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Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

WHAT’S RIGHT WITH TACOMA

THINK TANKS GIVES DISTRICT FAILING GRADE

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District challenges scoring methods, cites poverty rates By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS COURTESY OF OF CELEBRATING MILITARY SERVICE AND TACOMA PUBLIC LIBRARY

PATRIOTISM MARCHING ON. Crowds lined Pacific Avenue on a cold, wet day in 1949 to salute the service and sacrifices of members of the Armed Forces.

CELEBRATING MILITARY SERVICE Tacoma holds first all-military parade in 50+ years By Kathleen Merryman

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acoma, with all its ties to the Armed Forces, has not had a big-time, downtown military parade for more than 50 years. The Daffodil Festival is about to remedy that. On Aug. 24 (a Saturday guaranteed to be sunny) the Daffodil Festival will present what executive director Steve James bills as “our 1st Annual Military Service Celebration in Pierce County.” The event will start at 5 p.m. with a 56th Army Band concert at Tollefson Plaza at South 17th Street and Pacific Avenue. The parade will begin at 6 p.m., proceeding along Pacific Avenue from South 13th to South 24th street. It’s reasonable to question whether a “1st Annual” anything will have what it takes to make it to “2nd Annual.” But James has a good plan. Already he has lined up units from the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Air Force Reserves, Army National Guard, Navy Reserves, Washington Air National Guard, Washington National Guard, Madigan Army Medical Center and local law enforcement. He has commitments from bands, motorcyclists including the Patriot Guard, Puyallup Tribe of Indians, Canadian regiments and mounted units. The American Legion will bring its float, and wounded warriors will ride on the Daffodil Festival float. PCMARVETS will show off its mobile field office, and be available before and after to connect veterans to the benefits they have earned. JBLM will be sending honor guards and color guards bearing 56 flags representing the states and territories. James has invited four Medal of Honor recipients. “We will have multiple Strykers,” James said. “The Coast Guard is bringing a boat.” There is talk of a Howitzer. If it were not for the Daffodil Festival, there would be no talk of a Howitzer, or a Coast Guard vessel, rolling through down-

“It’s quite easy to say you support the troops, but what does your support look like? Let’s make honor an action verb. This is another resource to help parents teach their kids what honor looks like.” – Daffodil Festival Executive Director Steve James town. “We have connections with Joint Base Lewis-McChord,” James said. “For every Daffodil Parade we have three to four units marching.” That relationship inspired and jumpstarted plans for Celebrating Military Service. Earlier this year James met with Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland. Strickland brought up the idea of an evening parade that would bring thousands downtown to watch, then stroll off to enjoy shops, attractions and restaurants in one of the safest parts of the city. James liked the idea, but wanted to make it mean something. “We wanted to do something of significance,” he said, and realized he could not remember a Tacoma parade dedicated to honoring the men and women of the military. He researched the question at Tacoma Public Library’s Northwest Room, and on the library’s website. Press clippings from the Washington’s Birthday Parade and National Security Week in 1947 and 1949 show bystanders lining the streets on cold and rainy days – just like photos of so many Daffodil Parades. They also mention tanks. Don’t look for them this August. “They want to make sure we aren’t having tanks this year,” James said. “They would tear up the roads and all the new improvements along Pacific Avenue.

Workplace Garden Challenge A4

Michael Rector A7

TACOMA QUIRK: The most famous Tacoman no one knows. PAGE A5

Pothole Pig ...............A3 City News.................A5

While doing his research, James discovered that Armed Forces Day in 1956 was the last year on record of a military parade in Tacoma. It’s not that there are no military parades in Pierce County. Joint Base Lewis McChord’s parade grounds are busy with ceremonies and exercises. But, because the base is secure, most civilians never see them. They don’t get to stand and cheer and salute the men and women who serve in the Armed Forces. “This parade will be different for military personnel as well,” James said. “This is not a normal parade,” he told Robert Tucket, who was calling to arrange for Strykers to join it. “This is your opportunity to show off. The whole street will be lined to celebrate you. We are working on food, so you won’t have to be eating MREs in the staging area.” They also have arranged a special Sounder train for military families coming up from Lakewood at 3 p.m. and returning at 8:30 p.m. Anyone with military ID will ride it free, thanks to sponsors including AUSA, America’s Credit Union, WorkForce Central and Windermere Real Estate agent Jim Swanson. The Daffodil Princesses will ride on the special Sounder to show the way to the Link Light Rail, and on the Link to direct riders to the stops closest to the concert and parade. They’ll also meet and greet patrons at businesses like Anthem Beverage & Bistro, which is offering military discounts. X See PARADE / page A3

Music & Art in Wright Park B4

The Washington Policy Center, a free-market think tank that researches business and educational issues, has released “grades” for Tacoma schools based on a formula proposed by state lawmakers. The concept is to distill the performance matrix used to track educational efforts into a simple grade to inform parents and school watchers about how successful schools are educating children. The grades are a mixed bag, but the overall district received a failing grade from the policy center’s report, which district officials challenge. Only two of the 60 schools in the Tacoma Public School District, Skyline and Point Defiance elementary schools, ranked “exemplary” — the top ranking given by State Board of Education officials. The index rates schools as exemplary, very good, good, fair or struggling. If the “Achievement Index” that X See SCHOOLS / page A9

PROP 1 MEETING SLATED AROUND TACOMA

PLAN TO FIX TACOMA’S ROADS MOVED TO THE BALLOT BOX

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

ROADS. A utility tax that would

fund street improvements in Tacoma moves to the ballot box, and could reach a courtroom as well over legal challenges. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Proposition 1 is set to face voters in the fall and a series of informational meetings are scheduled across the city to educate voters on the issues. The proposition, if approved by Tacoma voters, would add a 2 percent tax on gross earnings by utility companies within Tacoma. The money would aid efforts to chip away at the city’s backlog of street, X See TAX / page A9

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WASHINGTON’S MOST WANTED

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An observant viewer provided a tip to Washington’s Most Wanted (WMW) that led to the arrest of DAVID ROSE convicted serial rapist William Manus. On Friday night’s (Aug. 9) broadcast, Manus was featured on the program for failure to

register. Earlier this month, the level 3 sex offender – the worst of the worst and highest risk to re-offend – “went off the grid� in Pierce County. With his long criminal history, cops knew they had to find Manus and quickly. “The danger of having registered sex offenders who’ve been convicted of rape multiple times, and robbery, and drugs, and a whole host of other crimes, is that you know they’re still out doing it,� said Pierce County Detective Ed Troyer. “We didn’t

City News VIBRANT SCHOOLS HOLDS <5+605.9(*0:4>692:/67

Vibrant Schools is hosting Undoing Institutional Racism (UIR) Workshops with facilitators from The Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Institute Northwest. Each workshop session will have 40 participants for two days â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Aug. 28-29 and Sept. 18-19. The August session will be for community and civic organizations. September will be dedicated to educational organizations and institutions. A dinner event will be held October bringing all participants from the August and September workshops together for information sharing and development of action steps as the result of UIR training. Those involved in these workshops will be asked to continue on as a cohort looking at collective action within our Tacoma community to address issues surrounding equity and race within their institutions. Everyone who participates in quarterly events will have the opportunity to present what anti-racist and equity work they have done at the 2014 Race and Pedagogy Conference. For more on how to be a participant, volunteer, or to sponsor these events, contact Info@VibrantSchoolsTacoma.org. Vibrant Schools coalition is comprised of long-time community members and public education supporters. Members send their children to Tacoma Public Schools, volunteer in the classrooms, tutor in after-school programs, knock on doors for school bonds and levy campaigns and employ the graduates. Vibrant Schools unites to advocate for children and support teachers as professionals through a constructive and collaborative approach.

TACOMA SELECTED TO HOST FILM FORWARD

Sundance Institute and the Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities has announced that FILM FORWARD: Advancing Cultural Dialogue will host free public screenings of eight films for the first time ever in Tacoma. These films are: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Town of Runners,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Light in Her Eyes,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chasing Ice,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Loving Story,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bones Brigade,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Valley of Saints,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beasts of the Southern Wildâ&#x20AC;? and

know where he was at, so that made Mr. Manus a very, very dangerous subject, who was likely going to hurt somebody else and continue a life of crime to support his habits.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The unique thing about this was that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s semi-transient,â&#x20AC;? said Loretta Cool of the Tacoma Police Department. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d been unable to locate him anywhere and a viewer had watched the show, either the 9:30 p.m. or 10:30 p.m. show, and by 11:30 had called in stating that the sub-

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Under the Same Moon.â&#x20AC;? The film tour will take place Sept. 3-7, with moderated discussions following each screening. Filmmakers Julia Meltzer (â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Light in Her Eyesâ&#x20AC;?) and Jerry Rothwell (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Town of Runnersâ&#x20AC;?) will be present on Sept. 4 and 5. FILM FORWARD is a partnership of Sundance Institute and four U.S. federal cultural agencies: the Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities, National Endowment for the Arts, National Endowment for the Humanities, and The Institute of Museum and Library Services. It is a touring program that offers film screenings, workshops and discussions designed to foster dialogue and cross-cultural understanding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Truly a community effort, the City of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Arts Program is partnering with the Grand Cinema, Washington State History Museum, Tacoma Public Library, Tacoma Public Schools, Metro Parks, University of Washington-Tacoma, University of Puget Sound and more to present this robust and insightful program,â&#x20AC;? said Tacoma Arts Administrator Amy McBride. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is no cost to see any of these screenings and everyone is welcome. In particular, we would love to see those who are new to independent film, students and the local filmmaking community come out and attend.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;My job as a filmmaker is to tell truthful stories about the world. I am hoping â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Light in her Eyesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; will help audiences gain a greater understanding of womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roles and rights within conservative Islam, especially now while the Middle East is undergoing great change.â&#x20AC;? said Meltzer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am excited to meet audiences in Washington through the FILM FORWARD program and participate in a dialogue about universal themes that unite and affect us all.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Town of Runnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is a film about opportunity, which is a theme that connects audiences from Ethiopia to Washington State,â&#x20AC;? said Rothwell. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From growing up in Kenya, to living in the United Kingdom, to filming around the world, I have come to realize how film can be a powerful medium to discuss global issues. I look forward to using â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Town of Runnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; as a catalyst for conversation.â&#x20AC;? Sundance Institute staff members traveling with the program are: FILM FORWARD Direc-

ject was last seen in the area of 82nd and Hosmer.â&#x20AC;? Cool said the caller believed that the subject was staying in a field. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The officers responded out there and actually searched a wide-open field that had a lot of bushes and things, and were able to locate the subject and take him into custody without any problems.â&#x20AC;? Manus is the 448th fugitive caught since Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wanted started in November of 2008.

tor Meredith Lavitt, FILM FORWARD Manager Jacqueline Carlson and Sundance Institute Social Media Manager Royale Zeigler. For a full schedule of events in Tacoma, visit cityoftacoma.org/arts. Following FILM FORWARDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visit to Washington, upcoming destinations include: Bosnia & Herzegovina (Sept. 19-25); and Maine (Sept. 30-Oct. 4). Completed programs this year include California, Mexico, Colombia, China, Taiwan and Puerto Rico.

FARMERS MARKET HOLDS GALA FUNDRAISER

The Tacoma Farmers Market Board will present its Banquet of Bounty annual fundraising dinner on Oct. 11. The event encourages us to remember that our vibrant cultural and agricultural heritage is alive and well in Pierce County and beyond. As the Tacoma Farmers Market approaches 25 years, the local food offered at Banquet of Bounty will remind you that farming has helped grow our region for over a hundred years â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and that we are fortunate to have such a bounty of locally grown food. Last year, the inaugural dinner welcomed 85 guests and exceeded its fundraising goal. This year, organizers expect to have 150 attendees. Dinner will be prepared by Chef Matt Stickle, and will feature the bounty from local farmers and producers. The event will feature special guest speaker Molly Wizenberg, award-winning food blogger (http://orangette.blogspot.com) and author of New York Times bestseller â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Homemade Life.â&#x20AC;? The evening begins with a no-host cocktail hour from 6:30-7:30 p.m., with dinner starting at 7:30. Tickets are $75 per person, available at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/414851. Proceeds from the event go toward keeping vendor fees affordable for all farmers and producers and to provide funds for market capacity-building. Near and future goals include providing weekly chef demonstrations at all markets, expanding educational offerings at the South Tacoma market, from canning and gardening seminars to eating healthy on a budget, and creating mobile market opportunities for large businesses and communities lacking access to healthy, local food.

Police Blotter A man violated a no-contact order when he stole a laptop from his ex-girlfriendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s car that was unlocked along the 6800 block of Tacoma Mall Boulevard on Aug. 8 and then left a voice message that he had taken it and still had keys to her residence. He also said that he still loved her. The woman feared the man would continue violating the restraining order against him. Patrol officers spotted a man in the middle of the roadway near the corner of South Seventh and Martin Luther King Jr. Way on Aug. 8 and found that he was sweating profusely and slurring his words. The man had three hypodermic needles in his pocket, one of which was full of liquid. The man refused to give his name when he was arrested for possession of drug paraphernalia and was searched. The officer then found a bag of methamphetamine in the manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pocket. He was taken to jail and booked after officers spent two hours trying to identify the man. Compiled by Steve Dunkelberger

CORRECTION

The Aug. 9 cover story headline â&#x20AC;&#x153;Student organizes UWTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first official sports teamâ&#x20AC;? was incorrect. UWTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Soccer Club was the first sports club on campus (2007-2008) and UWT doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have â&#x20AC;&#x153;teamsâ&#x20AC;? but rather â&#x20AC;&#x153;clubs.â&#x20AC;? Tacoma Weekly apologizes for the misinformation.

#1 WASHINGTON ELEMENTARY LAUNCHES PROP 1 RENOVATIONS #2 FROM BLANCO BRONCO TO BOOGER RED

MUSIC AND ART AT WRIGHT PARK WILL HIGHLIGHT THE BEST IN TACOMA ROCK AND INDIE CULTURE

#3 LINCOLN HIGH SCHOOL CELEBRATES ITS 100TH BIRTHDAY #4 STUDENT ORGANIZES UWTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FIRST OFFICIAL BASKETBALL CLUB TACOMA HUSKIES PLACE 2ND IN LEAGUE DIVISION

#5 WORKPLACE GARDEN CHALLENGE: CAN YOU DIG IT?

BANK

ROBBERY Tacoma Police detectives need your help to identify the suspect responsible for a bank robbery. At 1:15 p.m. on Friday August 9th, 2013, the pictured suspect robbed an American West Bank located in the 1000 block of A St. in downtown Tacoma. The suspect entered the bank and showed the teller a note demanding cash. The suspect took the money and walked out of the bank. The suspect is described as a white male in his 50â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, approximately 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; tall and 190 lbs. During the robbery he was seen wearing a tan collared shirt, a brown baseball hat, blue jeans, sunglasses, and an orange construction vest with bright yellow reflective stripes on the shoulders. Fridays at 10:30pm on

1,000

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Receive up to for information leading to the arrest and charges filed for the person(s) in this case. Callers will remain anonymous Call 253-591-5959 All

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1951

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 â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;ŠSsTtAaRrLlIiGgHhTt By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The 1951 Studebaker Champion Starlight was created by legendary Raymond Loewy with its final design touches added by Virgil Exner. It was an instant classic and its bullet-nose front has become one of the most iconic American automotive designs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Studebakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Starlight coupe â&#x20AC;&#x201C; sold in both low-priced Champion and luxurious Commander model lines â&#x20AC;&#x201C; was the most special iteration of all postwar Studebakers and tested oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s credulity,â&#x20AC;? Automobile Magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s June 2009 issue penned. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The rear window wrapped around to meet the B-pillars, as the C-pillars were dispensed with entirely. Rear-seat passengers were treated to the equivalent of a Cinemascope-styled picture window. The body style was and is nothing short of sensational and continued to be offered when the freshened bullet-nose design debuted. If ever there were a Studebaker to, so to speak, outStudebaker all others, it would be the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;50-â&#x20AC;&#x2122;51 Starlight.â&#x20AC;? The 1951 model offered an enlarged grille made flush with the body and by its all-new V-8 under the hood. The 120horsepower engine lasted through the end of the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s car-building days

hour with ease and without rattling or jerking. It also gave the driver 28 miles per gallon. Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Car Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1951 Studebaker Champion Starlight Coupe was restored by Dick Hannah Dealerships in Vancouver in 2009 and was frequently on display at the dealershipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s showroom before it was added to the LeMay collection. Dick Hannah Dealerships has been a family owned business since 1949, serving Vancouver and Portland for generations.

PCMARVETS goes to bat for injured vet By Kathleen Merryman

kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO BY ERICA WESTLING

VETERANS SERVICES ON WHEELS.

PCMARVETS brought its mobile Field Office to veteran Nick Boquistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home in Key Center

Out of the service, he followed his skills into construction work. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I ran heavy equipment,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help me any, I can tell you that.â&#x20AC;? Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had three back operations, he said, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;each time itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gotten worse.â&#x20AC;? Each time he paid for them through his work insurance and covered the deductibles with his own

money. He has, he said, been trying to get VA help for 30 years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I live in a fifth wheel on my sonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s property,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I live very modestly. Just me and my cat.â&#x20AC;? He believes he earned disability with his back injury. Even a 10 percent ruling would make all the difference, especially if paid retroactive to his first claim. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At least maybe I could get a nice apartment, somewhere to live,â&#x20AC;? he said. Erica Westling, the veteran service officer working out of the PCMARVETS mobile field office,

has read Boquistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s record and believes he earned those benefits. At the first of the year, she represented him at the hearing after his most recent claim. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how they treat a lot of the veterans,â&#x20AC;? Boquist said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think I was treated right by the government until I ran into Erica. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the only one who pushed it for me. At least we got a hearing.â&#x20AC;? That hearing, with support through PCMARVETS, may, after decades, bring him the support the military promised and that Westling believes he earned.

Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how you can give: Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â? Bring to Tacoma Weekly at 2588 Pacific Highway, Fife: t ,FVSJHDPGGFFQPET t #PUUMFEXBUFS t 5FB)PUDIPDPMBUF

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Visit www.pcmarvets.com and click on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;donateâ&#x20AC;? button.

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All aboard! Free family-fun guided boat tour Join us for a free guided tour of the

Maritime Festival, 535 Dock Street Sunday, August 25

AUGUST 24 -25 th

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MOTORCYCLE FESTIVAL

From page A1

17th and Fawcett Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;pothole initiative.â&#x20AC;? And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or return â&#x20AC;&#x201C; each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

Port of Tacoma. Discover fun facts about one of the busiest ports in America.

VINTAGE

WParade James contacted museum directors and asked them to consider staying open for the evening after the parade. They declined. Thanks to the Link, the Esplanade, Museum of Glass, Tacoma Arts Commission, and Downtown On the Goâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Walk Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s maps, there will still be plenty to see for free. Murals, the Graffiti Garage, the Bridge of Glass, the fishing fleet, a failing totem pole and the restored Spanish Steps. All of that is to make it a full and fun day around the concert and parade, and to do it for spectators and participants. Heroes, James said, deserve a great event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inspire the next generation of heroes. This is a celebration of honor. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quite easy to say you support the troops, but what does your support look like? Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make honor an action verb. This is another resource to help parents teach their kids what honor looks like.â&#x20AC;?

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK

PHOTO COURTESY OF LEMAY COLLECTION

in the 1960s. Studebaker owners, including those with Starlight Coupes, were pleased with their automobiles, as indicated by a 1951 customer survey taken by Popular Mechanics. Though even some owners thought the carâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s styling was â&#x20AC;&#x153;slightly radical, the majority were very happy with the automobileâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance, superior visibility, the rare need for maintenance and easy handling. Paired with a standard three-speed manual or optional three-speed Automatic Drive, the 1951 Starlight reached 100 miles per

CONNECTING VETS TO BENEFITS Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?

Nicholas Boquist was in his 20s when the U.S. Navy sent him to Korea. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was in on the tail end of the Korean War,â&#x20AC;? the 78-year-old Key Center resident said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was on an LST, and we were bringing troops back from Seoul. I was carrying a 100-pound sack of flour up a gangway, and the ship took a bounce and so did I.â&#x20AC;? The back injury the young sailor sustained sent him to Balboa Hospital in San Diego for several months. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d been in the Navy for six years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wanted to make the service my career,â&#x20AC;? he said. Instead, he said, the Navy discharged him. Boquist says it was because of the back injury, and has filed claims with the U. S. Department of Veterans Affairs to that effect. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I talked to the VA several times in Bremerton, and I never could get anywhere with them. They just ignored me. I went to the DVA in Bremerton, and they sent papers in, but they never pushed it for me. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been trying for many years to get disability. I had a back problem in the service, and they put me out of the service for it.â&#x20AC;?

Pothole pigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

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Departures at: 10 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1 p.m., 2:30 p.m. & 4 p.m. Free tickets available at the Port booth. Tours are first-come, first-served. Arrive at least 30 minutes prior to departure.

RIDE

2013

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7SHU[ZZVPSJHW[\YLKPZZVS]LKaPUJ HUKJVWWLYPU;6;,ÂťZYHPUNHYKLUZ By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

Seen those lovely gardens around the shops at TOTE? Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re working harder than stevedores. They are rain gardens, rigged with plumbing systems and filled with filtration layers and native plants. Each year, they grab dissolved zinc and copper out of a quarter million gallons of storm water. Rand Lymangrover, the terminalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s operations manager, had barely heard of rain gardens in 2010, when they were generating buzz with environmentalists. But when TOTE faced new clean water benchmarks, he hit the learning curve hard. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a general storm water permit from the state,â&#x20AC;? Lymangrover said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That requires that you do certain things to meet standards with outfall into the Blair Waterway. In 2010, they came out with more stringent requirements, and we were not meeting the benchmarks.â&#x20AC;? TOTE was not out of compliance with regulations, he said. The water they were sending into the waterway was crystal clear. But they were not meeting the higher standards attached to their

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

A05*;9(7 Rand Lymangrover shows off TOTEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rain garden and its test splash box. permit. Tests showed minute traces of zinc and copper. Lymangrover looked for the sources, and found them in TOTEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infrastructure. Buildings erected in 1984 have galvanized metal in their roof structures and downspouts. The fencing surrounding the shipping terminal is made of galvanized metal. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s zinc that coats galvanized metal and retards rust, and zinc

donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know about that,â&#x20AC;? Lymangrover said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then I thought of a couple of places where we could try it.â&#x20AC;? One of them faces 11th Street East and Alexander Avenue, along the side of the dry-out shed. Totem Ocean Trailer Express, TOTE to its friends on the Tacoma-to-Anchorage-and-backagain container ship route, has a big green streak. It sends its recyclables to companies on the Tideflats. It installed efficient lighting and cut its electricity consumption by 23 percent. It installed shore power, so its ships can plug into the dock rather than keep their diesel engines running while theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re moored. They have removed excess fencing and cover other stuff, like tires, that might leach pollutants. So it made sense to Lymangrover to give the rain gardens a try. David Hymel of Rain Dog Designs took on the job with AHBL, Inc. and designed the system. On April 19, 2011, 75 volunteers showed up to fill the gar-

leaches off in the rain. TOTE already had a good runoff purification system. With the new benchmarks, it faced spending $1 million or so to build a better one. Carrie Hernandez of Citizens for a Healthy Bay came to look over the site and the problem. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you try rain gardens?â&#x20AC;? she asked Lymangrover. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At first I thought, geez, I

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dens with soil and 600 native plants, including strawberry ground cover donated by Tacoma Garden Club. Those volunteers represented Washington State University stewardship extension service, AHBL, Inc., Citizens for a Healthy Bay, Stewardship Partners and Rain Dog Designs. As best they can figure, they built the first industrial rain gardens on Puget Sound. Out front, facing Alexander Avenue, galvanized downspouts capture all the rain from the dry out shed roof and send it into the system that carries it into the rain garden. From the street, it looks like landscaping instead of a hard-working water purifier. On the side, by the machine shops, the gardens are more complicated. They capture roof water, and handle the storm drains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have two big pumps in the storm drains,â&#x20AC;? Lymangrover said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Before the water gets to the outfall, they pump it back through two plastic tubes to the rain gardens. They seem to accept it.â&#x20AC;? TOTE is trying out an addition, a deep tub called a splash box. Pipes in the box diffuse the water to ease its pressure on the lower garden. Lymangrover figures the gardens cost about $8,000 each, and that spending $24,000 for a simple, durable solution is smarter than putting $300,000 to a million or so into a complex system. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what he tells everyone who asks to see the gardens. People call so much, he said, that TOTE has become a demonstration garden, and an inspiration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going in all over the place,â&#x20AC;? Lymangrover said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a relatively inexpensive way to deal with storm water. The way to start is with the simplest solution.â&#x20AC;? A solution as simple as soil, strawberries and a little extra plumbing.

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TACOMA QUIRK

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Pierce County crews and contractors are working on a short list of projects along the Puyallup River and its tributaries as the first of a series of projects designed to reduce flood risk and improve salmon habitat. â&#x20AC;&#x153;County staff and crews work hard to provide flood protection for private property and critical public facilities such as roads and bridges,â&#x20AC;? said Pierce County Executive Pat McCarthy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is to design and maintain systems that keep people and property out of harmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way in the event of a major flood. These projects along the Puyallup River will reduce flood risk, among other important benefits.â&#x20AC;? With the end of the annual salmon run along the river, construction began in July on a 2,000-foot-long side along the west side of the Puyallup River near Orting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This project will reduce flood risk in the area, restore floodplain and provide salmon habitat,â&#x20AC;? said Harold Smelt, Public Works and Utilities surface water manager. Construction will continue until fall and then resume next summer in an effort to avoid the salmon migration in the winter and spring months. During construction, large trucks and heavy equipment will reach the project site via South Fork Road, crossing the Foothills Trail just north of the McMillin Trailhead and State Route 162 bridge. Flaggers will be onsite to direct truck traffic and trail users. The project will be completed in multiple phases. The first phase will cost $1.62 million. Pierce County received a $719,000 grant from the Salmon Recovery Funding Board to design and construct the first phase. The county will pursue additional grant funding to complete the channel in separate phases northward. Ceccanti, Inc. is the contractor for the first phase. The side channel that will dovetail with another project that uses engineered log jams to prevent damage to Orville Road between Electron Road and 249th Street East. Work on

PHOTO BYSTEVE DUNKELBERGER

4(7 George Francis Train coined the phrase â&#x20AC;&#x153;City of Destinyâ&#x20AC;? as well as took a noted trip around the world that started and ended in Tacoma.

PHOTO COURTESY OF PIERCE COUNTY

36.3(:/05. Engineered logjams prevent erosion and can provide habitat for salmon.

that project began this month. Crews will construct engineered logjams along about a 700-foot-long stretch of the riverbank to prevent damage to the roadway. Many property owners depend on Orville for access to the area. Active Construction, Inc. has been hired to construct the project, which will cost $1.2 million. Throughout the summer, Pierce County maintenance crews will work on smaller projects along the major rivers in Pierce County to maintain and repair flood protection infrastructure. Work includes clearing and planting vegetation, and repairing and re-enforcing levees. This all takes time. And it takes money. Lots of money. The Army Corps of Engineers is expected to have a roster of needed work along the Puyallup River drafted later this year, the latest step in what has been a three-year project so far. The ballpark for the work is expected to be several hundred million dollars. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the money to do the big projects,â&#x20AC;? said Brian Ziegler, Public Works and Utilities Director and Flood Control Zone District Administrator. The flood district has 22 prior-

ity projects along the river but is only expected to bring in about $5 million a year through a property tax increase that began this year. Projects are ranked on their cost and the potential of costly flood damage if they were left undone. River Roadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s levee, for example, is high on the priority list but its cost of $80 million to $100 million will require federal, state, local and tribal partnerships to phase the work as money becomes available. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s definitely going to take a partnership,â&#x20AC;? Ziegler said. Federal, state and local environmental regulations require construction work along rivers and waterways only be done during the summer to avoid impacts to salmon. The path of the Puyallup has changed greatly during the 100 years of development in East Pierce County, dramatically limiting the natural habitat salmon require. The channels and logjams will provide slower running water and pools young salmon seek for rest during their migration up river to lay their eggs. The channels also provide Chinook and other large salmon species with new spawning grounds in an effort to boost fish production of the threatened species.

The most famous Tacoman no one knows By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

George Francis Train isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a household name around the City of Destiny the way Fawcett or Carr or Sprague are. But he should be. He coined the phrase, after all. But he also did much more. Train was a transportation-minded businessman with a flair for the dramatic. He was part of the group that organized business interests in backing the western portion of the Transcontinental Railroad. Train made a trip around the globe in 1870, which was covered by many newspapers and provided writer Jules Verne with some travel fodder for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Around the World in Eighty Days.â&#x20AC;? Then Train did it again, and again. The last time, Trainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trip started and ended in Tacoma. He was a celebrity of his day, having run as a third-party candidate for the White House and for a very public trial involving his questionable mental state the following year. He had, after all, sought the post of Dictator of the United States and charged admission to his campaign rallies to fund his travels. But no one in Tacoma cared about that on March 18, 1890, when Train boarded a ship bound for Japan for his next trip around the world. He would return 67 days and 13 hours later to a crowd of well wishers. A small plaque along the 900 block of Broadway marks the story that few people know of a man who quite literally put the City of Destiny on the map.

Local Restaurants DINNER AND A SHOW EYf\gdafKmk`aYf\Kl]Yc`gmk]kkcadd]\ chefs cook up memorable meals By Kate Burrows kburrows@tacomaweekly.com

After more than a year of sitting vacant, local restaurateurs JeAfter more than a year of sitting vacant, local restaurateurs Jenney and Doo Pyo Song have breathed new life into the space that formerly housed the beloved coffee shop Mandolin Cafe â&#x20AC;&#x201C; now re-opening its doors as a top-notch sushi and steakhouse. The Mandolin Sushi and Steakhouse boasts sleek, sophisticated interiors, complete with a sushi bar, as well as tables situated in front of iron grills where skilled chefs prepare Teppanyaki-style food right in front of your eyes. This live cooking show is sure to make for a memorable experience. The restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menu features a full roster of Teppanyaki-style dishes with a variety of ingredients such as chicken, shrimp and scallops (owner Jenney Songâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite GLVK Ă&#x20AC;OHWPLJQRQVWHDNDQGFDODPDULDQGPRUH²IDUWRR many to list. In addition, the menu also features a variety of classic and exotic sushi rolls, as well as sashimi and Teriyaki entrees. The husband-and-wife team also own and operate I Sushi Teriyaki in DuPont and are looking forward to getting to know the community in Tacoma. -HQQH\ 6RQJ KRSHV SHRSOH Ă&#x20AC;QG 0DQGROLQ 6XVKL DQG Steakhouse as a place to relax, unwind and enjoy some delicious food. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of people come here after a day of

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working hard, so I want them to enjoy the food and feel happy when they leave,â&#x20AC;? she said. On Sept. 15, the restaurant will be holding its grand opening festivities, and customers will enjoy 10 percent off their meals throughout the day. Mandolin Sushi and Steakhouse, located at 3923 S. 12th St., is open Monday through Saturday 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. for lunch, and 4-10 p.m. for dinner; and Sunday from 4-10 p.m. Info: (253) 301-4969.

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Sports

TH

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 2013

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s new sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 6

SWEENEY LEADS PITCHERS IN WINS, VERSATILITY AND FREQUENT FLYER MILES

STUDS WIN NATIONAL TITLE AT

NBC WORLD SERIES Late dramatics, solid pitching key to effort

Sweeney has spent 18 years in professional baseball, and leads this year’s pitching staff with eight wins. By Karen Westeen Correspondent

Tacoma Rainiers pitcher Brian Sweeney might be considered something of a vagabond, having been with four organizations and nine teams in the United States over an 18-year career, plus spending three years in Japan with the Nippon Ham Fighters from 2007 to 2009. His Major League record is 4-2, while his Minor League stats are 88-61, with 11 combined saves. He has spent all or part of seven seasons with Tacoma. This year, Sweeney leads the team in wins with an 8-3 record (remarkable because he is not in the starting rotation) in 94.2 innings while recording 74 strikeouts, both good enough for second among all Rainier pitchers. Sweeney recently talked to Tacoma Weekly baseball correspondent Karen Westeen about his amazing career.

By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

After placing second at the National Baseball Congress World Series three of the past five years, SeattleTacoma Cheney Studs head coach Barry Aden questioned whether this would be the year to break through. “I came into this season thinking it was going to be a rebuilding year,” said Aden, who has managed the amateur baseball team since 2001, and also from 1990-1993. But his squad was up to the challenge this year, winning all six games they played at the World Series in Wichita, Kan. – including a 5-1 win over the Wellington Heat in the finals on Aug. 10 to claim the national title. “They just played perfect baseball day after day after day,” said Aden, noting it was the team’s first national title since winning the American Amateur Baseball Congress national tournament in 1960. “Every game, someone new stepped up and had the performance of their life. It was neat as a coach to watch.” Studs pitcher David Benson – who picked up the loss in the finals in both 2010 and 2012 – was dominant on the mound against the Heat, pitching eight shutout innings before finally surrendering a run in the ninth. He finished the complete-game win by giving up the lone run on four hits, with one walk and four strikeouts. “He had six days rest, we couldn’t have asked for any more opportunity to prepare him,” said Aden. “He was not going to be denied.” First baseman Bobby LeCount had gotten the Studs on the board in the top of the second with a oneout solo homer, a 425-foot blast that Aden noted “really killed (the Heat’s) will.” “That was the one thing we needed to let them know we were there,” he said. Right fielder Matt Becker, a 19-year-old Puyallup High grad, finished 2-for-4 with a run and an RBI, while Kyle Boe, Ty Holm and Brian Corliss each added RBIs for the Studs in the final. That came after a dramatic walk-off, 4-3 win in 12 innings over the Clarinda A’s on Aug. 8, as Holm singled in Becker with two outs to punch the ticket to the finals. The Studs had begun the tournament with a 9-7 win over the San Antonio Titans on Aug. 2, as Univer-

PHOTO BY RICHARD TRASK/TACOMA RAINIERS

STEADY PRESENCE. Rainiers pitcher Brian

KW: Where do you call home? BS: My wife and I and our two daughters live in Clifton Park, N.Y., about two and a half hours north of New York City. They are here during the season. KW: How old are your daughters? BS: They’re 14 and 9. KW: Are they involved in sports? BS: Yes, the oldest plays tennis and softball and the youngest is in competition dance and gymnastics. KW: You’ve been playing professionally for 18 seasons. What’s your earliest memory of playing baseball? BS: When we were in Yonkers, N.Y., my sisters took me out on the deck and put a whiffle ball bat in my hands and pitched to me when I was two. PHOTOS BY MERYL LOOP

CHAMPIONS. (Top) The Studs pose with the championship trophy

after knocking off the Wellington Heat 5-1 on Aug. 10. (Bottom) Studs starter David Benson threw a complete game, allowing just one run on four hits against the Heat.

sity of Puget Sound sophomore outfielder Connor Savage went 2-for-5 for the Studs, including a bases-clearing triple in the top of the ninth to take the lead. Boe and Eric Peterson each collected two RBIs in the win for the Studs. They followed that with a 6-3 win over the El Dorado Broncos on Aug. 3, as Peterson’s two-run double helped spark a four-run outburst in the bottom of the seventh inning to take control. The Studs took a 3-2 win over the Hutchinson Monarchs on Aug. 6 behind Becker, who notched two more RBIs and finished by hitting .409 (9-for-22) in the tournament. Peterson helped give the Studs a 3-2 win over the Santa Barbara For-

esters in the quarterfinals on Aug. 7, tallying two RBIs while starter Ricky Holm gave up two runs on seven hits in seven innings, with two walks and four strikeouts. Aden also noted the efforts of reliever Taylor Thompson – also a UPS alum – who allowed a lone run in 13.1 innings throughout the tournament, with nine strikeouts. Most of all, though, Aden praised his team’s unselfishness, cohesiveness and unwillingness to quit. “There was no complaining,” Aden said of his group. “All 27 of them wanted to win. It’s really rare as a coach to have an opportunity to have a group like that. They didn’t care who got it done. They just prepared and worked their butts off. This year’s team was special.”

KW: What other sports did you play in school? BS: Basketball and football, but baseball was always my first love. KW: When did you decide that you were probably going to be a pitcher? BS: My senior year in college. I played all positions in college and had pitched my whole life, but I started focusing on pitching that year. KW: Did you have role models growing up? BS: I didn’t realize it when I was growing up but my mother and father were huge role models for me in how they raised the family. When it comes to baseball I was a huge fan of Don Mattingly and the way he hit and played defense. KW: Throughout your career you’ve been both a starter and a reliever. Do you consider yourself a relief pitcher who occasionally makes a spot start, or a starter who can also be a reliever? BS: That’s a good question. Do you know what I consider myself – first and foremost I

X See RAINIERS / page A8


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RECTOR CATCHING ON AT STANFORD Former Bellarmine Prep star in line for playing time By Steve Mullen Correspondent

M

aking changes in any way, shape, or form is never easy regardless of the situation in oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. For former Bellarmine wide receiver and defensive back Michael Rector, it was just a matter of getting used to his new environment as a freshman at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. last year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was excited for this new challenge in my life both on the field of play and in the classroom,â&#x20AC;? said the redshirt freshman, who sat out last year due to injury. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coach (David) Shaw has been great and is looking forward to utilizing the talent we have on the offensive and defensive side of the ball when Pac-12 play starts.â&#x20AC;? Joining Rector in northern California this fall will be his former teammate at Bellarmine, Calvin Chandler. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to line Calvin up at safety to take advantage of his size and speed,â&#x20AC;? Rector said. And with its outstanding academic reputation known worldwide, Rector knew what Stanford had in store for him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It can be tough while playing football in the fall and having a large classroom load,â&#x20AC;? said Rector, who plans on becoming a surgeon when his football playing career is over. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But once I got used to it last year, even while redshirting, it taught me how to manage my time well.â&#x20AC;? In just his second year at Stanford, Rector is climbing up the depth chart at receiver, and is in line for a good sum of playing time this fall. No doubt he will have a cast of fans on hand, as support systems have never been a problem in the Rector family. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mom and dad watched all of the games last year, just as they did my four years at Bellarmine,â&#x20AC;? he added. With the rigors of balancing academic and regular social life, that means there is little time to hop on a plane to go see your family and friends. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Late in the season with finals on the horizon and the great possibility of another bowl game, going home is not an option,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Besides, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see mom and dad at the game anyway.â&#x20AC;? Another thought that will undoubtedly cross his mind the closer he gets to his senior season is the opportunity to pursue the National Football League. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a thought that has crossed my mind.â&#x20AC;? While his college experience is just beginning, there are already many things the former Lion great cherishes about his time in Palo Alto so far. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybody has been nothing but great to me, and there have been many other things which are too numerous to name. Even the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Big Gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; week leading to the game with Cal, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an exciting time on campus to say the least. But when I leave Stanford, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll take many of the same great memories that I took when I left Bellarmine.â&#x20AC;?

PHOTOS COURTESY OF STANFORD ATHLETICS

BIGGER ROLE. (Above) Rector chats on the sidelines with Stanford receiver Drew Terrell (4) and running back Barry Sanders, Jr. (Below) Michael Rector lays out for a catch during a scrimmage at Stanford Stadium in Palo Alto, Calif.

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consider myself a baseball player. Does that answer the question?

use all four of my pitches. Lately, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been going to my curveball.

KW: Sure because thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a complex role. I know there are a lot of pitchers who get pulled into that position occasionally of making a spot start, but I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think of anybody else who has been more successful. BS: I have a few wins in relief and they do count. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been fortunate that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been out there in relief when weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been winning.

KW: When you come to the park, if you arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t penciled in to start, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your mind set â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I might have to come in early? I might have to sit until the end? BS: Every day when I come to the park I think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to pitch. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the only way to do it. When we walk down to the bullpen as a group Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m prepared to pitch that day. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t turn the switch off. I watch whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on, I try to get a feel for the game, how the manager wants to use me. I go through my routine of stretching down there, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m prepared to pitch. When the phone rings and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my turn to pitch Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m ready. If it

KW: Whichever role youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re pitching in do you use the same outpitch? And what do you consider to be your outpitch? BS: Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always a work in progress but I like to go to my changeup. I like to

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isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t then Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be ready for tomorrow. I prepare pretty much the same way every day.

KW: You have a new pitching coach, Terry Clark, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up from Double-A. Have you worked with him before and has he given you any insights yet? BS: We worked together in spring training this year but before that, no. All pitching coaches are different and have something to offer to help you get better. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the great thing about baseball. You think you know everything but you really donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always something to learn. KW: I never get tired of hearing how you got your first major-league win on June 29, 2004, against Randy Johnson, when you were with San Diego and he was pitching for Arizona. Talk a little about that, and how you felt going into the game. BS: It was an incredible day. A week before I had

pitched in Seattle, and after that game I found out I was going to start five days later in San Diego. I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t too nervous until I remembered Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have to hit too.

KW: How did you do? BS: (I went) 0-for-4 with two strikeouts, but Randy went 0-for-4 as well. It was a great win for the team, and I was fortunate enough to see him in the weight room the next day. We spoke about things that happened during the game, and in talking to him he kind of inspired me to keep fighting. In fact both of my Major League starts were against Randy. It was a good experience. Unfortunately I was sent back down to the minor leagues the following day (and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pitch in the Major Leagues again until 2006.) KW: You made your Major League debut when you were with the Mariners in 2003. Describe that. BS: It was in relief against Boston. I remember

the run in from the bullpen was nerve-wracking. Damian Jackson was the first Major League batter I faced. I threw him two balls, then got him out on a ground ball to third on the third pitch. It was a fastball. I was able to breath after that first out and I thought, now letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s go to work.

KW: You pitched here at Cheney before it was remodeled. Even though the fieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the same thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a different superstructure and the fences are different. Does that affect your pitching at all? BS: It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really. I think the whole (remodel) gives us a better atmosphere, with new dugouts and locker rooms. Now we like being at home. I think they did a great job. KW: So far whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been the highlight of your career? BS: I think it was the day in September 1996 when I signed my minor league contract with the Mariners. The Marinersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; scouting director Tom McNamara came to the house and my parents were there. There was no bonus but it was kind of like my draft day, because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d been playing in an independent league. We walked out to his car and he reached under some stuff in his trunk and pulled out a Marinersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; cap, gave it to me and said â&#x20AC;&#x153;Welcome to the Seattle Mariners.â&#x20AC;? That was

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KW: How many clubs have you played with? BS: Seattle, San Diego (twice), Tampa Bay, Japan, the Mets, and twice more with Seattle. KW: Have you been to the postseason? BS: Yes. San Diego played St. Louis in 2006 and we were eliminated in the first round, but that was a very cool experience. We also went to the Japanese World Series two of the years I was there, but didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t win the series either year. KW: What was it like being in Japan for three years? BS: We all have fond memories. It was a good time for us as a family. The culture and people were wonderful. KW: Have you thought any more about staying in baseball once you actually stop playing? BS: I have to consider my family as well, and if I go into coaching Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have to be away from them a lot. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if I want to do that. My kids told me recently that they want me to play next year but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be 40 then, and whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to want a 40-year-old at this point in his career? I have to leave it up to God that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll guide me to make the right decision.

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-YPKH`(\N\Z[‹tacomaweekly.com‹:LJ[PVU(‹7HNL

WTax

From page A1

bridge and sidewalk repairs. The measure was slated for the Nov. 5 election by a unanimous vote of Tacoma City Council in late July. The tax on gross earnings would bring in about $11 million a year. About $8 million would come from power companies, while another $1.75 million would come from phone and cell providers and another $1.25 million from natural gas providers if the measure passes. While not directly a tax on end customers, the companies are likely to simply add the 2 percent tax to their billing statements along with the current 6 percent tax already being collected. That tax brings in $40 million a year for general fund projects and city operations. The added tax would be earmarked for road work instead of simply funneled to the general fund alongside the current 6 percent utilities tax. City staffers are now working on plans to provide opportunities for citizens to learn more about the ballot measure, including a series of community meetings before the election.

-(*;:(5+05-694(;065:,::065: All sessions will begin at 6 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Aug. 26: Lincoln High School, 701 S. 37th St. Sept. 4: Wheelock Library, 3722 N. 26th St. Sept. 11: Fern Hill Library, 765 S. 84th St. Sept. 16: Meeker Middle School, 4402 Nassau Ave. N.E. Sept. 23: Truman Middle School, 5801 N. 35th St. Oct. 2: Tacoma Main Library, 1102 Tacoma Ave. S. Oct. 9: Moore Library, 215 S. 56th St. Oct. 10: Jason Lee Middle School, 602 N. Sprague Ave. Oct. 14: Gray Middle School, 6229 S. Tyler St. Oct. 30: Snake Lake Nature Center, 1919 S. Tyler St. “I will probably be very busy for the next two and a half months,” City Manager T.C. Broadnax said. “I am looking for clones of myself.” The meetings will be much like the city’s budget workshops last year. Almost a dozen

7(::05.*3(::&

The following presents the state’s Achievement Index and adds letter grades to show how “A” through “F” ratings would apply if the legislature were to adopt a letter grade system. ANGELO GIAUDRONE C Good ARLINGTON F Struggling BAKER D Fair BIRNEY D Fair BLIX D Fair BOZE D Fair BROWNS POINT C Good BRYANT C Good CRESCENT HEIGHTS D Fair DAY REPORTING SCHOOL Unknown DELONG D Fair DOWNING C Good EDISON D Fair FAWCETT B Very Good FERN HILL D Fair FIRST CREEK S D Fair FOSS D Fair FRANKLIN C Good GEIGER D Fair GRANT C Good GRAY D Fair HELEN B. STAFFORD B Very Good HOME BASED Unknown JASON LEE C Good JEFFERSON D Fair LARCHMONT D Fair LINCOLN D Fair LISTER D Fair LOWELL D Fair LYON F Struggling MANITOU PARK D Fair MANN D Fair MASON C Good MCCARVER F Struggling MEEKER D Fair MT TAHOMA D Fair NORTHEAST TACOMA D Fair OAKLAND HIGH SCHOOL D Fair PARK AVENUE CENTER F Struggling PEARL STREET CENTER Unknown POINT DEFIANCE A Exemplary JENNIE REED D Fair REMANN HALL JUVENILE Unknown ROOSEVELT D Fair SCIENCE AND MATH INS D Fair SHERIDAN C Good SHERMAN B Very Good SKYLINE A Exemplary SPECIAL SERVICES F Struggling STADIUM C Good STANLEY B Very Good STEWART F Struggling TACOMA BUSINESS ACAD F Struggling TACOMA PIERCE COUNTY Unknown TACOMA SCHOOL OF THE ARTS B Very Good TCC FRESH START D Fair TRUMAN C Good WASHINGTON-HOYT C Good WHITMAN D Fair WHITTIER C Good WILSON C Good Courtesy of the Washington Police Center

information sessions at various locations across the city have been planned so far. The sessions are designed to provide residents with information about the ballot measure. In addition to these meetings, city officials are available to make presentations to interested

community groups. “We are very open and transparent about the finances of the city,” City Council member Ryan Mello said during a study session on the issue. While the issue of road repairs ranked high on citizen surveys, the plan has its opponents. The Stop Higher Utility Taxes group, led by Simpson Tacoma Kraft’s lobbyist, filed an injunction in Pierce County Superior Court challenging the measure on the grounds that the ballot’s wording doesn’t specifically articulate that the tax on earnings will essentially mean higher rates for customers. The added tax would reportedly cost Simpson $500,000 a year. Residential power customers could see their bills jump by about $5 per month if the tax is simply passed through. Another issue is that the ballot measure would be decided by city residents while the tax would be collected on customers who are outside the city limits of Tacoma. Tacoma Power spans much of Lakewood, University Place, Steilacoom, unincorporated parts of Pierce County and Joint Base Lewis McChord, for example.

WSchools From page A1 was outlined by the state Office of Public Instruction and lawmakers in a failed bill last session was used, a quarter of the schools would be “good,” while 80 percent of these schools would receive a “C” grade or lower, according to the WPC’s study. “Parents of children in the Tacoma public school system want to know, and have a right to know, how their child’s school is performing, and this resource gives them an easy way to do that,” explained WPC Education Director Liv Finne. The policy center collected data from around the state and has been periodically releasing the specific “grades” of schools and school districts around Washington since February. The annual Achievement Index is a ranking of 2,189 public schools in Washington based on data compiled by the State Board of Education for the 2011 school year. “People aren’t so much interested in the state statistics,” Finne said. “They want to know about their own schools. That’s why this index is so important.” While the non-profit policy center has championed charter schools and other decentralized educational reforms that are outlined in the report, Finne said the purpose of the report cards is not to drive an agenda but promote debate on educational issues. “We are not hoping to drive the discussion in any particular direction,” she said. “We would just like for people to have the discussion.” Improving efforts to educate children involves several factors that simply can’t be distilled into a single grade, Tacoma School District spokesman Dan Voelpel said, especially from a group that has butted heads with the district on educational reforms for years. “We are not a fan of the Washington Policy Center

FILE PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

*3(::. Foss High School scored a grade of D on the Washington Policy

Center’s report on Tacoma schools. Other schools scored better, while others did not.

on these issues,” he said. “We know that we have schools that are not doing well, and we are doing a lot to improve that. We don’t feel it is helpful to assign a letter grade to these kids and these schools.” Tacoma schools have some of the highest concentrations of poverty in the state, he said, and low standardized test scores mirror that reality. Schools in affluent neighborhoods fare

well, while schools in lower-income neighborhoods don’t score as high. The high number of low-income neighborhoods, therefore, brings down the district’s overall “grade.” The district’s research shows that Tacoma schools with about 40 percent of their students receiving free or reduced-price lunch did well, while schools with closer to 60 percent on the free lunch program received

lower grades. “With Tacoma being clearly one of the most impoverished districts in the state, it’s no surprise,” Voelpel said. Performance scores around the district, however, are improving and many school programs have been noted for their innovation. Lincoln and Foss high schools, for example, have been ranked among the top in the nation


:LJ[PVU(‹7HNL‹tacomaweekly.com‹-YPKH`(\N\Z[


City Life

Music and Art In Wright Park

B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 2013

SECTION B, PAGE 1

PRINCE OF @#$@ DARKNESS: OZZY TALKS NEW SABBATH TUNES, RELIGION (BUT STILL MUM ON BILL WARD)

PHOTO COURTESY MSO PR

From Black Sabbath’s original lineup Geezer Butler, Ozzy Osbourne and Tony Iommi will appear at the Gorge Amphitheatre on Aug. 24. Rage Against the Machine/Audioslave drummer Brad Wilk is filling in for Bill Ward, who is absent due to a contract dispute. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

When Black Sabbath is on the road, their local stop always demands consideration for “show of the year” among local metal fans. But this time around the iconic rock band has significantly upped the ante by releasing “13,” the band’s first studio effort featuring metal godfather Ozzy Osbourne on vocals in 35 years; and there should be no doubt that Sabbath’s Aug. 24 stop at the Gorge Amphitheatre is the can’t miss rock event of the summer. Recently, Osbourne held a teleconference to promote the tour, taking questions from reporters across the country. Tacoma Weekly got things started by asking about drummer Bill Ward, a guy who will be notably missing onstage in Grant County. Here is a partial transcript with more coverage and audio outtakes available online at www. tacomaweekly.com. Question: I’ve got to ask about Bill Ward. When is the last time you spoke to him; and what are the odds that he’ll be back into the fold in the near future? Ozzy Osbourne: We would love to have Bill back in the fold. But, unfortunately, it didn’t work out, and we knew we had to deliver an album because we’d kept people waiting for, like, 35 years. We all just got on the boat; and unfortunately, Bill had some discrepancy about something or other. But we’d love to have him back in the lineup and work something out. Q: Have you spoken to him since negotiations broke down? Ozzy: No. I’ve been so busy doing this project and working in the studio; we just couldn’t stop. I wish him no harm. I still love him a lot. We all do. You know, it’d be great to have him back. But we felt if we pull the plug on this one, people would have gone, “Oh, it’s never going to happen, you know.” We tried, and we’d been speaking about it for a long time. Q: Among the sticking points he had … Ozzy: (abruptly) I don’t know anything about it. (Moderator jumps in to encourage keeping focus on tour.) Q: I remember back when Sabbath originally got back together in the late 90s, and you guys did a lot of touring then into the next decade. You had tried back then, for a time, to get a new record together; and then it didn’t materialize. Can you put your finger on what made things different this go around? Ozzy: You know what? I was at this

television thing with “The Osbournes” back then. I had my own career, and I suppose it was a clash of egos. You know, it just didn’t feel right. We tried to force an album. In fact, we recorded a demo with a bunch of stuff, which is nothing like the way we used to do. We were forcing it out of ourselves; whereupon this album, the “13” album - just came out. We just clicked. Q: I’ve read in quite a few places where you talked about Rick Rubin kind of suggesting to you guys when you got together to start on the album to go back to the first Black Sabbath album, listen to that. That was kind of his idea for a direction, I guess, for “13.” And I’m curious what you guys thought of that idea initially. Ozzy: Well, you know what? When Rick says, “I don’t want you to think of a classic heavy metal album,” I’m like, “Well what the (heck) do you want? What are you looking for?” Excuse my French. It took me the longest to understand what he was saying. He says, “Forget all the other albums. I want you to concentrate and zone into the vibe that you had on the first album. You know, that bluesy album.” So I thought, “What is he talking about, you know?” Then the penny drops; and then I suddenly remembered ... we hadn’t written that many songs. It was just like a jammer on side two (with) a bluesy album sound to it. And so I got what he was saying. He didn’t want a structured album in the respects to - you know, verse, riff, verse, riff, middle, solo. He didn’t want that all the way through. So he wanted that freedom that we had on the first album, which was just a natural vibe. Q: “13” has already proved to be very successful for the band. It’s the band’s first ever No. 1 album in the U.S. How does that feel, and what do you think it is about the Black Sabbath sound that, 45 years after you guys started, is still... Ozzy: You know what? You’re asking the wrong guy. ... I’m going to wake up and it’s all been a dream; because had this happened in 1972, after “Paranoid,” I’d have gone, “Oh, yeah, okay.” But now, after 45 years up the road, and we get our first No. 1, it’s kind of a hard thing to swallow, you know. It’s great. I’m not saying I don’t want it to be No. 1, but I just don’t understand. Why now, you know? I mean, we’ve been around for a long time, in one way or another. Q: I wanted to ask about the lyrics on the album. Now I know Geezer has a big hand in that. How does the process work? Ozzy: Well, what happens is I get a

melody, and I’ll just sing anything; and sometimes it can be like a beginning or a hook line or a couple of words that he gets inspiration from. He’s the main lyricist, although I wrote a couple of the sets of lyrics on the album. But Geezer gives Black Sabbath’s vocal message, verbally. Over the years, he’s given me some phenomenal lyrics, you know. He’s just one of these guys that can do that. I get an idea like “God is Dead?” for instance. I was in the doctor’s office one day. I was in the waiting room, and “Time” magazine, it just said on the front “God is Dead?” And I thought, “Wow, that’s a good idea.” And I started singing that on the track, you know – the “God is Dead” bit. Where I was coming from was that I thought, they’ve flown planes into the World Trade Center under the name of religion and God and Buddha … and all this (stuff.) That is not my idea of what God should be. My idea of what God should be is a good guy, you know. I don’t think there’s anything good in killing people in the name of your God, you know. That was my idea, and Geezer took it to another level. Q: Okay, so now you’ve got the album that you wanted. What’s the live show going to be like? Are you going to be able to… Ozzy: All I can say is a month or so ago we were in New Zealand, Australia, and Japan, and it was astounding how the reception was. We’re going to do some old, and we’re going to do some new. It’s just kind of interesting to be able to do some new stuff because in the past I haven’t been able to do a lot of new stuff because of the fact that my range is too high and I couldn’t do onstage what I did in the studio. But now on this - on “13” I sang it in a range that I could do most of them on stage so we did new things, “End of the Beginning”, “God is Dead?” and a couple of others. … We’re going to do “Paranoid,” “Black Sabbath” – we’ll play “Iron Man” – a good mix of the old stuff as well as the new stuff. Q: I wanted to see if you could talk about Tony Iommi, just how inspirational for you it was watching your friend battling cancer while making this album, and his courage. Ozzy: Believe me, I know from firsthand with my wife that treatment for cancer is not like doing a line of coke and going to a disco. It knocks the crap out of you, you know. But fair play to Tony, he just came down to the studio. The only thing we had to do was make it easier for him to get treatment. In other words, we started off at my studio in Calabasas; but we all moved to his studio in

England. I stayed in a hotel for a while, but we accommodated him. And he would come down to the studio every day. I’d go, “Tony, are you sure you’re okay to do this, man, are you ready?” And he goes, “No I’ll do it.” And not only did he come down, he came down with the goods. I thought, “My God, man, he is Iron Man.” Q: I’m kind of curious on what’s it like being on the road now versus 40 years ago? Ozzy: Well, we’ve all got a few years older, and nobody gets stoned or drunk or you know. Geezer will take a drink every now and again, but I don’t drink or use anymore. I mean, every time I do I get in (freaking) trouble, that’s why. We’re just guys now. We’re men. We’ve got families and we’ve got responsibilities, but I’m still (bleeping) crazy. (Laughs) I’m still having fun, you know. Q: I was wondering if going back and listening to that and trying to make an album in the spirit of the first Sabbath album put you in a reflective mood at all, if you thought much about the early... Ozzy: When I hear “Paranoid” or “Volume 4,” I remember where my head was at when we recorded it. I remember the first album, for instance, we just drove down in our van on the way to a ferry to go to do some work at the Star Club in Hamburg or somewhere like that. Our manager at the time said, “Stop off … at this recording studio and we’ll do all them songs you’ve been playing on the stage.” So we ... set the gear up, played and were back in the van going back to the ferry. (I remember) how quick it was. Really, the first album was a live album without an audience, you know. It just took me back to the way we were when I listened to that first album again. None of us had heard it for a long, long while. Q: Given how unlike it was, you know, most of what was on the radio at the time, did you expect it to like, find the kind of audience it found? Ozzy Osbourne: Sabbath in those days was always a band that was created by word of mouth, because you know, long-haired, dope-smoking crazy guys weren’t exactly the light of their lives. The formula for a successful rock and roll band would be a band that your parents love to hate and you’ll get success; and that was our philosophy, you know. The media never gave us one kind word. … I, myself, thought we’ll only last a couple of albums; and here we are 45 years later and we just got our first No. 1. So I don’t know what I’m talking about.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE DOWNTOWN BLOCK PARTY

The feel of the Downtown Block Party is all about tasting the fruit of creative collaboration. What’s it like to help paint a mural with friends and make mosaic flower boxes, then get your picture taken in Tacoma’s original costume photo booth and then throw paint balloons at a life-sized Operation game? Get down to improvised grooves played by some of the best musicians in the Northwest while you paint, eat, dance, play and create. Then strike up a conversation in the beer garden, if you’re of age. Come find out Aug. 17 – and admission is free. Location: Opera Alley at 709 Court C., 4-10 p.m.

TWO SUMMER STRIKE FEST On Aug. 18 at the South Tacoma Market at STAR Center, the Tacoma Farmers Market

in partnership with Click! and Metroparks will be hosting a fun, free, baseball-themed event with food, activities, and an MLB Network Strike Zone where you can pitch balls to win prizes. Come visit the STAR Center for a fun-filled family event complete with fresh farmer’s market produce and plants, as well as baseball staples like hot dogs and popsicles! The event goes throughout the normal Sunday market, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

THREE ROSWELL That’s right, Tacoma, it seems that the gods of rock have answered our prayers for rain and have granted us salvation in the form of Roswell. Roswell is a local four-man rock band made up of lead sing-

er and guitarist Joe Bakke, drummer Nick Vargish, bassist Kevin Bell and guitaris t/key boardist Alex Hart. Roswell is known for energetic live shows and for creating accessible enjoyable and extremely catchy pop rock. Recommended tracks include “Bells (Reprise)” “Stepping Stone” and “Winter Face.” Listen to Roswell at: http://roswellmusic.bandcamp.com.

FOUR IN THE SPIRIT In the Spirit: Northwest Native Arts Market and Festival, one of the largest Native American arts celebrations in the Northwest, returns to the Washington State History Museum on Aug. 17, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., with displays and performances from the

region’s most talented artisans. In addition to the free festival, the museum will offer free admission for visitors to view the complementary “In the Spirit” art exhibit, which features work from more than 20 tribal groups. Visit www.washingtonhistory. org for complete schedule.

FIVE ASIAN FILM FEST L a k e w o o d Playhouse hosts its first Asian Film Fest Aug. 16, 17 and 18, featuring five outstanding, award-winning films. There’s entertainment on tap as well – the Chang Hee Sook Korean Drummers and the Filipino American Youth Dancers (PAYO) will perform prior to the film screenings. The selection of films offers something for all ages, ranging from “G” ratings to “PG,” “PG-13” and “R.” The fest is free of charge with festival seating on a first-come, first-served basis. See the full schedule at www.lakewoodplayhouse.org.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 2 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, August 16, 2013

17th Annual South Tacoma Business District Classic Car Show Saturday, Aug 17th Summer in Tacoma wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be the same without it One of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most enjoyable summertime neighborhood festivals happens on Aug. 17 when the South Tacoma Business Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Classic Car Show takes over six blocks of South Tacoma Way between South 50th and South 56th streets. Now in its 17th year, this family-oriented event always lives up to its reputation of offering a wealth of fun activities and attractions for people of all ages to experience this vibrant part of Tacoma â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and admission is free. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great day of family fun,â&#x20AC;? said business district manager Gloria Egan, who has been involved in organizing the classic car show since its beginning in 1996. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a transportation neighborhood â&#x20AC;&#x201C; this is what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s IRXQGHGRQVRDFDUVKRZLVDQDWXUDOÂżWIRUXV to bring people to the neighborhood. We have a lot to offer.â&#x20AC;? Upwards of 300 cars are expected to be on display throughout the Classic Car Show, which runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The $2 car registration fee will go to South Tacoma Business District food banks. All pre-registered car owners will receive a free T-shirt, a free dash plaque, a goody bag and will be entered into a special drawing for a one-night stay at the Quinault Beach Resort with dinner for two at Emilyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Restaurant plus a gift card for a total value of $300. More than 35 trophies will be awarded as well (courtesy of Dande Company), and Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Flower will give roses to the ladies. Registration forms can be found at www.stbda.com. Out on the streets, the sweet sounds of music from the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;50s and â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s will provide a

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perfect backdrop to stroll among the more than 20 vendors and food offerings including gourmet hot dogs and selfserve frozen yogurt. NW Motor Scooters will have a large display, as will LeMay â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Car Museum with autos from the LeMay family collection. Tacoma Fire Dept. will bring WKHLU YLQWDJH 0DF ÂżUH truck and the Captain USA monster truck will return again this year courtesy of T&T Tire Factory. The stage this year will be something WR VHH Âą WKH EDFN HQG RI D Ă&#x20AC;DWEHG ZUHFNHU provided by Collision Specialists. Another annual favorite is the Jo Emery Ballet School performance. Starting at 2 p.m. the dancers will arrive in a â&#x20AC;&#x2122;50â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s red Ford truck to perform in the intersection at 54th and South Tacoma Way. Staged with a country western theme, the choreography is by Jo Emery, Janis Robinson, Kaye Munro and Jean Milano. Dancers will perform to music by ZZ Top,

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, August 16, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 3

MARITIME FEST 2013

Tacoma celebrates its maritime history all weekend

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MARITIME FEST

QUICK & DIRTY. Martime Festâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Quick & Dirty Boat Building contest is a crowd favorite. (Right) Maritime Fest has a new logo and new line of clothing

featuring this and other designs. By Matt Nagle

matt@tacomaweekly.com

T

heaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Park and the Foss Waterway Seaport will be buzzing with activity the weekend of Aug. 24 and 25 during the 21st annual Maritime Fest. For two days this free, family-friendly and genuinely fun celebration will focus on what makes Tacoma tick â&#x20AC;&#x201C; its working waterfront that has shaped and sustained the city since the late 19th century. Each day of the fest from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. will feature something for everyone: interesting and educational activities, music, food of many varieties, Tall Ship cannon battles, captainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seminars, a Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Zone, and much more. Event Director Sue Schaeffer said festival-goers will notice an increased number and variety of food options. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve really changed up the food this year,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have three times as many (options) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from crepes, barbeque and sushi to traditional fair food, ice cream and frozen yogurt. I really wanted to have a variety and cover all the bases.â&#x20AC;? There will also be shaved ice, elephant ears, Mediterranean cuisineâ&#x20AC;Śenough choices to get an appetite going just thinking about it. Schaeffer said other highlights include the tug ballet/dance on water, hydrofoil flight demonstrations from the Interna-

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tional Hydrofoil Society, and the Tacoma Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sailing Association with their information booth and boat to tour. The Knights of Veritas will be hosting an interactive medieval-period history pavilion this year with an exhibit of replica arms and armor that visitors can handle and authenticated medieval antiquities on display â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and handgonne (hand held canon) demonstrations will happen throughout the day. The Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Zone looks to be a perfect place for the young and young-at-heart with its Big Purple Slide, period games with Fort Nisqually, knot and bracelet making with the Sea Scouts, Daffodil Princesses on Saturday and train rides at Tacoma Rail also on Saturday. All around the festival area there will be dozens of local merchants selling their sea-faring swag, plus informational booths and other such attractions to browseand-buy. Things to do will be abundant â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the Sea Scouts sailboat races, a catch and release tank (International Longshore and Warehouse Union), a touch tank on Saturday (Harbor Wild Watch), boat building for kids (Tacoma Community Boat Builders and Vigor Marine), cannon battles (Grays Harbor Historical Society), tour of Port of Tacoma on Sunday via Argosy Cruises, and opportunities to tour many ships such as the Charles N. Curtis, Hawaiian Chieftan, Lady Washington, Odyssey, Yankee Clipper and

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Thea Belle. Seminars will be held for captains, crews, and those just curious on various nautical topics. Presenters include Nancy Erley, who led two voyages around the world; Wendy Hinman speaking on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living Without Refrigerationâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keeping Your Relationship Off the Rocksâ&#x20AC;? on how balance diverse personalities and needs aboard; author and maritime historian Chuck Fowler speaking on tall ships and tugboats on Puget Sound; and Skip Anderson on what it takes to earn your captainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license. A very popular event is the Quick & Dirty Boat Building competition in which teams of two to three people have six hours and a selection of materials to build their floating devices and then put them to the test in a speed race. Boats are also judged on categories such as appearance, seaworthiness, and originality. The highest scoring boat will be awarded a stunning Grand Prize Trophy that will be displayed at the Foss Waterway Seaport Working Waterfront Maritime Museum until next year. Proceeds from this event benefit the Youth Marine Foundation. Everything about Maritime Fest â&#x20AC;&#x2122;13 can be found at www.maritimefest.org. Check out the new look and logo, and the new bandanas, T-shirts and tank tops all courtesy of Maritime Festâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Creative and Marketing Director Athena Renee of Court & Custom Design House.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, August 16, 2013

Music & Art in Wright Park Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s web site is getting another makeover. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve added a new multi-media section called Beyond Words where weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll post and archive all the video, audio and photo galleries we use to supplement our coverage. We got it properly started this week with a gallery of images from last weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Music and Art in Wright Park festival, along with bootleg videos featuring performances by local favorites Big Wheel Stunt Show, Furry Buddies, Deathbed Confessions and more. Plus, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find audio outtakes from the teleconference Ozzy Osbourne held before the Black Sabbath tour is set to hit the Gorge Amphitheatre on Aug. 24. Find it all at www.tacomaweekly.com/beyondwords, and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to bookmark.

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

Empire Rocket Machine zeros in on target Tacoma

Friday, August 16, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Live Music TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

SINGER-GUITARIST JIMMY VIVINO (LEFT, WITH SINGER FELIX CABRERA) HAS PLAYED WITH MAX WEINBERG’S BAND ON “LATE NIGHT WITH CONAN O’BRIEN,” AND HE’LL BE THE MAIN ATTRACTION AT BLUES VESPERS, 5 P.M. AUG. 18 AT IMMANUEL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 901 N. J ST. HE WILL BE JOINED BY PAUL GREEN AND THE MARK RILEY TRIO. ADMISSION IS FREE, ALTHOUGH DONATIONS WILL BE COLLECTED FOR MUSICIANS; WWW.IPCTACOMA.ORG.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BAND

E.R.M. Portland’s Empire Rocket Machine is (L-R) Kevin Dunn, Piotr Moes, Jon DeBellis and Kenny Fields. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

P

ortland’s Empire Rocket Machine – a regular on our Weekly Mix Tape (www. tacomaweekly.com/mixtape) – will make its first appearance in Tacoma on Aug. 17 at the Harmon Taproom. The bill will also include Alex’s Hand and Bodybox, with music starting at 9 p.m. To mark the occasion, we caught up with singer-guitarist Jon DeBellis who gave us four things you should know about his band. 1.) It was brought together by hot dogs and jukeboxes: The catalyst for the band’s formation, one night in 2007, was drummer Kenny Field’s scattershot jukebox selections. “It would be, like, Tom Waits and then NWA and then Frank Sinatra and Cream,” DeBellis recalled. “I was looking LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER (132 MIN, PG-13) Fri 8/16: 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 Sat 8/17-Sun 8/18: 12:05, 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 Mon 8/19-Thu 8/22: 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 THE WAY, WAY BACK (113 MIN, PG-13) Fri 8/16: 2:00, 4:25, 6:50, 9:10 Sat 8/17-Sun 8/18: 11:35am, 2:00, 4:25, 6:50, 9:10 Mon 8/19-Thu 8/22: 2:00, 4:25, 6:50, 9:10 FRUITVALE STATION (90 MIN, R) Fri 8/16: 1:50, 4:00, 6:15 Sat 8/17- Thu 8/22: 4:00, 6:15 20 FEET FROM STARDOM (91 MIN, PG-13) Fri 8/16: 1:45, 8:20 Sat 8/17-Sun 8/18: 11:45am, 1:45, 8:20 Mon 8/19-Thu 8/22: 1:45, 8:20 GOOONIES (114 MIN, PG) Sat 8/17: 10:00am 25 NEW FACES OF INDEPENDENT FILM (TIMES RANGE, NR) Fri 8/16: 6:00, 8:15 Sat 8/17: 11:30am, 1:40, 3:40, 6:00, 8:15 Sun 8/18: 12:45, 2:45, 5:00 Mon 8/19: 2:45, 5:55, 8:00 Tue: 8/20: 1:00, 6:15, 8:30 Wed: 8/21: 1:45, 5:45, 7:30 Thu 8/22: 1:45, 5:45, 7:30

606 Fawcett, Tacoma, WA

253.593.4474 • grandcinema.com

at my buddy and saying, ‘Who is playing this music?’ And then the gentleman sitting next to me was like, ‘I am.’” The two bonded over shared musical influences and started as a duo, later adding lead guitarist Piotr Moes and bassist Kevin Dunn.

Portland’s Empire Rocket Machine will make its first appearance in Tacoma on Aug. 17. “Kevin was at this annual party that my wife and I throw, called Franksgiving,” DeBellis said. “We give thanks for franks. So, I go around town and collect sausages from all the local sausage makers, and then we cook them and have people over. He was there and said, ‘I don’t play bass, but I play guitar. I’m sure I could figure out bass.’ So we tried him out on a temporary basis, and it just kind of stuck.” The rest, as they say, is history. 2.) E.RM. took its name from a Portland machine shop, and nearly ripped off an iconic alt-rock band in the process: DeBellis and Field struggled to come up with a name before their first duo gig, and a friend mentioned driving by a block engine boring shop he thought was called Empire Rocket Machine. “The next day I find out the shop on Gleason is actually Rocket Empire Machine,” DeBellis said. “I was like, ‘Oh, you got the name wrong.’ Then Kenny was like, ‘That’s

Uncle Sam’s

probably good because Rocket Empire Machine is R.E.M., and R.E.M.’s already taken.’” He suggested boosting show attendance by making a simple, if dubious, change on the marquee. “I suppose being sued by Peter Buck would be a good publicity stunt,” he said. “I just don’t know if I can afford the legal fees to deal with it.” 3.) You shouldn’t expect them to sound like Yes or Phish: “I wasn’t interested in being in a jam band, and I wasn’t interested in playing rock-jazz odyssey music or noodling because I couldn’t really do that,” DeBellis said, recalling how the E.R.M.’s hooky, melodic sound first gelled. “Probably one of the most influential records to me was Elvis Costello’s ‘This Year’s Model’ because it was very accessible, and at the same time it pushed the envelope of what people expected pop music to be. I don’t want to make something that’s so out there that people don’t understand it or only a small group of people understand it. I want to make something that people want to listen to and have fun with or get energized by it.” 4.) Dunn is the sexy one: “There’s been a couple of female, drunk audience members that have been excited by our bass player. He’s probably the most attractive out of all of us, subjectively. He’s tall, and let’s just say Kevin went as Superman one year (for Halloween.) He actually does kind of look like Christopher Reeve. Kenny calls him the eye candy of the band. The rest of us are just sort of flailing our chubby stomachs about.”

PHOTO BY MARTIN BROOKS

FRIDAY, AUG. 16

SUNDAY, AUG. 18

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC IMMANUEL PRESBYTERIAN: Jimmy Vivino (blues) 5 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Bluegrass Sunday (open jam), 3 p.m., NC SPAR: Karen Lovely Band (blues) 8 p.m., NC SWISS: Music For Youth (jam session) 2 p.m., NC, AA UNCLE SAM’S: Remedy (jam session)

TACOMA COMEDY: Marc Ryan (comedy) 10 p.m., $10-15

MONDAY, AUG. 19 GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Sin City (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY @ 502: Kortney Shane Williams (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 HARMON TAPROOM: NWCZ presents Warning Danger, Goat, DJ Ninja Cat (rock) JAZZBONES: The Stacy Jones Band (blues) 8 p.m., $5 MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (Jazz) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: J. Martin, Imaginary Lines, Piko Panda (rock) 9 p.m., $5 SWISS: Kry (top 40) 9 p.m., $5-10 STONEGATE: Ghost 211 (rock) 9 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Three Quarter Minus, Hookerfist (rock) 8 p.m. UNCLE THURM’S: Urban Rhapsody (jazz, funk), NC, AA

SATURDAY, AUG. 17

STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino (rock, blues) 8 p.m., NC SWISS: Gary Crooks, Mike Jaap Trio (jazz) 9 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Billy Pease, Paul Buck, Chris Gartland (blues)

TUESDAY, AUG. 20 NEW FRONTIER: Bone Dance (rock) 9 p.m., $5

ANTIQUE SANDWICH SHOP: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (rock, blues) 7 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., NC LOCH’S: Open turntables (DJ) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: SubVinyl Jukebox (open jam) 8 p.m.

NEW FRONTIER: Mahnhammer, CFA (sludge-metal, punk) 9 p.m., $5

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 21 DOYLE’S: Sweet Kiss Momma (southern rock) 9:30 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Minh Tuyet (Vietnamese pop) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Kortney Shane Williams (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 HARMON TAPROOM: Empire Rocket Machine, Bodybox, Alex Hand (rock) 9 p.m., $5 LOCH’S: Megan Nefarious, DJ Omar, etc. (DJs) 8:30 p.m., $5 after 10 OPERA ALLEY: Downtown Block Party (festival) NC, AA SPAR: Black Market Revue, 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: South Tacoma car show, 11 a.m.; Ghost 211 (rock) 9 p.m., NC SWISS: Mr. Pink (top 40) 9 p.m., $5-10 TACOMA COMEDY: Marc Ryan (comedy) 10 p.m., $10-15 TRIPLE PLAY: Zero Down Blues (blues) 9 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Southern Justice Band (southern rock covers) 8 p.m.

DAWSON’S: Crazy Texas Gypsies (blues, open jam) 8 p.m., NC DAVE’S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: The Humpsters (jam) 8:30 p.m., NC

THURSDAY, AUG. 22 502: Kim Archer (blues, soul) 5:30 p.m., NC

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Open jam, 8 p.m. DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC HOTEL MURANO: Kareem Kandi (jazz) 8:30 p.m., NC, AA ROCK THE DOCK: Open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open mic) 9 p.m., NC SWISS: Barley Wine Revue (country) 9 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m.

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

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Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 16, 2013

FRI., AUG. 16 BACKYARD BBQ AT CHENEY Northwest Leadership Foundation will host its Annual “In Our Backyard Benefit BBQ” to celebrate the successes of youth, families, neighborhoods, and emerging leaders in the city. The event will include a catered meal and admission to the Tacoma Rainiers vs. Colorado Springs Sky Sox game. Enjoy a full catered meal with all your ballpark favorites, along with soda, water, beer and wine, live music, raffle prizes, personal concierge service, private area to watch and enjoy the game, post-game fireworks show! There will also be a Kids’ Zone with a bounce house. Info: northwestleadership.org/backyardbbq-at-cheney-stadium-2.

COMING EVENTS

PARENTS NIGHT OUT Each month, on the first and third Friday from 6-9 p.m., is parents’ night out! Bring the kids to the Children’s Museum of Tacoma, where organizers will entertain the kids in a safe and fun environment. Cost is $25 per child, $10 each additional sibling. Members receive a 10 percent discount. Parents’ Night Out is most appropriate for children 3-10 years old. All children must be able to use the toilet

calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

one with appeal for a range of ages, including adventureseeking adults. Info: www. pdza.org/zoom. VALUE VILLAGE DONATION DRIVE Visit the University Place Value Village, 6802 19th St. W. and proceeds from all donations of quality, reusable clothing will benefit The Arc of Washington. The organization helps to empower individuals with disabilities. There will be a drawing for a $50 gift certificate, as well. Info: www.valuevillage.com. TEDDIE BEAR MUSIC Teddie Bear Music is a child and parent musical adventure. Join instructor Janice Berntsen as she shows students how to share the gift of music and movement with their children, ages 1-4. Sessions are held Thursdays at 8:45 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. at Ted Brown Music, located at 6228 Tacoma Mall Blvd. Info: www.tbmoutreach.org.

SUN., AUG. 18

PUGET SOUND BEAD FESTIVAL The 19th Annual Puget Sound Bead Festival takes place Aug. 17-18. This year’s show will be held at Tacoma’s Public Market - Freighthouse Square, located at 25th & D Street, one block from the Tacoma Dome. This is a notto-be-missed festival, which has become the largest of its kind on the West Coast. Join bead merchants, artisans & instructors for a weekend of beads and jewelry making workshops for every skill level. The festivities start at 10 a.m.

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THE FOURTH ANNUAL DOWNTOWN BLOCK PARTY IS TAKING PLACE ON SAT., AUG. 17 FROM 4-10 P.M. THIS UNIQUE EVENT WILL FEATURE IMPROVISED GROOVES PERFORMED BY SOME OF THE BEST LOCAL BANDS AROUND. THE FEEL OF THE NIGHT IS ALL ABOUT TASTING THE FRUIT OF CREATIVE COLLABORATION – WHAT IT’S LIKE TO HELP PAINT A MURAL WITH FRIENDS, OR MAKE MOSAIC FLOWER BOXES, AND THERE WILL EVEN BE A CHANCE TO PLAY A LIFE-SIZED GAME OF OPERATION. THE EVENT IS FREE, BUT THERE WILL BE DONATION BINS FOR ANYONE INTERESTED IN SUPPORTING THE EVENT. THERE WILL BE PLENTY OF FOOD BOOTHS, A BEER GARDEN FOR THOSE OF AGE, AND A ROOT BEER GARDEN FOR THOSE WHO AREN’T (MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A MINOR). STICK AROUND FOR AN EPIC DANCE PARTY AROUND 8:30 P.M. THE FESTIVITIES TAKE PLACE IN OPERA ALLEY IN DOWNTOWN.

SUMMER READING CELEBRATION In cooperation with Tacoma Public Library, Point Defiance Zoo is hosting an annual celebration of reading. Young readers who’ve completed the library’s Summer Reading Program get free admission to the zoo. Details on the program are at www.tpl. lib.wa.us. The Point Defiance Zoo is located at 5400 N. Pearl St.

BULLETIN BOARD

class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater

TW PICK: DOWNTOWN BLOCK PARTY

SAT., AUG. 17

HILLTOP URBAN GARDEN BARTER FAIR Fair Tradin’ in Tacoma’s Backyard Barter Community. What to bring: The focus is on homemade and homegrown. This can cover many, many different types of items. A partial list would be: eggs, honey, baked goods, handmade soap, edible plants, garden seeds, fruit/vegetables/herbs, kimchi, beer/mead, jams/ jellies, homemade yogurt, homemade laundry soap.... etc. What to ask for in trade: The exchange value of any given item is up to each barter participant. The process is a simple one. You just ask, “Would you like to trade your (ie. jar of blackberry jam) for my (ie. loaf of bread)?” Sometimes people say “no thank you” but often traders can come to an agreement. Free event with donation of one nonperishable food Item per person in your group. All food collected will be donated to food banks. Info: www. facebook.com/FairTradin.

Promote your community event,

independently. Registration is required. Register early, spots fill up quickly! Info: www. playtacoma.org/programs. GARFIELD STREET FAIR AND CAR SHOW The Parkland Community and Garfield Business Street Association are gearing up for the Annual Garfield Street Fair and Car Show on Aug. 17-18. There will be a whole weekend of activities: 10th Annual Fair and the Grand Opening of the Garfield Street History Museum, with 100 vendors, musical stage, beer garden, margarita garden, and children’s activities. Trinity Lutheran Church is hosting Friday night in the park on the 16th, with a free community meal and free outdoor movie at dusk. Sunday in the park will feature worship services at 10 a.m. and a Parkland Community Picnic Potluck, with live music by the Tin Man, Strangely Alright, The Rusty Cleavers, Mt. Highway Bluegrass, SB Slim Olde Time Blues, The Tenants, Four on the Floor and the Frosted Hearts. Info: www.shopgarfieldstreet.com/ Pages/default.aspx. EXPLORE THE SHORE Explore the Shore will provide hands-on learning about sea creatures and train participants how to be citizen scientists. Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium staff will teach children, adults and families more about Puget Sound’s beaches and the creatures that live there. The zoo’s Explore the Shore program is set for Aug. 20 at Owen Beach in Point Defiance Park. All are timed to take best advantage of the low minus tides that reveal many of Puget Sound’s most interesting shoreline creatures. The events and programs are free and open to the public and reservations are not required. Bring sunscreen and wear

shoes and clothing appropriate for walking on rough beach terrain. Zoo naturalists accompany participants on low tide beach walks, where kids and adults will learn to identify tide pool animals and record their presence and location for addition to the scientific Nature Mapping database (www.naturemappingfoundation.org). Participants will learn about the biological diversity of local beaches and better understand how to protect them. Info: www.PDZA.org or call (253) 404-3665. T-TOWN SWING Get your Tacoma swing dance fix every Thursday at Urban Grace Church, located in downtown. Intro to swing dance: 8:30-9 p.m., free with dance admission. Social dancing, 9-11:30 p.m., is $5. The atmosphere is super laidback and fun, and features great guest instructors and DJs playing awesome swing music from the 1930s and 1940s, and it is sure to keep all the dancers hopping all night long. In addition, blues will be played every second and fourth Friday of the month and kizomba every fourth Sunday. BROWNS POINT LIGHTKEEPERS COTTAGE The Browns Point Lightkeepers Cottage, Gardens and Museums are now open every Saturday from 1-4 p.m. through November. Tour the 1903 cottage and view the new exhibit in the basement museum called “Dash Point Since 1906” – a collection of old and new photos and fun artifacts celebrating the Dash Point community. Visit the historical vignettes in the basement including kitchen, sewing room and old-fashioned school. Also on the grounds is the Boathouse museum that houses a replica Coast Guard surfboat, information on its

construction and a collection of antique tools. View the original lighthouse bell, and visit the recently restored Jerry Meeker Real Estate office on the grounds. This is the original 1906 office from which Meeker sold Hyada Park building lots. The park is a great place to picnic, fly a kite, beachcomb and more. Admission is free. Great for all ages. Limited entrance to people with disabilities (stairs). Group or school tours may be arranged by calling the message phone (253) 927-2536. Location is in the Browns Point Lighthouse Park at 201 Tulalip St. N.E. Limited parking or access the park through the adjacent Browns Point Improvement Club parking lot. Info: www.pointsnortheast.org or (253) 927-2536. BALLROOM DANCING The STAR Center hosts ballroom dancing on the first Sunday of every month and every Monday afternoon from 1-3 p.m. There is live music. Admission is $5. It is a good idea to come with a dance partner. This dance was formerly held at South Park Community Center. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org/ star or (253) 404-3939. ZIP LINE NOW OPEN Two courses at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium test physical agility and mental toughness – and anyone can conquer them. Zoom is more than a zip line; it is an aerial activity course that includes a number of challenges such as a swinging log bridge strung between trees, a high wire to walk and a fishermen’s net strung between trees to climb through. And, yes, there are sections of zip line to put some zing into the adventure experience. There are two distinct circuits to Zoom, one for kids as young as 5, sized just right for smaller children, and

HOT HULA FITNESS Every Monday through Wednesday, Asia Pacific Cultural Center hosts hot hula fitness classes from 7-8 p.m. Inspired by the dances of the Pacific islands, hot hula fitness incorporates easy to perform dance moves set to the sounds of traditional Polynesian drum beats fused with funky reggae music, resulting in a modern, hip fitness workout. Hot hula fitness is a fun, new and exciting dance workout that isolates your larger muscle groups, quads and arms, providing a total body workout in 60 minutes. All ages and fitness levels will enjoy hot hula fitness. Admission: $6 (discount with APCC membership). APCC is located at 4851 South Tacoma Way. DRUM CIRCLE Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages drum circle every Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. You do not need to have a drum to participate. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 2723211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com. CHARITY BOOT CAMP Jeff Jowers, owner and founder of Tacoma’s Ultimate Fitness Boot Camps, is hosting charity fitness boot camps every Saturday morning at 8:15 a.m., benefiting Campfire USA. These drop-in classes are $10 apiece, with all proceeds going to charity. Info: www.tacomabootcamps. com. FREE FIRST WEEKENDS Bank of America bankcard holders and employees receive free admission to the Tacoma Art Museum the first weekend of every month as part of Bank of America’s national Museums on Us program. Info: museums.bankofamerica.com. THE VALLEY CHORALE The Valley Chorale, a soprano-alto-tenor-bass singing group, meets every Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Lutheran Church of Christ the King, located at 1710 E. 85th St. in Tacoma. If you like singing, contact Joy Heidal at (253) 8481134 or Dixie Byrne at (253) 677-5291 for more information and a personal invitation to join the group. UKULELE CIRCLE Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages ukulele circle every Wednesday from 6:30-8 p.m. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com.

Many more calendar listings available at

www.tacomaweekly.com


Friday, August 16, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL

Jean Bonter 253-312-2747 FOR LEASE

Point Defiance CafĂŠ and Casino. Fully operational with unique card room and gambling facility. Only licensed casino between Lakewood and Bremerton. Or as an alternative, this facility could be used as full service restaurant with banquet rooms. Many other possibilities including day care, private pre- school, dance studio, and the list goes on. All handicap accessible.

DEER RIDGE HOME, PUYALLUP

Beautiful home crafted by Steve Jensen and meticulously cared for. All the Jensen signature touches - soaring spaces, coffered ceilings, crown molding, wainscoting, 6â&#x20AC;? base trim, tile, granite, and expansive windows. Sited on an elevated lot that adjoins natural area to the rear. Listen to the birds and your private waterfall from your patio. Wonderful landscaping

GIG HARBOR ž ACRE BUILDING LOT

designed for beauty and easy care. Sensational island kitchen opens to stunning family room. Huge master suite with fireplace. MLS #479207

Beautifully wooded, water and power available. $79,000. Perfect setting for your custom home. Owner/agent

UNIQUE BOUTIQUE BISTRO With Beer and Wine License. $20,000 Full Price.

www.jeanbonter.com

Evergreen Commercial Brokerage MOORAGE

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract

NORTH END GAS STATION/MINI MART High gross sales, excellent profit, positive cash flow, Price is $1,100,000 (Bus. & Prop.), possible terms price

LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? reduced Restaurant/Lounge Huge Price Reduction - For Sale For $510,000 (R.E. $485K) Bus. $25K. Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports bar and grill. RURAL LIVING: ASHFORD, WA- Restr./ Lounge, $125,000 with $50K Down, Real E. Avail: 3.4 Commercial Acres for Future Devel., 3 BR Remodeled Home, laundromat.price

reduced

VERY SUCCESSFUL/PROFITABLE SPORTS BAR Business is For Sale for $320,000 Terms are avail. priceced redu

GREEN PUP SPORTS price BAR & GRILL reduced (famous for its pizza) $189,000, cash. UNDISCLOSED RESTR./LOUNGE/ SPORTS BAR, very high annual food & drink sales, great food. Business is for sale, $125,000 with $75,000 down, motivated seller. price

reduced

HIGH GROSSING, VERY PROFITABLE COFFEE SHOP CAFE FOR SALE price $99,000 High trafic Count location. reduced VINOTIQUE WINE SHOP/BAR/DELI IN LAKEWOOD Business is for sale for price $109,000. Cash/terms.

FOR SALE

COMMERCIAL

Selling Your Commercial Building or Business? Call

MOORAGE

Boat Moorage Available. Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dock Restaurant on D Street across from the Glass Museum. 25 feet to 55 feet, $9.50 per foot per month. FOR RENT

FOR RENT

House for rent in beautiful Proctor area. 2 bedroom 1 bath with partial water view. $1,600.00 monthly. Contact Kim 253-752-7213.

Crescent Park Apartments Lakewood $450 per month, $100 Dep. Quiet area. 1 Bed Apt. Laundry on site. Most units no stairs. Water, sewer, garbage included in rent. Call (253) 228-2173 REALTORS

CALL 253.922.5317

EMPLOYMENT

FURNITURE

FURNITURE

NEW!!! 7 Piece Cherry Bedroom Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, 1 Nightstand, Headboard, Rails. Plus New Mattress Set still in plastic $499 (253) 539-1600

Black Iron Canopy Bed w/Orthopedic Mattress Set. New, Still in %R[ 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH  (253) 539-1600

5 Piece Pub Set Table & 4 Chairs New in Box List $1,000 Sell $350 253-537-3056 3 Piece Living Room Set New in plastic. Lifetime Warranty On Frame. $495 (253) 537-3056 Free Mattress Set with Cherry Wood Sleigh Bed Never Used. In Plastic. $380 (253) 537-3056 All New Pillow Top Mattress Set! Queen Size w/ Warranty, Still in Original Plastic. Can 'HOLYHU 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH $149 (253) 5391600 Full or Twin Mattress Set New Factory Sealed. Delivery Available. $120 Will Take. (253) 539-1600

City of ma o Tac Jobs www.cityoftacoma.org/jobs Hostess Wanted. Part-time, weekends. Also need part-time waitress. Come in and fill out application. Tower Lanes, 6323 6th Ave.

All New King Pillow Top Mattress Box Set 3 Pieces. New & Factory Sealed w/Warranty.. $249. Can Deliver (253) 537 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3056 New Adjustable Bed With Memory Foam Mattress. Wall Hugger with Warranty. $2,800 :LOO6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FHIRU 253.539.1600 New Platform Bdrm Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, Nightstand, H e a d b o a r d , Footboard, Rails. Still Boxed. Retails at $2,600. Will Take $850. 253.539.1600 New Overstuffed 0LFURĂ&#x20AC;EHU 6RID Loveseat. Still in plastic Can have for $750 (253) 539-1600 Absolutely New! Memory Foam Mattress Set! Can Deliver. Worth $2,000 Asking $450 (253) 537-3056

ANTIQUES WANTED

REALTORS

Hair Station for Rent. Davinci Salon and Spa, Lakewood. (253) 588-1719

Pierce County Community Newspaper Group is seeking an

Experienced

ADVERTISING SALES Representative

The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated selfstarter with a proven record of achieving sales goals. They will demonstrate the ability to develop new business and possess excellent time management skills. Additionally, they should be able to manage all aspects of the sales cycle: prospecting, cold calling, setting appointments, performing needs analysis, presentation, negotiation, and closing, all while maintaining a high level of customer service to existing customers.

,I\RXWKLQN\RXZRXOGEHDJRRGĂ&#x20AC;WIRURXUFRPSDQ\ ZHZRXOGOLNHWRKHDUIURP\RX3OHDVHVXEPLW\RXU UHVXPHWRHPSOR\PHQW#WDFRPDZHHNO\FRP

If I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell it to you and if I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live in it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t list it.

reduced

LAUNDROMAT W/ DROP SHOP. price reduced Same location 15 years in Lakewood. Excellent lease with contract terms. $36,000

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

PORT OF TACOMA DINER Breakfast & Lunch, M-F, Price $70,000. Long-time established & great location. â&#x20AC;&#x153;UNDISCLOSEDâ&#x20AC;? BEAUTY SALON In Puyallup, Great Location, $20,000 Cash. price reduced

CALL RICHARD PICTON or ED PUNCHAK 253-581-6463 253-224-7109

Shannon

Agent Extraordinaire

7OVUL!  -H_! ,THPS!ZOHUUVUZLSSZ'OV[THPSJVT

(253) 752-8105

SERVICE DIRECTORY Find the right business for your home, garden, pet, personal service needs and more right here! PAINTING

PAINTING

LAWN CARE

LAWN CARE

CASH FOR CARS

ELECTRICAL

The Happy Hooker

Allied Electric Service

Big Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawn Care Âş Handyman Âş Clean-up

FREE Hauling for Metal (253) 397-7013 LANDSCAPING

LANDSCAPING

ALEXâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Landscaping Fall Clean-up, Gutter Cleaning, Weeding, Pruning, Trees. Contact Alex 253-564-5743 Free Estimates

ROOFING Your Local Roof Experts â&#x20AC;&#x153;Repairs or Replacementâ&#x20AC;?

TriState Roofing, Inc. TRISTI*931QH

ROOFING

PAYS YOU! FOR YOUR Junk Cars

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

253-606-1647

www.alliedmarinecorp.com

Toll Free 1-877-272-6092 ALLIEE1963CQ

HAULING

CLEANING

Life is too short to spend it cleaning... So let us do it for you. Squeaky Clean 253.473.7621 Licensed & Insured

HAULING

HAULING

HAULING

Father AND Son Hauling Serving all your hauling needs. We will haul anything at any time. NOW Free Junk Car Removal!

1901 Center St. Tacoma, WA 98409 253-363-8280 www.tristate.pro

CONTACT US

CLASSIFIED DEADLINES

Phone: Mail:

Classified Display - Mondays @ 12 noon Classified Line Ads - Tuesdays @ 12 noon

253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma WA, 98417

CLEANING

CELL

OFFICE

253-222-9181

253-671-9951

fatherandsonhauling@hotmail.com

VISIT OUR WEBSITE www.tacomaweekly.com

Advertising Representatives: â&#x20AC;˘ Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com


Section B • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 16, 2013

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PETS

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Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org


Friday, August 16, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV Stephanie Lynch

Doug Arbogast (253) 307-4055 Over 20 Years Real Estate Experience

253.203.8985

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Loan products subject to credit approval

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WATERFRONT 1RUWK6DOPRQ%HDFK&RPPXQLW\ on Tacoma Narrows, 35-feet RYHUZDWHUIURQWDJHOHDVHKROG SURSHUW\'HFNZ SDUNLQJORW rights. $25,000 &RQWDFW6DOPRQ%HDFK1RUWK 5RJHU(GZDUGV

3 bed 1.75 bath 2,340 sf. Majestic views. Move in ready mid-century modern. Near Proctor District & Ruston Way waterfront. Minutes from I-5 for easy commuting. 6WXQQLQJ Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFH JOHDPLQJ KDUGZRRGV ORYHO\  HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW NLWFKHQ D VHFOXGHG  EDFN\DUGGHFNZYLHZ0/6

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5007 S Alaska St Cozy, warm & inviting are usually words one uses to describe a small cottage- not todaythis house has room for everyone. W/ 4 bedrooms, EDWKVRIĂ&#x20AC;FH MLS#518929 workshop, enclosed $174,950 covered patio, a media/den area, greatroom/kitchen, plus formal livingroom & diningroom- this house OLYHVHDVLO\ HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWO\$ODUJHIHQFHG\DUG tons of offstreet parking & an inviting master VXLWHDUHDZRZQĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHPDNHWKLVKRPH even more welcoming; add proximity to HYHU\WKLQJ DJUHDWĂ RRUSODQDKKK+RPH

Better Properties Shannon 253.691.1800

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$375,000

Sound Views! )DEXORXVORFDWLRQFORVHWR3URFWRU836WKH waterfront and freeways. EHGVEDWKVKDUGZRRGĂ RRUVDQGFRYHG FHLOLQJV2QHFDUJDUDJHRYHUVL]HGWZRFDU JDUDJHZLWKKHDWHGVKRS DPHFKDQLFZRRG ZRUNHURUDUWLVWVGUHDP ([FHSWLRQDO VTIWORWSRVVLEOHVXEGLYLGH EX\HUWRYHULI\  1HZHUURRIZLQGRZVDQGIXUQDFH7HUULĂ&#x20AC;F KRPH7HUULĂ&#x20AC;FORFDWLRQIDEXORXVRSSRUWXQLW\ &DOO3DP   IRUPRUHGHWDLOVRUDSULYDWHVKRZLQJ 0/6 %HWWHU3URSHUWLHV1RUWK3URFWRU

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REAL ESTATE I N V E S T M E N T

SERVICES REIS

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www.REISinvest.com www.REIS4rentbyowner.com Property Management Receiverships Condo/Home Owners Association Management Bank REO Acquisitions Commercial Sales/Leasing

For Rent

For Lease

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MLS # 493836 2 Condos $295,000 6319 19th, #s 9 & 11 1921 sq ft In UP across from TCC 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Waterview Crossing $13,900,000 1600 Unit Dev.Des Moines. Currently 3 Mobil Parks. GI $563,168 253-752-9742

Tacoma (253) 752-9742

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University Place 4 Plex $850 1100 sqft 3731 S. Orchard St #4 2br 1 3/4 bath 253-752-9742

Professional Office 4412 6th Ave Tacoma For Sale or Lease 253-752-9742

Center St Apt $450-$475 3872 Center St Studio & 1br 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Gig Harbor (253) 514-6539

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Downtown Office Condos 705 S 9th. Tacoma for Sale & Lease 253-752-9742

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Dave Peterson Better Properties (253) 222-8480


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 16, 2013

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