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FREE • Friday, September 2, 2016

HS FOOTBALL ARRIVES

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TAcOmA cOmmunITy BOAT BuILdERS

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cREEdEncE cLEARwATER REVISITEd

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.com TACOMAWEEKLY YO U R CO M M U N I T Y NE W S PA P E R - 29 YE A R S O F SE R V I C E

PHOTOS BY DEREK SHUCK

REVEAL. (Left) Old Town Business District Association President Ruth Dalenius (left) and former president John Trueman (right) unveil the returned statue

on Aug. 25. (Right) Bill Evans (left) who helped bring the salmon statue to Old Town in the first place, poses with the returned statue with former Old Town Business District Association President John Trueman (right.)

MISSING OLD TOWN SOUL SALMON SCULPTURE RETURNS TO GATEWAY PARK RETURNED AFTER 10 YEARS MISSING By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

T

he disappearance of salmon has been an issue in the Pacific Northwest for decades, but for residents of Old Town, one salmon’s absence has been particularly notable. Ten years ago, the 8-foot long “Soul Salmon” sculpture decorating Gateway Park in Old Town mysteriously disappeared without a trace. It was assumed that the small prank would quickly be over and the salmon would be returned. Days, weeks, months and years passed with no word on the salmon, and without any further clues, hope was slowly abandoned.

SALMON RETURNED EXACTLY FROM WHERE IT WAS TAKEN

“The most historic business community in our city is Old Town. This is where it all started. It’s the most historic of all the salmon because of what’s on it.” – BUSINESS OWNER BILL EVANS “We assumed it was somebody that would give it back shortly, that it was kind of a joke thing. It never happened,

HILLTOP STREET FAIR BRINGS GOOD THINGS TO OFTEN-MALIGNED NEIGHBORHOOD

and we just gave up,” John Trueman, former president of the Old Town Business Association, said.

COURT, AGAIN, ORDERS RELEASE OF PLANNED PSE GAS PLANT’S SAFETY INFORMATION

That is, until two weeks ago, when the salmon returned exactly from where it was taken, with a brief note letting the community know that the thieves had their fun and were done with the art. With minimal damage, the sculpture was (very) securely reattached to a stand, and is set to remain at Gateway Park, welcoming visitors to Old Town. On Thursday, Aug. 25, the Old Town Business District re-unveiled the statue at Gateway Park, finally restoring the area to its intended state. The salmon is part of a larger project to raise awareness for salmon habitat. Statues were distributed in Tacoma and beyond over a decade ago, and others sit at places u See SOUL SALMON / page A9

GABRIEL LANDRY: A FREE SPIRIT WITH RELATIONSHIPS, CAREERS AND TWO LIVES – INDIAN AND NON-INDIAN

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO BY KILIAM LORD

COMMUNITY UNITY. This year’s Hilltop Street Fair featured something for absolutely everyone to enjoy. It’s safe to say that everyone had a good time enjoying the uniqueness of the festival and the neighborhood. By Zane Harper Special to Tacoma Weekly

When you hear the word “Hilltop,” what comes to mind? For many Washingtonians, they think of what is described as being the roughest, toughest, “ghetto” neighborhood in the Pacific Northwest. No one could blame this opinion of the neighborhood due to

its drug activity, heavy gang violence and poverty. What happened on these streets throughout the 80’s and 90’s is a key factor as to why the area has the notorious, and undeniable, reputation that it has today. Throughout the years before, during and after Tacoma became an incorporated city, the Hilltop neighborhood u See hiLLtop / page A4

DOWN TO THE WIRE

A10 ouR viEw

The Click Engagement Committee presented ways that an “all in” system might work, what upgrading it would mean and how much it would all cost. paGE a6

I LOVE THE ’90S pHOTOS

B2

Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

Environmental activists and members of RedLine Tacoma, a group that opposes the planned liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility on the tideflats, scored a win of sorts last week when Superior Court Judge Frank E. Cuthbertson ordered the release of safety response studies that Puget Sound Energy submitted as part of the facility’s permit process. This is the same information RedLine Tacoma founder John Carlton sought months ago but has so far been blocked by an appeal. PSE is blocking the release to Carlton and media outlets seeking the information using

u See LNG / page A4

LANDRY

larry@tacomaweekly.com

Born in Tacoma 66 years ago, Gabriel Landry was the son of a Chippewa father, Alexander Landry, and a Puyallup mother, Lena, who was active in tribal affairs. It was a trait Landry attempted to follow – with mixed success. Growing up in Tacoma, one of his early life lessons was that being a Native required a unique personality. “Those in the tribe live two lives – there's Indian u See LaNdRy / page A9

JOHn CAPARULO IN CONCERT

B5 Sports ........................A10 Hot Tickets ................A11

Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO BY LARRY LARUE

By Larry LaRue

Facebook: facebook.com/tacomaweekly Twitter: @Tacomaweekly Tumblr: tacomaweekly.tumblr.com Pinterest: pinterest.com/tacomaweekly Flickr: flickr.com/tacomaweekly

A&E ....................... ....B1 Make A Scene ............B7

Calendar ................. B6 Horoscopes............. B6

Two Sections | 24 Pages


Section A • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 2, 2016

Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK

EAST 43RD AND C STREET Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the residents know it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.” In 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of roads riddled with holes, and continue those efforts. Two road packages passed by voters last year added money to the city’s street fund. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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Bulletin Board WALK TACOMA VISITS HILLTOP SEPT. 7 Walk through the revitalizing Hilltop neighborhood on Wednesday, Sept. 7 with Downtown On the Go’s second to last Walk Tacoma event of 2016. City of Tacoma Councilmember Keith Blocker will lead the group along a 1.5-mile route, emphasizing the valuable new community resources and developments over the past few years. The walk will begin at 5:15 p.m. at South 11th & MLK Jr. Way and end at People’s Community Center. There will be a social in the Center with light refreshments to highlight the upcoming opening of the new pool. This walk is free, and there is no need to pre-register, just meet at the start location. Councilmember Blocker will feature exciting community projects, new and existing, such as the Sound Transit Link expansion, which will begin construction in 2018, Catholic Community Services, the Tacoma Armory, and Valhalla Hall. Blocker is an involved councilmember and an engaging speaker who will have plenty of information to share on these projects. The Walk Tacoma series, sponsored by the Puyallup Watershed Initiative Active Transportation COI, is a sevenevent walking series held on the first Wednesday of the month, from April through October. The Veteran & Business Service, which works with the Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber to put veterans to work, is generously sponsoring the Hilltop Walk. The fun, themed walks, now in their seventh year, encourage people to enjoy downtown on foot by introducing new walking routes, and sharing information about the community and its history through the guided tours. Pick-up a Downtown On the Go punch card at the Hilltop walk and earn a DOTG T-shirt by attending three Downtown On the Go Walk, Bike or Transit events. Punch cards will be available at all Downtown On the Go Walk, Bike and Transit events. South 11th & MLK Jr. Way is accessible by many Pierce Transit routes. If you’re arriving by car, there is street parking available. Bike parking can be found on street at many of the adjacent businesses. For more information on the full Walk Tacoma series visit www.downtownonthego.org or find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. FERRY OFFERS TWO-BOAT SERVICE FOR LABOR DAY The Pierce County Ferry will offer additional runs during the Labor Day weekend to accommodate holiday travelers. Pierce County will operate both boats from noon to 6:40 p.m. on Sept. 2, 4 and 5. In addition to normally scheduled runs, the system’s second ferry will depart Steilacoom at 12:30 p.m., 1:50 p.m., 2:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m. and 6 p.m. Visitors can view the ferry schedule at www.piercecountywa.org/ferry. An additional run departing Steilacoom at 10 p.m. will be offered on Labor Day, Sept. 5. The Pierce County Ferry System provides service between Steilacoom, Anderson Island and Ketron Island. More information about the system is available at www. piercecountywa.org/ferry. UPCOMING EVENT ROAD CLOSURES THROUGH SEPT. 11 Please note the anticipated event-related road closures expected around Tacoma through Sunday, Sept. 11: · On Thursday, Sept. 1, the South G Street Back to School Block Party event will close South G Street between South 17th and South 18th streets from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. · On Sunday, Sept. 4, the Murray Morgan Bridge Wedding event will close South 11th Street, including the Murray Morgan Bridge, between A Street and St Paul Avenue from 1 to 4 p.m. · On Sunday, Sept. 4, the 29th Street Block Party event will close North 29th Street between North Lawrence and North Alder streets from 3 to 8 p.m. · On Monday, Sept. 5, the Adams Street Block Party event will close North Adams Street between North 24th and North 22nd streets from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. · On Tuesday, Sept. 6, the Eastside Families Back to School Parade and Festival event will close various segments of East 39th, East R, East 43rd, East Q, and East 51st streets, as well as East Portland Avenue between East 39th and East 52nd streets from noon to 1 p.m. · On Friday, Sept. 9, the Anderson Street Block Party event will close North Anderson Street between North 8th and North 10th streets from 4:30 to 9:30 p.m. · On Sunday, Sept. 11, the Downtown to Defiance event will close Ruston Way, Schuster Parkway, South 4th, and Dock streets between North 51st and East D streets from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Ongoing: · The Proctor Farmers Market closes North 27th from North Proctor to North Madison streets every Saturday from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. · The 6th Ave Farmers Market closes North Pine Street from 6th Avenue to North 7th Street every Tuesday from noon to 9 p.m. · The Broadway Farmers Market closes Broadway from South 9th to South 11th streets every Thursday from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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Closures may change as a result of weather, event alterations and other unexpected circumstances. To get event-related road closure updates, go to the cityoftacoma.org event road closures web page and use the “Click to subscribe” link. To access a map of City construction projects with potential traffic impacts visit GovMe.com and click on Large Impact Construction Projects.

SECTION OF 108TH STREET EAST TO BE RESURFACED 108th Street East will be resurfaced between Ainsworth Avenue South and Pacific Avenue South from Sept. 6-16. The road will remain open, although it will be reduced to one lane with alternating traffic. Motorists should expect 15-minute delays from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekdays. The work may be postponed if it rains. In order to extend the life of the pavement and improve the condition of the roadway, crews will break up the existing concrete slabs into smaller sections and apply four inches of asphalt over the top. Crews previously upgraded curb ramps along this section of 108th Street East to bring them into compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Puget Paving, Inc. is the contractor. The construction work will cost approximately $735,525 and is funded with County Road Funds. This work is part of Pierce County’s pavement preservation program. BUFFALO HISTORY MUSEUM HOLDS LABOR DAY FESTIVAL The Buffalo Soldiers Museum will be hosting their annual Labor Day Festival on Sept. 5 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Heidelberg baseball Park at 1902 South Tyler. In addition to food vendors and arts and crafts, JBLM Army and Air force teams will be taking the field to provide some free entertainment while honoring the past. The army will be representing the Buffalo Soldiers and the Air Force will be representing the Red Tail Hawks. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call 253-272-4257. PIONEER DAYS TO FEATURE SPECIAL PERFORMANCES The pioneer spirit is alive and well in Tacoma. Come to Old Town Park on Saturday, Sept. 17, where Job Carr Cabin Museum will host the seventh Annual Pioneer Days Festival, beginning at noon. This “pay as you can” event offers many fun hands-on activities and games for children, as well as pioneer craft demonstrations. This is family fun at its best – no electronics required. This year, the Festival will feature some fun music, too. “We are pleased,” said JCCM president John Power, “to have Podorythmie performing French-Canadian music, steps and ‘crankies.’” “Podorythmie is so excited to be at Pioneer Days,” stated Sue Truman, a member of the troupe. “One of the moving panoramas (crankies) we are bringing talks about 19th century quilts.” The afternoon will also feature Mike Saunders, a Celtic musician who performs on 19th century stringed instruments. Brass Band Northwest closes the festival and starts off the 12th season of Classical Tuesdays in Old Town. “Tap your foot to boogie woogie and marches while enjoying the exciting sounds of all-brass music in our lovely Old Town Park,” said Pamela Ryker, who coordinates this popular performance series. This ensemble plays in the tradition of the British brass bands, featuring several kinds of horns, plus percussion. KILMER TO HEAR CHALLENGE TRIBES FACE On Aug. 26, U.S. Representative Derek Kilmer (D-WA) joined the Chairman of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Martin Castro, along with local tribal leaders at the Quinault Reservation for a summit to discuss funding disparities facing tribal communities. The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights is currently putting together an update to a 2003 report called Quiet Crisis that found federal investments too often failed to provide adequate health care, education, natural resource protection and housing among other basic needs. Kilmer and Castro were joined by Quinault President Fawn Sharp, who is also President of the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians and Vice President of the National Congress of American Indians; Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe Chair Ron Allen, and other tribal leaders from across the state at the forum. Chairman Castro provided Kilmer and the tribal leaders with updates about the progress being made on the final report. He also heard testimony about gaps faced on reservations. After the listening sessions the group took a tour of the Quinault Reservation. “Too many tribes across the nation aren’t getting the investments they need to thrive,” Kilmer said. “Tribal communities are essential to creating jobs, protecting our environment, and helping our country grow. But they face significant challenges in health care, education, natural resource protection, and economic opportunity. Discussions like the one we had today – involving people who are directly impacted by the shortcomings in federal policy – can help establish a path forward. I'm committed to working with the Commission and with local leaders to address these challenges. We have to do better.” See more bulletin board itemS at tacomaweekly.com


Friday, September 2, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 3

LAkewood PoLice hoPe new dnA ProfiLe wiLL identify SuSPect in SeeLey PArk murder By David Rose Washington’s Most Wanted - Q13 Fox

Visiting her son’s gravesite hasn’t gotten easier for Vicky Jordan. It’s been one year since her son, Danny Guerin, was found stabbed to death near his pickup truck in the parking lot of Seeley DAVID ROSE Lake Park in Lakewood. “You’ll never have closure when your child is murdered in such a violent way,” said Jordan. Now, Lakewood Police say they have a DNA profile of a possible suspect in the GUERIN 36-year-old’s murder. “Officers found what they believe was fresh spit or saliva, probably about 5 to 6 feet from the victim’s body,” said Lakewood Police Lt. Chris Lawler. “Obviously, if it’s not dried, it’s pretty recent, so they’ve made that collection, and we got back a DNA profile and it came back as a male. That’s all we know. We’ve entered it into CODIS, which is a nationwide database. We’re waiting for a

hit. It gets checked at least weekly, because somebody is going to have to be arrested and have their sample inserted into it, and if we can get a match, obviously that’s a good lead for us because that person has to explain why their saliva which was reasonably fresh was still at the scene of that crime.” If they got a tip from the public on a person of interest, they could compare their DNA to that sample.

HIGH PRIORITY OFFENDER CONVICTED ON MULTIPLE CHARGES Michael Walter Wood, 56, identified as a High Priority Offender (HPO), has been convicted on four counts of unlawful possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver and unlawful possession of a firearm. Wood’s criminal history includes drug offenses, weapon offenses, as well as an assault and violation on a protection order. “A long criminal history equals a long sentence from our High Priority Offender team,” said Prosecutor Mark Lindquist. On or about Dec. 21, 2015, officers served a search warrant on Wood’s car and residence after conducting an undercover narcotics investigation. Wood was detained as he exited his car. He stated that his room was in the back of the trailer and that the officers would find "everything" there. Wood told the officers they would find "meth, coke, and heroin" in his room. He also told the officers that he had an unloaded gun on his bed. The officers secured the residence

and located a .357 caliber revolver on the bed. Officers also found five magazines for a Glock .40, three digital scales, Ziplock baggies, $2,095 in cash, small 1 x 1 inch baggies, scissors with black residue, approximately 332 grams of methamphetamine, 98 grams of heroin, 11 grams of cocaine, 180 tramadol pills and 61 hydrocodone pills. The street value is more than $25,000. Investigators located three school bus stops within 1,000 feet of where the drugs were found. Wood's criminal history includes 13 felony convictions including a conviction for unlawful delivery of a controlled substance while armed with a firearm. The High Priority Offender Program uses data, technology and intel to identify and target the small percentage of offenders who are causing a large percentage of crimes. The goal is to reduce crime by focusing resources on chronic offenders. Wood faces up to 42 years in prison. Sentencing is set for Sept. 16.

“If that DNA gets a match, you can’t say it wasn’t me. DNA doesn’t lie. It could have been a witness. It could have been that they were just there and maybe they left just as this was getting ready to start but saw something. We’d love for that hit to come up sometime sooner than later,” said Lawler. Surveillance video from Aug. 27, 2015 shows a pedestrian walking from the north to the south entering the park at 9200 Lakewood Drive SW before Guerin

DEPUTIES SHOOT GRAHAM MAN ARMED WITH RUNNING CHAINSAW Pierce County Sheriff’s deputies shot and killed a man on the morning of Aug. 30 in Graham after he charged at them with a running chainsaw. At 7:13 a.m., a woman called 911 to report that her 36-year-old son, who had previously assaulted her and her husband, was at their home armed with a chainsaw. According to the caller, the suspect refused to leave and said that deputies would have to shoot him. When deputies arrived at the residence in the 9000 block of 262nd Street East, they confronted the suspect, who refused to put down the running chainsaw. Deputies tased the suspect, and he fell to the ground, but he immediately got back up. He then charged at the deputies while the chainsaw was running and the deputies fired. The suspect was struck and fell to the ground. Deputies rendered first aid, but the suspect died at the scene. The suspect had a history of assaulting his parents and has threatened to kill them. According to his parents, he had a history of meth abuse, had a mental health diagnosis and refused to take his medications. His mother filed for a temporary protection order, but deputies had not yet been able to locate him and serve him with the order. The investigation is ongoing. At this time, it is unclear how many deputies fired.

arrives in his 2003 blue Chevrolet truck. Detectives believe the homicide occurred about five minutes later and think he may have been a victim of an attempted robbery. However, a motive has not been determined. “He really was such a gentle person to us, so for him to go out in such a violent way is really horrible to us,” said Jordan. Detectives are asking for any information on suspicious persons or vehicles seen near or in Seeley Park that night. “I often wonder if there’s somebody that knows something about this case, or maybe our suspect confided in somebody and they're holding on to that secret for a little while. I always hope that those people, their conscience gets the better of them and they decide to come forward to turn their friend in or family member in to do the right thing,” said Lawler. If you have any information that can help detectives solve the case, call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1 (800) 222TIPS (8477). There is a cash reward of up to $1,000 for information that leads to an arrest. This is one of the cases featured on “Washington’s Most Wanted” Friday night at 11 p.m. on Q13 FOX.

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Section A • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 2, 2016

t LNG

From page A1

the legal argument that dissemination of the detailed reports would make the planned facility a terrorist target. “The vulnerability assessments and detailed diagrams of the facility’s various safety and fire prevention features contained in the reports could facilitate an attack on the facility,” PSE argued in filings. “Widespread disclosure of this information would threaten public safety and would run counter to the state and national security interest…” Cuthbertson rejected that argument and determined that the information should be released as public documents – twice. Both decisions are under appeal. The private energy company has most of the permits required to start construction of an 8 million gallon facility at 1001 Alexander Ave. E. on the tideflats. The facility would manufacture and store LNG. The $275 million facility would then sell LNG to container ships and other customers seeking lower-emission fuels. The facility would also store LNG that the utility could tap into during the handful of unusual weather days each year when demand outpaces supplies. The facility could open in 2019. But legal challenges could shift that timeline. “It is a complicated, fragmented mess,” Carlton said. “I’m not sure what is going to happen.” A hearing on PSE’s appeal of Cuthbertson’s decision to release the safety information to Carlton has been set for January. No appeals track has yet been set on the more recent decision. If the appeals process drags out, the project could potentially gain all of the required permits before the safety-response information is even released. But there are other challenges to tangle up the permitting process as well. There is the appeal of the environmental review

the Puyallup Tribe filed, citing the process failed fully to address key concerns about the potential of contaminated soil on the 30-acre site leaking into the waterway during the construction process. Washington State Shorelines Hearings Board recently rejected an earlier appeal. But that decision is under appeal to a higher court. Then there is the matter of how the project will be paid for and operated if it gets built. The dual-use aspects of the facility create a complicated regulatory landscape. Washington Utility and Transportation Commission staffers object to PSE’s request for waivers on its original agreement with state utility regulators when an investment group bought the utility. An Australian investment conglomerate called the Macquarie Group bought Puget Sound Energy in 2008 under the specific condition that the utility would not form a private company in a way that could potentially open its 2 million customers to potentially higher rates or market risks. Utility regulators fear that is exactly what the company’s financing plan would do if PSE gains the waivers. Those waivers would allow PSE to form a private subsidiary to handle the unregulated sales of LNG to container shipping companies alongside the utility-regulated storage for “peak shaving” use by utility customers. PSE argues that LNG is an emerging industry that was never envisioned back in 2008 and its accounting system would shield ratepayers from swings in the market. The new company, if allowed to form, would share the cost of building and operating the facility based on a yet-to-be determined formula. There are several examples of a utility co-owning power plants and other facilities with a private company. This would be the only facility of its kind in the country, however, where the “partners” would be owned by the same parent company.

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t Hilltop

From page A1

has been known to put Tacoma on the map time and time again, whether it be for our crime rates, our churches, our businesses, or our legacies. The streets of Hilltop were never paved with gold, but somehow, the hearts of the natives of Hilltop were. Despite the hearts of these people, the reputation of Hilltop remains nearly completely tarnished. Many members of the community believe that due to the battering of Hilltop’s reputation throughout the years, it is the opinion that many members of the Hilltop community share. Furthermore, those that do believe that this is taking place are divided about what kind of impact these changes will have on Hilltop’s future. One of the bigger changes coming to Hilltop in the near future is the arrival of Sound Transit’s Link expansion. This project began on a winter day sometime in the month of December 2015. At one of Tacoma’s informative city council meetings, Sound Transit presented 30 percent of the design to the public as well as gathered feedback to the project’s design team. Since then, the topic has been addressed at city council meetings held monthly. As of now, we can expect to see the next milestone in the design nine months from now, in May 2017. The Link train will start at the Tacoma Dome Station and first cover the original route via Pacific Avenue. From there, the train will travel through the historic Stadium District, making three stops throughout the neighborhood. From the last stop in the Stadium District on Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Division Street, the Link will travel down MLK Way, making two stops in the Hilltop neighborhood before the route ends on 19th and MLK. Carolyn K. Littles, 76-year-old CEO of Bob’s Bar-B-Q Pit Inc., says that she is thrilled with the Link expansion project as well as many of the other changes she sees taking place. “I think it is going to be great to watch this so-called gentrification process take effect,” she said. “I don’t see these changes as gentrification; I see it as a really big chance for citizens from all walks of life coming together to do what this generation seems to do best: innovate! In fact, I haven’t seen such a huge impact occur in the community since the 80’s.” Another noticeable change to the community of Hilltop comes throughout the month of August for the Hilltop Street Fair. For the last three years, I’ve come to expect an unseen change to the spirit of Hilltop’s business owners and community leaders. Anticipation and excite-

ment begin to ripple through the streets despite the tarnished reputation, despite the ghosts of memories of the things that happened exactly where you were walking and standing throughout the festival, and despite even the few members of the community who are against the changes taking place. On Aug. 27 this year, approximately 14,000 Puget Sound residents came together to learn about and celebrate Tacoma’s Hilltop. One of the biggest goals the Hilltop Street Fair producers are known to strive for is to make every year’s festival both bigger and better. And the third time around was the charm for the festival this year. It turned out to be a raging success. At 11 a.m., as the festival booths and vendors scrambled to set up, gusts of wind threatened to blow away plates, food, chairs and even blowing down one vendor’s entire tent. It looked as though the wind might even blow away some of the festival’s success. But by mid-afternoon, the breeze was very much appreciated as we gradually reached a 72-degree high temperature for the day. This year’s festival won a 3rd place award, experienced an increase of approximately 4,000 more people in attendance compared to 2015, and also displayed diversity by combining this year’s Latino Arts Festival along with the street fair. The joining of the two festivals resulted in the blocks of South 9th and L streets, as well as South 10th and L streets, being added to this year’s festival as well as a fifth performance stage. If you walked just two blocks southeast of the puppet stage, you’d be bewildered by the events taking place in the heart of the festival. The block of 11th and MLK had a car show, numerous food and clothing vendors, and the 1111 featuring every genre of music throughout the day, as well as a beer garden for people 21 and older. A block south of the alcohol themed garden was something astonishing: a pop-up skate park in the middle of the street. The skate park featured a variety of ramps as well as an actual car as part of the ramps. Around noon I witnessed people all coming together as a team to set up as well as take down the skate park. This year’s Hilltop Street Fair featured something for absolutely everyone to enjoy. Whether you enjoyed the cars, the skate park, the unity, or even the beer garden, it’s safe to say that everyone had a good time enjoying the uniqueness of the festival and the neighborhood. The biggest thing accomplished was the fact that each year the festival changes the perception of Hilltop for potentially thousands of Washingtonians, ultimately making a huge contribution toward a very bright future for Hilltop.

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Friday, September 2, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 5

Scouting celebrated at WashJam 2016

By Steve Dunkelberger

J

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

oint Base Lewis-McChord was buzzing with activity last weekend as more than 4,500 Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Venture, Varsity, Explorer, Cub Scouts and their adult leaders attended WashJam 2016. The once-every-four-year event drew participants from around Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and British Columbia, as well as troops from as far away as Utah and Texas. The four-day event offered a range of scout and camping activities, from bb gun and archeology activities for younger campers to BMX bike trails, .22 caliber rifle and pistol shooting and wilderness survival training for older scouts. In a mash-up between camping and technology, scouts were also able to learn computer coding, HAM radio operation, robotics, automotive repair and technology as well as chemistry, science, botany and disaster preparedness. A Zombie Night hike drew more than 1,000 participants. Entertainment included visits from the U.S. Air Force’s Thunderbird team, which then performed precision flying demonstrations at the Air Show at McChord Field Saturday and Sunday.

PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

SCOUTS HONOR. More than 4,500 scouts from around the Pacific Northwest had more than 200 activities at their disposal during the four-day event. Mount

Rainier loomed large over WashJam’s campsite at Joint Base Lewis McChord last weekend. Younger Scouts learned marksmanship and gun safety using bb guns under the eyes of trained instructors. LeMay: America’s Car Museum kicked in the use of a classic car scouts could learn auto repair and maintenance skills. Impromptu competitions sprung up between scouts from neighboring campsites while dinner was cooking. Lacking quick access to a lake or river, a wading pond formed to provide younger scouts with canoe trips, while older scouts learned canoe safety at nearby American Lake. Volunteers from the Bedrock Prospectors Club shared their knowledge about panning for gold. Dotted around the activity area were three climbing walls that scouts of all ages could climb and challenge themselves to ring the bell at the top.


Section A • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 2, 2016

Our View

BOLD MOVES REQUIRE BOLD LEADERS The Click Engagement Committee, tasked late last year with researching the risks, costs and rewards of potentially expanding the municipally owned and operated Click Cable TV network, emerged from behind its closed doors to present ways that an “all in� system might work. Looking past the lack of public input or even inclusion of thoughts by industry experts not specifically invited by the committee, the group’s work provided a bit more detail of what upgrading the system would mean and how much it would all cost. The committee fronted three proposals for future discussion. One would continue the current $3 surcharge that customers pay on their Tacoma Power bill, gaining $1.5 million in labor concessions and “savings� while having the city’s general fund foot $1.7 million a year. Another option would be to cover the city’s contribution through an additional surcharge of 83 cents. The third would shift the $14 million expense onto the city and eliminate the surcharge over time. Each option has benefits as well as challenges. One such challenge involves interpretation of laws regarding the use of ratepayer dollars on non-utility projects. That seems to be a rather odd argument, not only because Internet access has become a vital part of everyday life, alongside water, power and heat, but also doesn’t take into account that Tacoma Public Utility ratepayers already spend money on non-utility projects in the form of campgrounds located along the shores of lakes formed by its hydroelectric dams. Sure, the campgrounds are simply patches of largely undeveloped land and provide camping and kitchen shelters as a side benefit of the dams. It seems a bit more than a legal leap to argue that the operation of a handful of campgrounds around Western Washington is a worthwhile effort, but providing customers with Internet options by using the excess capacity of a fiber optic system TPU already uses isn’t. Sure, there are larger amounts of dollars involved in going “all in� to provide cable, Internet and phone services than maintaining campgrounds. But it’s a matter of public good that deserves more than lip service. And much like those campgrounds, Click formed as a side benefit for what TPU needed anyway. Back in the day, TPU needed a fiber optic system to monitor power meters and track outage troubles. The system could handle higher flows of information than what TPU needed, so the idea of a municipal cable television system was born. It was a side project when it formed in 1997. Fast Internet access was considered a boutique service only tech geeks needed. TPU then punted the idea of installing “smart meters� that it wanted to use when it installed the $200 million web of fiber optic cables. Now the system is at a crossroads since TPU accountants say the system has an operational loss of $7 million a year – a figure under debate. But for the sake of argument, let’s say the figures show a true accounting of the finances. Tacoma could be a progressively modern – and model – city for municipalities that are also struggling to engage and educate their residents through Internet connectivity. Imagine the economic development potential of having a city populace connected through Internet access they could afford. To be fair, leasing the system out to a private company could bring those benefits, but they would have to be baked into the contract. That’s something Tacoma doesn’t do very well. It was a handful of votes away from approving a one-offer contract with Wave for pennies on the dollar before Tacoma residents halted those plans. Tacoma needs to think big and have leadership willing to think even bigger.

CORRECTION The article “Click committee differs on ways to pay for ‘all in’ expansion� in the Aug. 26 issue misidentified Mitchell Shook. He is the CEO of Advance Stream, a local Internet Service Provider. Tacoma Weekly apologizes for the error.

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Guest Editorials

ACCOUNTABILITY:

AN ABANDONED AMERICAN VALUE By Rivera Sun If our cars fatally malfunctioned as often as police officers shoot citizens, there would be a massive recall, pulling vehicles off the road, overhauling the engineering design, firing culpable employees, and paying out settlements to consumers for injuries and deaths of family members. The problem of a complete lack of accountability within the police system parallels the demise of accountability throughout our nation. Once upon a time, we believed in accountability. But times have changed, and wanton, reckless irresponsibility has become permissible for police officers, corporations, politicians, and the wealthy. If you are a wealthy politician or businessman, the law rarely applies to you. If you are a Wall Street banker, you receive bailouts instead of criminal charges. If you own an oil company, you receive mild wrist slaps for causing catastrophic environmental disasters. If you're in the military, you operate with unscrutinized impunity and negotiated immunity. If you're a white rapist, you cool your heels for a while before diving back into the pool. If you're a white killer who opens fire on African Americans in a House of God, you get a hamburger on the way to jail.

If you are poor or non-white, you are slapped with life sentences, death sentences, extrajudicial murders, public lynching, debt peonage, debilitating poverty, foreclosures, homelessness, poisoned water, strangulations, forced sterilization, home raids by SWAT teams . . . and the list goes on. In this upside-down world, the poor, the young, the homeless, the old, and minority groups bear the deadly cross of accountability for the wanton irresponsibility of the U.S. corporations, politicians, wealthy, and privileged. It is they who are incarcerated, poisoned, executed, and chained to debt. It is they who lose their homes, jobs, bank accounts, safety, health, social networks, societal respect, and are stripped of titles, positions, dignity, rights, and awards. The poor and downtrodden are held accountable for the wrongs of the society – they pay the price for U.S. violence, greed, corruption, pollution, destruction, hate, discrimination, and arrogance. Whistleblowers who demand accountability for atrocities and the egregious violations of our rights are imprisoned and exiled while those that perpetrated the crimes remain in power. This election season, we are chided to vote and "hold our policy makers" accountable – as if this were the only means of doing so. Where

is our judicial system, our oversight committees, or the straightforward enforcement of existing laws? In 240 years, the United States has failed to generate and enforce a practical and effective system of political and corporate accountability. Where are our citizen oversight committees with the power to subpoena and charge police departments? Where is our version of Spain's Partido X and its accompanying standards of political accountability? Where are our lawyers and judges will to prosecute and sentence reckless bankers as was done in Iceland after the financial crash? Accountability for one's actions is a value that functional societies require at every level from our children to our corporations to our Commanders-inChief. Without such a standard, the moral compass of our nation spins out of control, wildly sending us into dangerous and uncharted waters of increasingly rogue and criminal behaviors. When will the American public finally see accountability from all its power holders? The answer is: only when we demand it. Author/activist Rivera Sun, syndicated by PeaceVoice, is the author of “The Dandelion Insurrection� and other books, and the Programs Coordinator for Campaign Nonviolence.

ClimAte PoliCieS Should be ComPrehenSive By Don C. Brunell The flurry of climate regulations coming out of federal agencies is an example of what to avoid. Whether those new rules are based on laws enacted by Congress is questionable. Case in point: American Highway Users Alliance, a diverse group of organizations representing transportation, vehicle manufacturers and energy trade associations, questioned the Federal Highway Administration’s (FHWA) legal authority to impose greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction requirements on state transportation departments and metropolitan planning organizations. The Alliance is convinced that even if legal authority was justified, there are several reasons why the new stringent standards are inappropriate, unnecessary and duplicative of other requirements. As part of the new GHG rules for oil and gas, FHWA is working with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to impose new limits on methane gas. In 2014, methane accounted for about 11 percent of all U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from human activities. Human activities include landfills, manufacturing, waste water treatment, burning of fossil fuels and biomass and agriculture. Wetlands are the largest natural source. Smaller ones include termites, oceans, sediments, volcanoes and wildfires. According to the EPA, methane, the “key constituent of natural gas,� is a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential more than 25 times

greater than that of carbon dioxide. Even though it breaks down after approximately 10 years, the EPA says methane is the second most prevalent GHG emitted in the United States from human activities, and nearly onethird of those emissions come from oil extracting and refining, and the production, transmission and distribution of natural gas. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy stated that the Administration’s strategy under President Obama’s Climate Action Plan is to reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by 40 to 45 percent from 2012 levels by 2025. But is this piecemeal approach appropriate, achievable and affordable considering the other contributing human-related and natural sources? Last March, researchers from Germany’s Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) found of the rise in global methane emissions between 2007 and 2014 is from natural or agricultural sources and cannot be attributed to oil and gas. Furthermore, methane emissions from oil and natural gas represent only 3.4 percent of all greenhouse gases emitted in the U.S. and .005 percent worldwide. When considering government regulations as sweeping as EPA’s methane standard, it is important to look at all emissions carefully. For example, about a third of methane comes from wetlands, wildfires and ocean seepage – natural sources. In 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey even found methane emanating from 600 Atlantic

sea floor locations from Cape Hatteras, N.C., to Georges Bank off of Nantucket, Mass. Russia’s West Siberia is home to the world’s largest expanse of peatlands, which covers an area nearly the size of Texas. According to the Union of Concerned Scientists, the vast area contains 70 billion metric tons of thawing methane “equal to about 16 percent of all the carbon added to the atmosphere from fossil fuel combustion, land-use changes, and cement manufacturing over the course of the last 150 years (1850-2000).� The concern is as the climate changes and warms, higher volumes of methane will be released from places where methane is encased in ice. Methane gas has been in our atmosphere since the beginning of time. It has peaked and ebbed with the intensity of human and natural activities. Our federal government should pursue legally authorized regulations that protect our environment and health. Our public policies should be thoroughly researched and well vetted before being committed to writing. They must consider all related factors. We need to continue to develop and deploy the best technology available. All that takes time and a strong commitment to open-minded approaches. Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the state’s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.


Friday, September 2, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 7

TACOMA COMMUNITY BOAT BUILDERS HOSTS THE FUTURE FUNDRAISER

COME OUT SEPT. 8 TO FOSS WATERWAY SEAPORT AND HELP CONTRIBUTE TO THE FUTURE OF TACOMA’S AT-RISK YOUTH

PHOTOS COURTESY OF TCBB

WORTHY CAUSE. (Left) Since 2012, Tacoma Community Boat Builders has made it their mission to give back to Tacoma's at-risk youth. (Right) Come out on Sept. 8 to the Launch the Future Fundraiser, where all proceeds go toward benefitting the boat building outreach programs Tacoma Community Boat Builders provides to at-risk youth in the area.

develop a sense of belonging, learning and growing together; and restore their sense of self-worth and value to the community,” as stated in the TCBB’s mission statement. Youth are enrolled in one or more 10-week sessions where, under the guidance of their mentors, they learn the craft and practice of woodworking and wooden boat building, boat restoration and boat handling. These meaningful experiences are crafted to give at-risk youth a reason to stay out of trouble and reconnect with the community in a positive way while learning a useful trade for their future. TCBB, while helping teach the art of boat building, is also actively involving at-risk youth back into the community to build positive relationships for a prosperous future. This year, TCBB partici-

By Erica Cooley Special to Tacoma Weekly

Tacoma Community Boat Builders (TCBB) began in 2012 as a commitment by a few dedicated boat builders and sailors of the South Puget Sound to share their passion for the unique experience of building and sailing wooden boats. Four years later these dedicated community members continue to give their time to a great cause of involving at-risk youth in the Tacoma community in the trade of wooden boat building. “Our programs engage at-risk youth in a one-to-one relationship with adult mentors. Our aim is to break down the barriers that inhibit at-risk and other youth; help them acquire the skills, integrity and confidence to be citizens and work ready;

pated in the 2016 Tacoma Maritime Fest in July. Four teams of people spanning decades of life experience, catalyzed by the incredible energy and spirit surrounding them, made four boats in two days and took them out on the Foss Waterway at the Fest. TCBB is a leader in the community in building lifelong experiences and relationships that shape the futures of many youth in the Tacoma community. The community is invited to come out and support TCBB on Sept. 8 at TCBB’s “Launch the Future” fundraiser at Foss Waterway Seaport. TCBB will be hosting a fundraiser for their programs like none other they have before. This year, attendees will have a chance to go home with something made by Tacoma Community Boat Builders. There will be raffle and auction

items including a TCBB built toolbox, an oar making class, the Little Free Library and more. The evening’s auction will be led by professional fundraising auctioneer Laura Michaelek. The program will be from 6:30-8 p.m. with Kurt Miller, executive director of Community Youth Services, speaking along with others. In addition to speakers, there will be boat races with the youth in the program before the youth of TCBB will join the festivities for the evening. Check-in and social hour begins 5:30 p.m. Attire for the fundraiser is casual and will be a great event to bring out the whole family to support an influential community program for Tacoma’s youth. To register for the TCBB “Launch the Future” fundraiser, visit https://tacomaboatbuilders.org/rsvp or call (253) 720-8227.

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Section A • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 2, 2016

PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT Supporting the Economic Growth of Our Community

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

Federal, regional, state and local leaders gathered with the Puyallup Tribal Council on April 7, 2015 to officially cut the ribbon on the Tribe’s new state-of-the-art Salish Cancer Center (SCC). Joining in on the event were (back row from left): Fife Mayor Tim Curtis; former Congressman Norm Dicks and Puyallup Tribal Council Vice-Chairman Larry LaPointe; (front row from left) Puyallup Tribal Council Members Marguerite Edwards and Sylvia Miller; Puyallup Vice-Chairwoman Roleen Hargrove; Senator Maria Cantwell; Puyallup Chairman Bill Sterud; Gov. Jay Inslee; Lieutenant Governor Brad Owen; Congressman Denny Heck; and Puyallup Tribal Council Members David Bean and Tim Reynon. Learn more about the cancer center on pg. 3.

The most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians continues to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce County’s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its own membership, but sharing its wealth

among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County. With a payroll of more than 3,100 people that work in the Tribe’s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities – approximately 70 percent of whom are non-Native – employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits.

In 2015 the Tribe spent over $491 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more. From sponsoring local charities, non-profit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise

suffer or cease to exist, to protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and healthcare, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its destiny as “the generous people,” the meaning of the Tribe’s very name “Puyallup.” In the following pages, you’ll read more about what a valuable community partner the Puyallup Tribe of Indians is to the region and the state.

SALISH CANCER CENTER A place where healing begins On April 7, 2015, the ribbon was officially cut at the grand opening of the Salish Cancer Center (SCC). Housed in the Puyallup Tribal Integrative Medicine building in Fife, SCC is a non-profit venture of the Puyallup Tribe and is the first tribally-owned cancer center in Indian Country and the United States. This state-of-the art facility combines conventional cancer treatment (chemotherapy) and integrative oncology (naturopathic medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, Native healers and acupuncture) to create a truly modern oncology practice. As the indigenous keepers of the Puyallup Tribe Indian Reservation, the Puyallup Tribe has a strong ancestral bond with nature and creation, and this is reflected in the type of care SCC patients receive – focusing on the mind, body, and spirit using lifestyle, nutrition and botanical medicine that blends quite well with modern oncology practices and produces a foundation for providing innovative cancer treatment. At the ribbon cutting, Washington State Governor Jay Inslee praised Tribal Council Chairman Bill Sterud and the entire Tribal Council for making their vision for SCC a reality. “This is such a delightful day, not just for the Puyallup Nation, but for the state of Washington, because this is a center that is going to embrace health for the entire state of Washington and the Puyallup Nation all at the same time,” he said. “To me, it is a real achieve-

ment to know that the first tribally-owned and operated oncology center in the United States is right here in the Puyallup Nation. This is something for the whole state of Washington to be very proud of.” The SCC care team is delighted to have medical oncologist Dr. Eiko Klimant on board as medical director, as he joined the team just this year. This spring, Dr. Krisstina Gowin, medical oncologist from Mayo Clinic in Arizona, will also be joining the SCC care team. “My goal is to create a meaningful experience for the patient and their caregivers, which includes creating conditions and finding therapies to help assure the best possible outcome for each individual patient,” Dr. Klimant said.

Puyallup Tribal Member David Duenas offered up a Sundance song of sacrifice and honor at the Salish Cancer Center ribbon cutting.

Dr. Klimant was most recently the Medical Director of Integrative Oncology at Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Philadelphia. He is board certified in medical oncology and internal medicine, as well as hospice, palliative medicine and integrative medicine. He has extensive clinical experience in the management of pancreatic, breast, lung and brain cancers. Dr. Klimant is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Medical Association, American Society of Clinical Oncology, American College of Physicians and the Society for Integrative Oncology. He is fluent in English, German and French. At SCC, Dr. Klimant works within a multidisciplinary team to provide patient-centered cancer care. “The integrative care model puts the patient at the center. Patients’ needs are addressed on multiple levels, including innovative scientific cancer treatment, spiritual and psychological support, naturopathic medicine and an individualized nutritional program,” he said. While a cancer diagnosis can be the most frightening thing a person has to face and is often all consuming for patients and their care providers, SCC stands as a mighty protector and healer for those who have been told there is nothing more that can be done. “It’s a battle against this disease, only now our warriors are our doctors, nurses, lab technicians and people who are in the health profession world,” said Puyallup Chairman Bill Sterud. “Our warriors are going to be armed with the best medicine that can be, whether it exists now or down the road. This is not about making money – this is a non-profit organization that’s dedicated to the saving of lives.” Learn more at www.SalishCancerCenter.com.

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.


Friday, September 2, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 9

anyway. “My oldest brother, George, would tell From page A1 me about losing Warren.” It was a sad mystery that the Landry life and non-Indian life,” Landry said. “You family lived with for decades. “Eventually, Warren suspected he had become aware of it very early. A girl told me when I was young, 'You're really different,' a family. When he began searching for it, and that hurt me. It took me years to figure Warren was told he was from a tribe in Washington, so he tried the Muckleshoot out what she meant, and she was right. “With those two lives, you can feel awk- tribe first. They sent him to the Puyallup tribe. He called my mother, who burst into ward all the time.” tears. I was there that night, and when she For instance? Landry laughs. “We don’t entirely trust told me, we held each other and cried.” Landry has never been bitter about livnon-Indians,” he said. “We’ve had 500 ing in two cultures. Though he’ll retire in years of good reasons not to.” One of the examples Landry learned November as Human Resources director of the Puyallup Tribal Health Authority, he from began before he was born. “I had two older brothers, one older has always been something of a free spirit sister. And the youngest of my older broth- all his life. Landry has four children, though only ers, Warren, was kidnapped as a baby by a non-Indian care provider who moved out of one he fathered. He either took the other state. She told Warren he was born in Okla- three on in different relationships over the years or had them claim him. homa,” Landry said. “A couple of them adopted me,” Landry “I didn't meet Warren until I was 45 years old. My mother couldn't talk about said. “My kids say I’m a perpetual father.” Landry also perpetually tried jobs on him, it was too painful. She went to the police when it happened and they wrote for size. “I’ve had more careers than anyone I it off as a domestic case. That was in the 1940s, and many people thought Indian know,” he said. Start with picking berries in Puyallup babies were better off with white parents,

t Landry

t Soul Salmon around the city like in front of the Proctor Fire Department. The Old Town statue stands out due to it being covered in tiles featuring photos of Old Town’s history, including photographs of Old Town founder Job Carr, and businesses that have become the backbone of the district. The tiles were originally grafted on by artist team Bruce and

From page A1

Shannon Anderson. “The most historic business community in our city is Old Town. This is where it all started. It’s the most historic of all the salmon because of what’s on it,” said business owner Bill Evans, who helped bring the statues to Tacoma over a decade ago. Needless to say, the community is thrilled to

have their sculpture back. At the unveiling ceremony, neighbors across the street from the park raised a sign welcoming back their salmon neighbor, and the unveiling of the salmon attracted many members of the community come out to celebrate. The business district views the return of the salmon as an omen of good things to come, as it represents the past of the historic district as well as its bright future.

summers, where his family would spend nights in berry cabins and the kids thought of it as camping. “I worked for Washington State for seven years as a liaison with Native Americans with the Department of Social and Health Services,” Landry said. “I sold original art – it wasn't my art – door to door. I probably hit every business on the I-5 corridor. “I was a truck driver, once spent time as an industrial cleaner. I worked on a fishing boat but didn't make any money. The captain didn't know where the fish were. “I worked at a wood mill, I did carpentry work for a time, building pole buildings. I taught photography,” Landry said. Trained in photography at an eastern university, Landry went to work in Portland as a television cameraman until the station downsized in 1985. And, in one of the more contentious times in memory, Landry was elected a Puyallup Tribal Council member in 1989. He was involved in the settlement of a legal land dispute between the Puyallups and the Port of Tacoma, one that gave each of the approximately 1,500 tribal members $20,000. It was controversial from the moment “We see it as signs of good times to continue, prosperity and growth for the Old Town community QUALITY FACILITY ONLINE TRAINING AVAILABLE FLEXIBLE CLASS SCHEDULE

the settlement was made. “We worried that going to court, we might lose no matter what the evidence,” Landry said. “Which goes back to not trusting non-Indians. We were a small tribe then – we’re more than 6,000 strong now.” The settlement produced a $162 million package of land, cash and programs to improve education, employment and business opportunities for the tribe. It also produced recalls by the handful, taking out two tribal leaders and other council members – including Landry. “I was recalled six months before my term ended, and I’d already decided not to run again,” Landry said. “I didn’t fight the recall. When I was elected, I won by one vote – and every person who visited my office when I was on the council told me it was their vote.” Landry laughed again. “My major frustration was that no matter what I did, I didn't get my message across. There was so much what-can-thetribe-do-for-me out there,” he said. “It was like moving water uphill with a broom. I got tired of being wet. “My mother's only rule was never to embarrass the family. I've embarrassed myself many times, but never the family.”

and all of Tacoma,” said Ruth Dalenius, current Old Town Business Association president.

The statue now sits safely at Gateway Park and will, hopefully, remain there for years to come.

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SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHER PCCNG, Pierce County’s community news leader, is seeking a Sports Photographer with a great eye for capturing live game action at games, practices and events in Pierce County. Experienced photographers preferred. REQUIREMENTS: 1-2 years experience taking sports photos. Must have professional equipment, reliable transportation and ability to travel to sports event locations. The ideal candidate is a self motivated, outgoing individual with a positive attitude. They should be able to work evenings and weekends, be willing to work outdoors in various weather conditions, and be able to stand, bend, kneel for prolonged periods of time. Please send your resume and photography examples to jgimse@tacomaweekly.com.

MILTON • EDGEWOOD


TACOMAWEEKLY.com

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2016

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 10

TACOMA HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW 2016

NINE WEEKS OF FOOTBALL HEAVEN

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

CLOSE-OUT. (top) Tacoma right fielder PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

GRID CITY. Tacoma's historic Lincoln Bowl is showing off some brand new field turf. Lincoln's recent football success has brought new sights to their home field. Over the last two seasons, Lincoln Bowl and the Abes have hosted five state football games. By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

T

here have been some big changes over the summer which has altered the landscape of high school sports in and around the city of Tacoma. After the recent round of WIAA classification realignments, some leagues went through some major transformations, while others disappeared entirely. Upon first blush, there was quite a bit of grumbling around town concerning some of the changes, but when the sports seasons begin to roll this fall, there’s a good chance that local fans are going to like the new arrangements. The biggest change this offseason has been the dissolution of the 4A and 3A Narrows Leagues. Tacoma was represented by Bellarmine and Stadium in the 4A division, and the two teams have gone separate ways under the new alignment. Bellarmine joined the 4A South Puget Sound League (SPSL), while Stadium moved down to the 3A classification and will now do business in the newly-created 3A Pierce County League (PCL). Bellarmine is joined by Curtis, Sum-

ner, Puyallup, Rogers, Emerald Ridge, Graham Kapowsin, South Kitsap and Olympia in the 4A SPSL. There have already been conversations statewide that this may very well be the strongest 4A football league in the state. Five of the nine schools made the playoffs last season, with Sumner (10-1) and Graham Kapowsin (11-1) not losing a game until the state tournament. Stadium’s move to 3A could benefit the Tigers, but in reality there really isn’t much of a difference between solid 3A and 4A teams when it comes to high school football. Many football scribes actually believe the 3A classification is superior to the 4A schools. What the Tigers do have going for them is a host of returning veterans from a team that actually won some games last season. Lots of schools take wins for granted, but not at Stadium. They’ve been struggling for years, and their mark of 3-7 last season has injected the program with renewed energy and hope for an even better season. The new 3A Pierce County League also looks like a beast on the gridiron. Joining Stadium in the PCL will be Lakes, Bonney Lake, Bethel, Spanaway Lake, Mt. Tahoma Wilson and Lincoln.

FOOTBALL WEEKEND #1 FRIDAY, SEPT. 2 Rogers vs. Bellarmine Bellarmine HS – 7 p.m. Curtis vs. Puyallup* Sparks Stadium – 7 p.m. Steilacoom vs. Stadium Stadium Bowl – 7 p.m. Wilson vs. Foss Mt. Tahoma Stadium – 7 p.m.

Tumwater vs. Franklin Pierce* Franklin Pierce HS – 7 p.m. Concrete vs. Life Christian Curtis Viking Stadium – 7 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 3 Taholah vs. Evergreen Lutheran Franklin Pierce HS – 5 p.m. Crescent vs. Tacoma Baptist* Curtis Viking Stadium – 7 p.m.

The best matchup of week one will be taking place up north as Lincoln travels to take on perennial state powerhouse O’Dea. Speaking of powerhouses, Tumwater will pay a visit to Franklin Pierce for an intriguing non-league affair. Many consider the Cardinals to be a top-10 caliber team this season. They’ll be put to the test immediately by Tumwater. If you haven’t witnessed an eight-man football game, then Saturday night is for you. It’s usually a wild and high-scoring spectacle, and after some tough years it may be just the kind of change that the Tacoma Baptist Crusaders needed to turn things around.

FOOTBALL WEEKEND #2 FRIDAY, SEPT. 9 Auburn Mountainview vs. Lincoln* Lincoln Bowl – 7 p.m. Lakes vs. Bellarmine* Bellarmine HS – 7 p.m. Graham Kapowsin vs. Curtis Curtis Viking Stadium – 7 p.m. Mt. Tahoma vs. Charles Wright Charles Wright HS – 7 p.m. Bremerton vs. Wilson

Stadium Bowl – 7 p.m. Franklin Pierce vs. Foss* Mt. Tahoma Stadium – 7 p.m. Fife vs. Washington Franklin Pierce HS – 7 p.m. South Bend vs. Chief Leschi Chief Leschi Stadium – 7 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 10 Taholah vs. Tacoma Baptist Curtis Viking Stadium – 7 p.m.

Week two has some of the most exciting matchups of the entire season. While Auburn Mountainview lost a few big time players from last season, they will be bringing an experienced, tough squad to Lincoln Bowl and it will be the second huge test for the Abes in just two weeks. When Lakes visits Bellarmine it will be a battle of perennial playoff teams. Bellarmine just seems to keep rebounding every season and somehow makes it into the 4A playoffs. Meanwhile, Lakes is no stranger to dominance at the local 3A level. This game could go all sorts of ways. When Franklin Pierce visits Foss at Mt. Tahoma Stadium, it will mark the Falcons first league game in the 2A SPSL. They won’t get an easy start with the Cardinals, but it should be a good measuring stick as to where this team might be.

Five of the eight teams advanced to the playoffs last season, with Lakes and Lincoln occupying spots in the top-10 rankings the entire season. One name missing from the PCL is the Foss Falcons. With a dip in enrollment, the Falcons have found themselves in the new environs of the class 2A SPSL. While regular league games against their usual crosstown foes will be less regular, Foss will now find themselves locking claws with the likes of Franklin Pierce, Washington, Clover Park and Fife. The move to 2A should help the Falcons across their entire sports program. There was one significant change on the small school level this offseason. Tacoma Baptist has moved down to the 1B classification, and for the first time in school history will be competing in B-8 football. The Crusaders move to the Sea-Tac League should spark up a new gridiron rivalry with Evergreen Lutheran, which is located just a stone’s throw outside of Tacoma’s east side. We have compiled all nine weeks of Tacoma gridiron action and have highlighted what we think could be the best matchups of the weekend for the high school football fans out there.

FOOTBALL WEEKEND #3 FRIDAY, SEPT. 16 Wilson vs. Lakes Harry Lang Stadium – 7 p.m. Bethel vs. Lincoln Lincoln Bowl – 7 p.m. Bonney Lake vs. Mt. Tahoma* Mt. Tahoma Stadium – 7 p.m. Spanaway Lake vs. Stadium*

Stadium Bowl – 7 p.m. Foss vs. Fife Fife Stadium – 7 p.m. Lindbergh vs. Franklin Pierce Franklin Pierce HS – 7 p.m. Onalaska vs. Life Christian* Curtis Viking Stadium – 7 p.m.

Week three is a pretty clear-cut situation. Four playoff-caliber teams will be going at it and two teams are going to suffer a loss that might sting, come season’s end. Capital visits Lincoln Bowl for what could be one of the best games of the year, as the Cougars look to unseat the Abes from the top of the 3A Narrows heap. At a site to be determined here in Tacoma, North Thurston will visit Wilson for what should be a tighter game than last year’s 47-21 outcome for the Rams. A bonus is Saturday night’s game out in Lakewood between Ilwaco and Life Christian. Both teams are returning strong lineups that should translate into a real firecracker of a game.

FOOTBALL WEEKEND #4 FRIDAY, SEPT. 23 Olympia vs. Curtis* Curtis Viking Stadium – 7 p.m. Lakes vs. Lincoln* Lincoln Bowl – 7 p.m. Mt. Tahoma vs. Stadium Stadium Bowl – 7 p.m. Evergreen vs. Foss

Mt. Tahoma Stadium – 7 p.m. Foster vs. Washington Franklin Pierce HS – 7 p.m. Winlock vs. Chief Leschi* Chief Leschi Stadium – 7 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 24 Oakville vs. Tacoma Baptist Curtis Viking Stadium – 7 p.m.

Week four offers up a couple of huge games for local fans. When Lincoln hosts Lakes, it will be the fourth-straight opponent for the Abes that went to the playoffs last season. It won’t stop there either, as Lincoln pay a visit to Wilson, another playoff team, the following week. The Lincoln versus Lakes contest may very well set the tone for the league title race. Olympia and Curtis were both playoff teams last season and it looks like a smash mouth matchup. Chief Leschi will host a Winlock team that looks beatable. The Warriors have had problems for several years and with new head coach Ty Satiacum taking over the program, Chief Leschi may be on the right track.

u See FOOTBALL / page A13

James Ramsey puts on the afterburners and gets the out. (bottom) Fresno shortstop Nolan Fontana crashes into Tacoma catcher Rob Brantly. It was unclear if the impact caused the ball to come loose, or it was already popping out, but in the end Fontana was called safe on the close play at the plate.

RAINIERS JUST A FEW WINS FROM TITLE By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

The magical 2016 season has nearly reached its end for the Tacoma Rainiers. After Tacoma beat Albuquerque 6-5 on opening night April 7, Tacoma has never left its lofty spot at the top of the Pacific Coast League Pacific Northern division standings. That encompasses an incredible streak of 138 games in first place, and now they’re down to just six games remaining. While the streak is most impressive, Tacoma (77-60) is in the fight of their life to claim that title, with Reno (74-64) hot on their heels and champing at the bit to get up to Cheney Stadium for the final four games of the regular season. Tacoma fans don’t need to wait around for the playoffs to start. The fact of the matter is every game is so valuable right now, that each contest is basically a playoff game from here on out. The month of August has been a difficult time for the Rainiers. Not only have they lost players who were called up to the Seattle Mariners, but they have also lost some key talent due to injuries. Last week Tacoma fans got to spend a few games with Dae-Ho Lee before he was whisked away, back up to the big club. Simultaneously, Seattle’s top prospect D.J. Peterson injured his hand and may very well be out for the remainder of Tacoma’s season, just when they need him the most. If the Rainiers can pull out a win on Wednesday, Aug. 31, they’ll pull their record for the month back to .500 at 15-15. More importantly, it will maintain that 3.5 game lead on Reno, whether they win or lose on the same day. Through 138 games this season, the Mariners have put through 187 roster transactions that have affected the Tacoma Rainiers. While it’s a normal thing to see a string of new faces roll through Cheney Stadium during the season, the 2016 version has been ahead of the pace. When the Mariners make their September call-ups to the big roster, there’s no telling what this Rainiers team is going to look like. One thing that Tacoma fans can feel okay about is the fact that all of the other Major League Baseball teams will be making major call-ups to their Triple-A squads, so the Rainiers won’t necessarily be fielding a lesser ball club than their opponent, if they make the playoffs. The PCL announced that Tacoma’s Stefen Romero and Dan Vogelbach have both been named to the 2016 All-PCL team. It’s the first time in 15 years that Tacoma has landed more than one player on the team. Tacoma hosts the Fresno Grizzlies on Thursday, Sept. 1 to close their four-game set between each other. Reno visits Tacoma on Friday, Sept. 2 for the final four-game stanza that will ultimately end up crowning one of the two teams as the division champion. Tickets are still available at tacomarainiers.com, as well as the Cheney Stadium box office.


Friday, September 2, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 11

SPORTSWATCH

LOGGER WOMEN LOOK TO MAKE IT 15 TITLES IN A ROW

Despite a coaching change, the Puget Sound women's soccer team will be looking to continue its dominance of the Northwest Conference in the 2016 season. Head coach Joseph Vari, in his first year at the helm, will be looking to lead the Loggers to their 15th-consecutive conference title. The Loggers finished the 2015 season unbeaten, at 17-0-5 overall, and 12-0-4 against conference foes. Puget Sound finished last year with a league title, the Conference Coach of the Year, Offensive Player of the Year, and Defensive Player of the Year. After earning an automatic berth in the NCAA Division III National Tournament, the team advanced to the second round, where it fell in penalty kicks to Wartburg. Puget Sound will look to build on its continued success, starting at the back line. Despite graduating the 2015 NWC Defensive Player of the Year, the Logger defense, which only gave up three goals all year, returns three players who earned conference honors last season. In goal, Lauren Thomas returns for her senior season, after leading the nation in goals-against average (0.13) and save percentage (0.94), and being named to the All-NWC Second Team in 2015. In front of Thomas, the Loggers bring back defenders Emma Donckels (second team) and Bailey Edwards (third team). Despite graduating the league's top goal scorer, and NWC Offensive Player of the Year from the last two seasons, Coach Vari and the Loggers are excited about their goal scoring capabilities. Senior Annie Prickett was second on the squad in 2015 in scoring (five goals), while senior Grayson Williams-Krebs and junior Jacquelyn Anderson return after each chipped in three goals last year. The Loggers will have a good mix of returners and newcomers for the 2016 season. A large sophomore class will join the 10 juniors and seniors providing experience and leadership. Four freshman and a sophomore transfer make up the remainder of the squad. Puget Sound opens its season on the road, playing William Smith on Saturday, Sept. 3, at 11 a.m., before taking on Oneonta State, Sunday, September 4. The Loggers open their home schedule on Friday, Sept. 9, when they host Whittier at 4 p.m.

278 digs last year. Garrison and Lane tied for the team with 26 service aces in 2015. Juniors Moira McVicar and Kayla Thaller look to continue to provide depth in setting up the Loggers' attack. McVicar totaled 508 assists last year, while Thaller added 164. There was a five-game stretch late in 2015 when both McVicar and Thaller tallied at least 15 assists per contest, and they both finished with 21 assists in a win over Lewis & Clark during that stretch. The experienced Logger team is poised to improve on its 9-15 (6-10 NWC) mark from a year ago. The 2016 season opens with the Puget Sound Premiere starting on Friday, Sept. 2. The Loggers take on Vassar and Southwestern (TX) that Friday, followed by Carthage and Pacific Lutheran (non-conference) on Saturday, Sept. 3. The first conference game of the season is at home against Lewis & Clark on Friday, Sept. 16.

EXPERIENCED UPS SQUAD SET TO MAKE A RUN AT THE NWC SOCCER TITLE

A large group of returning Loggers will be looking to improve upon a year in which the Puget Sound men's soccer team won 10 games. The 2015 team finished third in the Northwest Conference (10-7-2, 8-4-2 NWC), after beginning their conference slate of games with a 7-2 record. Last season's squad was made up of a significant number of newcomers, and with a year of collegiate experience under their belts, the nine returning sophomores are prepared to help lead Puget Sound to greater heights. These Loggers join with nine juniors and five seniors to provide leadership and a drive to compete in the upper echelon of the Northwest Conference. On the offensive side of the pitch, senior Josh Sonico returns to lead the charge. The forward led the Loggers with seven goals scored, and added three assists in 2015, finishing the year with 17 points, good for second on the team. Sonico's seven goals ranked fifth in the NWC. Puget Sound's second-leading scorer a season ago, Cameron Lorek, also returns, and will be looking to improve on his five-goal tally. Lorek and Sonico each earned a place on the All-Northwest Conference Second Team for their efforts in 2015. On the defensive side of the ball, junior Zac Lokay returns to help anchor a backline in which he has started 35 games over the last two years. Four freshmen join the squad in 2016, completing a team which hopes to vie for a title in the Northwest Conference, and win at least 10 games for a seventhconsecutive season.

VETERANS RETURN TO BOLSTER LOGGER VOLLEYBALL CHANCES

Of all the changes in and around Memorial Fieldhouse, the Puget Sound volleyball team opens the 2016 season with an abundance of familiarity. Sixteen Loggers return from last year's squad, including All-Northwest Conference Second Team selection Hannah Stinson. The junior from Portland, Oregon posted 1.29 blocks per set in 2015, which ranked second in the NWC. Despite missing several games with an injury, Stinson led the Loggers with 90 total blocks. Senior Rachael Garrison is poised to help lead Puget Sound's defensive efforts. The Millbrae, California native has the led Loggers in digs in each of the past two seasons, including 373 digs in 2015. Fellow classmate Kristen Lane wasn't all too far behind, as she finished with

SEPT. 1 – SEPT. 11

THURSDAY, SEPT. 1 – BASEBALL Fresno vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 2 – VOLLEYBALL Vassar vs. Puget Sound UPS Fieldhouse – 11 a.m.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 2 – VOLLEYBALL Vassar vs. Pacific Lutheran UPS Fieldhouse – 3 p.m.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 2 – VOLLEYBALL Southwestern vs. Puget Sound UPS Fieldhouse – 5 p.m.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 2 – VOLLEYBALL Carthage vs. Pacific Lutheran UPS Fieldhouse – 7 p.m.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 2 – BASEBALL Reno vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 3 – FOOTBALL La Verne vs. Puget Sound UPS Baker Field – 1 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 3 – VOLLEYBALL Carthage vs. Puget Sound UPS Fieldhouse – 1 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 3 – VOLLEYBALL Southwestern vs. Pacific Lutheran UPS Fieldhouse – 3 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 3 – VOLLEYBALL Pacific Lutheran vs. Puget Sound UPS Fieldhouse – 7 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 3 – BASEBALL Reno vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 4 – BASEBALL Reno vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 1:35 p.m.

UPS FOOTBALL LOOKS TO BUILD OFF OF IMPRESSIVE 2015 SEASON

Continuous improvement is the key. The Puget Sound football team has improved its overall record in each of the past three seasons, and there's no sign of slowing down in 2016. The Loggers return several key players from the 2015 squad that finished 6-3 and third overall in the Northwest Conference. Seniors Hans Fortune and Brennan Schon team up once more following a record-setting aerial attack last fall, while Reid Hartmann anchors the offensive line following his second-consecutive All-NWC Second Team selection last year. Jacob Wuesthoff also earned his second-straight All-NWC Second Team nod, as the senior defensive back provides valuable leadership. Fortune set the school record with 2,878 passing yards in 2015, and Schon was on the receiving end for 1,074 of those yards, which is also a Logger record. Fortune was named to the All-NWC Second Team, while Schon joined fellow wide receiver Kevin Miller '15 on the All-NWC First Team. Although the Loggers are expected to air it out some more in 2016, senior running back Max McGuinn provides a reliable change of pace. McGuinn averaged 4.4 yards per carry in 2015, and he broke out for 141 rushing yards and two touchdowns in a 38-7 win at Lewis & Clark. Linebacker Brett Pilling joins Wuesthoff in leading the defensive efforts. Pilling totaled 42 tackles last year, including 3.5 tackles for a loss and a sack. In addition to its core of returners, Puget Sound introduces 39 first-year Loggers. The Loggers' steady ascension through the years has not gone unnoticed. D3football.com predicts that Puget Sound will repeat with a third-place finish in the NWC. Others, however, cast some doubt on Puget Sound's growth. The NWC Coaches' Preseason Poll predicts the Loggers will finish fifth in the league. Three years ago the Loggers finished with a 1-8 record, followed by a 4-5 mark in 2014. Puget Sound is out to prove that 2015 was no fluke. The 2016 campaign opens at home on Saturday, Sept. 3, against 2015 Sothern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Champion La Verne. The first NWC game of the year is at home against Willamette on Saturday, Oct. 1. The Loggers look to retain the Totem Pole Trophy when they play at crosstown rival Pacific Lutheran on Saturday, Oct. 29.

TACOMA’S HOT TICKETS

MONDAY, SEPT. 5 – SOCCER Men – Occidental vs. Pacific Lutheran PLU Sports Complex – 11 a.m.

MONDAY, SEPT. 5 – BASEBALL PLU WOMEN GARNER PRESEASON VOLLEYBALL NOD FROM COACHES, UPS FIFTH

Pacific Lutheran University is the prohibitive favorite heading into the 2016 season, securing the top spot in the Northwest Conference preseason volleyball coaches' poll released on Monday. The Lutes (18-7, 12-4 NWC) garnered seven of the nine first place votes, accruing 72 points in the poll and owning a 16-point buffer over defending NWC Champion Whitworth University (19-8, 13-3 NWC) who sits second with 56 points and the remaining two first place endorsements. Lewis & Clark College (10-13, 7-9 NWC) is third with 45 points while Willamette University (15-9, 11-5 NWC) is two points back in fourth. Crosstown rival University of Puget Sound (9-15, 6-10 NWC) is fifth with 37 points followed by Pacific University (10-14, 7-9 NWC) in sixth (30 points) and Linfield College (1015, 7-9 NWC) in seventh (27 points). Whitman College (6-16, 4-12 NWC) and George Fox University (8-16, 5-11 NWC) round out the poll, checking in at eighth (14 points) and ninth (12 points), respectively. PLU, Northwest Conference Champions in eight of the last 12 seasons, begins the regular season on Friday, Sept. 2 facing Vassar College and Carthage College at the Puget Sound Premiere. The Lutes open their home slate and NWC play on Friday, Sept. 16, welcoming Willamette to Olson Gymnasium.

PLU MEN EARN SECOND SPOT IN PRESEASON COACHES POLL

The Pacific Lutheran University men's soccer team is projected to finish runner-up in the Northwest Conference in 2016 according to the league's eight head coaches with the preseason coaches' poll unveiled on Friday. The Lutes (15-5, 11-3 NWC) accrued 44 points in the poll, including one first place vote, holding a 13-point edge over crosstown rival University of Puget Sound (107-2, 8-4-2 NWC) who tallied 31 points to secure third. Whitworth University (16-2-1, 12-1-1 NWC) secured the top spot, nabbing 54 points and six first place votes. Pacific University (7-11-1, 5-8-1 NWC) and Willamette University (6-11-2, 5-8-1 NWC) tied for fourth with 28 points while Whitman College (3-13-2, 2-10-2 NWC) is sixth with 22 points and the remaining first place vote. Rounding out the poll is George Fox University (6-11-3, 3-8-3 NWC) and Linfield College (9-11, 5-9 NWC) with 17 and eight points, respectively. PLU returns 20 student-athletes from last season's squad that tallied seven clean sheets, matching a program record for overall wins and conference victories while Head Coach John Yorke earned NWC Coach of the Year accolades for the fourth time in his career. The Lutes begin the 2016 season in southern California, facing Claremont-Mudd-Scripps Colleges on Thursday, Sept. 1 before opening the home slate on Labor Day with an 11 a.m. showdown with Occidental College at East Field. Pacific Lutheran opens the lid on NWC play on Saturday, Sept. 17 against George Fox University.

Reno vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 1:35 p.m.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 6 – SOCCER Washington vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma Stadium – 6:30 p.m.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 6 - SOCCER Wilson vs. Fife s Fife Stadium – 7 p.m.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 6 – SOCCER Central Kitsap vs. Stadium Stadium Bowl – 7 p.m.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 8 – SOCCER Bonney Lake vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma Stadium – 6:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 8 – SOCCER Spanaway Lake vs. Wilson Stadium Bowl – 7:15 p.m.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 9 – SOCCER Women – Whittier vs. UPS Puget Sound – 4 p.m.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 9 – SOCCER Women – Concordia vs. PLU PLU Sports Complex – 6 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 10 – FOOTBALL Cal. Lutheran vs. Pacific Lutheran Sparks Stadium – 1 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 10 – FOOTBALL Taholah vs. Tacoma Baptist Curtis Viking Stadium – 7 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 10 – BOXING Battle at the Boat 107 Emerald Queen Casino – 7 p.m.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 11 – SOCCER Women – Whittier vs. PLU PLU Sports Complex – 11 a.m.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 11 – SOCCER Women – Concordia vs. UPS Puget Sound – 12 p.m.


Section A • Page 12 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 2, 2016

2016 TACOMA AREA HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL SCHEDULES - TACOMA WEEKLY 4A SOUTH PUGET SOUND LEAGUE BELLARMINE LIONS 09/08 09/09 09/13 09/16 09/20 09/24 09/27 09/28 10/04 10/05 10/11 10/13 10/15 10/17 10/19 10/24

Lakeside @West Valley @Tumwater Mercer Island @Graham Kapowsin @Kent Classic Curtis @Ballard Skyline Rogers @Puyallup Olympia @Capital Tourney @South Kitsap Sumner @Emerald Ridge

7:45 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 5 p.m. 7 p.m. 8 a.m. 7:15 p.m. 7 p.m. 7:45 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 10 a.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m.

CURTIS VIKINGS 09/06 09/07 09/13 09/16 09/20 09/21 09/24 09/27 09/29 10/03 10/05 10/11 10/13 10/17 10/25

Tumwater Gig Harbor Tahoma Auburn Mtn. @Rogers @Garfield @Kent Classic @Bellarmine Rogers @Puyallup Olympia @South Kitsap Sumner @Emerald Ridge Graham Kapowsin

7 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 8 a.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m.

3A PIERCE COUNTY LEAGUE LINCOLN LADY ABES 09/07 09/13 09/15 09/19 09/22 09/26 09/28 10/04 10/06 10/10 10/12 10/18 10/20 10/25

@Spanaway Lake Stadium @Wilson Mt. Tahoma @Bonney Lake @Bethel @Lakes Spanaway Lake @Stadium Wilson @Mt. Tahoma Bonney Lake Bethel Lakes

7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m.

MT. TAHOMA T-BIRDS 09/06 09/08 09/13 09/15 09/19 09/21 09/26 09/28 10/04 10/06 10/10

Foss @Bonney Lake @Lakes @Stadium @Lincoln Bethel @Spanaway Lake Wilson Bonney Lake Lakes Stadium

7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m.

10/12 10/18 10/20 10/25 10/26

Lincoln @Bethel Spanaway Lake @Wilson @Foss

7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m.

STADIUM TIGERS 09/08 09/13 09/15 09/19 09/21 09/23 09/26 09/28 10/04 10/06 10/10 10/12 10/18 10/20 10/25

@Lakes @Lincoln Mt. Tahoma @Bethel Spanaway Lake @Annie Wright Wilson Bonney Lake Lakes Lincoln @Mt. Tahoma Bethel @Spanaway Lake @Wilson @Bonney Lake

7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 6 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m.

WILSON LADY RAMS HOME COURT – FOSS HS 09/06 09/08 09/10 09/13 09/15 09/19 09/21 09/26 09/28 10/04 10/06 10/10 10/12 10/18 10/20 10/25

@Kentlake Bethel @Auburn Mtn Tourney Spanaway Lake Lincoln Bonney Lake @Lakes @Stadium @Mt. Tahoma @Bethel @Spanaway Lake @Lincoln @Bonney Lake Lakes Stadium Mt. Tahoma

7:30 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 9 a.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m.

2A SOUTH PUGET SOUND LEAGUE FIFE TROJANS 09/06 09/08 09/13 09/15 09/20 09/22 09/26 09/28 10/04 10/06 10/11 10/13 10/17 10/20 10/25 10/26

Olympic @Rogers @Washington Foss @Lindbergh Franklin Pierce @White River Evergreen Foster Washington @Foss Lindbergh @Franklin Pierce White River @Evergreen @Foster

7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m.

FOSS FALCONS 09/06 09/13 09/15 09/20

@Mt. Tahoma @Franklin Pierce @Fife Evergreen

7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m.

09/22 09/26 09/28 10/04 10/06 10/11 10/13 10/17 10/19 10/25 10/26 10/27

@Foster Washington White River @Lindbergh Franklin Pierce Fife @Evergreen Foster @Washington @White River Mt. Tahoma Lindbergh

7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m.

FRANKLIN PIERCE CARDINALS 09/06 09/13 09/15 09/20 09/22 09/26 09/28 10/04 10/06 10/11 10/13 10/17 10/19 10/24 10/25 10/27

@Eatonville Foss Lindbergh @White River @Fife Evergreen @Foster Washington @Foss @Lindbergh White River Fife @Evergreen @Olympia Foster @Washington

7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m.

WASHINGTON PATRIOTS 09/07 09/13 09/15 09/20 09/22 09/26 09/28 10/04 10/06 10/11 10/13 10/17 10/19 10/25 10/27

@Kentlake Fife @Evergreen Foster White River @Foss Lindbergh @Franklin Pierce @Fife Evergreen @Foster @White River Foss @Lindbergh Franklin Pierce

7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m.

2B PACIFIC LEAGUE CHIEF LESCHI WARRIORS 09/08 09/13 09/29 10/04 10/06 10/11 10/13 10/18 10/24 10/26

@NW Christian Winlock @Life Christian North Beach @Ilwaco NW Christian @South Bend Ocosta @Willapa Valley Raymond

7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m.

LIFE CHRISTIAN EAGLES 09/05 09/10 09/22 09/29 10/04

Cascade Christian @Lynden Tourney Seattle Christian Chief Leschi @Willapa Valley

6 p.m. 8 a.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m.

10/06 10/13 10/18 10/24 10/26

Raymond @North Beach Ilwaco South Bend @Ocosta

7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m.

1B SEA-TAC LEAGUE EVERGREEN LUTHERAN EAGLES 09/03 09/12 09/13 09/16 09/19 09/20 09/22 09/27 09/29 10/04 10/07 10/11 10/18 10/20 10/25

Friday Harbor NW Yeshiva Neah Bay @Sun Dome Tourney @Puget Adventist @Christian Faith Pope John Paul II @Mt. Rainier Lutheran Seattle Lutheran @Rainier Christian @Shoreline Christian Quilcene @Crosspoint @Tacoma Baptist Auburn Adventist

1:30 p.m. 6 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 8 a.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m.

TACOMA BAPTIST CRUSADERS 09/07 09/09 09/13 09/15 09/17 09/20 09/22 09/24 09/26 09/27 09/29 10/06 10/11 10/18 10/20

@Rainier @Quilcene Seattle Lutheran NW Yeshiva @Crosspoint Tourney Auburn Adventist @Crosspoint @Raymond Tourney @NW Christian Rainier Christian @Christian Faith @Mt. Rainier Lutheran Pope John Paul II @Puget Adventist Evergreen Lutheran

7 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 8 a.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 8 a.m. 7 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m.

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Friday, September 2, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 13

t Football

FOOTBALL WEEKEND #7 From page A10

FOOTBALL WEEKEND #5 FRIDAY, SEPT. 30 Curtis vs. Bellarmine* Bellarmine HS – 7 p.m. Lakes vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma HS – 7 p.m. Lincoln vs. Wilson* Stadium Bowl – 7 p.m. Franklin Pierce vs. Fife*

Fife Stadium – 7 p.m. White River vs. Washington Franklin Pierce HS – 7 p.m. Morton vs. Chief Leschi Chief Leschi Stadium – 7 p.m. Quilcene vs. Tacoma Baptist Curtis Viking Stadium – 7 p.m.

FRIDAY, OCT. 14 Sumner vs. Bellarmine* Bellarmine HS – 7 p.m. Bethel vs. Mt. Tahoma* Mt. Tahoma Stadium – 7 p.m. Wilson vs. Stadium*

Stadium Bowl – 7 p.m. Lindbergh vs. Washington Franklin Pierce HS – 7 p.m. Adna vs. Chief Leschi Chief Leschi Stadium – 7 p.m.

Lincoln attack. This matchup is going to be exciting. Washington and Franklin Pierce have been rivals for decades, and it doesn’t matter what the records look like coming into the game. These two teams want to beat each other and they want to make it sting.

FOOTBALL WEEKEND #9

Week seven isn’t packed with games, but there is some Napavine vs. Chief Leschi FRIDAY, OCT. 28 serious quality in there. Sumner was a big time 3A playoff Chief Leschi Stadium – 7 p.m. Puyallup vs. Bellarmine* team last season and should give Bellarmine one heck of a Bellarmine HS – 7 p.m. SATURDAY, OCT. 29 ballgame. Something screams “overtime” about this game. South Kitsap vs. Curtis Puget Sound vs. Pacific We’ll have a pretty good idea about Mt. Tahoma’s growth Curtis Viking Stadium – 7 p.m. Lutheran by the time Bethel rolls into town and puts the T-Birds to Lincoln vs. Stadium* Sparks Stadium – 1 p.m. Things begin to get down to the nitty gritty in week five. The the test. Wilson will be looking to avenge a shocking loss to Stadium Bowl – 7 p.m. Tacoma Baptist vs. Ev. LuCurtis versus Bellarmine matchup will be a rematch of the open- Stadium in 2015. Wilson vs. Mt. Tahoma theran* ing round of the 4A playoffs last season, which saw the Lions Mt. Tahoma Stadium – 7 p.m. Franklin Pierce HS – 5 p.m. knock off the Vikings. Expect a dogfight. It’s hard to ever pass FOOTBALL WEEKEND #8 up a Lincoln versus Wilson showdown. Their games are often the most exciting contests of the season. The winner of Franklin Week nine marks the end of the regular season and Washington vs. Franklin Pierce versus Fife may very well take the inside track to the 2A FRIDAY, OCT. 21 offers up some excellent matchups. The Puyallup verPierce* Stadium vs. Lakes SPSL title. sus Bellarmine game should have some serious playoff Harry Lang Stadium – 7 p.m. Franklin Pierce HS – 7 p.m. implications. What’s not to like about the Lincoln versus Chief Leschi vs. Life Christian Bonney Lake vs. Lincoln* Stadium game? It’s a great thing for Grit City to see the FOOTBALL WEEKEND #6 Site TBA Lincoln Bowl – 7 p.m. longest-standing rivalry rekindled. Of course, we snuck in Muckleshoot vs. Tacoma Bethel vs. Wilson the PLU versus UPS game. Last season’s slugfest in rain Washington vs. Foss* Baptist FRIDAY, OCT. 7 Stadium Bowl – 7 p.m. Mt. Tahoma Stadium – 7 p.m. and mud was absolutely epic. Here’s hoping for another Rogers vs. Curtis Curtis Viking Stadium – 7 p.m. Foster vs. Fife Evergreen vs. Franklin Pierce Curtis Viking Stadium – 7 p.m. one. The eight-man matchup of Tacoma Baptist versus Fife Stadium – 7 p.m. Franklin Pierce HS – 7 p.m. Mt. Tahoma vs. Lincoln Evergreen Lutheran could be a great capper to a fun weekNapavine vs. Life Christian Lincoln Bowl – 7 p.m. end of football. Site TBA Bonney Lake vs. Wilson* Week eight’s best contests are a playoff rematch and a Stadium Bowl – 7 p.m. rivalry game. Bonney Lake upset undefeated Lincoln in the 3A state tournament last season in a heartbreaker for the VISIT US ON FACEBOOK Week six is a little light Abes. Not only was the game at Lincoln Bowl, but it was FACEBOOK.COM/TACOMAWEEKLY around Tacoma. The Bonney played under a torrential rain, which really hamstrung the Lake versus Wilson matchup should be compelling. It’s around this time of the Join Us for Prime Rib! season that the Rams find their groove and start making a run at a postseason RESTAURANT Easy, Free Parking berth. It should be a great & MARINA test as they’re going to have their hands full with Bonney Lake. Now that we’re into week six, the Washington versus Foss matchup will Across from The Museum of Glass be a good measuring stick 1900 EAST D ST., TACOMA (253) 627-3186 as to how Foss is progressing. They had a very rough season last year and any improvement is going to be a bonus for the Falcons.

CHECK US OUT AT TACOMAWEEKLY. COM/SPORTS WE HAVE QUICK GAME RECAPS AND REGULAR UPDATES TO KEEP YOU INFORMED ABOUT YOUR FAVORITE TEAM.

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Section A • Page 14 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 2, 2016

TACOMA

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Tacoma loved the ’90s

City Life

B2

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2016

SECTION B, PAGE 1

CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVISITED

RETURNS TO PUYALLUP

PHOTO BY JEFF DOW

FORTUNATE SONS. Creedence Clearwater Revisited is (L-R) Kurt Griffey, John Tristao, Stu Cook, Doug Clifford and Steve Gunner. The band will headline the Washington State Fair on Sept. 7. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

T

here are many examples of feuding rock bands that have managed to patch things up for the sake of a lucrative reunion tour: The Eagles, The Police, most recently Guns N’ Roses. But so far not Creedence Clearwater Revival, the Bay Area band behind some of the most iconic rock songs of the ‘60s and early ‘70s. Theirs is a decades-long beef, characterized by occasional litigation; and the chasm between singerguitarist John Fogerty and the other surviving members, bassist Stu Cook and drummer Doug Clifford, remains deep and wide. However, Creedence Clearwater Revisisted – featuring Cook and Clifford – is still out on the road, bringing “Down on the Corner,� “Have You Ever Seen the Rain� and other smash hits to the band’s diehard fans. On Wednesday, Sept. 7, Revisited will headline the Washington State Fair grandstand; and, in the days leading up to the show, Cook held out the teeniest, tiniest sliver of hope that Revival might reunite one day. You might need a microscope to see that hope, but it’s there. Here are outtakes from our conversation. TACOMA WEEKLY: Take me back to 1995. What made you and Doug want to revisit this music and take it back on the road again? COOK: We were hanging out a

lot together and jammin’, drinking beers, etc. We thought maybe we should start a musical project. It’s pretty much that simple. We needed to get out of the house. It was nothing more complicated than that. TW: What is it about the songs that people still connect with them so strongly? COOK: Gee, I don’t know. They were popular recordings in their day. Fortunately, the baton seems to be passed to at least two new generations. We’re very fortunate in that sense. TW: Do you remember when you were first starting out with Creedence Clearwater Revival, when you realized you had something special? COOK: The feedback for that was getting played on the radio. Once other people start liking what you’re doing, then you’ve got a chance. But before that, we couldn’t get into any kind of regular rotation. We’d been making records for almost nine years – over nine years, actually – before “Suzie Q� came out. We just never really clicked with the listening public. TW: Your sound and imagery is very Southern, but you guys are all West Coasters. COOK: That’s the kind of music we liked when we were kids. When we were first tuning into music, we preferred music from the South; blues, some country, but mostly blues, urban and rural. So as we were learning to play together, that’s the sort of stuff that we’d go to. We’d play other people’s songs, but it was Ike & Tina Turner, not Pat Boone.

TW: Speaking of Ike & Tina, what was it like watching them have success with one of your songs and putting their stamp on it? COOK: They were touring with us at the time, and Ike comes up with his arrangement to have Tina sing “Proud Mary.� I go, “Wait a minute, Ike. We’re doing that song tonight.� (He laughs.) I didn’t care for that version very much, but it’s always great to have other people tune in to what you’re doing; and if they want to do it themselves, that’s even better. They take it to a whole new audience. TW: You guys were one of the headliners at Woodstock. Do you regret not being in the film? At the time, you probably didn’t know it was this pivotal event in rock history. But later it’s like, “Hey, we were there, too.� COOK: You’re feelin’ my pain, aren’t ya? (He chuckles.) That was a huge mistake. That was Fogerty’s decision alone. We fought it. We argued till we were blue in the face. We were booked as the headliner for Saturday night, but we didn’t get to play til early Sunday morning because of technical difficulties, and the whole thing was kind of reinvented on the fly after another extra quarter million people showed up. Nobody knew that concert, but particularly that film, would create so many careers. We should have been in it. What can I say? Fogerty’s thinking, as I recall it, was “What good can that film do us? We’re u See CCR / page B4

The Washington State Fair kicks off today at the Washington State Event Center, 110 Ninth Ave. SW, in Puyallup. Here is a list of this year’s grandstand headliners, with more details available online at www.thefair.com. t +$PMFXJUI#BT IJQIPQ 7:30 p.m. Sept. 2, $70 to $115 t ,JE3PDLXJUI6ODMF,SBDLFS SBQSPDL DPVOUSZSPDL  7:30 p.m. Sept. 3, $38 to $120 t 5JN.D(SBX DPVOUSZ  7:30 p.m. Sept. 4, $85 to $350 t i&OE PG 4VNNFS #BTIw GFBUVSJOH "" +JNNZ #VGGFU USJCVUF 5 p.m. Sept. 5, free with gate admission t $SFFEFODF$MFBSXBUFS3FWJTJUFE DMBTTJDSPDL 7:30 p.m. Sept. 7, $30 t 4NBTI.PVUI QPQSPDL  7:30 p.m. Sept. 8, $30 t 3PEFPQMBZPGGTNBUJOFF1 p.m. Sept. 9 to 11, $5 to $35 t 3PEFP QMBZPGGT XJUI 5IPNQTPO 4RVBSF DPVOUSZ  6:30 p.m. $35 to $40 t 3PEFP QMBZPGGT XJUI $ISJT +BOTPO DPVOUSZ  6:30 p.m. Sept. 10, $35 to $40 t ,JOH  $PVOUSZ XJUI .BUU .BIFS $ISJTUJBO QPQ  7:30 p.m. Sept. 12, $26 to $46 t %/$&XJUI-VODINPOFZ-FXJT QPQ 7:30 p.m. Sept. 14, $28 to $55 t 9 "NCBTTBEPST XJUI 3BDIFM 1MBUUFO QPQ  7:30 p.m. Sept. 15, $40 to $60 t $IBSMJF 8JMTPO XJUI +PF 3#  7:30 p.m. Sept. 16, $45 to $65 t i'JFTUBT 1BUSJBTw XJUI 7P[ EF .BOEP  1SPZFDUP 9 BOE .BSJBDIJ%JWB .FYJDBOSFHJPOBM -BUJO 5 p.m. Sept. 18, $20 general admission, $10 ages 12 and under t $ISJT :PVOH XJUI $BTTBEFF 1PQF DPVOUSZ  7:30 p.m. Sept. 19, $40 to $60 t (BWJO %FHSBX XJUI "OEZ (SBNNFS QPQ  7 p.m. Sept. 21, $43 to $65

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE CAFFEINE & GASOLINE

Where can you find exotic cars, street rods, tuner cars, and race machines all in the same place? The first Saturday of every month, you’ll find those and more at Griot’s Garage Caffeine & Gasoline cruise-in car shows. Each installment has a different theme, but all kinds of cars are welcome. There will be free coffee and donuts when you cruise in to the retail sore, which is located at 3333 S. 38th St. Caffeine & Gasoline events are a great chance to talk cars with fellow enthusiasts, get inspiration for you own projects, and tune in to the local car scene; www.griotsgarage.com.

TWO GREAT PUMPKINS It’s that time of year when harvest activities begin and holiday shopping gets serious.

It’s also time for those two things to combine in a uniquely Northwest event, the 2016 Northwest Glass Pumpkin Patch tour, which is presented by the Tacoma Glassblowing Studio. The annual tour will feature more than 2,000 beautiful, hand-blown glass pumpkins crafted by local glass artisans and displayed at nine different locations throughout the Puget Sound region. This year’s events will be held on nine consecutive Saturdays starting at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 3, at Watson’s Nursery in Puyallup. Admission is free. Find a full list of events at www.northwestglasspumpkins. com.

THREE SUMMER SPLASH Labor Day weekend is upon us, and there may be no better place to mark the unofficial last days of summer than at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium. The schedule

is jam-packed with events and activities for animal lovers all day, every day. The zoo’s End of Summer Splash is scheduled for Saturday through Monday. Hours are 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. With a zoo bustling with things to do and see, the event will be more fun than watching a ton of walrus haul out of the water; www.pdza.org.

FOUR GEEK OUT Swords & Laser Book Discussion is a locally-organized, real-life offshoot of the online Sword & Laser community. Each month, Sword & Laser picks either a fantasy or a science fiction book to read and discuss. Next, the group will meet at 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 4, at King’s

Books to discuss “The Last Wish: Introducing the Witcher� by Andrzej Sapkowski; www. kingsbookstore.com.

FIVE SOAPY FUN Need to wash your clothes, but don’t feel like taking them off first? Then you’re in luck since Jazzbones is hosting it’s 14th annual Foam Fest, which will kick off at 9 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 4. Suds will fill the club as DJ Pressha and BZ Productions spin the hottest dance tunes. Admission is $15 for men. The first 20 women in bikinis get in free. Otherwise, women get in for $10 before 10:30 p.m. and $15 after.


3ECTION"s0AGE sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY 3EPTEMBER 

WEEKLY REWIND

Photos by Bill Bungard Thousands of Gen-Xers took a stroll down memory lane on Friday, Aug. 26, as the “I Love the ‘90s� tour took over the Tacoma Dome with smash hits from their youth. (L-R from top, left) Grammy Award-winning R&B group All 4 One was there. Young MC helped fans “bust a move.� Coolio turned the venue into a “Gangsta’s Paradise.� Color Me Badd delivered their ubiquitous early 90s hit, “I Wanna Sex You Up.� Rob Base & DJ EZ Rock demonstrated the power of two; and Salt-N-Pepa rocked the house with a little help from DJ Spinderella.

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Friday, September 2, 2016 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

KITTREDGE KICKS OFF NEW SEASON WITH COLBY RETROSPECTIVE AND WORK BY FOUR NEW STARS

Culture Corner

A Guide to the MuseuMs of tACoMA

Museum of the Week:

"Y$AVE2$AVISON

LeMay America’s Car Museum 2702 E. D St., Tacoma, WA 98421 Mon.-Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: www.lemaymuseum.org

dave@tacomaweekly.com

The Kittredge Gallery, University of Puget Sound’s venue for the showing of fine art (and one of the most important galleries in Tacoma), kicks off its new season of shows with a great double billing. In the main space is “Retro Colby,� a retrospective of the work of Bill Colby who was served as an art teacher at UPS for many years. Now in retirement from that position, 89-yearold Colby remains active and prolific as an artist. Kittredge’s “small gallery� features a show of works by four recent graduates of the UPS art school who produced work during a summer residency in Kittredge Hall. The show is called “Under Construction� because the artists pursued their work in the midst of construction going on in the building. Grace BestDevereux, Carly Brock, Rachel Kalman and Gaby Yoque did their work to the tune of jackhammers, electric saws and other construction equipment. Otherwise, the show has nothing to do with the mess, materials, hard hats and florescent orange objects associated with a construction site. Colby is predominantly a printmaker specializing in woodcuts. His trademark is the use of the natural grain of the wood in his prints. Most printers use the medium as a way to get more bang for the buck: to make dozens of copies of the image that the artist has cut into the plate. Colby, however, uses the medium more like a painter or a collage artist. He’ll mix and match parts of woodcuts and constantly play with the colors and gradient range of his inks. He often adds painted elements. More often than not, his “prints� are one-of-a-kind works of art. If Colby makes multiples, the number of prints made is very limited. “Retro Colby� spans six decades. There are some wonderful, busy, dazzling prints from the 1950s that show a variety of social situations: children with toys, people dancing in a bar, a family clustered together and all gazing at a television set. From the 1960s

This week’s events: SEPT

2016

Member Double Discount Day Sept. 4, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

All Museum members receive 20 percent off in the ACM Store and Classics by Pacific Grill. Not a member? Not a problem. Consider joining before you leave the Museum and apply the cost of your admission ticket to a membership. We have a membership level to meet your needs. PHOTO OF ART BY DAVE R. DAVISON

&,)'(4 “Crow Watch,� 2016, wood cut print by Bill Colby.

on, however, Colby took Mother Nature as his muse. Most of the work in the show depicts birds, evergreen trees, boulders in rivers – most of it in highly stylized form, often adapting local Native artistic motifs. Over time, Colby adopted a nature mysticism and system of symbols that seem to link him to Northwest mystics like Morris Graves, Kenneth Callahan, Guy Anderson and Mark Tobey. The 1986 woodcut “East Door,� for example (the largest work in the show), reads like a big scroll of nature-scripture with bands of stylized trees and mountains and a zone of “water� denoted by Northwest Native wave-like shapes. The whole thing is crowned by a solar hoop of evergreen boughs. In January Colby will celebrate 90 years on the planet. Let his example serve as a ray of hope for all artists and aspiring artists. The wellspring of inspiration will keep flowing if one maintains touch with the muse. The four young artists featured in the small gallery also inspire. Best-Devereux presents a few wall-mounted sculptures that explore her fascination with hair. BestDevereux brings attention to just how much our hair, and what we do with it, is bound with our sense of identity. Hair and hair styling weave together a whole complex of social status and self-identification. One’s hair broadcasts to others a vast quantity of information that ranges from the state of one’s physical health to the state of one’s bank account. Yoque combines digital prints with silk screen printing to create a set of images as simple and striking as a

SEPT

flash card. The digital portion of each work is the definition of an object in both Spanish and English. Over the enlarged gray font, the artist presents the object in visual form in colorful silkscreen. Brock and Kalman are both painters armed with skill and intelligence. Brock’s Skagit Valley landscapes feature roadways that are familiar to the artist. Each canvas features a section of road with the surrounding landscape. Brock notes that landscape scenes are unique in their own appearance, while the simple symbol system or road signs give a universally recognized element to each scene. Kalman, meanwhile, is already a master of her medium. Her paintings of metallic vessels attempt to revive and contemporize the tradition of the still life painting. Kalman picks objects with a highly reflective surface and represents them with a photo realist’s accuracy. She draws the viewer’s attention to the way that the reflective surface of three-dimensional objects have the power to mirror and distort the world around themselves (much as we do as human vessels of perception and memory). “Study in Green� is an especially charming painting of a steel creamer and ladle resting on a green, polka-dotted cloth. The whole composition has a poetic charm that is beguiling. “Retro Colby� and “Under Construction� are on view through through Sept. 24. For further information visit www.pugetsound. edu/about/campus-thenorthwest/places-spaces/ kittredge-gallery.

2016

If Cars Could Talk – Opening the Highways to All Mankind: Henry Ford and the Model T Sept. 6, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

There are many chapters to the story of the automobile. If cars could talk, they might just share stories we never imagined. Each month, our speaker will pick a car and offer a fascinating peek into its history. SEPT

2016

Race Night at ACM Sept. 8, 5-8 p.m.

Put your racing skills to the test every second Thursday of the month in the Speed Zone at ACM. Our CXC racing simulators are linked together to provide a realistic racing experience against other drivers. Compete on famous tracks such as: Darlington, Daytona, Dover and more.

SEPT

2016

Cruise-In at ACM Sept. 8, 5-8 p.m.

Cruise into ACM on the second Thursday of each month April through October, rain or shine on ACM’s Haub Family Field. Cruise-Ins at ACM are free, family-friendly and no pre-registration is required. Enjoy music by DJ Fred, BBQ by Gravediggers, popcorn by Queen of Pop, free coffee and cookies, and enter to win a door prize and/or People’s Choice award.

New Exhibit: BMW – Propelling a Century of Innovation ACM’s exhibit BMW – Propelling a Century of Innovation celebrates the centennial of this paramount company and its designs. While BMW began manufacturing airplane engines in 1916, it wasn’t until 1932 that the Munich-based company put together its first automobile. It built a reputation for producing exciting cars at the same time that the German autobahn was conceived. In the 1970s, BMW began marketing as “The Ultimate Driving Machine� and has used the tagline for countless iconic road cars since. The slogan, coined under the guidance of industry luminary Bob Lutz, is widely recognized as one of the best of all auto manufacturers and has served BMW well for the past 42 years.

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JOAN JETT DAZZLES WHILE HEART AND CHEAP TRICK DELIVER By Justin Gimse

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

Every once in a while, there is an opportunity that pops up in front of you and you must immediately say yes to it. Details such as when and where really don’t matter when a golden moment appears before you. It’s time for a command decision and you need to just go with it. This is where I found myself when asked whether I wanted to head on out to the White River Amphitheatre and cover what was billed as the “Rock Hall Three-For-All� tour. The lineup was an absolute scorcher. Heart, Cheap Trick and Joan Jett and the Blackhearts were coming to the area, and not only was each band a fixture within my own musical foundation, but surprisingly enough they were acts that I had never witnessed live and in person. When it was all said and done, I would leave the event a changed man and absolutely fulfilled. At the moment I am having difficulty remembering the last time I ever saw three bands take the stage and bring it the way it went down on Friday, Aug. 26. Not only did each act hold up to their legendary status as performers, but it was genuinely inspiring to see these musicians exude so much love for their fans and deliver so much energy as they entered the final month of a long national tour together. With a 6:30 p.m. start time for the show, it was going to take a bit of magic to get out to White River and catch the beginning of Cheap Trick’s opening set. In retrospect, taking the courtesy buses out of Auburn was probably not a solid idea, as the ride took over an hour to cover a distance of probably 10 miles.

Following the sweltering yellow school bus ride, we hit the pavement to hear the sounds of Cheap Trick’s regular opener “Hello There.� My heart began to pound a little stronger with anticipation and I couldn’t have been more relieved knowing that my wife Jolene and I hadn’t missed much of the show at all. Cheap Trick’s “Live at Budokon� was among a suitcase full of cassettes that my brother left with me when he headed off for the Marine Corps. I played it to death and without really knowing anything about them at the age of seven, I was a fan. Who knew that it would take around 35 years for me to actually see them live? They didn’t disappoint me. Robin Zander’s voice sounded great and Rick Nielsen was spot-on as he stalked around the stage whipping guitar picks into the crowd. They ripped it up from the get-go, but the second half of their set was where all the beef was located. After an excellent rendition of their hit “The Flame,� the boys brought the crowd to their feet for the remainder of the set with “I Want You to Want Me,� “Dream Police,� “Surrender� and “Goodnight.� The final two numbers included Pearl Jam’s Mike McCready joining the band on stage. Next up would be Joan Jett and the Blackhearts. I’ll be honest, I don’t have enough space to go on and on about Joan Jett. Suffice it to say that Joan Jett was one of my first loves as a young lad, and she’s had a special spot in my heart ever since. I’m serious when I say don’t talk any junk about Joan, or we’re going to have some words. Initially I thought Jett was opening the show, and was delighted to see her

playing the featured act slot. After her set was over, it was easy to see why she was playing in the middle, because the crowd couldn’t get enough of her. As good as Heart was following her, I’d have to give the night’s gold medal to Jett. When you open up a set with “Bad Reputation,� “Cherry Bomb� and “Do You Wanna Touch Me� and wrap it all up with “I Love Rock ‘n’ Roll,� “Crimson and Clover,� “I Hate Myself for Loving You� and “Everyday People,� it’s going to be hard to beat. In fact, I was floored by how solid Jett’s set was. At this moment, I could have headed home satisfied, but Heart was going to surprise me as well. Having seen quite a bit of concert footage of Heart over the years, I thought I was prepared for their awesomeness. Of course, there’s really nothing to compare to being in person, so all of those YouTube videos were merely appetizers for the real deal. Ann Wilson’s voice was on-point and the band was tight and rolling. While they played a handful of their hits, I was surprised that I found one of their mid-eighties numbers to be the highlight of the night. With sister Nancy Wilson on lead vocals, the band put together a rendition of “These Dreams� that left me with goose bumps. Ann’s duet of “Love Hurts� with Robin Zander was probably the second-best number of their set and crowd ate it up. All told, the three bands dazzled the crowd with 41 songs. After a long week and a hot night, I was pretty exhausted by the time the night was over. However, the show was so good, I would have gladly hopped back on the yellow bus the following evening to do it all over again.

t CCR

From page B1

already No. 1.� He told us we didn’t play well enough. But after listening to the tapes, and now you’ve seen video footage in the 40th anniversary box set ... we played a great set. We could have certainly picked one song. TW: Decades removed, I wondered if you have a laugh about that now. COOK: It’s still not funny. (He laughs.) I can laugh about pretty much anything. I have a fairly dark sense of humor; but professionally, I don’t know that we’ll ever get over it. It was just a huge, huge mistake. TW: Speaking of Fogerty, in recent years he’s said he’s open to playing with you guys. From your perspective, what are the odds you’ll get back together and do something? COOK: (He chuckles.) Not very good. I think he just says that stuff to polish his image because he’s, for decades, been so over-thetop negative about anything to do with his former band mates. That builds up after a while, and people come to think of folks like that as jerks. Like “why don’t you get over it?� There are more important things in life, for sure. So he’ll come out with that kind of a statement, but there’s absolutely no truth to it from what I’ve been able to figure out. Any time I read that or somebody tells me about something like that it’s like “You either read it wrong or something else is going on here because no one’s called me.� TW: So it sounds like you’re still not exchanging Christmas cards at this point. COOK: That’s right! (He cracks up.) TW: If somehow you were able to go into counseling together and iron out your personal differences, would you be up for it? COOK: If it was authentic. I mean that in the truest sense of the word. If it was a real situation that didn’t have any ulterior motives or any attempt to spin the whole thing, I would be open to sitting down and listening because I like to think of myself as reasonable. But I just don’t expect that to happen. It hasn’t happened yet, and I think every day that goes by makes it less interesting to anybody.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: NEKO CASE Singer-songwriter Neko Case has seldom performed in Tacoma since she lived here in the ‘80s and ‘90s. But fresh off her recent tour dates with case/lang/veirs – her super-group with K.D. Lang and Laura Viers – she’ll make a rare appearance at the Pantages Theater on Nov. 9. The show will start at 8 p.m. that night. Tickets are $34.50, and they’re available online through www.broadwaycenter.org. Visit www.ticketmaster.com for more details on that and these other hot tickets, except for where otherwise noted. • DNCE with Lunchmoney Lewis: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 14, Washington State Fair Event Center, Puyallup, $28 to $55; www.thefair.com. • X Ambassadors with Rachel Platten: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 15, Washington State Fair Event Center, Puyallup, $40 to $65; thefair.com. • Drake with Future: 7 p.m. Sept. 16, Tacoma Dome, $49.50 to $129.50. • Charlie Wilson with Joe: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 16, Washington State Fair Event Center, Puyallup, $45 to $65; www.thefair.com. • Alan Jackson: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 17, Washington State Fair Event Center, Puyallup, $50 to $85; www.thefair.com. • “Evergreen Festâ€? featuring Matisyahu, House of Pain and more: noon Sept. 17, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn, $27 to $66. • Fiestas Patrias featuring Voz de Mando, Proyecto X and Mariachi Divas: 5 p.m. Sept. 18, Washington State Fair Event Center, Puyallup, xxxxx; www. thefair.com. • Dolly Parton: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 21, Showare Center, Kent, $39.50 to $125; www.showarecenter.com.

Magazines, DVDs, Novelties, Gifts for Lovers

• Wade Hayes with Zach Henson: 8 p.m. Sept. 22, Steel Creek American Whiskey Co., $15 to $60; www.steelcreekwhiskey.com. • John Nemeth with Jimmy Thackery and Stacy Jones: 8:30 p.m. Sept. 23, Temple Theatre, $25. • Art Garfunkel: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 24, Pantages Theater, $29 to $85; www.broadwaycenter.org. • “Hops on the Soundâ€? featuring Tonic, Vicci Martinez and more: 1 p.m. Sept. 24, Cheney Stadium, $25 to $175. • Def Leppard with REO Speedwagon and Tesla: 7 p.m. Oct. 1, Tacoma Dome, $29.50 to $125. • Dr. John & the Nite Trippers: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 7, Pantages Theater, $39 to $110. • Alice Cooper: 8 p.m. Oct. 20, Emerald Queen Casino, $40 to $95. • Craig Ferguson: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 27, Pantages Theater, $19 to $69; www.broadwaycenter.org. • Steve-O: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 27 to 30, 10:30 p.m. Oct. 28 and 29, Tacoma Comedy Club, $22 to $30; www.tacomacomedyclub.com.

NEKO CASE

• Freak Night featuring Armin Van Buuren, Paul Van Dyk and more: 6 p.m. Oct. 28 and 29, Tacoma Dome, $304 two-day pass.

• Florida Georgia Line with Granger Smith and Chris Lane: 7 p.m. Nov. 11, Tacoma Dome, $37.75 to $57.75.

• Sir Mix-A-Lot: 8 p.m. Oct. 29, Temple Theatre, $20; www.ticketfly.com

• Flosstradamus with Snails, Towkio and Gent & Jawns: 6 p.m. Nov. 12, Tacoma Dome, $45.

• Five Finger Death Punch with Shinedown, Sixx:A.M., and As Lions: 6 p.m. Nov. 5, Tacoma Dome, $36.75 to $56.75.

• Amy Grant & Michael W. Smith: 7 p.m. Nov. 19, Showare Center, Kent, $42 to $252; www. showarecenter.com.

• Kris Kristofferson: 7:30 p.m. Nov. 10, Pantages Theater, $39 to $110; www.broadwaycenter.org.

• Bret Michaels: 6:45 p.m. Dec. 9, Showare Center, Kent, $39; www.showarecenter.com.

PHOTO BY ERNEST A. JASMIN

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TWO TACOMA FAVORITES, GIRL TROUBLE (SHOWN, CIRCA 1992) AND THE FUN POLICE, WILL TEAM UP FOR A ROWDY NIGHT OF ROCK STARTING AT 9 P.M. SUNDAY, SEPT. 4, AT THE VALLEY. ADMISSION IS BY DONATION; WWW. THEVALLEYTACOMA.COM.

PHOTO BY MICHAEL SCHWARTZ

FUNNY FAM. Comedian John Caparulo with his wife, Jamie, and daughter, Madden, who often appear on his online standup series, “Caplets.� "Y%RNEST!*ASMIN ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

Local sports teams that become world champions after years spent in the middle of the pack inevitably pick up legions of new, bandwagon fans. Comedian John Caparulo refuses to be one of those. Caparulo, who will be the main attraction at Tacoma Comedy Club from Sept. 8 to 11, often jokes about his plight as a longsuffering Cleveland sports fan. As he grew up in East Liverpool, Ohio, most of his love was reserved for the NFL’s Cleveland Browns. It was the NBA’s Cavaliers that brought glory back to “Believeland,� though, ending the city’s 52-year championship drought in June by beating the Golden State Warriors in the NBA championship series. Still, don’t expect Caparulo to show up stage next week sporting a burgundy and gold LeBron James jersey. “I never wanted to pretend I was suddenly a Cavs fan,� he said, calling from home in Los Angeles earlier this week. “When I was a kid, the Cavs were like our Washington Generals. We just went whenever they were playing somebody good. Like if Jordan was coming to town - or Shaq or Magic Johnson, somebody like that. “My dad’s a Cavs fan and has been for a long time. This is the first year the NBA finals weren’t fixed, as far as he’s concerned,� he said. “It’s great for Cleveland itself for finally getting off the ‘schneid,’ essentially, and getting a championship. The way they came back, that’s even better with LeBron’s comeback. The way he’s grown into his man-

hood is commendable. ‌ But still, at the same time I don’t want him ever being compared to my lord and savior, Michael Jordan. As long as people avoid those comparisons, I’m good.â€? Caparulo also talked about his time on E! Network’s “Chelsea Latelyâ€? where he often appeared as a guest on host Chelsea Handler’s panel, and his plans to develop a new, animated series. The former came up in the context of whether fans might see him on “Chelsea,â€? Handler’s new talk show for Netflix. “I don’t think you will,â€? he said. “But she really, really helped me out. She was really liberal with her spotlight, which is very rare now, so I have nothing but good things to say about her. But she’s moving on to whatever’s she’s doing now, and I think that’s great. If it were me, I would have stopped coming to work a long time ago, way before she started doing ‘Chelsea Lately.’ “I only went in once maybe every 10 episodes, (but) before the show went off the air, I’d sort of done as much as I could and really needed to move on and do my own thing. That’s what I’m really hoping to do. We’ll see.â€? Caparulo hopes his next big breakthrough will be “Cartoon Comic,â€? a pilot he is working on

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that he describes as being akin to Louis CK’s critically acclaimed FX series, “Louie,� but animated. “The possibilities are sort of endless with animation,� Caparulo said. “You don’t have to worry about the set or how it looks. You can go, ‘Okay, I want to mock the boat scene from ‘Jaws,’ and you can make it look like that. Or you can have a big crowd scene, or you can have explosions. There are no consequences, and you can be edgier. Cartoon characters can sort of get away with anything. My ultimate dream is to be able to be able to take my comedy, my comedic view and communicate that to the masses somehow. I think animation is such a fun way to do that.� Work on the pilot is already underway, he said, and a pilot episode will likely be done by year’s end. Tacoma Weekly also asked Caparulo about the worst experience he’d ever had bombing onstage, and he responded with a scenario that was surprisingly recent and hilarious, despite the therapy he may need to work through the trauma. The story was far too long to do justice in this space, though. You can listen to the audio online at www. tacomaweekly.com. Fans can also follow his online standup series, “Caplets,� on YouTube. MORRIS FROM AMERICA (118 MIN, R) Fri 9/2: 2:25, 4:45, 7:00, 9:10 Sat 9/3-Mon 9/5: 12:00, 2:25, 4:45, 7:00, 9:10 Tue 9/6: 4:45, 9:10 Wed 9/7: 2:25, 4:45, 7:00, 9:10 Thu 9/8: 2:25, 4:45, 9:10 SOUTHSIDE WITH YOU (84 MIN, PG-13) Fri 9/2: 2:15, 4:30, 6:35, 8:40 Sat 9/3-Mon 9/5: 12:00, 2:15, 4:30, 6:35, 8:40 Tue 9/6-Thu 9/8: 2:15, 4:30, 6:35, 8:40 DON’T THINK TWICE (92 MIN, R) Fri 9/2: 2:00, 4:15, 6:45, 9:00 Sat 9/3: 11:45 AM, 2:00, 6:45, 9:00 Sun 9/4-Mon 9/5: 11:45 AM, 2:00, 4:15, 6:45, 9:00 Tue 9/6-Thu 9/8: 2:00, 4:15, 6:45, 9:00 FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (110 MIN, PG-13) Fri 9/2-Thu 9/8: 12:45, 3:15, 6:00, 8:30 UNDER THE SUN (106 MIN, NR) Tue 9/6: 1:45, 6:50 VANISHING SAIL (88 MIN, NR) Thu 9/8: 6:45

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FRIDAY, SEPT. 2 REAL ART TACOMA: One year anniversary with Peace & Red Velvet, Power Laces, Little Donuts (hip-hop, funk, R&B, Hall & Oats covers) 7 p.m., $10, AA CULTURA: Latin Fridays (Latin DJ) 9 p.m. G. DONNALSON’S: Little Bill Engelhart and Rod Cook (blues, jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Afrodisiacs (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: DJ Minus (DJ dance) 10 p.m., NC-$5 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Bleed the Stone, Pacific Drive, Await the Avalanche, Riot and Rhythm, Static (rock) 8 p.m., $10, AA THE SPAR: Dave Roberts Band (rock covers) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Heritage, The Ill-Legitimates (reggae, surf-rock) 9 p.m., $8 TACOMA COMEDY: Kevin Bozeman (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $16-$22, 18+ early show UNCLE SAM’S: The Remedy (rock covers) 8 p.m. THE VALLEY: The Pearls, Shotgun Kitchen, Sofie Lute (country, Americana, rock) 8 p.m., NC WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: J. Cole (hip-hop) 7:30 p.m., $70-$115, AA ZODIAC SUPPER CLUB: Eliot Lipp (electronic) 9 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, SEPT. 3 WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Kid Rock, Uncle Kracker (rap-rock, country) 7:30 p.m., $95$120, AA

G. DONNALSON’S: Little Bill Engelhart and Rod Cook (blues, jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Afrodisiacs (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: “Snap Chat Party 2� with Mike Deez & Jig, DJ Jusz Nyce, DJ Schematik (DJ dance) 8 p.m., NC JOHNNY’S DOCK: Tim Hall Band (blues) 5 p.m., NC KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC REAL ART TACOMA: Ramona, Fairlady, Wells, I’m Not Me (indie-rock, punk) 8 p.m., $5, AA THE SWISS: Kry (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Kevin Bozeman (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $16-$22, 18+ early show UNCLE SAM’S: The Remedy (rock covers) 8 p.m. THE VALLEY: Widowspeak, Greenfield (indie-rock) 8 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: “Foam Fest 14� with DJ Indica Jones, BZ Productions (DJ dance) 9 p.m., $10-$15 JOHNNY’S DOCK: Little Bill Trio (blues, jazz) 5 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Bluegrass Sunday, 3 p.m., NC THE SPAR: Red House (blues) 7 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Kevin Bozeman (comedy) 8 p.m., $16-$22, 18+ early show THE VALLEY: Girl Trouble, The Fun Police (garage-rock, punk, alternative) 9 p.m., NC

MONDAY, SEPT. 5

DAWSON’S: Heather Jones and the Groove Masters (R&B, soul, funk) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: G’s showcase with Brian Feist (blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Chuck Gay (open mic) 7 p.m., NC WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: A1A (Jimmy Buffet tribute) 5 p.m., NC, AA

TUESDAY, SEPT. 6

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Doug Skoog and Brian Feist (blues) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: G’s showcase with Brian Feist (blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA NORTHERN PACIFIC: Stingy Brim Slim (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lefferty (open mic) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (open mic) 8 p.m., NC

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 7

DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: James Haye (blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA HARMON TAPROOM: Open mic with Steve Stefanowicz, 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 8 p.m., NC NORTHERN PACIFIC: Open mic, 7:30 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m. WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Creedence Clearwater Revisited (classic rock) 7:30 p.m., $30, AA

THURSDAY, SEPT. 8 JAZZBONES: Too Slim and the Taildraggers (blues, rock) 8 p.m., $15-$18

SUNDAY, SEPT. 4 WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Tim McGraw (country) 7:30 p.m., $85$150, AA

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: Blues and gospel night, 8 p.m., NC, AA

ANTHEM COFFEE: Live Roots (open mic) 5 p.m., NC, AA CULTURA: Ladies Night Out (hip-hop DJ) 10 p.m. DAWSON’S: The Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: Jared Hall Trio (jazz) 8 p.m., NC,AA KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: John Caparulo (comedy) 7:30 p.m., $17.50-$22.50, 18+ WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Smash Mouth (pop-rock) 7:30 p.m., $30, AA

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older


3ECTION"s0AGE sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY 3EPTEMBER 

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: OPENING SEPT. 9 ‘THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES’ Fri., Sept. 9, 8 p.m., Sat., Sept. 10, 8 p.m., Sun., Sept. 11, 2 p.m. Lakewood Playhouse @ Lakewood Towne Center, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd., Lakewood To open its 78th season, Lakewood Playhouse presents a comedic version of this Sir Arthur Conan Doyle classic. Presented in the Lakewood Playhouse’s thrust configuration, with seating facing the stage as well on both of its sides, this production will drop you right into the middle of this fast paced comedy of impossibly quick changes, comedic chaos and mysterious mystery. The production features three returning actors from previous productions – Jacob Tice (Sherlock Holmes), Kayla Crawford (Watson) and Gary Chambers (Sir Henry Baskerville) – with each of them performing one of the primary roles as well as a myriad of the over 50 other characters in the show. Special showings at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15 (Pay What You Can Night) and Thursday, Sept. 22 (“Pay What You Can� Actor’s Benefit). Price: $25 (general admission), $22 (military), $21 (seniors) and $19 (students/educators). Info: (253) 588-0042; www. lakewoodplayhouse.org BILL COLBY: RETRO COLBY Fri., Sept. 2, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. University of Puget Sound – Kittredge Gallery, 1500 N. Warner St. “Retro Colby� is a retrospective exhibition of work by former University of Puget Sound art professor Bill Colby. Price: Free. Info: (253) 879-3348; www. pugetsound.edu VOLUNTEER STEWARDSHIP HABITAT RESTORATION Fri., Sept. 2, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Tacoma Nature Center, 1919 S. Tyler St. Join us for our regular stewardship activities as we care for the park by removing invasive plant species, replanting areas with native plants and helping those plants thrive. No experience necessary. Price: Free. Info: (253) 591-6439; www. tacomanaturecenter.org

UNDER CONSTRUCTION Fri., Sept. 2, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. University of Puget Sound – Kittredge Gallery, 1500 N. Warner St. “Under Construction,� the 2016 Studio Art Graduate Residency exhibit, will include work by Gabriela Yoque, Grace Best-Devereux, Carly Brock and Rachel Kalman. Price: Free. Info: (253) 879-3348; www. pugetsound.edu URBAN SKETCHERS Sat., Sept. 3, 12-6 p.m. Tacoma Public Library, 1102 Tacoma Ave. S. This show of drawings by members of the Urban Sketchers club contains scenes of neighborhoods and sites around Tacoma. It is on view in the library’s Handforth Gallery through Sept. 6. Price: Free. Info: (253)

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

FUCHSIA DISPLAY GARDEN Mon., Sept. 5, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Point Defiance Park, 5400 N. Pearl St. The Pacific Northwest has one of the finest climates for growing a large variety of fuchsias. Display gardens help to convey the beautiful varieties of fuchsias that can grow in your yard. Come enjoy the beauty of Hardy Perennial Fuchsias at Point Defiance Park. Price: Free Admission. Info: (253) 3051000; www.tacomaparks.com

292-2001; www.tacomapubliclibrary.org THE STITCHUATION Sat., Sept. 3, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave. Get crafty with this group of needle crafters. Bring a project to work on and stitch, hook and knit away. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-8801; www.kingsbookstore.com MIXED MEDIA EXPLORATIONS Sat., Sept. 3, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Children’s Museum of Tacoma, 1501 Pacific Ave. Encounter a variety of media and materials and revel in the messy creativity of Becka’s Studio’s latest installation. Discover the nuances of color, texture, movement, line and space. Price: Donations accepted. Info: (253) 627-6031; www.playtacoma.org

BUCCANEERS, BRIGANDS AND BANDITS Wed., Sept. 7, 10:30 a.m. Pierce County Library System Headquarters, 3005 112th St. E. Cruiseship speakers, John and Donna Mollan, will give a talk on myths and realities of pirate life at the Fall Kickoff Event for Learning Is ForEver (LIFE). Price: $10. Info: (253) 241-4166; www. piercecountylibrary.org JAKE SHIMABUKURO Wed., Sept. 7, 7:30 p.m. Pantages Theater, 901 Broadway Jake Shimabukuro, the undisputed master of Hawaii’s most classic instrument is on his way to becoming a household name with over twelve million performance views on YouTube. Price: $29-$85. Info: (253) 591-5894; www. broadwaycenter.org/

END OF SUMMER SPLASH Mon., Sept. 5, 9:30 a.m.- 6 p.m. Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium There’s no better place to mark the unofficial last days of summer than at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, where the schedule is jam-packed with events and activities for animal lovers all day. Info: http://www.pdza.org

CRUISE-IN Thurs., Sept. 8, 5-8 p.m. LeMay – America’s Car Museum, 2702 E. D St. Every second Thursday the LeMay America’s Car Museum will feature classic cars on the Haub Family Field, April through October, rain or shine. Price: Free. Info: (253) 779-8490; www.americascarmuseum.org

LINE DANCING Tues., Sept. 6, 6-8 p.m. Asia Pacific Cultural Center, 4851 South Tacoma Way Beginners and intermediates can get on the dance floor for fun and exercise in this seven-week program. Beginners meet on Tuesdays, Intermediates on Thursdays. Price: $45 for 7 weeks. Info: (253) 752-0205; www. asiapacificculturalcenter.org

SWORD AND LASER BOOK DISCUSSION Sun., Sept. 4, 1 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave. This new Tacoma group is a locally organized, real-life offshoot of the online Sword & Laser community. Each month, Sword & Laser picks either a fantasy or a science fiction book to read and discuss. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-8801; www. kingsbookstore.com

INTUITIVE PAINTING WORKSHOP Thurs., Sept. 8, 6:30-9 p.m. Artful Dreamers Studio, 2926 S. Steele St. Ignite your intuition and get your creative juices flowing during this inspiring experiential class designed for anyone who wants to boost their creativity. Ages: Adults. Price: $25. Info: (253) 209-4706; www.artfuldreamers.com/

ARGENTINE TANGO ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS CLASS Tues., Sept. 6, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Backstreet Tango, 3505 S. 14th St. Join this group for an Absolute Beginner Level Class. The studio was built with the sole purpose of teaching only authentic social Argentine Tango. Price: $40 for eight classes and two practicas. Info: (253) 304-8296; backstreettango.com

RENO ACES AT TACOMA RAINIERS Sun., Sept. 4-5, 1:35 p.m. Cheney Stadium, 2502 S. Tyler St. The Rainiers host the Aces for this last regular-season Triple A division series. Price: $7.50$11.50, not including Ticketmaster fees. Info: (253) 7527707; www.tacomarainiers.com

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar� link.

Alysa Taylor has been in the world of Metaphysics for 20-plus years. She does spiritual counseling, palm and Tarot readings out of two local shops: Crescent Moon Gifts and Magical Garden. Contact Alysa at these two shops or e-mail revalysataylor@gmail.com.

“I believe that metaphysics are tools that can help enrich our everyday lives.� ARIES (MAR. 21 – APR. 20) Things start to look brighter after what feels like a ton of roadblocks. Pay attention to detail; the small things are important. Other people are watching, so shine! Be careful whom you trust. Not everyone has your best interest in mind. TAURUS (APR. 21 - MAY 20) Opportunities for new social situations will come up this week – take them. It may not seem important now, but you might regret it later. You may feel put out, but eventually realize it was worth it. If you have not had a checkup lately, you might want to get that done. You know, the whole ounce of prevention thing. GEMINI (MAY 21 – JUN. 20) You need to be mindful of exactly what is expected of you this week. Outside pressure is weighing down on you, and attempting to let it float and not nailing down a plan will not work. Procrastinating now will come back to bite you later. CANCER (JUN. 21 – JUL. 22) There has been so much going on in your world and you can’t seem to shut your brain off. You need to take a little bit of time to chill – get together with family and friends. This won’t automatically happen – you need to focus on dealing with one thing at a time. Don’t let the world pull you in too many directions at once. LEO (JUL. 23 – AUG. 22) Be very careful with your money, and watch where you invest. If it sounds risky, just don’t do it. You will not come out on top. You will have better peace of mind if you take your time, do your research, and make informed decisions VIRGO (AUG. 23 – SEP. 22) The Solar Eclipse occurs in your sign this week encouraging you to focus on what you want as opposed to what others expect from you. You need to focus on yourself a little right now. Taking care of yourself, doing some work on you is not selfish, it’s necessary.

LIBRA (SEP. 23 – OCT. 22) Pleasant changes should begin to take shape with Venus moving into your sign this week. Indulge yourself a little, which can include spending some money on you. There is still a lot going on behind the scenes that requires you to remain mentally alert with the right information as your fingertips. SCORPIO (OCT. 23 – NOV. 21) Be realistic with your priorities and goals for the near future. You are only human. Do not over estimate your money; it only goes so far. If you need to take a little time to re-evaluate some things, take it. You don’t have to make up your mind right now. There is still time.

J D J Z K L A U X E S N A R T V V C O I

G T L M C T A C O M A S T A R S Y J U F

P A R D R J A F Y C X T G E I W R S H J

N E L D O M T Y Z G C Z L P W E R G X X

K G A P C H E O C K W E S Z D E G S K S

M V V Z K R T Y Z Y L E Y O I S T U E U

R E R G T A E X H U L K B D A A L J W K

K E Z K A I S J OW W E S A E U K R U D S Y O O L L G E T I P W F X L O G N L D

Z U N C E G E N W S S A F R A C E C I U

A W I A R U G L C O R A I F Y M R H D S

R N E A O I M O L U I R T L L V T Q L N

M S R P A S U A T R U L V Q O P E W I X

C K S P O T F A M C I B E W N V R A U H

O V M Z S F N C H R R C M D X E T O B K

P A N P U Z E D B M E H K T D B V M T P

C Q L B R Z C L B Q Q Y X J N J Y A A Y

Z G D C S H J C C O F Z A V R N O R O Q

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22 – JAN. 19) Be flexible with longterm goals. Things change. Focus on detail with help, but don’t be too attached to the step-by-step road map. You will get there; it may just not be the way you planned. Look at the things that have lead you hear. How much of that worked out as planned?

PISCES (FEB. 19 – MAR. 20) Be clear when dealing with other people this week. You don’t want any misunderstandings floating around. This will be important later. Pay close attention to this in your personal life, or you may have some regrets in the New Year.

R V D J C P O H D T I G Q A T H R L I L

We’ve hidden 12 Tacoma Weekly-themed words in this word search. How many can you find? Not sure what you’re looking for? Head over to B5 for the complete word list.

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22 – DEC. 21) You are at a crossroads. It’s time to make up your mind and decide what is really important to you. You need to keep revising that list of commitments and personal responsibilities. Doubts can creep in; trust your gut. Don’t over-think. Deep down you know what is right for you.

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20 – FEB. 18) Dissolving financial partnerships is never easy. If you are in this situation, focus on your needs, not the wants of others. Stand your ground and stick to your guns. Make sure you are taking a little time in all of this for you. Your health may depend on it.

B S I S A L M O N R T H A I R A K R B B

BUFFALO SOLDIERS How many words can you make out of this phrase?


Friday, September 2, 2016 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

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EMPLOYMENT

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Friends of Longshoremen Needed! Great Earning Potential! Help Us Promote Exclusive Health & Wellness Products that are FDA Approved/Covered by Insurance. Call Toby Today (323) 696-5093

DISCRIMINATION Experiencing Workplace Discrimination? Retired City of Tacoma Civil Rights Investigator will provide assistance. Call 253-565-6179. Never a fee for my services.

#!2/,3490).' 3%26)#% 2ESUMES #ORRESPONDENCE %DITING6ERYAFFORDABLERATES #ALLFORMOREINFORMATIONORAN APPOINTMENT   ,OCATEDAT#3TREET 3OUTHNEAR0,5IN0ARKLAND  CLEANING

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EMPLOYMENT Fife Towing is looking for experienced tow operators who are hardworking and self motivated. Employment is full time. Pay is DOE. To apply email service@ fifetowing.com or visit 1313 34th Ave. E., Fife WA 98424 (253) 922-8784

Electrical wiring and repairs, residential and commercial Lighting outlets, gate operator, generator install and tune up Landscape lighting Tyson Electric LLC 360 280-8337 TYSONEL950CC

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PIERCE COUNTY COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER GROUP IS SEEKING A

SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHER PCCNG, Pierce Countyโ€™s community news leader, is seeking a Sports Photographer with a great eye for capturing live game action at games, practices and events in Pierce County. Experienced photographers preferred. REQUIREMENTS: 1-2 years experience taking sports photos. Must have professional equipment, reliable transportation and ability to travel to sports event locations. The ideal candidate is a self motivated, outgoing individual with a positive attitude. They should be able to work evenings and weekends, be willing to work outdoors in various weather conditions, and be able to stand, bend, kneel for prolonged periods of time.

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3ECTION"s0AGEsTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY 3EPTEMBER 

NOTICES

NOTICES

TO: Iris Rose Bloomfield

TO: MARIA CARRILLO

In the Welfare of: B.,A DOB: 07/19/2015 Case Number: PUY-G-JV-2016-0016

In the Welfare of: M Jr. J DOB: 08/26/1999 Case Number: PUY-CW-CW-2015-0157

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Children’s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1451 EAST 31ST STREET TACOMA, WA 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Initial Hearing on the 17th day of October, 2016 at 1:30 PM If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.750, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. Notice, pursuant to §7.04.740, If the parent(s), guardian or custodian fails to respond or appear for the formal adjudicatory hearing, the Court may find the parent(s), guardian or custodian in default, and enter a default order of child/family protection and order necessary intervention and appropriate steps the parent(s), guardian or custodian must follow to correct the underlying problem(s). Notice, pursuant to § 4.08.250, when a party against whom a judgment is sought fails to appear, plead, or otherwise defend within the time allowed, and that is shown to the Court by a motion and affidavit or testimony, the Court may enter an order of default and, without further notice to the party in default, enter a judgment granting the relief sought in the complaint. TO: ANTHONY SAKELLIS In the Welfare of: D-S., D DOB: 01/17/2015 Case Number: PUY-CW-CW-2015-0007

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an PreAdjudication Hearing in the Children’s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1451 EAST 31ST STREET TACOMA, WA 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Pre-Adjudication Hearing on the 6th day of OCTOBER, 2016 at 10:00am. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.750, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. Notice, pursuant to §7.04.740, If the parent(s), guardian or custodian fails to respond or appear for the formal adjudicatory hearing, the Court may find the parent(s), guardian or custodian in default, and enter a default order of child/family protection and order necessary intervention and appropriate steps the parent(s), guardian or custodian must follow to correct the underlying problem(s). Notice, pursuant to § 4.08.250, when a party against whom a judgment is sought fails to appear, plead, or otherwise defend within the time allowed, and that is shown to the Court by a motion and affidavit or testimony, the Court may enter an order of default and, without further notice to the party in default, enter a judgment granting the relief sought in the complaint.

NOTICE RE: DAVID MATEO MIGUEL v. CARMEN ANN MORENO IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF HAMBLEN COUNTY, TENNESSEE FILE NO. 16CV022 TO: CARMEN ANN MORENO

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Adjudication Hearing in the Children’s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1451 EAST 31ST ST., TACOMA, WA 98404 A Child/Family Protection Petition has been filed regarding the above-named child. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to personally appear before the Children’s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians for a FORMAL ADJUDICATORY HEARING and date, time and location below: DATE: October 6th, 2016 TIME: 11:00am LOCATION: 1451 EAST 31ST ST., TACOMA, WA 98404 At the formal adjudicatory hearing the petitioner must prove that the allegations raised in the child/ family protection petition are more likely true than not and that the best interests of the child will be served by continued Court intervention. The Court will either find the allegations of the child/family protection petition to be true or dismiss the child/family protection petition, unless continued to allow the presentation of further evidence. If you do not respond to the petition within 20 days or appear for the formal adjudicatory hearing, the Court may find you in default and enter a default order of child/family protection and order necessary intervention and appropriate steps you must follow to correct the underlying problem(s). You may call Puyallup Tribe Children’s Services for more information about your child. The caseworker’s name is Donna Torres and the telephone number is 253-680-5532. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.750, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. Notice, pursuant to §7.04.740, If the parent(s), guardian or custodian fails to respond or appear for the formal adjudicatory hearing, the Court may find the parent(s), guardian or custodian in default, and enter a default order of child/family protection and order necessary intervention and appropriate steps the parent(s), guardian or custodian must follow to correct the underlying problem(s). Notice, pursuant to § 4.08.250, when a party against whom a judgment is sought fails to appear, plead, or otherwise defend within the time allowed, and that is shown to the Court by a motion and affidavit or testimony, the Court may enter an order of default and, without further notice to the party in default, enter a judgment granting the relief sought in the complaint.

A complaint for absolute divorce has been filed against you by David Mateo Miguel . It appears that ordinary process of law cannot be served upon you because your whereabouts are unknown. It is, therefore, ordered that you respond to this notice by filing an answer to the complaint for divorce in this cause with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Hamblen County, Tennessee, and with Attorney Maria Dajcar at the address shown below before the date listed below. A copy of the complaint for divorce may be obtained from the Clerk of Circuit Court. If you do not answer or otherwise respond by the date shown below, a Default Judgement may be entered against you on the thirtieth (30th) day after the fourth (4th) publication. This notice will be published in the Tacoma Weekly for four (4) Consecutive weeks. POSTED : AUGUST 19TH 2016 TO SEPTEMBER 16TH 2016 Answer on or before: Oct. 17, 2016 Maria Dajcar BPR 032055 Attorney for Plaintiff3701 N Broadway, Suite C Knoxville, Tennessee 37917 (865) 583-6500

Auction Notice

Abandoned Vehicle Lakewood Towing Inc. #5002 9393 Lakeview Ave SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 Ph. 253-582-5080 Auction 09082016 Date 9/08/2016 View @ 11 am Auction Starts @ 2 pm In accordance with RCW 46.55.130 Lakewood Towing Inc. will sell to the highest bidder. See complete listing @ lakewoodtowing.com or posting at our office

VOLUNTEERS Make Time , Make Connections: Hospice Volunteers Needed CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative care is looking for compassionate people interested in honoring those near the end of their life. We are committed in our program to celebrate and support people’s lives all the way until they die. Volunteers can help by taking time to listen to life stories, make phone calls, support a

tired caregiver, play someone’s favorite music, run errands, welcome people to our hospice facility, or just hold someone’s hand. Our next training starts Saturday, September 10th at Hospice House. Training includes flexible webbased material along with class room instruction. To learn more and to get started call us toll free at 1-855-534-7050 or email us at jamesbentley@ chifranciscan.org

VOLUNTEERS Volunteer meals on Wheels Driver Seeking a volunteer Meals on Wheels Driver. Delivers frozen meals once a week in the Pierce County area, mileage reimbursement. Must have a clean background check, WA driver’s license, car insurance and food handlers card. Call front desk for more info: 253-272-8433 AmeriCorps Opportunity: Employment Case Manager/Job Developer Tacoma Community House is seek an outgoing, enthusiastic, and motivated professional that is passionate about assisting low-income community members on their journey to self-sufficiency. This professional position is responsible for assisting people in need of employment. The case manager/ job developer will provide career counseling, employment & training information, job search skills, workshop facilitation, job placement/ follow-up, and referral to other community resources. The case manager/job develop will assist in facilitation of our Employer Advisory Board and will also develop and implement 3 financial fitness events. Contact Arrie Dunlap at (253) 3833951 or adunlap@tacomacommunityhouse. org for more information. AmeriCorps Opportunity: Read2Me Program Specialist Tacoma Community House seeks an AmeriCorps member to assist in the Read2Me Program in local elementary schools. Read2Me is a one-on-one adult/ student reading program for struggling first, second, and third grade readers. Duties include recruiting volunteers, producing a monthly tutor newsletter, facilitating bimonthly tutor workshops, tracking attendance for both students and volunteer tutors, researching best practicing best practices for tutoring strategies and tutor training and tutoring a student in each of the four schools. You must be 18-25 years of age at the start date of service (Sep 1, 2016Jul 15, 2017). Contact Karen Thomas at (253)383-3951 or kthomas@ tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information.

Great Volunteer Opportunity Make friends, have fun and help seniors with simple tasks. You’ll make a big difference by helping people maintain their independence. This is volunteering, not caregiving. Volunteers must be 55 or older, low income, serve 15 hrs/ wk and live in Pierce or Kitsap Counties. Drivers are especially needed. Benefits in-

clude hourly tax-free stipend and mileage reimbursement. For information call Julie at Lutheran Community Services, Senior Companion Volunteer Program, (253)7225686. Food Bank Eloise’s Cooking Pot Food Bank on the Eastside of Tacoma, WA is powered strictly by volunteers. We provide much needed food and other basic household items to people in need on a weekly basis. Being a volunteer driven organization we are always looking for good people who are interested in donating a few hours of their lives helping make the lives of someone else a little better. Donate as much or as little of your time you want for a wide variety of tasks, there is always plenty to do. If you are looking for a way to be part of something bigger and give a little much needed help to the local community then contact us and we’ll get you started. Please join us in helping to spread a little holiday cheer. Contact 253-212-2778.

Help furnish hope to those in need! NW Furniture Bank Volunteers needed. “NWFB helps restore hope, dignity and stability in our community by recycling donated furniture to people in need.� Tuesday-Saturday Truck Volunteers Needed- 9:00 am2:00 pm. Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at info@nwfurniturebank.org or call 253302-3868. South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www. southsoundoutreach. org. Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/ nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@ tacomaparks.com or 253.305.1025. Join us in changing lives! Changing Rein Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies, a nonprofit, offers equine assisted services to differently-abled individuals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers

VOLUNTEERS who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and adaptive lessons. Other volunteer opportunities include: grounds maintenance and administrative/clerical work. Must be at least 14 years old to participate. Horse experience helpful, but not necessary. Training provided. For more information contact: Volunteer Coordinator at 253-370-1429 or volunteer@changingrein.org. The Tacoma Maritime Institute meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00. Call 253-536-4494 Be a Big Brother! Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG difference in the life of a child. There are several program options to fit your schedule and interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agency-planned activity. For more information, visit www.bbbsps.org or call 206.763.9060.

INTERVIEWEES FOR A NON-PROFIT PROJECT “MEMORY COMMUNITYâ€? What It Is: We are Memory Community (a 501(c) (3) non-profit corporation). The Memory Community Project is a creative service to seniors. Our Goals & Objectives: To create an accessible resource that: • helps our senior citizens tell their stories • connects the young and the old • increases our understanding of those before us who help us be who we are • honors the generations before us and show our appreciation by preserving their memories • All seniors are welcome to volunteer for filming their story! • At most two days of work during daytime – Day 1: pre-production meeting, and Release Form signing Day 2: filming, ideally wrapped within half a day What we’d like you to talk about in the film: Use 10 minutes or so to tell the most memorable story from your life, the lessons that were learned, and the wise words you want to pass along to your children/ grandchildren. Compensation: a DVD in which you are the leading character, and a free upload to our website http://memorycommunity.org/ Contact: send your emails to deyung@ memorycommunity.org Or call Deyung at 253-8582445 for scheduling a meeting. The filming is free, but donations are appreciated to help the project continue.

WANTED

WANTED: Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

  

PETS Pet of the Week

MARBLE IS MARVELOUS! Featured Pet Marble is looking to expand his horizons with a rabbit-savvy family. In the shelter environment, the brown bun ate little, and was terribly scared. Once placed in a foster home, the little guy began to relax and show his true colors. Fond of Oxbow complete and orchard grass hay (no alfalfa, please), his foster mom also learned that young Marble opts for cuddling when held, not typical of most rabbits. Add to your brood today with this here youngin, and see him blossom into the rabbit he was meant to be. #A506817 Like us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/TacomaHumane/

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www.thehumanesociety.org


Friday, September 2, 2016 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

CALL 253.922.5317

Classifieds REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

HOME BUYER EDUCATION CLASSES WA State Housing Finance Commission Loan Programs Home Buyer Course Topics t %PXO1BZNFOU"TTJTUBODF1SPHSBNT‰ BOEIPXUPHFUZPVSTIBSF t (FUUJOHRVBMJmFEBOEBQQSPWFEGPSBMPBO t $IPPTJOHUIFSJHIUMPBOUZQFGPSZPV t 6OEFSTUBOEJOHDSFEJUTDPSFTBOEIPXUPVTF DSFEJUJOXBZTUPJNQSPWFZPVSTDPSF t -FBSOUIF)PXBOE8IZPGXPSLJOHXJUIB SFBMUPS UIFIPNFQVSDIBTJOHQSPDFTTBOEIPX UPNBLFBOPGGFS

LEARN ABOUT THE...

CLASSES ARE FREE!

Home Advantage Loan

CALL FOR DATES AND MORE INFORMATION

REALTORS

REALTORS

JUST LISTED TWO HOUSES ON ONE PARCEL PRICE IS $239,000 2338 2336 S Cushman, Tacoma, WA 98405 Investors looking to cash flow, here is your chance! Two single family homes on once lg. parcel, sellers rent for 2,300 per month & cash flow 1,000 a month. One is an updated craftsman with 2 bedrooms, large living room, kitchen and dining, laundry, new windows, flooring & appliances w/front & alley access the other is a 1 single story 1 bed room w/ walk-in closet, nice, eat-in kitchen, living, laundry & mud room. Huge yard which could be split with fence, long driveway & off-street parking. (MLS# 964873)

HEATHER REDAL

(Loan Specific Criteria applies)

Down Payment Assistance

253-203-8985

0% INTEREST/%.035("(& NO MONTHLY PAYMENT!

Stephanie@LynchHomeGroup.com

(Deferred for 30 yrs. or if you sell or refinance house)

REFRESHMENTS PROVIDED

61500'5)&45.035("(&".06/5 64&'03%08/1":.&/503$-04*/($0454

Top Producing Broker 2008-2015 Voted “Five Star Professional� by Clients

Your Local Agent - Serving buyers, sellers, investors and military relocation. Realtor, Windermere Professional Partners www.HomesintheSouthSound.com HeatherRedal@Windermere.com (253) 363-5920

www.stephanielynch.com

FEATURED PROPERTIES

SERGIO HERNANDEZ omm nit

in e

17 SALMON BEACH, TACOMA

etter ro erties ni ersit lace ircrest (253) 3 -230 Ser io@ etter ro erties.com

MLS#: 1005622 Area: Tacoma Beds: 3 Baths: 1.75 Incredible, no bank water front gem nestled amongst the intriguing & eclectic community of Salmon Beach. Whale watch from your deck, breathe in sea air year round, & leave your cares behind as you become one w/ nature in this amazing home.

$399,950

FOR SALE 6 29 S ros ect St

acoma 9

3616 49TH AVE NE, TACOMA

09

MLS#: 1010544 Area: Brown’s Point Beds: 3 Baths: 1.75

$234,950

PENDING

Beautifully remodeled rambler located on a huge 8,600 sq ft lot completely fenced in back yard w/patio & 1 car garage. The interior of the home features 4 bedroom, 2 bathrooms, extensive bamboo flooring, custom maple cabinets, quartz counter tops, stainless steel appliances in the kitchen, separate laundry area off the kitchen, completely new elegant master bathroom. Close to all services and Wapato Hill park.

2

5th

eS

l m ia 9 5 3

$279,000 Charming 2 story with covered porch on corner lot. Living room with soaring ceilings, gas fireplace and open spindled staircase. Kitchen with SS appl. , walk in pantry and breakfast bar, open to Family room and Dining area. Slider to patio and fenced back yard. Master with walk in closet and 5 pc bath with jetted tub. additional 2 bedrooms that share a jack and jill bath. Close to schools, shopping and JBLM. 1 year old appliances stay! New roof.

FOR RENT

REALTORS

%0/05/&&%50#&'*3455*.&)0.&#6:&3 )064&)0-%45)"5&"3/6150 1&3:3 64&8*5)')" 7" $0/7-0"/4

CLASSES HELD REGULARLY

er in t e

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FOR RENT

HOMES

HOMES

House for Sale in University Place

So cool, so functional, so efficient. Entire home heated w/ 1500 watts & a gas fireplace. Heated floors; hickory cabinets; soaring 18 foot ceilings & a stunning custom, old growth staircase & banister are some of the fab details. Huge partially finished upstairs awaits your vision.

$375,000

4608 60TH AVE W, UNIVERSITY PLACE

PENDING

TACOMA 2305 S 74TH ST #7

$1095

$775

2 BED 1 BATH 1100 SF. NORTH END APT INCLUDES ALL APPLIANCES, DINING AREA, NEWER CARPET AND $50 FEE FOR WSG.

2 BED, 1 BATH 650 SF. GROUND FLOOR 2 BED UNIT INCLUDES EAT IN KITCHEN, $45/MO W/S/G, BALCONY AND MORE.

TACOMA 2419 N 31ST ST

LAKEWOOD 8017 CUSTER RD #A3

$1795

$1250

2 BED, 2.5 BATH 1200 SF. 2 BED RUSTON WAY TOWNHOME HAS AMAZING VIEW, LARGE KITCHEN, HUGE MASTERS AND MORE.

2 BED 2 BATH 1023 SF. AMAZING CONDO HAS ALL APPLIANCES, 5 PIECE MASTERS, FRONT PATIO AND GARAGE SPACE.

PUYALLUP

DUPONT

14003 176TH ST E

1972 BRAGET ST

$1895

$1895

4 BED 2.5 BATH 2220 SF. AMAZING HOME HAS FAMILY ROOM, CHEF’S KITCHEN, HARDWOOD FLOORS, PETS OK AND FENCED YARD.

4 BED 2.5 BATH 2328 SF. LARGE HOME HAS OPEN LAYOUT, FORMAL DINING, MASTERS SUITE, PETS POSSIBLE AND MORE.

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200

View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Professional Management Services

By APPT only. 1530 sq. ft. 3 bd, rambler, 1.5 bath, Âź acre lot, RV parking, 2 car garage, 2 storage buildings, sprinkler, alarm system. New roof, windows and gas furnace. 2 fireplaces, hardwood & carpet, pocket/louvered doors, french doors, cement patio. Estate Sale.

Open House, Sunday 9.4.16, 2-4 p.m. 3626 65th Ave. W, U.P., 98466 $275,000 253-531-9549

FEATURED PROPERTIES

G PENDIN $249,950

G PENDIN $369,900

Just Listed! This charming 3 bedroom home sits on a large private lot located in the highly desirable University Place district. This updated home has beautiful vaulted ceilings, all new windows, new roof, updated bathroom, fresh paint inside & out and a new fully fenced and landscaped back yard! There is also a covered carport with plenty of storage and U shaped driveway for easy access. Home is move in ready!

11299 Borgen Loop NW Gig Harbor, WA 98332

Beds: 3 Baths: 2.5

Heat/Cool: Forced Air Water Heater: Electric Appliances: Dishwasher, Range/Oven, Refrigerator Interior Features: Bath Off Master, Double Pane/Storm Window, Dining Room, Vaulted Ceilings

$339,950

Shannon Agent Extraordinaire

If I wouldn’t buy it, I won’t sell it to you and if I wouldn’t live in it, I won’t list it.

Ph: 253.691.1800 F: 253.761.1150 shannonsells@hotmail.com

HOMES

RV SPACE

3008 S. 12th St., Tacoma

RV SPACE

CONDOS & HOMES NORTH TACOMA 509 N YAKIMA AVE #304

MLS#: 963152 Area: University Place

3 Beds, 1 Bath, 1250 SF. Wonderful Victorian home that has easy commute to UPS & is close to Franklin elementary!!! Large covered front porch. Main floor bedroom. Both a living room & family room Large bedrooms. Breakfast bar & loads of storage in kitchen. Newer roof, storm windows, newer hot water tank & furnace.Great Value Fully fenced backyard and paved driveway. Fresh paint inside and out, new flooring, updated plumbing & electrical, and fully insulated! Plenty of room for your own touches! Super close to 6th Ave! MLS# 832899 $150,000

Carmen Neal, Blue Emerald Real Estate

253-632-2920

30 Foot Max. Not Older than 2008. $345 month, $150 Deposit. Screening. No pets. 253-381-8344 COMMERCIAL

NORTH LAKEWOOD COMM. BUILDING FOR LEASE. $650 MONTH, $600 DEPOSIT AND SCREENING. 253-381-8344

REALTORS

REALTORS

Want to sell? Need to sell? I’ll put a signed contract in your hand in 48 hours guaranteed.

Send us a smoke signal

Caveman Real Estate 864-706-6721 COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

RESTAURANT FOR SALE 5013 S 56th, Ste B Tacoma WA 98409 1200 sq. ft.

Contact Sam at (206) 734-8122

BUSINESSES OPPORTUNITIES COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS FOR SALE/LEASE POPULAR, WELL ESTABLISHED, VERY PROFITABLE EATERY, with Beer, Growlers, Wine & Liquor. Asking price $375,000. MEXICAN FAST FOOD Successful Franchise in Pierce County, 15 yrs. same location. $350k annual gross sales, excellent net. Asking $129,000, terms avail., Owner retiring. OFFICE BUILDING WITH 6 SUITES, Close to Wright’s Park, ideal for Attorneys or Professional use. Asking Price $599,000, Terms. Suites are also available for Lease. LONGTIME ESTABLISHED POPULAR RESTR./LOUNGE ON 6TH AVE. Business for sale. $110,000 OR LEASE the space, 3,300 SQ. FT. $149,000 for $4,000 Month. another price reduction

Lisa Taylor 253-232-5626

Michelle Anguiano 253-232-5626

www.Homes4SaleByMichelle.com

SAME OWNER: BARTENDING ACADEMY OF TACOMA, Since 1959, Very profitable, Training provided.

RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109


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