Issuu on Google+


Contents Mondragon Culturescape

Thesis/Fall 10 - Spring 11

CIS Edukopolis K12 School

Competition/August 11

Environmental Education Center

Third Year/Spring 09

Ashburton Ave Housing Development Fourth Year/Fall 09

Grant Ave Public Library

Fourth Year/Spring 10

Downing St. Two Family Housing Third Year/Fall 08

DUMBO Performing Arts Center

Second Year/Spring 08


“The fact is that building, everything involved in building, is necessarily an act against nature; it is an anti-natural act... When someone chooses a site, they separate it from nature� -Joseph Rykwert


Mondragon Culturescape

Mondragon, Basque Country, Spain

Prof. Jocob Alspector Thesis /Fall 2010-SP 2011 Team Project with Konstantinos S.


Ambiguity in a definition can be a solution, and the line that separates architecture and landscape has no more need of clarity. The ambiguity could be a medium that fills the distance between human and nature, a medium to re-scale human life. Mondragon Culturescape occupies a former stone quarry, in the town of Mondragon, Basque Country, Spain, which developed along the growth of Mondragon Cooperative Co., one of the largest company in the nation. Owned by the industrial company, the quarry had produced aggregates and concrete mix for over 50 years. It is a symbol of human intervention onto natural environment, but still a scar on the earth, which requires a remediation that at the same time grafts a new direction on its life. The project, Mondragon Culturescape, aims to be a long-term mean to treat the site with an educational, cultural institution and a park, as a ground for culture to develop over time as an extension of its cooperative history. The complex of architecture and landscape is a medium to reunite the town and the quarry, and the people and nature. The culturescape matures its beauty as the landscape and culture grow and unify over aging.

Top Right: the ruin of a church on the quarry shows local architectural language and beauty of architectural “aging� with vegetation. Right: original condition of the quarry and shale, stone from the quarry. Bottom: site analysis, incl. local climate, geography, hydrology, past & future city-planning, building uses, etc.


z

Clad with random-set shale stone from the quarry, buildings are perceived as rock pieces cut out, exposed, or buried, and landscape covers the site with terracing like a re-sized figure of the quarry. Paths run as if the land was split. Vegetations will cover the landscape and buildings, unifying and balancing them. The project as a whole is designed to be an environmental system with its form, planning, and details. Though it stands like a secret monastery, isolated from the town by highways and elevation change, the museum and auditorium building stands as an architectural statement to the context, as an iconic piece of upheaved but sculpted rock, as well as functionally a gateway to the main level. The experience of the museum resembles the terracing of the landscape, going through local history and culture exhibited. Public buildings form a main plaza paved with the shale, around the iconic arm of the quarry, as if buildings are extruded from the ground. The plaza distributes the paths weaving into landscape where people find themselves in different ways to relate to the buildings, the landscape and the quarry. Academic buildings are spread around the site with different architectural attitude toward landscape, creating different type of exterior and interior spacial experience.

z-z

1:1200

west site elevation

1:1200

4

2

z

0

200 ft 50 m

site plan

1:4000


apple Latin Name: Malus domestica Tree Size: Small Leaf Type: Deciduous Growth Rate: Slow Water Needs: Moderate Features: White, pink, or red flowers

almond Latin Name: Prunus dulcis Tree Size: Small to Medium Leaf Type: Deciduous Growth Rate: Slow Water Needs: Moderate Features: White, pink flowers

holm oak Latin Name: Quercus ilex Tree Size: Large Leaf Type: Evergreen Growth Rate: Rapid Water Needs: Moderate Features: Glossy, deep green leaves remain all winter; long-lived shade tree.

olive Latin Name: Olea europaea Tree Size: Medium Leaf Type: Evergreen Growth Rate: Rapid Water Needs: Moderate Features: silvery green leaves, small white feathery flowers

vegetable

landscape/vegetation

environmental/landscape system

grape Latin Name: Vitis vinifera Tree Size: Liana Growth Rate: Rapid Water Needs: Moderate Features: palmately lobed leaves


1. museum 2. auditorium 3. main plaza 4. retail 5. administration 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

10

11

txoko/community dining culinary art agriculture humanity

11. library 12. central mechanical plant /ex-stone processing facility 13. San Joseppe ruins 14. intercity highway

12

7 9

13 3 6 4

1

5

2

8 14

level +2

level 0

1:2200


y 1

3

2

5

4

6

8

7

10

9

11

12

13

14

15

n 5

m

3

7 7

1

4

8

10

9

l

k

5

3

11

6

j

i

2 h

g

f

e

2 x’

d

x’

c

x

x b

a

11

y

1. lobby 2. exhibition space 3. office 5. meeting room 4. manager’s office 7. inclined elevator 8. lounge 9. projection room 10. auditorium w/250 seats

level 0

6. ticketing/coat check 11. balcony

1: 800

museum & auditorium

x-x

x’ - x’

1 : 80

2

4 4 1

1. lobby 2. ticketing/coat check 4. exhibition space 5. gallery

y-y

1: 500

3. mechanical room

2

3

5

1 5


4

2

3

1

a

b

c

d

e

1 : 800

1 : 400

agriculture 3

a

b

c

y

d

e

f

5

1

1

2

3

5

4 4

y

5 5 2

6

1 : 800

y-y

typical detail

1 : 40

1 - oak window frame w/ double glazing

1 : 400

humanity

2 - random size shale pavers: regular coursed set with mortar - 3” screed with radiant heat pipes - water proof membrane - 2” rigid insulation - 8“ reinforced concrete slab - 2“ screed - 2” rigid insulation - gravel bed - compressed soil 3 - random size shale pavers regular coursed set in 1-1/2” sand - 4” gravel - waterproof membrane - 2” rigid insulation - vapor barrier - 8” reinforced concrete flat slab

4 - random size shale: irregular coursed set with mortar anchored to structure - 1” air space - waterproof membrane - 2” rigid insulation - vapor barrier - 10” reinforced concrete wall - oak veneered blockboard d3/4” 5 - precast concrete member 6 - exterior uplight - gravel border - waterproof membrane - pvc d5” perforated drain pipe - vapor barrier - compressed soil


stone plaza and community dining

art plaza


CIS Edukopolis Cleveland, OH

Proposal For Cleveland Design Competition, Aug 2011


Architectural complex of micro socioeducational environment realizing a new form of educational facility that establishes both school and social education in one sequence.

site is selected, land is detached

a cultural icon but also as a chimney for the entire complex’s ventilation system using double leaf facade on its north. Its spatial sequence also fluently connects the city’s urban and the university’s suburban contexts, with the public accessibility to the roof garden connecting physically north and south side of the lot, extending the campus’ green way. The facility planning helps the school’s communication with its outside community by providing public venues, such as galleries and auditorium, in the east wing combined with renovated historical building. It serves cultural study spaces, such as art and music rooms, expecting a collaboration with the venues and also with the university and an art gallery in the historical building adjacent to the site on the north.

land rises, wall appears

sun rises, light falls

conceptual diagrams

venue Payne A

Sperior Avenue

Spatial quality of the Educapolis brings experience of both city/society and global school life together. The main spaces are formed by solid volumes that include special activity/work spaces mimicking city’s built environment, and courtyards that create open, ambiguous class spaces providing precious relationship with outside, in response to the CSI’s philosophy about spatial relationship and accessibility between teachers and students. In addition, the architectural experience of the Edukopolis can be interpreted as environmental education by itself because of its micro environmental system, controling light and ventilation by planning, utilizing roof garden and courtyards for water management and solar panels to supply a large portion of its annual energy demands. The renovated existing building stands as

solar panel

summer winter

office/ utility rooms

city

Re-use

activity spaces

w o r k rooms

activity spaces

renovated existing building

class rooms rain water

campus international school

university c a m p u s


7 5

6

17

12

4

4

11

10 8

3 3

9

3

13

3

2

18 14

1

3

16 3

15

3

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

School Entrance Student Lounge Class Room Special Class Room Gymnasium Food Service/Kitchen Custodial

8. Kindergarten Room 9. Admin. Office 10. Music Rooms 11. Multi-Purpose Space 12. Art Class Room 13. Auditorium 14. Public Lobby

20 19

15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

Library Exhibition Gallery Student Dining Public Roof Garden Computer/Media Room Family/Consumer Science


Environmental Education Center

Prof. Volkmann THIRD YEAR/SPRING 09 Designed with Konstantinos Spiropoulos Selected for BEST OF THIRD YEAR

Location : The Seward Park Branch of Public Library, Lower East Side Program : classrooms, exhibition space, 4000sf. multipurpose room, cafe, bookstore, shared book storage, offices. Total Area : approx. 10,000 sf

Esse x St.

y

adwa

E.Broadway Subway Station

N

E.Bro


“Art (and by extension, architecture) must have begun with nature itself, as a relationship between the human being and nature, from which we cannot be separated.� -Lucy R. Lippard

This project challenges contradiction that an environmental education center is planned to displace the planted area of the park. It is an attempt against the upward tendency of sustainability that excuses and promotes our excessive building-culture. Sustainability should be a moral attitude of architecture, and is neither a promotional nor marketing feature to justify the practice of excessive development. If seperation from nature is innate in architecture, our act should bridge the gap. The building submerges into the landscape to minimize its impact on and to maximize contribution to the site. The submergence returns ground surface to the park, allowing sun-light to reach the earth and the air to go through the park, and as a medium, gently connecting the two oppositing forms of environment, the park and the library. The physical harmonization with the ground also raises visitors’ consciousness of their relationship to the earth.

West Elevation


17

Roof Plan

B

12 15

A

13

14 14

11

2 A 16

B

Ground Floor

6

5

2

7

1

1

8 4

3

9

10

1. Classroom 2. Multipurpose Room 4. Main Corridor/Exhibition Space 6. Mechanical Room 7. Interior Courtyard 9. Courtyard 10. Library Basement 12. Book Store 13. Courtyard 15. Roof Garden 16. Library Lobby

3. Library/Book Storage 5. Secondary Corridor 8. Water Collection Pool 11. Entrance Lobby 14. Vegetated Roof 17. Roof Top Cafe

Underground Floor

Scale 1:750


Controled day-lighting condition and natural ventilation emphasize the concept of the environmental education. The garden roof provides more open space to the park and protect the interior and architecture. It also collects rain water and the water is recycled. The entire body of the architecture works as a micro-climate system, as if natural systems work inside of the earth. Visitors experience environmental manner through the architecture.

Section A-A

Sun Light

Classroom Micro-Climate Diagramatic Section B-B

Winter

Summer

Warm Air Cool Air

7

8

10

1. Reinforced Concrete w/ Water-Repellent Finish 2. Rigid Insulation

3. Insulated Jalousie Window Computer-Operated 4. Double Glazing System w/ Mechanical Louver 5. Vegetated Roof

6. Swithch-Operated Window 7. Steel Grill 8. Sliding Window 9. Awning Window 10. Drain Channel For Water Collection

Detail Section B-B

Scale 1:40


5

2

1 6

9

3

4


Main Corridor

Class Room

Multi-Purpose Room Toward Courtyard


Ashburton Ave Housing Complex Yonkers, NY

Prof. Julio Salcedo Fourth Year/Fall 09

Location : 108 Ashburton Ave. Yonkers, NY Program : 80 residential units(various sizes), commercial space, parking, community space, public exterior space, etc.

Palisad

e Ave

Ashburton Ave


The housing development project consists of two design phases. The first phase that was led by a team of two develops a conceptual master plan for two distanced housing blocks. Based on the master plan, the southern housing lot was developed farther as an individual project.

Phase 1 Conceptual Master Planning

DOWNTOWN YONKERS

COMMERCIAL PUBLIC / INSTITUTIONAL

$

RESIDENTIAL

WORK

RESIDENCE TYPE

$$

23%

32%

ASHBURTON AVE HOUSING PROJECT

RENT 80 UNITS

ST. JOSEPHS AVE HOUSING PROJECT AFFORDABLE 110 UNITS

45%

MARKET PRICE 150 UNITS

A right development project can ignite its community’s sleeping mechanisms. Architecture can re-create a socio-economic system which self-sustains and attracts more attention of outer societies. After intense studies on the socio-economic behavior of the area, the team reaches a creation of diagrammatic program organization that would stimulates, promote, and balance the existing economic flow and social values of the community as well as architecturally provoking and balancing with adjacencies. It is a project of city-planning, architecture, landscape, and entrepreneur.

COMMERCIAL

ST. JOSEPHS AVE HOUSING PROJECT

Socio-Economic System

50% < 25% - 50% < 25% BLACK

+ 50% < 25% - 50% < 25% WHITE

= BLACK 50%< 50%< 25-50% 25-50% 0-25% 0-25% 25-50% WHITE 0-25% 25-50% 25-50% 0-25% 25-50% 50%< 50%< OTHER 0-25% 0-25% 0-50% 25-75% 25-75% 0-50% 0-25%

Ethnicity

Master Plan

ASHBURTON AVE HOUSING PROJECT

DOWNTOWN YONKERS


The new urban composition, which is a reversed micro version of its context, regenerates its own socio-economic system. A variety of residential units, which are elevated and ringed by vehicular paths, mixes people with various social standing. A market-style commercial space, which is burried half underground, increases job opportunities for its residents and a new attraction in the neighbor, as well as allowing the entire lot to become an open public landscape.

Three Sizes of Residential Units (3BdRm, 2BdRm, Studio/1BdRm)

East Elevation

South Elevation

Market Space


Phase 2 Architectural Development

Housings have been developed and built up seeking for maximum amount of light and air since ancient time, though the accumulation of the architectural enthusiasm also bears a risk of producing unhealthy environment which draws people into shadow. This project challenges the negative by-product of architecture and aims to approach a level of the greatness and liveliness, which could be seen in ancient, vernacular architecture. The complex is formed by two different attitudes that are the north side, which responds to its urban setting, and the south side, which relates to the characteristic hill. The north side of the housing is laid horizontally and hovers entirely to allow the urban flow to filter through, avoiding fortification of the block and harmonizing the street and the hill side. The south side is a colonnade of small towers, allowing vertical filtration of air, light and the views. Each tower enthusiastically stands against the hill, extending the body horizontally toward the north side. Both the horizontal and vertical filtration of the complex creates an opportunity to have airy and brighter inner street and spaces within the block.

Shadowy, Unhealthy Street in Winter

Open Market /Public Plaza

Sun-lit, Healthier Street and Culture

The west side of the block becomes a public square to serve as a circulation and community hub, connecting Ashburton Ave, the east and west side of the housing complex, and the Croton Aqueduct walkway. The slab building floats as an icon of the intersection, and it houses community spaces underneath. It visually connects and balances the landscape, the public plaza, and the housing complex.


B

C

A

A

C

B

de Av e

Level +1

Palisa

Ashburton Ave

6

6 7

9

6

8

5

Level 0

3 1

2

4 176

170

Trailway Old Croton Aqueduct

150

130 1. Laundry Room 4. Public Square 7. Management Office

Level -1

Scale 1:1500

2. Mechanical Room 5. Open Deck 8. Community Room

3. Parking 6. Entrance 9. Commercial/Market Space


West Elevation

South Elevation


Section B-B

Section C-C

Scale 1:500


Grant Ave Public Library Bronx, NY

Prof. Joan Krevlin Fourth Year/SP 09


Location : Grant Ave & E169th St., Bronx, NY Program : Library for Adults, Children & Teens, Community Auditorium (180 Seats), Conference Rm, Meeting Rms, PC Work Station, PC Learning Center, Cafe, Exhibition Gallery, Offices.

Although a library of the 21st century is to contain diverse forms of media, information, and activities, the concept of library, a place for knowledge, remains the same. The project explores to develop a new library that responds to todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s demands, but as an inheritance of a traditional library. A clear architectural expression as a public building in response to the context and respectful spacial experience for books/any media are lost in contemporary libraries.

N

St

Av e

9th

nt

E16

Gra

The library realizes the goal by articulating diverse spaces created by interaction of volumes with layers of walls and slabs. The layering allows protected rooms and open spaces next to each other. Book stacks are contained in longitudinal secure volumes/wall and an outer layer surrounds them to create space open to the sky. Controled natural light falls into the space, contrarily to the book spaces with ambient light. Connected and penetrated horizontaly by bridges, community spaces form its own volume that floats above the important corner of the lot as a statement of the public building, visually and spatially connecting the public ground floor to the Grant Avenue park.

Grant Ave Park

park

public

park


A

14

15 12

C

21

10

24

C

15 10

9

9

B

B

16

19

18

18

17

4

4

20

4

A Third Floor

Fourth Floor

3

7

11

5 12

6

10

13

4

10

13

9

3

2. Cafe 4. Office 6. Conference Rm 8. Casual Books 10. Non-Fiction 12. Special Collection 14. Ref. Reading 16. PC Work 18. Meeting Rm 20. Staff Lounge 22. Director’s Office 24. Roof Garden

2

Ground Floor

E169th St.

N

1. ExhibitionGallery 3. Circulation/Info 5. Auditorium 7. Service Entry 9. Periodical 11. Reference 13. Study Rm 15. Reading Rm 17. Tech. Learning 19. Teens Library 21. Children’s Library 23. Staff Meeting Rm

1

Grant Ave Scale 1:500

8

Second Floor 7


North Elevation

Section A-A

Scale 1:400


stone cladding - facade

concrete - outer wall - book stuck

lightwell

steel

- slabs - columns

er

y cent t i n u m m o c

library


65˚

40˚

A

30˚ 25˚

Detail A

Book Stacks Rm

Scale 1:100

The main book spaces are enclosed respectfully by cast-concrete structure. The spaces are equipped with floor-to-ceiling metal book shelves and mezzanine bridges, resembling the traditional manner of classical libraries. Those concrete boxes sandwitch a lightwell topped with a custum-designed louver system to provide comfort of natural light around a year.

Metal Book Shelves, Continuous from Floor to Ceiling

Steel Railing Weld to Steel Beam

W12 Steel Beam, w/ Intumescent Coating, Flushed w/ Decking

Concrete Slab Thickened For Structure & Seating W12 Steel Beam, w/ Intumescent Coating, Exposed @ Floor Edge

Book Stacks Rm Detail

Scale 1:20

2” Wood Decking W6 Steel Joist w/ Intumescent Coating Acoustic Insulation Suspended GWB Ceiling


2” Granite Clad

Folding Glass Door

Steel Tie

W12 Steel Beam, w/ Intumescent Coating, Flushed w/ Decking

B

Steel Strap @ Vertical Joints

1/2”

Steel C-Profiles

2” Wood Decking W6 Steel Joist w/ Intumescent Coating Acoustic Insulation Suspended GWB Ceiling

1 1/2” Wood Decking 1”x4” Wood Batten 3” Rigid Insulation Waterproofing Membrane R.C. Slab Steel Channel Gypsum Board

B

Detail B

Scale 1:20

The Community Center portion is constructed in steel structure, and its exterior is clad with granite panels, which emphasizes the significant appearance of the public building. The exterior wall is detached at the north of the fourth floor, to create a balcony that opens toward the park.

summer

Section B-B Detail

winter

Scale 1:100

The study/reading rooms function as air shafts to carry hot air out in summer as well as light-capturing device in winter. They face and open toward the Grant Ave Park and the highschool, allowing more pleasant views of the public axis despite the dense urban neighborhood.

Section C-C Scale 1:300

Reading/Study Rm Detail

Scale 1:100


Downing St. Two Family Housing

Prof. Elisabetta Terragni Third Year/Fall 08

Location : 51 Downing St, West Village, NYC

G

ST

D

OR

DF

BE E

AV

N

AVE OF AMERIC

A

IN

WN

DO

31


The density of buildings in the city resulted in fortifying each block with continuous building facade. It prevents flow of the air and the sun light. As lightwells were poorly introduced to mitigate the fortification, eventually, they emphasized the darkness.

The facade of 51 Downing St. housing inherits the nature of street wall of the block. However, the continuity is led inward, becoming a private street reaching the inside of the block and deviding the lot. It forms a sculptural lightwell to trap the sunlight for the housing, and distributes the light to the street. Now, the block is oppened to the street. Architecture is not to block light, air, and space. Its structure and composition of spaces also responds to the condition of day-lighting. Private spaces appear as individual volumes and they float to control the sun light coming inside. Then, architecture becomes a complex of spaces formed by light and air, and is no longer an enclosure.

Street Elevation

Summer Sunlight Spring/Fall Sunlight Winter Sunlight

The expression of the trapped light changes time by time, season by season. It reflects ambience of dawn and rolls out a bright layer of light onto the street surface. It displays fade-out of dusk and becomes a part of street lights. More expressions on the street, more liviliness and richness in the scene of the village. 32

Section C-C

Morning

Afternoon


9

8

10

8

7

8

Third Floor

B

A

6

C

C

6

8 7

B

A

Second Floor

4

1

1

5

Lobby Office Storage Art Gallery Master Bd Rm Play Rm

2. Home Office 4. Artist Studio 6. Living/Dining 8. Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bd Rm 10. Study Rm

3

2

DOWN

N

1. 3. 5. 7. 9.

Ground Floor

Scale 1:350

DOWNING ST. 33


June

Mar/Sep

Dec

9:00

10:00

11:00

PM

12:00

1:00

2:00

3:00

4:00

5:00

6:00

Sun Light Footprint

House A: Light-Fall

Family A ; young couple with 3 children Required Program : living room, family room, home office, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s room, bedroom for each member, large storage.

In house A, as more private spaces are required and more volumes are needed, they can be organized to control the strong daylight. They float within the house, creating gaps where ambient and direct light to fall down. A stair well works as a dramatic light well.

Section A-A 34


N

N

18:00 W

8:00

17:00

9:00

16:00

E

W

E

10:00

15:00

11:00 14:00

12:00

13:00

16:00 8:00 15:00 9:00 10:00 14:00 13:00 11:00 12:00

S

S

9:00

E

17:00

S

11:00

W

9:00

NW

NE

SE

12:00

11:00 NW

NE

13:00

N

E

SE

NNW

NEE

14:00

S

12:00

N

SE

SW

13:00

E

S 14:00

15:00

NE

SSE

NE

SE

15:00

SW

Sun Path Diagram

House B: Light-Drift

Family B ; a couple with a wheelchaired child Required Program : living room, family room, work studio, art gallery, guest room, childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s room, bedroom for each, storage. *all rooms to be accesible to wheelchair.

In house B, since private spaces are less, volumes are organized to surround shared spaces to create a basin of light, that holds and diffuses ambient light. Sun light comes as ambient and stays drifting at the bottom.

Section B-B 35


Site Model: A site model can be a tool to visualize the designersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; perception about the site. What they perceive in the site as its character, how they want to influence the site, and most importantly, how they want to see the site, should be reflected. This site model was generated as a fusion of subjective and objective view. The adjacent buildings are built in objective way that makes volumes perpendicular. On the other hand, the buildings away from the site were designed in perspective. 36


DUMBO Performing Arts Center

Prof. Antonio Furgiuele Second Year/Spring 08

Old Tobacco Warehouse At The Brooklyn Bridge Park, Brooklyn, NY Built in the 1870s as a tobacco customs inspection center 20,000 s.f. East River

Ma

kl

Br

d Bri

yn

an

oo

att

nh

Br

id

ge

ge

M

E

Q.

B.

M

N


Guests Room

Theater Courtyard

Cafe

Guests Room

Park Side Elevation

Transformation of the existing shell connects the community with the park and view, and Brooklyn with Manhattan, more strongly. The flow of people is led into the shell and released into the dramatic spaces, as if taking a role of performance or live art.

Conceptual Diagrams

The brick shell literally transforms as if revealing its inside toward the city. It swells, loosing bricks, and concrete spreads and projects out. It gains porosity, and dissolves into the air. Creation of a smooth spatial transformation connects outside and inside, public and private, and community and art. Street becomes hallway, opening into a lobby, becoming theatrical spaces, turning into private rooms. Light-filled court yards appear in the enclosed shell. A Light box exists next to a black box. The park is connected by the succession of voids, pulling wind in from the park. The porosity filters the air for natural ventilation, by controlling heat gain.

Section A-A

Section B-B

Courtyard

Exhibition

Hall

Black Box Courtyard Courtyard

Studio

Studio

Lobby

Office

Office Office

Meeting Rm

Mech. Rms Storage

Street

Park

Courtyard


A

B

24 23

23

22

21

15

20

18

19 19

17

15 16

15. 18. 21. 24.

Storage 16. Private Restroom Conference Room 19. Studio Main Theater 22. Patron’s Lounge Costume/Make-up

17. Director’s Office 20. Blackbox Theater 23. Green Room

Second Floor

B

A

13 14

13 11

12

12

6

4

10

5 3

UP UP

2

8

1. Ticket & Coat Room 4. Courtyard/Exhibition 7. Mechanical Room 10. Loading Dock 13. Reflecting Pool

Ground Floor

2. Lobby 5. Outside Exhibition 8. Management Office 11. Stage Set Shop 14. Public Walk

Scale 1:300

3. Outside Stage 6. Cafe/Gallery 9. Artist Residence 12. Locker/Shower

1

9

8

7

7

7



Takuma Megumi-Architecture Portfolio 2011 Aug.