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INSPIRATION FOR THE DOERS, THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE OUR WORLD TURN

ISSUE 9 | COMMUNITY EDITION

EXTREME DREAM

SINGING ALONG TO THE SAME SONG

BMX star has eyes for the Olympics

Getting behind budding artists

STARTING FRESH

STATE OF PLAY

Joining new communities

Are you a gamer without knowing it?

THE GREAT UNIFIER

Bringing people together through food

UPCOMING EVENTS Come along to one of our events, more information on page 12

THE START OF GLOCAL CITIZENS

LEARNING POTENTIAL

THE POWER OF LIFE EXPERIENCE


POWER TO THE PEOPLE In days past, a community was an easy to grasp concept – confined to geographic boundaries and clear cultural image. These were our neighbourhoods, suburbs, faiths and cities; while these spaces and the people within them continue to connect for the greater good, what we define as our community has shifted greatly. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) has cited that communities can be built anywhere, anyhow so long as there is a commonality to embrace.

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This feeds into the new norm, where a community is a concept that defies limitation. There are no set borders or concrete parameters. A group that seeks improvement, inclusion, evolution and betterment of the individual and the collective are the constants you can depend on whether you are a music community, a fun cultural enclave, an industry or a new virtual vanguard.

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At TAFE Queensland Brisbane, we seek to grow and enable communities, whatever form they take. Whether this applies to our own student community or the industry or passion-based communities that stem from our multitude of study areas, we seek to inspire and drive all students to achieve their individual and common goals. Acceptance, support and encouragement are given without hesitation. This is after all, how you make great happen and how futures are forged.

13 72 48 tafebrisbane.edu.au CONTRIBUTORS Editor in Chief

Kate Smith

Designer

Nella Picon

Writers

Alita Pashley

Tim Trotman

All information was accurate at time of publication; however, TAFE Queensland policies, tuition fees and course content are subject to change without notice.

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CONTENTS 04. A LITTLE LEARNING

GOES A LONG WAY

Changing communities by empowering people from all walks of life.

IT RUNS IN THE FAMILY Find out how a new community gave one family a fresh start.

06. PEDAL POWER One student’s race to the top of her sport.

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08. COME AS YOU ARE Using life experience and honest tunes to heal.

09. MORE THAN MARIO How gaming is changing everything from the way we buy our groceries to the way we perform surgery.

GLOCAL CITIZEN New cultures and how they can change you.

10 . APPETITE FOR

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CREATIVITY

What happens when an architect enters the food world.

11. WE’RE ALL IN

THIS TOGETHER

Three very different communities, one shared love of music.

12. EVENT CALENDAR Experience the best of TAFE Queensland Brisbane by coming along to one of our upcoming events.

05 TAFE Queensland Brisbane | 03


IN 2008 THE ALTOOBI FAMILY PARENTS, FIVE BROTHERS, AND THREE SISTERS ARRIVED IN BRISBANE FROM IRAQ. It was during the first few weeks settling into a new country, learning a new culture and attempting to learn a new language that the middle brother, Yousif’s career path was decided. He just didn’t know it yet. The family were orientated, welcomed and shown around by the Multicultural Development Association (MDA), a not-for-profit group, that years later Yousif would end up working for. Three months af ter leaving the turmoil of their homeland, Yousif, his brothers Ali and Ahmed and sister Alia enrolled in TAFE Queensland Brisbane to learn English. “ We all started in the same class, learning English for beginners. We all passed with a Certificate IV in English,” he said.

“THE ONE CONTINUING PURPOSE OF EDUCATION, SINCE ANCIENT TIMES, HAS BEEN TO BRING PEOPLE TO AS FULL A REALISATION AS POSSIBLE OF WHAT IT IS TO BE A HUMAN BEING.” Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

According to The Global Partnership for Education, learning can do a great many things – from reducing poverty and increasing economic growth through to promoting gender equality and cultural integration. In other words, from one generation to the next, education has acted as a cornerstone of growing and sustaining the community. In this regard it is essential that individual educators, and the institutions that they work for, respond and adapt to the everchanging needs of the community. In Australia, and Queensland in particular, this equates to education programs focused on realising the potential of the young, the newly arrived, the job seekers, and the disadvantaged – many of whom can overlap and intersect in learning requirements.

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The important thing to remember is that education is here to empower the individual so that they can create, maintain and grow communities, near and far. Find out more about TAFE Queensland Brisbane’s Community Services courses and Educational Support programs at tafebrisbane.edu.au.

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10365NAT - Certificate IV in Spoken and Written English - Further Studies


The Community as Family “I went and worked in a factory for a while and then started a plumbing certificate, but realised I really wanted to get into community services so I came back to TAFE.” At the same time Ahmed started a Diploma of Nursing. The pair graduated together at the end of 2015. Their other brother Ali is studying to be a dental technician part-time while raising a young family. Younger sister Alia, who was studying accounting has taken time off to start a family of her own. Sister Lasa also joined the siblings at TAFE and is currently studying a Diploma of Dental Technology to become a dental technician.

For Yousif, the decision to study has been among the best he has made. Having been accepted to university he is currently working part-time at MDA helping other new arrivals make a safe home in Australia. “When we arrived they helped us with housing and school, which is what I now do,” he said. “Every client has their own story and their own experiences, so it’s mainly about learning as much as I can from them and to figure out what it is that they need.” “I know how hard it is, especially for new arrivals. I know they really struggle, especially if they can’t speak English, because they don’t have the experience with the culture, with the system. My experience made me realise I wanted to do this, but when I did my Diploma of Community Services course it really opened my idea about how it feels f or all dif f erent people as well.”

“It’s part of our culture to all be together, so it’s been very rewarding for us,” he said.

Yousif Diploma of community services CHC52015

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Find out more about our Adult Migrant English Program and our many other courses at tafebrisbane.edu.au.

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"When you make the jump you just feel free and accomplished that you’ve done what you’ve been aiming to do."

CN920 Queensland Certificate of Education (QCAA) (Certificate of Education Year 11 and 12)

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EDAN WHITLOCK IS A NAME TO REMEMBER. The rising BMX star, who hit the track for the first time four years ago, has already made waves in the extreme sport, receiving national recognition and competing on the international circuit. Now, with the addition of BMX events in the Olympics, she has her sights firmly set on Tokyo in 2020. “I had a lot of hobbies growing up,” Edan said.

“That same month I’d knocked myself out in the South East Queensland titles. I’ve crashed and gone to hospital a few times but I guess if you love it, you just stay with it.”

“I did cheerleading for a year, gymnastics for seven years. I did tennis, I’ve done a wide variety of sports, but as soon as I got to BMX I was like, yeah this is my type of sport.” And it shows.

Edan, who enrolled in TAFE Queensland Brisbane’s Senior Studies program in 2016 so she could complete grades 11 and 12 around her busy training schedule, said she doesn’t plan on going anywhere until graduation day.

The 16-year-old has won the state titles, nabbed another 1st in an A Pro Women’s event and most recently placed 2nd in Australia for her age group.

“I really like my classes. I’ve gone from Cs and Ds to As and Bs. All the kids there are more mature and the teachers help you a lot more,” she said.

“I did my first world titles in 2013. I crashed in the last part and ended up in hospital,” she said.

“They really care about your education.”

But between studying, coaching beginners and training, Edan has started to fill her trophy cabinet with the hopes of receiving a scholarship and eventually moving to the United States to pursue her sport with the world’s top athletes before heading to the Olympics. “I’ll be saving as much money as I can for Super Cross rounds. They’re all over the world,” she said. “That’s the sort of event where you’re coming down 8m start hill and there’s the 15m jump then hitting a huge jump, and you can’t see the bottom. It’s a bit frightening.“ “I’ve done the 8m start hill many times. When you hit it you just feel free and accomplished that you’ve done what you’ve been aiming to do. That’s what I really love about BMX. It’s the freedom.”

Follow Edan's career at instagram.com/edanwhitlock Find out more about Doing Year 11 and 12 Differently at school. tafebrisbane.edu.au. TAFE Queensland Brisbane | 07


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dam Rosewarne never really considered himself the ‘academic award-winning’ type.

Though he never struggled in class, he said he never really stood out at high school either. Fast forward a few years and add in a move from a traditional high school setting to TAFE Queensland Brisbane’s Senior Studies program and all of that has changed. “When I first went to TAFE I was completely homeless,” he said. “I rocked up with no shoes and I didn’t even have money to pay. They just told me to keep coming, to keep turning up, and I kept coming in every day.” The hard work paid off. By the time Adam graduated with his grade 12 certificate in 2015 he was named student of the year, best student in pre-vocational maths, and best student in music. He was also well on his way to a career in youth work, the same profession that he owes to getting him this far.

“I’ve always had an interest in helping. I’d probably like to get into residential care – the youth workers that are on 24/7,” he said. “I think that’s the best way to build a bond with young people. Everyone has trust issues, you’ve just got to keep being there until people are ready to open up to you. There’s also a real lack of males in the industry. If there’s a teenage boy under stress he might really want to talk to another male. There’s a real need there.” Having been a young person in residential care, Adam understands the unique challenges faced by his future clients, but said ultimately his love of psychology and passion for music would be his best asset. “Music and psychology tie in together,” he said.

YOUTH IN NEED

CN920 Queensland Certificate of Education (QCAA) (Certificate of Education Year 11 and 12) Currently studying Diploma of Youth Work (CHC50413)

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“I’ve had youth workers come in and bring a guitar and just have a session with young people. It’s just awesome. Listening to music is proven to reduce depression. Just making someone a little happier is such a good start.” Adam, who now plans on using his Diploma of Youth Work to fast track his way into a Bachelor of Social Work, said he never doubted he’d get here, but can understand the unique challenges faced by young people. “I just think it helps some people if I talk about this kind of stuff, especially those suffering mental illness or homelessness. They can still pass, they can still get their year 12 certificate,” he said.

“If you don’t try, you’re not going to get anything. If you try you might fail and then you’ll have to start again. But if you keep trying, you will always have the opportunity to succeed and it’s that opportunity that will get you to where you need to be.”


THE WORLD OF GAMING HAS CHANGED Stats from the 2016 Digital Australia report shows that there is an almost equal split between the genders, with 47 per cent of Australian women identifying as gamers and 90 per cent of gamers with children saying they use their hobby as a time for family bonding. But perhaps the most telling statistic about the future of gaming is that almost a quarter of Australian employees have used games for workplace training and 35 per cent of school children’s curriculum is based on some form of digital game play.

And that’s where Peter sees gaming technology, particularly virtual reality (VR), headed. “In a traditional screen and control set up, the input and output match so you can really lose yourself in the games,” he said. “That is going to be the next really big challenge for VR, balancing those levels. At the moment everyone is just trying to come up with something that doesn’t make people want to throw up, because the experience is so jarring. “I think there will always be a place for VR though, particularly with simulations and training. It’s the kind of technology that will allow doctors to perform remote surgery on patients – it could save lives.”

This is no surprise for Bachelor of Games and Interactive Design student Peter Mills, who is working toward finding his industry’s ‘eureka moment’.

And as far as Peter is concerned, the best is yet to come.

“There isn’t one demographic that isn’t a gamer now. Not everyone has a massive PC and loves playing Skyring, but everyone has a phone and engages with gaming in one way or another,” he said. “Game design is essentially just making a piece of software that you interact with only because interacting with it is a fun, satisfying experience. If you take those lessons and apply them to a piece of software that’s also designed for accounting, then you’ve got accounting software that’s fun and satisfying to use. We’re gamifying how we pay our bills, we’re gamifying how we do everything.”

He is excited to be a part of the generation who discovers what games can really do. “I think games are the most interesting new art form and we don’t really know what they’re capable of yet,” he said. “Smart people love to fool around with things that start off as a bit of fun and then it turns out that ‘hey that might cure cancer’."

“If I can make something that pushes games forward as a medium and in 10 or 20 years people look back on it and say ‘Oh look, that’s where we figured out how that works’, I’d really like that.”

GLOCAL CITIZENS In this globally connected age, the world is getting smaller - we can see, hear and even virtually explore other lands and cultures from the comfort of our own lounge. Imagine what you could bring back to your friends, peers, and family

after experiencing the world at large. Writer and academic Suzy Kassem says, “To become a true global citizen, one must abandon all notions of otherness and instead embrace togetherness”.

Studying abroad is your ticket to experiencing this togetherness with strangers, like-minded individuals, cultures and more all across the globe - lessons that will change your career and life outlook forever. Find out more about our Study Abroad programs at tafebrisbane.edu.au. TAFE Queensland Brisbane | 09


Th e Fi n e Art of FOOD FUSION “THERE’S A RENAISSANCE OF PEOPLE REALISING HOW IMPORTANT IT IS TO USE FOOD AS A WAY TO CONNECT WITH EACH OTHER. PEOPLE ARE DOING THIS IN ALL KINDS OF CREATIVE, INSPIRED AND FUN WAYS.” Anna Lappe, Author and Sustainable Food Advocate After earning one of two prized spots working alongside acclaimed Iron Chef Sakai in Japan, TAFE Queensland Brisbane cookery student Hyeonju Jeon is well on her way to realising her culinary dream. A former architecture graduate and drafter Hyeonju put this career path aside when she realised food and its communal power was where her true passion lay. “Everyone has a certain level of fear when trying new cuisines and it would be less stressful if they try new things unseen in their ordinary meals. I think my food dream can play a role to introduce new cuisines and cultures into Australian culture,” says Hyeonju. The Iron Chef competition, held on Saturday 27 August 2016, was a joint initiative between TAFE Queensland International, Trade and Investment Queensland and the Department of Premier and Cabinet. As any fan of Iron Chef will know, brave competitors are tasked with crafting menus around a key ingredient, and in the case of our competition, it was coconut. Hyeojnu masterfully crafted a flavour journey which blended fine Queensland produce with elements of Japanese and Thai cuisine. Just from a single look at the menu it was obvious that the judging panel were going to love her creations. Her menu included an entree of Tempura Scallop with Coconut Chawanmushi, Frizzled Leek, Yuzu-pickled Fennel; and for dessert, she served up a Coconut Mandarin Parfait, with Poached Seasonal Mandarin, Coconut Genoise and Cointreau Chantilly. Using her time in Tokyo with Chef Sakai and current role at leading Brisbane restaurant Sono as a springboard, Hyeonju is looking to complete her Advanced Diploma of Hospitality Management and get started on turning this dream into a reality. In her own words, “I think my study at TAFE will make it easier to manage my restaurant dream. A modern Australian restaurant inspired by Asian cuisines, where the food provides shared experiences expressed through texture, form, composition and interaction with patrons.” Find out more about TAFE Queensland Brisbane’s Commercial Cookery and Hospitality courses at tafebrisbane.edu.au. SIT60316 - Advanced Diploma of Hospitality Management

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Want to learn to cook like Hyeonju? Check out our blog at blog.tafebrisbane.edu.au for her recipes.


WHAT DO MUSIC FESTIVALS, KICKSTARTER AND NASHVILLE ALL HAVE IN COMMON? ON THE SURFACE, ONLY SO MUCH. DIG A LITTLE DEEPER THOUGH, AND YOU WILL SEE COMMON THREADS OF TOGETHERNESS BROUGHT ABOUT BY PASSION AND CREATIVITY.

For Clara Durbidge, a single project for the Bachelor of Contemporary Music Practice has brought all these things together to create the perfect storm for success in music. The key to this success so far in her own mind, is ‘community’ – whether it is her local community getting behind her mini music festival, Kickstarter funding her, or the Nashville music scene embracing her with open arms. Clara said, “Music brings people together – it is the ultimate healing and unifying experience, transcending gender, time, race, language.” For the final phases of her course, Clara was required to undertake an independent study tour which involved crowdfunding the endeavour, writing original music and launching it to the masses. And for her, there was no better place to Bachelor of Contemporary Music Practice 306JA.1 Diploma of Music Industry CUA50815

go on tour and start on her dream than Nashville – the international epicentre of country and folk music. “Crowdfunding covered my accommodation, the recording, and session musicians.” “We held a fundraising music event and sold food and beverages at this event to raise money as well selling raffle tickets. At the same time, I ran the online campaign through Kickstarter to raise as much as I could to get to Nashville,” she told us. And after only a month in Nashville, she was able to see all of this was more than worth it. “It was such a positive and collaborative place that really fosters creativity. I met so many friendly and inspiring people including a song lyricist who I will be doing a co-write with in the coming months,” she added.

For Clara to reach the Nashville music community and build a career in such a fashion represents one of the biggest changes to both creativity and community involvement in recent years. According to Variety, as of July this year, Kickstarter has generated at least USD$5.3 billion (AUD $6.9 billion) for creative projects since its inception. We look forward to collectively experiencing the joy of Clara’s music, whether is on the airwaves or in one of her private concerts that she plans to market for parties and other personal gatherings.

For more information on music production or music business courses, visit tafebrisbane.edu.au. TAFE Queensland Brisbane | 11


SHARE THE DREAM. TAFE Queensland is proud to be the Training Partner for the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games. In our role as Training Partner, we are doing our part for the games and the community by training a growing family of 15,000 enthusiastic volunteers, all of whom we will be celebrating in the year ahead. Keep your eyes and ears open as we share the dreams of everyday heroes from on the track and off across our Brisbane campuses. There has never been a better time to study at TAFE Queensland.

UPCOMING FREE EVENTS

WHAT'S ON ORIENTATION WEEK

START OF STUDY WEEK

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

23 JANUARY – 27 JANUARY

30 JANUARY – 3 FEBRUARY

15 M A R C H

Discover the ins and outs of your course and our cutting edge facilities with tours, talks and more, hosted at each of our Brisbane campuses.

Get your study adventure off to a flying start with a wide range of fun and informative activities being hosted at each of our Brisbane campuses.

Join us for the next our Industry Insights series, where industry experts, educators and graduates share the must-know facts about the changing face of work.

For more information and to register, visit tafebrisbane.edu.au/events or like us on facebook.com/TAFEBrisbane.

Make 9  

This edition explores how our students interact within their communities, local and global.

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