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1.Why did  you  feel  the  need  to  found  Women  Sp3akers?    There  is  a  relative  absence  of  women’s  voices  in  leadership,  entrepreneurship,  and  in  technical  and   professional  fields  –  in  Scandinavia  as  well  as  in  the  rest  of  the  world/Europe.   Women  have  unique  qualifications  to  take  a  leadership  role  as  advocates  for  global  challenges  that   require  solutions  across  national  boundaries,  e.g.  within  ethics  and  social  responsibility,  sustainable   innovation  and  the  environment.  WS  can  provide  them  with  a  soapbox.   2.  The  rest  of  Europe  tend  to  see  the  Nordic  countries  as  a  perfect  example  of  full  equality.  And   yet,  statistics  prove  that,  contrary  to  common  belief,  equality  is  not  fully  acquired  in  the  Nordic   countries  regarding  equal  pay,  presence  of  women  in  top  positions,  gender  proportion  regarding   part-­‐time  jobs,  length  of  paternity  and  maternity  leaves,  and  also  domestic  violence.  Where  do  you   think  this  misunderstanding  comes  from?   This  year’s  OECD  statistics  put  Norway  in  first  place  for  gender  equality  in  the  workplace  for  the  third   year  running,  two  female  prime  ministers,  the  quota  law  for  women  on  company  boards,  and  a  high   general  employment  rate  for  women  (  73.8%,  compared  to  EU-­‐wide  average  of  58.6%)  have-­‐  not   surprisingly-­‐  contributed  to  this  impression.  I  do  not  agree  that  the  perception  of    Norwegian  equality   is  a  misunderstanding.  We  have  after  all  achieved  a  lot.      However  we  still  have  a  way  to  go  in  order  to  achieve  full  equality:   !

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Norway is  often  congratulated  for  its  high  general  employment  rate.  But  a  lot  of  women  in   Norway  work  part-­‐time  both  by  choice  and  because  a  lot  of  positions  are  not  available  full-­‐time   .This  affects  their  income  and  contributes  to  the  ‘gender  pay  gap’.   Norwegian  women  receive  a  longer  education  than  European  women  on  the  whole,  but  as  in   many  other  countries,  Norwegian  women  typically  study  more  ‘female’  subjects,  such  as   humanities  and  the  arts.   Gender  segregation  across  occupations  in  Norway  is  correspondingly  high.  So  whilst  women   appear  to  be  educated  at  the  same  level  as  men,  the  range  of  their  eduactional  and  professional   choices  are  much  more  restricted  and  traditional  than  are  men's.     The  quota  law  for  women  on  company  boards  has  been  successfully  implemented,  with  44%  of   corporate  board  places  being  taken  by  women.  But  this  hasn’t  trickled  down.  The  share  of   women  in  management  positions  in  large  companies  has  only  increased  by  2%,  and  still  stands  at   20%  overall.     Female  employees  in  Norway  earned  on  average  15.9%  less  than  male  employees  –  and  this  is   largely  unchanged  since  2006.  The  status  of  many  women  as  part-­‐time,  and  the  likelihood  of   them  being  in  certain  sectors  of  the  labour  market,  contributes  to  this  difference.  

The present  status  indicates  that  culture  is  lagging  behind  many  of  the  formal  structures.  Going   forward,  we  need  to  implement  both  structural  and  attitudinal  measures.  We  believe  WS  can  play  an   important  part  in  this  respect.    

Interview le pais  

Some of the questions, form the interview with Le Pais, in english.

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