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However, unemployment rates of some refugee populations are higher than those born in the U.S. In Minneapolis, the unemployment rate of Somali refugees in its Cedar-Riverside neighborhood is 17 percent, compared to only 4 percent in the overall Twin Cities area, according to “America’s Real Refugee Problem,” an October 2016 article from The Atlantic. Fears of radicalization and global terrorism have dominated the news cycle; President Donald Trump once promised during his election campaign to ban Muslims from entering the U.S. However, banning certain groups could impact travel, further hurting our talent market and economy, according to an article appearing in Newsweek, “Counting the Cost of Banning Muslims From Visiting the U.S.” Cited in the article are the Department of Commerce’s findings that there were 77.5 million international visitors, supporting 1.1 million American jobs, in 2015. “A Muslim ban, or any targeted or broad-based ban on foreign visitors from countries with significant Muslim

populations, would also have consequences well beyond the direct effect on travelers. It would hurt the economies of communities dependent on tourism,” according to the article. Employers Embracing Refugees Some companies have relied on refugees to grow their business. USCRI’s Blake said she and Bracy often speak with employers who attribute their success to their refugee-inclusive workforce. “When, on top of that, you expand the capacity of your business with additional language capacity, additional cultural understanding and additional new ways of thinking about products and markets, I think you’re really positioning yourself for success,” Blake said. Above all, refugees come from a variety of backgrounds and experiences, making this group ripe with diversity of thought, which has been found to foster new ideas and innovation. “There’s a big impact in what’s produced, certainly, and the innovation that comes with people who think differently, think outside the box,” Bracy said.

Want Government to Function Like a Business? Act Like One by Rick Bell A new boss naturally creates a blend of excitement and trepidation. Workers are curious, supervisors are nervous and everyone involved is filled with hope for glorious success while simultaneously suppressing fear of a long, agonizing road to failure. We’re still getting to know our nation’s new boss following Donald Trump’s election victory as the president of the United States in November 2016. But unlike most new workplace leaders where we scour the internet and email friends of friends seeking any shred of insider information, we know a lot about this CEO’s

past. If he were set to take over your organization, you’d be well within your rights to shake your head and question the board’s collective sanity for making this hire. On the plus side, there’s a great chance business could boom. He built a multibillion-dollar business, and that obviously curries favor with the board and shareholders. Like him or loathe him, he nevertheless is one of those rare personalities with an innate ability to command a room — an essential trait for negotiating. It’s also hard to argue against his ability to hammer out a deal — or at least surround himself with people possessing such talents — providing a lucrative windfall for himself and his organization. With the good, though, comes the bad. Beating down small businesses with a barrage of lawyers W i n t e r 2017 • T a l e n t E c o n o m y

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Talent Economy — Winter 2017  

Like the Industrial Revolution at the turn of the 20th century, today’s technology boom will upend industries and norms for generations. Its...

Talent Economy — Winter 2017  

Like the Industrial Revolution at the turn of the 20th century, today’s technology boom will upend industries and norms for generations. Its...