REALM OF FINE ARTS

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REALM OF FINE ARTS

MÄNTTÄ 11.6.–29.8.2021

CONSTANTLY AND EVERYWHERE


ISBN 978-952-99684-4-2 Editorial board: Krister Gråhn, Riikka Lenkkeri, Antti Korkka Cover image: Sylvester Kivelä, #FF69CD, video, sound, short story Layout: Piritta Maisala Publisher: Town of Mänttä-Vilppula


SAMUEL INKILÄINEN

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ALINA LAMPINEN

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SARI MOILALA

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ANNIKA TAKKALA

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FANNY VARJO

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SUSANNA SELIN

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SAARA-MARIA SIPPONEN

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ALEKSANDRA NÄVERI

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ELLENORE WENTJÄRVI

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KAISA ANNIKA HALONEN

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EMILIA NURMIVAARA

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ALEKSI SYSTÄ

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SYLVESTER KIVELÄ

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REALM OF FINE ARTS The Kuvataiteen valtakunta - Realm of Fine Arts exhibition for graduating visual artists will be organised in the Art Town of Mänttä-Vilppula for the first time this year. Previously, the universities of applied sciences that teach fine art have organised a touring exhibition of the same name in different localities every three years. Now the Kuvataiteen valtakunta exhibition gets a new beginning in Art Town. Finnish art education has a long-standing tradition, and the universities of applied sciences have a key role in the training of visual artists. Over the years, schools have evolved from small units to become a part of larger regional universities of applied sciences. All universities of applied sciences that teach visual arts in Finland take part in the exhibition, which together form a strongly cooperating network. Mänttä-Vilppula is a nationally known town for art that attracts everyone interested in art. Art Town provides an extraordinary setting to showcase graduating visual artists in our country. We wish success to all graduating visual artists and courage to operate in the rapidly changing world as active artists and proactive social players. We would warmly like to thank our partners, curators and student trainees as well as everyone involved in setting up the exhibition for their enthusiastic efforts and support for this exhibition.

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A special thanks to the Pirkanmaa Regional Fund (Finnish Cultural Foundation) that saw the significance of our exhibition in highlighting graduating visual artists. Antti Korkka Director of Culture Town of Mänttä-Vilppula Culture services Eija Mustonen Program Manager LAB University of Applied Sciences Institute of Design, Fine Arts Eija Rajalin Lecturer Lapland University of Applied Sciences Visual Arts Matti Velhonoja Lecturer, Team Leader Satakunta University of Applied Sciences Kankaanpää School of Fine Arts Fanny Niemi-Junkola Lecturer, Team Leader Tampere University of Applied Sciences D.P. in Media and Arts/Fine Art Taina Erävaara Head of Fine Arts Turku University of Applied Sciences Arts Academy Marika Holm Lecturer, Project Leader Novia University of Applied Sciences Fine Arts


CONSTANTLY AND EVERYWHERE Things are happening around us all the time. How, why and where do I live? We gather information with all our senses that are the foundation of our experiences. The themes of sharpening our senses and stopping at small details constantly emerge in the works of the recently graduated visual artists. We observe and are sensitive to our emotions. Personal experiences form a part of broader interaction. We are a part of the society and the nature. Being sensitive to our observations and sharpening our senses open up possibilities for experiencing things in a new way. Precision and sensitivity are the tools we use in our pursuit to get to the essence of matters. Time and concentration help us to exceed plain observations and might make us understand our experiences better.

The freedom of art is a matter worth being loud for. The polyphony, inherent critical attitude, flexibility and the ability for self-analysis of contemporary art are not trivial matters. Art discusses, participates and makes an impact. We can have meaningful experiences constantly and everywhere.

Krister Gråhn Curator, artist Riikka Lenkkeri Curator, artist

The ability to sharpen our senses and change our viewpoints is included in the contents of today’s fine arts education. The education seeks to receive each student as an individual as well as to form personal paths of learning artists that are different from one another. The education of visual arts lives and changes along with our society. Educational institutions are founded, closed down and merged with one another. The education of fine arts is suddenly offered from a different angle or harnessed for the use of the market economy. Concerns related to the teaching of free arts repeatedly emerge, however.

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SAMUEL INKILÄINEN

Samuel Inkiläinen (1996) has created a background image for the virtual world where even the impossible is possible. Despite the technology, the background image is based on the cooperation of the eye and the hand as well as on marking the line. The drawing separated from the image is produced by computer. But in order for someone to make software or to use it, one must understand drawing. Inkiläinen talks about his dream of being included in creating an artwork – a game that he could love.

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Laboratory 2020 Digital mixed media 3840 x 2160 px

Intermediate stage 2 2020 Line render 4 x 2,25 m

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ALINA LAMPINEN

Viimeinen kimalainen (The Last Bumblebee) made of scrap metal and packaging plastic by Alina Lampinen (1998) reminds us, in the words of Pliny the Elder, that Nature is nowhere greater than in her smallest works. (Pliny the Elder 79 BC). Hierarchical proportion is a technique used in religious art where unnaturally large proportion or scale is used to depict the relative importance of the figures in the artwork. Lampinen uses her artwork to highlight the importance of insects in our ecosystem.

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The Last Bumblebee 2021 Welded from scrap metal 290 x 230 x 110 cm Photograph: Tomi Karjalainen

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SARI MOILALA

The starting point for the Momentum -paintings of Sari Moilala (1965) is being present in the moment amidst nature. Experientiality and different sensory perceptions as well as our awareness of the continuous movement around us are central elements of the painting process that seeks to describe the bodily sensations caused by the experience of nature instead of painting representational portraits of the nature. Time is an essential part of our experiences, but how is it possible to illustrate time?

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The Sun Will Rise Tomorrow 2020 Acrylic and charcoal on canvas 150 x 200 cm

They Need Nothing From Us 2021 Acrylic and charcoal on canvas 150 x 200 cm

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ANNIKA TAKKALA

Annika Takkala (1993) turns around the idea behind information boards as the source of accurate information. The artist asks how the reality transmits information about itself. What does a reflection say about the amount of light, what do waves say about the wind or a piece of birch bark about the life of a birch tree? Do they transmit information like codes, diagrams and i nfographics? Takkala gravitates towards small details and stops to reflect on the meaning of information found everywhere around us.

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INFO 3 (detail) 2021 Mixed media 80 x 70 cm

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FANNY VARJO

Visions reflects on our way of humanising natural beings. “I find the confluences between human bodies and nature interesting. A sculpture becomes bodily once the folds of its surface create an illusion of a human body or when the surface is covered with hair”. The brightly coloured and partly humoristic sculptures of Fanny Varjo (1995) highlight the question of how and what kind of power we use by defining our perceptions in relation to the human.

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Being from the Visions series 2021 Mixed media 80 x 88 x 50 cm

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SUSANNA SELIN

Nude soft animal explores our complex and even difficult relationship with nature by contrasting the human physicalness with natural shapes. Susanna Selin (1982) uses her viewpoint to provide us with an opportunity for observing ourselves and our lives from the outside as a performance that can seem absurd or even comical. What is our habitual way of observing the nature and its details, are we able to detect the reasons behind our perceptions?

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Compassion makes you beautiful 2021 Photo on canvas 195 x 130 cm

Nude soft animal 2021 Photo on canvas 150 x 100 cm

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SAARA-MARIA SIPPONEN

An existing form, an industrially manufactured skipping rope handle, is the starting point for Saara-Maria Sipponen’s (1984) work. The limited expression form used for the Toistoja (Repetitions) series creates sculptures containing expressive bodily references, both by chance and through conscious processing. The sculptures in different types of arrangements create impressions of cavities of the human body, of movement and repetition.

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Repetition V 1 2021 Glazed clay 11 x 10 x 6 cm Photograph: Tomi Karjalainen

Repetition V 2 2021 Glazed clay 9 x 6 x 7 cm Photograph: Tomi Karjalainen

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ALEKSANDRA NÄVERI

Urban Chaos by Aleksandra Näveri (1996) examines our relationship with the urban space. The pictorial narration resembling a product catalogue portrays the city as a dark environment constantly under further construction. Despite the slow-motion video footage, the fast pace of the city is retained in the parallel images. Näveri examines our way of taking over and privatising shared spaces. How people seek freedom and security from the surrounding environment and how these might be found from rather surprising sources.

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Urban Chaos 2021 Video 8 min

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ELLENORE WENTJÄRVI

The comics and small photos of personal history by Ellenore Wentjärvi (1996) describe the youth of the artist before her time in the fine arts academy. The artist’s hometown, Espoo, appears as a place with no future where drugs and alcohol serve a purpose of life. The black and white drawings and the poetic text guide the viewer forward. The mobile photos add in the question about fact and fiction as well as about to whom and why the story is being told.

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Gränsland – berättelser från broarna 2021 Excerpts from the comic 21 x 29,7 cm

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KAISA ANNIKA HALONEN

Enkelikenttä (Field of Angels) is painted in black. The different shades of black and the changing surface structure of the painting impact the way in which we perceive the colour. Kaisa Annika Halonen (1996) talks about the long process during which she combined different techniques, substances and surface materials. Black is not only black. Instead, the markings made in black on black form a personal journey in time and a multidimensional range of colours with a title that enables various interpretations.

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Angel ground 2021 Mixed media 150 x 300 cm Photograph: Arto Apila

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EMILIA NURMIVAARA

Emilia Nurmivaara (1992) has painted the dining room of her childhood home. The everyday and familiar environment is reflected from and repeated by different surfaces and communicates the atmosphere, feelings and memories hidden in the room. Dark corners, the light of the table lamp and the vase with flowering lilies of the valley are repeated in the reflections, but a reflection, painting or even a memory are never true to the original situation.

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Panel door 2021 oil on canvas 160 x 116 cm

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ALEKSI SYSTÄ

The feelings experienced by the artist Aleksi Systä (1993) amidst the insecurity and isolation brought about by the pandemic have been recorded in the series of paintings titled Päiväkirjaamista (Journaling). In his journal, Systä completely abandons using words and finds his expression in the brush strokes. In the works of Systä, the erased parts speak as much as the parts with added colour. The days spent in isolation are reformed again and again through each viewer’s experiences.

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In exceptional circumstances (#2) 2020-2021 Oil on cardboard 36,5 x 55,5 cm Photograph: Sylvester Kivelä

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SYLVESTER KIVELÄ

Sylvester Kivelä (1997) discusses love in his work #FF69CD linssien läpi (#FF69CD through glasses). Love is complex and can include hidden and sometimes even nasty or ugly things. Fine arts enables us to discuss these things. According to Kivelä, he looks for a way to connect with others through art without actually taking contact. There is no love between us as love exists in you and me, separately at both ends. What is left in between?

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#FF69CD 2021 Video, sound, short story 13 min

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UNIVERSITIES OF APPLIED SCIENCES TEACHING FINE ART

LAB University of Applied Sciences Institute of Design, Fine Arts

Tampere University of Applied Sciences Degree Programme in Media and Arts, Fine Art

The fine arts education provided in Lappeenranta covers various forms of art: graphic art, painting, photography, sculpture and art jewellery as well as new art forms such as public art. In addition to traditional techniques, new materials and technologies are also very much included in the teaching.

The English-language Media and Arts degree programme includes the following three study paths: Fine Art, Music Production and Interactive Media. The studies offer content in various areas in the field of art. The degree programme offers both BA and MA degrees.

Lapland University of Applied Sciences Visual Arts The focus area of the fine artist training of the University of Applied Sciences provided in Tornio is the use and application of digital tools and environments. As a fine artist, you create visual artworks and make them available to an audience. Fine artists working with digital images take advantage of digitalisation as a change, a social phenomenon and a technique.

Satakunta University of Applied Sciences Kankaanpää School of Fine Arts Kankaanpää School of Fine Arts is a centre of expertise in fine arts that trains fine artists in the field of contemporary art. The city and the surrounding nature offer an inspiring starting point for the careers of young, talented artists.

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Turku University of Applied Sciences Arts Academy The fine arts education provided by the Arts Academy continues the legacy of the Turku School of Drawing, founded in 1830, by training new fine artists. The degree programme is part of the Arts Academy’s multidisciplinary offering and provides good foundational knowledge and skills for working as a fine artist.

Novia University of Applied Sciences Fine Arts Novia University of Applied Sciences operates in Vaasa, Turku, Raseborg and Jakobstad. Novia is Finland’s biggest Swedish-language university of applied sciences. Novia offers high-quality education based on the needs of work life for undergraduates and postgraduates. The Jakobstad campus focuses on visual arts, graphic design, performing arts and music.


PARTNERS

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CURATORS

KRISTER GRÅHN

RIIKKA LENKKERI

Krister Gråhn works with sculptures and installations. During his career, Gråhn has studied in three different schools of fine arts and is currently completing his post-graduate studies in the Praxis programme of the Academy of Fine Arts of Uniarts Helsinki.

Riikka Lenkkeri works as a painter. She graduated from the Accademia Ligustica di Belle Arti in Genoa in 1995.

In recent years, Gråhn has collaborated with different artists and worked with his own projects. Working in pairs with other artists has provided new challenges to the production of art –different aesthetic preferences must be brought together and the artists must share constant dialogue aboutthe content of the artwork. Gråhn has held private exhibitions in different parts of Finland and participated in various curated and juried group and collaboration art exhibitions since 2001. Since the beginning of his career, Gråhn has actively worked in different roles in the artistic field, as a technical executor, producer, publisher and curator.

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In recent years, Lenkkeri has explored working methods that combine different painting techniques, where the know-how of old painting traditions is linked with contemporary materials and subjects. Lenkkeri has worked as an artist for nearly three decades and has held several private exhibitions, both in Finland and Italy, and also participated in numerous group exhibitions. Alongside her artistic work, she has worked as a lecturer and a supervisor of final projects in different Finnish schools of fine arts. Lenkkeri is a member of the association Mäntän kuvataiteen ystävät ry, the association behind the Mänttä Art Festival activities.


CONSTANTLY AND EVERYWHERE