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2016–17 NON UT SIBI MINISTRETUR SED UT MINISTRET


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MISSION TO EDUCATE THE WHOLE STUDENT MOTTO NOT TO BE SERVED BUT TO SERVE (Non ut sibi ministretur sed ut ministret)

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What does it mean to be a

TAFT GRADUATE?

ACADEMICS

Faculty, Courses, Arts, College, Service, Alumni

It means you’re You’re You’ve You’ve You’re You’ve You’re You’re You’re You’ve You’re You’re You’re

4 Who Will Be Teaching You? 6 Honor Code 8 Programs of Distinction 8 Morning Meeting 10 Courses to Check Out 14 All Over the Map 16 Visual Arts 16 Arts Facilities 18 Performing Arts 20 College Counseling 22 Non ut Sibi: Community Service 24 Tafties

EVERYTHING ELSE Campus, Sports, Clubs, Life

WELC

26 The School’s Architecture CS Center Spread Fold-out: Where will you be living and learning? Campus Map 28 Big Red: Taft Sports 28 Athletic Offerings 29 Intramural Sports 30 Athletic Facilities 32 Clubs, Committees and Publications 34 Q & A 36 Life @ Taft 38 Teachers, Coaches, Mentors 39 Spiritual Life at Taft 40 What to Expect When You Are Accepted 41 Unique Taft Lingo

APPLYING How, When, Why

42 Top 10 Reasons to Apply to Taft 43 How to Apply 44 Scholarships 50 Admissions 51 Affording Taft 52 Headmaster’s Letter IBC Portrait of a Graduate

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an environmentalist, a doctor, a public health activist. a state Supreme Court justice. devoted your life to saving elephants in Africa. founded a school, won a Nobel Prize. a composer, a writer, a movie director. created an Emmy award winning television show. a senator, a teacher, a headmaster, a race car driver. a mountain climber, a dancer, a puppeteer. a Grammy award winning musician, a New York Times best-selling author. won a Gold Medal at the Olympics. the only foreign-born secretary of the Army, an Admiral in the Navy. an internet fashion entrepreneur, an actor on stage and screen. a photographer for National Geographic.


HOW are

you going to do all this?

Life after Taft may seem a long way off. In the meantime, what does it mean to be a

TAFT STUDENT? You will You can You can You can You can You can You can You can You can You can You will You will

have the opportunity to live with people from all over the world. build robots, transplant genes, and dig a freshwater well in rural Cambodia. write a play, produce a movie, and choreograph a dance. work at a school in Africa, start a charity, and build a boat. ski for Big Red and travel to spring training. sing in Europe with Collegium and play squash in Scotland. participate in Model UN and compete in the Math Olympiad. paint a self portrait and exhibit your work in the Potter Gallery. lead your TEAMS engineering group to a state championship. play with professional jazz musicians in New Orleans. recite sonnets.

If you’ve been accepted to Taft, then you are bright, motivated, adventurous, inquisitive, and creative. Still, a Taft education can be hard work. We won’t leave you hanging. You’ll have classmates, teachers, mentors, and advisors who will guide you, lend an ear, and marvel at your accomplishments.

YOU’RE GOING TO BE GREAT!

engage in discussions with prominent guest speakers.

OME

to TAFT

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WHO

Will Be

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TEACHING You? CARLY BORKEN

Meet Carly Borken. She’s a science teacher, the director of Taft’s environmental studies and stewardship, and the creator of Taft’s “EcoMons” program—elected student leaders who raise environmental awareness and work to reduce Taft’s carbon footprint. She introduced the farm program, coaches crew and soccer, and lives in a dorm with her family. And she and her students maintain a solar-powered chicken coop on campus. Want to do well in her Oceanography class? Then be ready to strap on waders and muck around in coastal estuaries and the intertidal zone.

BABA FREW

The name Baba is an apodo from her time spent in Mexico as a child. It’s her 28th year teaching at Taft. This year she’ll teach Spanish and AP Human Geography, a perfect combination for an incurable world traveler. A veteran teacher, she mentors younger faculty in the UPenn Fellows program. “I love helping our young teachers. They earn their Masters degree while teaching at Taft, and I am inspired by their enthusiasm for sharing pedagogical innovations from Ivy professors.” She’s also the Director of Community Service, the faculty advisor to the student-run Service Board, and a co-director of the Global Leadership Institute. Ten Taft kids and ten kids from Waterbury public schools are chosen after a rigorous selection process conducted by a panel of teachers from Taft and Waterbury. “The GLI is remarkable,” says Baba. “Taft and Waterbury students collaborate and develop leadership skills

that will help them address urgent issues confronting their generation both locally and globally.” How can you make a difference in life? “Our world is ever more complex,” says Baba. “The lessons students learn in the foreign language and human geography classrooms, in tandem with service to others, prepare our kids for diplomacy and leadership beyond Taft’s walls.”

MARK TRAINA

“I had great teachers in my private secondary school, one of whom was my advisor,” says Mark Traina, veteran history teacher and varsity hockey and baseball coach. “He taught me American Studies, a course about the connections between literature and history. It was my first experience with truly deep learning, and it made an impression on me. So from the age of 17, I knew I wanted to teach at a boarding school. And there’s no better place to teach than at Taft.” At 18, Mark became a summer intern at St. George’s School. At 21, he came to Taft as a teaching fellow. “My mentors in Taft’s history department taught me that it’s okay to take risks,” he says. “Taft has an incredible mentoring program for young teachers.” He went on to get his master’s degree at Wesleyan University. His wife, Edie, is the Dean of Faculty, and also teaches history. They live on campus with their two young girls. “Our children learn by watching Taft students operate,” says Mark. “They learn that it’s cool to be passionate, to work hard, and to be kind. Something really magical happens here.”

YEE-FUN YIN

Yee-Fun Yin is an active professional artist who focuses on documentary portraiture. His striking images have adorned Taft’s walls and galleries. “I was trained as an architect,” he says. “But I found that photography was a better medium to achieve self-expression.” He spent his childhood in Burma and Laos, and speaks fluent Mandarin. He attended Yale as an undergraduate. “I love photography because it’s project oriented, and I found I really loved teaching. Knowing that I’ve helped change lives? That’s pretty satisfying.” How can you do well in his intro photography class? “My students need to pay attention to the technical aspects, in order to define their craftsmanship,” says Mr. Yin. “But then they must realize the distinction between taking a picture and making a picture. Anyone can snap a picture. I want my students to learn to be deliberate, to think about what we are making. I want them to make it personal, so that they achieve selfexpression through their art.” What does he love about teaching at Taft? “I have a lot of freedom within the curriculum. I’m able to customize each class, and to teach multiple tutorial students at different levels of talent and areas of interest. I love to watch my students learn that photography is interconnected to their lives and their learning.”

MORE FANTASTIC FACULTY c

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MORE c OZZIE PARENTE

Ask a group of Taft kids who their favorite teacher is, and his name comes up over and over. A teacher of chemistry, Mr. Parente is known for playing music as kids walk into his class, and for his corny jokes. What’s his teaching secret? “I pride myself on knowing my students really well,” he says with a modest shrug. “Kids are really forgiving if you’re honest with them and are just yourself.” He’s also a dean of the Upper Mid (junior) class, the boys’ varsity

soccer coach, thirds’ boys’ basketball coach, assistant girls’ softball coach, and, famously, the Commissioner of PSBL (Pre-Study Ball League), the wildly popular, coed student and faculty recreational softball league that the whole school looks forward to every spring. “PSBL has taken on a life of its own,” he says. “It’s a great chance for the kids to have unstructured fun, to make their own calls, their own lineups. And the faculty team is super competitive.” What’s the best part of teaching

at Taft? “I love coaching and teaching chemistry. But what l like most about my job is having interactions and conversations with students. Every lunch block I’m in my office and students cycle through, just to chat. Yeah, it’s part of my job, but it’s my favorite part. Being a dean, a coach, and a dorm parent makes you a better teacher. If you go to your student’s play or coffee house performance, they’re going to trust you and give you more of themselves in the classroom.“

JIM MOONEY

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Over the past thirty years, Jim Mooney has taught Introductory Physics, AP Physics, Electronics, Statistical Mechanics, Quantum Mechanics, Advanced Classical Mechanics, and Advanced Electricity and Magnetism. He directs Taft’s robotics program, and coordinates a number of science competitions, including the Science Olympiad, the TSA/TEAMS (Technology Student Association/Test of Engineering, Aptitude, Math and Science) competition, and the Yale Physics Olympics. Not only does he teach all levels of science at Taft; he spent twenty summers at Taft Educational Center, our popular professional development summer school program, teaching teachers on how best to present the AP Physics curriculum. He ought to know. Not only has he written Taft’s Introductory Physics textbook, he has also published three additional books about Physics and Calculus. What does he love about Taft? “We have motivated, interested students. I enjoy teaching the introductory level, because even if Physics is not a student’s strong point, Taft kids always want to do well. And it’s a true privilege to teach students at the advanced level, kids who are interested in pursuing a physics-related career.”

The

HONOR Code

Be honest: You want to come to Taft. No, really. If you want to come to Taft, you need to be honest. At Taft, we take honesty really seriously. Taft’s Honor Code was developed by students, and every student pledges academic and personal honesty for every assessment, whether it’s the daily homework or a final exam: “I have neither given nor received aid on this assessment.” The Honor Code is a simple but important lesson: Your word is your bond, and by the time you’ve graduated, personal integrity will be part of your DNA.


PILAR SANTOS

A native of Spain, Ms. Santos has been teaching Spanish at Taft for the past fifteen years. She’s also the coordinator of School Year Abroad, and the International Students’ Advisor. “I’m in charge of the orientation program. I start communication with new international families, help make travel arrangements, help them arrange for insurance and books, and facilitate a general transition to Taft. It’s difficult to send your child so far away. I want parents to know their kids are going to be taken care of.” As a native speaker, how does she approach teaching Spanish? “I see both sides of the problem—I know what it is like to decode a foreign language, because I had to learn English. My biggest goal is for my students to sound authentic. We are very lucky here at Taft to be able to bring people from all over the world to teach languages. I also like to give my students the background. Comprehension of a language goes beyond the vocabulary. To appreciate a Spanish text, movie, piece of news, etc., you must know about the culture, the history, the music, the politics.” What is her favorite part of teaching at Taft? “When I got here it was my first time in America. I was dropped off in this new place with 80 kilos of luggage, knowing no one. And the very day I arrived, I was invited to a birthday party at someone’s house. This campus is a place where people really get to belong. They feel this is home. That’s what makes Taft different. It is our home, and our students feel at home.”

JENNIFER KENERSON She’s been at Taft for 22 years. She currently teaches AP Calculus AB, Honors Geometry, and Geometry. This is her second year as math department head. “Last year we had a lot of senior faculty, and this year we have several younger faculty members. It’s been a great challenge, but we have exciting opportunities for change. We work hard to maintain the authenticity of what we do in the math department.” She encourages the members of her department to try innovative teaching strategies, to visit each others’ classes, and to get the students involved in the problem solving and discovery process as much as possible. In the course of her career at Taft, she has coached varsity field hockey, varsity lacrosse as an assistant, and JV squash. She’s also been on the summer reading committee for the past six years. What’s the best part about

teaching at Taft? “The kids. It’s great to witness their growth from the beginning to the end of the year. I love teaching ninth graders, and instilling in them the confidence that they are good at math, and then following them to the end of senior year and seeing how much they’ve changed.”

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of Distinction OUR GLOBAL STUDIES OUR CENTER FOR It’s hard to narrow AND SERVICE DIPLOMA GLOBAL LEADERSHIP down all the amazing It’s part of our commitment to a global, multi- AND SERVICE academic opportunities cultural education. The program is all about is an exciting new partnership between Taft active citizenship—the capacity to appreciate and the City of Waterbury, premised on the you’ll have at Taft, the global dimension of everyday, local life philosophies “think globally, act locally” and but here are some and to catalyze social change. What are the “service leadership.” Through the Global requirements for this diploma? Demonstrated Leadership Institute (GLI), a program of the that make us proficiency in a second language; three Center, you can earn credit toward your GSS especially proud: semesters of work in GSS courses; documented Diploma. A two-year program of workshops cross-cultural experiences at Taft, in the local community, and abroad; a portfolio of written work about your cross-cultural experience; and a final public project.

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Morning

MEETING

Two mornings a week, the entire school assembles in Bingham Auditorium for a school meeting with the headmaster, chaplain, a student, faculty member, or outside artist/ performer/lecturer as a guest speaker. The outside speakers, like New York Times columnist Bob Herbert (above), may be authors, artists, scientists, or theologians, and speak on provocative issues in their fields.

GLOBAL ONLINE ACADEMY (GOA)

is a group of several dozen independent schools from around the world. Member schools combine their resources to offer online courses that mimic classes taught on their own campuses. GOA features small classes and close interactions between teachers and pupils. Even though courses are taught asynchronously, students near each other geographically frequently share ideas and resources in real time as they work on projects in small groups. Last year, upper mids and seniors who took full-year or singlesemester GOA courses from “Medical ProblemSolving” to “Japanese Language Through Culture” found the experience complemented their Taft courses nicely while introducing them to an exciting new learning format.

and speaker series, the GLI accepts ten Taft and ten Waterbury Public School sophomores each year. Each scholar participates in a summer service internship and presents a 10-page research paper.

OUR SCIENCE CURRICULUM

Why single this out? Because we’re a bit of an outlier in the way we’ve sequenced our science courses. Since we made the change a decade ago, Taft students’ work in the sciences has elevated dramatically. We teach physics first, freshman year, followed by chemistry and biology in the 10th and 11th grades, respectively. As a result, we can offer a number of post–AP courses to seniors.


OUR ACADEMIC HABITS SCALE

Taft teachers deserve their reputation for providing in-depth, thoughtful evaluations. So in addition to getting a numerical achievement grade, you will also get a more nuanced evaluation—two “habits” grades. One reflects planning and persistence (P/P)—the level of your organization, class preparation, and response to challenge. The other reflects your level of engagement and self-regulation (E/S)— your curiosity, collaboration, and focus.

ARTS AS CLASSES

We believe that the arts are so important, we include them as part of the class day. Every student must take at least one semester of each of the three arts: music, theater, and the visual arts. Our athletes dance. Our scientists paint. Our poets sing in the chorus.

TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING PROGRAM We offer a growing program of courses in Technology and Engineering, ranging from introductory offerings in web development, game programming, and engineering and design, through upper level courses such as AP Computer Science. Advanced students can work on independent projects in programming and robotics, or compete with the school’s robotics team.

OUR OBSERVATION BEEHIVE

Installed in the Wu Science Building, the honeybee hive can be observed and studied— and we’re doing our part in the battle against colony collapse disorder.

MUSIC FOR A WHILE

A series of free concerts in beautiful Walker Hall. We hear some amazing talent.

SENIOR PROJECTS

The Senior Project is designed to be an independent experience that prompts Seniors to demonstrate their genuine passions beyond the limits of the curriculum. Past projects have included live dramatic and musical performances, interactive exhibits and films, carpentry, electronics, and solar energy installations.

SONNET RECITATIONS

Every member of the Mid (sophomore) class memorizes a Shakespeare sonnet. You have a competition within your class for the best readers. Then the finalists present before the whole class, which gathers for the evening recitation in the faculty room and then votes. It’s epic.

ECOMONS

Recently our Director of Environmental Stewardship began a new program that quickly became wildly popular: Ecomons. Their role is to make sure that the use of materials and energy on our campus is as efficient as possible.

SERVICE THROUGH SPORTS

Many of our teams have organized one-day clinics with school kids in Waterbury— including volleyball, golf, soccer, football, and basketball. They’ve also helped to organize events and fundraisers with local community organizations.

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COURS to Check Out

Of course we offer a rigorous academic curriculum that will provide you with an intellectual foundation and prepare you for college. It includes Honors, Advanced Placement classes in every discipline, and post-AP courses. But we also want you to have the freedom to pursue an individual course of study that fits your needs and specific interests.

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Have a look at some of the classes we offer:

INDEPENDENT TUTORIAL IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

Where you can learn the basics of coding, or more advanced programming in robotics, artificial intelligence, and genetic programming

THE QUEST

You’ll do some deep thinking and hold lively conversations as you read some classics and ponder age-old philosophical questions.

WORLD CINEMA

A course where you get to watch movies? Yes, but these are not your typical Hollywood flicks. You’ll screen films from foreign countries— past films have been from Brazil, China, Spain, Italy, India, and France. You’ll read film theory and analysis. You’ll learn about a range of cinematic styles. You’ll explore the cultural context in which a film is made. And you’ll do a whole lot of critical essay writing.

THE REVOLUTIONARY CENTURY: FROM IMPERIALISM TO GLOBALISM

You’ll explore the historical roots of the rebellions, riots, revolutions, and world conflicts of the twentieth century. You’ll study the effects of powerful individuals from Mao and Lenin to Gandhi and Mandela. You’ll read, research, write, and rewrite. And then you’ll debate the issues.

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING AND DESIGN

It’s part of our STEM initiative. Students can learn major engineering principles and applications, and put them into practice with computer-aided design software and 3D printing.

MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS AND LINEAR ALGEBRA

This post-AP course first introduces and explores the differentiation and integration of functions of more than one variable, including vectors, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, gradients, optimization, Lagrange multipliers, double and triple integrals, vector fields, line integrals, flux integrals, and Green’s, Gauss’s, and Stokes’ theorems, and then turns to linear algebra, including systems of linear equations, matrices, vector spaces, determinants, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and linear transformations. It’s every bit as much fun as it sounds.

GAME DESIGN USING JAVA

Would “Game Designer” be your dream job? You can find out if you’re cut out for it with this introduction to using Java programming language. You’ll learn the fundamental concepts of data types, conditionals statements, loops, methods, arrays, inheritance, object-oriented design, and polymorphism.

Who will be your

PROBLEM SOLVER? EMILY

Hometown: Woodbury, Connecticut Passions: Soccer, basketball, crew, and singing with Collegium Favorite dining hall food: “Breakfast for dinner.” Does being a day student hurt your social life? “No way,” says Emily, a junior on the high honor roll (average of 93 or higher). “You learn quickly how to get involved. The teachers and other students make you get

involved. I feel pretty much like a boarder. Preseason in the fall of my freshman year was a big plus. Some of my best friends are people I met freshman year, before school even started.” Her favorite courses are Honors Precalculus and Spanish III Honors. Her favorite teacher is Mr. Heavenrich. “He keeps the class super energetic, and you can tell by the way he teaches that he is truly passionate about math. Also, he is really funny and does a great job at making the lessons interactive.”


ES

Who will be

WADING

to be your lab partner? JIMMY

Hometown: Westford, MA. “But we’ve moved fourteen different times. I’ve lived all over the US and in Germany.” Passions: Sports, environmental science Favorite food in the dining hall: “Chicken burritos: It’s a perfect combination of rice, beans, chicken, and tortilla. A full meal in one hand. And the salad bar is always really fresh. Both my sisters are vegans. They’ve made me mindful of what I’m eating. I go to the salad bar every day.” “When I first got to Taft as a repeat Junior, the first thing I did was start the Bongo Club. We collected a bunch of hand drums and just met periodically to jam out.” He’s a midfielder on the varsity soccer team. “Someone’s gotta do the hard work,” he says with a grin. He also plays hockey and runs track. He has five older siblings in a very close family. “They’re my five best friends. But here at Taft, I feel like I have 100 siblings in the dorms. I have friends in multiple kinds of groups. I have friends who are athletes, sure, but I’m also really close to Tong [a PG from Thailand]. He’s into science and physics, and so am I. Also, my family has ‘adopted’ my friend Naima [a student from Somaliland]. She comes home with me for Thanksgiving. I like to have a variety of friends.” He’s from a military family. “Moving a lot made me really adaptable. It prepared me to enter new situations and hit the ground running. It made me tough because I had to make new friends, join new teams, adjust to new teachers. But I wouldn’t have wanted it any other way.” What does he want to study next year at Cornell? “Something to do with environmental science. I took that class with Mr. Lehner, and I don’t think there’s a more important or pressing issue in this day and age. It’s such a multidisciplinary field—math, science, economics, humanities, English. Environmental Science blends all that together into one.”

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LIGHTING your path? EZRA

Hometown: Cascais, Portugal Passions: Biology, music, and skiing Favorite meal in the dining hall: “The annual Thanksgiving turkey dinner.”

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Ezra lived for most of his childhood in Mozambique, where much of the population has little access to electricity. “We were talking about the dangers of living in such a remote area without a reliable light source at night,” he remembers, “and I realized maybe it was something I could help with.” His idea? Create autoluminescent plants that will help people travel safely through the dark by lighting up paths. His independent tutorial at Taft focused on selectively transplanting autoluminescent genes into plants.

MORE COURSES c

Who will be

POX AND PESTILENCE

FORENSIC SCIENCE

A look at some of the nastiest and most ruthless infectious diseases, including smallpox, syphilis, HIV/AIDS, influenza, bubonic plague, cholera, and malaria. These tiny organisms have caused a lot of human misery. They’ve felled leaders, crippled societies, devastated cities, and transformed politics and economics.

You’ll study trace evidence—glass, paint, hair, fiber, and fingerprints—and learn how it is analyzed, compared, interpreted, and used in criminal investigations. You’ll learn to examine, analyze, and reconstruct a major crime scene.

POST-AP HISPANIC LITERATURE

Do you want to be onstage or would you rather build one? You’ll learn about stage scenery, costumes, lighting, sound, and properties. You’ll participate in fundamental construction methods, stage electrics, and theater-specific computer programs.

You’ll read the greats from both Spain and Latin America, including Miguel de Unamuno, Federico García Lorca, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes, Gabriel García Márquez, Isabel Allende, and Pablo Neruda.

STAGE CRAFT

Who’s in your CLASS? QUENTIN

Hometown: Wilton, Connecticut Passions: I like all aspects of sports, including the business side. My dream occupation is to be a GM of a sports team. Favorite food in the dining hall: “Nachos. Oh, and Extreme Burger Day: you get bacon and barbecue sauce and all kinds of other stuff.” What made Quentin decide that Taft was the school for him? “I knew I wanted to go to a boarding school. I got into four, and narrowed it down to Andover and Taft. I chose Taft because I liked the feel of the school, and because my parents would be able to come to my games. They have been to every single game since freshman year.” He’s a co-head monitor, a three-sport athlete including the quarterback of the football team, and has made the honor roll six semesters (and counting). He’s headed off to Duke in the fall. “In college, I plan to pursue economics with a concentration in finance. I’ve really loved taking AP Econ with Ms. Foley. Some day I’d like to open my own business.

“I pride myself on being an academicminded student. Sometimes good athletes get stigmatized as not being intellectual; I try to defy that stereotype. I also try to be caring and compassionate. I like the quote: ‘Character is defined by what you say or do when no one’s looking.’ I always feel compelled to pick up litter. I feel guilty if I leave it there. I try to do little things right, even if I’m not getting credit for it.”


PUBLIC SPEAKING

Who doesn’t get butterflies before giving a speech? You won’t, after you take this class and practice delivering descriptive, informative, demonstrative, persuasive, and humorous speeches. This class is ideal for both the comfortable speaker and the shy student interested in improving confidence and oral communication skills.

ADVANCED DANCE

You have to audition for this one, but if you’re in, you learn advanced technical skills in all styles of Classical Ballet, Modern and Jazz dance styles. You’ll also learn choreography, and you’ll perform year-round in a variety of venues.

Who’s your STUDY

PARTNER? LAUREN

Hometown: Shelton, Connecticut Passion: writing Favorite food in the dining hall: chocolate chip cookies She’s written one novel and has begun a second one. She’s an editor of Red, Inc. and the Global Journal. She helps out tutoring at the Writing Center. She’s a co-head of Spilled Inc, a poetry club at Taft. She’s also a GLI scholar, a dorm monitor, an eco-mon, a member of the volunteer board, and a member of both the summer reading committee and the admissions council. “I decided to come to Taft because I felt like it had the best balance of all the schools I applied to. I can explore things and be a more multifaceted person here.” Last year, she and her roommate SeArah decided to write and perform a poem for Taft’s MLK Day Multicultural Arts Celebration. “We pulled our families’ stories into the present and created a commentary on the world we live in.” Three Taft filmmaking students approached them and asked if they could use the poem as the sound track for a video. The filmmakers then submitted it to the Tribeca Film Festival in “The America I Am” Film competition. Their film ended up winning. “I was so honored to have been a part of the project,” says Lauren. “It would not have been possible at another school. Taft gave us space to tell our stories on paper, on stage, and in film. Everyone was so supportive.”

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All Over the Who can you ECHO? Ai

Hometown: Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Passion: “Spreading smiles.” Favorite Food in the Dining Hall: “Taylor’s homemade chocolate chip cookies” Her work with echolocation began during her junior year, when she studied its occurrence in bats and dolphins. Then she built her own model, using old parts from the robotics team. “My echolocation device is designed to help the blind. In my work teaching English to blind kids, I learned that their biggest fear is not to know if a car is coming their way.” Her device can be worn on the side of a hat. “It sends out waves that reflect back to let the person know if something is in the way.” She received a Page Grant from Taft, which allowed her to test the prototype at shelters for the blind in Vietnam. How did she design her test? “I organized

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a pillow fight,” says Ai. “They liked that. The person wearing the device could tell when a pillow was coming.” One of her favorite teachers has been Mr. Mooney. “He was very passionate about my research and helped me a lot. He’s also been my twin for Twin Day every year since freshman year. This year we dressed like motorcycle riders.” She’s been a school monitor, dorm monitor, the head of the International Club, a founder of the Random Acts of Kindness club, an MLK fellow, and an actor in several plays. She also played field hockey for three years. With the help of Poole Grants, she traveled to Thailand to take care of elephants, and joined a service trip to Costa Rica to help rebuild a school. Next fall, she’s headed to MIT to study biomedical engineering. “I also want to study architecture,” she adds, with a little smile.


Being a student today doesn’t look the way it used to. At least, not at Taft. On a typical day, you’ll find round-table discussions, labs with bubbling beakers, black-box theater workshops, day trips into the field, and language labs where students listen, speak, interact, and Skype with native speakers. But we like to take learning even further afield. At Taft, you’ll have many options to broaden and design your own curriculum, outside of a traditional classroom setting. Feeling footloose? How do some of these sound?

INDEPENDENT STUDIES PROGRAM

Students can undertake extracurricular projects in addition to their regular classes. Each ISP is overseen by a faculty advisor and culminates in a significant, original piece of work.

TUTORIAL PROGRAM

Students can work closely with a faculty member to design and execute an intensive academic course outside the regular curriculum.

SUMMER STUDY ABROAD

We offer summer programs, and strongly encourage and help our students to participate in summer learning opportunities in countries throughout the world.

KILBOURNE GRANTS

are summer enrichment funds that provide Taft students with opportunities to participate in summer programs in the arts.

THE MODERN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT offers a three-week immersion program in Nerja, Spain every summer. Students live with host families, attend classes, and explore the cultural richness of Andalucia.

POOLE FELLOWSHIPS

This service-oriented summer grant program encourages students to broaden their perspectives and expose themselves to new ideas and experiences. Recent projects included community service in Moldova, Mongolia, Cambodia, India, and Vietnam, as well as service projects in the U.S.

MEG PAGE ’74 FELLOWSHIPS

In memory of her commitment to compassionate health care, this fellowship is awarded annually to a student who wishes to explore an experience or course of study devoted to the provision of better health care in areas such as public health, family planning, medical research, mental health, and non-Western practices of healing.

SCHOOL YEAR ABROAD AND SEMESTER STUDY PROGRAMS AWAY FROM TAFT

The School Year Abroad program includes immersion experiences in China, France, and Italy. Our students also participate in semester programs at the Maine Coast Program of the Chewonki Foundation, at the Island School in the Bahamas, and at the High Mountain Institute in Colorado.

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ARTS

Visual

Whether you have greasepaint or brush strokes in your blood, Taft can offer you a lot of artistic outlets to pursue your passion.

You’ll be required to take some introductory art courses, but many of our students go beyond the basics. We offer Advanced Placement courses in Art History, Music Theory, and Studio Art. Upper Mids and Seniors can take an Independent Study Program in the arts. Mids and Upper Mids can apply for a Kilbourne Summer Enrichment Program in the Arts. Concerts, plays, recitals, exhibits, and popular “open-mike” coffeehouse evenings fill the school calendar. Taft’s size and wealth of opportunities mean many students are involved in multiple artistic activities throughout the school year. Others choose to specialize in one facet of the arts program. There’s room for all levels of talent, interest, and involvement.

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Arts

FACILITIES c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c

The Pailey Dance Studio Mark W. Potter ’48 Art Gallery Pottery Studio Gail Wynne Art Studio Tremaine Art Studio Woodward Black Box Theater Bingham “main stage” Theater Choral Room Photography darkrooms Digital photography lab Multiple practice rooms Electronic Music Studio Art rooms designed for printmaking, ceramics, and fabric design Walker Hall performance space Woodward Chapel with a beautiful Gress-Morgan pipe organ Band Room Multimedia Computer Lab Video production classroom

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Who will be PAINTING next to you? NATASHA Hometown: Sydney, Australia and Hong Kong Passion: Painting Favorite food in the dining hall: “I really like the Chowder Festival competition they have every year. It’s exciting to vote for your favorite chowder!” For the past two years, she’s pursued an independent studies project with Ms. Saarnijoki. “I’ve investigated why people who express themselves through art (both visual and literary) choose one medium over another. Last year I studied Monet and Degas. This year, I applied my research to my own preferred forms of artistic expression, and I reached the conclusion that when I draw something, I’m collecting information outside of myself. When I write, I’m looking inside of myself and trying

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to anchor my emotions and inner feelings.” Her favorite medium is oil painting. “I draw from life, so in that sense I have a realistic painting style, but I like to play with color to make it more my own.” Her favorite teacher? “Ms. Chic. [Loueta Chicadaunce]. I’ve had her for the past four years. She’s the one who influenced me the most, and encouraged my passion for art.” She’s also close to her advisor, Ms. Monti. “She’s always there for me, for both personal and academic matters. Even when she’s doing a hundred things in one day, she always finds time for me.” In her free time, Natasha prefers small, spontaneous get-togethers to school-wide structured functions. “The big events—dances, Formal, Red Riot—are fun, of course, but having private conversations with my friends are more meaningful to me, and what I cherish the most here.”

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Who will be

HARMONIZING with you? KAEDE

Hometown: Bronx, New York Passion: Music Favorite food in the dining hall: The brick-oven pizza She’s in Taft’s a cappella group, Hydrox, a member of the gospel choir, a frequent cast member in Taft musicals, and a go-to soloist in Taft’s chorus, Collegium Musicum. Her rich, warmed-honey tone and her perfect pitch make her a leader in the chorus. “She’s a gift to the school and a gift to my program,” says Collegium director Bruce Fifer. “My alto section has never been better.”

“I grew up listening to a lot of different genres,” says Kaede. “Reggae, R and B, hip hop. I formed very diverse music tastes. Music has always been my refuge in times of happiness and sadness.” Although she’s passionate about sports, she’s “not really the the athletic type.” Last winter she was the manager for the girls’ Varsity basketball team. Her favorite Taft activity? “Going to the dances! I especially love the ‘colors’ and the ‘Dress to Impress’ dances because they have great music.” She’s got a wide variety of friends with varied interests. “I create friendships with people I connect with easily, people I feel comfortable being myself with.”

From full-scale musicals to student-directed, one-act plays, the school presents at least a dozen theatrical productions a year. You can also perform or participate in dance productions, vocal and instrumental music groups, and our top-notch film program.

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Got a hankering to travel? In recent years, Taft’s singing group, Collegium Musicum, has toured Australia, Canada, China, United Kingdom, Italy, France, California, and Spain. Our Chamber Ensemble and the Jazz Band have toured and performed in Barcelona, Prague, Budapest, Salzburg, Vienna, Lisbon, New York City, Boston, San Francisco, Memphis, and New Orleans.

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Who will be DANCING with you? KAYLA

Hometown: Southbury, Connecticut Passion: Dance Favorite food in the dining hall: Carrot cake (“I’m a dessert person!”) She’s the Head Writer of the Papyrus, Editor in Chief for Red Inc, and writes children’s books on the side. She’s also a classical ballet dancer, and a frequent cast member in musicals and theater. She’s headed to Yale in the fall. Her favorite thing about Taft? “I like that the school is open to allowing students to try new things, and

supports them when they want to strike out on their own.” Last year, she took dance as an independent tutorial, training on her own and choreographing a classical ballet solo, which she performed at the Fall Dance Showcase. “Ms. Surber was helpful. She watched me and gave me critiques to help me improve it even more.” She performed a second solo at the Spring Showcase. She and her roommate solicited work from students for Red Inc, Taft’s literary journal, and received enough submissions for a second issue. “All the copies disappeared off the stand in one day,” she said. “It made me happy that people were so willing to read this journal.”

Who will be

CONDUCTING

Our Arts Department faculty are more than teachers. They are also practicing artists, photographers, actors, singers and dancers.

you?

BRUCE FIFER

He’s the head of the arts department and the director of Taft’s Collegium Musicum. He has been a professional singer for more than 35 years. Before he came to Taft, he was the director of liturgical music and drama at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York. And, fun fact: you can hear his booming baritone in the soundtracks for a number of Disney films, including Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, Pocahontas, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, and Mulan.

Who will be ACTING with you? TATTNALL

Hometown: New York City Passions: Singing and dancing Favorite food in the dining hall: Omelet bar and French toast. “I’m a breakfast guy.” This is Tattnall. He’s a member of the all male a cappella group, Oriocos. He just auditioned for Collegium next year, and made it. He’s a member of class committee. He plays thirds squash and thirds tennis. And he landed a lead role in the musical, where he sang and tap danced before a delighted

audience. “The arts program at Taft is extraordinary,” he says. “I’ve learned so much about what happens backstage.” He’s no slouch in the classroom, either. His favorite subject? “Latin. It intrigues me, how one word has three genders and each gender has five cases, both in singular and plural. And verbs have six tenses (that I’ve learned so far). Each word is so complex, but it’s all so uniform—there aren’t many irregularities like in Spanish or English. I find it fascinating that a language spoken two thousand years ago could be so sophisticated.”

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COLLEGE Counseling

In the College Counseling Office, our mission is to do everything we can to help our students and their families to successfully navigate the college search, application and selection process, and to ensure that each of them finds the best match. We work on the student’s self-advocacy skills, but it’s our job to present the student to prospective colleges in an accurate, nuanced, and compelling light.

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Who will HELP you get into college? ALISON ALMASIAN

Alison Almasian is the Director of College Counseling. As a graduate of Georgetown University, a certified teacher, and a former director of admissions at St. Lawrence University, she has been on all sides of the college admissions process. “Matching a student with the right college is both an art and a science,” she says. “We use data to inform our conversations about the initial choices, but we also do a great deal of questioning, getting to know the student. Then we blend together the art and the science to come up with a solid list for each student.” How do the college counselors get to know kids in order to write an in-depth letter for each and every one? “We communicate constantly,” says Ms. Almasian. “We meet with each student multiple times before the end of the junior year. There’s a questionnaire for students, and for parents. We read every teacher comment, dean letter, and advisor letter. And even informally, we reach out to teachers at the lunch table if we need more information. All of this comes together to tell the student’s story, to present the narrative of who they are in a compelling way.”

Over the past five years (2012 to 2016) Taft students have enrolled at 184 different colleges and universities in 30 states, the District of Columbia and eight foreign countries. During that same period, five or more student have enrolled at the following:

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Our office is staffed with four full-time professionals who have more than 80 years of combined experience on both the secondary and collegiate levels. They attend conferences, visit college campuses, constantly review media reports, and cultivate relationships with our colleagues in admissions offices. Our college counselors also coach, attend sit-down dinners, and interact continually with students, their teachers, and their coaches. We get to know our students in virtually every facet of their lives at school. The formal process begins in the late fall of the Upper Mid year. College counselors meet individually with each of their students as often as needed to help them clarify goals and interests and to identify a range of schools to consider. We also advise students on course selection, standardized testing requirements, essay writing, and how to best present themselves on their college applications. In the fall of the student’s senior year, we help the student to finalize his or her list of colleges, and consult closely with teachers, coaches, deans, dorm faculty and advisors prior to crafting a detailed letter of recommendation. This letter covers much more than just academics; it highlights every facet of a student’s moral, intellectual, and social development. We always invite parents to participate in the process. We also give upper school students a few days off to visit schools, and well over one hundred college admissions representatives visit Taft each year to meet with students.

Amherst College 9 Babson College 9 Bates College 10 Boston College 11 Boston University 11 Bowdoin College 7 Brown University 12 Bryant College 5 Bucknell University 13 Colby College 10

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Colgate University 13 Colorado College 8 Columbia University 9 Connecticut College 10 Cornell University 16 Dartmouth College 10 Denison University 5 Duke University 8 Elon University 7 Franklin & Marshall College 5

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George Washington University 16 Georgetown University 35 Gettysburg College 8 Hamilton College 13 Harvard University 6 Hobart & William Smith Colleges 6 Johns Hopkins University 5 Lafayette College 6 Lehigh University 9 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 7


“The tradition started years ago. In ‘exchange’ for my college recommendation letter, students place a college decal of the institution they decide to attend. By the time we left the old science building, much of the window space was covered. When the sun angle was right, it looked like a cathedral. Now in the Wu Science Center, we are mostly finished with my classroom windows and ready to move on to the chemistry prep room. I enjoy seeing the decals every day and remembering which students are represented by each decal.

CLASS OF 2016 Testing Profile SAT

75th percentile Mean 25th percentile

CR Math Writing 700 710 710 643 654 648 600 590 600

ACT

EN MA RE SC CP English Math Reading Science Composite 75th percentile 34 31 34 30 32 Mean 29.4 28 29.7 27.1 28.6 25th percentile 26 25 27 24 26

It is common on Alumni Day to have alums come back to look for their decals. I love staying in touch with my graduates, some of whom are now old enough to send their own kids to Taft!” —David W. Hostage,

Chemistry Teacher

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McGill University 6 Middlebury College 17 New York University 18 Northeastern University 6 Occidental College 8 Princeton University 10 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 5 Southern Methodist University 15 St. Lawrence University 10 Stanford University 7

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Stonehill College 5 Trinity College 28 Tufts University 17 Union College 8 University of Chicago 6 University of Colorado 6 University of Denver 5 University of Michigan 7 University of North Carolina 12 University of Notre Dame 5

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University of Pennsylvania 12 University of Richmond 13 University of Southern California 13 University of St. Andrews 13 University of Vermont 7 University of Virginia 20 Vanderbilt University 5 Wake Forest University 8 Wesleyan University 18 Williams College 7 21 Yale University 11


Community

SERVICE

NON UT SIBI MINISTRETUR SED UT MINISTRET —not to be served but to serve

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Who will VOLUNTEER with you? EMILY

Hometown: Montreal, Canada Passion: Volunteering Favorite foods in the dining hall: “The bagels. Oh, and the breakfast pastries. And the chocolate chip cookies! Sooo good.” She adds, “I have a sweet tooth.” Emily came to Taft intending to play tennis. But when life gives you a dislocated shoulder, and, later, a sprained ankle, you go to plan B. “Being unable to do athletics turned out to have a huge upside,” she says cheerfully as she readjusts her crutches. “I got a chance to volunteer at Carrington Elementary School. We created our own after-school

program, and taught kids public speaking and acting.” She came to Taft as a first-year junior. “I wasn’t ready to leave home before,” she says. “But I’m so glad that when I was ready, I chose Taft.” A French-speaking Montreal native, she takes AP French. “I like to baffle my teachers with my Canadian French idioms,” she says with a gleeful smile. Her favorite course so far? “Pox and Pestilence, co-taught by Ms. Monti [a science teacher] and Ms. Foley [a history teacher]. We studied the history and biology of diseases. I loved the small class size and the fun discussions we had.” Emily plans to major in international relations. “My dream is to work at the UN.”


Here are some of the projects our

COMMUNITY SERVICE COUNCIL

Whether it’s serving families at a soup kitchen, tutoring at nearby elementary schools, or traveling to foreign countries to help rebuild communities, our students live the school motto. Service to others isn’t just an “extracurricular” to point to. It’s really part of the fabric of Taft.

organizes regularly:

The Community Service Council is an extremely active, vibrant organization. Led by a board of 12 students, composed of 50 or more members, and overseen by a faculty advisor, the members of the Community Service Council are involved in many events in surrounding communities. Because so many students participate, the Community Service schedule is purposefully flexible, so as to allow athletes, actors, artists and musicians to participate while also pursuing their extracurricular passions.

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Our volunteer activities have shifted from mere fundraising to much more hands-on service. Also, we like to partner with local organizations, including the Police Activity League; Girls, Inc.; Brass City Charter School; Boys and Girls Club; and Little Britches Therapeutic Riding Program.

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Spring break trips have included Habitat for Humanity® builds in South Carolina, Mexico and Guatemala, Outreach 360 in the Dominican Republic, and visits to townships in South Africa. Summer trips include Guatemala and Mexico.

Who will SERVE with you? ZYGI

Hometown: Vilnius, Lithuania Passions: World affairs, service, leadership Favorite food in the dining hall: Anything they have out there is good!” Originally from Lithuania, Zygi was born in Belgium and raised in both Finland and Poland. “I’m really grateful to my parents, who managed to provide me with an international education, but at the same time make sure that I never lost touch with my national identity.” He’s the editor in chief of Taft’s Global Journal, Opinions editor of the Papyrus, a Global Leadership Institute scholar, one of Taft’s World Fest organizers, a Model UN enthusiast, and a member of the Taft

Breast cancer awareness month Red Cross blood drives Serving weekly meals at the St. Vincent de Paul homeless shelter Working at the mobile food pantry Organizing local food drives Volunteering for after-school programs and in nursing homes Clothing drives

Volunteer Board. “I also managed to be elected a co-captain of cross country,” he adds with a grin, “even though I never thought I had any athletic ability.” Last spring, Zygi planned, organized, and advertised the first Let’s Do It, Watertown event. This communitywide, environmental cleanup day was a local incarnation of the global civic mass movement that began in Estonia in 2008, and quickly spread all over the world. “Lithuania was the second country to participate, and I wanted to bring a piece of that to Watertown,” says Zygi. He hopes that will become an annual tradition at Taft. His plans for the summer include participating in the Yale Young Global Scholars two-week program for Politics, Law, and Economics. And after that? “I plan to learn how to drive.”

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TAFTIE JACQUELINE ROSA

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She was a smart, ambitious kid from Spanish Harlem in the Bronx who learned—late in the process—about a special scholarship program that enabled high-achieving, inner-city students to attend some of the country’s best prep schools. She applied to Taft two days before the admissions deadline, and got accepted. It was one of the best moves she ever made, she says. Rosa graduated from Taft in 1982. Now she’s the global head of supplier diversity for JPMorgan Chase. Her job is to pay special attention to small businesses, particularly those that are run by minorities, women, veterans, the disabled, and members of the LGBT community. She helps the owners and entrepreneurs get funding from her bank to run their businesses and secure contracts providing goods and services to the bank. Diversity and equal opportunities have been a priority for her throughout her adult life—prior to her current position, she established several internship programs, career development advising, and networking opportunities for low-income high school and college students of color.

ALFRED GILMAN

MARY CHAPIN CARPENTER

She’s won five Grammy awards and sold 13 million records. She released her first album in 1987, and her 1992 album went quadruple platinum and had seven charting singles. In 2012 she was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame. But we’re most proud that she’s a 1976 graduate of Taft.

YI-MING YANG

He was the school’s first international exchange student from China, arriving at Taft for his senior year in 1986. He attended medical school in Beijing, returned to the U.S. in 2003, received his M.D. from Columbia, and is now a high-ranking interventional cardiologist at the Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. But he clearly internalized Taft’s Non ut sibi motto: he also volunteers at the Charles B. Wang Chinatown Health Clinic.

JOYCE POOLE

Many Taft grads go on to pursue fulfilling careers in law, medicine, or business, and you could, too—or you could do something slightly more off the beaten track. For instance, this Taft grad decided to become an elephant whisperer. Joyce Poole graduated from Taft in 1974, and ever since, she’s devoted her career to studying elephant behavior and writing about elephants. Nowadays she and her husband run an organization called ElephantVoices. Its mission is to inspire wonder in the intelligence, complexity and voices of elephants, and to secure a kinder future for them through research and the sharing of knowledge.

TREY ANASTASIO

He’s a guitarist, vocalist, and composer of more than 150 songs for the band Phish. He’s part of a dectet (a ten-person ensemble), known as the Trey Anastasio Band. He has written scores for Broadway musicals, and arranged compositions for sixty-piece orchestras. At Taft, he created his first two bands, Red Tide and Space Antelope. But what do you think is the coolest accomplishment of this multitalented Taft grad—the fact that he filled in for the late leader of the Grateful Dead, Jerry Garcia, and played lead guitar on the Dead’s final farewell tour, or that Ben and Jerry named an ice cream flavor after his band?

DYLLAN MCGEE

At Taft, Dyllan was the school monitor and director of Hydrox. She starred in many Taft productions, graduated in 1989, and went on to Trinity College in Hartford. After college, she became a senior producer for a production company specializing in historical documentaries. Today she’s a documentary filmmaker and founder of her own media company. Her work has appeared on PBS and HBO, and she’s won two Emmy awards, a Peabody award, and many others.

Are you science-oriented? So was young Alfred Gilman when he graduated from Taft back in 1958. Said Gilman, “Taft taught me how to study, but more importantly, Taft taught me how to think, [and] how to go on learning for the rest of my life.” He wasn’t kidding about the “go on learning” part. He went on to become a molecular neuropharmacologist and professor and chairman of pharmacology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas, and was then elected Dean of the Medical School. Oh, yes, and we almost forgot to mention one other notable career highlight—he has won a Nobel Prize in medicine.

RODMAN MOORHEAD

He graduated more than fifty years ago, but while at Taft he was a monitor, member of class committee, in the Glee Club, and Church Choir, and a varsity football, basketball, and track star. He graduated magna cum laude from Harvard and earned his MBA from the Harvard Business School. He’s a parent of Tafties (Rod ’97, Clay ’98), and since 1991 he’s served as a trustee and board chair. He’s a staunch supporter of different education initiatives, and has dedicated much of his life to both education and to Taft, supporting the school in every way imaginable, including donating the Moorhead Learning Wing, where our state-of-the-art Academic Center is situated.


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LEXI REESE

PETER BERG

Yeah, sure, he’s a movie star and he also wrote and directed the movie and the television series Friday Night Lights and has produced, directed, and written episodes and pilots and screenplays. But today Taft kids all know Peter Berg ’80 for a different reason. While Berg was at Taft, Headmaster Willy MacMullen, then a student himself, was Berg’s Corridor Monitor, and they’ve remained tight. And from time to time, Mr. Mac will enlist Berg to create a short film to be played at Morning Meeting, where Berg and some famous actor will announce that the next day will be a surprise HEADMASTER HOLIDAY. You can find some of these links on our website.

PATRICK KERNEY

He was a three-sport star athlete in Taft’s class of 1995. His dream was to become a hockey player. The only reason he played football at Taft was that he needed a fall sport. Tall and scrawny, he was cut from varsity, but managed to get brought up from JV after he played well in the first JV game. In another ironic twist, he headed to University of Virginia as a lacrosse recruit, and walked on to the football team. By the time he graduated from Virginia, he’d become a first team All-American and a first round NFL draft pick in 1999. He played defensive end for eleven seasons, first for the Atlanta Falcons and then for the Seattle Seahawks. He joined the board for Special Olympics of Georgia, and was the Falcons’ United Way spokesperson. He also raises money for the Lt. Thomas L. Kerney Fund, created in memory of his brother, a police officer, who was killed in the line of duty.

JOHN VOGELSTEIN

If there could be an extra entry in the dictionary to define the term “giving back,” it would be “John Vogelstein.” He graduated from Taft in 1952 after an illustrious stint as wrestler, golfer, and editor-inchief of the Papyrus. He went on to Harvard, then to Wall Street, where he became president of a prominent firm. But he continued to give back to his community. He has been a trustee and director of New York University, the Rand Graduate School, the Jewish Museum, the Leonard N. Stern School of Business, and the New York City Ballet. He is also the Chairman of the Board Emeritus of Prep for Prep, an organization that helps New York City kids prepare for admission to independent schools.

Lexi Reese is a Vice President at Google, where she is responsible for the company’s global programmatic media and platforms team. How does she explain what she does to her young daughters? “They know Google is like a magical genie that answers all their questions. I tell them that the genie needs fuel to keep working and the advertising we sell is that fuel.” What led her to choose Taft over many other schools? “From the moment I walked into the main lobby, I felt a warmth that was unique. Whereas other places felt a bit sterile and cold, the Taft kids were smiling, laughing; the teachers were approachable, friendly. From the art room, to the black box, to the fields … I wanted to be in that environment, doing those things with the people I met there.” After Taft, Lexi attended the University of Virginia and graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a focus on Latin American History. She worked as a documentary filmmaker in Nicaragua, as a paralegal in the sex crimes unit of the Manhattan District Attorney’s office, and as a policy advocate for the microfinance organization ACCION International. She eventually graduated from Harvard Business School and went on to American Express before joining Google in 2007. “Taft’s motto, ‘not to be served but to serve,’ continues to inspire me. I lead Google’s philanthropic outreach efforts to help women and girls generate and pursue passions in science, technology, engineering, and math. I love the power of technology to solve big problems in the world— whether it’s access to information or connecting people to resources they may not otherwise have—and I want to continue helping to crack those systemic challenges.”

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KAREN STEVENSON

She was among the first group of girls admitted to Taft in 1971, and as a ninth grader, was one of the first female boarders. After graduating from Taft in 1975, she was one of the first women to win a Morehead Scholarship to University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a BA in History. She was also a track star. In 1979, she became the first female AfricanAmerican Rhodes Scholar, and one of the first women admitted to Magdalen College in Oxford, which had been all-male since its founding in 1458. While there, she earned a master’s degree in European history, and decided to try rowing. She was invited to row with an eights crew for Oxford’s Worcester College—the first women’s boat ever. After returning from Oxford, she went on to graduate from Stanford Law School, with Distinction. “I wasn’t trying to make any statement,” says Stevenson. “’Being first’ was not something I thought about. I was doing what I was interested in. I was trying to be the best that I could be.” In 2015 she was recognized by Savoy magazine as one of the most influential black lawyers in the country. And recently, she left private practice to join the bench as a Magistrate Judge in the United States District Court for the Central District of California. “At Taft I had teachers who believed in me, who expected me to do well and who encouraged me to do well. It was at Taft that I learned how to work hard, how to believe in myself, and how to compete. By the time I got to college, I was able to do so many things—community service, athletics, be a student advisor—because thanks to my time at Taft, I had the academic part handled.”

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Because Taft’s buildings are all situated close together, you really will live where you learn. The layout of the school buildings is designed so that students, faculty and staff inevitably interact with one another multiple times every day.

About 485 of our 594 students live on campus (80% of the student body). Teachers, administrators, and college counselors all live throughout the dorms. Dorm faculty quickly become more than just your teachers or your coaches;

they become friends, mentors and role models, offering advice, a family-style meal, or simply popcorn and a movie. Day students won’t miss out on the fun, though. They are always welcome to stay late for social events, or to spend

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THE NANCY AND BEN BELCHER LEARNING CENTER

includes the Belcher Reading Room and the Hulbert Taft Jr. Library. The library’s mission is to provide a place where students can work individually and in small groups; where they can browse through open shelves and sample new interests; where teachers can pursue their own research and interests. The library houses 58,000 volumes and subscribes to a wide array of local, state, national, and international newspapers, as well as more than 150 journals in hard copy. In addition, full-text databases provide access to articles in over 12,000 periodical titles.

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Choral Room Bingham Auditorium Pailey Dance Studio Electronic Music Studio Photography Dark Rooms Music Practice Rooms Woodward Black Box Theater Gail Wynne Studio Mark W. Potter ’48 Art Gallery Tremaine Art Studio Walker Hall

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ATHLETIC FACILITIES

McCullough Athletic Center Mays Rink Logan Field House Paul and Edith Cruikshank Athletic Center Odden Hockey Arena Donaldson Family Pavilion Snyder Field Rockefeller Field William Weaver Track Parents’ Association Field House Geoffrey C. Camp ’91 Field Katie Jackson Morrison ’92 Soccer Field Lawrence H. Stone Baseball Pavilion at Rockwell Field 42 Softball Field A Athletics Fields GC Golf Course

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features more than 45,000 square feet of state-of-the-art laboratory and classroom space, along with two networked computer labs. Each laboratory in the science center is equipped with a SMART Board™ interactive whiteboard, enabling teachers to dynamically deliver video, animation, graphics, text and audio from a projected computer. Mobile laptop labs throughout the school enable teachers and students to collect and analyze data, conduct historical research and participate in writing workshops.

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THE PINTO LANGUAGE LEARNING AND RESOURCE CENTER

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features a sophisticated combination of computer hardware and software facilitates for learning foreign languages, including interactive work and access to foreign media.

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Oscarson Jigger Shop Moorhead Wing East Dining Hall Laube Dining Hall Prentice Dining Hall

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OTHER

1 Main Entrance 4 School Store 11 Potter’s Pond 19 Martin Health Center 24 Centennial Quadrangle 28 Wade House P Parking AD Admissions

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Horace D. Taft Hall Charles Phelps Taft Hall John L. Vogelstein ’52 Dormitory Cruikshank House Congdon House McIntosh House Upper School Girls Dormitory Centennial Dormitory

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THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES DIGITAL DESIGN PROGRAM

has 12 computers used for teaching graphic design, digital photo editing, 3-D animation and modeling, and video production. The entire campus is covered by a wireless network and connected to the Internet via a fiberoptic network.

FACILITIES ON “THE GREEN” > > > >

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Alumni Development Office 25 The Green Woodward Chapel 25 The Green Business Office 39 The Green Walker Hall 50 DeForest Street

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MOORHEAD ACADEMIC CENTER,

staffed by certified learning specialists, provides a resource center with networked computers and study space for research and individual tutoring. Services include instruction in strategic reading techniques, time management and organizational skills, peer tutoring programs, collaboration with deans and school counselors on support to students, and reference materials on learning issues and the latest research in neuroscience.


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Who will be your TOUR

GUIDE? REESE

the night on weekends, or in case of inclement weather. Anchoring one end of the school is Bingham Auditorium, where the entire school gathers four times a week. It is connected to the main artery of the

school, known as the Main Hall, along which are offices, bulletin boards, and many faculty and administrators’ offices. Anchoring the other is the dining hall, where we gather for informal buffets and also for more formal, sit-down meals.

CTURE

Hometown: Greenwich, Connecticut Passions: Softball and field hockey Favorite day in the dining hall: “Thursdays! My friend and I have a Thursday lunch date every week: a plateful of fries, a bowl of chicken Caesar salad, and then ice cream with toppings.” Reese is a member of the Taft admissions council, and she loves giving tours. “When I give a tour sometimes I’ll stop at the top of the hill and point down to the campus. I tell them that all those buildings right there are dorms and classes. The closeness of the buildings brings the community closer. People here have spirit and happiness.” Growing up, she traveled a lot. “I was born in London, and have lived in Texas, California, and Connecticut. Moving so much draws you out of your shell. I’ve gotten good at putting myself out there. I came to Taft for preseason and so I already knew people by the time school started.”

Athletic

OFFERINGS Taft offers the following sports at the Varsity, Junior Varsity, and often Thirds, levels. Those marked with an asterisk compete in New England Championships.

FALL SPORTS Cross Country* (b/g) Field Hockey* Football* Soccer* (b/g) Volleyball*

WINTER SPORTS Basketball* (b/g) Ice Hockey* (b/g) Skiing* (b/g) Squash* (b/g) Wrestling* (b/g)

SPRING SPORTS Baseball Crew* (b/g) Golf* (b/g) Lacrosse (b/g) Softball* Tennis* (b/g) Track* (b/g)

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Who will be on your TEAM? MATTEO

Hometown: Lake Zurich, Illinois Passion: Sports Favorite food in the dining hall: “The quesadillas. Also, the ice cream—vanilla chocolate swirl.”

A three-sport athlete in soccer, hockey, and track, Matteo was accepted at nine prep schools he applied to, and was waitlisted at the tenth. So what made him choose Taft? “I liked the people I saw at Taft. Everyone said ‘hi.’ I thought that was really cool.” His favorite subjects have been math and chemistry, “because I like working with numbers.” His favorite teacher? “Mr. Parente. He’s the faculty member I’m closest with. He’s been my dorm parent both years I’ve been here, my soccer coach, my chem teacher, and my dean. He knows everything that happens in my life.”

Who will be

COACHING you? GRETCHEN SILVERMAN

is our girls’ varsity hockey coach. At Dartmouth, she studied history and economics, while becoming the school’s all-time leading scorer and two-time Ivy League Player of the Year. She played on several U.S. National teams before earning a spot on the 1998 Olympic team, where they won gold in Nagano, Japan. She came to Taft in 2013, where she teaches math to lower-schoolers. “I love to have fun in the classroom,” she says, “but I want the younger kids to realize it’s only the beginning of

their journey. I emphasize organization as a key cornerstone of their overall program at Taft.” She also works in admissions and assists with coaching lacrosse and soccer when called upon. She and her husband live in Centennial with their two boys and three dogs. “When we have late ice time [typically 7:15–8:45 pm], I run a special afternoon study hall for the girls, in the library,” she says. “Some of the older girls grumbled a little about that at first, but they came to admit that it was great to have their work done before practice!”

Intramural

SPORTS

If you’re looking to ratchet down the intensity of your sport or a season, try one of these intramural options:

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Team sports include: soccer, tennis, squash, basketball, hockey, running, and sailing. Non-team sports include step aerobics, conditioning, horseback riding, martial arts, pilates, rock climbing, skating, ultimate Frisbee, weight training, and yoga.


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Who will be

RALLYING with you? MADIE

Hometown: Killingworth, Connecticut Passion: Sports Favorite food in the dining hall: “I love when they have chicken in the salad bar.”

Who will be

COACHING

you?

MEET STEVE PALMER,

Taft boys’ cross country has had only two coaches since its inception in the 1950s: John Small was the first. Now it’s Steve Palmer. Steve has coached the team for the past 32 years. He coached the track team for 28 years. He’s been a class dean and a chair of the English department. He’s currently the Associate Dean of Faculty. What’s the best part of his job? “I genuinely look forward to every class, practice, or cross country meet. Taft kids continually surpass my expectations.”

She plays soccer, hockey, and softball, and has been a six-sport captain. In her spare time she likes to play the drums. At Taft, I’ve learned how to study more efficiently, and became a better overall student.” Clearly her newfound study habits paid off, because she has made Honor Roll for the past four semesters. She also heads up the group known as Recognize the Rhino. “Students can submit a good deed that another student has done, and we recognize them at Assembly and give them a T-shirt,” she explains. She’s also been a dorm monitor for two years. Her favorite times at Taft? “I love Red Rally. It’s such a great event, and the whole school participates. I also love Super Sunday. It gets everybody excited about the beginning of the year, and it’s a great way to get to know people, especially if you’re new.”


Athletic

FACILITIES c c c

Who will be

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PLAYING

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with you?

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KYLE

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Hometown: New Canaan, Connecticut Passions: Squash and lacrosse Favorite food in the dining hall: “Pizza from the brick oven.”

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A two-sport athlete (squash and lacrosse), Kyle has committed to Harvard for lacrosse. “I want to study law and government there, “ he says. At Taft, his friendship circle includes kids from all backgrounds and interests. “I have friends at Taft who are really different from me. One of my friends is from Canada, another is from France. I have a friend who wants to be a filmmaker.” What made him choose Taft? “When I was looking at schools I was really struck by how everybody at Taft had a smile on their face. It just felt different from the other schools I toured. And once I got here, I was surprised by how diverse everybody’s interests are. There are people here from all over the world with different opinions and different interests.”

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18-hole golf course William Weaver 400-meter, all-weather track The Donaldson Family Tennis Pavilion with 12 outdoor tennis courts, along with 4 indoor tennis courts Snyder soccer field Kate Jackson Morrison ’92 soccer field Rockefeller football field Geoffrey C. Camp ’91 Field, an artificial turf field that is home to field hockey and boys’ and girls’ lacrosse The Lawrence H. Stone Baseball Pavilion at Rockwell Field Multiple playing fields, including: baseball fields, softball field, lacrosse fields, soccer fields, and field hockey fields Off-campus horseback riding, crew, and skiing Eight squash courts McCullough Athletic facility, a field house with four indoor tennis and basketball courts and an indoor track. Mays Hockey Rink Odden Hockey Arena Paul and Edith Cruikshank Center, with two hardwood courts for basketball and volleyball, along with an indoor rock climbing wall and locker rooms for boys and girls Logan Field House, which contains the John Wynne wrestling room, free-weight training rooms, and a fully equipped athletic training and rehabilitation room Aerobics/yoga studio Rowing ergometer room Fully equipped cardio and weighttraining rooms


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CLUBS Committees and Publications

We’re proud of our motto (Non ut sibi), but if we wanted a second one, it could be “Never a dull moment.” At Taft, you’ll be amazed at the number of clubs, committees, publications and other activities you can join. Here are some of the current choices:

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Admissions Council and Tour Guides c Asian Food Club c Astronomy Club

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Without Banners (“Game of Thrones” Club) c Chess Club c Current Events Club c Debate Team c DECA c Filmmakers Club c FOCUS c Gamer’s Union

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German-Austrian Club Girls Who Code c Global Awareness Club c Gospel Choir c Gun Violence Prevention Club c HeForShe Club c Hydrox/Oriocos (a cappella)

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IRP (Taft International Relations and Public Policy Chamber) Jewish Student Organization (JSO) Key Club Latin Dance Club Meditation Club Model Congress Club Model U.N.

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Nintendo Club Operation Smile Club Outdoors Club Outreach360 Club Photography Club Pond Hockey Club Pop Punk Club Random Acts of Kindness Club Recognize the Rhino


Who will be in your CLUB? WENGEL

Hometown: New Haven, Connecticut, but she’s originally from Ethiopia Passions: World Affairs, International Relations Favorite food in the dining hall: “Parmesan chicken and Cold Stone ice cream.” “I’m an only child, and was living with my mom in Ethiopia when the civil war happened. My aunt fled from Eritrea to a refugee camp in Ethiopia, and we joined her there. I was five years old. After two years in the camp, we were sent to Connecticut. I had never heard of such a place!” She speaks Amharic, the language of Ethiopia, at home with her mother. “My mom and aunt found jobs and an apartment. I learned English quickly, and started to do very well in school. When I was in eighth grade, my school recommended that I apply to boarding school. I had an amazing

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Red Inc. Religious and Spiritual Life Committee Rhino Rescue SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions) S.A.G.E. Students Advocating for Gender Equality Science Journal Club

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interview with Mr. Frew—he and I really hit it off—and he offered me a wonderful scholarship. I got into lots of other places, but I knew Taft was the right place.” Wengel plays squash recreationally, volunteers, and participates in United Cultures at Taft and SHOUT. “I love that I have the opportunity to participate in conferences, such as the Independent School Gender Project Conference and the Student Diversity Leadership Conference. I attend conferences because I want to be as informed as possible. I love getting to know people with the same sense of open mind.” What does she do for fun? “On Saturday nights I hang out with friends. We stay at dinner for two hours. We like getting dressed up for the theme dances. We watch TV and movies. It’s just a nice way to unwind from the week.” She’s headed to Middlebury College in the fall.

S.H.O.U.T. (Students Homosexual and Otherwise United at Taft) Spilled Ink Taft Baking Club Taft Entrepreneurial Club Taft Environmental Awareness Movement Taft Fishing Club

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Taft Investment and Economics Club Taft Lifting Club Taft Lookbook The Backgammon Club The Big Red Stampede The Broken Quill The Christmas Club The Taft Papyrus The Movie Club

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The NBA Club The Physics Club The Pre-Med Club The Running Club The Taft Democrats Club The Taft Republican Club The Unitarian Club United Cultures of Taft (UCT) Volunteer Council

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We Need to Ted Talk Women Speak Out Loud (WSOL) c Wounded Warriors Foundation c WRED Radio c Zumba c


Q&A

Q: What if I get homesick?

Who will you be FRIENDS with? BRANDON

Hometown: Harlem (New York City) Passion: Basketball Favorite food in the dining hall: “Burger Day!”

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“The first thing I noticed when I toured Taft was its campus and the people,” says Brandon. “It was just—wow! The green fields, the trees popping out, and how everyone was so welcoming and friendly. I don’t think I spoke to a single kid who wasn’t happy and upbeat and positive.” He’s a big fan of the food. “I loved the time in the dining hall when they had the ‘cupcake wars.’ The kitchen staff teamed up and each of the teams made their own cupcakes, and we voted on our favorite.” His favorite class? Public Speaking. “I hadn’t realized the importance of public speaking and how much value it has in my life. My teacher was amazing—a born storyteller.”

You can keep in touch with your parents through phone calls and email. Also, monitors and dorm parents are great resources to talk to if you start missing home. Hayley: Sometimes I feel homesick, mostly during finals, so I just drop by my advisor’s house. It is amazing what a pint of Ben & Jerry’s will do to lift your spirits.

Q

: Are the dorms coed? Can I get a single if I want one? The dorms are not coed. Ninth and 10th graders live in dorms together, as do 11th and 12th graders. New 9th and 10th graders will have a roommate. All students can apply for singles; seniors are guaranteed one.

Q: I’m a day student. Will

that hurt my social life? All

day students are assigned a dorm association, and are an essential part of life at Taft. Day students can be seen eating breakfast and dinner on campus, attending extra help sessions during evening study hall, and are allowed to stay over in the dorms on Saturday nights. Day students can also apply to be residential monitors, an important role in our boarding community. Often they invite boarding student friends home for long weekends.

Q

: What time do I have to go to bed? All 9th and 10th graders have lights out at 10:30 pm. Upper school students need to be in their rooms studying quietly after 10:30 pm, and do not have a specific lights out time.

Q

: How do I get back and forth from the airport? The school runs shuttles for students to all major airports before and after all major school vacations. We can also arrange cabs for trips close to campus.

Q

: What if I’m a vegetarian? What if I get starved at 10 p.m.? Our dining hall provides vegetarian and gluten-free options at all meals. Plenty of local food establishments deliver to Taft, but there are also frequent “feeds” held by coaches and advisors. And every Friday a dorm parents will have a dorm feed, ranging from ice cream, pizza, and hamburgers, to chips, guacamole, and smoothies. You can order from G’s Burgers (an excellent local hamburger place) and from Chipotle two days a week—they make a special group delivery just for Taft kids. Ryan: It is always great coming back to your dorm and hearing tons of kids yell, “FEED!”

Q: Can we use cell phones?

You’re allowed a cell phone, but we ask students to keep them out of sight at mealtimes and during class. Many students keep their class schedules on their phones and check their email between classes, but we just think it’s nicer not to be surrounded by people constantly yakking on their cell phones, or running into walls while texting.

Q

: What if I get sick in the middle of the night? That’s why we have an adult on duty every night. That adult will escort you to the Health Center, which is staffed 24 hours a day. The Health Center is a great place; the nurses are so sweet and the Health Center has the best bagels with butter on campus!

Q

: How often am I allowed to go home for the weekend? About half our weekends are “open,” when we can go home or to a friend’s house after Saturday classes. We also have long weekends every term and at least one Monday a term where we don’t have classes.


Q

Q

Q

: Does Taft have a dress code? Yes. Class dress is worn

: How can I continue to take music lessons? We have

: Can I walk into town whenever I want? You can walk

during the class day. For girls, that means dresses, pants or leggings, or skirts with blouses. For boys, collared shirts and trousers. After Long Weekend in the spring, boys and girls may wear Bermuda shorts. For sit-down dinners, more formal dress is worn. For girls that means dressier skirts or dresses and shoes. For boys, that means a sport coat, collared shirt, tie, dress trousers, and dress shoes.

excellent piano, voice, violin, cello and guitar instructors on our staff, and lessons with local musicians for other instruments can be arranged through the music department.

downtown any time as long as you’re back before 7 pm (and 9 pm on weekends), and have signed out with the duty office.

in a sport? What if I’d rather act or dance or paint? You have

As a 9th and 10th grader, you are allowed to sign out to faculty apartments for extra help, but at other times you have to remain in your room studying. Eleventh and 12th graders are allowed to sign out to the library or extra help during evening hours. Study hall runs from 8–10 pm for allstudents, and all students have to be back in their own dorms by 10:15 pm.

Q

: I never eat breakfast. Do I have to show up every morning? Yup. If you’re in 9th or 10th grade, you have to sign in to breakfast between 7 and 8 am.

Q

: What if there’s a special occasion, like my grandmother’s birthday? Can I go home for the weekend? Sure. Provided she does not live in the Outback and you don’t have to miss a week to make the trek to visit her. Within reason we try to accommodate students who wish to leave for family events. Alex: On Mother’s Day, my dorm parent drove me to the Waterbury mall to get a last-minute gift for my mom!

Q: Can I play varsity even as

a freshman? Yes. Earning a spot on a team is based on talent and physical ability, not age.

Q: Who chooses my room-

mate? The Admissions officers

make a point of getting to know incoming students, and they work closely with the Directors of Residential Life to match students into compatible rooming pairs. All returning students, of course, choose their own roommates.

Q: Do I have to participate

a lot of choices besides sports with our afternoon programming. You can opt for musical theater, dance, acting, physics team, science Olympiad, or community service. We do require participation in something, but we want you to pursue your passion.

Q

: Do I have to make my bed? Yes. Dorm faculty inspect rooms every day. Students must make their beds, pick up their stuff, and empty their trash and recycle bins.

Q

: What if I don’t finish my homework before lights out? 9th and 10th graders can request late lights two nights per week, but must be in bed by 11:30.

Q

: Do I have to go to school on Saturdays? Yes—but it is only a half day of classes. Wednesdays and Saturdays are half days to allow for interscholastic athletic competitions. Occasionally we do have five-day weeks.

Q: What if I need to ask my

teacher a question during study hall? Many teachers hold

extra help sessions in their apartments or offices during evening hours, and we allow any student to sign out during study hall to visit teachers. Will: “The night before our chemistry test, our teacher was available to answer questions about the test. It was really helpful and helped me feel ready for the test the next day.”

Q

: Do I have to study in my own room during study hall?

Q

: Am I allowed to use my computer during study hall? We have several classes that only use online submission of homework (on Google Docs, for example), so you will be using your computer often. Every class has its own webpage that will have your syllabus as well, so you will always know what your homework is. During the evening we encourage students to use their computer responsibly to complete assignments.

Q: What about my laundry?

There is a laundry service with weekly delivery that also includes dry cleaning. You can also use the washers and dryers that are in each dorm.

Q

: Can I watch TV if I finish my homework? We allow students to watch TV before and after study hall, but not during. Seniors are allowed to watch TV in the student union during study hall, and for very special occasions (like the Super Bowl or similar), we create an optional early study hall schedule for students wishing to watch.

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Q

: How many kids live in each dorm? We have 12 dorms on campus: seven boys’ dorms and five girls’ dorms. Most dorms average 40–50 students, including the Corridor Monitors. Monitors are upper school students elected by the faculty to act as student leaders in the dorms.


LIFE

@TAFT

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Who will be COOKING for you? GREAT CHEFS

Who will you be STUDYING with? TAWANDA

Hometown: Gaborone, Botswana Passions: Poetry, Philosophy, and Theoretical Physics Favorite food in the dining hall: Korean tacos Tawanda cites Honors Humanities as the most important class he’s taken at Taft. “I always wanted to get a survey of western philosophy, literature, and history, and it’s exactly what I wanted to study,” he says. The course has expanded his thinking. “I had always been rigidly Enlightenment, but

Our food services team takes pride in serving the Taft community. From cook-offs, to theme meals, to the recipes-from-home program, where we feature some of the students’ favorite home-cooked meals, our team lives the Taft motto: “Not to be served but to serve.” “I couldn‘t ask for a better team to work with,” says our Food Services Director. “Our passion for quality service and food shows every day in what we do. I love hearing the comments from students and staff about how much they enjoy the meals we prepare.”

recently I have become very attracted to Romanticism. It was like a loose shutter that kept getting louder and louder.” Outside of the classroom, he performs community service at a nearby elementary school, where he plays with kids and helps them with their homework. He’s also a member of The Broken Quill, a poetry and intellectual discussion group at Taft. “I love talking to people with different points of view. I value intellectual diversity.” Next fall he’ll be attending Harvard, where he hopes to study physics and philosophy. “And if I have space—literature.”

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Teachers

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Coaches

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Mentors

Our teachers do far more than teach. No rigid division exists between faculty and administration; many teachers have administrative responsibilities, and that is by design. Outside the classroom, teachers also coach, direct, conduct, counsel, and advise. Dorm faculty also feed kids, frequently. Each new Taft student is assigned a temporary advisor for the first few weeks of school, after which he or she chooses one for the rest of the year. Advisor-advisee relationships are usually very close, and the advisor is the first adult a student turns to for counsel.

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In addition to teachers and a faculty advisor, each student has a class dean who oversees the progress of students in that particular grade. The class deans meet regularly with dormitory faculty and with the Director of Counseling and Community Health. The Dean of Academic Affairs advises students on course selections and academic aspirations, and meets with every student in the school personally each semester. Taft monitors the progress of our students closely. Every three to four weeks, teachers submit academic reports. Exams are held at the end of each semester, and grades are sent home four times per year. Seven times a year, the entire faculty gets together for several consecutive evening meetings to discuss the progress of each and every student in the school. As a result, no one falls through the cracks. If a student is struggling, whether it be an academic, social, or time-management issue, we know about it early on and step in to help. All parents are encouraged to contact or meet personally with faculty members, coaches, advisors, and administrators at any time to discuss their children’s intellectual, athletic, artistic, or social development.


SPIRITUAL

Life at Taft

Taft is a nondenominational school with no single religious affiliation. Yet we believe educating the whole student includes the mind, body, and spirit. We acknowledge and celebrate the diverse religious traditions within the school, while respecting the differences and integrity of each. We try to provide many opportunities on campus, both formal and informal, to nurture spiritual life. c

Woodward Chapel serves as a performance and gathering space for the Taft community. c During exam weeks in December and May, meditation is offered every night to help students reduce stress and remain focused. The chaplain also leads meditation classes throughout the school year. c The Religion and Spiritual Life Council is made up of students from several religious traditions as well as representative members from other school groups including SHOUT, UCT, JSO, FOCUS, and FONTS. The RSLC seeks to promote pluralism by facilitating a healthy dialogue among the many religious and spiritual traditions represented on campus. c In the past decade, Taft has acquired a 150-year-old Torah scroll from Tashkent, a 1616 King James Bible, a 19th-century Qur’an from Saudi Arabia, and a Tibetan thangka from the Gomang monastery in southern India.

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WHAT TO EXPECT When You Are Accepted

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GREAT ADVISORS What makes Hannah: It was the night before the Taft unique? history exam and I went to my adviWhat sets us sor’s dorm apartment worried about hard the exam would be. He apart from how and his wife calmed me down and other schools? quizzed me and I ended up acing it. Whether you’re FUN WEEKEND entering the ACTIVITIES There are so many things to do! school as a Bob: We hang with our friends, go to the Lower Mid or movies, ride bikes, go skiing, skate the pond, hike, go to the dance, as a Senior, on throw discs, or toss the football. you can expect Cameron: One of the best things Watertown is the Farm Shoppe to become a in(a local eatery). It’s great to get up on member of a a Sunday morning and walk to town a great breakfast. community for Anant: My favorite thing to do on a that sticks to free day is to go to Dimitri’s Pizza with friends. The waitresses are friendly its core values. my and my friends and I always find some ways to make ourselves laugh. Tanya: For fun, I play golf. Taft has an 18-hole golf course, which many schools don’t have. I like to take advantage of our club and play a game I love to play. Hayley: I hang out in friends’ rooms, go into town, and go to dances! I spend a lot of my free time rollerblading around campus with my friends.

RESPECT FOR BEING SMART

Daniela: At Taft, it’s cool to be smart. It’s fun to be in a class filled with smart people, which really keeps me on my toes.

TEAM BONDING

Jake: Thirds soccer feeds are THE best. Probably because thirds soccer was such a diverse group that we had a hilarious time no matter what, and also because we had such great coaches.

A SMOOTH TRANSITION INTO THE TAFT COMMUNITY

All new students are assigned student sponsors (called “old boys” and “old girls”) whose job it is to greet you the moment you arrive on campus on your first day, to answer your questions, explain our customs, and help you feel at home. You will also be assigned a temporary faculty advisor for the first three weeks of school. This person may become your permanent advisor if you so choose.

THE CHANCE TO STRETCH YOUR WINGS, TO TRY THINGS YOU NEVER THOUGHT YOU’D TRY

Will: I never thought of myself as a singer. I thought of myself as an athlete. But I had heard Collegium sing and I thought it was cool that they get to travel all over the world. Then Mr. Fifer encouraged me to try out. I auditioned and I made it. Now I think of myself as a singer who also plays sports. Keith: I took a dance class and now I love to dance. Zander: I did ceramics and now I’m interested in making sculptures.

GREAT FOOD, GREAT CONVERSATION

Our Student Union is equipped with email kiosks, a digital video jukebox with touch-screen music selection, a multizone sound system, and a flat panel television with a surround sound theater. Kids have also organized regular weekly deliveries from G’s Burger and from Chipotle. Claire: I have met so many new people at sit-down, and it brings a sense of community to Taft. It adds a family-like feeling to the school. You feel as if your real family has grown to include 590 brothers and sisters and the entire Taft faculty. Ally: Being a hockey player who had never owned a dress before

coming here, it was quite an experience having to dress up every Tuesday and Thursday for sit-down. After the second dinner, however, I began to secretly look forward to them. John: After four years of sit-down dinners, I am forced to admit: I look pretty darn good in a coat and tie. Devon: Sit-down is great. At the beginning of the year, as a freshman, it was a really good way to make new friends, especially in older grades. Sarah: My dorm had a chocolate fountain feed one night! It was amazing. I loved it!

WRED

Holly: I’m a DJ and while I tend to play my favorites, I also take requests as I’m walking across campus on the way to the studio. I’m not sure I will ever be a professional DJ but it’s pretty cool having the chance now.

MEANINGFUL HOMEWORK, NOT BUSYWORK

Rex: Not until I came to Taft did I actually learn how to form a clear thesis and how to actually edit my own papers. Taft forces you to write, write, and write until you have it down to an art.

PASSIONATE, KNOWLEDGEABLE TEACHERS

Coco: I love my math teacher. I love when he has a problem on the board and then he’ll trade places with someone in class and sit at the student’s desk while the student teaches. He’s great at getting everyone involved and excited. Oat: Being from Thailand, I wasn’t used to the freedom of speech we had in class. Taft teachers call on us all of the time. I soon overcame my shy personality and became more comfortable talking in class. Amanda: I’ve never been pushed so hard and achieved so much in a single semester. This place is intense, but I definitely feel like I’m ready for college.


BEAUTIFUL CAMPUS, STUNNING FACILITIES

Max: Miles of fields, an 18-hole golf course, and awesome academic, arts and athletic facilities—I feel like we can do anything here.

IN-DEPTH REPORT CARDS

Henry: My parents couldn’t believe the quality and depth of the comments written on my report card. It showed them that Taft was not just a school, but a place where the teachers really care about you as a student and a person.

THE CHANCE TO TRAVEL AND BE OF SERVICE TO OTHERS Helena: It was an awesome experience getting to help kids less fortunate. You learn a lot about their culture and it’s a huge shock to see how they live. I left the Dominican Republic with a whole new appreciation for what I have.

Kerry: I traveled to the Dominican Republic this spring break, and it was an unforgettable and life-changing experience. We taught English to elementary school kids. Ben: Building a home in Guatemala was incredibly meaningful. Working alongside a family from the developing world taught me to appreciate how lucky I am.

Unique Taft LINGO

THE SCENE

Freshmen are called Lower Mids. Sophomores are called Mids. Juniors are called Upper Mids. Seniors are called Seniors!

the time after dinner and before study hall, when you can hang out with your friends.

MEMBERS OF THE TAFT STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Afternoon activities that range from sports to theater to community service to robotics, dance, and organic farming.

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Monitors are 12 Seniors elected by the whole student body. They have demonstrated special qualities of leadership and character. They assist in the implementation of the Honor System, in the dormitories, and in day-to-day school events. The Head Monitors, one boy and one girl, are chosen by the entire student body. Class Committee members are students in the lower three classes, elected by the members of their class. They assist with governing the school. Corridor Monitors are Upper Mids and Seniors selected by the faculty to live among younger students in the dorm in order to help the dorms run smoothly. The Day Student Council members are elected by the day students.

THE JIG

is the recently renovated student union, where you can hang out with your friends and get delicious food when the dining hall is closed. Brooke: Sandy and Marty in the Jig are part of the community. I just tell them “the usual” and they always know what I want.

EX-

THE PLEDGE

A symbol of the pride that our school holds in honesty, integrity and individual work. “I pledge my honor that I have neither given nor received aid on this evaluation.”

SIT-DOWN

A twice-a-week dinner involving assigned tables and semi-formal dress.

PSBL

The hugely popular informal softball league, in which coed teams composed of students and faculty compete for the championship and bragging rights. PSBL stands for “prestudy -baseball league.”

FEED

Advisors, coaches, dorm parents, clubs all prepare food for you, whether it’s ice cream, pizza, dinner, dessert, or a backyard picnic.

SCHOOL COLORS

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Technically, blue and red, but red has become the dominant color. History tells us that, of the first graduating class of 10 students, nine were going to Yale and one to Harvard. So blue was chosen as one school color, and out of deference to the Harvard student, red was chosen for the other. But by the 1970s, because we had no mascot at the time, school teams began to be referred to as “Big Red.”

TAFT RHINO

The school mascot. But interestingly, we had no mascot until the late 1980s. Back then, students took a poll and elected “Big Red Rhinos,” somewhat as a joke. Formally announced at the Centennial Symposium in 1990, rhinos gradually began appearing on T-shirts and logos and the rhino became part of the cultural fabric of the school. The rhino choice actually spoke of strength, power and humor, although it’s likely none of that was factored in when the students adopted it. Nowadays the rhino is everywhere—on hats, T-shirts, books, stationery, yearbooks and suited up at sports events. Looks like it’s here to stay.

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PANTON ® E 287 C


TOP

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Reasons to Apply to Taft

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The opportunity to make amazing, lifelong FRIENDS: kids come from 47 countries and 33 states.

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Our library, math, and science CENTERS: they’ll be close enough to your dorm and classrooms that you’ll have plenty of time to get from one place to another without showing up panting.

7 6 5

Your ADVISOR: he or she will not just give you great advice, but will also drive you to Starbucks if you’re desperate for a caramel macchiato.

The many awesome options on your WEEKEND social calendar. You’ll be making lists for your lists. Time to pursue your PASSION, stay fit, explore something new, and be prepared for college. Dorm FEEDS, advisee FEEDS, team FEEDS, club FEEDS.

4

3 2

1

Time for R AND R: you can relax and hang out at the Jig with a bacon, egg, and cheese, or you can challenge the reigning pingpong champ of the school. The chance to TRY NEW STUFF: you can be a linebacker who sings in the chorus, or a physicist who stars in the play. Exceptional FACULTY: they’re passionate about their subject, committed to teaching, and love what they do.

RED.

You look fantastic in


APPLY

How to We are eager to hear from you and happy to help guide you through the admissions process. Spend some time browsing our website. Check out our videos at taftschool.org/ admissions. Feel free to call or email any of the members in our office with questions. Most importantly, come visit us.

Steps to follow: 1.

Fill out the Admissions Inquiry Form on our website to set up your Taft Admissions Portal. To apply, you must use the Standard Application Online (“SAO”). More information is available on our website.

2.

Schedule a visit. We require that every applicant has a personal interview. The best time to visit is during the months of September through January. Your visit will take about two hours, as it includes an interview and a tour of the campus for you and your parents. If finances or distance make such a visit impossible, let us know, and we will try to arrange a Skype interview, or an interview with an Alumni Representative in your area.

3.

If you would like to be considered for financial aid, you can apply online by following the link on our website to the School and Student Service for Financial Aid (SSS). Your parents must fill out the Parents’ Financial Statement (PFS) online by February 1. Your parents will also need to submit their tax returns for the last two years. These should be attached electronically to your PFS.

4.

Sign up to take the SSAT (SSAT.org). You should plan on taking the SSAT in October, November, December, or January. Taft’s SSAT code is 7600. If you’re applying as a postgraduate candidate, you must take the PSAT or SAT. If your first language is not English, we strongly encourage you take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). Taft’s TOEFL code is 3834.

5.

After November 15, use the SAO to give your Principal or Guidance Counselor and your English and math teachers online access to your recommendation forms. Your teachers should submit their recommendations to Taft by January 15.

6.

Use your Taft Admissions Portal to check that all application materials, along with the non-refundable application fee, have been submitted by January 15.

Go to our website TaftSchool.org for more information.

“I loved how my tour guide went out of her way to answer my questions and make me feel welcome when I applied to Taft. Now, I enjoy touring new applicants and showing them my school.”

THE TAFT SCHOOL 110 Woodbury Road Watertown, CT 06795-2100 860-945-7700 Admissions@TaftSchool.org TaftSchool.org

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—Coco, Upper Mid


SCHOLARSH ALBERT FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 1996 by Sylvia

and Burton Albert, Jan and Eric Albert ’77, Rachel and Jonathan Albert ’79, and David and Deborah Albert Rosmarin ’82, provides financial assistance to a deserving day student with preference going first to an individual who has participated in and been endorsed by the Waterbury Police Activity League as an Albert Brothers Waterbury Police Activity League Scholar. This fund was created in memory of their parents and grandparents, Hilda and Sidney Albert and Bessie and Eli Meisel.

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JOHN ALEXANDER ’90 MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 2000 by the family and friends of John Alexander, provides financial assistance to a deserving student in memory of John Alexander, Class of 1990.

ELIZABETH AND NINA ANDERSEN SCHOLARSHIP, established by bequests

from Elizabeth H. Andersen and her sister, Nina E. Andersen, provides financial assistance to deserving day students. The Andrews Family Scholarship Fund was established in 2016 by Michelle Andrews and her father Kenneth Heithoff to support inspired exceptional scholars who bring with them well cultivated passions to enrich life at Taft and a demonstrated commitment to positively impacting their communities.

THE ANDREWS FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND was

established in 2016 by Michelle Andrews and her father Kenneth Heithoff to support inspired exceptional scholars who bring with them well cultivated passions to enrich life at Taft and a demonstrated commitment to positively impacting their communities.

BAREFOOT FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established by Pamela and Brian

Barefoot, parents of Molly Barefoot ’99, provides financial assistance to enable a deserving student to attend Taft.

BENJAMIN M. BELCHER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS,

established in 1989 by the Belcher family in memory of Benjamin M. Belcher ’32, provide aid to deserving students.

BELL FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP,

established in 2011 by Shelly and Drummond C. Bell III ’63, parents of Rachel Bell Robards ’92 and Drummond C. Bell IV ’90, is awarded to enable deserving students to have the benefit of a Taft education with preference given to qualified candidates from the Bridgeport, Connecticut, area and surrounding communities.

BENDHEIM FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 1987 by the family

of Thomas L. Bendheim of the Class of 1981, provides financial assistance to a deserving student.

PETER W. BERG ’80 SCHOLARSHIP

was established in 2009 by Peter W. Berg ’80 in gratitude for the formative education and ethic of service that he received at the Taft School. This scholarship provides opportunities for the education of the whole person, as envisioned by the school’s founder, enabling students in need of financial assistance to attend Taft so that they may further develop their creativity, intellect, and integrity.

GEORGE ROBISON BLACK SCHOLARSHIPS, established in

memory of George Robison Black of the Class of 1927, provide assistance to needy and deserving students.

FREDERICK HENRY BLAKE AND HELEN AVERY BLAKE SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 2005 by Frederick H. Blake, Jr. ’29 in memory of his parents, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

EDWARD GAYLORD BOURNE SCHOLARSHIP, made possible

through the generosity of Miss Grace E. Bourne and Edward W. Bourne ’15, was established in memory of their father, a professor of history at Yale University and a close friend of Horace Dutton Taft.

THE W. PHILIP AND NANCY C. BRAENDER SCHOLARSHIP FUND

was created by a bequest of W. Philip and Nancy C. Braender. Philip was a 1934 Taft graduate. This scholarship provides financial assistance to deserving students.

BRENTON GALBRAITH FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 2004 by Mrs. Julie A. Brenton, Class of 1981, Mr. Robert Galbraith, and Mr. and Mrs. Junius C. Brenton, provides financial assistance to deserving students with preference given to candidates from central Iowa.

BRISTOL FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 1998 by Michal

W. Bristol, father of Robert H. Bristol, Class of 1976, David A. Bristol, Class of 1980, and James D. Bristol, Class of 1986, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

JOHN W. BRISTOL SCHOLARSHIP,

established in memory of John W. Bristol, Class of 1931, by his wife, Louise, provides financial assistance to a deserving student.

WILLIAM W. BROWNING, JR. SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 2000 by Jane H. Browning in memory of her husband, William W. Browning, Jr., Class of 1948, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

BROWNSTEIN FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 1996 by Mr. and Mrs. Jack Brownstein and their sons, Lawrence F. Brownstein, Class of 1974, and Andrew R. Brownstein, Class of 1971, provides financial assistance to deserving students from the Greater Waterbury area.

ARTHUR HUGH BUNKER SCIENCE SCHOLARSHIP FUND, created by

a bequest of Arthur H. Bunker, Class of 1913, provides financial assistance to deserving students who excel in the study of science.

BUTTENHEIM FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP, created in 1991 in

memory of Edgar J. Buttenheim by his children, Donald ’33, Curtis ’36, Edgar M. ’40, and Constance B. Swain, provides scholarship aid to deserving students who exemplify the school’s motto.

GEOFFREY C. CAMP MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 1989 by Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Camp, provides aid to deserving students in memory of their son, Geoffrey C. Camp, Taft Class of 1991.

ORTON P. CAMP SCHOLARSHIPS

were established in memory of Orton P. Camp 1908 to enable the school to accept students from the Waterbury area who show promise in science and mathematics and who will make a meaningful contribution to the extracurricular life of the school.

CHALLENGERS BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB SCHOLARSHIPS, established

through the support of the Roger S. Firestone Foundation and the efforts of Lisa Firestone von Winterfeldt ’85, Ferdie Wandelt ’66, and the late Lou Dantzler, founder of the Challengers Boys and Girls Club, provides financial assistance to students from the Los Angeles club to attend Taft Summer School, enriching their educational opportunities.

CHAMBERS SCHOLARSHIP FUND,

established in 1998 by Raymond G. Chambers, a friend of the Taft School, provides financial assistance to deserving minority students.

CHENG FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 1994 by Ivy

C. and Christopher W. C. Cheng, parents of Catherine K. Cheng ’95 and Jonathan S. H. Cheng ’99, is awarded to a deserving student.

HENRY CHENG FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP was created in 2016

by Henry and Katherine along with, and in honor of their children. Adrian ’98, Sonia ’99, Brian ’01 and Christopher ’08. This scholarship is awarded annually to a deserving student who otherwise could not afford a Taft education.

CHU FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established by Irene C. and

Alexander F. Chu ’66, is awarded a deserving student with preference given to students from Chinese communities in New York City.

CLASS OF 1943 MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 1983 by the families, friends, and members of the Class of 1943, provides financial assistance to a deserving student in memory of the Taft Class of 1943.

CLASS OF 1962 MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND was estab-

lished in 1997 by members of the Class of 1962 on the occasion of their Thirtyfifth Reunion as a permanent memorial to their deceased classmates: Thomas B. Carter, Leon T. Garretson, David E. Goldberg, Timothy S. Mayer, William J. Miller, James D. Pratt, Frederick D. Sharp, John W. H. Simpson, and Christopher B. Williams. In the selection of the recipient of this scholarship, preference shall be given to candidates who, in the estimation of the Headmaster and Director of Admissions, have made or are deemed capable of making a unique contribution to the life of the School.


HIPS CLASS OF 1999 SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established by members of the

Class of 1999 and their parents as a permanent endowment fund in support of financial aid, is awarded to that boy or girl who is committed to community service in the spirit of Mr. Taft’s motto, Non ut sibi ministretur sed ut ministret.

RICHARD D. COBB SCHOLARSHIP, established by Kathryn and Stephen Parks, parents of Kathryn ’05, Andrew ’07, and Clare ’08, to honor Dick Cobb of the Classics Department and his outstanding ability and dedication to teaching, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

COOKMAN SCHOLARSHIPS were

established by John E. Cookman and his family in memory of Thomas Cookman ’68 and Brown University ’72.

FORD HILLARD COOPER SCHOLARSHIP was established by

Ford Hillard Cooper ’22 to provide assistance to one or more deserving students selected by the Headmaster and the Admissions Committee.

ROY F. COPPEDGE III AND LUKE COPPEDGE ’98 SCHOLARSHIP FUND in honor of Suzette Sands

Wandelt, established in 2000 in honor of Suzie Wandelt, mother of Frederick H. Wandelt III ’66 and grandmother of Allison C. Wandelt ’91 and Christopher S. Wandelt ’96, pays tribute to a remarkable woman’s deep belief in youngsters and the importance of education. This scholarship is awarded annually to a deserving Taft student.

CHRISTOPHER CUMMINGS ’77 SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 2001 in memory of Christopher Cummings of the Class of 1977 by his family, friends, and classmates, provides financial assistance to a deserving student.

DADDARIO FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in

2001 by Mr. and Mrs. Francis E. Daddario of the Class of 1935 and the Daddario Charitable Foundation, provides academic scholarships, based on Horace Taft’s fundamental beliefs in the training of character, mind, and body, to enable students of financially deserving families to attend Taft.

Alumni, parents, and friends of the Taft School have given generously to establish these scholarships and endowed funds to provide financial assistance for qualified students: DAVIS INTERNATIONAL SCHOLARS PROGRAM, established

TIMOTHY EASTMAN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP was established

by Mr. and Mrs. Shelby M. C. Davis, son Lansing A. Davis ’97, and their family, provides scholarship funds to international students from financially deserving families in support of greater global diversity on American boarding school campuses. The program seeks to identify and recruit highly-motivated future leaders from around the world, who will make the most of their educational experiences as well as throughout their professional lives, including “giving back” to help shape a better world.

by the parents of Timothy Eastman ’60 to provide aid to a student who has shown proficiency and interest in the study of mathematics.

DAVIS OPPORTUNITY SCHOLARS PROGRAM, established by Mr. and

by Jacqueline and Christina R. Erdman along with their daughter Makenzie ’14 to provide annual support for the Dance Curriculum at Taft.

Mrs. Shelby M. C. Davis, son Lansing A. Davis ’97, and their family, provides scholarship funds to domestic students from financially deserving families, especially for students from recentlyimmigrated families. The program seeks to identify and recruit highly-motivated future leaders, who are seeking extraordinary educational opportunities at American boarding schools.

THE H. WILLIAM “RUSTY” DAVIS AND LINDA SAARNIJOKI SCHOLARSHIP was established

in 2016 to honor the many years of their extraordinary service to Taft. This scholarship is awarded annually to provide financial assistance to deserving students.

LOIS S. DEPOLO MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 1997 by the friends and family of Lois DePolo, provides financial assistance to deserving day students in memory of Lois S. DePolo, mathematics instructor and friend from 1986 to 1997.

MAUREEN ANNE DONOHOE SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 1991 in memory of Maureen Anne Donohoe of the Class of 1984, provides financial aid to a deserving student who confronts challenge with strong character and spirit.

ALBERT KEMPTON D’OSSCHE ’66 MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP,

established in 2004 by the estate of Mrs. Daisy K. Dickson in honor of Albert Kempton d’Ossche, Class of 1966, and in recognition of the Taft School’s meaningful contribution to her late son, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

CLARK R. EGELER, JR. SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

by bequest in 1993 in memory of Clark Raymond Egeler, Jr. of the Class of 1964, provides financial assistance to deserving minority students.

ERDMAN FAMILY ENDOWMENT FOR DANCE was established in 2016

JOHN C. ESTY SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established in 2015 by

Talbot Baker, Jr. to honor the School’s third Headmaster.

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS SCHOLARSHIP FUND was estab-

lished in 1998 by the participants of the Financial Institutions Contributions Committee: American Bank, Bank of Boston Connecticut, First Union, Fleet, Chase, North American Bank, People’s Bank, and Webster Bank. The Fund provides financial assistance to deserving local students from the thirteen-town Chamber of Commerce service area with a preference for students from the Children’s Community School.

CONRAD G. FLEISHER ’44 SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in

1998 by the Harry Fleisher Foundation, is awarded to a deserving student in memory of Conrad G. Fleisher, Taft Class of 1944, who throughout his lifetime upheld the School’s motto, Not to be served but to serve, through his loyalty and generosity both to Taft and to the local community.

JONATHAN B. FLEISHER ’73 MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established by the Harry Fleisher Foundation and Mr. and Mrs. Conrad G. Fleisher ’44 in memory of their son, Jonathan B. Fleisher of the Class of 1973, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

45

PAMELA FAITH FLEISHER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 1996 by Mr.

and Mrs. Conrad G. Fleisher ’44 in memory of their daughter, Pamela F. Fleisher, provides financial assistance to deserving day students.

THE FOLEY FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP

was established in 2016 by Lawrence and Megan Foley, in honor of their son L.J. ’17. This scholarship will be awarded annually to a deserving student who would otherwise be unable to attend Taft.

EDWARD E. FORD FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP FUND enables

deserving students requiring financial assistance to attend Taft.

DOUGLAS A. FREEDMAN SCHOLARSHIP FUND was created in

1998 through the bequest of Charles W. Lubin, Doug’s maternal grandfather, and through the additional generosity of the Lubin Family Foundation, Kate and Doug Freedman ’88, and Sara and Axel Schupf. The Fund, established in honor of Doug Freedman’s Tenth Reunion, provides financial aid to deserving students, with preference given to scholar-athletes.

GENUNG FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND supports students from the Woodbury area. It was established in 1994 by Diana and Fred Genung ’63.

GILLIKIN FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP,

established in 2012 in honor of Joanna Baker Wandelt, mother of Allison C. Wandelt ’91 and Christopher S. Wandelt ’96, pays tribute to a remarkable woman and her belief in the importance of education, to her devotion to young students, to support and nurture their personal growth and development. This scholarship is awarded annually to a deserving Taft student.

EVERETT M. GOULARD MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

by his widow, Marion Goulard, and son, James Goulard, Class of 1960, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

RICHARD M. GREGORY FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in

honor of Meriel Gregory by her husband and children, Richard M. Gregory ’60, Larsen C. Gregory ’86, and Brooks M. Gregory ’89, provides financial assistance to deserving students.


SCHOLARSHIPS THE GUERNSEY FAMILY ENDOWMENT FOR THEATRE AND THE ARTS was established in

2015 by Peter and Evelyn Guernsey and their daughter, Sarah ’11 to support the theatre and the arts program at Taft.

CONRAD AND SUE HAM SCHOLARSHIP, established in 1996

in memory of Conrad S. Ham, Class of 1914, and his wife, Susan DuPont Ham, is awarded to deserving students based on scholastic merit, leadership, character, and financial need.

46

GEORGE M. HAMPTON, JR. ’60 SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in

2010 by the Class of 1960 to honor the memory of George M. Hampton, Jr., head monitor, is given to a deserving student who demonstrates those traits that George so richly embodied: strong leadership, character, integrity, and empathy.

ROBERT F. HARR MEMORIAL FUND, created by a bequest of Robert

F. Harr, loyal Taft employee from 1948 to 1985, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

HARRIS FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP

was established in 2004 through the generosity of Susan and Charles T. Harris III and will provide financial assistance to a student with demonstrated need. The award may, if appropriate, be expanded to include funds to allow the student to travel to school and home if such travel is otherwise impossible.

JONATHAN M. HARRIS ’90 SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established by

Mr. and Mrs. J. Ira Harris in honor of their son, Jonathan M. Harris, Class of 1990, provides financial assistance to deserving students, with a preference given to those candidates who are residents of Chicago.

HAYDEN FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP, established by the

Charles Hayden Foundation, provides financial aid to deserving students from the New York and Boston metropolitan areas.

THE HEADMASTER’S SCHOLARSHIP was created in 2015

and donated anonymously to honor the school’s fifth Headmaster, William R. MacMullen ’78, and will provide financial assistance for a deserving young student.

WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST SCHOLARSHIP FUND, created in

1986 by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, provides financial assistance to deserving minority students.

BENJAMIN HEINEMAN AND CRISTINE RUSSELL SCHOLARSHIP FUND in honor of Frederick H. Wandelt III ’66, established by Mr. Benjamin Heineman and Ms. Cristine Russell, provides financial aid to enable a deserving student to attend Taft.

HELLSTROM FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 1992 by Linda and Jay Hellstrom and their daughter, Erika Hellstrom of the Class of 1992, provides assistance to deserving students most in need of financial aid in order to attend Taft.

HEMINWAY SCHOLARSHIP was established by Mrs. Merrit Heminway of Watertown.

HENRY L. HILLMAN SCHOLARSHIPS, established by

THE ERIC W. JOHNSON ’53 SCHOLARSHIP FUND provides

assistance to a deserving student in memory of Eric Johnson, who attended Taft for nine months and quickly discovered that the school provided an excellent environment in which to excel and prepare for success in the real world. Eric’s generosity, enthusiasm and loyalty to the school have been strong since graduation. His legacy, based on the school’s motto, Non ut sibi ministretur sed ut ministret will help others appreciate what the Taft School can offer.

KARNASIEWICZ FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND,

established by Dr. and Mrs. Michael E. Karnasiewicz, provides financial aid to a deserving student from the Greater Waterbury area.

Henry L. Hillman ’37, enable deserving students in need of aid to attend Taft, with preference given to candidates from western Pennsylvania.

KEELER SCHOLARSHIP was established by a bequest of Birdie R. Keeler to provide financial aid for students who are residents of the state of Connecticut.

DANIEL HOGAN SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 1999 by Dan Hogan

BRADLEY DEWEY KENT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, created

’63, father of Lindsey H. Hogan ’95 and Michael D. Hogan ’00 and uncle of Kerry P. Morton ’84 and Katherine R. Polzer ’86, provides financial assistance to a deserving student from the New England region.

PHILIP K. HOWARD ’66 SCHOLARSHIP FUND was estab-

lished in 2005 to provide financial assistance to deserving students.

ANN AND ALLEN HUBBARD SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 1991 by Ann Hubbard and her husband, Allen Hubbard, of the Class of 1933, provides scholarship aid to a deserving student.

INDEPENDENCE FOUNDATION FUND provides support for the student loan program.

JACOBSON SCHOLARSHIP FUND,

established in 1994 by James A. Jacobson of the Class of 1962, provides financial aid to a deserving student.

BARCLAY G. JOHNSON ’53 SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 2000 by the Class of 1953 in honor of Barclay Johnson on the occasion of his retirement following his distinguished thirty-nine-year-long career as a teacher, coach, and head of the Independent Studies Program, is awarded to a deserving student.

through the generosity of the Charles Hayden Foundation and the parents and friends of Bradley Dewey Kent, honors the memory of an outstanding Taft master by providing aid to a deserving student from the Boston or New York area.

WILLIAM J. KEYS ’06 MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP was established in 2011

by the friends and family of Will Keys ’06, who through his life of honor, integrity, courage, and service to his country exemplified Taft’s motto, Non ut sibi ministretur sed ut ministret. The scholarship provides financial assistance to a deserving student who is determined, as Will was, to pursue a life that makes a positive impact on Taft, the country, and the global community. When appropriate, preference will be given to a candidate whose family has involvement in military service.

HARRY S. KINNEY SCHOLARSHIP

was established by H. Craig Kinney of the Class of 1968 in honor of his father, Harry Secord Kinney, of Columbus, Indiana.

ZOË B. KLIMLEY SCHOLARSHIP FUND The Zoë B. Klimley ’15 Memorial

Scholarship Fund was established by her parents, Brooks and Laura, and her friends to provide financial support to Taft students who evidence the qualities that Zoё endorsed daily: a deep sense of community, an empathetic appreciation of all people, and a boundless enthusiasm for life.

DANEY AND LEE KLINGENSTEIN ’44 SCHOLARSHIP FUND.

Throughout its history, Taft has been committed to recognizing the strong support provided by its alumni family to the School’s ongoing development. To recognize this relationship and to encourage the family nature of the School’s admissions policies, Daney and Lee Klingenstein, Class of 1944, have established a scholarship fund to provide financial assistance for the children and grandchildren of Taft graduates. In so doing, they hope to encourage those who might otherwise be hesitant to apply for admission to do so, recognizing the School’s commitment to making a Taft education available to qualified alumni children.

THE LEE KLINGENSTEIN PROGRAM, established by Lee Paul

Klingenstein of the Class of 1944, was designed to support character education including but not limited to service, ethical behavior, community responsibility and responsible citizenship.

KREHBIEL FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 1997 by Fred

and Kay Krehbiel, parents of William V. Krehbiel, Class of 1994, and Jay F. Krehbiel, Class of 1997, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

L. RICHARD KUGELMAN, JR. MEMORIAL FUND was established in

memory of Rick Kugelman of the Class of 1985 by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. L. Richard Kugelman, and his sister, Kristen G. Kugelman of the Class of 1986. The purpose of the fund is to provide scholarship assistance to a deserving student or to provide financial assistance to a student in need of help upon the recommendation of the Headmaster.

ELIZABETH LAKE LANAHAN ’08 FUND established in 2015 by Michael

and Leslie Lanahan ’73 to honor their daughter, Lily ’08. The income from this fund is unrestricted and is to be used at the discretion of the Headmaster and/or the Board of Trustees.

BYRON J. LAPHAM SCHOLARSHIP, established by Mildred Stiles Lapham in memory of her husband Byron J. Lapham of the Class of 1920, provides financial assistance to a deserving student.

BRADFORD C. LAUBE ’51 ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP, established in 2009

through the bequest of Bradford C. Laube ’51, provides financial assistance to deserving students, with preference given to the sons and daughters of Taft alumni.


MILTON LEEDS SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 2000 by Milton

Leeds, provides financial assistance to especially needy and deserving students, with preference given to students from the Greater Waterbury area.

LEHMAN SCHOLARSHIP was established by Orin Lehman ’38 to provide financial assistance to a deserving student. LLOYD SCHOLARSHIP, established

by the family of John M. Lloyd of the Class of 1967, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

DAVID AND HENRY LONG FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 1997 by David and Judy Long and Henry and Dutton Long to provide financial assistance to deserving students from Watertown. It was created in the belief that Watertown is a better place in which to live because of the School, and, if more young people are afforded the opportunity of a Taft education, both they and the town will benefit. David is the father of Lisabeth Long Shaw, Class of 1987, and D. John Long, Class of 1988.

TODD P. MCGOVERN ’92 SCHOLARSHIP, given to that

deserving student whose courage, passion, optimism and commitment to service embodies the extraordinary life of Todd McGovern.

LOSEE FAMILY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, established by the

Losee Family in memory of Jeanne G. and Thomas P. Losee and Thomas P. Losee, Jr., Class of 1959, is awarded to a deserving student in need of financial assistance.

HERBERT B. LURIA MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS were established in

memory of Herbert B. Luria by his wife and his brothers, Henry T. ’28, Mortimer ’34, David, and William Luria.

JAMES AND SALLY MAILLIARD AND WILLIAM MAILLIARD MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, created by the Mailliard family, provides scholarship assistance to a deserving student from the San Francisco Bay area.

FREDERICK G. MASON SCHOLARSHIP FUND was estab-

lished in 1993 by Frederick G. Mason, Jr. of the Class of 1943 as a memorial to his father, Frederick G. Mason of the Class of 1897. Frederick G. Mason was a co-founder of the Taft Alumni Association during the School’s earliest years. This scholarship was given by Mr. Mason’s son as a memorial tribute on the occasion of his Fiftieth Reunion and the onehundredth anniversary of his father’s matriculation at Taft. Scholarship awards shall be made to deserving students, with a preference given to residents of Watertown and Waterbury.

BERKLEY F. MATTHEWS ’96 MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND,

established in 1997 in honor of Berkley F. Matthews, Class of 1996, by her family and friends, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

DONALD F. MCCULLOUGH SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 2001 by Lulu McCullough in loving memory of her husband, Donald F. McCullough, Class of 1942 and Chairman of the Taft Board of Trustees, for his distinguished leadership and devoted service to the School since 1963. The scholarships provide financial assistance to enable deserving students to attend Taft.

MCDOWELL FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

by Alan and Susan McDowell in honor of their daughter, Whitney W. McDowell, Taft Class of 1994, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

MCKINNON FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in

1997 by Floyd W. McKinnon ’60, James W. McKinnon ’87, Sarah E. McKinnon ’89, and Robert K. McKinnon ’93, in recognition of their affiliation with Taft, is awarded to enable a deserving student to have the benefit of a Taft education.

MEHTA SCHOLARSHIPS, established

in 2010 by Shweta Siraj-Mehta and Amish H. Mehta ’91 in honor of their parents and families, are intended to promote global diversity at Taft. The scholarship provides financial assistance to enable deserving students, with preference given to students from the Indian subcontinent, to attend Taft.

MESTRE FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP,

established in 2010 by Gillian and Eduardo G. Mestre ’66, parents of Laura ’98, Cristina, and Edward, provides financial assistance to enable deserving students to have the benefit of a Taft education.

STEWART L. MIMS, JR. SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 1999 through the estate of Mary W. Mims in memory of her son Stewart L. Mims, Jr., Class of 1933, is awarded to a deserving student.

MORRIS FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP,

established in 2011 by Kate and Hans Morris, parents of Mac ’06 and Lucy ’10, provides financial assistance to enable deserving students to attend Taft.

WILLIAM BEMIS MORRIS SCHOLARSHIP, established by Mr.

and Mrs. Joseph G. Morris in memory of their son, William Bemis Morris of the Class of 1949, provides financial aid to deserving students.

DONALD OSCARSON ’47 SCHOLARSHIPS, established in 2013

in memory of classics teacher Donald Oscarson ’47, are awarded to Taft students in need, who best represent Oscie’s spirit in terms of fellowship among their peers and also demonstrate a strong and determined work ethic in their daily lives at Taft.

DAVID AND DANIEL ALFOND PEARL SCHOLARSHIP FUND,

established by Mrs. Susan Alfond Pearl in honor of her sons, David Alfond Pearl ’86 and Daniel Alfond Pearl ’88, provides aid to a deserving student, with preference given to scholar-athletes from the state of Maine.

MUHLHAUSER SCHOLARSHIP,

PERCARPIO FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 1999 by Dr. and

LANCE R. ODDEN SCHOLARSHIPS,

MARINA C. PETERSEN ’06 SCHOLARSHIP is designated in

established in 1998 by Robert F. Muhlhauser, Jr., Class of 1963, provides financial assistance to deserving students, with preference given to scholar-athletes and residents of the Greater Cincinnati area.

established in 2001 as a tribute to Lance Odden’s extraordinary leadership of Taft during his twenty-nine-year tenure as the School’s fourth Headmaster, provide financial assistance to a select group of talented and motivated students who show promise of fulfilling Horace Taft’s and Lance Odden’s highest aspirations for young people, namely, education of the whole person, the formation of lasting principles and values, and service to society as concerned and committed citizens.

LANCE R. AND PATSY ODDEN SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 1997 in honor of Lance and Patsy Odden’s twenty-five years of leadership and dedication to the Taft School, provides financial assistance to students who demonstrate qualities of leadership and concern for their community.

ONEGLIA FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 1996 by Louisa

and Francis J. Oneglia and Catherine and Gregory S. Oneglia ’65, with the support of O & G Industries, provides financial aid to a promising student from the local community.

JOHN A. ORB FUND, established in 1989 through the generosity of John A. Orb, Class of 1937, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

47

Mrs. Bernard Percarpio, provides financial aid to a deserving girl or boy from the Greater Waterbury area who exhibits an aptitude for the sciences with a special interest in community service.

remembrance of Marina, who spent four years as an active and happy member of the Taft community. Marina cherished her time at the Taft School, where she developed and nourished strong friendships with day students, boarding students, faculty, and staff. This scholarship is to be awarded to an incoming day student girl, with demonstrated need, from Watertown.

HENRY AND EVA B. POLLAK SCHOLARSHIP, established by

Maurice Pollak and his son Henry Pollak II ’40, is awarded annually to a student who shows superior strength and interest in things scientific.

MARGAUX POWERS ’00 MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP was

established in 2008 in memory of Margaux E. Powers by her father, Michael S. Powers ’69, her sister, Dana A. Powers, family, classmates, and friends. This scholarship will stand as a lasting tribute to a remarkable woman, of warm heart and beautiful spirit, beloved by family and friends. Her genuine and caring nature, her intelligence, her confidence and strength, her skills as an outstanding competitor and athlete inspired all who knew her. In awarding this scholarship to deserving students, preference is given to young women attending Taft who exemplify these outstanding qualities.


SCHOLARSHIPS PRECOURT FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP, established in 2011

by Agatha and J. Anthony Precourt, Jr. ’89 and their family, provides financial assistance to a deserving student, with a preference given to candidates from Colorado, California, or Arizona with high academic and athletic achievement.

ROBERT S. RAU MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND, created by

a bequest of Robert S. Rau, Class of 1924, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

48

JONATHAN R. READ ENDOWMENT FOR FINANCIAL AID, established in 1997 by Jonathan

R. Read, Class of 1974, father of Colin J. Read, Class of 2002, provides financial aid to a deserving student who will benefit from the legacy of guidance through life by the moral and philosophic compass given by the School.

ROMANO SCHOLARSHIP FUND,

established in 2001 in honor of Jerry and Anne Romano by alumni, parents, and friends, in recognition of their thirty-one years of inspirational leadership, loyalty and devoted service to the School, provides financial assistance to a deserving Taft student.

MARSHA AND CHRIS ROON ’75 SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND, established in 1997 by Chris

Roon, Class of 1975, and his wife Marsha, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

LANNY ROSS ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP, established in 1995

by a bequest of Lancelot P. Ross, Class of 1924, is awarded to deserving students.

SAXTEN-BARNARD SCHOLARSHIP

arship aid to students who are qualified academically to meet Taft’s standards of excellence but who face financial difficulty in attending.

is awarded to a deserving student who demonstrates leadership ability and a balanced interest in scholastics, sports, and school activities. This award was established in 1991 by John A. Saxten and Bailey S. Barnard of the Class of 1963 and is intended to enable Taft to enroll students from diverse geographical backgrounds.

ALVIN I. REIFF MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

SCHILLER FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FOR THE ARTS, established in 2013 by

READER’S DIGEST ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND provides schol-

in 1988 in memory of Alvin Ira Reiff, Taft master from 1958 to 1988, provides financial aid to a deserving student.

REYNOLDS FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP, established by Vada Odom Reynolds, mother of John C. Reynolds ’62, provides for financial assistance to a deserving student with preferences given to candidates from New Orleans or the state of Louisiana.

RHULEN FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 1995 by Eileen

and Peter Rhulen, parents of Samantha R. Rhulen ’87, Blake M. Rhulen ’88, and Sloane W. Rhulen ’90, supports international students and programs.

VIRGINIA AND WILLIAM H. RISLEY ’35 SCHOLARSHIP FUND

provides financial assistance to students who demonstrate character and spirit in upholding the School’s motto—Non ut sibi ministretur sed ut ministret—with preference given to students from New York and Connecticut who have been given special guidance to prepare them for the requirements of Taft.

Philip Schiller and Kim Gassett-Schiller, parents of Mark G. Schiller, Class of 2013 in gratitude for Mark’s Taft experience. This scholarship is awarded to a student, or students annually, who show interest, aptitude and a desire to continue their studies in any of the performing or visual arts, with a special preference for supporting musicians and musical performances. It is hoped that this financial support will make it possible for talented students to attend Taft who otherwise could not afford to do so, and in so doing, promote and enhance the importance and visibility of the arts at Taft.

SCHOONMAKER FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 1999 by Carolyn P. and Samuel V. Schoonmaker III, parents of Samuel V. Schoonmaker IV ’86 and Frederick P. Schoonmaker ’97, in support of the School’s motto Non ut sibi ministretur sed ut ministret provides financial assistance to a deserving student.

ELENORA L. SCHWEIZER SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in

2000 in memory of Elenora L. Schweizer by her son, Tod H. Schweizer ’57, in recognition of her effort and determination in making his Taft education possible, provides financial assistance to a deserving student.

HARDIE SCOTT ’26 SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 1998 by Hardie

SMITH/ARNOLD FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 1996 by members of the Smith and Arnold families, provides financial aid to a deserving student from the Greater Waterbury area.

SMITH FAMILY FOUNDATIONS’ SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in

Scott, Class of 1926, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

1988 by the Smith Family Foundations, provides financial aid to a deserving student from Wisconsin, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, or Minnesota.

SEARBY FAMILY ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP, established in

PETER J. SOLOMON FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND was

2008 through the generosity of Catharine and Dan Searby, Class of 1953, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

SERENBETZ FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP was established in

2007 with a gift from Stuart W. Serenbetz and Jean B. Serenbetz, parents of Tucker ’03, Hunter ’06, and Skyler ’09. This scholarship was created in honor of Stuart’s parents, Warren Lewis Serenbetz and Thelma Randby Serenbetz, whose lives exemplify the Taft motto, and whose steadfast commitment to the education of their children and grandchildren inspires all of us. The Serenbetz Family Scholarship will be awarded yearly to provide financial assistance to a deserving student with demonstrated financial need, strength of character, and academic promise.

established by Peter J. Solomon in honor of his daughter, Kate Solomon, Class of 1990, to support financial aid for deserving students.

CORNELIUS V. STARR SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 1961 by Cornelius V. Starr, provides financial assistance to a deserving student, with preference given to the children of Taft faculty.

DWIGHT L. STOCKER, JR. MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND,

established in 1970 in memory of Dwight L. Stocker, Jr. of the Class of 1950 by his family, friends, and classmates, provides financial aid to a deserving student.

SUGAR FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 1996 by Dr.

lished in 1960 upon the seventieth anniversary of the founding of the School to support the needs of deserving students requiring financial assistance.

and Mrs. Jerome O. Sugar, parents of Lindsey A. Sugar, Class of 1997, and Sara R. Sugar, Class of 2001, provides financial aid to a deserving student from the greater Waterbury area. This fund is dedicated in memory of Cecil Sugar, grandmother of Lindsey and Sara.

SHREVE FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND in honor of Frederick H. Wandelt

HORACE DUTTON TAFT ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIPS were established by

SEVENTIETH ANNIVERSARY SCHOLARSHIP FUND was estab-

III ’66 brings to the Taft family deserving students who need financial assistance in order to attend Taft. The Fund was established in 1996 by Dorothy and Brandon Shreve, Class of 1964, and their sons Wick Shreve, Class of 1997, and Lanny Shreve, Class of 1999.

SIEMON COMPANY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in

1996 by The Siemon Company, provides financial assistance to deserving day students from the Greater Waterbury area, with preference given to candidates who are residents of Watertown.

the Board of Trustees to provide scholarship assistance to the children of alumni who, by virtue of their public service, would not have the resources to send their children to Taft.

HORACE DUTTON TAFT AND ROBERT A. TAFT SCHOLARSHIPS

are awarded by the Trustees in memory of Senator Robert Taft 1906 and Horace Dutton Taft, founder of the School.


HORACE DUTTON TAFT SCHOLARSHIP was established by

the Dorothy Abbe Thomson Trust to aid students who are selected on the basis of character and ability, rather than wholly on scholarship.

TARASUK FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established by Dr. and Mrs.

William E. Tarasuk, parents of Jon Randall Tarasuk, Class of 1993, and Lindsay B. Tarasuk, Class of 1999, provides aid to a day student scholar who demonstrates academic and extracurricular promise.

ROBERT BENSON TAYLOR SCHOLARSHIPS were established

by Vernon R. Taylor of San Antonio, in memory of his son Robert Benson Taylor ’41, who was lost in action over Nanau, Germany, February 17, 1945.

TUCCI FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP

was established in 2011 by Michael and Kimberly Tucci in honor of their daughter, Ali Tucci ’12, to provide financial assistance to deserving students who otherwise would be unable to attend Taft, with preference given to those candidates who will make a meaningful contribution to the extracurricular life of the school in the area of athletics.

TUNLEY SCHOLARSHIP, established by Roul Tunley, Class of 1930, is awarded to deserving students with preference given to those with an interest and talent for creative writing.

MARGARET AND ROLAND TYLER SCHOLARSHIP was established by a

bequest of Margaret Tyler in memory of her husband Roland Tyler, Taft master from 1925 to 1967.

VINTIADIS FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in 1995 by Regina

and Polyvios Vintiadis, parents of Sara R. Vintiadis ’93 and Jason H. Vintiadis ’95, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

JOHN L. VOGELSTEIN SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established in

1991 by John L. Vogelstein, Class of 1952, provides financial assistance to deserving minority students in conjunction with Prep-for-Prep.

JOHN K. WALLACE, JR. ’52 SCHOLARSHIP, established in 2002 by

John K. Wallace, Jr., Class of 1952, provides financial assistance to deserving students.

THE FREDERICK H. WANDELT III ’66 SCHOLARSHIP was created by

his family and friends to honor Ferdie and to celebrate his four decades of leadership as director of admissions and assistant to the headmaster on alumni affairs. In devoting his life to the school he loved, Ferdie inspired and mentored thousands of students and faculty and fundamentally shaped the destiny of Taft. This scholarship is awarded annually to enable qualified students of financially deserving families to attend Taft.

GORDON B. TWEEDY SCHOLARSHIPS, established by Mrs.

Mary Johnson Tweedy in memory of her husband Gordon B. Tweedy of the Class of 1924, provide financial assistance to deserving students.

ALUMNI PARENTS’ SCHOLARSHIP JAMES AND NANCY BETTER SCHOLARSHIP LIVINGSTON CARROLL ’37 MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP CLASS OF 1928 SCHOLARSHIP MARIAN SHAW CROSBY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP JOSEPH I. CUNNINGHAM MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP NELSON G. CURTIS SCHOLARSHIP DENTON L. DEBAUN ’33 SCHOLARSHIP HOLCOMBE AND MONICA GREEN ENDOWMENT FUND ARTHUR P. GREENBLATT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP HARTFORD AREA SCHOLARSHIP ALAN LADD JOHNSON SCHOLARSHIP DAVID LEIB ’73 MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

FREDERICK H. WANDELT, JR. SCHOLARSHIP, supported by Kevin

and Karen Kennedy, was established in 1997 in honor of Frederick H. Wandelt, Jr., father of Frederick H. Wandelt III, Class of 1966, and provides financial assistance to deserving students.

DOROTHY S. AND DEVER K. WARNER SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND was established in 2008 to assist deserving students or students who have shown a pronounced aptitude for and interest in mathematics and scientific fields of study, with preference given to children of Taft alumni.

WARREN ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP, established in 1995, honors the memory of Harvey T. Warren of the Class of 1906 and his son William T. Warren of the Class of 1936.

WESLEY S. WILLIAMS, JR. ’59 AND KAREN HASTIE WILLIAMS SCHOLARSHIP FUND, established

in 1999, awards partial scholarships to deserving students with the intent to support multiculturalism and diversity at Taft.

WOLD-RICHMOND ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP was established in

2010 by John S. Wold ’34, his son, John P. Wold ’71, and family members to enable a graduate of the Taft School to attend Union College. This scholarship is awarded to students who have written a compelling record while at Taft in both their academic and extracurricular endeavors and who are most likely to contribute in a similar fashion to the community of scholars at Union College.

DAVID WOODWARD SCHOLARSHIP was established

established by George E. Weigl, father of Peter D. Weigl ’57 and Robert C. Weigl ’62, provides financial assistance to a deserving student.

WEIGL FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP,

by Mrs. John K. Ottley of Atlanta and Watertown in memory of her father, who was a close friend of Horace Dutton Taft and a generous benefactor of the School in its early days.

ANDREW J. WERTHEIM ’76 SCHOLARSHIP FUND was estab-

DAVID, HELEN, AND MARIAN WOODWARD SCHOLARSHIPS

WEYERHAEUSER–WAGNER FUND,

was established in 2009 by Wonhi Yoo and Kay Song, parents of Andrew ’11 and Walter ’12, in honor of their children and with gratitude for their education at the Taft School. This fund provides financial assistance to deserving students, who will benefit from attending the School.

lished in 1999 by Andrew J. Wertheim ’76 to provide financial assistance to deserving students.

established by Mr. and Mrs. George H. Weyerhaeuser ’44, Merrill Wagner Weyerhaeuser ’78, and G. Corydon Wagner ’43, provides financial assistance to deserving students, with preference given to candidates who are residents of the Pacific Northwest region.

provide financial assistance for students from the Waterbury area.

A. AND W. YOO SCHOLARSHIP

LEONHARDT FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP NORDEN SCHOLARSHIP PETER ORDWAY ENDOWMENT FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS FLORENCE M. AND ALICE QUINN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP MRS. H. S. RICHARDSON SCHOLARSHIP CHARLES F. RINALDI ’53 DAY STUDENT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP DR. CHARLES DOUGLAS SAWYER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP LOUIS HENRY SCHROEDER SCHOLARSHIP MALTBY SMITH 1906 MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP LISA JANE SUMMA ’86 SCHOLARSHIP DAVID S. TAYLOR ’43 SCHOLARSHIP MARIA AND GLENN TAYLOR SCHOLARSHIP GARRETT W. WYMAN ’87 SCHOLARSHIP

49


ADMISSIONS FOUNDED: 1890 GRADES: 9–12 NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 594 BOYS: 298 GIRLS: 296 BOARDERS: 489 DAY STUDENTS: 105 STUDENTS OF COLOR: 33% 50

NUMBER OF COUNTRIES REPRESENTED: 43 NUMBER OF STATES REPRESENTED: 32 PERCENTAGE ON FINANCIAL AID: 34% SCHOOL COLORS: RED & BLUE MASCOT: RHINOCEROS CAMPUS: 226 ACRES STUDENT TO FACULTY RATIO: 5:1 AVERAGE CLASS SIZE: 11 MALE FACULTY: 68

The Admissions Committee is interested in candidates as people, not merely as scholars. We look for students who are curious, who will become involved, and who will commit themselves to a high standard of intellectual and personal growth. To learn about a candidate, the Admissions Committee depends upon previous scholastic record, standing in class, recommendations from school head and teachers, results of admission tests, personal essays, and an interview. Taft’s course of study covers grades nine through postgraduate, and it is desirable for students to attend for three or four years so that they may take full advantage of the various Honors and Advanced Placement courses and extracurricular richness offered. However, a number of wellqualified students are admitted to both the Upper Middle and Senior classes each year, since the Admissions Committee finds these students make a significant contribution to the academic and extracurricular life of the school. Parents and their children are cordially invited to visit the school, but definite appointments should be made well in advance. The Admissions Office interviews Monday through Saturday. Appointments on Wednesday and Saturday are available only in the morning. All candidates for admission to grades 9, 10, or 11 are expected to take the Secondary School Admission Test (SSAT), which is administered at centers throughout the world. Candidates are urged to take the test in October, November, December, or January. Taft does not offer an early decision plan. We notify candidates of our decisions on March 10, and the parents’ reply date for accepted students is no later than April 10.

IMPORTANT DATES Secondary School Admission Tests (Preferred dates) October 15, 2016 November 12, 2016 December 10, 2016 January 7, 2017

Application Deadline January 15, 2017 Notification Date March 10, 2017

ADMISSIONS OFFICERS

FEMALE FACULTY: 58

Peter A. Frew ’75 Director of Admissions

AVERAGE AGE: 44 FACULTY WITH ADVANCED DEGREES: 91

Suzanne H. Campbell Associate Director of Admissions

NUMBER OF AP COURSES OFFERED: 31 NUMBER OF COURSES OFFERED: 200

Michael Hoffman ’97 Director of Financial Aid Tamara Sinclair ’05 Director of Multicultural Recruitment

Shavar Bernier Kerry Bracco John B. Kenerson ’82 Diana LaCasse Rob Madden ’03 Daniel P. Murphy Ginger O’Shea Kate Pistel Gretchen Silverman Tyler Whitley ’04 Missy Wolff Admissions Officers

Mark Traina Associate Director of Financial Aid

GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION 2016–2017

Parents’ Reply Date for Admitted Students April 10, 2017

Peggy L. McKee Admissions Program Coordinator Pilar Santos International Student Advisor Gail R. Blomberg School Receptionist Caroline Murphy Wendy Osborn Joanna Wandelt Administrative Assistants

U.S. BOARDING STUDENTS Arizona California Colorado Connecticut Delaware

Florida Georgia Illinois Louisiana Maine Maryland

Massachusetts Minnesota Montana Nebraska Nevada

New Hampshire New Jersey New York North Carolina Ohio Oregon

Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina Tennessee Texas

Vermont Virginia Washington, DC West Virginia Wyoming


Affording Expenses The tuition for boarding students is $56,550 for the 2016–2017 school year. The tuition for day students (including lunch) is $41,950. These fees do not meet the actual cost of educating a student at Taft, and the difference is made up by the school’s endowment funds and gifts. An enrollment deposit of 10% of tuition due is payable upon enrollment. The remaining yearly tuition may be paid in installments due on July 1 and November 1. The school encourages the use of monthly tuition payment plans. Information about a plan is sent to parents with the enrollment contract. Books, a computer, and other items from the School Store are not included in tuition. Students should deposit funds in a student bank account in the School Store or Business Office, and will be given a “Taft$” card.

We get it. We appreciate that the cost of a great education can put a serious strain on a family’s budget. At Taft, 34% of our students receive some form of financial aid. We don’t just look at your family’s income; we consider the size of your family, and the costs of education for your siblings. If you’re admitted to Taft, we’ll make it work financially. FINANCIAL AID AWARDS FOR DOMESTIC STUDENTS ADMITTED IN 2016* Family Income (Boarding Students)

Average Award

Average Tuition

# of Awards

<$60,000

$55,150

$1,400

13

$60,000–$100,000

$50,550

$6,000

7

$100,000–$140,000

$46,000

$10,550

9

$140,000–$180,000

$41,550

$15,000

13

>$180,000

$24,550

$32,000

16

Average Award

Average Tuition

# of Awards

Family Income (Day Students) <$60,000

$40,500

$1,450

2

$60,000–$100,000

$31,000

$10,950

1

$100,000–$140,000

$27,000

$14,950

2

$140,000–$180,000

$28,000

$13,950

2

>$180,000

$24,600

$17,350

5

*Family income, family size, and the number of students in tuition-charging schools are all considered in awarding aid. 20 international students were admitted with an average award of $48,900.

SEE pp. 44–49 FOR OUR LIST OF SCHOLARSHIPS

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS Albania Australia Austria Bahamas Bermuda Botswana

Bulgaria Canada Cayman Islands China Colombia Czech Republic

Ecuador Finland Georgia Germany Ghana Hong Kong

Hungary India Jamaica Japan Korea Lithuania

Malaysia Mexico Moldova Nepal Nigeria Poland

Saudi Arabia Singapore Slovakia Somalia Spain Switzerland

Taiwan Thailand Turkey United Kingdom Vietnam Zimbabwe

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Headmaster’s The founding of this school in 1890 by Horace Taft was a humble event. Mr. Taft had very little teaching experience, the campus was a small house, and there were only seventeen students. But Mr. Taft had a simple, compelling idea: that the education of the whole student would profoundly shape lives. Although we talk about that vision in different language today, it remains our mission—an education that is intellectual, moral, physical, and spiritual. Articulated in the “Portrait of a Graduate” on the adjacent page, we hope our graduates leave Taft well-prepared for college and carry lessons that help them lead good lives of service to others.

52

Taft is hardly the only school aspiring to educate the whole student, but this book, our website, and best of all a visit to our campus will give you a sense of how we succeed. Critical to this venture is our faculty— dedicated, passionate, and caring men and women who love being in a school where they can teach on every corner of campus. Students come from all over the world, and they are smart, motivated, and kind. The campus is beautiful; a combination of new and renovated buildings built a century ago, and it brings people together, especially in the Main Building. The academic offerings are deep, ranging from lower mid English to multivariable calculus to environmental science; and students can choose from 31 Advanced Placement courses. We have traditions that bring us together often, like School Meetings, Assemblies, formal “sit-down” dinners, and dorm “feeds.” And there are countless extracurricular activities and clubs to choose from: in service, robotics, politics, music, and so on. These myriad opportunities create a place where the education of the whole student happens all day, every day. You will find it easy to capture the “feel” of the campus, and that’s probably what should interest you most. After all, there are other great schools with many of the qualities I describe above. You want to find a place that feels right at a deep level. A few words come up repeatedly when people describe Taft. We are an intellectually demanding school, and every day is challenging, but students and parents tend to add words like “community,” “warm,” “happy” and “friendly” a lot. I know that Taft is an extremely rigorous place, one that prepares students for the best universities, but I also think that Taft is a fun, spirited, and enthusiastic place. Very few schools are both, and we carefully culture this balance. I invite you to visit campus. Take a tour, have an interview, and talk to students and faculty. It’s an exciting and dynamic community, and though we are much bigger than in 1890 when Horace Taft taught at a table with a handful of students, in many ways we are still that school. Taft is about caring faculty, a close-knit campus, and eager students—and a clear mission to educate the whole student. Welcome to Taft!

Willy MacMullen ’78 Headmaster


Portrait of a

GRADUATE A Taft education prepares students in a community devoted to creating lifelong learners, thoughtful citizens and caring people. More particularly, Taft graduates have exhibited that they: c

act with honor and integrity, and value both the Taft Honor Code and the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fundamental conviction that honesty and personal responsibility are the cornerstones of character and of community.

c

c c

serve others unselfishly, reflecting and acting upon the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s motto in both formal and informal contexts: Non ut sibi ministretur sed ut ministret.

c

have cultivated a moral thoughtfulness through exposure to various ethical perspectives and ways of thinking. They have shown that they make informed choices after considering the possible consequences of their actions and decisions.

c

value each individual and engage diversity as essential to the growth of all community members.

c

make informed choices in living healthy and balanced lives.

c

apply the knowledge, skills, and habits of mind of all disciplines to framing questions and solving problems in the pursuit of understanding. Moreover, they see even the most formidable challenges as opportunities for growth.

c

possess intellectual curiosity and resourcefulness, and actively engage in the process of learning.

work cooperatively and collaboratively, and are willing to subdue their individual needs and desires in order to contribute to the collective efforts of people united in a common purpose. work and think independently. They are self-reliant, disciplined and courageous about taking risks in their thinking.

c

express themselves clearly, purposefully and creatively in their speaking and writing, as well as other forms that they find effective and rewarding.

c

appreciate the arts and have explored their own capacity for creation in all of their endeavors. They apply imagination and inventiveness in the creative process.

c

apply appropriate technologies to the process of learning and understand the possibilities and limitations of various technological innovations.

c

reflect regularly upon their learning and themselves as learners, leading to greater awareness of themselves as individuals and of their places in the world in which they live.

Copy writing: Sarah Albee, Kaitlin Orfitelli Photography: Bob Falcetti, Peter Frew â&#x20AC;&#x2122;75, Anne Kowalski, Kaitlin Orfitelli, The Taft School Community,

The Taft School actively seeks and

Shutterstock.com: Serg64, Malysh A Peter Waters, Roblan, 3d-sparrow, Talvi, Lightspring, Hurst Photo, and Andy Lidstone

on the basis of race, color, creed,

policies and programs.

Design: Good Design, LLC

admits students of any race to all its rights, privileges, programs and activities and does not discriminate sex, sexual orientation, or national origin in the administration of its

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