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The History

Mystery Show Companion About TADA!, Using the Guide & Theater Etiquette .............................. Page 1 About The History Mystery .............. Page 2 Interview with the Director ............... Page 3 Say What? ................................................. Page 4 (Glossary of Terms) Historical figures, periods & documents from The History Mystery ............................ Page 5-7 Quotes from the show .......................... Page 8 Crossword Puzzle .................................. Page 9-10 Activities ................................................... Page 11-14 Glossary Terms ...................................... Page 15

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Mission Statement

ABOUT TADA!

Since 1984, TADA!’s mission is to provide young people from different backgrounds with musical theater programs that inspire them to be creative, learn, and think differently. TADA! is a unique Drama Desk award-winning nonprofit youth theater that produces original musicals for children, teens, and family audiences. TADA! offers a free, year-round, pre-professional training & youth development program for the Resident Youth Ensemble (ages 8-18); musical theater classes/camps for the public; as well as musical theater residencies in NYC schools and community centers. Through TADA!’s high-quality work, young people’s self-confidence and creativity are enhanced. They also develop advanced skills in leadership, communication, responsibility, collaboration, and problem-solving – skills that help with growing up and are essential to their success both in school and in life. A 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

USING THIS GUIDE This Show Companion is a practical, hands-on resource for group leaders, teachers, parents and kids that contain background information related to TADA!’s production and curriculum-based activities. The contents of this guide may be explored before and after attending the show.

Make The Most Of Your Visit (Tips on Theater Etiquette)

1. Laugh, cry, and sigh – but don’t talk. You hear the actors; they hear you. Any reaction that comes from your experience of the musical supports the performance, but shouldn’t distract from it. 2. Please enjoy food and beverages in the lobby – not the theater – and please put any garbage in the garbage cans before the show. Note: Actors will hear if you’re unwrapping food or hard candy. Please do that before or after the show – not during the performance. 3. Please silence all phones, tablets, and anything else that might make noise or light up during the show. Then, after the show, be sure to like it, tweet it, post it, and talk to your friends to tell them how much you enjoyed it! 4. Please stay in your assigned seat. 5. Photographs (with or without flash – and even on your phones) as well as the recording of the show in any way are not allowed. Recording the show is distracting and potentially dangerous to the actors as well as your fellow audience members. Additionally, recording is prohibited to protect the artistic work that went into making the show.

Tips for Group Leaders: - Please arrive approximately 15-30 minutes early. - Assign one chaperon for every fifteen students and ask your chaperones to seat themselves amongst the student group to help support best behavior.

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ABOUT THE MUSICAL Janine Nina Trevens, Producing Artistic Director/ Rod Christensen, Executive Director and The Resident Youth Ensemble presents

The History

Mystery Travel back in time to meet famous and “not so famous” kids who changed the world such as Ben Franklin, Eleanor Roosevelt, the Wright brothers, Suffragettes & Martin Luther King Jr. MUSICAL NUMBERS

1. IT’S A MYSTERY 2. SOMETHING GREAT 3. OUR FIGHT ISN’T OVER YET 4. IT ISN’T FAIR 5. YOU’VE GOT THE RIGHT 6. FREEDOM 7. BE THE STORY 8. MAKING HISTORY TODAY 9. YOU’VE GOT THE RIGHT (REPRISE)

Book by Janine Nina Trevens Music by Eric Rockwell Lyrics by Margaret Rose Director: Janine Nina Trevens Choreographer: Joanna Greer Musical Director: Matthew Gregory Set Designer: Joel Sherry Costume Designer: Megan Turek Lighting Designer: Steve O’Shea Production Supervisor/TD: Jake Platt Production Stage Manager: Ashley Knowles Assistant Stage Manager: Emma Hogan Assistant to the Director: Vann Strasen**

THE BAND

Piano: Matthew Gregory Percussion: Ray Grapone

CAST Study Hall, Present Day Toni ............................................................ Lauralie Mufute* Marty ............................. Andrew Johnson**, AJ Walker** Jenny .................................................................. Mya Rosado* Steven ................................................................. JJ DiBartolo* Amy ................................................................. Kayla Claudio* Sheila .................................................................... Kiyo Garcia Kerry ............................................................ Marissa Michel* John................................. AJ Walker**/Andrew Johnson** Ricki ......................................................... Ashley Figueroa** Three Overlapping Locations Ben Franklin .......................................... Roman Malenda Laura Ingalls ............................ Kiera Chiu*, Talia Ifrah* Orville Wright ............................................... Luke Bejema* Wilbur Wright ..................................... Daniel Fooksman* New York City, 1895 Eleanor Roosevelt ......... Nisha Borrelli**, Anya Eder* Suffragette Leader ...................................... Riya Nagpal** Suffragettes ................................................ Kayla Claudio*, Naomi De Leon, Ashley Figueroa**, Kiyo Garcia, Anglea George*, Nathalia Mendoza, Marissa Michel & Tomai Nelson**

Atlanta, GA, 1938 ML ............................................. Jon Luc Jobson-Larkin* Tasha ........................................................ Bailey Emhoff* Richie ................................................................. Luke Pinn Gordon ............................................... Nicholas Johnson* Mary ....................................................................... Evie Lee* Betty .............................................................. Hallie Meola* Patty ................................................................. Mira Meola* Bobby .................................................... Roman Malenda Virginia .................................................. Ysobel Leonard* Voice of ML’s Mother ....................... Marissa Michel* Washington D.C., August, 1963 Martin Luther King Jr. (Adult) ......... Jaden Jordan** California, 1942 Lead Singer ............................................. Kayla Claudio* Backup Singers .......... Talia Ifrah* & Riya Nagpal** Swing Dancers .... AJ Walker**/Andrew Johnson**, Ashley Figueroa**, Daniel Fooksman*, Angela George*, Jaden Jordan**, Marissa Michel*, Nathalia Mendoza & Tomai Nelson** Nancy ................................................. Nathalia Mendoza Paula .................................................... Ashley Figueroa** Anna ......................................................... Naomi De Leon

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Q & A WITH DIRECTOR, JANINE NINA TREVENS Q: Congratulations on a four show season! Could you share why you chose to revive The History Mystery this fall? A: I thought that there were people who still needed to see this show. The run last season didn’t feel long enough to me. As a nation we are still dealing with the reality that there is not freedom and justice for all, and I want to have TADA! be part of the conversation to help families talk about these issues. Q: I understand that the script went through some re-writes for the January 2017 production, can you talk a little about what prompted that process? A: The musical was originally written in 1995 and a lot has changed since then (unfortunately a lot hasn’t as well). The musical starts in modern day so the script needed to be updated to reflect today. I also needed to address the results of the last election. Q: Students don’t seem to be as excited about learning history as other subjects; why do you think that is? A: Honestly, you will find kids and teens interested in all different subjects and you will find some not interested in learning at all in the way things are taught in schools. It really depends on how subjects are taught and how much a teacher is enthusiastic about teaching and can find a way to relate to their students and their student’s lives. Sometimes history is taught chronologically and students need to memorize dates, names of wars, and laws but not how it relates to the world today or told as a story. Too much emphasis is spent on testing and grades. Q: Being a theater artist, what strikes you most about studying history? A: History really is stories of the past. As a writer, I like to tell stories. Sometimes they just come from my imagination and sometimes they are sparked by history. Q: There are some current political undertones written throughout the script. Being a youth theater that produces work for youth, how much of an impact can today’s youth have on the world? A: Today’s youth will be the citizens that will change the world. They need to understand that we all have a voice that can influence our politicians so that laws and policies can change. Also, the way we all treat each other as people is important. This isn’t just up to adults, we all have this responsibility. Q: As the writer and director of this production, what do you hope the audience takes with them when they exit the theater? A: Hope and determination to be active in making this nation all that it can be because it is up to you and me to make history.

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SAY WHAT?

A Glossary of Selected Vocabulary from

The History Mystery Assemble [uh-sem-buh l]: to bring together; gather into one place, company, body, or whole.

Liberty [lib-er-tee]: freedom from external or foreign rule; independence.

Citizen [kon-si-kwen-shuh l]: a native or naturalized member of a state or nation who owes allegiance to its government and is entitled to its protection.

March [mahrch]: a group of individuals who ban together and walk for a common purpose or protest.

Consequential [sit-uh-zuh n]: following as a logical conclusion or inference; logically consistent.

Obscure [uh b-skyoo r]: not clear or plain; ambiguous, vague, or uncertain.

Creed [kreed]: any system or codification of belief or of opinion. Daft [dahft]: senselss, stupid, or foolish. Deny [dih-nahy]: to withhold something from, or refuse to grant a request of. Endow [en-dou]: to furnish or equip, as with some talent, faculty, quality or source of income. Etiquette [et-i-kit]: conventional requirements as to social behavior; proper conduct for any occasion as established in any class or community. Four Score [fohr-skohr]: four times twenty: eighty. Gazette [guh-zet]: a newspaper (now used chiefly in the names of newspapers) Hunger strike [huhng-ger-strahyk]: a deliberate refusal to eat, undertaken in protest against imprisonment, improper treatment, objectionable conditions, etc.

Neophytes [nee-uh-fahyt]: a beginner or novice.

Pioneer [pahy-uh-neer]: a person who is among those who first enter or settle a region, thus opening it for occupation and development by others. Printing press [prin-teeng praehs]: a device invented c. 1440 for applying pressure to an inked surface resting upon a print medium (e.g., paper or cloth), thereby transferring the ink. Pursuit [per-soot]: an effort to secure or attain; quest. Radical [rad-i-kuh l]: (especially of change or action) relating to or affecting the fundamental nature of something; far-reaching or thorough. Rally [ral-ee]: to draw or call (persons) together for a common action or effort. Relevance [rel-uh-vuh ns]: having direct bearing on the matter in hand. Segregation [seg-ri-gey-shuh n]: the practice or policy of creating separate facilities within the same society for the use of a minority group.

Internment Camp [in-turn-muh nt kamp]: a prison camp for the confinement of enemy aliens, prisoners of war, political prisoners, etc.

Self-evident [self-ev-i-duh nt]: containing its own evidence or proof without need of further demonstration.

Unalienable [in-eyl-yuh-nuh-buh l]: not alienable; not transferable to another or capable of being rejected: inalienable rights.

Slavery [sley-vuh-ree]: the subjection of a person to another person, especially in being forced to work.

Independence [in-di-pen-duh ns]: freedom from the control, influence, support, aid, or the like, of others.

Suffrage [suhf-rij]: the right to vote, especially in a political election.

Justice [juhs-tis]: the quality of being just; righteousness, equitableness, or moral rightness.

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HISTORICAL FIGURES FROM THE HISTORY MYSTERY Abraham Lincoln (1809 – 1865) The 16th President of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. He successfully led the U.S. through a great constitutional, military, and moral crisis – the American Civil War – preserving the Union, while ending slavery, and promoting economicas well as financial modernization. Reared in a poor family on the western frontier, Lincoln was mostly self-educated. He became a country lawyer, an Illinois state legislator. His distinctively human and humane personality and historical role as savior of the Union and emancipator of the slaves creates a legacy that endures. Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) One of the most famous Americans, vital to the development of the democratic system in this country as well as forging new inroads in fields such as literature, music, science, foreign culture, and social issues. As a child he was fascinated by books and reading; from books he got ideas he would try out (such as becoming a vegetarian as a teenager). His first kite experiment was to use a kite to pull him along faster in the water while swimming. His experiments with electricity were a lifelong fascination, and he developed many terms we still use today such as “battery,” “charge,” “electric shock,” and “electrician.” Thomas Edison (inventor of the lightbulb) used many of Franklin’s ideas about electricity as the starting point for his own work. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968) One of the most influential civil rights leaders in the 1960s. He was born in Georgia, in the “Sweet Auburn” district, and lived in a two-story Victorian home with many relations and boarders. In this neighborhood, he learned about segregations sanctioned by the government. He also learned about dignity and tolerance from the church where his father and grandfather preached, and where he too would preach in later years. In 1955, he achieved a PhD in systematic theology. In 1959 he visited India, becoming a longtime admirer of Mohandas Gandhi to whom he credited his success in the use of passive resistance. In a typical year of demonstrations, he traveled more than 800,000 miles and delivered more than 208 speeches. King paved the way for full legal Civil Rights to be achieved in the United States. The speeches King made are still heard today in classrooms from elementary schools to college and remain a cornerstone plus inspiration in the continuing fight for social equality. Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962) One of the most influential women in American politics, championing the course of the oppressed throughout her life. She was a painfully shy child and self-consciousness plagued her as an adult. Nevertheless, she did not follow the traditional part of a woman’s role mandated by her upper-class upbringing. Early in her life she worked for women’s rights and as she became increasingly visible through her efforts to aid her disabled husband’s presidency, she changed the role of First Lady forever. For the first three years of her daily newspaper column, which began in 1935, she concentrated exclusively on women’s rights. As her concerns expanded, so did her place on the world stage, and she became an outspoken advocate for minorities, the poor and disadvantaged. She won many awards for her humanitarian efforts, and William chafe said of her, “Eleanor Roosevelt is a constant reminder of how much one’s life can accomplish.” Johannes Gutenberg (1395 – 1468) A German inventor of a method of printing from movable type. He started experimenting with printing by 1438 and obtained financial backing in 1450 from the financier Johann Fust. Due to professional strain in their relationship, Gutenberg lost his establishment to Fust in 1455. Gutenberg’s masterpiece, and the first book ever printed from movable type, is the 42-Line Bible, completed c. 1455. Laura Ingalls Wilder (1867-1957) Born in Kansas in 1887 in the Big Woods of Wisconsin. Her family moved frequently, living in Missouri, Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, and finally, South Dakota. As a teenager she was very shy but did well in school, especially in English. At the early age of 15, she became a teacher herself. Over time, she began to write magazine articles. At the age of 63, with the encouragement of her childhood, she wrote an autobiography which she called Pioneer Girl. The book did not find a publisher until she rewrote it as Little House in the Big Woods. The book was very popular and the demand for more stories caused Laura to write the “Little House” series we know today. She died in 1957 at the age of 90.

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Susan B. Anthony (1820 – 1906) Born in Adams, Massachusetts, Susan B. Anthony was brought up in a Quaker family with long activist traditions. Early in her life she developed a sense of justice, which led her to a career in teaching. She joined the women’s rights movement in 1852 and soon after she dedicated her life to woman suffrage as well as campaigned for the abolition of slavery, women’s right to their own property & earnings, and women’s labor organizations. In 1900, Anthony persuaded the University of Rochester to admit women. Thomas Jefferson (1743 – 1826) An American Founding Father who was the principal author of the 1776 United States Declaration of Independence and from 1801 – 1809 served as the third President of the United States. Wilbur Wright (1867-1912) and Orville Wright (1871-1948) Brothers who spent a lifetime interested in machines that could fly. Up until their famous first flights a flying machine had not been invented that was heavier than air, could operate under its own power, maintain constant speed, and land at a point higher than equal to the one it started from. The first flight was only 12 seconds and traveled 120 feet, but it fulfilled the requirements above plus carried the weight of a pilot. Orville, the younger brother, made the actual first flight of four successful test flights done on December 17, 1903, on the sands of North Carolina’s Outer Banks. Wilbert made the longest flight of the day, traveling 852 feet in 59 seconds.

HISTORICAL PERIODS FROM THE HISTORY MYSTERY Women’s Rights Movement As early as the 1772, women were publicly voicing the need for legal and social equality with men, but it wasn’t until 1848 that the movement gained a strong following with the first Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York. At this convention, a document was drafted that declared women’s rights to own property, have an education equal that of men, equal employment opportunities, and the right to vote or suffrage. The idea of demanding the right to vote was at first considered too radical even for some of the leaders of the movement. Suffragists were arrested for “obstructing traffic” while picketing. While in jail they were force-fed after starting a hunger strike in protest. In 1920 the 19th amendment to the constitution was adopted, granting women the right to vote years after the movement began. The Women’s Rights Movement continues today. Civil Rights Movement Although the American Equal Rights Association was founded in 1866 with the purpose of securing Civil Rights for all Americans regardless of race, color or sex, it wasn’t until the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s that racial discrimination under the law was ended. Segregation - the enforced separation of whites and blacks was the main issue that sparked the movement. Black Americans were required by law to remain separate: eat in different restaurants than whites, go to different schools, as well as play and live in different places. Although slavery legally ended at the close of the Civil War, many Southern States passed segregation laws to restrict the movements and freedoms of black Americans. With leaders like Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr., the struggle began to demand rights under the law. The movement was marked by extreme violence and peaceful protest. The Civil Rights Movement Act of 1964 and the voting rioutghts act of 1965 ended the sanction of racial discrimination. The Civil Rights Movement continues today. WWII and Japanese Internment Camps World War ll was one of the largest wars in history, with most of the world countries divided into two opposing sides. During this time (1941-1945), Japan and America were on opposite sides. After the 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor by the Japanese, mistrust of U.S. citizens of Japanese ancestry grew enormously. Japanese-American community leaders were arrested immediately after the bombing. In 1942, Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an order that resulted in the internment of 120,000 Japanese-Americans from the West Coast. More than half of those incarcerated were children. These Americans citizens were forced to leave their homes, possessions and businesses and live in barrack-style camps. In 1981 a U.S Commission determined that the major causes of the mass incarceration were “racism, opportunism, and the failure of political leadership.” In 1988, Ronald Regan signed an official apology for the unconstitutional imprisonment of Japanese-Americans during WWll and provided compensation payments to surviving internees.

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HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS FROM THE HISTORY MYSTERY Declaration of Independence: A statement adopted in 1776 by the Continental Congress, which announced that the thirteen American colonies then at war with Great Britain regarded themselves as independent states, and no longer a part of the British Empire.

Bill of Rights: The first ten amendments to the Constitution of the United States, which guarantee certain rights to the people, such as freedom of speech, assembly, and worship. The Bill of Rights identifies the essential rights and freedoms of U.S. citizens. First Amendment: Protects the Freedom of speech and refers to the freedom to speak freely without censorship, which includes any act of seeking, receiving, and imparting information or ideas, regardless of the medium used. The right to freedom of speech is not absolute in any country and the right is commonly subject to limitations such as slander, obscenity, and the encouragement to commit a crime. Fourth Amendment: Protects against unreasonable searches and seizures, along with requiring any warrant to be judicially sanctioned and supported by probable cause. Emancipation Proclamation: An executive order issued in 1863 by U.S. President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War. It proclaimed the freedom of slaves in the ten states then in rebellion. Executive Order 9066: The President authorizes Japanese relocation. In an atmosphere of World War II hysteria, President Roosevelt, encouraged by officials at all levels of the federal government, authorized the internment of tens of thousands of American citizens of Japanese ancestry and resident aliens from Japan. The Gettysburg Address: Written and delivered by President Abraham Lincoln on November 19, 1863 at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania following the Battle of Gettysburg (July 1–3, 1863) where between 46,000 and 51,000 Confederate and Union soldiers were killed, wounded, captured or missing. 19th Amendment: Ratified on August 18, 1920, granted American women the right to vote—a right known as woman suffrage. At the time the U.S. was founded, its female citizens did not share all of the same rights as men, including the right to vote. It was not until 1848 that the movement for women’s rights launched on a national level with a convention in Seneca Falls, New York, organized by abolitionists Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902) and Lucretia Mott (17931880). Following the convention, the demand for the vote became a centerpiece of the women’s rights movement. After a 70-year battle, these groups finally emerged victorious with the passage of the 19th Amendment. United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR): A 1948 declaration adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in response to the experience of the World War II. It represents the first global expression of rights to which all human beings are inherently entitled and consists of 30 articles which have been associated in succeeding international treaties, regional human rights instruments, national constitutions, and laws.

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QUOTES FROM THE HISTORY MYSTERY ELEANOR: “You haven’t heard? There are women in jail. Some even on hunger strikes. They will do whatever it takes so that women get the right to vote.” TONI: “Well, I know for sure one will run for President. And I believe that someday it will happen. Someday a woman will be President.” MARTY: “The color of our skin shouldn’t matter. All people should be free and treated fairly.” JENNY: “History isn’t just about memorizing. It’s the stories of our past and of us.” ALL: “It’s up to you and me to make history.”

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE (AFTER YOU HAVE SEEN THE SHOW!)

Across 3. At the end of the musical, the students STILL have to study for a test in what subject?? 4. Where are the students at the beginning of the musical? 5. Toni tries to click her heels like ____________ to bring everonye home at the end.

2. What city does Toni take Marty and Jenny to with her imagination? 7. Toni meets Eleanor ________________ while she fights for a women’s right to vote in 1895 New York City.

6. Jenny first meets the writer ____________ Ingall in the beginning of the play.

11. At the end of the play, Toni reminds us that it isn’t just HIS-tory but “it’s ___________ stories too!”

8. When Marty first meets Martin Luther King Jr., what game is he playing on the playground?

12. Marty meets a little boy on the playground who would grow up to give a speech called “I Have A __________”

9. Which character gets to talk to her own great-grandmother in her imagination? 10. The Decleration of ________________________ begins with the words “We hold these truths...” 13. Who does Marty first meet? Hint:; These brothers invented the first flying machine.

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Down: 1. Who is the first person that Toni meets? Clue: He discovered electricity


10 Answers to crossword Across: 3. Science, 4.Library, 5. Dorothy, 6. Laura 8. Kickball, 9. Jenny, 10. Independece, 13. The Wright Brothers Down: 1. Benjmain Franklin, 2. New York City, 7. Roosevelt, 11. Our, 12. Dream


ACTIVITIES FOR YOUNG AUDIENCES Matching Activity: Taking the Mystery out of History In groups of 2, based from the information in this guide, match the person’s name (the corresponding letter in Column A) with the correct information in Column B (the corresponding number). Answers to this activity are on page 13.

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Column A

Column B

a) Abraham Lincoln

i) Completed the first flying machine flight in Dec. 17, 1903.

b) Benjamin Franklin

ii) Wrote an autobiography called Pioneer Girl, which later developed into the “Little House” series.

c) Laura Ingalls Wilder

iii) A First Lady who was an outspoken advocate for women’s rights, minorities, the poor and the disadvantaged.

d) Johannes Gutenberg

iv) A preacher and an influential civil rights leader in the 1960s. He promoted the practice of passive resistance.

e) Thomas Jefferson

v) A U.S. President who led the nation through the American Civil War and ended slavery.

f) Wilbur & Orville Wright

vi) A German who invented the printing press (a method of printing from movable type).

g) Eleanor Roosevelt

vii) Became a vegetarian and held a lifelong fascination with electricity. Developed terms “battery” and “electric shock.”

h) Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

viii) Born in 1820, she dedicated her life to woman suffrage (vote) and campaigned for the end of slavery.

i) Susan B. Anthony

ix) A U.S. President and principal author of the U.S. Declaration of Independence.


Writing Activity: A Sense of the Past In The History Mystery, characters travel through time and meet important historical figures such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Eleanor Roosevelt, and witness important historical events. Each event represents a completely different moment in history, yet they all represent a similar theme: freedom and equality. This activity explores the similarities and differences each moment in time, and how they are all in some way interconnected. On your own, imagine you are a character in The History Mystery traveling back in time to each of the events pictured below. For each picture, use your senses to identify what you might see, hear, smell, and feel as if you were a character in that picture.

Women’s Suffrage Parade New York City, 1912

See: ____________________________________________________ Hear: ___________________________________________________ Smell: ___________________________________________________ Feel: ____________________________________________________

Japanese internment Camps California, 1943

See: ____________________________________________________ Hear: ___________________________________________________ Smell: ___________________________________________________ Feel: ____________________________________________________

Children in segregated schools North Carolina, 1940

See: ____________________________________________________ Hear: ___________________________________________________ Smell: ___________________________________________________ Feel: ____________________________________________________

Martin Luther King Jr. March on Washington, 1963

See: ____________________________________________________ Hear: ___________________________________________________ Smell: ___________________________________________________ Feel: ____________________________________________________

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ACTIVITIES FOR OLDER AUDIENCE MEMBERS: Theme: Conecting With The Past Journaling Activity Writing “in-role” as one of the time-travelling characters from The History Mystery, write a journal entry about your experiences using the following guiding questions as prompts: o o o

On your travels through time, what did you notice about each event you visited? What was different about each of the events? What was similar? Has your sense of history changed now that you have travelled to these events and seen them with your own eyes?

Theme: Finding Freedom Research Activity The lyrics to the song “Freedom” from The History Mystery list some of the freedoms we enjoy as American citizens: “WE HAVE FREEDOM TO ASSEMBLE AND MAKE A SPEECH FREEDOM TO RELIGION TO PRAY AND PREACH FREEDOM TO SPEAK OUR MIND WE HAVE FREEDOM EVERY DAY OF EVERY KIND WE HAVE FREEDOM TO EXPRESS OUR OWN POINT OF VIEWS FREEDOM TO BE RADICAL IF WE CHOOSE FREEDOM IN HOW WE DRESS WE HAVE FREEDOM TO PURSUE SOME HAPPINESS” (“Freedom,” The History Mystery) In groups of 3-5, use this show companion guide or a trusted online resource to research the following questions for each of the rights listed: o What part of the U.S. constitution guarantees this right? o In what year was the right passed into law? o Has this right always been guaranteed to all U.S. citizens? If not, who was not granted this right and when did that change? o Who were the leading activists who fought for this right?

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Answers to activity on page 11 a:v, b:vii, c:ii, d:vi, e:ix, f:i, g:iii, h:iv, i:viii


Theme: Children’s Rights Discussion Activity Since the U.S. Constitution was adopted in 1787, there have been many minority groups that have fought for (and won!) their freedoms as American Citizens. Today, the U.S. Constitution guarantees life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness to all American Citizens regardless of race, gender, ethnicity, or class. But there are still some freedoms that are denied to children under the age of 18. o o o o

What freedoms do adults enjoy that are denied to children under the age of 18? Why might law-makers not think children should have these freedoms? The age at which children are allowed to drive varies from state to state, why do you think this may be the case? At what age do you think children should be given the right to drive? Do you think children should be allowed to vote? Why or why not? At what age do you think this right should begin?

Split the class into two groups with one group representing the view that the voting age should be lowered to 16 and the other group representing the side that the voting age should stay 18. Debate the pros and cons of lowering the voting age.

Theme: Making History Today Drama-Based Activity “IT’S UP TO YOU AND ME TO MAKE HISTORY TURN OUT THE WAY IT OUGHT TO BE ‘CAUSE IN EVERYTHING WE DO AND IN EVERYTHING WE SAY YOU AND I ARE MAKING HISTORY TODAY” (The History Mystery) Imagine that you are a time traveler traveling back in time from 2060 to visit important historical figures living today. Who might you choose to visit and why? On your own, create a short scene (4-5 mins long) of dialogue between that modern day “historical” figure and the time traveler. o How is the world in 2060 different from the world today? o How have the actions of the historical figure you selected affected the future world in which you live? o What questions might you want to ask this person? o What advice might you want to give this person? With a partner read the scenes that you both created aloud and then discuss: o Who did you each choose to visit and why? o What were the differences in the worlds that you imagined for 2060? What were the similarities? o How can the actions you take today affect the future and become a part of history?

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A GLOSSARY OF SELECT TERMS & CAREERS IN THE THEATER Actor: a performer in a play, devised piece, or improvisation who strives to portray a deep understanding of a character through the use of body, voice, imagination, and emotion Aesthetic: a guiding principal of creating artwork concerned with visual and emotional experience rather than construction of the work itself Artistic choices: aesthetic decisions made by a theatre artist about a situation, action, direction, and design in order to convey meaning and purpose Business/Stage business: small movements created by an actor that indicate lifelike behaviors of a character, usually incidental related to the world of the play, character, and plot; used by directors and actors to create and give nuances and details to a performance Character: a person, animal, or entity in a story, scene, process drama, or play Costumes: clothing, accessories, or materials worn by an actor which can express the personality or status of the character, the time period, and the style of the play Designer: the individual(s) responsible for developing the physical and aural atmosphere (set, lighting, sound) and visual qualities (costumes, props) associated with a particular production of a play or devised piece Director: the individual responsible for developing and carrying out the overarching artistic vision and interpretation of a particular production of a play or devised piece

Dramaturg: the individual charged with studying, researching, and explaining the background, customs of the time period, and language of a play to the actors, designers, and director; dramaturgy is the act of doing this work Playwright: the individual(s) responsible for developing the written text and/or visual vocabulary for a particular production of a play or devised piece Production elements: technical elements selected for use in a specific production, may include design elements such as set, sound, costume, lights, music, props, and make-up, but also include elements specific to the production like puppets, masks, special effects, or other story telling devices/ concepts Rehearsal: steps in preparation for a performance or presentation that can include character development, analysis, blocking/staging, refining and modifying the work of theatre or drama to convey meaning Scene : the subdivision of an act in a play, or process drama, identified by place and time Script : a piece of writing for the theatre which explores the human experience and that includes a description of the setting, a list of the characters, the dialogue, and the action of the characters

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The History Mystery  

Show Companion Guide: a fun guide through the show, the characters, and the themes. This guide includes games and activities for students to...

The History Mystery  

Show Companion Guide: a fun guide through the show, the characters, and the themes. This guide includes games and activities for students to...

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