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Taking One for the Team

RENDERING COURTESY OF PIERCE COUNTY

PARK. The final comment period for the Chambers Creek Master Plan updates will end April 1. An open house is set for later this month.

Pierce County wants your thoughts about Chambers Creek plan updates By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@universityplacepress.net

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Pierce County released the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement regarding the proposed updates to the Chambers Creek Properties Master Site Plan earlier this month and is now gathering comments about the planned changes. Comments are due April 1. The proposed updates generally focus on the South Area of the Chambers Bay Regional Park, but it also includes changes born from the planned hotel, restaurant and golf clubhouse complex where the current clubhouse and restaurant are presently located in the park. The South Area could provide unique park amenities since the site includes a peninsula that juts into Chambers Bay. Ideas in the works include an off-leash area, a boardwalk, trails, a boat launch and beach access. Those ideas in the works for the South Area came from 1,400 comments gathered online and at open houses last year that largely wanted the area available for views, open spaces and nature walks. “People don’t want to lose what’s there and want more of it,” project manager Joseph Coppo said. The addition of walking trails and picnic areas in the area will require the spreading of topsoil so plants can grow as well as the laying of utility lines for power, water and sewage. “All of that has to come in to do even a minimal amount of development,” Coppo said. The original Master Site Plan was adopted in 1997, with a review and update completed in 2007. The 2017 update includes two main parts. The first part consists of an overall update of the whole 930-acre park during the last 10 years, particularly to the Central Area and Chambers Creek Canyon and possible impacts of new uses of the park that already includes two miles of saltwater shoreline, more than two miles of walking trails, soccer fields, a signature golf course an play areas. The county executive, after all, selected a group last fall to design, build and operate a $45 million resort facility at the park. The privately funded plans call for a boutique hotel, golf clubhouse, meeting and event space, a spa, a 200-seat Tom Douglas restaurant and bar, a public plaza and enhanced trails. The planned complex has grown from 180,000 square feet that was envisioned in 2007 to 220,000 square feet in current plans. The general features haven’t changed, but the overall and specific sizes of each of the components have, so those have been updated. Copies of the draft updates are available from Pierce County Planning & Public Works, Environmental Services, 9850 64th St. W., and City of University Place City Hall, 3715 Bridgeport Way W. Electronic copies of both documents are available for $10 or for free download by visiting the project website. Comments may be submitted via e-mail at DSwindale @Cityof UP. com. If submitting by e-mail, include “Chambers Creek Properties” in the subject line. The open house will outline the draft master plan updates, as well as provide ways for people to provide public testimony on the proposed changes. The open house is set for 6 p.m. on March 15, at the Pierce County Planning & Public Works Environmental Services Building, 9850 64th St. W. in University Place. Environmental Services Building, 9850 64th St W. in University Place.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CITY OF UNIVERSITY PLACE

South Sound Law Enforcement Officers are all smiles as they take the plunge into the bitter cold Puget Sound on Saturday, Feb 25.

U.P. Police Chief Mike Blair is done swimming for a while…at least until next year. Blair was one of several members of the local law enforcement community to participate in the Special Olympics’ Tacoma Polar Plunge. He braved the late February cold air and water temperatures to take a plunge into the waters off Owens Beach to support the more than 14,500 athletes in Washington

State with intellectual disabilities who compete in the Special Olympics. Despite spending much of his professional life urging people to make good decisions even when others around them aren’t, he admits he fell prey to “group think” during the Polar Plunge. “Like a bunch of lemmings, we all went into the water,” Blair laughed. “But knowing that our efforts were raising money for the Special Olympics did help take some of the chill away.”

Although he has just begun to regain his normal body temperature, Blair suspects that if asked, he will do the Polar Plunge again. But first he’d like to get an answer to a question of his own: “I noticed that the organizers don’t jump in,” he said, and assuming his role as chief law enforcement officer he added, “I’m a little suspicious of that.” See more photos on page 8.

Chambers Bay Distillery looks to expand as demand grows By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@universityplacepress.net

Childhood friends Alan Davis and Jeff Robinette grew up in Lakewood and wanted to stay local when they set out to craft spirits that were not only good tasting but created a sense of place. Chambers Bay Distillery opened in 2012. Bourbon mash was mixed. Alcohol distilled and the poured into oak barrels to age in 2014. They then waited. And waited. And waited. Their first spirit, Ghost Dog Whiskey – corn whiskey infused with ghost peppers – became a hit. It won a silver medal at the 2016 American Distilling Institute Craft Spirit Awards. Then came Greenhorn Bourbon, a spirit that they wanted to create as locally as possible not just as a matter of economics but to create a flavor that simply could not be repeated anywhere else. The grains came from Grant County and the mashing yeast is a strain from University Place’s Curran Apple Orchard. The aging barrels are stored in a boathouse to not only take on the notes of the sea but as a way to rhythmically churn the bourbon to speed up the aging process. The first batch was aged for a year and a half before it went on to win a Gold Medal at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition last spring. It was the only gold awarded to a Washington distillery whiskey. “It was our goal to create a bour-

PHOTO COURTESY OF CHAMBERS BAY DISTILLERY

Alan Davis and Jeff Robinette use waves to agitate their spirits.

bon that was as local and unique as possible,” Robinette said. “It’s as much of this part of the country as we could fit in a bottle.” With whiskey and bourbon awards won, Chambers Bay set out to expand with a signature vodka line with Ran that hit the market in December. Pulling its name from Norse mythology, the vodka arrived last fall. Its uniqueness comes from being infused with

sea salt from the San Juan Islands as a way to make a not only keep production local but also produce a flavor that is distinct without being considered just one of the “flavored vodka” that currently flood the market. The goal was to distill vodka that stands alone but also is distinct enough for bars to seek out while crafting their signature drink recipes.

u See DISTILLERY / page 12


Page 2 • universityplacepress.net • Friday, March 10, 2017

Police Blotter

CONNIE’S COUNCIL CORNER

A New Year – 2017 By Connie Ladenburg Pierce County Council

WEST PIERCE FIRE AND RESCUE

Members of West Pierce Fire and Rescue participated in Read Across America by reading to students in local schools around the district.

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Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC 2588 Pacific Highway E., Fife, WA 98424 (253) 922-5317 • FAX: (253) 922-5305 Publisher: John Weymer / jweymer@universityplacepress.net News Desk: news@universityplacepress.net Managing Editor: Matt Nagle / matt@universityplacepress.net Staff Writers: Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@universityplacepress.net Larry LaRue / larry@universityplacepress.net Duncan Rolfson / duncan@universityplacepress.net Entertainment Editor: Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@universityplacepress.net Sports Editor: Justin Gimse/ jgimse@universityplacepress.net Pagination: Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar Web Developer: Ed Curran Photographers: Rocky Ross, Bill Bungard, Richard Trask, David Turnipseed Contributing Writers: Dave Davison, Chance Pittenger

interested and invested in economic development gathered to discuss an unified approach to make Pierce County the economic development leader in the South Sound. Known as the South Sound Alliance, we envision the Alliance as a collective dedicated to seeking creative solutions to community and economic development issues in the region and will focus on data-driven responses to selected common issues or challenges facing our region. The intent of the South Sound Alliance is to be multi-jurisdictional, multistakeholder, public, and private partnerships dedicated to working together to make the South Sound Region a destination of choice. It is only natural that the University of Washington-Tacoma, led by Dr. Ali Modarres, Director & Professor, Urban Studies, will host and support this collaborative through the assistance of researchers specialized in areas of urban and regional development. The university was established in 1990 to meet the needs of the South Sound community and will serve us well in this regional economic development endeavor. I'm excited about the "Chambers Creek Properties Master Site Plan." We already know how outstanding the site is. The Soundview Trail is always busy. People love the playground and the larger parking lot. Chambers Bay hosted the record-breaking 2015 U.S. Open. And we got the great news that the course will host the 2019 Four Ball Championship too. And we have given the community the opportunity to plan what the next decade of development will look like for the rest of the 900 acre site, especially the area surrounding the Wastewater Treatment Plant. After all, this is the public’s park! We're still in the process of public meetings and gathering feedback this year, but it's sure to be an exciting time. Plus, the Chambers Bay Resort project is moving forward. The $45 million private investment will replace the temporary clubhouse, and continue down the hill to the Central Meadow with a multi-level hotel, spa, clubhouse, and restaurant and event space. The plan also includes adding more trails and public access. I am also excited that the developer Chambers Bay Development, LLC includes several Pacific Northwest partners such as Tom Douglas Restaurants, Columbia Hospitality and Absher Construction Company just to name a few. So we have a busy year ahead. And I want to encourage you to contact me about these and any other issues of importance to you. I can be reached at: (253) 798-7590 or Connie.Ladenburg@co.pierce.wa.us. Or check out my new blog at https://blog.co.pierce.wa.us/connieladenburg.

A new year at the Council just started and I thought that I would talk about some of the issues that we will be working on. Behavioral health and homelessness is at an epidemic level in our county, and something needs to be done. At the end of 2016 the LADENBURG County Council considered a onetenth of one-percent sales tax to pay for Behavioral Health services. Sadly, it failed. I see how the tax makes it possible for the city of Tacoma to provide necessary support for suffering families and I strongly believe it could reduce the burden on our county jail and other justice services. I pledge to work with the public and Council to find a way to address this horrible situation. In preparation for the vote the Council commissioned an analysis done by Human Services Research Institute (HSRI). We have formed an Ad Hoc Committee on Human Services that I will be chairing. Our task will be to review the analysis by HSRI and work toward implementing the recommendations that are cost neutral or minimal. We will be forming a coordinating committee made up of stakeholders for input on these recommendations. I hope to also work with this committee to finalize next steps for program development. Public safety remains a big priority of the County Council. We added five new deputy sheriffs to the Sheriff's Department this year. In 2016, we created the Property Crimes Unit to target an uptick in burglaries. And to further bolster community crime prevention efforts, I worked to increase funding for Safe Streets by $30,000, giving them a total of $185,000 out of the general fund. This increase covers a new “crime prevention mobilizer” to help citizens start block watch groups and coordinate with law enforcement. We continue to support our Superior Court’s Drug Court and Mental Health Court as well as the District Court Mental Health docket. One of my goals is to make sure that economic development in Pierce County is a top priority for our Council. Every day, 135,000 people who live in Pierce County drive outside of Pierce County to work. That is 40 percent of our work force! We need to do a better job of connecting people with local employment opportunities, and attracting new businesses in our County. Recently, a number of people

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MISSING PERSON Pierce County Sheriff’s detectives need your help to locate a missing man. Daniel O’Leary has been missing since February of 2017 under suspicious circumstances. O’Leary was last seen by his wife on the night of Saturday February 11th, 2017. O’Leary left their apartment in the Parkland area following an argument, and has not been seen or heard from since. Since his disappearance O’Leary has had no contact with his wife or daughter; he has not shown up or called in to work. There has been no activity on

his cell phone or bank account. O’Leary’s blue 2014 Ford Focus was found two days later abandoned on the side of the road in the 10500 block of 5th Ave. E. in Tacoma. The car was unlocked, the keys were found on the ground nearby, and the car appeared to be in normal condition. At the time he went missing Daniel Michael O’Leary was described as a white male, 5’8”, 155 lbs., with brown hair and blue eyes. He had several tattoos including “Britney” on his Detectives are looking for right hand and “Alecia” on his any information regarding his left forearm. disappearance. Fridays at 10:30pm on

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By Christine Kilduff (D-University Place) 28th District

It was a great moment on Friday when three members of our Joint Base Lewis-McChord (JBLM) family – Colonel Timothy King, Sergeant Major Kenneth Breeding and Director of Department and Veterans’ Affairs ‘Alfie’ AlvaradoRamos – joined the House to recognize the 100-year anniversary KILDUFF of JBLM. We were honored to have them and adopted a resolution recognizing this amazing anniversary. Afterward, I had a chance to chat briefly with these outstanding servicemembers and thank them for their service to our great country. JBLM Centennial visit Priority legislation: What has passed the House? This week is our “House-of-origin cutoff’ which means bills have to be approved by Wednesday in order to be considered by the Senate. Below are some of my priority bills that have passed so far: Adjusted training requirements to help families with Developmental Disability needs / HB 1322 Families who have loved ones with developmental disabilities are on-call 24 hours a day. The training requirements to get another family member or friend qualified can be an impediment. This bill changes training requirement for family members, neighbors, or friends who occasionally (under 300 hours a year) care for someone with developmental disabilities to get more respite care providers qualified. Updating and improving the child support economic table / HB 1603 The child support economic table, which determines how much child support is owed during family law proceedings, has not been updated since 1987. The Child Support Workgroup developed a new table rooted in sound policy that would update how a child support obligation is calculated. This legislation will bring our child support laws into the 21st century and make sure kids have the resources they need. Pro bono legal services for military families / HB 1055 When a servicemember is facing a legal dispute but

deployed overseas, or a veteran is seeking benefits at home, it’s often not easy or feasible to hire a lawyer. Under this legislation, the Attorney General’s Office will serve as a clearinghouse to connect veterans and military servicemembers with free legal services. Consumer protections for our military service members / HB 1056 Sometimes our military servicemembers have to break contracts like gym memberships, or cable TV when they’re given orders and have to move. Our servicemembers don’t have a choice; when they are told to go, they go. It’s not fair to make them pay extra costs for amenities the rest of us get to enjoy. This bill gives them extra consumer protections so they can terminate contracts without penalty. Allowing family members a way to help get treatment for their loved ones / HB 1162 One tool families have in getting loved ones mental health care, is the ability to petition the court for review of a decision to not commit someone to a mental health facility. Too many families are not fully aware of that option. This bill would require designated mental health professionals to document that they have informed family members about the process to petition for court review. We should do everything we can to make sure family members understand their rights when it comes to the mental health treatment of loved ones. Town Hall this weekend and Coffees with Christine update: Please come to the town hall I am hosting with Rep. Dick Muri this Sunday, March 12. Doors open at 4 p.m. and we’ll be discussing issues of importance down in Olympia and across our state and answering questions from you. We will be at Steilacoom Town Hall, 1717 Lafayette St., Steilacoom, WA 98388. In addition, I wanted to thank everyone who came out to the “Coffees with Christine” I held around the district in University Place, Steilacoom, and DuPont. It was great to see many of you there. We were able to have some thoughtful and deliberate conversations about the direction our district and our state is going. I appreciate having you join me and I look forward to future meetings. 28 Seconds for the 28th District I have started a new video series called “28 Seconds for the 28th!” where I break down a single issue we’re working on in Olympia, in 28 seconds or less.

An update from Olympia By Rep. Dick Muri (R-Steilacoom) 28th Legislative District

We’ve reached the halfway point of our scheduled 105-days at the state Capitol. Each year, legislators consider hundreds of ideas for state laws. The process by which a bill becomes a law is complex, involving many steps. It is deliberately designed that way to prevent hasty decisions on matters affecting MURI the lives of the people of our state. The legislative process is driven by specific deadlines that keep bills moving through the Legislature. March 8, was the last day for bills to pass out of the chamber they originated in, or they are considered “dead.” Bills that “survive,” and are approved by the House, will be sent to the Senate, where they will start the process all over again. Here is a quick look at some of the bills I sponsored, or cosponsored, recently approved by the House: Paraeducators make a vital contribution to our state’s education system. House Bill 1115 would help them to develop within their profession. The bill would implement statewide paraeducator standards, professional development and career progression. House Bill 1055 would create an Office of Military and Veteran Legal Assistance within the Office of the State Attorney General’s office. This office would help facilitate civil legal assistance programs, pro-bono services, and other self-help services for military service members, veterans and their families. Producing “mead” is a growing industry in Washington state. House Bill 1176 will help producers work with regulators and encourage growth in the industry. Mead is not

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defined in state law and is considered to be a type of wine. Because it is classified this way, the Washington State Wine Commission has levied a fee on its production. This bill would allow mead to be produced without having to pay those fees. House Bill 1226 is a common-sense policy proposal that would take advantage of existing waste collection systems by allowing the curbside collection of electronic wastes. The Senate passed a bill recently that would revamp the Sound Transit’s agency leadership by making the board accountable to the people. Currently, the Sound Transit Board is made up of seventeen appointed officials. The executive in each county makes the appointments. Senate Bill 5001 would get rid of the appointed board, replacing it with 11 elected directors. This would give taxpayers a voice in managing the $54 billion Sound Transit 3 light rail project. The bill is now waiting on a public hearing in the House Transportation Committee. I’ve co-sponsored a bill which would force Sound Transit to stop using an outdated formula setting vehicle values. House Bill 2132 would revise the current inflated valuation system, which is driving up the cost of car tabs. A companion bill sponsored by Sen. Dino Rossi, and co-sponsored by Sen. Steve O’Ban, is also making its way through the Senate. In addition, several constituents have asked me about the possibility of allowing cities, or counties, to withdraw from Sound Transit by a vote of the people. This is something I’m looking into in order to address concerns brought to me by people in my district. My door is always open. If you have questions, concerns or comments you would like to share, please feel free to give me a call at (360) 786-7890 or send an email to dick. muri@leg.wa.gov. Thank you for the honor of representing you in Olympia.

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Friday, March 10, 2017 • universityplacepress.net • Page 3


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Work on Prologis complex at Tacoma, Fife border begins By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@universityplacepress.net

Construction on a massive industrial warehouse complex on the edge of the tideflats between Fife and Tacoma is taking shape and will include street improvements to streamline traffic to and from the facility that is projected to add between 300 and 1,500 jobs to the marketplace. The project is the largest of its kind in development in the South Sound and will become operational later this year. One of the last large swaths of undeveloped land on the tideflats is transforming into a warehouse complex that could span up to 1.6 million square feet on 80 acres of land three years after plans for the site began. The Port of Tacoma Commission selected Prologis as the developer in 2014 and signed a 50-year lease with the global real estate investment trust the following year. This development is located east of 46th Avenue East, within the Tacoma city limits and along the city’s border with Fife along 12th Street East, which will be improved to calm traffic snarls created by the added cars and trucks flowing to the area. Plans call for three main buildings in the complex. The largest facility in the complex will span 1.1 million square feet, another would total 223,000 square feet, and the last building will cover 316,000 square feet. As of yet, what will go into these buildings has not been decided but projects suggest the site will bring between 300 to 1,500 light industrial and warehouse jobs to the area and could reach an employment roster of up to 2,500, depending on the tenant mix. “It’s a project that’s right in the wheelhouse of Prologis,” said Prologis Vice President of West Region Development Dan Letter during a project update last fall. Prologis has 670 million square feet of space under its management that spans 570 cities in 22 countries. This facility will have two access points, from 12th Street East and 8th Street East, that will provide quick access to 54th Avenue East and Interstate 5 just a half mile away. The site also abuts State Route 509 and the future connection point with SR-167 that would directly link the Port of Tacoma to the regional

RENDERING COURTESY OF PROLOGIS

Work on an 80-acre site between Tacoma and Fife will bring a 1.8 million-square-foot industrial warehouse complex that will likely offer 300 to 1,500 jobs to the area.

distribution hub of the Kent Valley. The size and location of the project meant several communities had interest in what happened to the property, namely Port of Tacoma, the cities of Tacoma and Fife as well as the Puyallup Tribe. The site also edges a residential neighborhood, where many of its residents are worried about traffic troubles and noise levels generated at the complex. Those concerns slowed the process. “We wanted to go slow and make sure

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we heard from everyone and include that into the design process,” Letter said. There are 30 mitigations and an additional 24 “advisory notes” listed for the project. The most obvious of those mitigations is the construction of a 14-foottall landscaped berm along 12th that will also include an eight-foot solid fence to address noise, light and aesthetics to the residents and business south. The fence-topped berm will almost completely screen the neighborhood from viewing the building or the trucks at the complex.

The roadway itself will also widen from a two-lane street to one that offers a third lane for traffic turning into the property that will also have sidewalks and bike lanes. Port officials had been preparing the land for years before formally issuing a call for development ideas in 2014 that led to the selection of Prologis. The port will receive $2.1 million a year under the lease with Prologis, which manages 15 million square feet of commercial spaces in Puget Sound, including about 2 million square feet in Fife on 20th Street East.


Friday, March 10, 2017 • universityplacepress.net • Page 5

NOISE STUDY FINDS MINE WON’T AFFECT NEIGHBORS By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@universityplacepress.net

A noise study based on information from the mine operators concludes that the proposed sand and gravel mining would not violate Tacoma’s noise limits, despite there being a residential area just 450 feet away. Mining could start as early as this summer if permits are approved as submitted. A group called Terra5 Company LLC wants to restart the former Coski Surface Mine at 2500 Marine View Dr., which is located between the Hylebos Waterway and been mothballed for decades. The homes in the nearby Point Woodworth neighborhood were built since the mine ceased operations 20 years ago. The property abuts the Tacoma Police Department’s Firing Range. The plan is to remove about 400,000 cubic yards of sand and gravel from the 17-acre site during the next decade, which would call for about 15 truckloads every hour of operation, or 600 truck trips a day that would be split into two shifts. Mining would occur only during the day, while loading would occur both day and night. The permit documents mention two shifts, from 6:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 5 a.m. City of Tacoma planners added the need for a noise study after residents and groups voiced concern about the project during the city's public comment period earlier this winter. The mine operator contracted with BRC Acoustics and Design of Seattle to conduct the noise concerns. The firm concluded that the site’s plans to retain buffers on the rim of the site would shield the residential areas from any noise of mining operations. “With these noise-mitigation measures in place, sound levels from proposed operations are expected to meet City of Tacoma noise limits by a wide margin and not to produce significant noise increases at any sound-analysis locations,” the 21-page sound analysis stated. “Therefore, no additional noise-mitigation measures are required.” Increases in noise from the trucks driving on the roadway are also not expected to rise above the Washington State Department of Transportation guildlines, particularly since the road is projected to see a 45 percent increase in truck traffic even without the project. Restarting the mine will bring that increase to 52 percent. Citizens for a Healthy Bay (CHB), the non-profit environmental group tasked with monitoring the environmental wellness of Commencement Bay, has wanted the city to conduct a full environmental review of the project after plans were announced late last year since the mine is located along the already environmentally troubled Hylebos Waterway and forested habitat areas as well as is located downhill from the residential area of Northeast Tacoma. “A short distance down the shore is Squally Beach, an important restored habitat site,” CHB reports state. “The mine also cuts into a forested hillside, which provides wildlife habitat while buffering Northeast Tacoma residents from the impacts of industrial port activities. Finally, it is possible

PHOTO COURTESY OF COLDWATER RESOURCES

MINING. Citizens for a Healthy Bay wants the city to conduct a full environmental review regarding plans to restart mining operations at the former Coski Sand and Gravel Mine along the Hylebos Waterway.

that the site contains contaminated materials from illegal landfills, like those found on neighboring sites, or from large steel drums currently stored there. If so, mining activities may release this hazardous contamination. This sensitive location also means that the impacts from mining and trucking will be felt particularly hard by local residents, as well as the birds, salmon and other wildlife that depend on the area.” Those concerns aren’t adequately addressed under the current review process, CHB charges. “It's difficult to know exactly what hazards the project might create, but concerns stem both from mining itself and the trucking of mined materials,” the report continued. “Both would create noise day and night, disturbing wildlife and neighborhoods alike. Dust and other air emissions would also not be contained on-site and could further degrade local air and water quality already suffering from other pollution sources.” The sand and gravel removed from the site will be used for local construction projects as well as fulfill the Department of Natural Resources requirement for mine reclamation and slope stabilization. The city accepted public comments on the noise study until March 3, after which planners will issue a final decision on the project. Permit details are available at tacomapermits.org.

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Page 6 • universityplacepress.net • Friday, March 10, 2017

PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT Supporting the Economic Growth of Our Community

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

Federal, regional, state and local leaders gathered with the Puyallup Tribal Council to officially cut the ribbon on the Tribe’s new state-of-the-art Salish Cancer Center (SCC) in the spring of 2015. Joining in on the event were (back row from left): former Fife Mayor Tim Curtis; former Congressman Norm Dicks and Puyallup Tribal Council Vice-Chairman Larry LaPointe; (front row from left) Puyallup Tribal Council Members Marguerite Edwards and Sylvia Miller; Puyallup Vice-Chairwoman Roleen Hargrove; Senator Maria Cantwell; Puyallup Chairman Bill Sterud; Gov. Jay Inslee; Lieutenant Governor Brad Owen; Congressman Denny Heck; and Puyallup Tribal Council Members David Bean and Tim Reynon.

The most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians continues to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce County’s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its

own membership, but sharing its wealth among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County. With a payroll of more than 3,100 people that work in the Tribe’s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities – approximately 70 percent of whom are non-Native –

employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits. In 2015 the Tribe spent over $491 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more.

From sponsoring local charities, non-profit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer or cease to exist, to protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and healthcare, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its destiny as “the generous people,” the meaning of the Tribe’s very name “Puyallup.”

SALISH CANCER CENTER A place where healing begins On April 7, 2015, the ribbon was officially cut at the grand opening of the Salish Cancer Center (SCC). Housed in the Puyallup Tribal Integrative Medicine building in Fife, SCC is a non-profit venture of the Puyallup Tribe and is the first tribally-owned cancer center in Indian Country and the United States. This state-of-the art facility combines conventional cancer treatment (chemotherapy) and integrative oncology (naturopathic medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, Native healers and acupuncture) to create a truly modern oncology practice. As the indigenous keepers of the Puyallup Tribe Indian Reservation, the Puyallup Tribe has a strong ancestral bond with nature and creation, and this is reflected in the type of care SCC patients receive – focusing on the mind, body, and spirit using lifestyle, nutrition and botanical medicine that blends quite well with modern oncology practices and produces a foundation for providing innovative cancer treatment. At the ribbon cutting, Washington State Governor Jay Inslee praised Tribal Council Chairman Bill Sterud and the entire Tribal Council for making their vision for SCC a reality. “This is such a delightful day, not just for the Puyallup Nation, but for the state of Washington, because this is a center that is going to embrace health for the entire state of Washington and the Puyallup Nation all at the same time,” he said. “To me, it is a real achieve-

ment to know that the first tribally-owned and operated oncology center in the United States is right here in the Puyallup Nation. This is something for the whole state of Washington to be very proud of.” The SCC care team is delighted to have medical oncologist Dr. Eiko Klimant on board as medical director, as he joined the team just this year. This spring, Dr. Krisstina Gowin, medical oncologist from Mayo Clinic in Arizona, will also be joining the SCC care team. “My goal is to create a meaningful experience for the patient and their caregivers, which includes creating conditions and finding therapies to help assure the best possible outcome for each individual patient,” Dr. Klimant said.

Puyallup Tribal Member David Duenas offered up a Sundance song of sacrifice and honor at the Salish Cancer Center ribbon cutting.

Dr. Klimant was most recently the Medical Director of Integrative Oncology at Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Philadelphia. He is board certified in medical oncology and internal medicine, as well as hospice, palliative medicine and integrative medicine. He has extensive clinical experience in the management of pancreatic, breast, lung and brain cancers. Dr. Klimant is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Medical Association, American Society of Clinical Oncology, American College of Physicians and the Society for Integrative Oncology. He is fluent in English, German and French. At SCC, Dr. Klimant works within a multidisciplinary team to provide patient-centered cancer care. “The integrative care model puts the patient at the center. Patients’ needs are addressed on multiple levels, including innovative scientific cancer treatment, spiritual and psychological support, naturopathic medicine and an individualized nutritional program,” he said. While a cancer diagnosis can be the most frightening thing a person has to face and is often all consuming for patients and their care providers, SCC stands as a mighty protector and healer for those who have been told there is nothing more that can be done. “It’s a battle against this disease, only now our warriors are our doctors, nurses, lab technicians and people who are in the health profession world,” said Puyallup Chairman Bill Sterud. “Our warriors are going to be armed with the best medicine that can be, whether it exists now or down the road. This is not about making money – this is a non-profit organization that’s dedicated to the saving of lives.” Learn more at www.SalishCancerCenter.com.

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.


Friday, March 10, 2017 • universityplacepress.net • Page 7

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Stop LNG Now!

KEEP TACOMA BEAUTIFUL Once upon a time, Tacoma had an ugly reputation for being a dirty city – even giving off its own smell that became notorious as “the aroma of Tacoma.” Adding to this, tourist traffic was low, crime was high and it seemed that Tacoma didn’t matter because Seattle was just a short drive away. This all changed in recent years, as Tacoma has made a stunning comeback and is now one of the most beautiful and livable cities on the west coast. Tacoma is back on the map and no one wants to return to those dark and dreary days.

PUYALLUP TRIBE: “NO LNG!” The extinction of salmon throughout Puget Sound is upon us.

Among the most ardent Tacoma boosters is the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, which has been a forward thinking and financially generous leader in keeping Tacoma beautiful. The Tribe’s active protection of this area’s pristine waters, the salmon and all natural resources has benefitted the entire region. The Tribe vigorously opposes the prospect of an LNG plant being sited in the metropolitan Tacoma area. Not only would the plant be placed right on the Tribe’s reservation, it would mar Tacoma’s great scenic beauty, put natural resources at risk and endanger the lives of everyone who lives and works here in the event of a catastrophic LNG accident.

A PLANT WITHOUT A CUSTOMER Pristine waterways next to an industrial complex such as LNG could cause an environmental disaster in the Puget Sound from which we may never recover.

Puget Sound Energy is in the final permitting stages of the proposed LNG plant even though at this point PSE lacks any customers for LNG. The proposal started after the private utility company landed a contract with Totem Ocean Trailer Express (TOTE) to provide ships with cleaner-burning LNG rather than diesel, but TOTE has since put those plans on hold, announcing in a news release that the company does not have an exact date for when it will retrofit its ships to use LNG. In other words, PSE wants to build a plant without a customer.

LNG PUTS AREA RESIDENTS IN JEOPARDY Also among its plans, PSE wants to form a for-profit subsidiary to handle the commercial sales of LNG to TOTE and other yet-to-be-determined customers while also storing the LNG for its utility customers to use during extreme weather conditions. Transporting LNG for local ratepayers presents the threat, and the inherent risks, of tanker trucks on our roadways and the potential for gas truck accidents in our neighborhoods or at the plant. Moreover, we would face potential risks to our health, the environment and our wallets for something PSE has yet to prove utility customers need. Thousands of oil train cars enter and leave the Port of Tacoma daily. A train derailment in the river would be catastrophic.

THE HISTORIC DANGERS OF LNG The construction of an LNG plant would require a large capacity natural gas pipeline to be constructed through the heart of the city of Fife, another booming city that lies right on the Interstate 5 corridor through Pierce County. This should deeply concern local residents considering historic on-site accidents that have occurred involving or related to LNG: r On Oct. 20, 1944 in Cleveland, 128 people died when an East Ohio Natural Gas Company’s LNG tank ruptured and exploded. LNG spilled into the city’s sewer system, vaporized and turned into a gas, which exploded and burned.

The I-5 corridor is well known for traffic congestion, which greatly increases the risk of toxic accidents on the highway.

A catastrophic LNG explosion could ignite the entire Port of Tacoma.

r On Oct. 6, 1979 in Lusby, MD a pump seal failed at the Cove Point LNG facility, which released natural gas vapors that settled into an electrical conduit. The gas vapors ignited when a worker switched off a circuit breaker, causing an explosion that killed one worker and severely injured another. r On Jan. 19, 2004 an explosion at Sonatrach LNG facility in Skikda, Algeria killed 27 people and injured 56. Three LNG trains were also destroyed. The massive hydrocarbon gas explosion was ignited when a steam boiler that was part of an LNG liquefaction train exploded near a propane and ethane refrigeration storage site. A report from a U.S. government inspection team cited that a leak of hydrocarbons from the liquefaction process initiated the domino effect of explosions. r On April 7, 2014 a “processing vessel” at a Williams Co. Inc. facility near the small town of Plymouth, Wash., exploded, spraying chunks of shrapnel as heavy as 250 pounds as far as 300 yards. The flying debris pierced the double walls of a 134-foot LNG tank on site, causing leaks. Five workers were injured, and local responders warned that vapors from the leaks could trigger a more devastating, second explosion. A county fire department spokesman said authorities were concerned a second blast could level a 0.75 mile “lethal zone” around the plant.


Page 8 • universityplacepress.net • Friday, March 10, 2017

Taking One for the Team Continued from page 1

CITY HALL Office Hours: Address: Phone: Fax: Email: Website:

9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Weekdays 3715 Bridgeport Way W, Ste B-1 University Place, WA 98466 253.566.5656 253.566.5658 city_hall@CityofUP.com www.CityofUP.com

UP CITY COUNCIL MAYOR JAVIER FIGUEROA JFigueroa@CityofUP.com | 253.682.7379 MAYOR PRO TEM KENT KEEL KKeel@CityofUP.com | 253.878.8041 COUNCIL MEMBER STEVE WORTHINGTON SWorthington@CityofUP.com | 253.565.4855 COUNCIL MEMBER KEN GRASSI KGrassi@CityofUP.com | 253.278.1946 COUNCIL MEMBER DENISE MCCLUSKEY DMccluskey@CityofUP.com | 253.878.8039 COUNCIL MEMBER CHRIS NYE CNye@CityofUP.com | 253.878.8042 COUNCIL MEMBER CAROLINE BELLECI CBelleci@CityofUP.com | 253.878.8040

CITY COUNCIL MEETING TIMES MONDAY, MARCH 6, 6:30 P.M.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CITY OF UNIVERSITY PLACE

Bottom Photo Pictured Left to Right: Tacoma Police Department Officer Jeremy Kunkel, Tacoma Police Department Officer Gerald Bratcher, Edgewood Police Chief Micah Lundborg, Pierce County Sheriff Deputy Shane Masko, University Place Police Chief Mike Blair, Pierce County Detective/ Sergeant Jason Laliberte, Pierce County Sheriff Paul Pastor.

Enjoying a big bite of success

Regular Council Meeting ȗ Public Hearing: Chambers Landing Comp Plan & Zoning Map Amendments ȗ Surface Water Management Plan Amendments All items listed are tentative; please refer to the City’s website at www.CityofUP.com for the most up-to-date information. All City Council meetings are held in the Town Hall meeting room, Windmill Village, 3715 Bridgeport Way, at 6:30 p.m. on the 1st & 3rd Mondays of the month. Changes to meeting times and locations are posted at City Hall, University Place Library and at www.CityofUP. com or you may contact the City Clerk’s Office at 253.460.2510.

OPEN HOUSE PHOTOS COURTESY OF CITY OF UNIVERSITY PLACE

Like thousands of college students, Adam Teske (right) and Ryan Wildy (left) needed part-time jobs while they were students at the University of Illinois. So they signed on to be drivers for Jimmy John’s Gourmet Sandwiches. Eventually they moved from their cars to the corporate offices, assisting company-owned stores with marketing and then moved on to working with franchisees as well. “We got to learn the brand from the inside and outside,” Teske said. It wasn’t long before they wanted to apply that knowledge to a store of their own. They began looking at places all across the United States where they could open their business—and where they would like to live as well. Teske says the pair fell in love with the mountains and water of Puget Sound while also discovering that the South Sound presented a promising unsaturated market for their new store. They opened their first Jimmy John’s in Olympia three years ago and their hunches proved right. The business was successful very quickly, which prompted them to open two additional shops, in Lakewood and on Joint Base Lewis-McChord. But they always had their eyes on University Place as well. So when a space at 3800 Bridgeport Way W. in the Green Firs Shopping Center became available, they decided the time was right to open

their fourth location. Since opening three weeks ago, Teske says their walk-in, delivery and catering business has been strong. “We’ve received a great reception from the community,” he said. “People are excited we’re here.” The community’s enthusiasm is both a reflection of their product—Entrepreneur magazine ranked Jimmy John's the highest-ranked franchise among the entire Franchise 500 for 2016—but also an indication that the two businessmen did their homework in choosing the right location for their newest store. “This space and this community just fits the Jimmy John’s brand,” Teske says. “The people are friendly and welcoming and the city is growing. Every time we came here we always got the vibe that University Place is just blossoming right before your eyes.” About a third of the store’s approximately 25 new employees are drivers, just like Teske and Wildy were not so long ago. They will deliver orders as small as one sandwich or catering requests to serve hundreds. And who knows, maybe someday one of those drivers will own their own business (or four of them) just like Teske and Wildy do today. For more information on Jimmy John’s, including full menus, visit www.jimmyjohns.com or call the University Place store at 253.566.7060. You can also download the Jimmy John’s app for Android and iOS devices.

OPEN HOUSE ON MARCH 15 FOR CHAMBERS CREEK PROPERTIES MASTER SITE PLAN 2017 UPDATE Pierce County is proposing to update the Chambers Creek Properties Master Site Plan, 2007 (MSP) and existing environmental documentation. The proposed update is primarily focused on a comprehensive development plan for the south area of the Regional Park. However, the update also envisions a hotel, restaurant and golf clubhouse complex in the vicinity of where the current clubhouse and restaurant are located in the park. The Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (DSEIS) will analyze the proposed update at a programmatic level. The DSEIS was released on March 1, 2017. A single 30-day public comment period has been established. Written comments on the DSEIS must be submitted no later than 4 p.m., April 1, 2017 to David Swindale, Planning & Development Services Director, City of University Place, 3715 Bridgeport Way West, University Place, WA 98466. Comments may also be submitted via e-mail at DSwindale@CityofUP.com. If submitting by e-mail include “Chambers Creek Properties” in the subject line. An Open House to gather public testimony will be held on March 15, 2017 at 6 p.m. at: Pierce County Planning & Public Works Environmental Services Building, 9850 64th Street West, University Place, WA 98467. Copies of the DSEIS and the Draft Chambers Creek Properties Master Site Plan Update have been printed, distributed, and made available for public review. Additional copies are available from Pierce County Planning & Public Works, Environmental Services, 9850 64th Street West, University Place, WA 98467, and City of University Place City Hall, 3715 Bridgeport Way West, University Place WA 98466, for the hard copy price of $40 for the DSEIS and $40 for the Chambers Creek Properties Master Site Plan 2017 Update. Electronic copies of both documents are available for $10 or for free download by visiting the project website at http://www.co.pierce. wa.us/index.aspx?NID=4745.


Friday, March 10, 2017 • universityplacepress.net • Page 9

CONSTRUCTION UPDATES BRIDGEPORT – 19TH TO 27TH Improvements: This project will provide new sidewalks, bike lanes, street lights and landscaping along both sides of Bridgeport Way between 19th Street and 27th Street. A right turn lane will be provided at the northwest corner of the Bridgeport and 27th Street intersection in front of Walgreens. The water main along will be replaced/upgraded. The traffic signal at 27th Street will be upgraded to match the other signals along Bridgeport.

Adams becomes University Place Municipal Judge

Anticipated Completion: April 2017 Status: Water main upgrade has been completed; sidewalk, driveway and street patching has been completed with the exception of the areas near the 27th Street intersection (those areas cannot be completed until the new traffic signal poles and cabinet are in place); lighting, signal work, landscaping striping and pavement markings anticipated to be complete this spring. 27TH STREET/REGENTS – BRIDGEPORT TO MILDRED/67TH Improvements: This project will provide new sidewalks, bike lanes, street lights and landscaping along both sides of 27th Street/Regents Blvd between Bridgeport Way and Mildred/67th Avenue. The water main along will be replaced/ upgraded. A new signalized crosswalk will be installed between Cascade Place and Rochester.

PHOTO BY DEANA WRIGHT

Susan Adams, the former director of the Crystal Judson Family Justice Center, is now the Municipal Court Judge for University Place and surrounding communities. At a recent University Place City Council meeting, Susan Adams donned the black judge’s robe and addressed the City Council: “I am incredibly honored to have been selected to serve the citizens of Lakewood, University Place, Steilacoom and DuPont.” Ms. Adams replaces Judge Grant Blinn who in November was elected to the Pierce County Superior Court. (Left to right: Council Member Chris Nye, U.P. Historical Society Rep Howard Lee, Council Member Caroline Belleci, Council Member Denise McCluskey, Mayor Javier Figueroa, Municipal Judge Susan Adams, Mayor Pro Tem Kent Keel, Council Member Ken Grassi, Council Member Steve Worthington.)

Partner UP – Jeannie’s Café PHOTO COURTESY OF CITY OF UNIVERSITY PLACE

Anticipated Completion: April 2017

On the evening of Thursday, March 2, more than 25 business owners spent time networking and connecting at Jeannie’s on Bridgeport, a very comfortable café located in the Alicia Building. Pictured with Council Member Denise McCluskey (left) and Mayor Javier Figueroa (right) is Jeannie Christian (center), the owner of Jeannie’s, who provided a delicious sampling of her menu—from salads and sandwiches to cookies and scones.

Status: Water main upgrade has been completed; sidewalks, landscaping, lighting and signal work anticipated to be complete in April.

SOUNDVIEW DRIVE IMPROVEMENTS TO BEGIN IN MAY A haphazard system of drainage pipes and ditches along Soundview Drive is about to get an extreme makeover. The existing drainage system is a mismatched combination of pipes, ditches and missing links that have been installed by a variety of homeowners and contractors over the last 40 years. “Rebuilding the drainage system and roadway of Soundview Drive has been on my wish list since we incorporated as a city in 1995,” said Gary Cooper, U.P.’s Director of Public Works. “Not only is the drainage system inadequate, but a number of natural springs send water seeping out of the properties located on the east side of the road and this has damaged the roadway. Needless to say, Soundview Drive has been a maintenance challenge for us.” In recognition of these issues, the City Council commissioned a review of the Soundview Drive West and Brookside Drive West storm drainage system in 2014. Residents living in the affected area were invited to an open house in 2015 to offer their comments on design recommendations on how to resolve the drainage issues. These include removal of existing storm drainage structures and the addition of 3,500 linear feet of new storm drainage structures and asphalt roadway and driveway reconstruction between 31st Street West and Brookside Drive West. Last month, 16 bids were received for the construction phase of the project, with DPK General Contracting of Kent submitting the lowest bid for $1,134,155. Construction is tentatively scheduled to start May 1, 2017. Staff will reach out to affected residents with more information about the project, including a detailed schedule and additional contact information. In the interim, anyone with questions about this major infrastructure improvement project should contact Gary Cooper, Director of Public Works, at 253.460.6494.

Don’t Drip and Drive Did you know that vehicles drip an estimated seven million quarts of vehicle fluids, including motor oil, fuel, lubricants and more, into the Puget Sound watershed each year? Each time it rains, the petroleum products that drip from our cars and are left behind on our roadways get carried into our waterways to rivers, streams, lakes and eventually to Puget Sound, harming wildlife and habitats in the process. Don’t Drip and Drive is a regional campaign funded by grants from the Washington State Department of Ecology to encourage drivers to regularly check their vehicles for leaks, whether on their own or at a contributing partner repair shop. Regular inspections identify important cost-saving preventative maintenance while also protecting the quality of our local waterways

for future generations. Three University Place repair shops have agreed to participate in the Don’t Drip and Drive program by offering free visual leak inspections to drivers. They are: Air Import Repairs (8016 27th Street West), McCabe's Automotive (3147 Bridgeport Way West) and Meineke Car Care (2701 Bridgeport Way West). For those who prefer to identify leaks on their own, Don’t Drip and Drive suggests placing a 3-by-6 foot piece of cardboard on the ground under your car’s engine after your car has been driven at least 15 minutes. After the engine has been off for about 20 minutes, pull the cardboard out to see if there are any drip spots. If so, the car should be serviced to fix the leak. “If residents have a vehicle that is leaving drip puddles, they should

soak up any leaks with kitty litter and then sweep it up and put it in the trash,” said Todd Smith, the City of U.P.’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Coordinator. “It is illegal to discharge pollutants to storm drains and residents should report illegal dumping to me immediately.” Contact Todd Smith at 253.460.5432 or email him at TSmith@CityofUP.com. For more information, visit www.fixcarleaks.org.

'RAPTOR' BRIGADE ‘RAPTOR’ BRIGADE TO CASE COLORS FOR UPCOMING DEPLOYMENT The 16th Combat Aviation Brigade, 7th Infantry Division, will case its colors March 10 ahead of its deployment to Afghanistan. The casing ceremony will take place at 2 p.m. at the Evergreen Theater. The “Raptor” brigade is set to deploy to Afghanistan with about 800 Soldiers as part of a regular rotation of forces in support of Operation Freedom's Sentinel, where they will conduct full-spectrum aviation operations promoting security and stability in the region. "The soldiers of the Raptor Brigade have worked very hard to build readiness over the last year, and I am extremely confident in their ability to accomplish our upcoming mission," said Col. William A. Ryan, 16th CAB commander. "We employ some of the Army's most advanced aviation technology, but it is our tremendous team of Army professionals that will ensure mission success." The 16th CAB, led by Ryan and Command Sgt. Maj. Mark Brock, will uncase the brigade’s colors in theater once they officially take over the mission from the 1st Combat Aviation Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, in early April.

PUBLIC INPUT SOUGHT FOR UPCOMING STORMWATER MANAGEMENT PLAN Review and comment on the 2017 Stormwater Management Plan (SWMP). The Washington State Department of Ecology requires an annual review and update to the Stormwater Management Plan which focuses on seven major components of our NPDES Phase II Municipal Stormwater Permit. At the March 6 Council Meeting, the 2017 Stormwater Management Plan Draft was presented to City Council for review. It is now open for public review and comment through March 20. At the March 20 Council Meeting there will be opportunity for additional public comment on this plan, prior to adoption by the City Council. Please visit www.CityofUP.com to view the draft. Email comments to NPDES Coordinator, Todd Smith, at tsmith@CityofUP.com, or by phone, 253.460.5432.


Page 10 • universityplacepress.net • Friday, March 10, 2017

SPORTS

CURTIS TOPS FED WAY FOR FOURTH PLACE

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

TROPHY TIME. They may have fallen short of capturing the 4A boys’ state basketball championship, but in reality, the Curtis Vikings (23-5) performance at the

4A Hardwood Classic was absolutely fantastic. The Vikings gave eventual 4A state champion Kentwood all they could handle in their quarterfinal matchup on Thursday, March 2. A split-second moment of indecision was all that kept Curtis from tying up the game at the buzzer as they fell by just two points, 57-55. Curtis would bounce back the following day with a resounding 64-46 win over Enumclaw and the table was now set for a rematch with Federal Way in the fourth-place game on Saturday. The 8 a.m. contest was a tight affair, but Curtis was able to pull away in the end for a 70-62 victory over the two-time defending champions, and the fourth-place trophy was heading to University Place. (top-left) Senior Sindou Diallo. (top-middle) Junior Devante Williams-Byrd. (top-right) Senior John Moore. (bottom-left) Senior Tashon Brown. (bottom-middle) Senior Nate Ward. (bottom-right) 4A SPSL MVP, John Moore.


Friday, March 10, 2017 • universityplacepress.net • Page 11

Pierce County READS does more than promote reading The Pierce County Library system READS is marking its 10th year with the selection of a book that is not only gripping and impactful, but also relevant and local. The county’s largest community one-book reading program is encouraging everyone to read “Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War� by Mary Roach. READS selected the book not only because of the book’s content, but as a way to strengthen the ties and understanding between the area’s civilian population and its military residents, particularly at Joint Base Lewis-McChord. It is celebrating 100 years of operation after all, and remains the county’s largest employer and economic engine. The book takes a hard, but readable, and often humorous look at the science behind life of service in the military, from exhaustion and panic, to long marches and post-combat stress and fatique. But it also examines the science that goes into the design of military uniforms and equipment as well as the dietary research that military food undergoes to provide meals that are edible, nutritious and portable. It reads less like a “science book� and more like an episode of “Myth Busters,� which makes it a great read for people of all reading levels. But on top of the content itself is the fact that READS picked the book as a way to connect people and com-

munities in a time when everyone in the nation seems more divided than ever. While the book isn’t going to get people of diverse politcal views singing in harmony, it will at least help bridge the divide by providing ways for people to find commonality. It’s a start. A kickoff open house of the community event is planned for March 11 at 3-5 p.m., at Lewis Army Museum on Joint Base Lewis-McChord that will include music, food, special museum exhibits, and brief remarks at 3:15 p.m. Other events will dot the calendar in March and April to allow people to attend book discussions around the county that will explore everything from military medical science, to cooking for an army, to Robert S. McNamara’s career as Secretary of Defense, and the seen and unseen impacts of war on military personnel. The highlight of Pierce County READS is the author event, slated for Friday, April 28, 7 p.m. at McGavick Conference Center at Clover Park Technical College. Ariel Van Cleave, KNKX’s “Morning Edition� producer, will interview Roach onstage. Afterward, Roach will autograph books. The author event will also be live streamed at seven locations around the county. Give “Grunt� a read and get out to talk about it. The journey is worth the investment.

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Page 12 • universityplacepress.net • Friday, March 10, 2017

TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF CHAMBERS BAY DISTILLERY / LEFT PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

Chambers Bay Distillery uses local ingredients. Jeff Robinette checks a spirit in progress.

t Distillery From page 1

“Bartenders are really getting creative with it,” Robinette said. “It’s the mineral water of vodka.” Chambers Bay Distillery labels can be found at a couple dozen bars and stores around Tacoma as well as sampled at its tasting room in U.P. But early successes and growing demand means expansion plans are already in the works. Imagine

ő

visions of a destination distillery and restaurant along the waterfront or maybe even in the distillery’s namesake park. Expect more news on that front later this year as the distillery seeks investors and partnerships to add capacity. “We would love to be part of the Chambers Bay resort in some way,” Davis said.Chambers Bay Distillery has a tasting room open Wednesday through Friday from 4-7 p.m. and Saturday from 2-7 p.m. For more information on Chambers Bay Distillery, visit chambersbaydistillery.com.

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Friday, March 10, 2017 • universityplacepress.net • Page 13

ENTERTAINMENT

KALEIDOSCOPE 2017 TACOMA MUSICAL PLAYHOUSE HOSTS ONE-ACT PLAY FESTIVAL By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

Last weekend, Tacoma Musical Playhouse hosted the Washington State Community Theater Association’s One Act Play Festival, in which Washington State theatrical groups brought their best work to stage to contest for awards and for the honor of moving up to the next level of competition. For three consecutive nights (March 2 to 4) Tacomans and visitors were treated to one-act plays performed by theatrical groups from all over the state. The top two groups (taken by Tacoma Little Theatre and hosts Tacoma Musical Playhouse) will take their performances to the regional festival in Boise at the end of the month. There, one lucky group will be selected to the National American Association of Community Theatre’s festival, which will be in Rochester, Minn. June 26 through July 1. After each one-act performance, a trio of adjudicators (accomplished individuals in the world of live theater) gave their critique and assessment of the play. The adjudicators for the weekend’s festival were Brian Freeland, a director and playwright based in New

PHOTO BY KAT DOLLARHIDE

SPOOKY GOOD. Tacoma Musical Playhouse's "Addams Family" is one of two Washington State one-act

plays advancing to the American Association of community Theatre's regional contest at the end of the month.

York; Mark Harvey Levine, a prolific writer of short plays that has had his work produced around the world; and Darren R. Schroader, an actor based in Los Angeles. All three were generous in their praise, judicious in their criticism, and generally charming and funny. The performances were diverse in style and content, but all were so engaging that they breezed by leaving the

audience hungry for more. Each group had to fit all of their props and set materials in a 10-foot by 10-foot area backstage. They had 10 minutes to set up, one hour to perform and 10 minutes to take down the set. March 2 featured two performances: a non-adjudicated reprise of Tacoma Musical Playhouse Family Theater’s recent production of “Rosa Parks and the

CALENDAR EVENTS

Montgomery Bus Boycott” followed by The Richland Players performance of “Cathedral,” a story of a blind man helping others to perceive beauty. On March 3, ACT’s Troupe – comprised of high school students drawn from the Tri-Cities area – performed “Snap Judgements,” a series of vignettes having to do with bigotry, bullying and abuse with a little

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@universityplacepress.net or calling (253) 922-5317.

TOP PICK: SECOND SUNDAY MUSIC SERIES Sun., March 12, 1-2:30 p.m. Seymour Conservatory in Wright Park, 316 S. G St., Tacoma Steve and Kristi Nebel share a concert with Gen Obata, part of the Second Sunday Music Series sponsored by Metro Parks Tacoma, wherein all are invited to enjoy live acoustic music among lush tropical floral displays. The Nebels learned their art during 20 years on the road performing their own songs in folk clubs and at festivals. Each has played many styles of music over their years of experience. Kristi plays bass guitar, and Steve plays guitar. Kristi recorded a solo western swing and Americana CD in 2011. In 2014 one of the songs CD was nominated song of the year by the Academy of Western Artists, and she made it to the top five for female performer of the year. Her band, “Cowgirl’s Dream” is recording its’ first CD. Gen Obata has been writing songs and playing flatpick guitar since the 1970’s. He helped found the St. Louis-based traditional bluegrass band, The Seldom Home, and was also a member of the eclectic acoustic bands Raven Moon and City Folk. Gen is currently a member of the Tacomabased bluegrass band Barleywine Revue, the americana trio Cosmo’s Dream, the acoustic duo Unassuming Beekeepers, and the alt-country band Road Work. Price: Free. Ages: All ages. Info: (253) 591-5330; www. metroparkstacoma.org/calendar ‘DOUBT: A PARABLE’ FINAL WEEKEND Fri., March 10, 8 p.m. Sat., March 11, 8 p.m. Sun., March 12, 2 p.m. Lakewood Playhouse at Lakewood Towne Center, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd., Lakewood Lakewood Playhouse presents the fourth show of its 78th season, winner of the Tony Award, the Academy Award and the Pulitzer Prize Award for Drama. This production of “DOUBT: A Parable” will place you in the center of a gripping story of suspicion cast on a priest’s behavior that is less about scandal than about fascinatingly nuanced questions of moral certainty. AUDIENCE WARNING: This Play Contains Mature Content and Themes. Info: www.lakewoodplayhouse. org; (253) 588-0042

GYPSY Fri., March 10, 7:30 p.m. Tacoma Little Theatre, 210 N. “I” St. A crowning achievement in American musical theatre, “Gypsy” tells the story of Mama Rose, the ultimate stage mother, and her hopes and dreams for her daughters, June and Louise. Ages: All ages. Price: $24; $22 students, seniors & military; $20 12 and under. Info: (253) 272-2281

‘GODSPELL’ Fri., March 10, 7:30 p.m. Pacific Lutheran University – Studio Theatre, 12180 Park Ave. S. An eclectic blend of songs is employed from pop to vaudeville as the story of Jesus’ life dances across the stage. Price: $8 general; $5 55+, military, & alumni, $3 PLU & 18 and younger. Info: (253) 535-7325; www.plu.edu/ soac/events

2ND SATURDAY SOUNDS PRESENTS NIKO JOHNSON Sat., March 11, 7-9 p.m. Vino Aquino Winery, 4417 Sixth Ave. Vino Aquino Winery welcomes Niko Johnson to the stage. A transplant from Los Angeles, he’s an up and comer in the Tacoma music scene. Price: $5. Info: (253) 2725511; www.facebook.com/ events/257614911346321/

OPEN MIC NIGHT AT FORREY’S FORZA Fri., March 10, 7-9:30 p.m. Forza Coffee Company, 2209 N. Pearl St. Open Mic Night is perfect for those looking to share their talent and passion for music. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 301-3925; forzacoffeecompany.com

comic relief mixed in. Next up was a condensed version of Tacoma Little Theatre’s “Second Samuel,” a play by Pamela Parker about a post WWII Southern community in which the townsfolk have to grapple with a (to them) shocking secret about Miss Gertrude, a recently departed citizen that had played a vital role in the lives of many of the characters. The evening ended

with Cindy Lou Johnson’s riveting “Brilliant Traces” performed by Pullman Civic Theater’s Travis Gary and Kristin Lincoln. In this show, two lost souls find one another through an unlikely fate that brings them together during a blizzard in a remote cabin in Alaska. On the final night, March 4, the TMP hosts put on a rip-roaring rendition of the first act of their musical comedy “The Addams Family.” The stellar cast performed sumptuous songs and dazzling dance routines in a comedic, energetic show that was well-crafted on all counts: the sets, the costumes, the makeup and the acting of the main cast as well as the ensemble of “dead ancestors.” The night ended with Kitsap Peninsula’s group, The Changing Scene Theatre Northwest, performing “Love: You’ve Got to be kidding,” a collection of comical and absurdist skits having to do with love and romance – sometimes between sets of eyeballs or household cutlery. Kaleidoscope also included a series of workshops put on by the adjudicators and others involved in the Community Theater scene.

SOUTH SOUND WEDDING WORKSHOP Sat., March 11, 2-4 p.m. Titlow Lodge, 8425 6th Ave. The wedding workshop is an opportunity for engaged couples to learn helpful tips from premier South Sound wedding professionals. Price: Free. Info: (360) 480-5095; www.metroparkstacoma.org UNDERSTANDING YOUR MEDICARE OPTIONS Sat., March 11, 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Tacoma Public Library – Moore Branch, 215 S. 56th An overview of Medicare options presented by a licensed insurance broker, to help attendees to make informed decisions on Medicare coverage. Price: Free. Info: (253) 341-4848; www. tacomalibrary.org ARGENTINE TANGO BEGINNERS CLASS Sun., March 12, 12-1 p.m. Backstreet Tango, 3505 S. 14th St. Join this group for an Absolute Beginner Level Class. The studio was built with the sole purpose of teaching only authentic social Argentine Tango. Ages: 16 with guardian and up. Price: $10 per class, 8 classes for $40, 10 classes for $70. Info: (253) 304-8296; backstreettango.com

FILM FOCUS: FUTURISTIC – ‘TRON’ Sun., March 12, 3 p.m. Theatre on the Square, 915 Broadway The cult classic story of a computer hacker absorbed in a digital gladiatorial arena – where every move could be his last, and the stakes go far beyond pixels and computer chips. Price: $12. Info: (253) 5915894; www.broadwaycenter.org KAREEM KANDI BAND W/TRACY KNOOP Sun., March 12, 5-9 p.m. The Swiss Pub, 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. A native of the Pacific Northwest, saxophonist Kareem Kandi is a performer, composer and educator in high demand for his talents both on and off the stage. Ages: 21+ Price: Free. Info: (253) 5722821; www.theswisspub.com HISTORIC “OLD ST. PETER’S CHURCH” INVITES YOU TO WORSHIP Sun., March 12, |10-11 a.m., and 5-5:40 p.m. St. Peter’s Church, 2910 N. Starr St. Tacoma’s 1st and oldest church St. Peter’s (est. 1873) invites you to experience Holy Communion every Sunday at 10 a.m. (Sunday School). At 5 p.m. we offer Compline Services the 1st and 3rd Sundays, and Evening Prayer all others. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-4406; www.oldstpeters.org SUDSPOP: FORT GEORGE BREWERY’S DJ HOYT Mon., March 13, 6-9 p.m. Peaks and Pints, 3816 N. 26th St. Every month Peaks and Pints invites a craft brewery to create a three-hour soundtrack off our Jukebox, pour its craft beer and award prizes during zany games. Ages: 21 and older. Price: No cover. Info: (253) 328-5621; peaksandpints.com BIBLE DISCUSSION THE GOSPEL OF JOHN Mon., March 13, 1-2 p.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St. All are welcome for a discussion of the Gospel of John, led by Pastor Martin Yabroff of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church. No background required. Open discussion and

practical applications. Price: Free. Info: (253) 564-4402; www.saintandrewstacoma.org KITTREDGE GALLERY EXHIBIT Mon., March 13, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. University of Puget Sound – Kittredge Gallery, 1500 N. Warner St. Exhibit includes Isabella Gresser, visual artist, and student-curated works from the Abby Williams Hill Collection. Price: Free. Info: (253) 8793348; www.pugetsound.edu LINE DANCING Tues., March 14, 6-8 p.m. Asia Pacific Cultural Center, 4851 S.Tacoma Way Beginners and intermediates can get on the dance floor for fun and exercise in this seven-week program. Beginners meet on Tuesdays, Intermediates on Thursdays. Price: $45 for 7-week session. Info: (253) 383-3900; www.asiapacificculturalcenter.org PACIFIC GALLERY ARTISTS MARCH MEETING Tues., March 14, 7-9 p.m. Asia Pacific Cultural Center, 4851 S.Tacoma Way The program for Pacific Gallery Artists on March 14th will be sculptor LeeAnn Perry. She will give a power point presentation of her sculptures of marble, alabaster and soapstone. Price: Free. Info: (253) 383-3900; www.asiapacificculturalcenter.org RCIA PRESENTS: WHAT ARE THE SCRUTINIES? Tues., March 14, 7-8:30 p.m. St. Patrick Catholic Church, 1001 North J St. Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults: Grow in your Catholic faith, deepen your prayer life, and help build the Church that Christ is calling us to be. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 383-2783; parish.saintpats.org GRIT CITY THINK & DRINK Tues., March 14, 8 a.m. The Swiss Pub, 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. It’s time for the Grit City Think & Drink. Dr. Lauren Montgomery of UW Tacoma will talk about Becoming a Honeybee Guardian. You will learn how to plant for and keep honeybees. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 572-2821; www.theswisspub.com


Page 14 • universityplacepress.net • Friday, March 10, 2017

ENTERTAINMENT TW PICK OF THE WEEK: EXPERIEMENTAL SEATTLE QUARTET KINSKI WILL HEADLINE THE VALLEY PUB ON FRIDAY, MARCH 10, WITH SUPPORT FROM LOCAL FAVORITES RADIO ON AND OLD FOALS. MUSIC STARTS AT 8 P.M; WWW.THEVALLEYTACOMA.COM.

DANCE THEATRE NORTHWEST PRESENTS ‘ILLUMINATIONS’ Performance incorporates music and dance in response to exhibitions and collections of glass art at the Tacoma Glass Museum.

PHOTO BY LORD FOTOG

FRIDAY, MARCH 10

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: Jazz and blues open mic, 5 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rain City Rock Camp, Kim Archer (rock, blues, singer-songwriter) 7 p.m., NC MARINE VIEW CHURCH: Eugenie Jones (jazz) 5 p.m., NC REAL ART TACOMA: Not Til Tomorrow, Closer to Clouds, The Melting Point, Gutterpup, Greater Space, Desidia (punk, alternative) 6 p.m., $7, AA THE SPAR: Gin Creek (blues) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Kareem Kandi Band with David Marriott (jazz) 5 p.m., NC

THE SWISS: Trick Candles, Item, Asterhouse, Pyramids (rock, alternative) 9 p.m., $8 COLLECTIVE VISIONS: Pearl Django (gypsy jazz) 7 p.m., G. DONNALSON’S: Good Vibes Trio (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: The Phoenix (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: The Rusty Cleavers with Shivering Denizens and Bolo (bluegrass, country) 8 p.m., $7 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Second Sting, Fan Halen (Scorpions, Van Halen tribute) 8 p.m., $10, AA MARKEE (OLD TOWN): North End Mafia (rock covers) 7 p.m., NC, AA PANTAGES: Manhattan Transfer with Take 6 (vocal) 7:30 p.m., $39-$110, AA REAL ART TACOMA: Wrvth/Name, Witch Ripper (metal) 8 p.m., $9, AA STONEGATE: Led Zeppmen (Led Zeppelin tribute) 9 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Jose Bolanos (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $20-$26, 18+ early show UNCLE SAM’S: Headfirst (southern rock) 8 p.m. THE VALLEY: Kinski with Radio On and Old Foals (post-rock, alternative, garage-rock) 8 p.m.

MONDAY, MARCH 13

G. DONNALSON’S: Jazz and blues open mic, 5 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke (live band karaoke) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Chuck Gay (open mic) 7 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Heather Jones and the Groove Masters (R&B, soul, funk) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: “Guitar Going Monday,” 7 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: Michael Langdon (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, MARCH 14

JAZZBONES: Tigerhawk, Burn Burn Burn!, Tom Tuttle (punk, alternative) 9 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, MARCH 11

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Billy Stoops (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA METRONOME: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., NC, AA NORTHERN PACIFIC: Stingy Brim Slim (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lefferty (open mic) 8 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY: “New Talent Tuesday” (comedy) 8 p.m., NC, 18+

JAZZBONES: Hell’s Belles (AC/DC tribute) 8 p.m., $15-$20 B SHARP COFFEE: The Tonic Blues with Joel Astley (blues) 8 p.m., $7, AA DOYLE’S: D’Vonne Lewis’ Limited Edition (jazz) 9:30 p.m., NC EMERALD QUEEN: Blue Oyster Cult (classic rock) 8 p.m., $25-$35 G. DONNALSON’S: Good Vibes Trio (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: The Phoenix (dance) 9 p.m., NC KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Lust Punch, Van Eps, DedSet, LocoMotive (rock) 6 p.m., $10, AA MARKEE (OLD TOWN): The Minstrel & His Lady (folk, rock covers) 7 p.m., NC, AA METRONOME: Dylan O’Toole and Arran Fagan and Co. (folk) 7 p.m., NC, AA REAL ART TACOMA: The Bomb Shelter, Newbrighton, Counter/Balance, Of Sleep, Tidelines (indie-rock, alternative) 7:30 p.m., $7, AA RIALTO: Northwest Sinfonietta presents “Havana Heat II” with Aldo López-Gavilán (classical, jazz) 7:30 p.m., $20-$50, AA THE SPAR: Ain’t No Seven Heaven (jazz) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: The Spazmatics (‘80s covers) 9 p.m., $10 TACOMA COMEDY: Jose Bolanos (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $20-$26, 18+ early show TACOMA DOME: “Lucky 2017” with Knife Party, Nicky Romero and more (DJ, EDM) $86-$132 UNCLE SAM’S: Headfirst (southern rock) 8 p.m. THE VALLEY: Trees and Timber, Patrick Galactic, The Variety Hour (power-pop, alternative) 9 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15

REAL ART TACOMA: Deathbed Confessions, Mercy Brown, Redeem the Exile, Ergo I Exist (metal, rock) 7:30 p.m., $7, AA DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Motamouth Jones, Serious Mak, NYQE Unorthodox, Scott Elkins (hip-hop) 8 p.m., $5 NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 8 p.m., NC NORTHERN PACIFIC: Open mic, 7:30 p.m., NC, AA TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+

THURSDAY, MARCH 16

TACOMA COMEDY: Pablo Francisco (comedy) 7:30 p.m., $15-$22, 18+ B SHARP COFFEE: Keith Henson Octet (jazz) 8 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: John Maxwell (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: DJ Sessions (DJ dance) 10 p.m., $5 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC PANTAGES: “Soul Revue: The ‘70s Edition” featuring Kim Archer, Lady A, Sotario Gibson and more (soul, R&B, funk) 7:30 p.m., $30-$70, AA TACOMA ELKS: Casanova (dance) 6:30 p.m., $6-$10

SUNDAY, MARCH 12

TACOMA COMEDY: “The Roast of Susan ‘Cupcake’ Jones” (comedy) 8 p.m., $10-$16, 18+

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

PIERCE COUNTY COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER GROUP SEEKING A

SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHER PCCNG, Pierce County’s community news leader, is seeking a Sports Photographer with a great eye for capturing live game action at games, practices and events in Pierce County. Experienced photographers preferred. REQUIREMENTS: 1-2 years experience taking sports photos. Must have professional equipment, reliable transportation and ability to travel to sports event locations. The ideal candidate is a self motivated, outgoing individual with a positive attitude. They should be able to work evenings and weekends, be willing to work outdoors in various weather conditions, and be able to stand, bend, kneel for prolonged periods of time. Please send your resume and photography examples to jgimse@tacomaweekly.com.

MILTON • EDGEWOOD

PHOTO BY KATY LEVESQUE

SUBMERGE. Dance Theatre Northwest will perform in conjunction with the

"Into The Deep" exhibit that is on view at the Museum of Glass. The performance takes place March 11 at 1 p.m.

For more than a decade, Dance Theatre Northwest has been presenting lecture demonstrations incorporating music and dance in response to exhibitions and collections of glass art at the Tacoma Museum of Glass. “Illumination” is an original series of “art inspired” dances created by DTNW’s Artistic Director Melanie KirkStauffer. And, it is coming up on Saturday, March 11, 1 p.m. One of the themes shaping the performance is the relationships between sea life and the world under the sea. Originating from the Museum’s “Into The Deep” exhibit are “The Reef,” “Jewels of the Sea” and “Sea Anemones.” Australian born artist James Minson created the correlating glass pieces, “The Reef,” in 2007, and “Anemones,” in 2005. Featuring Katie Neumann, Philandra Eargle, and Oceana Thunder, the choreographies range from Debussy and ballet to contemporary Miami jazz style dance and music. The other ballet “Jewels of the Sea,” features DTNW’s Junior dance ensemble with Oceana Thunder, Philandra Eargle and Madeline Ewer. For this ballet, KirkStauffer has chosen the complexity of Bach’s Violin Concerto #2 to express her observations and responses to “Luscious Symbiosis” by Marsh Blaker-DeSomma (American Born, 1951). The expressive part has always come easily to Kirk Stauffer who loves this type of commission. “Being surrounded by beautiful things which includes art not only enriches daily life but continuously inspires me to create fun and fanciful dance choreography. Most recently, I have been exploring the rippling effect of creativity, its powerful effect on the universe and how it translates into my life’s work,” said Kirk Stauffer. “It’s amazing to look back on my collection of pieces inspired by other artists. In fact, since music adds to the exhilaration of creating and helps to give clarity to the shape of my dance pieces, you could say that all of my designs are art inspired.” However, the drive to explore the work of other artists “is constantly being fed by the exhilarating high I get from the expe-

rience of invention. Time almost stops when working with the dancers to refine the ideas into movement and the development of each piece provides inestimable pleasure.” Typical of most choreographers, KirkStauffer has specific visions for the costumes and has a hand in costuming as well as every other aspect of the show. June Davies, Jan Sandger and Katy Levesque have also done a lot of the work with new costume construction. Glamorous costuming is always a part of DTNW’s shows. Every piece being performed this Saturday is brand new except “Habanera.” An audience favorite but with a slightly newer cast, the ballet is inspired by the work of Dominick Labino, an internationally known scientist, inventor, glass artist and master glass craftsman. Labino’s art works in glass are in the permanent collections of more than 100 museums throughout the world. In response, DTNW trumpets a short, many layered contemporary ballet. Also on the line-up are three succinct pieces inspired by the “Art Deco” collection recently provided to the Museum by David Huchthausen. Two of the dances are jazzy while the other has a Latin flair. Music by George Gershwin and an unknown Latin classical composer complement the movement and the associated art. Both company members and guests perform in the pieces. Saturday, March 11 at 1 p.m. is the only performance. It will take place at Museum of Glass, 1801 Dock St. in Tacoma Free with Museum Admission, each performance is presented as a lecture demonstration. Melanie Kirk-Stauffer will be sharing her ideas, discussing each piece being performed, and providing an inside look at the process. Dance Theatre Northwest is a 501-c-3 non-profit organization is committed to making dance as an important art form accessible to individuals and groups and to assisting future dancers and artists. For more information, visit www.DTNW.org or call (253) 778-6534.


Friday, March 10, 2017 sUNIVERSITYPLACEPRESSNETsPAGE 15

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NOTICES

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Auction Notice

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Fife Towing, Fife Recovery Service & NW Towing, at 1313 34th Ave E, Fife on 3/14/2017. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130 at 09:00 a.m. Viewing of cars from 08:00-09:00 a.m. Registered Tow Numbers 5009, 5421, 5588. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

Abandoned Vehicle Lakewood Towing Inc. #5002 9393 Lakeview Ave SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 Ph. 253-582-5080 Auction 03232017 Date 03/23/2017 View @ 11 am Auction Starts @ 2 pm In accordance with RCW 46.55.130 Lakewood Towing Inc. will sell to the highest bidder. See complete listing @ lakewoodtowing.com or posting at our office TO: Kenneth Nugent

Case Name: B.J.

Case Name: N., Q.S

Case Number: PUY-G-JV-2017-0003

Case Number: PUY-G-JV-2016-0047

Nature of Case: Guardianship of a Minor Child

Nature of Case: Guardianship of a Minor Child

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF HEARING

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF HEARING

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a petition has been filed asking the Court to appointed the above named Petitioner(s) to be the guardian(s) for B.J., a minor child under PTC 7.12 (Guardianship of Minors Code).

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a petition has been filed asking the Court to appointed the above named Petitioner(s) to be the guardian(s) for N., Q.S, a minor child under PTC 7.12 (Guardianship of Minors Code).

YOU ARE SUMMONED to appear at a guardianship hearing in this Court on the Puyallup Indian Reservation at:

YOU ARE SUMMONED to appear at a guardianship hearing in this Court on the Puyallup Indian Reservation at:

DAY: Monday DATE: March 6th, 2017 TIME: 2:00 PM LOCATION: 1451 EAST 31 st ST., TACOMA, WA 98404

DAY: Monday DATE: April 3rd, 2017 TIME: 10:00 AM LOCATION: 1451 EAST 31 st ST., TACOMA, WA 98404

The guardianship hearing is private and closed. Only those persons the Court finds to have a legitimate interest in the proceedings may attend. The Court will hear testimony to determine whether guardianship is in the best interest of the child and the Tribal community. The Court will consider all guardianship reports submitted for review. All parties shall be given the opportunity to contest the factual contents and conclusions of the guardianship reports.

The guardianship hearing is private and closed. Only those persons the Court finds to have a legitimate interest in the proceedings may attend. The Court will hear testimony to determine whether guardianship is in the best interest of the child and the Tribal community. The Court will consider all guardianship reports submitted for review. All parties shall be given the opportunity to contest the factual contents and conclusions of the guardianship reports.

Any party may file recommendations regarding the guardianship with the Court at least 10 calendar days before the hearing.

Any party may file recommendations regarding the guardianship with the Court at least 10 calendar days before the hearing.

You also have the following rights before the Court:

You also have the following rights before the Court:

1. The right to be present before the Court; 2. The right to present written and oral testimony; 3. The right to subpoena witnesses; 4. The right to submit relevant evidence to the Court for consideration; 5. The right to counsel at your own expense and effort; the Court has a list of attorneys who are admitted to practice before the Puyallup Tribe; and 6. The right to appeal a final decision in this matter.

1. The right to be present before the Court; 2. The right to present written and oral testimony; 3. The right to subpoena witnesses; 4. The right to submit relevant evidence to the Court for consideration; 5. The right to counsel at your own expense and effort; the Court has a list of attorneys who are admitted to practice before the Puyallup Tribe; and 6. The right to appeal a final decision in this matter.

If you do not appear at the hearing or file a written response to the petition within 20 days from the date of this notice, the Court may enter an order in your absence.

If you do not appear at the hearing or file a written response to the petition within 20 days from the date of this notice, the Court may enter an order in your absence.

NOTICE PURSUANT DEFAULT JUDGMENT

NOTICE PURSUANT DEFAULT JUDGMENT

PTC

4.08.250-

TO

PTC

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF PIERCE NO: 17-2-05189-1 SUMMONS BY PUBLUCATION Ronald L. Moore and Claudia J. Moore, Husband and wife, Plaintiffs, Vs. NETWORKING FUNDING CORPORATION, a California Corporation and any person or entity claiming by, through or under them, in any capacity, regarding the property which is the subject of this suit.

4.08.250-

WHEN A PARTY AGAINST WHOM A JUDGMENT IS SOUGHT FAILS TO APPEAR, PLEAD, OR OTHERWISE DEFEND WITHIN THE TIME ALLOWED, AND THAT IS SHOWN TO THE COURT BY A MOTION AND AFFIDAVIT OR TESTIMONY, THE COURT MAY ENTER AN ORDER OF DEFAULT AND, WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE TO THE PARTY IN DEFAULT, ENTER A JUDGMENT GRANTING THE RELIEF SOUGHT IN THE COMPLAINT.

WHEN A PARTY AGAINST WHOM A JUDGMENT IS SOUGHT FAILS TO APPEAR, PLEAD, OR OTHERWISE DEFEND WITHIN THE TIME ALLOWED, AND THAT IS SHOWN TO THE COURT BY A MOTION AND AFFIDAVIT OR TESTIMONY, THE COURT MAY ENTER AN ORDER OF DEFAULT AND, WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE TO THE PARTY IN DEFAULT, ENTER A JUDGMENT GRANTING THE RELIEF SOUGHT IN THE COMPLAINT.

Copies of the Petition and this Summons are available at the Court Clerk ‘s Office located at 1451 E. 31st St., Tacoma, WA 98404.

Copies of the Petition and this Summons are available at the Court Clerk ‘s Office located at 1451 E. 31st St., Tacoma, WA 98404.

If you have any questions, please contact the Court Clerk ‘s Office at (253) 680-5585.

If you have any questions, please contact the Court Clerk ‘s Office at (253) 680-5585.

Join us in the new year for trainings scheduled in January and March. Log onto www.chifranciscan. org and click “hospice and palliative care” in the “our services” tab to learn more. Or call James Bentley at 253-538-4649

Defendants.

You are herby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit: within sixty days after the 10th day of February, 2017, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled court, and answer the complaint of the plaintiffs, Ronald and Claudia Moore, and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorney for plaintiff, Donald N. Powell,, at his office below stated; and in case of your failure to do , judgment will rendered against your according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The object of the lawsuit is to quiet title to the property in and with Plaintiffs and to declare the lien created by the deed of trust in favor of the named defendant, NETWORK FUNDING CORPORATION, a California Corporation, is void and of no effect, having fully paid and satisfied more than ten years ago. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that you written response, if any, may be served on time. This summons is issued pursuant to Revise Code of Washington Chapters 7.28 and 4.28 and pursuant to a Court order authorizing service by publication. Dated this 6th day of February, 2017. DONALD N POWELL. WSBA #12055 Attorney for Plaintiffs Ronald and Claudia Moore

There are about 2,000 homeless in Tacoma and about 1.000 beds. Many are families with children. Please help #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA to provide some basic necessities. All items donated will go directly to people on the street. PROJECT FEED TACOMA is 100% volunteer. This is a true grass roots organization and they really need your help. For more information and to find more go to www.projectfeedtacoma.org. Can you help with some urgent needs as winter approaches? Here are some suggestions and a huge THANK YOU! Needed: Warm Socks for Men, Women and Children; Warm Hats; Gloves; Peanut Butter and Jam/Jelly; Crackers, Chips and non-perishable snacks; Individually wrapped granola bars or protein bars; cookies; lotion; lip balm; tampons and sanitary napkins; wipes; soap, shampoo and conditioner; gallon sized freezer bags. A BIG THANKS TO THE COPPER DOOR FOR ALLOWING PROJECT FEED TACOMA TO COLLECT DONATIONS THERE.

City of Fife Needs You!

Read Across America Day Communities in Schools of Tacoma is working with both Graduate Tacoma and the Rotary Club’s to organize and recruit volunteer guest readers for Read Across America Day, to encourage students to pick up a book and read. And this year marks the eighteenth annual celebration of reading and Dr. Seuss’s birthday! As we gear up for Read Across America Day, we would like to ask fellow community members to put aside the many hats they wear for work and read to children on March 2, 2017. If you are interest-

Volunteer meals on Wheels Driver Seeking a volunteer Meals on Wheels Driver. Delivers frozen meals once a week in the Pierce County area, mileage reimbursement. Must have a clean background check, WA driver’s license, car insurance and food handlers card. Call front desk for more info: 253272-8433 Great Volunteer Opportunity Make friends, have fun and help seniors with simple tasks. You’ll make a big difference by helping people maintain their independence. This is volunteering, not caregiving. Volunteers must be 55 or older, low income, serve 15 hrs/wk and live in Pierce or Kitsap Counties. Drivers are especially needed. Benefits include hourly tax-free stipend and mileage reimbursement. For information call Julie at Lutheran Community Services, Senior Companion Volunteer Program, (253)722-5686.

Help hard-working families by volunteering with VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance)! Provide free income tax preparation to low and moderate income households. Locations throughout

PETS

VOLUNTEERS We are looking for passionate applicants for open positions on our volunteer Boards and Commissions. Openings are on the Arts Commission, Parks Board, Tree Board and Youth Commission. Applications are accepted year round, but first review will be 3/24/17. Online Application: www.cityoffife.org/ getinvolved

Pierce County. Day, evening and weekend hours available (February to April 2017). Volunteers can serve as tax preparers, quality reviewers, greeters, or interpreters (for non-English speaking or hearing-impaired tax payers). Free training provided. Learn more and apply online at www.VolunteerTaxHelp.org.

#PROJECTFEEDTACOMA

THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO : NETWORK FUNDING CORPORATION, a California Corporation and any person or entity claiming by, through or under them, in any capacity, regarding the property which is the subject of this suit.

TO: Christina Burwell

TO

VOLUNTEERS

Pet of the Week

ed in reading to children on March 2nd, please contact Valerie Sweisthal, Communities In Schools of Tacoma-Early Childhood Outreach Coordinator for more information 253571-4989 or vsweist@ tacoma.k12.wa.us or visit http://tacoma.ciswa.org/ news/join-communities-inschools-of-tacoma-andgraduate-tacoma-for-readacross-america-day/ to find out what schools are participating. I look forward to working with you to motivate our children to read on March 2 and every day. NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE, TWEET LESS CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care has some great ways for you to serve the community and make meaningful connections. Those near the end of life need help with living. If you have 1-4 hours a week to read to someone, listen to their stories, run errands, make phone calls, or welcome people to our hospice facility, then we have several opportunities for you.

BRODY Featured Pet Brody may look tough on the outside — slightly rough around the edges with a twinkle in his eye — but when cheek rubs come into play, he’s one big softy. The three-year-old has tested positive for the eline Immunodeficiency Virus IV think kitty AIDS . Some cats live a normal life and never develop any complications, while other felines can go on to develop infections or other medical conditions. Given his status, Brody must be kept inside and ideally would be the only cat in the household, which is just fine with him. e’d love nothing more than to perch and look out at his kingdom, content as sole observer. What’s more, the Domestic Shorthair’s adoption fee has been completely waived thanks to a generous donor. So definitely check out this cool cat today A514 89.

www.thehumanesociety.org

Call us today to place your classified ad! 253-922-5317 or fill out this form and mail with payment to:

Name: _______________________________ Address: _____________________________

Tacoma Weekly 304 Puyallup Ave., #1 Tacoma WA 98421

Category: Ad Copy Here:

_____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________

______________________________________ Phone:_______________________________

Deadline: Tuesday by 12 noon for Thursday publication

.

30 Words and Under: _____________________ Extra words @ .05: ________________________ Sub Total: _______________________________ x Number of Weeks = _____________________ Total Amount: __________________________

Cash Check Money Order Visa/Mastercard

Exp.

Card #

Cost: $15 for 30 words for one week. 5¢ per each additional word. Deadline: Tuesday, 12 noon for Thursday publications. Payment: Required on all classified ads at time of placement. We accept cash, check, money order or Visa/Mastercard. Bring payment to Tacoma Weekly at 304 Puyallup Ave. Tacoma. Email: advertising@tacomaweekly.com

3 0 4 P u y a l l u p Av e . , Ta c o m a • 2 5 3 - 9 2 2 - 5 3 1 7 TA C O M A W E E K LY

FIFE FREE PRESS

M I LTO N - E D G E W O O D S I G N A L

w w w. t a c o m a w e e k l y. c o m

UNIVERSITY PLACE PRESS


Friday, March 10, 2017 sUNIVERSITYPLACEPRESSNETsPAGE 17

Classifieds REALTORS

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REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

CALL 253.922.5317

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

SERGIO HERNANDEZ

HOME BUYER EDUCATION CLASSES

Serving the Community Since 1991

WA State Housing Finance Commission Loan Programs

Better Properties University Place/Fircrest (253) 431-2308 Sergio@betterproperties.com

Home Buyer Course Topics t %PXO1BZNFOU"TTJTUBODF1SPHSBNT‰ BOEIPXUPHFUZPVSTIBSF t (FUUJOHRVBMJmFEBOEBQQSPWFEGPSBMPBO t $IPPTJOHUIFSJHIUMPBOUZQFGPSZPV t 6OEFSTUBOEJOHDSFEJUTDPSFTBOEIPXUPVTF DSFEJUJOXBZTUPJNQSPWFZPVSTDPSF t -FBSOUIF)PXBOE8IZPGXPSLJOHXJUIB SFBMUPS UIFIPNFQVSDIBTJOHQSPDFTTBOE IPXUPNBLFBOPGGFS

LEARN ABOUT THE...

CLASSES ARE FREE!

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CALL FOR DATES AND MORE INFORMATION

%0/05/&&%50#&'*3455*.&)0.&#6:&3 )064&)0-%45)"5&"3/6150 1&3:3 64&8*5)')" 7" $0/7-0"/4 (Loan Specific Criteria applies)

CLASSES HELD REGULARLY

Down Payment Assistance

Call Amy for information:

0% INTEREST/%.035("(& NO MONTHLY PAYMENT!

206-715-1847

(Deferred for 30 yrs. or if you sell or refinance house)

61500'5)&45.035("(&".06/5 64&'03%08/1":.&/503$-04*/($0454

REFRESHMENTS PROVIDED

Top Producing Broker 2008-2015 Voted “Five Star Professional� by Clients

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

WANTED

$625 $1250

UNIV. PLACE TACOMA DUPLEX 2208 GRANDVIEW DR. W 4109 S M ST #A&B

$1450 $1075

3 BED 2 BATH 1742 SF. WEL1BED BATHGREAT 450 SF. 2 BEDCLEAN, 1 BATH11025SF. CENTRAL 2 BED 1.5BATH 840SF.3 BRAND CONCOME TO THIS BED 2NEW BATH COZY APARTLOCATION CHARMINGWITH 2 BED/1 STRUCTION DUPLEX UPPER AND LOWER U.P. HOME, W/HARDWOOD MENT IN INTHIS TACOMA, BATH DUPLEX IN THETO NORTH END. LEVEL UNITSON OFFTHE OF 38TH M ST. FLOORS MAINAND LEVEL. EASY ACCESS WA-16.

DUPONT HOME DUPONT

PUYALLUP TACOMA DUPLEX

2367 MCDONALD 2205 BOBS HOLLOWAVE LN

9007 AQUEDUCT 115TH ST. DR. E 11515

BED 2.5 SF. 2 STORY W/ 33 BED 1 BATH BATH2274 1040SF. DESIR3 SPACIOUS BEDROOMS, UPSTAIRS ABLE 3 BED/1 BATH RAMBLER OPEN LOFT, AND LANDING NESTLED AWAY IN THE AREA HEART PERFECTOF FOR A WORK STATION. DUPONT.

2 BED 2.51BATH SF. REMOD2 BED BATH1157 920SF. CUTE ELED TOWNHOUSE W/ 2DUPLEX BEDS 2+ BEDROOM, 1 BATH & 1.5 BATH.NEAR NEWER FLOORING, LOCATED GOLDEN GIVEN APPLIANCES, NEWER PAINT. AND 112TH

$695 $950

$1425 $2100

$1395 $1850

WANTED

SIGNAL MAN LOOKING TO RENT A ROOM IF YOU HAVE ONE AVAILABLE. PLEASE CALL 253-651-0083

CONDOS & HOMES APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES TACOMA N.TACOMA DUPLEX 3228 AVE. 1401SNUNION VILLARD ST

www.stephanielynch.com

$950 $1150

TACOMA TACOMA HOME TACOMA TRIPLEX N.SPANAWAY 14406S PACIFIC S 5121 ST. CT. 4716 WARNERAVE ST #B 4621203RD N MULLEN STE

3 BED 2.5 BATH 1680 SF. 1 BED, 1 BATH 575 SF.CENTRALGREAT 2 BED, 1 BATH 730SF. 3MUST BED 2 BATH 1773SF. MUST VIEW SEE!! FANTASTIC 2 VALUE IN THIS NICE 1 BEDLY ROOM LOCATED 2 BEDROOM 1 BATH PROPERTY. AND INTRIGUING STORYIMMACULATE HOME, 3 BEDROOM UPPER UNIT AVAILABLE TRIPLEX IN SOUTH TACOMA REMODELED BEDROOM / 2 BATHROOM 2.5 BATH3ON A CORNER LOT. IN THE PACIFIC OAKS APTS.

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200

View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

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Certified Arborist PN-7495A

Call us today to place your classified ad! 253-922-5317 or fill out this form and mail with payment to: Tacoma Weekly

Name: Address: Phone:

$15.00 30 Words and Under: ______________ Extra words @ .05: _________________ Check

Visa/Mastercard Card #

$619,950

$289,000

Beautiful turn of the century Spectacular views of Narrows passage and both Narrows bridges as well as the Gig Harbor and Fox Island. From the kitchen to the master bedroom, these amazing views/sunsets can be enjoyed. Especially from the newer Trex deck. There has been only 1 owner who has taken emaculate care of this custom built home. This home boasts of not 1 but 2 fireplaces that have never been used and incredible storage. All appliances included in this must see home!

Beautiful turn of the century home, located central to all services. Remodeled 2 stories w/ basement detached oversized 2 car garage, fully fenced, hot tub, nicely landscaped. Interior Floor plan features open concept living w/ spacious formal living & dining, enticing Kitchen w/Quartz counter tops, Shaker cabinets, Farm sink, Stainless Steel appliances, Pantry & Island. Evening brings 4 bedrooms 2 tastefully tiled bathrooms one adjoining. Partially finished laundry area in basement for games & hobbies.

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

FOR SALE!! 4008 S. Pine, Tacoma

$595,000

Good Investment Property, FULLY LEASED , completely remodeled commercial office building, 3350 sq ft, .25 acre commercial lot, owner occupied, 10 offices, 3 bathrooms, Spacious conference room, 2 full Kitchen reception area, 2 parking lots front and rear. Centrally located to all services. 7.5 Cap Rate.

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

BUSINESSES OPPORTUNITIES COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS FOR SALE/LEASE

UNIVERSITY PLACE-COMMERCIAL ZONED, 27th & Bridgeport Way, Former CPA Office - Real Estate Included, $225,000, Now Vacant. temporary off the market EATING ESTABLISHMENT WITH BEER & WINE - Same Owners last 9 years, great location, Business price $285,000, terms avail.

g 6 SUITES, OFFICE BUILDING WITH n iideal for Attorneys or Close to Wright’s Park, d nAsking Price $519,000, Terms. Professional use. e P available for Lease. Suites are also

price reduction

LONGTIME ESTABLISHED POPULAR RESTR./LOUNGE ON 6TH AVE. Business for sale. $149,000 $110,000 OR LEASE the space, 3,300 SQ. FT. for $4,000 Month. SAME OWNER: BARTENDING ACADEMY OF TACOMA, Since 1959, Very profitable, Training provided.

304 Puyallup Ave.,#1 Tacoma WA 98421

Ad Copy Here:

Cash

FOR SALE FOR SALE 6726 N Parkview LN, Tacoma 1660 S 55th ST, Tacoma

Money Order Exp.

Sub Total: ________________________ x Number of Weeks = ______________

Total Amount: _______________

Cost: $15 for 30 words for one week. 5¢ per each additional word. Deadline: Tuesday, 12 noon for Thursday publications. Payment: Required on all classified ads at time of placement. We accept cash, check, money order or Visa/Mastercard. Mail or bring payment to Tacoma Weekly at 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma. Email: advertising@tacomaweekly.com

w w w. t a c o m a w e e k l y. c o m

RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109


PAGE 18suniversityplacepress.netsFriday, March 10, 2017

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March 11, 8pm

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I-5 Showroom $25, $35, $55, $60

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April 14, 8:30pm

April 22, 7pm

May 6, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $40, $60, $90, $95

I-5 Showroom $35, $55, $100

I-5 Showroom $30, $45, $65, $70

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