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University Place Press .net S E RV I N G U N I V E R S I T Y P L AC E A N D S U R R O U N D I N G CO M M U N I T I E S

A LOOK BACK AT 2016

MAYOR FIGUEROA PRESENTS HIS REPORT TO CITY COUNCIL

A

t the Jan. 3, 2017 meeting of the City of University Place City Council, Mayor Javier Figueroa presented his report on the Council’s activities during 2016. He pointed out that it had been a busy and eventful year, with a total of 17 ordinances and 25 resolutions being passed by the Council. Among the Council’s notable legislative actions during the year were:

RES. 808: Passed in April, this approved

the Town Center Lot 4 Development Agreement which will bring an

additional mixed-use building offering retail and professional space on the north side of Market Square in the Village at Chambers Bay.

RES. 814: Passed in August, the USGA Interlocal Agreement for Chambers Bay provides opportunities for the City of University Place and its neighboring municipalities and Pierce County to collaborate on future tournaments and events at the golf course.

ORD. 674: Passed in September, this

u See LOOK BACK / page 10

CURRAN APPLE ORCHARD ANNOUNCES PRUNING PARTIES

WORTHINGTON TAPS INTO CAREER FOR COUNCIL SERVICE By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@universityplacepress.net

Steve Worthington ran for University Place City Council in 2014 as a way to extend his municipal government career into semi retirement after more than 25 years in local government, including a stint as the city manager of Fife and as an Economic Development Board Tacoma/ Pierce County trustee. “For me, I serve on council because it allows me to use some of the skills and experiences from being a city manager in a new way,” he said. “It allows me to continue in public service but at a scale that can include other activities. Being a city manager is totally consuming of your time and attention.” His time in Fife in the early 2000s saw much of the same budget cuts seen in University Place, as state initiatives changed

u See WORTHINGTON / page 12

UNIVERSITY PLACE VOLUNTEER FAIR

Start the New Year with fun activities, meeting new friends and helping YOUR community Stop by and visit the University Place Volunteer Fair on Thursday, Jan. 19, from 3-7:30 p.m. in the UP Civic/Library Building Atrium located at 3609 Market Place (36th and Bridgeport) in University Place. Representatives from various U.P. community groups will be on hand to provide information about ongoing and one-time volunteer opportunities throughout the year. People are needed to help with clerical tasks, outdoor clean up efforts, computer work, event set up, grant writing and much, much more. This is a great way to connect with your community and make a difference. Many opportunities are also available for people seeking community service hours. U.P. volunteer groups interested in participating can register online at www.upforarts.org.

upcoming free Pruning Parties at the Curran Orchard located at 3920 Grandview Dr. W on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on these dates: Feb. 4 and 18; March 4 and 18; April 1 and 22. Wear old clothes and bring loppers, hand pruners and saws if available. Help is also needed hauling branches to the dumpsters. Great for community service hours too! Refreshments provided. For more information, visit www.curranappleorchard.com or email apples@ curranappleorchard.com.

Now that the playoffs are on the way, the Seahawks could very well be headed to the Super Bowl again. It’s important now more than ever to support the team! The University Place Press is getting in the game with a photo contest for all 12s to show their Seahawks pride. Send in a photo of yourself, your best friend, your family or even your pets showing unabashed Seahawks spirit. We will collect photos until Jan. 16 and post the images on our Facebook page and print them in the Jan. 23 issue of the University Place Press. Votes will be tallied on Feb. 6. The winner will be announced in the Feb. 10 issue. Once chosen, the winner will be celebrated at an upcoming U.P. City Council meeting. Send your photo (limit one per person) to stevedunkel@ universityplacepress.net, and don’t forget to vote once the photos have been posted on our Facebook page.

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Learn a new skill and help take care of a unique orchard park in University Place. Come and take part in a free night pruning class taught by master gardener/arborist Robert Sweet on Thursday, Jan. 26 from 7-9 p.m. at the United Church in University Place, located at 3912 Grandview Dr. W. Participants in this class, sponsored by Curran Orchard Resource Enthusiasts (CORE), will get an overview of proper pruning techniques for apple trees. Interested people can then practice their skills at the

SHOW US YOUR SEAHAWKS SPIRIT!

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CITY OF UNIVERSITY PLACE


Page 2 • universityplacepress.net • Friday, January 13, 2017

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University Place Press S E RV I N G U N I V E R S I T Y P L AC E A N D S U R R O U N D I N G CO M M U N I T I E S

Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC 2588 Pacific Highway E., Fife, WA 98424 (253) 922-5317 • FAX: (253) 922-5305 Publisher: John Weymer / jweymer@universityplacepress.net News Desk: news@universityplacepress.net Managing Editor: Matt Nagle / matt@universityplacepress.net Staff Writers: Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@universityplacepress.net Derek Shuck / derek@universityplacepress.net Larry LaRue / larry@universityplacepress.net

SEARCH ON FOR ACCUSED CHILD RAPIST GILBERT GREENWOOD By David Rose Washington’s Most Wanted - Q13 Fox

Pierce County Sheriff's deputies are searching for Gilbert M. Greenwood. The 51-year-old is charged with four counts of rape of a child in the first DAVID ROSE degree (aggravated) and one count of child molestation in the 1st degree (aggravated). He was arrested on May 17, 2013 and was out on bail when his trial was scheduled for Sept. 15, 2014. He failed to appear in court and a warrant was issued for his arrest. "At the time, we were told he had left the country. We now believe he is somewhere on the Olympic Pen-

insula and so we are asking for the public's help to find him" said Det. Ed Troyer. According to the charging documents, Greenwood allegedly showed a 4-5-year-old girl videos of men and women having "really rough" sex before raping her. Prosecutors say the sexual abuse continued for years. Greenwood is 6-feet, 4-inches tall, 265 pounds with black hair and brown eyes. If you can tell deputies where to find him, Crime Stoppers will pay you a cash reward of up to $1,000 for any information that leads to his arrest. Call the hot line at 1 (800) 222-TIPS (8477). This is one of the Pierce County fugitives being featured Friday night on “Washington's Most Wanted” at 11 p.m. on Q13 FOX.

Police Blotter WEST PIERCE FIRE AND RESCUE West Pierce Fire and Rescue will be offering training for its Community Emergency Response Team. This emergency preparedness course is a way for people to learn how to help people become prepared to help others until 911 response can arrive. The program is funded by a $4,200 grant from the Puget Sound Energy Foundation, which funded the purchase of CERT backpacks and other preparedness supplies. Registration is free. The course runs Feb. 27 to March 18. Visit www.westpierce.org/ cert for more information or to register.

Entertainment Editor: Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@universityplacepress.net Sports Editor: Justin Gimse/ jgimse@universityplacepress.net Pagination: Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar Web Developer: Ed Curran Photographers: Rocky Ross, Bill Bungard, Richard Trask, David Turnipseed Contributing Writers: Dave Davison, Chance Pittenger Copy Editing: Garrett Westcott Cartoonists: Chris Britt, Milt Priggee Advertising: Rose Theile / rose@universityplacepress.net Marlene Carrillo / marlene@universityplacepress.net Andrea Jay / andrea@universityplacepress.net PHOTOS COURTESY OF WEST PIERCE FIRE AND RESCUE

University Place Press is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@universityplacepress.net.

Firefighters and medics held ice rescue training to take advantage of the timely weather. People are reminded to stay off the ice and keep pets away from frozen waterways as well.

ARMED ROBBERY Pierce County Sheriff’s detectives need your help to identify the suspect responsible for an armed robbery of a convenience store. At 6:40 p.m. on Thursday, November 17th, 2016, the pictured suspect robbed the Handy Corner Grocery store located on 112th St. S. in Parkland. The suspect walked into the store and pulled a ski mask over his face, then displayed a handgun and demanded cash. The suspect took the money and fled the store. The suspect is described as build, dark brown hair, a goatee/ blue jeans, a white t-shirt, a blacka hispanic male in his 20’s, ap- mustache, and sideburns. During zippered sweatshirt with a gray proximately 5’11”, with a medium the robbery he was seen wearing hood, and a black ski mask. Fridays at 10:30pm on

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Receive up to for information leading to the arrest and charges filed for the person(s) in this case.

Call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) All Callers will remain anonymous

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6824 19th Street W #139 • University Place WA 98466


Friday, January 13, 2017 • universityplacepress.net • Page 3

CONNIE’S COUNCIL CORNER

HOW MUCH IS A LIFE WORTH? By Connie Ladenburg

Winter is here. Temperatures in the 20’s and 30’s. Brrrr. I often think about how lucky I am that I was given opportunities to have a loving home while growing up, had a good education, have had LADENBURG good jobs, and have a great husband and family. And have good health, both mental and physical. And on these cold nights, I am thankful for the warmth of hearth and home, which not everyone in our county has. On a cold December night, heading out to our council meeting, I noticed on the side of the road a gentleman carrying on a conversation with someone that only he could see. It was a little ironic since we had an ordinance in front of us that evening to authorize an 0.1% tax for Behavioral Health (mental health and substance abuse disorders) and Therapeutic Courts. I have worked on this since I got on the council four years ago and have written two previous columns that explained the need and the process. Many of us have studied this issue and talked to and listened to hundreds of people that are impacted by the lack of services for behavioral health. Those of us on the council that see the need for this tax have been working with community and family members, first responders (law enforcement and fire) to develop a system that would use the funds appropriately and efficiently to better serve these populations and their families. I, along with council members Talbert, Young and Richardson, voted in favor of this ordinance. That is four – a majority. But this ordinance required a super majority. It did not pass. I have to admit that I am frustrated and, yes, angry. But most of all I am sad‌sad for all those people, like the gentleman that I saw that night, like the mother who told me she had no place for her daughter who is exhibiting symptoms of mental illness, like the brother who talked about his brother who has been on the streets for years because the resources are not there for him, and like the parents whose son committed suicide at a young age. If passed, this tax would have affected all areas of the county outside of Tacoma (they have already passed this tax within their jurisdiction). Would this be an efficient use of funds? Many mentally ill in this county who do not qualify for Medicaid currently get served either in our jail or our emergency

ELECTRIC VEHICLE (EV) USAGE By Rep. Dick Muri 28th Legislative District

rooms. Neither provides treatment. How much would this tax cost an average household in Pierce County? $1.67 a MONTH. It costs $208 dollars a DAY to jail someone with a behavioral health condition in our jail. Plus the cost for our first responder to respond to calls. Plus the cost to businesses for loss of potential business. Plus the increases in medical insurance premiums to cover the cost of emergency room care. Our residents are in reality paying more than what they would pay in this tax. Treatment in the community is more cost effective and more successful in prevention of future arrests. In fact, since the passage of the tax in Tacoma and the implementation of prevention and intervention programs, the jail population of offenders that have been arrested as a result of their mental conditions has decreased by 75 percent. And it would be possible to use these savings for further treatment programs or additional police or jail mental health services. Some think that this should go to a vote of the people. This vote, by law, would be advisory only. It would not be binding. According to the County Auditor, this election would cost us $380,000. I would argue that we have made our case in justifying this tax by identifying the gaps and needs in the system, as well as the foundation for the utilizations of the funds. I also need to reiterate that we are elected to research and study issues and to listen to constituents in order to make informed decisions. We have done that. And sometimes we need to be the voice of those that cannot speak for themselves and take care of those that are least able to care for themselves. Oh, one other thing that I think all of you should be aware of: The Legislature allocated $1.5 million to Pierce County for mental health services if this tax were passed in this biennium. Those that voted against this tax basically threw away $1.5 million and were willing to waste another $380,000 on an election that has no teeth. I am going home tonight in a car with a heater to a home that is toasty warm. And every time I do, I think about those on the street that have behavioral health problems, that can’t get treatment, that have no place to go. I also think of those that do have homes but also have no resources to help them survive their daily demons. All of these people struggle daily. Some of them will not survive. They will die on the streets or in their homes. So I have to ask: Is a life worth $1.67?

The use of locally produced and environmentally sound energy sources for our transportation needs is a bipartisan issue. For the past four years, I’ve driven my electric vehicle (EV) for many good reasons, including that its EV usage is better for national security, zero air and water pollution and nearly 100 percent of the electric energy consumed is made right here in Washington state. Although EVs pay MURI an extra annual road usage fee of $150, the energy cost to drive one is around 80 percent less than a standard gasoline or diesel fueled vehicle. With no oil changes, there are almost zero maintenance costs. America’s transportation sector is dominated by the need for a steady supply of oil. Our dependence on this fuel source exposes us to the whims of the global oil market. Fortunately, the American story is defined by revolution and innovation. Today, cutting edge technology in alternate fuels to power cars, trucks, and aircraft are a reality in our daily lives. While we’ve made strides in reducing the demand for foreign oil through improved vehicle efficiency, more can be done. Republicans, Democrats and Independents are all interested in reducing our exposure to the volatile and easily manipulated global oil market. It does my patriotic heart good not to send more money overseas to foreign oil suppliers. Electric cars put people in the driver’s seat with 100 percent of their fuel bill reinvested locally. Along with the cost-savings of electricity versus the gas pump, all the money for fueling my EV reinvested in the local utility market. Electric vehicles are better for the environment than gas-powered ones. Electricity is cheaper and cleaner than diesel. While it’s true that electricity from coal-fired plants may cause more pollution than diesel, the reality is our electric grid is made up of a variety of energy sources, not just coal. But, this goes beyond saving money. It’s about actively engaging in environmental protection in our daily lives. I’m a strong believer in free enterprise, but I also believe we need to do all we can, for us and generations to come, to live in a pollution-free environment. These two things come together beautifully in EV usage. What are the challenges ahead for EVs? We need to build the right infrastructure now to support the use of EVs. The great thing is we already have electricity serving our homes. We don’t need to build vast amounts of infrastructure. But, we do need to be thinking about a new way of “filling-up� and EV public policy. In 2015, I co-sponsored legislation, signed into law by the Governor, aimed at “priming the pump� for a cleaner environment and energy independence. The measure gives a financial incentive to utilities to invest in and build infrastructure necessary to power charging stations for EVs, helping to increase the number of stations in Washington. As a Republican, environmental advocate and “City Captain,� I will be helping with the 4th annual National Drive Week in Steilacoom Sept. 9. Hosted by Plug in America, The Sierra Club, and the Electric Auto Association, event organizers hope to bring more awareness about the benefits of EVs. In 2016 we had 40 vehicles and more than 100 people in attendance. Come and join me and your neighbors, and learn more about EV usage in our state. As always, I welcome your comments, questions and concerns. Please feel free to reach out to me in my Olympia office at (360) 786-7890 or by email at dick.muri@leg.wa.gov.

Connie Ladenburg is a member of the Pierce County Council.

Source: www.technologyreview.com/s/517146/are-electric-vehiclesbetter-for-the-environment-than-gas-powered-ones/

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Page 4 • universityplacepress.net • Friday, January 13, 2017

t Look Back

CITY HALL

From page 1

ordinance approved the refinancing of 2005, 2007 and 2009 limited tax general obligation bonds at a lower interest rate, a move that will save the City $3.1 million in interest costs over the next 17 years.

RES. 816: Passed in September, this approved the City Council’s stated goals, which call for efforts to support: ȗ A safer and more livable community through a commitment to public safety and community amenities ȗ Stronger financial conditions through prudent fiscal decisions ȗ Greater trust and confidence through regular communications with citizens ȗ Increased economic vitality through continued economic development initiatives

Office Hours: Address: Phone: Fax: Email: Website:

9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Weekdays 3715 Bridgeport Way W, Ste B-1 University Place, WA 98466 253.566.5656 253.566.5658 city_hall@CityofUP.com www.CityofUP.com

CITY HALL HOLIDAY CLOSURES City Hall offices will be closed in recognition of the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday on Monday, Jan. 16. Normal office hours will resume on Tuesday, Jan. 17 at 9 a.m.

UP CITY COUNCIL MAYOR JAVIER FIGUEROA

BEFORE

JFigueroa@CityofUP.com 253.682.7379

ORD. 675: Passed in October, this enables

the City of University Place to compete for Complete Streets grants at the state and national level to ensure the completion of work that was begun in 1997 to provide a network of sidewalks, bike lanes and motor vehicle improvements that will improve safety for all residents.

MAYOR PRO TEM KENT KEEL KKeel@CityofUP.com 253.878.8041

COUNCIL MEMBER STEVE WORTHINGTON SWorthington@CityofUP.com 253.565.4855

AFTER

ORD. 677: Passed in November, this approved the City’s biennial 2017-2018 budget. The budget was balanced

without using any one-time revenues, calls for no deficit in the 10-year forecast and was a significant factor in Moody’s Investor Service decision to upgrade the City’s bond rating to A1.

COUNCIL MEMBER KEN GRASSI KGrassi@CityofUP.com 253.278.1946

COUNCIL MEMBER DENISE MCCLUSKEY DMccluskey@CityofUP.com 253.878.8039

COUNCIL MEMBER CHRIS NYE CNye@CityofUP.com 253.878.8042

COUNCIL MEMBER CAROLINE BELLECI CBelleci@CityofUP.com 253.878.8040

CITY COUNCIL MEETING TIMES TUESDAY, JAN. 17, 6:30 P.M.

Regular Council Meeting ȗ City Commissions ȗ Flood Regulation Amendments ȗ Hazard Mitigation Plan

(Please note: Regular Council meeting is on Tuesday due to the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday.) All items listed are tentative; please refer to the City’s website at www.CityofUP.com for the most up-to-date information. All City Council meetings are held in the Town Hall meeting room, Windmill Village, 3715 Bridgeport Way, at 6:30 p.m. on the 1st & 3rd Mondays of the month. Changes to meeting times and locations are posted at City Hall, University Place Library and at www.CityofUP. com or you may contact the City Clerk’s Office at 253.460.2510.

RES. 823: Passed in November, this important

resolution ensured that the senior citizens of University Place will continue to enjoy meals and programming at the Senior Center, which will remain open, operated and fully funded by the local nonprofit Community Connection Place.

THE CITY OF U.P. ON YOUTUBE

GOT THE POST-HOLIDAY BLUES? THIS WILL CHEER YOU UP!

RES. 825: Passed in December, this resolution approved the Town Center Lot 12 Development Agreement that will bring additional retail and professional space to Bridgeport Way across from the Village at Chambers Bay.

u Continued on page 5

Want to relive the magic of the annual Christmas Tree Lighting in Market Square? The City of U.P.’s YouTube Channel has several videos that capture the smiles, music and moments with Santa, as well as the actual minute that Santa flipped the switch and the tree lit up. So even though the holidays are over, take a minute to check out these videos. Who knows—you might even see someone you know! View the videos at www.YouTube.com\ UniversityPlaceTV.


Friday, January 13, 2017 • universityplacepress.net • Page 5

Continued from page 4 In addition to these official legislative accomplishments, Mayor Figueroa also noted that the City’s 2016 Capital Improvement Program saw the completion of the improvements to the Bridgeport LID, the Elwood Safe Routes to School program and along Mildred Street. Two additional programs were begun during the year, including improvements along 27th Street and Bridgeport Way Phase 5. In addition, the City received $3.1 million in grant funding, including a portion from the Puget Sound Regional Council, to support five new

projects: Bridgeport Way Phase 4; 35th Street; 67th Avenue Overlay; Mildred Overlay; and Morrison Road. The mayor also stressed that Moody’s Investor Service noted that its decision to upgrade the rating of the City’s general obligation limited tax bonds from A3 to A1 was due to “substantial improvement in the city’s financial position with healthy reserves and liquidity.” Other notable highlights from 2016 included the City’s continued interaction and partnership with the 16th CAB as the unit’s Community Connector, as well as popular community events such as the Duck Daze Parade, Moonlight Movie in the Park and the annual

Christmas Tree Lighting in Market Square. “When I look at all we accomplished, I can’t help but feel very proud of the work we’ve done,” Figueroa said. “There were some tough decisions that had to be made along the way, but I truly believe our current City Council is the “A-Team,” and has demonstrated that in all that we’ve done.” At the same time, however, Figueroa stressed that the group’s work is not complete. “There are still many more issues to tackle and opportunities to grasp,” he said. “I have no doubt that 2017 will be as successful—if not more so—than 2016.”

CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING

MOONLIGHT MOVIE IN THE PARK

DUCK DAZE

16TH CAB COMMUNITY CONNECTOR PARTNER

Job Opportunities The City is pleased to announce its recruitment for a Maintenance Worker I, Landscape. Salary Range: $3,774 - $4,245. Please visit the City's website at www.CityofUP. com for a full job announcement and instructions. Maintenance Worker General Functions: Under the supervision of the Director of Public Works and Parks, performs manual labor involving maintenance of City's landscaping, open spaces, parks, storm drains and building facilities, including but not limited to the operation of a variety of hand and power tools, vehicles, trailers and a range of medium and heavy equipment. Provides support for City clean-ups and special events. As a member of the Public Works and Parks department, provides support for various Public Works operations, tasks, projects or emergency response that may also include after hours and weekends. Ability to work in a self-directed manner is often required for accomplishing tasks. All non-probationary employees in this position must be members of the International Union of Operating Engineers Local #612. How to Apply: An application form may be obtained from the City of University Place main reception desk located at 3715 Bridgeport Way W., University Place, WA 98466, or from the City’s website at www.CityofUP.com. Submit completed application packet to: City of University Place Attn.: Human Resources 3715 Bridgeport Way W. (#B-1) University Place, WA 98466-4456 or email LPetorak@CityofUP.com In order for your application to be considered, please provide a completed application form, resume, cover letter and a driver’s abstract. Incomplete applications will not be accepted. The position will remain open with first review on Friday, January 27. The City is an equal opportunity employer.

PHOTOS BY CITY OF UNIVERSITY PLACE


Page 6 • universityplacepress.net • Friday, January 13, 2017

PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT Supporting the Economic Growth of Our Community

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

Federal, regional, state and local leaders gathered with the Puyallup Tribal Council to officially cut the ribbon on the Tribe’s new state-of-the-art Salish Cancer Center (SCC) in the spring of 2015. Joining in on the event were (back row from left): former Fife Mayor Tim Curtis; former Congressman Norm Dicks and Puyallup Tribal Council Vice-Chairman Larry LaPointe; (front row from left) Puyallup Tribal Council Members Marguerite Edwards and Sylvia Miller; Puyallup Vice-Chairwoman Roleen Hargrove; Senator Maria Cantwell; Puyallup Chairman Bill Sterud; Gov. Jay Inslee; Lieutenant Governor Brad Owen; Congressman Denny Heck; and Puyallup Tribal Council Members David Bean and Tim Reynon. 

The most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians continues to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce County’s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its

own membership, but sharing its wealth among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County. With a payroll of more than 3,100 people that work in the Tribe’s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities – approximately 70 percent of whom are non-Native –

employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits. In 2015 the Tribe spent over $491 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more.

From sponsoring local charities, non-profit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer or cease to exist, to protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and healthcare, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its destiny as “the generous people,” the meaning of the Tribe’s very name “Puyallup.”

PARTNERING TO ENHANCE LOCAL TRANSPORTATION Partnering with local jurisdictions to improve local transportation over the past seven years, the Tribe has spent more than $40 million on transportation projects and traffic safety services in neighboring areas. These are largely done in collaboration with state and local governments to benefit the region’s growing traffic infrastructure, which helps everyone. Projects range from lighting and safety improvements to bridges and reconstruction projects, providing hundreds of jobs to local engineers, tradesmen, environmental and cultural resource consultants, construction contractors, and the like. Examples of the Tribe’s expenditures over the past seven years to completed and ongoing projects include: 30TH STREET SAFETY PROJECT, TACOMA Paving, lighting, ADA access, replacement of sidewalks on both sides of 30th Avenue from Portland Avenue to R Street, and one side of 31st Avenue, including relocation

of public utilities. Permitted through the City of Tacoma. The project was completed spring of 2013. 31ST STREET REHABILITATION PROJECT, TACOMA 31st Street was a failed road that has received repavement, curb and stormwater facilities, street trees, and relocation of public utilities. Permitted through the City of Tacoma. The project was completed in summer 2015. EAST ROOSEVELT/EAST WRIGHT STREET IMPROVEMENTS & MAINTENANCE WORK The Tribe committed $15,000 to replace a failing section of Roosevelt that was important for access to the Tribal Health Clinic. A new asphalt overlay was applied, alongside curb improvements and alleyway paving. TRANSPORTATION PLANNING & COLLABORATION WITH STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS I-5 HOV Project, Tacoma and Fife: Tribal staff has

worked with WSDOT regarding HOV improvements on I-5. East Side Community Projects: Tribal staff is working with the City of Tacoma with respect to long-range transportation planning involving several city streets.  Additional Transportation Planning and Administration: Tribal staff works in collaboration with a number of federal, state and local government agencies to plan and administer transportation projects in the region. Inspection Services: The Puyallup Tribe pays for City of Tacoma inspectors for road project oversight; fees to exceed $100,000. Port of Tacoma Emergency Response ITS Study: The Puyallup Tribe has committed $75,000 to partner with the City of Tacoma, Port of Tacoma, and local port businesses to study emergency vehicle response in the Port of Tacoma tide flats area to address safety concerns and increase local police & fire response.

TRIBE, WSDOT PARTNER TO IMPROVE TRANSPORTATION AND SAFETY In keeping with their mutual agreement reached in 2014, the Puyallup Tribe and the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) continue to partner on WSDOT’s HOV construction project on Interstate 5 on the Puyallup Indian Reservation. The agreement provides that work will be conducted in a manner respectful of the Tribe’s lands and treaty rights. For example, in late 2015 WSDOT crews focused on several excavation activities with the Tribe’s archaeological monitors present during the work. The agreement further conveys several parcels of land to the Tribe to offset the lost use of lands on which the Tribe has given WSDOT easements for the project. A right of first refusal gives the Tribe an opportunity to purchase additional lands. The agreement deals particularly with replacement of Interstate 5 bridges across the Puyallup River, as the bridges are more than 50 years old and would not withstand the impact of a serious earthquake. The new bridges will provide a much greater degree of safety in such an event, and the HOV lanes will improve transportation significantly in the area. In addition to providing room for one HOV lane on this portion of I-5, as part of this project WSDOT will also rebuild the northbound I-5 Puyallup River Bridge to make it straighter and wider than the existing bridge; improve the I-5/Portland Avenue interchange; and repave all the lanes of northbound I-5 within the project limits. Construction of the first bridge shafts for the new northbound I-5 bridge over the river has started near State Route 167, and work on the new ramp bridge from northbound I-5 to SR 167 is also progressing. Part of the agreement is to protect the fishery habitat and resource and to preserve Tribal members’ opportunity

to fish, a right guaranteed by the Treaty of Medicine Creek. To accomplish those goals, WSDOT has focused its work in the Puyallup River at times other than fishing season and fish migration periods. The work will use construction methods that minimize impact on the resource. With the project to rebuild the bridge will come in-water work in the Puyallup River that WSDOT is keeing tribal fishermen informed of. This work includes monitoring equipment for water quality to be placed in the water to meet water quality standards for the river established by the Tribe and by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The placement of floating booms will outline an 80-foot channel for boats and behind the booms temporary work platforms will be constructed on both sides of the river. Isolation casings for the in-water bridge piers will also be installed. STATE ROUTE 167 In 2015, Gov. Jay Inslee formally signed a transportation package that will flow $16.2 billion toward roads and transportation routes around the state for the next 16 years. On the roster of projects slated for those dollars is the final leg of State Route 167 that would provide a roadway between the distribution and warehouse hubs of Kent and Auburn to Port of Tacoma waters. The Tribe is working with the state and other partners to ensure that the project remains a top priority and again remains respectful of the Tribe’s lands and treaty rights. The funding package includes $1.85 billion to continue the SR 167 roadway, which currently ends just short of the waterway. The roadway had been first pondered back in the 1970s. Construction started in the 1980s only to stall ever since. It was called a “top priority” for lawmakers for the last generation only to go unfunded year after year

A computer-enhanced image of what I-5 will look like after the new northbound bridge is complete. Note that both northbound and southbound I-5 traffic will temporarily be shifted onto the new northbound bridge while crews demolish and rebuild the southbound bridge.

for the last 25 years. The Tribe, Port officials, business groups and transportation boosters have lobbied for the roadway as a way for the state to be competitive for international shipping traffic, which could avoid transportation delays found through the Puget Sound by routing cargo through Canadian ports and eventually route larger ships through the Panama Canal. Washington is the most tradedependent state in the nation, with 40 percent of jobs related to international trade. Pierce County is the most trade-dependent county in the state, so any threat to that industry raises alarms for businesses and lawmakers alike. The project will receive $2.5 million between now and 2017 and then ramp up to a peak of $395 million between 2021 and 2023 during the main construction period with a final $200 million between 2029 and 2031 to finalize the work. Washington State Department of Transportation estimates a completed SR 167 could fuel job growth to the tune of $10.1 billion.

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.


Friday, January 13, 2017 • universityplacepress.net • Page 7

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

PHOTO COURTESY OF VAPE-O-RAMA

LOUNGING. Vape-O-Rama in University Place not only offers a large selection of Vaping products, but a lounge to try new flavors or converse with like-minded customers.

VAPE-O-RAMA By Derek Shuck

derek@universityplacepress.net

University Place residents looking for a one-stop vape shop can visit Vape-O-Rama, located at 7406 27th St. W., which offers a large selection of products for all your vaping needs. Vape-O-Rama is a shop dedicated to newcomers and veteran vapers alike. Those unfamiliar with vaping can count on the knowledge of a friendly staff dedicated to customer service that will get you started on the road to vaping. On the other hand, experienced vapers can take comfort in not only the wide variety of products VapeO-Rama offers, but also a space that allows them to talk to other vaping enthusiasts about the pleasures of this revolutionary smoking trend. Owner Chuck Bertrand credits the store’s success to their fantastic customer service and a policy by which Vape-O-Rama makes sure that every product works as intended. “I think the biggest thing is we take care of our customers. If something goes wrong, we fix it or replace

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it. Obviously customer service is important for building long term relationships,� Bertrand said. “If you bought [a product] three months ago from us and it breaks, we’ll replace it. “ The store also offers a wide variety of products to buy; everything from equipment to various flavors are displayed throughout the store, which provides a nice environment to talk about vaping for beginners and regular users. Should you want to try new flavors or just hang out at the friendly store, Vape-O-Rama’s vape lounge should meet all your needs, including “try before you buy.� Through putting an emphasis on customer service and dedication to helping people with their vaping needs, Vape-O-Rama has established a reputation as one of the best. Vape-O-Rama in University Place is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Vape-O-Rama also has locations in Kent, Renton, Lakewood and Burien. For more information, visit vape-o-rama.com or call (253) 267-5698.

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Page 8 • universityplacepress.net • Friday, January 13, 2017

SPORTS

CURTIS GIRLS UPSET DRIVE FALLS SHORT AGAINST BELLARMINE

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

ENERGY. (left) Curtis junior Jalaiya Frederick is shadowed by Bellarmine sophomore Reyell Frazier. The two guards are among the best in the business in the

area and they're always a threat to steal the ball and score points from all over the court. (right) Viking senior Hailey Marsh tries to find some room between a host of defenders. By Justin Gimse jgimse@universityplacepress.net

W

henever Curtis and Bellarmine Prep meet up in the gymnasium or on the field of play, there’s a pretty good chance that the contest is going to go down to the wire. With a scant four miles separating the two schools, the players always seem to get up for the contests and give it their all. Needless to say, the crowds are also always into it, lending a playoff feel to the game, no matter where it lands in the season’s schedule. Now that the two teams are competing in the same league, it’s beginning to feel like these affairs have

been turned up a notch. The Curtis girls’ basketball team paid a visit to Bellarmine on Tuesday, Jan. 10 and while it wasn’t the most well-executed basketball game this season, it certainly fit the bill as a true Curtis versus Bellarmine battle. At times it seemed as though neither team could remember how to get the ball in the basket, and then the floodgates would open up for one of the teams. In the end, it would be Bellarmine sitting a little higher in the water as the 4A South Puget Sound League leaders fought off a late Curtis surge to take the win by a score of 53-47. A frenzied pace was set following the opening tipoff and it had the feel of a runaway train for both teams. Turnovers began to mount as both defenses swarmed to

the ball, forcing turnovers and rushed shots. It was only a matter of time before the two squads remembered that there was still going to be three more quarters of play and that perhaps the exuberance was outpacing the game plans set out by the coaches. At the end of the first quarter, Bellarmine led by a score of 6-2. However, if the amount of energy put out by both teams were added up, the score would have been closer to maybe 30-28. As we know, basketball doesn’t work that way. It was clear though that if the defensive pressure mounted by both teams continued at the first quarter level, there wasn’t going to be a whole lot of scoring going on in this affair.

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Friday, January 13, 2017 • universityplacepress.net • Page 9

BAY WATCHERS CALL FOUL ON PROCESS TO RESTART GRAVEL MINING By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@universityplacepress.net

review regarding plans to restart mining operations at the former Coski Sand and Gravel Mine along the Hylebos Waterway.

would reportedly take place during the day, and loading could occur both day and night. The permit documents mention two shifts, from 6:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 5 a.m. “The mine is directly uphill from the Hylebos, a waterway with numerous environmental problems, and is only 450 feet from the closest Northeast Tacoma home,” Citizens for a Healthy Bay stated in an alert about the project. “Despite this

From page 8

The first team to get their offense on track was Bellarmine, as the Lions took a 16-6 lead a little over two minutes into the period. The double-digit deficit seemed to slap the Vikings awake and Curtis began chipping away at the Bellarmine lead. With three minutes left in the first half, the score sat at 20-18 Bellarmine. There were probably several fans in the gym who must have been wondering how this had come about, because it seemed as though just a moment before the momentum of the game was going the Lions’ way. Before a clear answer to that question arrived, Curtis junior guard Jalaiya Frederick launched a deep three-point shot from the wing that found the bottom of the net and the Vikings had taken the lead at 21-20 with 1:30 left in the second quarter. A minute later, Curtis freshman Ella Brubaker took a feed from senior Kaelin Williams-Kennedy for open layup and Curtis led 23-20 going into halftime. A quick tabulation at halftime found that the Vikings had forced the Lions into an astounding 18 first-half turnovers. While Curtis’ nine turnovers were nothing to really brag about, the number dialed up by their defense was something very impressive. If this trend continued into the second half, it looked as though Curtis may very well pull off the upset over the league leaders. One thing that was playing to Bellarmine’s disadvantage was a huge one. Two-time Tacoma Weekly All-City selection Shalyse Smith was in street clothes on the Bellarmine bench. The team was obviously missing their center and leader and game plan tweaking was going to be needed at halftime to counter Curtis’ swarming pressure. Smith is still recovering from a concussion and injured neck that she suffered in a recent game against Sumner, when her head

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VIKS! Curtis freshman Kayrena Taylor is already

proving to be a strong performer for the Vikings. Taylor would leave the Bellarmine game midway through the fourth quarter after taking a whack to the nose.

collided with her opponent’s. She is expected to return as early as next week. Without the cool hand of their big gun, Bellarmine would turn to a couple of other veterans to get the Bellarmine offense back on track and under control. Juniors Madeline Garcia and Jenny Hagle settled things down for

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the Lions in the third quarter and the results began to show immediately on the scoreboard. Halfway into the quarter, Bellarmine had regained the game’s momentum and led 34-27. On the flipside, it felt like someone had put a cover over the Vikings’ basket. Curtis was only able to muster just nine points in the third quarter, even though they had some excellent opportunities. Bellarmine led 45-32 at the end of the period. Going into the fourth quarter, the flow of the game looked as though Bellarmine had all the mojo going for themselves. However, the Vikings still had a surprising amount of their own still left in the gas tank. The fourth quarter was not friendly to the Lions. From the opening whistle to just under a minute left in the game, Bellarmine was able to muster just five points on free throws. Meanwhile, the Vikings were clawing their way back into the game with the sort of ferocity that saw them shock Bellarmine at the end of the first half. With 1:02 left in the game, Hagle hit one of two free throws to give Bellarmine a 50-45 lead. For the second consecutive trip down court, Williams-Kennedy was unable to convert a shot attempt at close range, and Bellarmine got the ball back with time running out. After chewing up a bit of time off the clock, Hagle found Mary Joyce open under the basket and the senior converted the Lions’ only field goal of the quarter, and it would turn out to be the deal breaker. Another Curtis miss on their own end closed out the Vikings’ upset run. Frederick would score a lay-in with two seconds remaining, but it wasn’t going to be enough as Bellarmine took the 53-47 win. A scoring check between the University Place Press and Bellarmine’s shot tracker following the game found that Bellarmine was incorrectly awarded an extra point between the third and fourth quarter. A three-point shot was awarded after the fact on a play that was actually a layup, so in reality the score should have been 52-47.

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MINING. Citizens for a Healthy Bay wants the city to conduct a full environmental

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Citizens for a Healthy Bay (CHB), the non-profit environmental group tasked with monitoring the health of Commencement Bay, wants the city to conduct a full environmental review of a plan to restart surface mining at the former Coski Sand and Gravel Mine facility on the Hylebos Waterway, particularly since plans call for 600 gravel trucks a day streaming from the waterfront location. The mine had stopped operations about 20 years ago. News of the permit application came during the holiday season that announced a public hearing would be held this week. Comments are being accepted only until the end of the month, something CHB director Melissa Malott said seemed far short of the “transparency” pledge by city officials, following the outcry regarding news of the now-dead methanol plant and the planned construction of a liquefied natural gas plant. “We are pretty frustrated,” she said. “We basically think this is ridiculous. I am, honestly, pretty appalled.” A group called Terra5 Company LLC has submitted plans to the former Coski Mine at 2500 Marine View Dr., which is located between the Hylebos Waterway and 450 feet from the residential area of Northeast Tacoma. Plans call for the removal of about 400,000 cubic yards of sand and gravel from the 17-acre site during the next decade, which would call for about 15 truckloads every hour of operation, or 600 trucks a day. Mining

what hazards the mine might create without the review, but potential air quality, noise and traffic impacts alone from mining and heavy truck usage are enough to warrant a full review. Illegal landfills have also been found on neighboring sites, making possible chemical contamination from an undocumented on-site dump another major concern. Second, the public will have far fewer opportunities to influence the city's decision. If the city grants the Conditional Use Permit, the company will be able to apply for a mining permit with the state.” The city is conducting a SEPA review and has conducted all of its checklist except for a noise analysis, project manager Shirley Schultz stated. “The city has made a preliminary determination that an Environmental Impact Statement is not necessary; the project as presented can be mitigated through either conditions placed on the project (through SEPA or the conditional use permit) or through compliance with adopted regulations and policies. That is not the same as exempting something SEPA reviews; it’s a different path to environmental analysis. However, the determination is preliminary, and public /agency comment can provide additional information about whether an EIS is warranted, and, if so, what the scope of that EIS would be.” The city will accept public comments until Jan. 27, after which planners will issue a final decision on the project. Information about the project is available at healthybay.org. Permit details are available at tacomapermits.org.


Page 10 • universityplacepress.net • Friday, January 13, 2017

BE WELL

inside & out

HAND AND STONE

By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

K

evin Byrne knows what it’s like to need some relaxation. With a life in banking and financing, Byrne took to monthly massages for health reasons. Finding a passion for the art, when the time came to switch careers, he opened a Hand and Stone massage franchise in Kent nearly four years ago. Last July, Byrne opened a second location in University Place at 3904 Bridgeport Way W. Now U.P. residents have Hand and Stone’s various services right in their back yard. Customers are encour-

aged to create a custom session with services that run the gamut from massages, to facials, to hair removal. A signature aspect of Hand and Stone is the hot stone service. Various hot stones are used throughout a massage to heat up muscle tissue in the customer. “The purpose of that is that warmth will break up individual muscle tissue, so you get a deeper service and have those individual muscles relax much better because that heat takes away that individual tension,” Byrne said. Contrasted with that is Hand and Stone’s unique cold-stone face massage. The service begins with a hot towel on the customer’s face to open up pores. Then stones cooled in an ice bucket are applied. The

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service is intended to help those who suffer from migraines, and to help relieve that sinus process. Hand and Stone also offers a hair removal procedure. While other businesses offer waxes, Byrne and his team use a soy-based product to make the experience more pleasant. “The purpose of the soy is that in a wax you put it on the strip and as its cooling, it’s pulling the moisture out of the skin and then you peel that off and the skin’s dry and you wind up with little red bumps. Soy doesn’t dry so it doesn’t pull moisture out of skin, and you avoid those bumps,” Byrne said. Of course, all of these services are just a small part of what Hand and Stone provides, and are overseen by top-quality employees who have the knowledge to make guests feel comfortable and get them what they need. “The quality of the service and the quality of the message therapist is why you should come to us,” Byrne said. “The quality and the knowledge.” Anyone is welcome to schedule an appointment at Hand and Stone, but the business also provides a month-to-month membership that provides a substantial discount to individual services. Hand and Stone is open seven days a week, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information about the University Place location, call (253) 444-6995. The Kent location, found at Kent Station, can be reached at (253) 813-8011. For online information, visit www.handandstone.com.

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Friday, January 13, 2017 • universityplacepress.net • Page 11

BE WELL

inside & out

WEIGHT LOSS CAN START A CHAIN REACTION OF HEALTH BENEFITS

JUDY BEFORE

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Judy had severe knee pain. She went to her primary care provider and was referred to an orthopedist. He advised her that she did have severe arthritis, and surgery may be indicated, but that her excess body weight was likely making the pain worse. If she lost 30 pounds, he said, the pain may be improved significantly. Every 10 pounds, he said, was like 30 pounds on her knee. Judy was motivated to avoid surgery, but had already tried “every diet in the book,� so, as many people do, she turned to the Internet to do some research. There, she found Rainier Medical Weight Loss and Wellness, the practice of Dr. Valerie Sutherland, MD, and took a chance on making a new patient appointment. That was a year ago. Now, Judy has lost 90 pounds, and not only does she no longer have knee pain, but her diabetes and blood pressure numbers are normal. Judy says, “I lost way more than 30 pounds! I look forward to my blood work now, as the results are always phenomenal.� Excess weight and obesity affect two-thirds of the population in America. This chronic metabolic disease is the second leading cause of preventable death in America and causes or contributes to more than 20 chronic conditions including cancer. Healthcare costs

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are an average of $8,000 more per year for a person with obesity, and with a BMI over 40, life span is 8-10 years shorter. Studies show that people with obesity encounter a “weight bias and discrimination� in many places, including their doctors’ offices. This can manifest itself in many ways that affects the healthcare they receive. Symptoms such as pain or shortness of breath may be attributed to their weight when, in fact, they are caused by something else. This can lead to a delayed or missed diagnosis. Once a diagnosis is made, fewer or less aggressive treatment options may be offered to a patient with obesity than a patient of normal weight. Moreover, many physicians are not trained in the underlying causes or treatment of obesity, and do not consider obesity a disease, despite the American Medical Association’s official recognition of it as such. Therefore, many people have experienced shame or blame at their physician’s office and lack of evidence based treatment or referral for this disease. Dr. Valerie Sutherland is a Diplomate of the American Board of Obesity Medicine and the American Board of Internal Medicine and is dedicated to increasing awareness of the treatment options for obesity. Many people are being treated for the symptoms of obesity and not the underlying cause and do not even know that medical treatment for excess weight is an option. Prescription medications for blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar, reflux, as well as machines for obstructive sleep apnea and pain medication for arthritis, are all prescribed when treatment for the

excess weight may cause remission of those diseases. In Dr. Sutherland’s practice, many people are motivated by their desire to avoid getting diabetes, avoid insulin, get off medications, or no longer require a breathing machine at night. While not everyone is advised to reduce or stop medications, and many medications have benefits even at normal weight, there are many cases when individuals are very pleased with how weight loss has reduced their overall health care and medication requirements and improved quality of life, function, and overall sense of well-being. Dr. Sutherland has some tips and advice for individuals with obesity for talking with their physicians. “Ask your physician if your symptoms could be from something other than your weight. This should trigger him or her to make a more comprehensive differential diagnosis. If you would like to know about treatment options for obesity, ask your physician if he or she has experience and training with successfully designing a treatment plan, including prescribing any of the FDA approved medications for obesity. If not, ask for a referral for a specialist.� The Obesity Medicine Association has approximately 1,400 physicians in the United States and Canada, and one of them is right here in University Place. Rainier Medical Weight Loss and Wellness has helped their patients lose over 14,000 pounds since opening in June 2015. A second office opened in Puyallup in August 2016. Most insurances are accepted and new patient appointments are available. Visit rainiermd. com for more information or call (253) 292-1535.

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Page 12 • universityplacepress.net • Friday, January 13, 2017

TACOMA UNITES FOR MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. DAY By Duncan Rolfson

Special to University Place Press

This year, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day will be observed on Monday, Jan. 16. People of all races, religions and genders will be taking time from the mundane-trenches we call life to observe the legacy that this great man imparted on our nation. Starting as early as the Sunday just before this holiday, there will be gatherings of community and fellowship for a common belief. Spanning nearly half the week, here is a list of a few events aimed and remembering and celebrating this great man. The 11th Annual MLK Jr. Redeeming the Prophetic Vision is being presented on Sunday, Jan. 15, 2:30 p.m. at Urban Grace Church by “The Conversation” and in collaboration with the church and Associated Ministries. Traditionally, it has served as a collaborative effort of community-focused and faith-based volunteers and artists attempting to illuminate the inequities and other hurdles in modern day society. Alongside multi-faith blessings and calls for peace and unity, the event will feature live art expressions via spoken word poetry and live music focused on civil rights and equal justice for all. It is free to the public, and all are invited to attend and share in the message being offered. The goal of this event is to express the need for actively promoting and reiterating Dr. King’s message of the betterment of singular and social justices. In conjunction with the observance, two local activists will be honored with a Social Justice Award. These men are Henry Lyle “Hank” Adams and Dean Jackson. Hank Adams (Sioux-Assiniboine), is a local social justice activist whose long-standing work has been instrumental in working to assert and protect local Native American fishing and hunting rights. Dean Jackson is founder and director of Hilltop Urban Gardens (HUG) located in the landmark Hilltop neighborhood of Tacoma, which serves as an example for the locals on how to work to create and promote food sovereignty and re-connection to the soil by simply changing the lives of local people on the margins of our community. On Monday, Jan. 16 at 8 a.m., the 2017 MLK Jr. Unity Breakfast will be hosted by University of WashingtonTacoma, located in the University Y Student Center. Local artistry, community involvement, and peer recognition are the happenings here, including a presentation of the Dream Awards and a keynote speech from Erin Jones from the Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Please come down and get involved – only you and your community will benefit from your participation in

t Worthington

FILE PHOTOS

(Left) Dr. Maxine Mimms will be honored with the prestigious 2017 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Service Award. (Right) Keynote speech will be delivered by Julianne Malveaux, a renowned labor economist, author and commentator who will be shedding light on the current state of our country’s stance in equality and our perception of it.

this year’s event. Also on Jan. 16, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., will be the the City of Tacoma’s Annual MLK Celebration at the Greater Tacoma Convention and Trade Center. This year, Dr. Maxine B. Mimms will be honored with the prestigious 2017 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Service Award, which is presented each year during the city’s annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. birthday celebration before an average crowd of approximately 2,000 attendees from the community. “Dr. Mimms embodies the mission of Dr. King through her extraordinary dedication to opening doors of higher education to the diverse community in Tacoma,” said Committee Chairwoman Erin Lee. “Our event theme is ‘Beloved Community’ and we gave special consideration to nominees whose work focused on understanding our community and its needs, and delivering solutions.” The event will feature keynote speaker Harold Moss, Tacoma's first African American city council member and Mayor. Moss has been active in the Tacoma community since the 1950s when he was a member of the local branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). He served two terms as president of the branch. The celebration will include exhibitions of

all types – music, dance and poetry – that highlight the strength, resiliency and creativity of young men of color. Performances will focus highly on Dr. King’s relationship with the communities he affected, how he challenged and changed our nation's very fiber, and his message to honor the dignity and rights of every person, no matter their differences to you or me. The following day the University of Puget Sound is inviting the community to come together for their annual Martin Luther King Celebration. Everyone is welcome to the free evening. Keynote speech will be delivered by Julianne Malveaux, a renowned labor economist, author and commentator who will be shedding light on the current state of our country’s stance in equality and our perception of it. Described by author and activist Cornel West as “the most iconoclastic public intellectual in the country,” Malveaux truly embraces views on race, culture, gender and economics that are helping shape public opinion in 21st-century America. Malveaux’s keynote talk, plus messages from the Puget Sound community and the presentation of the Keep The Faith Alive Award, will take place on Tuesday, Jan. 17 from 7-8:30 p.m., in Schneebeck Concert Hall on campus. The doors will open at 6:30 p.m. No tickets are required.

From page 1

the formula about sales taxes generated in small cities, and retail sales fell at the start of the recession, which forced Fife to cut about a quarter of its workforce. University Place, for example, now receives just 8 cents on every property tax dollar collected within the city, all of which goes to police services. That $5 million budget line item leaves few options for revenue to fund city administration and non-public safety services, especially since the second largest budget item is the $3.5 million a year the city pays for debt service, largely linked to the Town Center development that started back to the early days following the city’s incorporation in 1995. “The past practice of paying for everyday services by borrowing more couldn't be continued,” Worthington said of the council’s decision to end recreation programming this year as a way to cover a $400,000 budget shortfall. “The money the city owed had maxed out the credit line. So something had to change. This council saw to that and took action to reduce regular expense to meet our fixed revenue. To do that, we had to stop doing some things. That resulted in the ending of recreation services. We are hopeful that the not for profit and for profit communities will come in to fill the void that has resulted.” Economic development opportunities within the city, particularly the hotel complex at Chambers Bay, will bring more revenue to city coffers in the years to come, but municipal recreation programs aren’t likely to return anytime soon. Any new money borne by commercial projects will likely go to backfilling previous cuts of police patrols, considering the department has 16 officers, down about half of its peak a decade ago. Residential roads also need about $1 million in repairs each year, outstretching the $300,000 a year funded by sales taxes and car tabs through the Transportation Benefit District. One untapped business-development idea he wants to explore is tying the city more to its shoreline if not commercially then through marketing and promotions. “We are a waterfront community, but I think a lot of the community forgets about that,” Worthington said. “Chambers Bay helps us with that, but there may be other opportunities.” What is clear is that University Place residents have high expectations for city services and don’t want to pay more taxes to support them “The voters have been very clear,” he said. “More taxes are not reasonable options here.” When not working on city business, Worthington enjoys cooking, ballroom dancing, culinary gardening and traveling.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF STEVE WORTHINGTON

Steve Worthington dances with wife Jill Worthington at their 40th anniversary. They dance with Tacoma Arthur Murray Studio.


Friday, January 13, 2017 • universityplacepress.net • Page 13

ENTERTAINMENT

LAKEWOOD PLAYHOUSE BRINGS THE RAZZLE AND DAZZLE OF 'ROCKY HORROR' TO THE STAGE By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

Lakewood Playhouse continues its 78th season with a production of Richard O’Brien’s “The Rocky Horror Show,” a zany, gender-bending, genera-blending spectacle that most of us are familiar with from the cult movie phenomenon that has been around since it bubbled up out of New York City in the 1970s. Lakewood Playhouse director Alan Wilkie is a self-professed “Rocky Horror” addict, having frequented the midnight showings that took place at Seattle’s Neptune Theater. Mingling the musical genera with the aesthetic of B-grade horror and science fiction movies, “Rocky Horror” tells the tale of a chaste (stodgy), newly engaged couple – Brad (Jake Atwood) and Janet (Jenna McRill) – that get stranded on a dark and rainy night and go to a weird castle to use the phone. There they encounter a hedonistic group of characters that exist without any kind of sexual boundaries. Representing the kind of stock, “Leave it to Beaver” type of characters from 50s and 60s television shows – the kind where married couples sleep in separate, twin beds – Brad and Janet are plunged into a sexual free-for-all that exemplifies the loosening of mores that was happening at the height of the sexual revolution. (The process was gaining steam until the specter of AIDS threw a wet towel on things in the 1980s.) The opening weekend of Lakewood Playhouse’s scintillating spectacle was marred by technical difficulties involving the use of wireless microphones. These cut in and out causing gaps in the otherwise great vocal performances of the actors. Sometimes

PHOTO BY TIM JOHNSTON

THE HORROR. (l to r, back row) Tony Williams as Rocky, Brandon Ehrenheim as Frank 'N'

Furter, Winnie Bean as Columbia. (l to r, front) Jake Atwood as Brad, Xander Layden as Dr. Scott, and Jenna McRill as janet.

a character is belting out a line only to have it be inaudible to the audience. This technical glitch (which one hopes will be ironed out as the show goes on) disrupts the flow of the story and undercuts the performances of the fine cast. Starring as Frank ‘N’ Furter – the alien, transvestite, mad scientist – Brandon Ehrenheim towers over the show both figuratively and literally. Tall and confident, Ehrenheim vamps to and fro across the stage, dressed in a corset, fishnet stockings and glittering platform shoes. His flawless performance is a delight to behold. Equally adept is Gary Chambers as Riff-Raff, Frank’s chief henchman. Chambers performs his

musical parts with all the gothic vibrato of a heavy metal diva and has a gift for inhabiting his characters to the point that the acting is seamless. Slender LaNita Hudson, possessed of a brassy and sassy set of windpipes, is great in her two roles as the Usherette that sings the opening number and as the mad housemaid Magenta. Atwood and McRill both are brilliant in their performances as nerds seduced by the pleasures of the flesh in Frank ‘N’ Furter’s castle. They are also brave enough to perform much of the show in their underwear. The pigtailed, tutu-wearing groupie Columbia is played by Winnie Bean. Her energetic per-

CALENDAR EVENTS

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@universityplacepress.net or calling (253) 922-5317.

TW PICK: COUNTER-INAUGURAL BAWL BALL Sat., Jan. 21, 7 p.m. Asian Pacific Cultural Center, 4851 South Tacoma Way For those concerned about the Donald Trump presidency, come and enjoy an evening of being with like-minded folks on the weekend of his inauguration. There will be people there with a wide variety of concerns and issues, from peace to the environment to race matters to labor to immigration reform to LGBTQ to health policy to election reform, etc. We gather together, because we will need each other in our resistance to the Trump agenda and because we honor the words and spirit of Emma Goldman: “If I can’t dance, I don’t want to be part of your revolution.” Music by Smokey Wonder, DJ (think Smokey Robinson and Stevie Wonder), The Derivatives: A rock-solid cover-band. Come, have a good time, and find strength in community. If you don’t like to dance, there will be plenty else going on! Co-sponsors include (in reverse alphabetical order): Tacoma Chapter Veterans for Peace 134, United for Peace of Pierce County, Radio Tacoma, People for Peace Justice & Healing and Jewish Voice for Peace (Tacoma). Price: $10 (includes memorable party favors); proceeds go to the NW Detention Center Resistance and Radio Tacoma. No host bar, all attire welcome. RSVP appreciated but not required (it would help make sure there is enough alcohol and food). Write to Tacoma@JewishVoiceForPeace.org with the number of people attending in the subject line. Info: www.facebook.com/events/1780453032194283 DISTINGUISHED WRITER SERIES WITH TOD MARSHALL Fri., Jan. 13, 7-9 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave. This monthly event features a distinguished writer followed by an open mic for all poets. Sign-up is at 6:45 p.m. This month features poet Tod Marshall. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-8801; www.kingsbookstore.com TACOMA WEAVERS’ GUILD MONTHLY PROGRAM Fri., Jan. 13, 10-11 a.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S 12th St. Sewing purses, bags and totes with Patti Schmidt, expert sewer, who will discuss sewing bags using hand-woven and commercial fabric. Ages: Adults. Price: Free. Info: (253) 564-4402; www.saintandrewstacoma.org OPEN MIC NIGHT AT FORREY’S FORZA Fri., Jan. 13, 7-9:30 p.m. Forza Coffee Company, 2209 N. Pearl St. Open mic night is perfect for those looking to share their talent and passion for

music. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 301-3925; forzacoffeecompany.com THE ART OF TRAVEL TRAVEL POSTERS OF THE 1920S, 30S AND BEYOND Fri., Jan. 13, 9 a.m. Tacoma Public Library, 1102 Tacoma Ave. S. From 1910 through 1959, modern cruise ships, railroads and commercial airlines made travel both simpler and more economical. Before the 20th century, few but the wealthy could afford to travel for pleasure. Ages: All Ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 292-2001; www.tacomapubliclibrary.org A YEAR WITH FROG AND TOAD Sat., Jan. 14, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., 2-3:30 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 Sixth Ave. Based on Arnold Lobel’s wellloved books, featuring a hummable score by Robert and Willie Reale, this whimsical show is part vaudeville, part make believe…all charm. Ages: All. Price: $10 - $15. Info: (253) 565-6867; www.tmp.org

formance is a vital ingredient in the dynamism of the spoof. Likewise, the high octane show put on by Xander Layden, as both Eddie and Dr. Scott, helps boost the dance numbers to a fever pitch. Clad in a skin tight, golden muscleman outfit, Tony L. Williams breaths life into Rocky, the hunk created by the mad scientist Frank that is meant to be an object of carnal desire. Good natured and somewhat gawky, Williams nevertheless is becoming a crowd favorite of Lakewood Playhouse shows. The theater’s artistic director John Munn performs the part of the jovial narrator who talks back to audience remarks and gets increasingly drunk as the show goes on.

One of the best features of the show is the live band, conducted by Josh Zimmerman who is a wizard on the keyboards and keeps things stirred up with clever asides shouted at the narrator. Kayla Crawford’s choreography is also a key ingredient of the show. The cast is continually forming piles and configurations of human bodies that make things seem like an ever-shifting game of Twister. Staging “Rocky Horror” brings with it the dicey problem of how to deal with the audience participation aspect so vital to the cult movie experience. Many in the audience exhibit intimate familiarity with this cinematic experience that involves shouting things at the actors, throwing things and even dressing up as the characters and acting out some of the parts (in what are called shadow performances). Lakewood Playhouse wants to encourage some of this and discourage some of it. Throwing, lighting and squirting are prohibited. Shouting, dancing and dressing as characters, on the other hand, are encouraged. For a mere five bucks, theatergoers can buy an “audience partica-pation goodie bag” that has little LED lights and confetti that can be used at given parts of the show. While some members of the audience are obvious aficionados, many others are “virgins” and are taken unawares by the various shouts ejaculated by their fellows. Overall, the show is a dazzling spectacle. If Lakewood Playhouse can get its microphones to cooperate, this could be something more. “The Rocky Horror Show” runs through Jan. 29. The run includes two midnight performances that will go even further to capture that cultic, cinematic experience. For further information visit www. lakewoodplayhouse.org.

FOOD ADDICTS IN RECOVERY ANONYMOUS Sat., Jan. 14, 8-9:30 a.m. Trinity Lutheran Church, 12115 Park Ave. S. An international fellowship of men and women who have experienced difficulties in life as a result of the way we used to eat. Price: Free. Info: (253) 310-8177; trinitylutheranparkland.org REDSHIFT AT B SHARP COFFEE HOUSE Sat., Jan. 14, 8-10 p.m. B Sharp Coffee House, 706 Court C Jazz trio Redshift will be performing. Ages: All ages. Price: $7 cover. Info: (253) 292-9969; www.bsharpcoffeehouse.com ‘30 AMERICANS’ Sat., Jan. 14, 10 a.m. Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave. This critically acclaimed, nationally traveling exhibition showcases paintings, photographs, installations, videos, and sculptures by prominent African American artists who have emerged since the 1970s as trailblazers in the contemporary art scene. Ages: All ages. Price: $15

adult, $13 student/military/ senior (65+), $40 family (two adults and up to four children under 18), children 5 and under free. Members always free. Info: (253) 272-4258; www.tacomaartmuseum.org ‘SOUNDS OF BRASS’ Sun., Jan 15, 3-4 p.m. Tacoma Community College, 6501 S. 19th St. 19th annual concert with clarinetist soloist Cindy Renander and music selections of Beethoven, Prokofiev, Mahler, and Ravel. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 7599511; www.tacoma.ctc.edu FILM FOCUS: SPENCER TRACY – ‘GUESS WHO’S COMING TO DINNER?’ Sun., Jan. 15, 3 p.m. Theatre on the Square, 915 Broadway A couple’s prejudices and views on race are challenged when their daughter introduces her fiancée. Price: $12. Info: (253) 591-5894; www. broadwaycenter.org NEW SPANISH WORSHIP SERVICE Sun., Jan. 15, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 101 E. 38th St. We are offering a new Spanish worship service for the community. All are welcome to this new outreach which will use the same format as our English service. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 474-0525; blctacoma.com PBS KIDS ‘SPLASH AND BUBBLES’ SPECIAL SCREENING Sun., Jan. 15, 1-3 p.m. Foss Waterway Seaport, 705 Dock St. Come and enjoy a special screening of the new PBS KIDS show “Splash and Bubbles.” Admission will be free, and there will be an exciting presentation of “One Big Ocean” with lots of hands on activities and fun give-aways. Ages: All ages.

Price: Admission free with registration. Info: (253) 272-2750 2017 MLK JR. UNITY BREAKFAST: LET’S TALK ABOUT ACTION Mon., Jan. 16, 8-10:30 a.m. University of WashingtonTacoma, 1918 Pacific Ave. The 11th Annual MLK Unity Breakfast recognizes and celebrates the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his historic civic leadership that inspired a nation to strive for equality. Price: Free. Info: (253) 692-4501; www.tacoma.uw.edu/mlkregister CREATIVE COLLOQUY MONTHLY READING & OPEN MIC Mon., Jan. 16, 7-10 p.m. B Sharp Coffee House, 706 Court C Don’t let January’s winter chill keep you from bundling up and heading to downtown Tacoma for Creative Colloquy’s monthly reading and open mic. Price: Free. Info: (915) 471-5028; www.bsharpcoffeehouse.com SUDSPOP WITH PACIFIC BREWING & MALTING CO. Mon., Jan. 16, 6-10 p.m. Peaks and Pints, 3816 N. 26th St. We’re calling the series SudsPop, asking breweries to supply music playlists and craft beer, as well as host activities such as trivia and games of skill. Ages: 21 and older. Price: No cover. Info: (253) 328-5621; peaksandpints.com COAST TO CASCADES: C. C. MCKIM’S IMPRESSIONIST VISIONS Mon., Jan. 16, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave. McKim’s light-filled, evocative images of Oregon landscapes capture the unique beauty and character of the Northwest. Ages: All ages. Price: $15 adults, $13 student/military/ seniors (65+), $40 family (two adults and up to four children under 18), children 5 and under free. Members always free. Info: (253) 272-4258; www.tacomaartmuseum.org


Page 14 • universityplacepress.net • Friday, January 13, 2017

ENTERTAINMENT TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

MOTOWN LEGEND SMOKEY ROBINSON – AKA THE POET LAUREATE OF SOUL – WILL BRING “QUIET STORM,” “TEARS OF A CLOWN” AND OTHER CLASSICS TO THE EMERALD QUEEN CASINO I-5 SHOWROOM ON FRIDAY, JAN. 13. THE SHOW STARTS AT 8:30 P.M., AND TICKETS ARE ON SALE NOW WITH PRICES RANGING FROM $70 TO $160; WWW.EMERALDQUEEN.COM.

GET THE PARTY STARTED, SHE WILL: SAUCY YODA RETURNS NEXT WEEK

PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD

FRIDAY, JAN. 13

MONDAY, JAN. 16 THE VALLEY: Old Foals, Nocturnal Habits, Blanco Bronco (rock, alternative) 8 p.m., NC

G. DONNALSON’S: Johnaye Kendrick (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Sonic Funk (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Stoned Evergreen Travelers, Cottonwood Cutups, Danny Cash (bluegrass, country, Americana) 8 p.m., $5-$8 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC PACIFIC BREWING: Ethan Tucker (rock, blues, acoustic) 8 p.m., NC, AA REAL ART TACOMA: Mungfest 2017 featuring American Wrecking Co., Fallen Kings, Massacre at the Opera, Chamber 6 (metal, hard rock) 8 p.m., AA STONEGATE: Led Zeppmen (Led Zeppelin tribute) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: ‘90s Underground (alternative, Brit pop) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Steve-O (comedy) 10:30 p.m., $22-$30 UNCLE SAM’S: The Remedy (rock covers) 8 p.m.

THE SWISS: Chuck Gay (open mic) 7 p.m., NC

B SHARP COFFEE: Creative Colloquy (spoken word) 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON’S: Heather Jones and the Groove Masters (R&B, soul, funk) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: “Guitar Going Monday,” 7 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke (live band karaoke) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Michael Langdon (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, JAN. 17

DAWSON’S: Leanne Trevalyan and Billy Stoops (open mic) 8 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, JAN. 14

TACOMA COMEDY: Steve-O (comedy) 10:30 p.m., $22-$30

B SHARP COFFEE: Redshift (jazz) 8 p.m., $7, AA G. DONNALSON’S: Nancy Erickson (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Sonic Funk (dance) 9 p.m., NC KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC THE SPAR: Mashtown Bluegrass Band (bluegrass) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Spazmatics (‘80s covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 UNCLE SAM’S: Law Dogg show, 8 p.m. THE VALLEY: Squeak and Squawk fundraiser with Mr. Motorcycle, Widowspeak, The Cutwinkles, Kilcic Band (indie-rock, punk, psychedelic rock) 9 p.m., $7

SUNDAY, JAN. 15

IMMANUEL PRESBYTERIAN: Blues Vespers with Kim Archer and Jay Mabin (blues, rock, soul) 5 p.m., NC

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA NORTHERN PACIFIC: Stingy Brim Slim (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lefferty (open mic) 8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18

DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SAUCY YODA

G. DONNALSON’S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 8 p.m., NC NORTHERN PACIFIC: Open mic, 7:30 p.m., NC, AA TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m. THE VALLEY: Saucy Yoda, Garlic Man and Chicken (rap, pop, punk, garage-rock) 8 p.m., NC

THURSDAY, JAN. 19

TACOMA COMEDY: Rocky LaPorte (comedy) 8 p.m., $10-$16, 18+

B SHARP COFFEE: Samsara Blues Band with Lafleur (blues) 8 p.m., $7, AA G. DONNALSON’S: “Soulful Sundays” (blues, gospel) 6:30 p.m., NC, AA REAL ART TACOMA: The Cardboard Swords, Panoramic, Quieter, Item Finder (rock) 5 p.m., $7-$10, AA

B SHARP COFFEE: Keith Henson Octet (jazz) 8 p.m., NC, AA G. DONNALSON’S: John Maxwell (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Power Rock Jam (jam night) 8 p.m., NC

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

POP. Saucy Yoda is set to bring her blend of rap, pop and garage to the stage at The Valley Pub Jan. 18. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@universityplacepress

Saucy Yoda has turned to the dark side (sort of), which may come as some surprise to local fans that have followed her since she first surfaced in Tacoma at Maltoberfest, an Oktoberfest-spoofing event held at Bob’s Java Jive in 2011. Saucy Yoda being the stage name of Alaska’s Melodie Langer, who will headline The Valley Pub on Wednesday, Jan. 18. To this point, she has specialized in irreverent party jams about turning up (“Party Every Day,” “Mothership”), turning back down (“Melatonin”) and Chinese takeout (or possibly something else on the innuendo-heavy “Wonton”). Her sound is an infectious blend of rap, pop and garage-rock that the Alaska Dispatch News recently called “Punky Brewster meets the Beastie Boys.” But from her first album, “Dysfunctional Dingus,” to 2015’s “It’s Not a Mystery,” there has been a pronounced movement away from programmed rhythm tracks to guitardriven rock, a transition that came partly out of necessity after her computer died a few years back. “I didn’t have a way to make beats, and my old producer quit music and sold all of his equipment,” Langer recalled last week. So she picked up her

first guitar and quickly realized she preferred strumming to staring at an LED screen for hours on end. “That’s just such a tedious practice,” she said. “I’d rather just hold a guitar in my hand and make (songs) like that. My first album, I spent an entire year recording, working almost every single day in the studio; and it was all done on a computer.” Langer may have rapped to digital backing tracks during her earliest performances, but fans should expect a full rock show on Wednesday. Her band includes drummer Jackson Eli McQuown and Bremerton-based bassist Dante Manalo, who will also open the show with solo ukulele material, as Ukululu Brown. Singer and backup dancer Nessa Marie will also open the show under her own alias, Sasshole. Fans can also expect to hear some new material, which is where Saucy Yoda’s flirtation with “the dark side” comes in. Langer said she has been drawing on weirder influences – the likes of Mr. Bungle and Jay Reatard – as she has prepared a “darker” new album that she hopes to release over the summer. “This album is different,” Langer said. “I kind of consider my band to be like Ween or Beck or the Beastie Boys where it’s just all over the place and people generally tend to like it. Most of my fans

are pretty open minded.” Among new cuts that may show up during next week’s set are “Park Song,” which she said features spooky whistling; a 1960s-style garage-rock cut called “No Fun;” and a number called “Sun Slime.” “That one is more ominous and surreal sounding,” she said, “as if the twins from ‘The Shining’ were to write a song and sing it.” Also joining Saucy Yoda on the bill Wednesday will be weirdo electro-clash duo Garlic Man and Chikn, which recently switched monikers to Creature Hole. (Do yourselves a favor and check out their video for “Shavin’ My Leg” on YouTube; but maybe do it at home since it’s mildly NSFW.) The fun will start at 8 p.m. Wednesday, and there will be a $5 cover charge. The Valley is located at 1206 Puyallup Ave; www. thevalleytacoma.com for further details. Saucy Yoda and company may also appear Thursday night at Real Art Tacoma, though details had not yet solidified as the deadline for this story approached. Visit www. realarttacoma.com for possible updates.

Find Saucy Yoda’s music online at saucyyoda. bandcamp.com


Friday, January 13, 2017 sUNIVERSITYPLACEPRESSNETsPAGE 15

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NOTICES

NOTICES

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF THURSTON FAMILY AND JUVENILE COURT NO:16-7-00461-34 Notice and Summons by Publication (Dependency) (SMPB) Dependency of: JOE PERVA, JR, D.O.B.: 04/05/01 To: KRISTINA BJORNE, Mother: A Dependency Petition was filed on July 27, 2016; a Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: January 20, 2017, at 1:30 p.m. at Thurston County Family and Juvenile Court, 2801 32nd Avenue SW, Tumwater, Washington 98501. You should be present at this hearing.

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Fife Towing, Fife Recovery Service & NW Towing, at 1313 34th Ave E, Fife on 1/17/2017. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130 at 11:00 a.m. Viewing of cars from 08:00-09:00 a.m. Registered Tow Numbers 5009, 5421, 5588. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

The hearing will determine if your child is dependent as defined in RCW 13.34.050(5). This begins a judicial process which could result in permanent loss of your parental rights. If you do not appear at the hearing, the court may enter a dependency order in your absence. To request a copy of the Notice, summons, and Dependency Petition, call DSHS At 360-725-6700 or 1-888-822-3541. To View information about your rights, including right to a lawyer, go to HYPERLINK “http://www.atg. wa.gov/DPY.aspx” www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.aspx. Dated: 12-9-2016, by Linda Mythre Enlow, Thursday County Clerk.

TO: Anthony Sakellis Case Name: D-S., D Case Number: PUY-CW-CW-2015-0007 Nature of Case: Child/Family Protection Petition-ADJUDICATORY HEARING SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF HEARING A Child/Family Protection Petition has been filed regarding the above-named child. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to personally appear before the Children’s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians for a FORMAL ADJUDICATORY HEARING and date, time and location below: DATE: February 23, 2017 TIME: 10:30 am. LOCATION: 1451 EAST 31ST ST., TACOMA, WA 98404 At the formal adjudicatory hearing the petitioner must prove that the allegations raised in the child/family protection are more likely true than not and that the best interests of the child will be served by continued Court intervention. The Court will either find the allegations of the child/family protection petition to be true or dismiss the child/family protection petition, unless continued to allow the presentation of further evidence. If you do not respond to the petition with in 20 Days or appear for the formal adjudicatory hearing, the Court may find you default and enter a default order of child/family protection and order necessary intervention and appropriate steps you must follow to correct the underlying problem(s). NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.750, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THISMAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. A copy of the Petition and an Advisement of Rights is available at the Court Clerk’s office. You may call Puyallup Tribe Children’s Services for more information about your child. The caseworker’s name is Katie Riebel and the telephone number is 253-680-5532. Dated this 9th day of January, 2017. For more information, please call the Puyallup Tribal Court Clerk at 253-680-5585

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Northwest Towing, at 2025 S 341st Pl, Federal Way on 1/17/2017. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130. at 2:00 p.m. Viewing of cars from 1:00-2:00 p.m. Registered Tow Number 5695. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

WANTED WANTED: Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

(253) 752-8105

VOLUNTEERS NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE, TWEET LESS CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care has some great ways for you to serve the community and make meaningful connections. Those near the end of life need help with living. If you have 1-4 hours a week to read to someone, listen to their stories, run errands, make phone calls, or welcome people to our hospice facility, then we have several opportunities for you. Join us in the new year for trainings scheduled in January and March. Log onto www.chifranciscan.org and click “hospice and palliative care” in the “our services” tab to learn more. Or call James Bentley at 253-538-4649

#PROJECTFEEDTACOMA There are about 2,000 homeless in Tacoma and about 1.000 beds. Many are families with children. Please help #PROJ E C T F E E D TA C O M A to provide some basic necessities. All items donated will go directly to people on the street. PROJECT FEED TACOMA is 100% volunteer. This is a true grass roots organization and they really need your help. For more information and to find more go to www. projectfeedtacoma.org. Can you help with some urgent needs as winter approaches? Here are some suggestions and a huge THANK YOU! Needed: Warm Socks for Men, Women and Children; Warm Hats; Gloves; Peanut Butter and Jam/Jelly; Crackers, Chips and non-perish-

VOLUNTEERS able snacks; Individually wrapped granola bars or protein bars; cookies; lotion; lip balm; tampons and sanitary napkins; wipes; soap, shampoo and conditioner; gallon sized freezer bags. A BIG THANKS TO THE COPPER DOOR FOR ALLOWING PROJECT FEED TACOMA TO COLLECT DONATIONS THERE. Wear a 100 years of Fashion! Like to play dress-up? The Golden Oldies Guild (a volunteer arm of Goodwill) is looking for women to model in our vintage fashion shows. We do shows at lifestyle retirement communities, museums, assisted living facilities, churches, and a wide variety of fundraisers. The collection, from the late 1890’s to l980’s, is women’s garments in about size 12 and smaller. You don’t need to be elegant—you need to like to have fun. We also need piano and keyboard accompanists. Come join us! Contact Christine Oliver-Hammond (253) 5736765 (corrected phone number) or goldenoldiesguild@goodwill.com for information or to apply. Help hard-working families by volunteering with VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance)! Provide free income tax preparation to low and moderate income households. Locations throughout Pierce County. Day, evening and weekend hours available (February to April 2017). Volunteers can serve as tax preparers, quality reviewers, greeters, or interpreters (for non-English speaking or hearing-impaired tax payers). Free training provided. Learn more and apply online at www.VolunteerTaxHelp.org. Volunteer meals on Wheels Driver Seeking a volunteer Meals on Wheels Driver. Delivers frozen meals once a week in the Pierce County area, mileage reimbursement. Must have a clean background check, WA driver’s license, car insurance and food handlers card. Call front desk for more info: 253-272-8433 AmeriCorps Opportunity: Employment Case Manager/Job Developer Tacoma Community House is seek an outgoing, enthusiastic, and motivated professional that is passionate about assisting low-income community members on their journey to self-sufficiency. This professional position is responsible for assisting people in need of employment. The case manager/ job developer will provide career counseling, employment & training information, job search skills, workshop facilitation, job placement/follow-up, and

VOLUNTEERS

referral to other community resources. The case manager/job develop will assist in facilitation of our Employer Advisory Board and will also develop and implement 3 financial fitness events. Contact Arrie Dunlap at (253) 383-3951 or adunlap@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information. AmeriCorps Opportunity: Read2Me Program Specialist Tacoma Community House seeks an AmeriCorps member to assist in the Read2Me Program in local elementary schools. Read2Me is a one-on-one adult/student reading program for struggling first, second, and third grade readers. Duties include recruiting volunteers, producing a monthly tutor newsletter, facilitating bimonthly tutor workshops, tracking attendance for both students and volunteer tutors, researching best practicing best practices for tutoring strategies and tutor training and tutoring a student in each of the four schools. You must be 18-25 years of age at the start date of service (Sep 1, 2016-Jul 15, 2017). Contact Karen Thomas at (253)-383-3951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information. Great Volunteer Opportunity Make friends, have fun and help seniors with simple tasks. You’ll make a big difference by helping people maintain their independence. This is volunteering, not caregiving. Volunteers must be 55 or older, low income, serve 15 hrs/wk and live in Pierce or Kitsap Counties. Drivers are especially needed. Benefits include hourly tax-free stipend and mileage reimbursement. For information call Julie at Lutheran Community Services, Senior Companion Volunteer Program, (253)722-5686. Food Bank Eloise’s Cooking Pot Food Bank on the Eastside of Tacoma, WA is powered strictly by volunteers. We provide much needed food and other basic household items to people in need on a weekly basis. Being a volunteer driven organization we are always looking for good people who are interested in donating a few hours of their lives helping make the lives of someone else a little better. Donate as much or as little of your time you want for a wide variety of tasks, there is always plenty to do. If you are looking for a way to be part of something bigger and give a little much needed help to the local community then contact us and we’ll get you started. Please

join us in helping to spread a little holiday cheer. Contact 253212-2778.

Coordinator, royf@ tacomaparks.com or 253.305.1025.

Join us in changing lives!

Help furnish hope to those in need! NW Furniture Bank Volunteers needed. “NWFB helps restore hope, dignity and stability in our community by recycling donated furniture to people in need.” Tuesday-Saturday Truck Volunteers Needed- 9:00 am-2:00 pm. Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at info@ nwfurniturebank.org or call 253-302-3868.

Changing Rein Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies, a nonprofit, offers equine assisted services to differently-abled individuals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and adaptive lessons. Other volunteer opportunities include: grounds maintenance and administrative/clerical work. Must be at least 14 years old to participate. Horse experience helpful, but not necessary. Training provided. For more information contact: Volunteer Coordinator at 253-370-1429 or volunteer@changingrein.org.

South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www.southsoundoutreach.org.

The Tacoma Maritime Institute meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00. Call 253-536-4494

Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/ nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports

Be a Big Brother! Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG difference in the life of a child. There are several program options to fit your schedule and interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agency-planned activity. For more information, visit www.bbbsps.org or call 206.763.9060.

PETS Pet of the Week

FEZZIWIG Would you look at those ears? Word at the shelter is that it Bull Terrier mi e iwig fits his namesake to a tee. Just like Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol character, this pooch could be explained as happy, kind, and affectionate. Eightyears-young e iwig would fit est with a teenage or adult home — #A513029

www.thehumanesociety.org

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his MUS SEE newly updated home boasts new hardwood floors, carpets and a large deck that will be finished in a couple weeks. Located in a beautifully quiet part of orth acoma with a partial view of the sound is just a stones throw from an amazing park and walking distance to a shopping area! ith 3 bedrooms on the main level and another in the lower, this home is large yet cozy! ot to mention the huge rec room downstairs! Come and check it out! You wont regret it! 3 5,000

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3 BED 2 BATH 1742 SF. WEL1BED 1 BATH 450CLEAN, SF. 1BED 1 BATH 450 SF. 2 COME BD 1BATO845 SF.3COZY SETHIS BED 2AND BATH CLEAN, COZY APARTCOZY APARTMENT IN TACOMA, CLUDED 1BD 1BA HOME W/ OPEN U.P. HOME, W/HARDWOOD MENT IN TACOMA, WITH WITH EASY ACCESSTOTOWA-16. WA-16. LOFT SPACE THE FIN.LEVEL. ATTIC. FLOORS ON IN THE MAIN EASY ACCESS

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9007 115THAVE ST.E E#L1 1122 FOSDICK DR LN NW 8403 LOCUST 2205 PT. BOBS HOLLOW

Keller Williams Realty www.NeverWalkAlone.co With Keith G. Walker by your side, you’ll never walk alone

22BED BATH 1157 33 BED BED2.52BATH BATH 1822SF. WONBED2.5 2 BATH 1100SF.SF.REMODBEAU2274 SF. 2 STORY W/ ELED & TOWNHOUSE W/ 2 LOWER BEDS TIFUL SPACIOUS 2BD 3DERFUL SPACIOUSSECLUDED BEDROOMS, SETTING UPSTAIRS 1.5 BATH. NEWER FLOORING, AND AREA FOROPEN THISLOFT, 3 BD 2 LANDING BA HOME WITH & UNIT AT WEST LAKE TAPPS APPLIANCES, NEWER PAINT. PERFECT FOR A WORK STATION. LOFT AREA OVER THE KITCHEN. CONDOMINIUMS

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$1425 $1750

3 BED 2.5 BATH 1680 SF. 1 BED, 1 BATH 575COMFORTABLE SF. GREAT 2 BED, 1 BATH 880 SF. 4 BD 2.5 BA 2450 SF. BEAUTIFUL MUST FANTASTIC 2 VALUE IN THIS NICE 1 BEDLOWER LEVEL 2 BEDROOM / 1 BATH- HOME HAS SEE!! FORMAL ROOM, STORY HOME, 3SITTING BEDROOM ROOM UPPER UNIT AVAILABLE ROOM UNIT.PACIFIC SECTIONOAKS 8 ACCEPTED OPEN KITCHEN AMPLE STORAGE 2.5 BATH ONW/ A CORNER LOT. IN THE APTS.

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HOMES

3008 S. 12TH ST., TACOMA

COMMERCIAL

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BUSINESSES OPPORTUNITIES

Real Estate Consultant

PLACE N.UNIV. TACOMA HOME

Good Investment Property, FULLY LEASED , completely remodeled commercial office building, 3350 sq ft, .25 acre commercial lot, owner occupied, 10 offices, 3 bathrooms, Spacious conference room, 2 full Kitchen reception area, 2 parking lots front and rear. Centrally located to all services.

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REALTORS

253-653-1168 TACOMA TACOMA APT.

GREAT LOCATION! Brand new construction in Old Town. Great views of Commencement Bay. Large covered trex decks on water side to enjoy the views. Main floor Master with deck access. Gas fireplaces up and down. Gas furnace with heat pump, Huge Rec/ Family room downstairs. Maple raised panel Cabinets, Granite counters ,Engineered flooring on the entire main floor. Vaulted ceilings. Roughed in Vac system. Deluxe painted millwork.Quiet dead end street. Beautifully staged & ready! A Rare find!

$749,000

Carmen Neal, Blue Emerald Real Estate 253-632-2920

Keith G. Walker CONDOSCONDOS & HOMES APARTMENTS, & HOMES

Beautiful turn of the century home, located central to all services. Remodeled 2 stories w/ basement detached oversized 2 car garage, fully fenced, hot tub, nicely landscaped. Interior Floor plan features open concept living w/ spacious formal living & dining, enticing Kitchen w/Quartz counter tops, Shaker cabinets, Farm sink, Stainless Steel appliances, Pantry & Island. Evening brings 4 bedrooms 2 tastefully tiled bathrooms one adjoining. Partially finished laundry area in basement for games & hobbies.

3 Beds, 1 Bath, 1250 SF. Wonderful Victorian home that has easy commute to UPS & is close to Franklin elementary!!! Large covered front porch. Main floor bedroom. oth a living room & family room Large bedrooms. reakfast bar & loads of storage in kitchen. ewer roof, storm windows, newer hot water tank & furnace.Great Value Fully fenced backyard and paved driveway. Fresh paint inside and out, new flooring, updated plumbing & electrical, and fully insulated! Plenty of room for your own touches! Super close to 6th Ave! MLS# 832899 $150,000

Rachel Lieder-Simeon, Redfin Real Estate (253) 780-6068 FOR RENT

FOR SALE!! 4008 S. Pine, Tacoma

HOMES

HOMES

1326 N. HEATHERWOOD W, TACOMA, WA 98406-1433

FOR RENT

FOR SALE 2307 N 27th St., Tacoma

$289,000

%0/05/&&%50#&'*3455*.&)0.&#6:&3 )064&)0-%45)"5&"3/6150 1&3:3 64&8*5)')" 7" $0/7-0"/4

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FOR SALE 1660 S 55th ST, Tacoma

EATING ESTABLISHMENT WITH BEER & WINE - Same Owners last 9 years, great location, Business price $285,000, terms avail. OFFICE BUILDING WITH 6 SUITES, Close to Wright’s Park, ideal for Attorneys or Professional use. Asking Price $519,000, Terms. Suites are also available for Lease.

price reduction

LONGTIME ESTABLISHED POPULAR RESTR./LOUNGE ON 6TH AVE. Business for sale. $149,000 $110,000 OR LEASE the space, 3,300 SQ. FT. for $4,000 Month. SAME OWNER: BARTENDING ACADEMY OF TACOMA, Since 1959, Very profitable, Training provided.

RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109


PAGE 18suniversityplacepress.netsFriday, January 13, 2017

Smokey Robinson Battle at the Boat 109

Lunar New Year Nguyen Hung

January 13, 8:30pm

January 20, 8pm

January 28, 8pm

I-5 Showroom $70, $95, $160, $170

I-5 Showroom $30, $50, $75, $100

I-5 Showroom -VDLZ&OWFMPQF(JWFBXBZ

Air Supply

CageSport MMA Blue Öyster Cult

February 14, 8pm

February 25, 7pm

March 11, 8pm

I-5 Showroom $30, $45, $70, $75

I-5 Showroom $35, $55, $100

I-5 Showroom $25, $35, $55, $60

MORE Winners, MORE Often! twww.emeraldqueen.com &2$* *&YJU &UI4U 5BDPNB 8"t&2$)PUFM$BTJOP *&YJU 1BD)XZ& 'JGF 8" :PVNVTUCFUPFOUFSUIFDBTJOP.BOBHFNFOUSFTFSWFTUIFSJHIUUPDIBOHFBOZFWFOUPSQSPNPUJPO5JDLFUTBWBJMBCMFBUUIF&2$#PY0GGJDFT&2$JTOPUSFTQPOTJCMFGPSBOZUIJSEQBSUZUJDLFUTBMFT


Upp 01 13 17 p01