNITS SOHO W1 TEL 020 7486 3531 renu@breckergrossmith.co.uk

Mediums Call one of our friendly & gifted mediums now!

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For details of classified advertising call 020 3728 6260

only 75p per min DEBIT/ CREDIT CARD

DATE CHAT

0800 075 1108

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VISIT

www.hearstmagazines.co.uk OR CALL

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Photography: Graham Walser at Hearst Studios.

QUESTIONNAIRE completed by JOHNNY COCA

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