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FREE s Friday, August 2, 2013

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TENNIS

Bookstore Report

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Music and Art in Wright Park B1

Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

WHAT’S RIGHT WITH TACOMA

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ų SPARK GRANTS IGNITE COMMUNITY INITIATIVES

WHAT’S RIGHT WITH TACOMA

By Kathleen Merryman

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PHOTO COURTESY OF JESSE MICHENER

READY TO ROCK OUR WORLD. Recipients of Greater Tacoma Community

Foundation’s first Spark Grants are, from left to right, Michael Chansavang, Petra Perkins, Joshua Jorgensen, Jesse Michener, Patty Villa and Hal Meng.

xpect more healthy food, deeper conversations and bigger tables. Greater Tacoma Community Foundation has announced its first crop of Spark Grant winners, six true-blue activists who now have $1,500 each to turn their innovative ideas into commu-

nity assets. “We wanted projects that inspire action and bring diverse people together, led by trusted organizers,” Sherrana Kildun told the recipients at their first meeting. Kildun, GTCF’s director of community programs, said that, to the delight of the staff and evaluators, 47 people had applied. X See GRANTS / page A10

UWT SET TO ADD ‘Y’ TO ITS CAMPUS

FLYING BOOTS CLOSED Patrons steal mementos, memories on closing night

PHOTOS BY KATE BURROWS

STICKY FINGERS. After

75 years in business, Flying Boots Café closed its doors July 27, but not before thieves helped themselves to paintings on the wall, glasses and other items owner Peggy Warren collected throughout the years. By Kate Burrows kburrows@tacomaweekly.com

RENDERINGS COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON-TACOMA

FITNESS. University of Washington Tacoma and YMCA of Pierce and Kitsap Counties are moving forward with design and construction of a University Y Student Center. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

U

nder an agreement between the university and YMCA of Pierce and Kitsap Counties, future University of Washington-Tacoma students will soon have a University Y Student Center that will be part fitness center, part lounge and part student activity offices. The agreement reached a milestone late last month when the contract to design and construct the building was announced. Mortenson Construction of Kirkland and Tacoma-based McGranahan Architects won the initial nod. Negotiations now begin on

PCMARVETS A2

SAFETY FIRST: Tacoma City Council proposes school zone changes. PAGE A4

“We can’t wait to build this new community hub to serve UW Tacoma students and our community.” – Bob Ecklund, Y’s President and CEO a contract to deliver the building as early as late 2014. “The Mortenson-McGranahan team offered a vision for how this student center and recreation facility will add to the architectural and cultural fabric of the campus and the

Tacoma Aroma A7

City News.................A2 Pothole Pig ...............A3

broader community. Working together, the Y and UW Tacoma will provide so much more than either institution could offer on its own,” said UW Tacoma Chancellor Debra Friedman, who had experienced a similar X See YMCA / page A10

Rat Rod Car Show B4

Liz Hanson remembers hitting Flying Boots Café after long nights working the graveyard shift about 30 years ago. She’d get off work at about 6 a.m., and meet up with her longshoremen friends for drinks and a few laughs. And when she heard Flying Boots Café was preparing to close its doors on July 27, the McKenna, Wash., resident knew she had to make a special trip to Tacoma to visit one last time. But it was not easy. Others had an even harder time saying goodbye when, at closing time, a handful of people began stealing mementos that have been collected throughout the bar’s 75-year history. “The monetary value of what was stolen doesn’t mean much to me,” said owner Peggy Warren. “It’s the fact that these X See CAFE / page A10

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Sports ......................A6 Make A Scene ........ B5 A&E ....................... ..B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Two Sections | 20 Pages


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City News NOMINATIONS SOUGHT FOR AMOCAT AWARDS

The Tacoma Arts Commission is currently accepting nominations for the 2013 AMOCAT Arts Awards. Nominations should be made using the nomination form at www.surveymonkey.com/s/AMOCAT13 through Aug. 30. “The AMOCAT Arts Awards help spotlight the people and organizations who are investing their time, money and passion into improving our community through the arts,â€? said Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland. “These people have helped make the arts an essential part of Tacoma’s identity and we want to recognize them for their service.â€? The three award categories are: ¡ Community Outreach by an Individual – Community outreach, engagement and involvement in the arts in Tacoma by an individual ¡ Community Outreach by an Organization – Community outreach, engagement and involvement in the arts in Tacoma by an organization ¡ Arts Patron – A community partner who significantly supports or contributes to the arts in Tacoma The Tacoma Arts Commission will review all nominations and select one finalist in each award category based on the breadth and depth of the nominee’s community impact, as well as the quality of the work being done by the nominee, not by the number of times the nominee has been nominated. Strickland will present the 2013 AMOCAT Arts Awards at the Art at Work Month Opening Party on Oct. 28. In the category of Community Outreach by an Individual, past winners include: Lynn Di Nino, Jared Pappas-Kelley & Michael S. Lent, Laura and Matt Eklund, Lance Kagey & Tom Llewellyn, Linda Danforth, William Kupinse, Oliver Doriss, Stella Haioulani, and Katy Evans. In the category of Community Outreach by an Organization, past winners include: Tacoma Art Museum & Museum of Glass Education Programs, Arts Impact, Tacoma School of the Arts, Barefoot Studios, Victory Music, King’s Books, Hilltop Artists, Fab-5, D.A.S.H. Center for the Arts, and The Grand Cinema. In the category of Arts Patron,

past winners include: Sound Transit Art Program, Pierce Transit, 6th Avenue Business District, The Weekly Volcano, Hotel Murano, City Arts, Urban Grace Church, The Greater Tacoma Community Foundation, and Key Bank. Additional information about the AMOCAT Arts Awards can be found at www.cityoftacoma. org (type AMOCAT in the search field).

WALK TACOMA HOLDS SCAVENGER HUNT

Come explore downtown Tacoma and join Downtown On the Go for a walking scavenger hunt Wednesday, Aug. 7, from 4:30-8 p.m. Participants will begin the scavenger hunt at the Social Bar and Grill (1715 Dock St.), the event sponsor, between 4:30 and 5:30 p.m. Participants may complete the hunt as individuals or in teams, and will use public transportation and their feet to take them to destinations scattered across downtown Tacoma before meeting back at the Social Bar and Grill for food, drinks and prizes at 6:45 p.m. Participants will decipher clues that will lead them to specific downtown destinations, many of which have been featured during the 2013 Walk Tacoma series. Participants will be asked to take a photo at many of the locations, so a camera or camera phone is required. The event is free, and there is no need to pre-register for the event. All ages are welcome. Many teams and individuals who complete the hunt will win prizes. The highest scoring individual and team will each win a grand prize and be featured by Downtown On the Go in the Commuter Profiles series (www.downtownonthego.com/work/commuter-profiles). Since this is the final Walk Tacoma walk of 2013, Downtown On the Go will also be rewarding participants who took public transit, walked, or biked to any of the Walk Tacoma events by entering them into a drawing to win one of six baskets, each in the theme of one of the DOTG walking maps. The Scavenger Hunt is part of Downtown On the Go’s 2013 Walk Tacoma series sponsored by Franciscan Health System. It is an eight-event walking series held on the first and third Wednesdays, from April through August. The fun, themed walks, now in their fourth year, encourage downtown employees and residents to exercise and enjoy the outdoors by discov-

ering the different walking routes and parks in downtown Tacoma. The walks are scheduled at the lunch hour and just after work to encourage downtown employees to walk during their workday, whether it is to and from work, at a lunch break, or to a nearby meeting. For an exclusive sneak peak at some of the clues, follow Downtown On the Go on Facebook and Twitter. For more information on the full Walk Tacoma Series, visit www.downtownonthego.org.

ART AT WORK MONTH SEEKS ARTS ACTIVITIES

Will you be hosting an arts event in November? Do you want to contribute to the arts programming offered in Tacoma, build community, and benefit from free publicity? Submit your arts activity for inclusion in the 2013 Art at Work: Tacoma Arts Month online calendar. The Tacoma Arts Commission is seeking submissions of arts activities happening during its 12th annual Art at Work: Tacoma Arts Month this November. Organizers are looking for a variety of activities spanning all categories of art and culture including, but not limited to, music, visual art, literary art, dance, theater and film. If you will be hosting an exhibition, performance, class, workshop, reception, lecture, tour, artists’ market, celebration, meeting, presentation, or any other programming, let Art at Work know and they will list your arts event in an interactive and searchable online calendar of events on www. ArtAtWorkTacoma.com. There is no cost to you. The many events going on throughout the month will be promoted through newspaper and magazine advertisements and articles, email newsletters, television ads, radio ads, and through a variety of social media outlets. This month would not be possible without the participation of local businesses, organizations and community members, so all those interested are encouraged to participate by hosting your own arts activity or event. Deadline for submissions is Sept. 15, 2013. To qualify, your arts activity must be located within the City of Tacoma limits and occur during the month of November. To participate, submit the following two items: 1. Go to www.surveymonkey. com/s/artactivities2013 and fill out the online Art at Work Activity Submission form. If you are sub-

mitting multiple events, please fill out a form for each event. 2. A digital photograph (optional) to be used for promoting this event. Image must be at least 150 ppi. Email digital images to tacoma.submissions@cityoftacoma. org. Please put “Activities – Your Event Name� in the subject line. Questions? Contact Naomi at nstrom-avila@cityoftacoma.org or by calling (253) 591-5191. Based on overwhelmingly supportive feedback received from the community, Art at Work Month will be moving to October in 2014. Not this year. Next year. More information will be available when the date gets closer.

TACOMA SCHOOLS HIRING SUBSTITUTE NUTRITION :,9=0*,/,37,9:

Tacoma Public Schools has immediate openings for substitute Nutrition Service helpers. These Nutrition Service helpers will earn $9.19 per hour; the hourly rate is subject to change. You must be able to obtain a current food handler’s permit to be hired for this position. You will: ¡ Earn extra income ¡ Work in your own community ¡ Have holidays and weekends off ¡ Enjoy flexible part-time work ¡ Assist in providing nutritious meals to Tacoma students Apply for these jobs at tacomaschools.org. For more information, contact Human Resources at 253-571-1250.

Police Blotter DEA RAIDS MARIJUANA +0:7,5:(9@

Federal law enforcement agents served search warrants at the Tacoma Cross marijuana dispensary last Wednesday as they also raided a handful of other dispensaries in Seattle, Olympia and Lacey. While Washington voters approved recreational use of marijuana, its use remains illegal under federal law, a fact that puts our state’s marijuana-related operations in a gray legal area. The cultivation and sale of marijuana for medical reasons requires medical screenings and has caps on the amount of marijuana a patient can have at one time. No one was arrested in the raids, however, many employees from the marijuana dispensaries and collective grow operations apparently were ordered to appear in federal court this fall. The dispensaries were also among the dozens of marijuana businesses targeted with similar raids two years ago.

CORRECTION

The website address for Grit City Comedy Club listed at the end of last week’s article “New kids on the block: 502 Martini Bar & Lounge and Grit City Comedy Club� was incorrect. It should have been www.gritcitycomedy.com. Tacoma Weekly apologizes for the error.

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The 10th annual Ride Around Puget Sound (RAPSody) bicycle event Aug. 24-25 offers homemade cookies and hot calzones, scenic views and great support for bicyclists seeking a challenge. The 170-mile ride starts and ends in Tacoma, with luggage transport to motels or free overnight camping at the half-way mark in Shelton. Enjoy rootbeer floats, a BBQ and bike movies at the overnight, then ride on through Olympia and peaceful miles along the paved Chehalis-Western Trail. The finish line features ice cream and live music. RAPSody is hosted by five local bike clubs and all proceeds support the Bicycle Alliance of Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s statewide advocacy and education. Registration closes Aug. 16. Learn more at www.rapsodybikeride.com.

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ROBBERY Tacoma Police detectives need your help to locate bank robbery suspect Ronald Perozzo. A felony warrant has been issued for Perozzoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arrest for Robbery in the 1st degree. At 3:50 p.m. on Monday May 6th, 2013, suspect Ronald Perozzo robbed a Key Bank located in the 8400 block of Pacific Ave. in the City of Tacoma. Perozzo entered the bank and handed the teller a robbery note written on a piece of cardboard. The note demanded cash. The suspect took the money and walked out of the bank. Ronald Kevin Perozzo is a white male, 50 years old, 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; tall and 190 lbs., with graying dark brown hair and brown eyes. Perozzoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hair and/or mustache may be dyed black or shaved off in an attempt to conceal his identity. Fridays at 10:30pm on

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 â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;Š 314 By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The 1926 model of the Cadillac Series 314 was narrower and taller than previous models and offered a more durable nickel-plated radiator with vertical, thermostatically controlled shutters. It also offered tilting headlights and a V-8 engine that offered 80 horsepower through a three-speed manual transmission. It was apparently also difficult to maintain, namely its 65 lubrication points. The 1926 Cadillac was marketed as â&#x20AC;&#x153;The New Cadillacâ&#x20AC;? because its introduction of body design and amenities. This was a significant vehicle for Cadillac because that was the year the company shifted from Henry Leland engineering to Earnest Seaholm and Harley Earle. The Series 314 designation was used chiefly by the sales and mechanical departments. No, it does not refer to geometry, as in pi. It simply referred to the

all four wheels provided the stopping power. A total of 27,771 Cadillacs were produced in 1926 at a price tag of between $3,000 and $5,000. The remaining cars sought by collectors often run upwards of $100,000 when they come to auction.

Bank On It: PCMARVETS makes ethical, economic sense By Kathleen Merryman

I

f you served with Diane Malone in the Army or the Reserves, if you live in her neighborhood, be warned: Next time Malone sees you, she will ask you to help keep the PCMARVETSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mobile field office on the road. Founded last year with a $125,000 grant from the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, the non-profit veteranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outreach purchased a 1997 Ford Fleetwood motor home, computer equipment and hired Erica Westling as veteran case manager. They take the office to parts of Pierce County that do not have easy access to Veterans Affairs resources. From senior centers and food banks to nursing homes, gun shows and homeless encampments, they offer veterans the expertise and materials to file claims for benefits they may have earned. It is noble work, Malone said. It is necessary work. And now, after a year of traversing the county at $100 per tank of gas, PCMARVETS is facing the end of its funds. If it cannot raise enough to keep it on the road, the non-profit will have to park the mobile field office. Malone was the first to step up. She brought a check for $100, plus a case of water and rolls of paper towels, to the Tacoma Weekly offices. She had hoped she was just one in a stream of donors. After 22 years, she knows what it means to be part of the military family. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was a Reservist for 13 years at McChord with an air medical squadron, and nine at Camp Murray with an 85-bed MASH hospital,â&#x20AC;? she said. She found a meaningful, challenging, rewarding life as part of what she considers her military family. Some veterans never experienced that sense of support, and she wants to do what she can to help PCMARVETS connect them to their benefits. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re out there hiding,â&#x20AC;? Malone said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I go hiking by Wilkeson, I see these homes, very modest, almost camps with the American flag and the POW flag, and I think that a lot of them are veterans.â&#x20AC;?

An acquaintance told her, â&#x20AC;&#x153;My mom and dad would be doing fine without having to pay $1,500 for their meds each month.â&#x20AC;? The father, she learned, was a veteran who, as he said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;only did one hitchâ&#x20AC;? and did not think he had veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; benefits. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I took him to the VA, and now the meds are down to $300 a month,â&#x20AC;? Malone said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I met a vet who was panhandling,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He told me â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go to the VA. They told me I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t use it because of my alcoholism.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I told him I would drive him there myself.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how she is. She doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t advise people to contact Veterans Affairs. She takes them to the office to fill out the claim. She knows they have been given buckets full of misinformation over the years. Many have told PCMARVETS Board Vice Chairman George Hight that when they left the service after fighting in Vietnam, their sergeants told them they were not eligible for benefits because they were drafted, only did one tour, were not technically veterans, and so on. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The misunderstanding just goes on and on,â&#x20AC;? Hight said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know those veterans are out there, in nursing homes, unable to travel, far out in the woods. We find them and go to them. More than 300,000 were wounded. How many more were unidentified as wounded? Twenty years ago, they were told Agent Orange didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hurt anybody. They were treated terribly. They didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to go back. Those are the ones we are pulling back into the fold now. Often compensation will make the difference between homelessness and a respectable lifestyle.â&#x20AC;? The veterans are not the only ones who have benefited. In the year Westling has been work-

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KIDS FLY FREE! Ages 4-10 with full fare adult

Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;pothole initiative.â&#x20AC;? And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or return â&#x20AC;&#x201C; each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

DELIVERY. Diane Malone deliv-

ered water, paper towels and $100 to PCMARVETSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; George Hight.

ing out of the field office, she has met with 500 veterans and brought them more than $4 million in benefits they earned. Think of that as a local stimulus package paid for with service to America. These veterans are putting that $4 million straight back into Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy. They have paid off debts, bought groceries, clothing and reliable vehicles. Some have been able to purchase modest homes, and some have steady rent money. Malone is happy to have helped support the effort. But she had a criticism. The Tacoma Weekly, at 2588 Pacific Highway, is the main donation center, but if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the Waltâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Muffler parking lot just down Pacific Highway from the Harley dealership, we can be hard to find. And some people are wary of making financial transactions on-line, even at the non-profitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.pcmarvets. com. Malone suggested a direct donation account at a popular bank. Hight and Westling agreed. They have set up a PCMARVETS account at Columbia Bank. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make Diane Malone have to drive you there.

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Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how you can give: Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â? Bring to Tacoma Weekly at 2588 Pacific Highway, Fife: t ,FVSJHDPGGFFQPET t 5FB)PUDIPDPMBUF t 1BQFSUPXFMT t #PUUMFEXBUFS t 1BQFSDPGGFFDVQT t 1SJOUFSQBQFS Visit www.pcmarvets.com and click on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;donateâ&#x20AC;? button.

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POTHOLE OF THE WEEK

PHOTO COURTESY OF LEMAY COLLECTION

displacement of the carâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s motor. The Series 314 came in standard and coach models as well as a host of amenities that ranged from interior hardwood paneling, detachable vanity and smoker cases, silk cord handles and electric gasoline gauge. Bumpers cost $24 extra. Mechanical brakes on

CONNECTING VETS TO BENEFITS Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?

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RENDERING COURTESY CITY OF TACOMA

:(-,;@-09:; Tacoma City Council is pondering a change that would expand school zones. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma City Councilmember Robert Thoms has presented a plan to the council that would widen the speed-reduction areas around school zones. The proposed changes city staffers are now detailing could basically double the 20-mile-per-hour speed zone around schools. Current zones are determined by measuring the 300-foot speed reduction zone starting at the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main crosswalk and moving outward 300 feet in both directions. This method means that the school zone often begins in the middle of a block or midway along a schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ball field or parking lot. The proposal would change that measurement to up to 300 feet from the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;active useâ&#x20AC;? area, namely ball fields, parking lots and playgrounds. The change would mean schools would have reduced speed zones about two city blocks around them. The idea had been under discussion and endorsed by the School Safety Task Force, a joint committee that includes city and school officials.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;With the upgrades of schools across the Tacoma Public Schools District, this effort is actually a great time to drive toward greater collaboration and partnership where we have similar concerns,â&#x20AC;? Thoms said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We obviously control the streets and infrastructure, and they know the schools that have the most acute growth and challenges.â&#x20AC;? City staff is working out the details, but the initial proposal is to do the work in phases, starting with elementary schools that would only require moving the current signs farther down the streets to fit the new school zone policy. That would cost $13,000 and change school crossings at four locations. The effort would then target the three schools that would only require minor changes and a few new signs. Cost is estimated to be $900. The third phase is expected to cost $50,000 to change zones at nine schools because the work could include street upgrades. The first two phases can simply be absorbed into the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current street budget and be finished by the time school starts in September. The final phase, however, would likely require some cost sharing. Street

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changes around schools are often funded by a three-way split among the City of Tacoma, Tacoma Public Schools and state grants. One concern about the changes involves a matter of driver behavior. If a school zone is too long, drivers might slow down at the first sign only to speed up again by the time the school passes outside their windows 600 feet later. A test at Lowell Elementary School, for example, had mixed results. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That is the great debate,â&#x20AC;? said Safety and Environment Manager for Tacoma Schools Ken Wilson. The district doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have statistics on student-related car accidents around schools, but many of the schools are located on either main arterials or roads that have seen increased traffic volumes during the years since they were built, Wilson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a lot of hard data, but we get periodic reports of kids being bumped and that kind of thing,â&#x20AC;? he said, noting that such non-injury incidents often donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t generate a formal report. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You get the impression that traffic isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t calming down

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around schools.â&#x20AC;? While some drivers might first slow down only to speed up while still in a school zone, it would just take one driver to honor the speed limit to slow the rest of traffic since most schools border two-lane roads that wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t easily allow a speeding car to pass, he said. The Tacoma Police Department doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t aggregate accident data in school zones either. Police reports use cross streets to denote crash sites, not location names like schools. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a whole lot of them,â&#x20AC;? Tacoma Police spokeswoman Loretta Cool said of pedestrian-versus-car accidents in school zones. She recalled two. One was last year, when a student on a bike apparently was clipped by a car but was not seriously injured. Another occurred more than a decade ago, when a boy living across the street from Lister Elementary School ran from his house to play with other children who had arrived to school early. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He just opened the door and ran off,â&#x20AC;? she said. A passing SUV hit the boy and dragged him under the car. He died. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was a really bad one.â&#x20AC;?

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

7<7*@*3, Mugsyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the lead dog seat in

William Hansenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sidecar. Leon, on the left, and Crash bring up the rear.

There are few things dogs like more than riding in cars. Riding in motorcycles is one of them. Ever a friend to pups, William Hansen has adapted his sidecar to provide maximum canine delight. He built the front compartment with enough room for a person and a fair-sized dog. Then he added a back section with two wells just the right size for toy breeds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had six cycle dogs,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Three of them have passed away.â&#x20AC;? One was his black Labrador retriever, who is memorialized in a bust on the back.

One of them belonged to a friend, and outlived him. When the dog died, Hansen had its body cremated and buried the ashes next to the old ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grave in the Puyallup Tribal Cemetery. His dog, Mugsy, who he says may be part dingo, goes everywhere with him. The dogs that belong to his daughter, Angie Hansen, love it when he pulls up. He tells them theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going for a ride. They pop into their seats and the 1973 BMW roars off as they seek adventure on Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unending blacktop. Or drive a few blocks to do some banking. We met the dogs while Hansen was doing his banking. (Remember that. It could win you four tickets to a Rainiers game, plus sidewalk chalk and a Frost Park locator map.) They attracted admirers, remaining calm even as they became a photo op. If you look between the stickers on the rear, you will notice one small failure in truth in advertising. Leon the Chihuahua and Crash the terrier are not â&#x20AC;&#x153;PSYCHO DOGS.â&#x20AC;? Neither is Mugsy, who rides shotgun in the passenger compartment. The wind in their ears and the delicious aromas of Tacoma make them too happy for bad behavior. They were waiting, quiet and patient, for Hansen to come out of the Tacoma-grown financial institution. Hansen, too is Tacoma-grown. He was, in fact, born almost across the street from where he banks. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your Quirk Question: In what hospital was William, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wilburâ&#x20AC;? to his pals, Hansen born? Be the first to e-mail the correct answer to kathleen@tacomaweekly, and you will win that fabulous baseball-and-chalk prize package.


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Over the years, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians has transformed itself and its role in the community. The Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s determined protection of its natural resources, its pivotal role in development of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s port area, the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s major donations to other governments and to charitable organizations, the new-concept Tahoma Market gas station and convenience store, and the development and expansion of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Emerald Queen Casinos are examples of the Puyallup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic progress. Through its two Emerald Queen Casino locations, Administration, Health Authority, Housing Authority, economic development corporation, and school, the Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County with a payroll of more than 3,500 people â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 74 percent of whom are non-Native â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and total spending in 2011 of nearly $430 million. This spending supports the community by paying good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and by purchasing goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors and construction companies. Assistance provided to the broader Native American community and the Puyallup Tribal membership also has a far-reaching impact in the community as most of these dollars are in turn spent in the local economy. The Puyallup Tribe is continuously living up to its name, which means, â&#x20AC;&#x153;generous and welcoming behavior to all people.â&#x20AC;? As such, the Tribe is a key sponsor of countless local charities, non-profit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tight economy. Despite economic uncertainties across the country, the South Sound is doing well, and the Puyallup Tribe of Indians plays a key role in keeping that a reality. From funding education, jobs, healthcare, city improvement projects, crime prevention and environmental efforts, the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tradition as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;generous peopleâ&#x20AC;? is as strong today as it ever was. This pamphlet gives several examples of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s participation in the community.

'.&#-'#.,#-/'+*.6),-+1'*%$5!'#*!4+-+/#!/()+* Puyallup Tribe operates two of the five hatcheries on the Puyallup River, playing a vital role in salmon restoration and commercial fishing alongside non-tribal facilities. With the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s acquisition of an innovative fish screw system, the fisheries operations expect to become more efficient and effective in 2013 than ever before. The system moves fish through peak returns without relying on their natural migration habits, according to Russ Ladley, resource protection manager for the Tribe. The system reduces the time and resources required to move fish during peak times, and moves them more efficiently improving hatchery production. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This has greatly lessened man hours needed for fish spawning,â&#x20AC;? Ladley said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have had trouble loading fish during peak returns when they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to move through the fish ladder, but the fish screw would make it not optional to keep moving.â&#x20AC;? The application of this system is

growing in the Pacific Northwest, but the Puyallup Tribe is staying ahead of the curve by working closely with fabricators to improve the design and maximize the success of the system. The Puyallup Tribe is leading the way through its hard work, resources, and innovation to improve the system with the hopes it can be utilized by Tribal and non-Tribal fish hatcheries to improve hatchery operations and fish production. In addition to the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s innovative hatchery operations, a $250,000 2012 project to build an acclimation pond on private land in Clearwater to provide for spring Chinook runs is now complete, and should see its first fish next spring. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This project fills a production hole weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had since the road washed away in 2009,â&#x20AC;? Ladley said. The Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hatchery is key in providing spring Chinook runs for Tribal and non-Tribal fisherman on the Puyallup River.

/'1# )#-'!*.43#.  '(('+*'* Indian people pay taxes. They pay most of the same taxes non-Indians pay, and in some cases additional Tribal taxes as well. Indians have a few tax exemptions, just as non-Indians do. The Puyallup Tribe and its members are dramatic examples of these realities. Indian tribes collect taxes that are then sent to the appropriate taxing bodies. The Tribe withholds federal income tax from its employees (who include Puyallup Tribal members, other Indians, and nonIndians), and from the per capita payments it makes to its members. As federal law provides, the Tribe sends that money to the I.R.S., a total of over $42 million in FY 2012. As an employer, the Tribe pays its share of payroll taxes and withholds payroll taxes from its employees, which is then sent to the Social Security Administration and other government agencies. Those taxes added up to over $16 million in FY 2012. Under the terms of agreements with the State of Washington and local governments, the Tribe collects and pays tax funds to those governments, including about $10 million to the State of Washington, and $300 thousand to the City of Fife. Unlike all other governments, non-trust land owned by the Puyallup Tribal government is often subject to state and local property taxes. In 2012, the Puyallup Tribe paid nearly $1 million dollars in property taxes to state and local governments. The total amount in taxes collected, withheld, or paid to the various governments by the Tribe in FY 2012 was over $70 million.

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Sports

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s new sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 6

POYTHRESS LIFTS RAINIERS WITH TWO HOMERS Walker struggles in fifth Triple-A start

LOCAL STANDOUT MATZENAUER NETS THIRD PNW TITLE Second seed Peralta upsets Abid for men’s title

S

econd seeds Suzanne Matzenauer and Julio Peralta each pulled off upsets to emerge victorious in the women’s and men’s singles tournaments at the 122nd Annual Pacific Northwest Open Tennis Championships at the Tacoma Lawn and Tennis Club on July 23-28. “The weather, the fans and, of course, the play on both sides of the draw were fantastic,” said tournament co-director Mike Politeo. “It just keeps getting better every year.” While the men’s side of the draw saw its share of great play all tournament long, the storylines to watch were on the women’s side. Both top seed Gail Brodsky and Matzenauer – the hometown favorite and Bellarmine Prep grad – had their sights set on being the first player since Teresa Dobson in 1993 to become a three-time winner. Brodsky, the back-to-back defending champion, needed only three games against an injured Kady Pooler to get through to the finals. But Matzenauer was tested in the semifinals by 16-year-old defending runner-up Dasha Ivanova, who gave her everything she could handle with her quick feet and precision ground strokes. But in the end, Matzenauer pulled out a 6-1, 2-6, 6-4 victory to earn the right to face Brodsky. “Ivanova is really tough, she really extended me all day,” said Matzenauer. On the men’s side, top-seeded Mohamed Abid cruised through to the finals with a 6-3, 6-2 win over third-seeded Malcolm Harrison after losing the first two games of the first set, and Peralta defeated unseeded Campbell Johnson 6-1, 7-5 to set up Sunday’s final. But Peralta jumped out early and never looked back in the anticlimactic championship match, winning 6-1, 6-3 and winning seven consecutive games at one point. “I played very patiently and stuck to my game plan and beat a real good player in the process,” said Peralta, who originally hails from Chile but will be instructing in California in the near future. The stage was set for Brodsky or Matzenauer to achieve tournament history and equal Teresa Dobson’s feat in the early 90’s. Matzenauer took a 6-4 win in the first set, which featured four service breaks. Tied 1-1 in the second set, Matzenauer won three consecutive games, finally establishing a good serve and volley game to defeat Brodsky 6-4, 6-3. “I’d like to thank my coach Gill Rigell, who has had a big influence on my game,” said Matzenauer, who also won the title in 2005 and 2010. “I started to play a lot better in the second set. To beat the two-time defending champ is something special.” Matzenauer later teamed up with Pooler to take the women’s doubles title, defeating Megan Carter and Meghan Cassens 6-4, 6-2. She added the trifecta when she teamed with Luke Shields for an 8-4 win over Brian Battistone and Carter X See PNW / page A8

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

CHAMPIONS. (Top) Bellarmine Prep grad Suzanne Matzenauer readies for a backhand return in the finals, where she added her third title at the PNW. (Bottom) Tournament newcomer Julio Peralta smashes a serve during his win over Mohamed Abid in the men’s final.

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

BIG GAME. (Top) Donning a rave green

Sounders-style Rainiers jersey, First baseman Rich Poythress connects with a pitch early in the game against Tucson. (Bottom) Starter Taijuan Walker delivers in the first inning against the Padres. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

Among the numerous roster moves made by the Tacoma Rainiers this season, Taijuan Walker has certainly created the most buzz with his dominant pitching during his first month in Triple-A. But on a night when the 20-year-old faced his first struggles with the Rainiers, it was lineup regular Rich Poythress who stole the show. Poythress homered twice – including a walk-off solo shot on the first pitch he saw in the bottom of the 10th inning – to give the Rainiers a 6-5 win over the Tucson Padres on July 25 and keep Tacoma in a tight playoff race after recently falling out of first place. “It’s been an interesting year,” said Poythress, in his first season in Triple-A. “I’m learning a lot of things not only about the game but about myself. I’m just working hard, and luckily the last week or so things have worked out… when it works out it’s obviously fantastic.” The Rainiers took a quick 1-0 lead in the first inning when Ty Kelly scored on an infield single by Stefen Romero, and increased the lead to 2-0 on Abraham Almonte’s sacrifice bunt that plated Scott Savastano in the second. Poythress then drilled his first homer in the third – a line drive over the left field wall with Romero in motion on a hit-and-run – to make it 4-0. “Rich Poythress is just killing the ball,” said Rainiers manager John Stearns. “I can’t say enough good things about him.” Walker, meanwhile, retired the first six batters – four by strikeout – before allowing a solo homer to former Rainier Mike Wilson leading off the top of the third. Walker then began to struggle in the fourth, when the Padres sent nine batters to the plate and scored four runs. Gregorio Petit started the damage with a single past a diving Savastano to plate Daniel Robertson. Chris Robinson later added a tworun single, and Jesus Merchan gave Tucson a 5-4 lead with a single up the middle to score Wilson. “He struggled a little bit,” Stearns said of Walker, who allowed five runs on six hits in five innings, with three walks and eight strikeouts. “He’s 20 years old. He’s going to need those struggles at this level. But he’s going to work through those and come out better on the other side.” The Rainiers’ offense couldn’t answer until the bottom of the eighth, when Poythress walked with two outs and later scored on an opposite-field bloop single by catcher Jason Jaramillo to make it 5-5. That score stood until the 10th, when Poythress hammered a firstpitch fastball from Brad Brach over the left field fence to end it. “I’ve had a lot of at-bats against Brach in the Cal League, in Spring Training in Arizona, fall stuff, everything,” Poythress said. “He’s actually a pretty good friend of mine. I figured he’d challenge me.” Poythress finished 3-for-4 with two homers, a double, three runs scored and three RBIs. As of July 30, the Rainiers remained one game behind Salt Lake in the standings with a 60-50 record.


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NOMADS TAKE THIRD AT THE TACOMA AROMA Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and high school rugby tourneys converge

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

ON THE RUN. (Left) The Nomadsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Robby Lavatai (right) breaks free for a try as an Eastside defender lunges for a tackle, and Nomads teammate Jamie Douglas

trails behind in support. (Top right) Lincoln High grad Blake Hansen tries to snag a pass as an Eastside defender approaches. (Bottom right) The Tsunamisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Sam Carroll swings a ball out wide in the opening loss to Prairie. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

The premier summer showcase for rugby in Tacoma returned on July 27, as 29 menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and high school teams from around the region converged on Portland Avenue Park for the 36th Annual Tacoma Aroma 7â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tournament. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We try to keep it growing every year,â&#x20AC;? said Ryan McHugh, president of the host Tacoma Rugby Club and coach of the Tacoma Nomads. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the longest running sevens tournament in the Northwest.â&#x20AC;? The Nomads â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tournament â&#x20AC;&#x201C; started off with a solid 29-5 win over Fort Lewis in their opener in pool play. Robby Lavatai got the Nomads on the board, while Nick Lonn and Cameron Archie each scored and Nick Lipoma added two scores. They fol-

lowed that up with an exciting 14-12 win over the Eastside Axemen, as Lavatai used blazing speed to score twice on breakaway runs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just tried to use what they gave me,â&#x20AC;? said Lavatai, who joined the Tacoma Rugby Club two years ago after first taking up the sport 10 years ago. â&#x20AC;&#x153;See a gap and go for it. Put your head down and go for the score.â&#x20AC;? In a tense few minutes late in the first half, the Nomadsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense came up with big stops three times to preserve a tight 7-5 lead at the break, and proving to be the key part of the match. But the Nomads came up against perennial heavyweight Old Puget Sound Beach (OPSB) in the first round of the playoffs, quickly bringing the momentum to an end. Lavatai quickly got the Nomads on the board, breaking down the right side for a long try to make it 5-0. But after that it was all OPSB,

as they broke for several long scores and breezed to the win. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can only play defense for so long, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard work to play defense,â&#x20AC;? McHugh said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just too much firepower. We broke down. We gave it a shot and did the best we could.â&#x20AC;? OPSB would later take the tournament title by topping Oregon Sports Union (ORSU) of Portland. While the Nomads settled for third place in the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bracket, the Tsunamis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the high school team for the Tacoma Rugby Club â&#x20AC;&#x201C; found the road similarly difficult in their tournament. Facing Prairie in their opener, the Tsunamis battled to just a 5-0 deficit at the half, but couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t create much offensive attack as they managed a late score but fell 17-5. They later were eliminated 26-0 by top seed Liberty, the eventual tournament winners.

The Tacoma Sirens started off with a convincing 19-5 win over Chuckanut in the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tournament, but were blanked 24-0 by ORSU in their second pool contest. The Sirens were topped again by ORSU in the finals to settle for second place. With rugby sevens set to make its debut in the 2016 Olympics, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s safe to say that the Tacoma Aroma will be a tournament that continues to grow in the near future. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basically a good environment,â&#x20AC;? Lavatai said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You come up here and play the game hard. Everything is left on the field. You come off and everybody is brothers, basically.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sevens is growing,â&#x20AC;? added McHugh. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a crowd favorite because thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so much action. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to know much about rugby to understand it. (Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) a lot of big hits and good skills.â&#x20AC;?

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WPNW From page A6

for the mixed doubles title. Battistone and Joel Kielbowicz defeated Abid and Oren Motevassel 6-1, 1-6, 6-1 for the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doubles title. By Steve Mullen

;67:,,+:*9<0:,05 8<(9;,9-05(3:

Early in the Pacific Northwest Open, the top few seeds in both the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s singles tournaments proved exactly why they were placed there. After cruising in two sets in his first two matches to advance to the quarterfinals, top seed Mohamed Abid proved to be too much for Boise State sophomore Thomas Tenreiro, who had battled for a three-set victory over Brian Patrick Foley in the round of 16. Abid slowly wore down Tenreiro, eventually claiming a 6-3, 6-3 victory that he finished with an ace. Similarly, second seed Julio Peralta made

short work of eighth seed Emmett Egger, winning 6-0, 6-1 in the quarterfinals by repeatedly showcasing a solid backhand return. The most interesting, and physically draining, match in the quarterfinals was between third seed Malcolm Harrison and fourth seed Joel Kielbowicz. The two â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who have played doubles and trained together for several years â&#x20AC;&#x201C; went back and forth with swings of momentum, as Harrison won the final two games to claim the first set 6-4. Kielbowicz answered right back, claiming four of the final five games in the second set for a 6-3 win. But Harrison shot out to a 3-1 lead in the third set, eventually taking the match with a 6-3 win. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joel is such a tough competitor,â&#x20AC;? Harrison said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always a difficult challenge playing him because he handles pace well and he handles aggressive players really well. I like to be aggressive, so we kind of counterbalance each other out on the court.â&#x20AC;?

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Unseeded Campbell Johnson â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a senior at the University of California â&#x20AC;&#x201C; capped an impressive few days by taking a 6-3, 6-1 win over tournament regular Oren Motevassel in the final menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quarterfinal. The two traded games in the first set, but Johnson turned it on to win the final three games, and took a commanding 4-0 lead in the second set by forcing Motevassel into some errors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the first set was so long and taxing physically,â&#x20AC;? said Johnson, in his first year at the PNW. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The second set I started to get on a roll a little bit in the beginning and just kind of ran with it. We were both pretty tired, it was just whoever could maintain the longest.â&#x20AC;? The womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quarterfinals went completely as expected, as the top four seeds advanced. Top seed Gail Brodsky got an easy pass when Megan Carter had to withdraw before the match, and third seed Dasha Ivanova won the first set 6-2 over fifth seed Denise Dy, who retired with Ivanova leading 1-0 in the second set. Local favorite Suzanne Matzenauer found the road a lot tougher against seventh

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

;67:,,+. Mohamed Abid makes contact with a return during his loss in the finals to Julio Peralta.

seed Maggy Lehmicke, a sophomore at the University of Nebraska. Matzenauer jumped out to a quick 3-0 lead in the first set, looking as if she would cruise to victory. But

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Lehmicke showed resolve in closing to within 4-3 before Matzenauer took the final two games to win the first set. The second set was a back-and-forth affair, with each player taking turns seizing momentum and having moments of struggle. Matzenauer seemed to get an advantage by taking a 2-1 lead, but the two then exchanged sets, with Lehmicke refusing to let down. But Matzenauer finally closed it out with a 7-5 win, rallying for four straight points after being down 40-0 in the final game.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just changed my strategy the last couple games and kind of dictated more to her forehand side,â&#x20AC;? said Matzenauer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was just mentally tough and pulled it out. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to go three sets because sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s young and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probably fitter than me.â&#x20AC;? Fourth seed Kady Pooler displayed a dominant serve and battled through a late injury to earn a 6-2, 6-2 win over Tacoma native and eighth seed Meghan Cassens, a junior at Iowa State, in the other quarterfinal match. By Jeremy Helling

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South Tacoma Business District invests in a workplace garden of hanging baskets By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

+9052<7. Kyle Couture tends to the petunias that have become the hallmark of the South Tacoma Business District.

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Are you and your employer up for the challenge of a workplace garden? If so, we want to hear from you. Tell us the kind of space you have, the work you do, and why you think a garden is a good fit. Let us know how you decided the size and form. Are you going raised bed or in-ground? What is your planting medium? Will you go with food, flowers or a combination? What will you do with the things you grow? What’s your position on garden art? Do you fear gnomes? How about clown gnomes? Over the summer, we will share tips and award prizes. Let us know what you’re growing at work at kathleen@tacomaweekly.com.

The pink wave rolls through the South Tacoma Business District, welcoming to the urban village shoppers, diners and folks who need haircuts. Since 1997, businesses in the walkable center on South Tacoma Way have invested in beauty – and the young people who plant and maintain it. This year, they have spent close to $5,000, about half their annual budget, on 120 hanging baskets of pink wave petunias. The wave petunias work best because they don’t have to be dead-headed said Bruce Peterson, who owns Brown’s Flowers and serves as a director of the business district. For the past three years they’ve gone with the deep pink color for the simple, smitten reason that it is gorgeous and bright and summery. It’s a fresh complement to the public art that tells the story of the workingclass neighborhood built around transportation, from horses to trains, trolleys, even airplanes. It may not be a rich urban village, but that $5,000 is well spent, business district members believe. It sends a message of welcome. “The baskets show that we care,” Peterson said. “The membership buys into it. They enjoy it. They like it. They’re proud of it. The neighbors like it.” He knows that because people like Mary Lewis stop in and thank him throughout the summer. “They always bring a smile to my lips and to my heart,” Lewis wrote in a letter to Tacoma Weekly advising us that we would be missing a good story

if we did not write about the baskets. Smart woman, that Mary Lewis. Lewis aims her thanks at Peterson because he started the basket tradition. “When we started, it was 40 baskets,” he said. “I did them in my greenhouse.” The project outgrew that space, about the time Mount Tahoma High School opened, with a greenhouse and a horticulture curriculum. It was a natural fit. “We buy the plants, soil and pots and take them to Mount Tahoma High School. They have a fabulous agriculture program,” said Peterson. The horticulture students put the baskets together in Mount Tahoma’s enviable greenhouse and have them ready by midMay. “It gives them practice,” Peterson said. After that, the baskets give Kyle Couture a part-time job. Couture, who is 17 and will be a senior at Mount Tahoma, waters the baskets, as his older sister, Alexis Couture, and brother, Justin Pease, did before him. Every day, or every other day, depending on the weather, he hauls his cart, with its 30-gallon vat and its watering wand, on a route around the district, stopping to fill up five times. “It’s the best summer job a teenager could have,” Couture said. “You work for three hours, and it’s usually nice outside.” This year, he said, aphids marched on the baskets and debeautified them for a week or so. The petunias are recovering now. The aphids are not. The waves are rolling on.

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WGrants From page A1

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were overwhelmed by the number of ideas,â&#x20AC;? she said. They ranged from the arts to communication, gardens and food, events, and projects by -- and for -- young people. They spanned Pierce County, from Gig Harbor to Orting. They were proposed by young-to-senior visionaries who represent Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enviable diversity. The funding is smart, and minimal. Some of the projects are onetime events, others are start-ups for long-term programs. All have accountability and an element of legacy built into them. Greater Tacoma Community Foundation brainstormed the grants and funded them with the help of One Nation, founded by George Russell after Sept. 11, 2001. The people who helped choose the first six are eager for the next batch of applications. The information on them is at www.gtcf. org, and they are due by Oct. 15. For now, the first six are rolling. s 4HE 2EALLY "IG 4ABLE 0ROJECT takes that literally. Joshua Jorgensen and Kristina Walker are building, yes, a really big table and the trailer to haul it around the county, by bicycle. The table is built in three sections and measures close to 30 feet. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll set it up, say, in Tollefson Plaza or Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Park or anywhere else they might find people willing to sit around it and have a serious conversation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to document the conversations that go on around it,â&#x20AC;? Jorgensen said. That could be as simple as laying out a sheet of

WCafe From page A1

pieces are part of the history of the Boots. What we had on these walls were anywhere from 75 years old to two years old.â&#x20AC;? The bar was packed that night, with a birthday party

butcher paper on the tabletop and asking people to make notes on it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to facilitate the conversation at the beginning, but we want to graduate from it,â&#x20AC;? Jorgensen said. If, say, Michael Chansavang and Annie Tang wanted to, they could make an appointment to use it, then bike it to theâ&#x20AC;Ś s 9OUTH 3UMMER "ASH  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last year, we partnered with The Gathering Church, had a stage and a volunteer sound engineer and reached 500 people,â&#x20AC;? Chansavang said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Of course, we want to do something bigger and better this year.â&#x20AC;? They plan a three-on-three basketball tournament, performances by local bands, a school supplies give-away, bounce houses, raffles, health and information booths. They have it scheduled for Sept. 21 at Stewart Heights Park. It would be an ideal event for Jesse and Mikel Michener to add to s 4ACOMA    IMAGES and stories from my hometown. Jesse is a photographer, passionate about capturing the spirit as well as the image of her subjects. Over the year, she will photograph 253 scenes and people she runs into and ask the people about what makes them happy. She is posting them as she goes along on Tacoma253.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe that art is the bridge that connects us,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to create a tapestry that transcends my experiences.â&#x20AC;? Already, she has captured the images of some of the young people who will participate in s %MERGING ,EADERS OF 0IERCE #OUNTY 0ETRA 0ERKINS AND %VA Bowen are members of The Conversation, a group that addresses difficult issues with civil conver-

and two busy bartenders trying to keep up with business. Although few people attempted to stop the thieves that night, Warren is encouraging anyone who was taking pictures to see if they can spot anything unusual in the background of their photographs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you have a good photo on your camera, please bring it in,â&#x20AC;? she

sation. They want to reach out to emerging leaders ages 17 to 35 with three train-the-trainer and peer-mentoring workshops. In those workshops, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll share strategies on connecting with people who are doing some of the same work in the community. That could include art, youth programs, race, entrepreneurship, even the kind of food insecurity issues s 3OLSTICE #OMMUNITY #ANNING Program addresses. Hal Meng and Dean Jackson are leaders in the Community Garden movement sweeping Pierce County. Meng is making the flavors last into winter by teaching classes in food preservation, from canning to pickling to drying to making fruit leathers. He is stocking the commercial kitchen at the Ruston Senior Center with the dehydrators and pressure cookers that are beyond many peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s means. Patty Villa has given him an open invitation to teach a class at s /RTING 6ALLEY &ARMERS -ARket. It seemed odd to Villa and Leah Winter Larson that an agricultural town like Orting did not have a farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s market. When they did a survey, they figured out WHY .ONE OF THE TRADITIONAL MARket times worked for the farmers, crafters, entertainers and the commuting residents. They picked Fridays from 3-7 p.m., when the commuters are heading home and the farmers have already prepped for the Saturday markets. So far, Villa said, it is working, generating access to fresh, local food for customers, economic opportunity for merchants and an opportunity for the community to get together, and grow stronger. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the spirit. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Spark.

pleads. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You never know whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the background of your pictures.â&#x20AC;? When one bartender spotted a man unscrewing the barâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature neon â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spur Roomâ&#x20AC;? sign from the wall, she managed to stop him. But that did not stop people from leaving with paintings, plaques, trays, glasses and more. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People just helped

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WYMCA From page A1

agreement between the YMCA and Arizona State University while she was there. She brought the idea to Tacoma when she became chancellor. The facility will be at the site of the former Longshoremenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hall at 1710 Market St. that the university already owns and uses as a gaming center and event space. The location is within the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campus and also just a few blocks away from the downtown Tacoma YMCA facility at 1144 Market St. But the facility will be more than a gym. The proposed 70,238square-foot building will have three floors that will include an indoor track, a weight room, a gym much like other YMCA facilities, but it will also have meeting rooms, lounges, multipurpose rooms and office spaces for student activities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You could consider it a Student Union facility as well,â&#x20AC;? said UWT spokesman John Burkhardt. More than 50 student groups can be found on the campus and currently have few dedicated spaces to hold meetings or to store supplies. The buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conceptual design shows spaces for them as well as a grand entryway and a twostory gymnasium that could accommodate an NCAA-regulation basketball or volleyball court. All three stories in the building would be open to daylight and have floor-to-ceiling glass walls to minimize cost

themselves,â&#x20AC;? she said. She filed a police report, and asks that stolen items be returned to the beer garden. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hopefully some people out there will feel guilty,â&#x20AC;? she said. The Flying Boots CafĂŠ has certainly enjoyed better days, filled with generations of regulars who made many memories throughout the decades. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This has always been such a friendly, neighborhood spot,â&#x20AC;? Warren said.

of operations by being flexible and use as much natural light as possible. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some things have yet to be completely configured,â&#x20AC;? said Burkhardt, noting that large timber beams from the existing building might find their way into the new facility to be more eco friendly and honor the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history. The university will fund construction of the $20 million building and maintain the exterior shell and landscaping. YMCA will administer the recreation and wellness facility, providing exercise equipment and maintaining the interior spaces. For students, it means quick and free access to meeting and workout spaces. The monthly YMCA membership will be covered by the activity fees student already pay along with their tuition. Members of the public who are YMCA members will have full access to the facility, like any other Y branch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait to build this new community hub to serve UW Tacoma students and our community. Our partnership continues to strengthen as we go through this process,â&#x20AC;? said THE 9S 0RESIDENT AND #%/ "OB %CKLUND Partnership is the key to the building. The university strives to partner with existing groups rather than invent something on its own whenever possible, Burkhardt said. The university doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a cafeteria or school-run eating facilities, for example, because officials would rather provide those opportunities to private ventures.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We truly got to know our customers and their friends and family.â&#x20AC;? During Flying Bootsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; peak years, Warren had about 25 full-time employees, where this year she had five. The restaurant took a hit when Washington passed a law prohibiting smoking indoors and in public places. Coupled with changing liquor laws and the economy, it has been a long, hard road for Warren, who poured

much of her own money into the business in recent years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This was supposed to be my retirement plan, but it is not exactly working out that way,â&#x20AC;? she said. The business has been on the market for more than three years, and she hopes the right buyer will come along and see the potential she did. â&#x20AC;&#x153;During our best years, Flying Boots would gross about $1 million,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The potential is there.â&#x20AC;?


City Life

Rat Rod Car Show

B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

SECTION B, PAGE 1

From From Blanco Blanco Bronco Bronco to to Booger Booger Red: Red: MUSIC AND ART AT WRIGHT PARK WILL HIGHLIGHT THE BEST IN TACOMA ROCK AND INDIE CULTURE PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

PHOTO COURTESY OF BIG SIN OF SYNRGY ENTERTAINMENT

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

PHOTO BY BRIAN KASNYIK

PHOTO BY ERNEST JASMIN

MUSIC = HAPPINESS. Just like MAWP reveler Judi Hyman (above, left), you too will be a happy camper when your ears take in the sounds of Blanco Bronco (top), Kramer (middle), Mosquito Hawk (bottom) and Mahnhammer (right). By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

It’s taken 20 years, but Music and Art in Wright Park is finally starting to look like a tradition that will last. On Aug. 10, the event will again assemble some of the hottest up-and-coming talent from Tacoma’s burgeoning rock scene, alongside some of the scrappy veterans that built it. That amounts to Mahnhammer, Mosquito Hawk, Blanco Bronco, Girl Trouble, Kramer and more jamming on two rotating stages, from noon to 7 p.m. “My biggest goal is to get people out to the event to see some bands they’ve never heard of,” said local rocker Cody Foster (CFA, Furry Buddies) who organizes MAWP with founder Ken Johnson and a dedicated corps of volunteers. “They may see all these bands and think, ‘Hey, man, I might go out and support these guys.’” It’s one of the summer’s most highly anticipated events for Tacoma music boosters, more than 2,500 of which are expected to turn out, based on last year’s attendance. But despite the event’s obvious appeal, it’s only been able to grow in fits and starts over the years. Johnson founded the event in 1993, when he was still owner of the now-defunct Tacoma rock label and record store Mother Records. That first show is immortalized in the video for Girl Trouble’s Tacoma rock anthem “My Hometown.” The band’s lanky, perpetually shirtless front man, Kurt Kendall, can be seen climbing onto a parked vehicle during a set at Wright Park. The roof visibly buckles under his 6-foot-5 frame. “I remember climbing on the sound guy’s truck, and it popped back, luckily for me,” Kendall recalled

of the incident, captured 20 years ago during the inaugural Music in the Park festival. “(Drummer) Bon (Henderson) and I were just looking at the lineup from that one,” he said. “I forgot some of those bands, like Katie’s Dimples, who were poised to be one of those next big thing bands; and there was Spontaneous Funk Whorehouse.” The effort’s initial run continued through 1997, showcasing Portrait of Poverty, Poppa Wheelie, the Lemons and other local punk favorites. Johnson revived it for three big shows with local promoter Chris Miller and Bennett Thurmon in the summer of 2000. Foster was the catalyst for the current incarnation, which began in 2009; but it, too, hit a snag in 2011, when organizers couldn’t raise the $8,000 to $11,000 the event usually costs to produce. “The general consensus was that everybody missed it,” Foster said. Organizers regrouped, multiplied in number and came up with creative new ways to finance the festival. This year’s event was funded by a series of benefit shows, raffles, yard sales and even a campy “Real Men of Tacoma” calendar, featuring local rockers in comical, sexy poses. (Imagine Playgirl, but with lots of tats, hairy backs and pot bellies.) “It’s easier this year,” said Foster. “There’s been a lot of support because people are saying, ‘That one year it didn’t happen, we really missed it.’” After bouncing back in 2012, organizers have put an emphasis on expanding the festival’s focus to include a wider variety of rock bands and more visual art. “Something we really talked about in our meetings is how can we really, really incorporate rock besides just having people come and sell stuff,” said organizer Jayme Fisher. “That happens at five or six festivals a year. But I think having the artists here and having

people watching them create live is going to be a great focal point.” Among the visual artists creating material live are graffiti artist Booger Red (which we presume is not his birth name) and painter Julie Luke. “I adore music in all forms, and music is a key component to my creative process,” Luke said. “So I feel it will only enhance the experience. I look forward to it.” Among the bands generating a big buzz on the musical end of the spectrum are Tacoma art-rock band Not From Brooklyn. “Not From Brooklyn is one of the biggest bands in Tacoma right now,” Fisher said. “The have a huge fan base, and people are really, really excited to see them. Also, the Purrs (from Seattle) are getting huge. And Blanco Bronco is putting out their vinyl.” Blanco Bronco’s new record is called “Pronto,” and 300 limited edition copies with swirling, colored vinyl and one-of-a-kind designs by renowned Seattle artist Art Chantry will be available next weekend. “They’re all very unique and individualized, so we’re pretty excited,” Blanco drummer John Ledington said. “We still haven’t decided on the record release, but it’ll be available at MAWP.” Old-school scenesters will also be thrilled to learn of a partial reunion of My Name, among one of the most popular Tacoma punk bands of the early ‘90s. The band Gold Records includes guitarist Fred Speakman, and that band will be joined by singer Abe Brennan to play a couple of songs from My Name’s 1996 swan song, “Rocks for Jocks.” Other bands on the bill include Wheelies, Ranchero, Furry Buddies, Big Wheel Stunt Show and Deathbed Confessions. Set times are a closely guarded secret among MAWP organizers up until the day of the show.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE GROSS OUT OLYMPICS It’s back, that wacky, slimy, messy, fun event that tests your skills at such things as human cheese puff, chocolate slurping, and many more disgusting events. The G.O. Olympics will be held Wednesday, Aug. 7 from 1-3 p.m. at Chambers Creek Regional Park, 9850 64th St. W. in University Place. Pre-register by Aug. 6 for a fee of $10 per person. To register or for more information call (253) 798-4177 or visit www.piercecountywa.org/parks.

TWO TEA EXPERIENCE

Asia Pacific Cultural Center invites you

to experience tea from where it all began – China. The Chinese have enjoyed tea for millennia. Scholars hailed the brew as a cure for a variety of ailments; the nobility considered tea consumption a mark of status and the common people simply enjoyed its flavor. On Aug. 3, join Ms. Foon Chu for “Beauty from Lotta” and experience the Chinese tea ceremony. Call to make a reservation at (253) 383-3900.

THREE

year, and the Dugan Foundation has invited rescues and shelters from all over the state. Admission is free, pets are affordable and will already be spayed or neutered, have their shots, and be ready to go home. 10 a.m. at Todd Field, University of Puget Sound. Info: www. duganfoundation.org.

FIVE SWEETKISS MOMMA

FOUR LINCOLN HIGH’S BIRTHDAY

WOOFSTOCK 2013 Some of the most adorable, playful, cuddly and crazy pets will be available for adoption at Wo o f s t o c k 2013 on Aug. 3. Dogs, cats, bunnies and ferrets are coming together for the seventh

Celebrate Lincoln High School’s 100th birthday bash with the Rainiers on Aug. 5. Get a tour of the new Cheney Stadium at 4 p.m., game time is at 7 p.m. Tickets $15. For further details or to purchase tickets, RSVP to Lincoln100birthday@hotmail. com or call (253) 905-8017.

Tacoma’s very own SweetKiss Momma is in the finals Aug. 2 at Muckleshoot Casino’s Battle of the Bands. Audience ballots decide the winner, and there’s some big money at stake that could help the band inch closer to their drams: first place is $10,000, second place is $5,000 and third place is $2,500. Be there to show your Tacoma pride and cast your vote for this great group of guys and the kickin’ music they make.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 2, 2013

SUMMERTIME,

AND THE READING IS EASY…

AN EXPLORATION OF TACOMA’S LOCAL BOOKSTORES By Sean Contris Special Correspondent

T

ruth be told, I was never much of a reader when I was a kid. I never had the patience for the stuff. My poor parents tried time and time again to cram my head into a book as a desperate plea to pull my attention from whatever video game I was involved in at the time, and of course, these attempts of my parents always went unrewarded. Perhaps it was that nothing had caught my eye. I spent whatever amount of time I had with a book focusing on fantasy novels after discovering an early love for Harry Potter and Walter Moore’s “The 13 and a Half Lives of Captain Bluebear.” But with age comes wisdom and eventually, thanks to a lovely freshmen English teacher, my love of literature was awakened with a single reading of “The Catcher in The Rye.” With a sudden interest in reading came an odd obsession for collection. I simply needed books, the more the merrier. Even if my room became a massive overflowing library

that could hardly be considered habitable, I didn’t care. I had a desire to collect and read as much as I could. I took a strong interest in classics, and with several lists in my hand, and several recommendations in mind, I took a flying leap into book shopping and began to traverse the rocky terrain of bookstores around the area. I never enjoyed Kindles too much, and reading anything on a screen seems unusual to me. The large chain bookstores such as Barnes & Noble and the now deceased Borders were too expensive for my paycheck of zero dollars and zero cents from my non-existent jobs. So what does that leave for a cheap, jobless, high school student such as me to do? As it turns out, the answer led me to some of the most interesting places around: the local bookstores of Tacoma. With summer comes a desire to read, and with a sense of lovely relaxation comes a desire for knowledge and adventure. The perfect time for a good book, I think, is in the dead of winter or the heat of the summer, preferably sitting on a beach or surrounded by trees. Therefore, without further ado, here are my favorite bookstores of Tacoma, and some titles that the owners of each would recommend to the typical summer reader.

CULPEPPER’S BOOKS

L

ocated on Proctor not far from Mason Middle School and hidden between Umpqua bank and the Italian restaurant Europa Bistro sits Culpepper’s books, a small but brilliant monument to the love of the printed word. Now, I love Culpepper’s. In fact, it may seem biased to even write about it, as it has become such a beloved location for me. The atmosphere in the store is remarkably homey, and is perhaps one of the most well organized bookstores in the area. Culpepper’s specializes in rare, used, and out-of-print books and has a healthy selection and styles of literature ranging from contemporary fiction, classics, tomes of historical accounts, books on chess, fishing and painting. Yet the draw of Culpepper’s Books is its owner, veteran book dealer Jerry Culpepper. Culpepper is the kind of guy that, even if you were to try, you could never forget that he bears a stronger resemblance to a character straight out of a novel rather than a person sitting in front of you yakking your ear off. Passionate and impossibly funny, Culpepper gives the store its life and ability to charm, and for the most part I simply enjoy going into the store for his company and the company of his friends, a cast of characters so fascinating and interesting that to describe them would take several articles in and of themselves (here’s to you, Richard Baker). Culpepper has worked as a book vendor for much of his life, starting at the age of 19 under the wing of Mrs. Fox at Foxes Books. Though he moved around and worked other jobs, he continued to have a passion for selling books and would return to Mrs. Fox for work from time to time. It was in 2001 that Culpepper decided to settle down and open his own bookstore with wife and co-owner Michelle. With an eccentric personality, Culpepper has taken a cue from the books he sells and has developed an uncanny ability to tell a brilliant story, and for the most part has a gift for gab. Yet these stories are extraordinary to hear, be it stories from his life or of

PHOTOS BY SETH WHEELER

CULPEPPER’S BOOKS. The draw of Culpepper’s Books is its owner, veteran book dealer Jerry Culpepper.

his times and adventures as a bookseller. These are tales that will eat up hours of your time and will leave a vivid image permanently imprinted on your mind. Perhaps dodging any bullets or anger from other book dealers in the area, I feel that saying Culpepper is the most educated and opinionated book salesman in the area isn’t much of a stretch. Simply put, if you ever want to discuss a novel, an author, or a piece of history, none are more fantastic to speak to than Jerry Culpepper.

He has a set of novels that his customers have dubbed “Culpepper Classics” that he considers his favorites; and ones that he thinks everyone and their mother should read. Included are: “How Green Was My Valley” by Richard Llelwyn “She” by H. Rider Hagard “Blue Nile/White Nile” by Ellen Morehoud “Lonesome Dove” by Larry McMurtry “Sailing Alone Around The World” by Joshua Slocum

TACOMA BOOK CENTER

P

TACOMA BOOK CENTER. Owned by Larry Jezek (pictured here) and David Killian, Tacoma Book Center has seen nothing but growth since it opened, and even needed an expansion and got one with the purchase of a building they now use as warehouse space to hold its massive amount of books.

erhaps the biggest of the bookstores around Tacoma is deservingly entitled Tacoma Book Center, and it exists in an interesting part of town just within walking distance of both Tacoma Dome and Freighthouse Square. The majority of my books are purchased there, and the stock of literature, both fiction and nonfiction, on display is staggering. On some days, a sign that advertises the store boasts that there are over half a million books in the store, but this seems like a drastic understatement, as the store seems to go on for miles with every inch covered in books. Although the books are less valuable than those on display at Culpepper’s, the size and scale of Tacoma Book Center is immense. Through frequent visitations to the store, friends and I have nicknamed the store “Bunker Books” as it seems to resemble a bunker that could be utilized in the event of a world war. Nearly every genre of book sits calmly waiting in this store’s many rooms and hallways. Books range from fiction to nonfiction, to philosophy, to manga, to the classics, to the arts and, interestingly, even a collection of highly coveted and frequently stolen books that sit just behind the counter. Tacoma Book Center is run by a collection of people who seem to be at their friendliest at all times. Each is willing and able to give his/her opinions and in the friendliest manner possible. Like other stores, the prices that Tacoma Book Center offers are fair and reasonable. On top of this, the store gives a wonderfully fair deal on trades and great cash for book exchange.

u See BOOKS / page B3

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, August 2, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

P Books From page B2

Tacoma Book Center opened in 1984 near the Frank Russell Building. The store experienced a consistent level of growth and relocated in 1989 to where it sits now. Owned by Larry Jezek and David Killian, Tacoma Book Center has seen nothing but growth since it opened, and even needed an expansion and got one with the purchase of a building they now use as warehouse space to hold its massive amount of books. Tacoma Book Center is also one of Tacoma’s oldest bookstores, giving it a sort of vintage feeling that creates a fantastic atmosphere to wander in for hours. Books recommended for the summer: Larry Jezek (owner): “The Passage” by Justin Cronin “Night Dogs” by Kent Anderson “11/22/63” by Stephen King Marie Paxton (employee): “Life of Pi” by Yann Martel “Half Broke Horses” by Jeannette Walls “Mists of Avalon” by Marion Zimmer Bradley Sookie Stackhouse novels by Charlaine Harris

PARK AVENUE BOOKS

O

f all the bookstores highlighted in this article, Park Avenue Books is likely the one you have heard the least about. Clear across town, Park Avenue Books sits in the Fern Hill district in South Tacoma. Quiet and unassuming longtime book dealer and former owner of Linda’s Books, Linda Howell, runs it. She refers to herself as a book lady and claims that the bookstore is an accomplishment of a childhood dream of owning a massive library. “I used to go to this great library when I was a girl and I just used to think, you know, I would like to own one of these great big libraries someday,” she said, before adding with a smile, “of course I can’t do that really so I think this is the next best thing for me.” Park Avenue is overwhelmingly crowded with books, and to many this may prove difficult to navigate, but this place is a sanctuary for people who simply love books at an extraordinarily reasonable price. Park Avenue specializes in trade paperbacks, with a good chunk of the store’s stock being made up of romance novels, mysteries, selfhelp books and Christian fiction novels. Howell’s statement about the business is simply: “Put books in the hands of people who want to read them for a reasonable price,” and she has been doing so for a number of years.

PHOTOS BY SETH WHEELER

PARK AVENUE BOOKS. Park Avenue Books sits in the Fern Hill district in South Tacoma. Quiet

and unassuming longtime book dealer and former owner of Linda’s Books, Linda Howell (right), runs it.

Starting as a book dealer with her first store aptly titled Linda’s Books, she met Diana Brown, owner of Boomerang Books, and the two decided to go into business together after creating a foundation of friendship. Howell and Brown founded Park Avenue Books after agreeing that they both needed bigger stores. After Brown passed away in 2011, Howell became the sole owner of the store and is assisted in running it by a number of close friends. Howell is characterized by an incredibly sweet and kind disposition, greeting each customer with a warm smile

and an almost nostalgic tone of voice that brings to mind the warmth of a motherly figure. Though Howell was hesitant to give any personal favorites as recommendations, she was more than willing to suggest a few for the summer reader including classics such as: “Moby-Dick” by Herman Melville “The Scarlett Letter” by Nathaniel Hawthorne “The Pearl” by John Steinbeck Linda strongly recommends the author Jillian Hart.

KING’S BOOKS

K

ing’s Books is perhaps Tacoma’s most well-known local bookstore. King’s is the one you hear about all the time, the place that cool girl who drinks too much coffee and reads feminist novels says she is going when she heads off to her book club. King’s Books is currently in the midst of its 13th year of business, and though it doesn’t look strikingly different from an average bookstore, it is held afloat by its numerous community nights, events and book clubs. King’s can largely be described as a meeting place for the book-loving population of Tacoma. Its large, airy, and at times silent atmosphere leads to a sense of ease in the bookstore, with its long bare hallways that lead into a massive meeting spot in the back of the store. It might feel overwhelming at first sight, but one quickly realizes this space gives access to large community events. King’s, like the other local bookstores, specializes in a large selection of used and traded-in books that can be sold at a cheaper and affordable price. However, King’s is also an advocate for bringing in newly published books and selling them for a cheaper price as well. As stated above, King’s is primarily a communityrun bookstore. Though King’s is under the ownership of a single owner by the name of Sweet Pea Flaherty, it’s the local community that pulls together the events that mark King’s Books as a landmark of the city. Though any sort of large-scale events or happenings have died down for the summer, the bookstore always makes time for its numerous book clubs. King’s book clubs are typically centered on a key theme or idea that every member either is a part of, or believes strongly

KING’S BOOKS. Though King’s is under the ownership of a single owner by the name of Sweet Pea Flaherty, it’s the local community that pulls together the events that mark King’s Books as a landmark of the city.

in; included are a book club around food and veganism, the LGBT community, feminism and others. Books recommended by owner Sweet Pea Flaherty: “Where’d You Go” by Bernadette-

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Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 2, 2013

PHOTO BY ED CURRAN

PHOTO BY WALT KAPLIN

RAT ROD TIME. It will be a rat-rodders paradise on Aug. 11 when Tacoma’s first-ever Rat-Rod-O’Rama takes place at Griot’s Garage. The event will

attract car club hobbyists from near and far, like these members and friends of Tacoma’s own Demonos, the Rat Bastards from Gold Bar (led by Marcia and Ron Foreman, back row, fifth and eighth from left) and the Rodettes who visited the Tacoma Weekly offices last week.

RAT-ROD-O’RAMA SET TO ROLL INTO GRIOT’S By Matt Nagle

matt@tacomaweekly.com

T

here’s a brand new car show coming to town, one that will appeal greatly to those who miss Hot Roda-Rama that used to take place at The Swiss. It’s called Rat-Rod-O’Rama, and it will be held on Sunday, Aug. 11, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Griot’s Car Care Center at 3333 S. 38th St. While the focus of this event is on rat rods and those who love them, Rat-Rod-O’Rama is open to all types of traditional hot rods, early customs, vintage cars and special interest vehicles. This is a family-friendly event and admission to the general public is free. The registration fee for vehicles is just $15. Every registrant will receive a DVD of a fulllength feature film from the 1950s – “The Wild One” or “Hot Rod Girl” – and an event dash plaque while supplies last. Jazzy’s Café (3701 S. Lawrence St.) will be the official food vendor at Rat-Rod-ORama, so it will be worth saving your appetite for a taste of what Jazzy’s has to offer. There will also be raffles and door prizes, a swap meet for automotive goods, and a Dyno machine on the premises courtesy of Pull This Mobile Dyno Service (which can be reached at 425-422-0381). Many awards will be handed out, 26 in all, and DJ Walt Kaplin will spin music from the ‘50s and ‘60s (he’ll

take requests, too). The atmosphere at this event will be fun, festive and friendly – and will offer a chance to meet some of the movers and shakers who are working to preserve this important part of American history and culture. A lifelong car enthusiast and hobbyist, Kaplin is the organizer and producer of Rat-Rod-O’Rama. Well known in car show circles, he has brought together other car events in Tacoma, including 2011’s historic 60th anniversary reunion at Griot’s of those who used to cruise Busch’s Drive-In back in the ’50s, a milestone event that recalled Tacoma’s golden era as the car cruising capital of the Northwest. (Read the full article at www. tacomaweekly.com/citylife/view/celebrate_ the_fabulous_50s_at_buschs_60th_anniversary_reunion.) Kaplin seeks to help keep alive this vibrant car culture by encouraging young people to enjoy it too, hence his new event Rat-Rod-O’Rama. “This is one way to get into the hobby, and it’s a wonderful way of doing it,” Kaplin said. “The future of the hobby lies with our young people. If it’s going to continue on to the extent it was back when I was young, you obviously need the diversity.” He said that while young people often can’t afford to own the tricked-out, meticulously maintained (i.e. expensive) classic cars, they could afford to work on their own

rat rods, as the unfinished, and oftentimes “rough,” look of these rods is part of their charm. “The hobby is good. It’s good for everybody,” Kaplin said, noting that it’s also good for Tacoma, as big car enthusiast gatherings like Rat-Rod-O’Rama bring in hundreds of people to town, including hobbyists from east of the mountains. In Gold Bar, the Rat Bastards Car Club is leading the rat rod pack in the Northwest. Founded in 2002 by Ron and Marcia Foreman, this non-profit organization treasures the 1969-and-older traditional hot rods and cool customs. The club embraces the rougharound-the-edges, real steel and iron “old skool” street rods. “It’s fun, I enjoy doing it and I want to see it continue, and I want to see more young people get into it,” Marcia Foreman said. “Younger kids are starting to get into it, which is just awesome.” The Rat Bastards have about 45 members, sometimes up to 75, and dues are $25 a year. You have to build your own car to be in the club, and there are many events the club participates in where members can show off their pride-and-joy. The club’s own car show for pre-1969 models, Infestation, happens Sept. 1, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Triple X Root Beer Drive-In in Issaquah, 98 N.E. Gilman Blvd. For information, call (253) 623-7515 or (425) 770-4550. Look up the Rat Bastards

Local Restaurants Sarah’s Burger Shack now open in Auburn After running several other local hamburger joints throughout Western Washington, the Hong family was looking for a change. With their latest venture, Sarah’s Burger Shack, the family is able to offer some of the best burgers around, along with a diverse menu featuring options that will appeal to even the pickiest eaters. Located at 33032 Auburn Way S. in Auburn, Sarah’s Burger Shack is well worth the drive – especially to experience the restaurant’s signature California Burger, a bacon cheeseburger complete with onion rings and avocado (around $4, or about $6 for a double). Sarah’s Burger Shack also offers milkshakes, chicken strips, kids meals, hot dogs and even steak and potatoes. With ample seating inside, along with a drive-through, the restaurant is ready to meet the needs of busy diners, or those looking to relax with a good meal. At the moment, the Hong family is running the show, with owner Gregory Hong taking charge in the kitchen while his two sons and wife help give customers a truly memorable experience. The restaurant’s hours are Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For more information, call (253) 887-7655.

on Facebook to keep up with all they’ve got going on. And don’t let their name fool you – the Rat Bastards are a very warm and welcoming, down-to-earth group of family oriented people who simply love to work on, drive and talk about hot rods and classic cars – it’s in their blood. Plus, they bring slow drags and rockabilly music culture into the mix, and the gorgeous Pin-Up Angels who raise money to send care packages to soldiers overseas. Their founder, Miss Kitty Baby, will emcee Infestation. “They are a wonderful group to be around,” Kaplin said of the Rat Bastards. “They’re fun and from all walks of life. More importantly, they’re part of something that’s good for the country.” Expect to see additional car clubs represented at Rat-Rod-O’Rama, like the Demonos (founded in 1957 at Lincoln High School) and the women-only club The Rodettes, which just formed two years ago. For further information on Rat-RodO’Rama, call Kaplin at (253) 858-8739 or Griot’s at (253) 922-2200. And keep an eye on Tacoma Weekly for further developments in some big news Kaplin recently shared: plans are in the works for the first-ever Rat Rod Northwest Nationals in Pierce County – date, location and details to be announced.

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REBEL RIOT

PHOTOS COURTESY OF REBEL RIOT

REBEL ROCK. The Black Crabs are performing on the main stage at

Friday, August 2, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Live Music

TW PICK OF THE WEEK: AWARD-WINNING BLUES AND R & B SINGER JANIVA MAGNESS WILL HEADLINE JAZZBONES ON AUG. 2 WITH SONGS FROM HER NEWEST ALBUM “STRONGER FOR IT.” MUSIC STARTS AT 8 P.M., AND TICKETS ARE $15; WWW. JAZZBONES.COM FOR FURTHER DETAILS.

FRIDAY, AUG. 2

1 p.m. during Rebel Riot on Aug. 3. By Kate Burrows kburrows@tacomaweekly.com

O

n Aug. 3, downtown Tacoma will be transformed into a car-lover’s paradise, with throngs of pre-1969 hot rods and custom cars on display, along with a full day’s worth of live music and entertainment. This year’s Rebel Riot will offer something for everyone: pre-1969 traditional hot rods and custom cars, pin-up contests, a top-notch burlesque show, performances from some of the biggest local bands on the scene, a beer garden hosted by Club Silverstone, and more. A variety of local vendors will be displaying products and services, ranging from speed equipment, custom, vintage clothing, haircuts, straight-razor shaves, pinFRUITVALE STATION (90 MIN, R) Fri 8/2: 2:15, 4:40, 7:00, 9:00 Sat 8/3-Sun 8/4: 11:55am, 2:15, 4:40, 7:00, 9:00 Mon 8/5-Thu 8/8: 2:15, 4:40, 7:00, 9:00 THE WAY, WAY BACK (113 MIN, PG-13) Fri 8/2: 2:00, 4:25, 6:50, 9:10 Sat 8/3-Sun 8/4: 11:35am, 2:00, 4:25, 6:50, 9:10 Mon 8/5-Thu 8/8: 2:00, 4:25, 6:50, 9:10 20 FEET FROM STARDOM (91 MIN, PG-13) Fri 8/2: 1:35, 3:45, 6:15, 8:30 Sat 8/3-Sun 8/4: 11:30am, 1:35, 3:45, 6:15, 8:30 Mon 8/5: 1:35, 3:45, 6:15, 8:30 Tue 8/6: 3:45, 6:15, 8:30 Wed 8/7-Thu 8/8: 1:35, 3:45, 8:30

striping and more. The Pinup Angels will be sponsoring the Rebel Riot Pinup Contest, hosted by Miss Kitty Baby. The contest is open to 10 ladies, and contestants will be scored based on their vintage-inspired bathing suits, personality and crowd reaction. The winner will receive a photo shoot with the winner of the City of Destiny Pick car. “This event is so much more than a car show,” said organizer Allison Lazar. “We have great bands that will be playing, and a full day of entertainment.” The event’s move from the Dome District to downtown will add an even more unique element to the festivities. Many shops along Antique Row have already jumped on board to participate in Rebel Riot. “We wanted to invite people to explore even more of Tacoma,” Lazar said, adding that hot summer days seem to be bad for business for many

Schedule of events: Car show, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Pinup contest, 2 p.m. Car show awards, 3 p.m.

I’M SO EXCITED (90 MIN, R) Fri 8/2: 1:50, 4:00, 6:30, 8:40 Sat 8/3-Sun 8/4: 11:45am, 1:50, 4:00, 6:30, 8:40 Mon 8/5: 1:50, 4:00, 6:30, 8:40 Tues 8/6: 1:50, 4:00, 8:40 Wed 8/7-Thu 8/8: 1:50, 4:00, 6:30, 8:40 STRANGER THINGS (77 MIN, NR) Tues 8/6: 1:35, 6:35 INOCENTE (45 MIN, NR) Thurs 8/8: 7:00

Antiques Row owners. “It astonishes me that people don’t hang around that area more during the summertime. We thought this would be a great chance to show people another great area to shop.” On the night before the big car show, organizers are kicking off the festivities at The Mansion on Broadway, a 130-year-old event space located at 539 Broadway. Throughout the night there will be performances by The Roy Kay Trio and Argentina Weeps, both Seattle bands, along with a burlesque show featuring The Shanghai Pearl, Miss Mosh, Miss Kitty Baby, Nani Poonani, Dessi Devine, Mae Zing and Rosie Cheex. Admission to the Friday night showcase is $15 in advance, or $20 at the door. Rebel Riot will be held at Tacoma’s Antique Row, on Broadway between S. 9th and S. 7th. Visit www.therebelriot.com and “like” Rebel Riot on Facebook.

Music lineup: 11 a.m. – Scuff 12 p.m. – Baby and the Nobodies 1 p.m. – The Black Crabs 4 p.m. – Big Wheel Stunt Show

MONDAY, AUG. 5 NEW FRONTIER: Tex, Kyle Alfred Hileg, Trees & Timber (rock) 9 p.m., $5

GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Grinder (rock covers) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Nick Decktor, Beka Barry, Cameron Muzzuca (comedy) 9 p.m., $15 HARMON TAP ROOM: The Dignitaries, Lucarne (rock) 9 p.m., $5 JAZZBONES: Janiva Magness (blues) 8 p.m., $15 METROPOLITAN MARKET: Proctor Arts Fest, featuring Merrillee Rush, the Lance Buller Trio, Twang Junkies, Rick Gonzalez & Ike Sutton and more (rock, jazz, country) THE MANSION: Rebel Riot showcase with Roy Kay Trio, etc. (rockabilly, rock “Evita” tribute, burlesque) 9 p.m., $20 MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC METRO MARKET: Proctor Arts Fest with Merrillee Rush, Lance Buller, Twang Junkies, etc. (eclectic) 10 a.m., AA, NC TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Jay Hollingsworth (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE THURM’S: Delvon Lamarr Trio (funk) 7:30 p.m., AA, NC

SATURDAY, AUG. 3

UNCLE SAM’S: Billy Pease, Paul Buck, Chris Gartland (blues)

GRIT CITY COMEDY: Open mic comedy, 8 p.m, NC STAR CENTER: Ballroom dancing, 1 p.m., $5, AA

TUESDAY, AUG. 6 UNDER THE BRIDGE (block party): Strangely Alright, Big Wheel Stunt Show (rock) 5 p.m. AA, NC

ANTIQUE SANDWICH SHOP: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (rock, blues) 7 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 7

ANTIQUE ROW (downtown): Rebel Riot with Big Wheel Stunt Show, Black Crabs, etc. (rock, burlesque) 11 a.m., AA, NC

GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Grinder (rock covers) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Nick Decktor, Beka Barry, Cameron Muzzuca (comedy) 9 p.m., $15 NEW FRONTIER: Against the Grain (rock) 9 p.m., $5 SPAR: Reggae night, 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Jay Hollingsworth (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAM’S: Blacktop Demon (rock) 8 p.m.

DAWSON’S: Crazy Texas Gypsies (blues, open jam) 8 p.m., NC

TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Open mic comedy, 8 p.m., 18+, NC DAVE’S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Humpster Jam, $8:30 p.m., NC

THURSDAY, AUG. 8 TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Mike Malone (comedy) 8 p.m., $10

SUNDAY, AUG. 4 DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

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DAVE’S OF MILTON: Open jam, 8 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open mic) 9 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m. URBAN GRACE: T-town Swing (swing dancing), 8:30 p.m., $5, AA

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older


Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 2, 2013

FRI., AUG. 2 TACOMA NATURE CENTER VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY ETC – All ages are welcome to join this free event focused on habitat restoration. Join the group for its regular stewardship activities as volunteers care for the park by removing invasive plant species, re-planting areas with native plants and helping those plants thrive. No experience necessary. Come dressed for the weather and prepared to get dirty. Work parties occur rain or shine. Children must be accompanied by adults. Info: www. metroparkstacoma.org/tacomanaturecenter/. The event takes place at 9 a.m. at Tacoma Nature Center, located at 1919 S. Tyler St.

COMING EVENTS

– Warm August days are perfect for spending a little time indoors at the South Pacific Aquarium, and what could be better than spending one of those days checking out the sharks? That’s the plan when the finny friends get the spotlight. There will be special activities about sharks all day. They will include talks by staff biologists as well as hands-on activities. And conveniently next door to the shark exhibit, Stingray Cove beckons with a pool full of stingrays to touch. Info: www. pdza.org/calendar?cid=134. The festivities start at 11 a.m. at Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium, located at 5400 N. Pearl St. HAPPENINGS

TUES., AUG 6 SCHOOL BOARD CANDIDATES FORUM ETC – Do you care about what is happening in your schools? A huge part of pol-

production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

COME ONE, COME ALL – SOME OF THE MOST ADORABLE, PLAYFUL, CUDDLY AND CRAZY PETS WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR ADOPTION AT WOOFSTOCK 2013. DOGS, CATS, BUNNIES AND FERRETS ARE COMING TOGETHER FOR THE SEVENTH YEAR LOOKING FOR NEW HOMES, FILLING TODD FIELD AT UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND. THE DUGAN FOUNDATION HAS INVITED RESCUES AND SHELTERS FROM ALL OVER WASHINGTON STATE. BE THE BRIGHT NEW CHAPTER IN AN ANIMAL’S LIFE, AND MAKE A FRIEND FOREVER. ADMISSION IS FREE, PETS ARE AFFORDABLE AND WILL ALREADY BE SPAYED OR NEUTERED, HAVE THEIR SHOTS, AND BE READY TO GO HOME. THIS YEAR’S MUSICAL LINE UP IS SPONSORED BY TIN STAR RECORDS, MAURICE THE FISH RECORDS AND NWCZ RADIO. FEATURED ARTISTS ARE: HITCH THE PONY, DAVE HANNON, THE RALLIES, SEVENS REVENGE AND THE WHOOPPEE CATS. THIS LINEUP WILL PROVIDE A MIX SOULFUL POP, R&B AND COUNTRY POP. ALL OF THE MUSICIANS GIVE THEIR TIME TO HELP FIND HOMES FOR AS MANY HOMELESS ANIMALS AS POSSIBLE. WOOFSTOCK 2013 IS AIMED AT BRINGING PEOPLE TOGETHER TO HAVE A GREAT TIME AND TO COLLABORATE IN SUPPORT OF DEVELOPING WASHINGTON STATE INTO A SUSTAINABLE, NO-KILL COMMUNITY. WE ENCOURAGE EVERYONE, INCLUDING PETS, TO COME AND EXPERIENCE THE MOST ENJOYABLE AUGUST DAY FOR FAMILIES, AND TO MAKE IT THE LUCKIEST DAY IN AN ADOPTED ANIMAL’S LIFE! INFO: WWW.DUGANFOUNDATION.ORG/INDEX. PHP/EVENTS/16/_WOOFSTOCK_2011. THE EVENT STARTS AT 10 A.M. AT TODD FIELD, LOCATED AT 1500 N. WARNER ST.

TACOMA NARROWS HALF MARATHON HAPPENINGS – Run or walk one of the most unique race courses in the Puget Sound Region! This point to point course starts at the Tacoma Narrows Airport, crosses over the majestic Tacoma Narrows Bridge, runs on the track at Cheney Stadium (where you will see yourself on the Jumbotron!), and finishes in beautiful downtown Tacoma...the City of Destiny. Info: www.tacomanarrowshalf.com/entry. html. The race starts at 7:30 a.m.

SHARKS!

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TW PICK: WOOFSTOCK 2013

SAT., AUG. 3

ROCK AND RALLY FOR THE TROOPS HAPPENINGS – Operation Ward 57 and Rock The Dock Pub & Grill present Rock & Rally for the Troops 2013. The event will benefit wounded soldiers, their loved ones as well as those that aid in their recovery through the programs of Operation Ward 57, a non-profit that supports wounded warriors. This event will consist of a Motorcycle Dice Run sponsored by Brothers In Arms MC. Following the Dice Run will be an outdoor concert event featuring 4-5 local bands. Must be 21 or older in beer garden. Outside vendors, tables and bike viewing open to all ages. Even if you cannot make the dice run, come for the outdoor stage, beer gardens and silent auction. There is a $10 suggested donation at the door. Bike registration: donation of $15 bike/$10 additional rider. Breakfast available starting 9 a.m., Motorcycle run on site registration starts 9 a.m., Bikes out at 10 a.m., returning at 3 p.m. Info: rockandrallyforthetroops.com/.

Promote your community event,

which Meeker sold Hyada Park building lots. The park is a great place to picnic, fly a kite, beachcomb and more. Admission is free. Great for all ages. Limited entrance to people with disabilities (stairs). Group or school tours may be arranged by calling the message phone (253) 927-2536. Location is in the Browns Point Lighthouse Park at 201 Tulalip St. N.E. Limited parking or access the park through the adjacent Browns Point Improvement Club parking lot. Info: http://www.pointsnortheast.org or (253) 9272536. BALLROOM DANCING HAPPENINGS – The STAR Center hosts ballroom dancing on the first Sunday of every month and every Monday afternoon from 1-3 p.m. There is live music. Admission is $5. It is a good idea to come with a dance partner. This dance was formerly held at South Park Community Center. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org/ star or (253) 404-3939. ZIP LINE NOW OPEN HAPPENINGS – Two courses at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium test physical agility and mental toughness – and anyone can conquer them. Zoom is more than a zip line; it is an aerial activity course that includes a number of challenges such as a swinging log bridge strung between trees, a high wire to walk and a fishermen’s net strung between trees to climb through. And, yes, there are sections of zip line to put some zing into the adventure experience. There are two distinct circuits to Zoom, one for kids as young as 5, sized just right for smaller children, and one with appeal for a range of ages, including adventureseeking adults. Info: www. pdza.org/zoom.

icy change in our schools has to do with those on School Board. Come hear candidates Dexter Gordon and Debbie Winskill speak and answer questions surrounding policy, history and future for the youth in our community. Enjoy snacks and refreshments while learning about the two candidates and what they are able to do for the youth you most care about! Vibrant Schools will have a set of questions and offer an opportunity for public comment and questions. This is your moment to share your voice, concerns, and hopes for our schools. For questions please contact: Info@ VibrantSchoolsTacoma.org. Vibrant Schools has 29 different organizations who are members representing many people from all different backgrounds, social, political, and religious, views, and cultures vantage points coming to one table to share with one voice our hope that all youth are successful in life. Info: vibrantschoolstacoma.org. The forum takes place at 4 p.m. at Peace Community Center, located at 2106 S. Cushman Ave. in Tacoma.

FRI., AUG. 9 T-TOWN SAILING CHAMPIONSHIPS HAPPENINGS – Come to the first annual T Town Sailing Regatta, Aug. 9 at 5 p.m. to Aug 11 at 4 p.m. at Rock the Dock Pub and Grill, located at 535 Dock St. in Tacoma. Enjoy a dockside party, the biggest beer garden Rock the Dock has ever done, and steel drum and reggae music from Stay Grounded, Ghost 211 and Author Unknown. Info: www.facebook.com/ events/462089313874128/ ?ref=22.

BULLETIN BOARD HIDDEN TREASURES GRAND RE-OPENING ETC – Hidden Treasures, located at the corner of S. 12th and Proctor Street, is hosting grand re-opening events starting Aug. 3 and culminating with an art show and sale on Aug. 10-11. Familiar vendors still offer the great variety of items they’re known and loved for; new vendors continue to join the 15-plus group. Fresh paint and flowers show the Proctor-side entrance is ready for the grand re-opening “Start-Up Saturday” festivities Aug. 3. A list of events can be acquired at Hidden Treasures. The store features vintage, mid-century modern and antique furniture, jewelry and everything in between. Info: (253) 223-6055. EXPLORE THE SHORE HAPPENINGS – Explore the Shore will provide hands-on learning about sea creatures and train participants how to be citizen scientists. Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium staff will teach children, adults and families more about Puget Sound’s beaches and the creatures that live there. The zoo’s Explore the Shore program is set for Aug. 20 at Owen Beach in Point Defiance Park. All are timed to take best advantage of the low minus tides that reveal many of Puget Sound’s most interesting shoreline creatures. The events and programs are free and open to the public and reservations are not required. Bring sunscreen and wear shoes and clothing appropriate for walking on rough beach terrain. Zoo naturalists accompany participants on low tide beach walks, where kids and adults will learn to identify tide pool animals and record their presence and location for addition

to the scientific Nature Mapping database (www.naturemappingfoundation.org). Participants will learn about the biological diversity of local beaches and better understand how to protect them. Info: www.PDZA.org or call (253) 404-3665. T-TOWN SWING Get your Tacoma swing dance fix every Thursday at Urban Grace Church, located in downtown. Intro to swing dance: 8:30-9 p.m., free with dance admission. Social dancing, 9-11:30 p.m., is $5. The atmosphere is super laid-back and fun, and features great guest instructors and DJs playing awesome swing music from the 1930s and 1940s, and it is sure to keep all the dancers hopping all night long! In addition, blues will be played every second and fourth Friday of the month and kizomba every fourth Sunday. HAPPENINGS –

BROWNS POINT LIGHTKEEPERS COTTAGE HAPPENINGS – The Browns Point Lightkeepers Cottage, Gardens and Museums are now open every Saturday from 1-4 p.m. through November. Tour the 1903 cottage and view the new exhibit in the basement museum called “Dash Point Since 1906” – a collection of old and new photos and fun artifacts celebrating the Dash Point community. Visit the historical vignettes in the basement including kitchen, sewing room and old-fashioned school. Also on the grounds is the Boathouse museum that houses a replica Coast Guard surfboat, information on its construction and a collection of antique tools. View the original lighthouse bell, and visit the recently restored Jerry Meeker Real Estate office on the grounds. This is the original 1906 office from

TEDDIE BEAR MUSIC Teddie Bear Music is a child and parent musical adventure. Join instructor Janice Berntsen as she shows students how to share the gift of music and movement with their children, ages 1-4. Sessions are held Thursdays at 8:45 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. at Ted Brown Music, located at 6228 Tacoma Mall Blvd. Info: www.tbmoutreach.org. MUSIC –

HOT HULA FITNESS ETC – Every Monday through Wednesday, Asia Pacific Cultural Center hosts hot hula fitness classes from 7-8 p.m. Inspired by the dances of the Pacific islands, hot hula fitness incorporates easy to perform dance moves set to the sounds of traditional Polynesian drum beats fused with funky reggae music, resulting in a modern, hip fitness workout. Hot hula fitness is a fun, new and exciting dance workout that isolates your larger muscle groups, quads and arms, providing a total body workout in 60 minutes. All ages and fitness levels will enjoy hot hula fitness. Admission: $6 (discount with APCC membership). APCC is located at 4851 South Tacoma Way. DRUM CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages drum circle every Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. You do not need to have a drum to participate. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com. UKULELE CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages ukulele circle every Wednesday from 6:30-8 p.m. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com.


Friday, August 2, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL

Jean Bonter 253-312-2747 FOR LEASE

Point Defiance CafĂŠ and Casino. Fully operational with unique card room and gambling facility. Only licensed casino between Lakewood and Bremerton. Or as an alternative, this facility could be used as full service restaurant with banquet rooms. Many other possibilities including day care, private pre- school, dance studio, and the list goes on. All handicap accessible.

DEER RIDGE HOME, PUYALLUP

Beautiful home crafted by Steve Jensen and meticulously cared for. All the Jensen signature touches - soaring spaces, coffered ceilings, crown molding, wainscoting, 6â&#x20AC;? base trim, tile, granite, and expansive windows. Sited on an elevated lot that adjoins natural area to the rear. Listen to the birds and your private waterfall from your patio. Wonderful landscaping

designed for beauty and easy care. Sensational island kitchen opens to stunning family room. Huge master suite with fireplace. MLS #479207

UNIQUE BOUTIQUE BISTRO With Beer and Wine License. $20,000 Full Price.

4 Sale with Owner Contract

NORTH END GAS STATION/MINI MART High gross sales, excellent profit, positive cash flow, Price is $1,100,000 (Bus. & Prop.), possible terms price

LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? reduced Restaurant/Lounge Huge Price Reduction - For Sale For $510,000 (R.E. $485K) Bus. $25K. Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports bar and grill. RURAL LIVING: ASHFORD, WA- Restr./ Lounge, $125,000 with $50K Down, Real E. Avail: 3.4 Commercial Acres for Future Devel., 3 BR Remodeled Home, laundromat.price

reduced

VERY SUCCESSFUL/PROFITABLE SPORTS BAR Business is For Sale for $320,000 Terms are avail. priceced redu

GREEN PUP SPORTS price BAR & GRILL reduced (famous for its pizza) $189,000, cash. UNDISCLOSED RESTR./LOUNGE/ SPORTS BAR, very high annual food & drink sales, great food. Business is for sale, $125,000 with $75,000 down, motivated seller. price

reduced

HIGH GROSSING, VERY PROFITABLE COFFEE SHOP CAFE FOR SALE price $99,000 High trafic Count location. reduced VINOTIQUE WINE SHOP/BAR/DELI IN LAKEWOOD Business is for sale for price $109,000. Cash/terms. reduced

LAUNDROMAT W/ DROP SHOP. price reduced Same location 15 years in Lakewood. Excellent lease with contract terms. $36,000 PORT OF TACOMA DINER Breakfast & Lunch, M-F, Price $70,000. Long-time established & great location. â&#x20AC;&#x153;UNDISCLOSEDâ&#x20AC;? BEAUTY SALON In Puyallup, Great Location, $35,000 Cash. Call Angelo, (253) 376-5384. price

reduced

CALL RICHARD PICTON or ED PUNCHAK 253-581-6463 253-224-7109

GIG HARBOR ž ACRE BUILDING LOT

Beautifully wooded, water and power available. $79,000. Perfect setting for your custom home. Owner/agent

www.jeanbonter.com

Evergreen Commercial Brokerage FOR RENT

Businesses Opportunities

FOR RENT

Summertree Apartments 2 Bedroom, Well located close to Parks, Schools, Colleges and Jobs. Wonderful large courtyard. Terrific Value! (W/S/G included) 1801 S. 15th Call (253) 272.1722 MOORAGE

FOR SALE

COMMERCIAL

Selling Your Commercial Building or Business? Call

MOORAGE

Boat Moorage Available. Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dock Restaurant on D Street across from the Glass Museum. 25 feet to 55 feet, $9.50 per foot per month.

CALL 253.922.5317

FOR SALE

FURNITURE

FURNITURE

NEW!!! 7 Piece Cherry Bedroom Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, 1 Nightstand, Headboard, Rails. Plus New Mattress Set still in plastic $499 (253) 539-1600

Black Iron Canopy Bed w/Orthopedic Mattress Set. New, Still in %R[ 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH  (253) 539-1600

5 Piece Pub Set Table & 4 Chairs New in Box List $1,000 Sell $350 253-537-3056 3 Piece Living Room Set New in plastic. Lifetime Warranty On Frame. $495 (253) 537-3056 Free Mattress Set with Cherry Wood Sleigh Bed Never Used. In Plastic. $380 (253) 537-3056 All New Pillow Top Mattress Set! Queen Size w/ Warranty, Still in Original Plastic. Can 'HOLYHU 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH $149 (253) 5391600 Full or Twin Mattress Set New Factory Sealed. Delivery Available. $120 Will Take. (253) 539-1600

All New King Pillow Top Mattress Box Set 3 Pieces. New & Factory Sealed w/Warranty.. $249. Can Deliver (253) 537 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3056 New Adjustable Bed With Memory Foam Mattress. Wall Hugger with Warranty. $2,800 :LOO6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FHIRU 253.539.1600 New Platform Bdrm Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, Nightstand, H e a d b o a r d , Footboard, Rails. Still Boxed. Retails at $2,600. Will Take $850. 253.539.1600 New Overstuffed 0LFURĂ&#x20AC;EHU 6RID Loveseat. Still in plastic Can have for $750 (253) 539-1600 Absolutely New! Memory Foam Mattress Set! Can Deliver. Worth $2,000 Asking $450 (253) 537-3056

Gibson food freezer. Works awesomely. Has never failed. It has a vacuum compressor that seals the door when shut. Exterior dimensions are 70â&#x20AC;? x 32â&#x20AC;?. Asking $200. Will deliver if in port orchard. 360-551-6626

EMPLOYMENT City of ma o Tac Jobs www.cityoftacoma.org/jobs Hostess Wanted. Part-time, weekends. Also need part-time waitress. Come in and fill out application. Tower Lanes, 6323 6th Ave.

Hair Station for Rent. Davinci Salon and Spa, Lakewood. (253) 588-1719

AUTOS

GARAGE SALE

DANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S QUALITY CARS

Saturday 9 am-5 pm 309 192nd St. Spanaway WA 98387 (253) 219-6523

Pierce County Community Newspaper Group is seeking an

253.221.2209

All proceeds go for Altrusaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nonprofit fund raisers. A range of teen size school clothes and other items have been donated to raise funds for local scholorships and other needs.

Experienced

429 ST HELENS AVE â&#x20AC;˘ TACOMA, WA

ADVERTISING SALES Representative

The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated selfstarter with a proven record of achieving sales goals. They will demonstrate the ability to develop new business and possess excellent time management skills. Additionally, they should be able to manage all aspects of the sales cycle: prospecting, cold calling, setting appointments, performing needs analysis, presentation, negotiation, and closing, all while maintaining a high level of customer service to existing customers.

ANTIQUES WANTED Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;05 LINCOLN LS V6

LEATHER LOADED, THIS CAR IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION! WE OFFER GREAT FINANCING FOR ANY TYPE OF CREDIT!

BUY HERE. PAY HERE. NO CREDIT CHECK!

(253) 752-8105

,I\RXWKLQN\RXZRXOGEHDJRRGĂ&#x20AC;WIRURXUFRPSDQ\ ZHZRXOGOLNHWRKHDUIURP\RX3OHDVHVXEPLW\RXU UHVXPHWRHPSOR\PHQW#WDFRPDZHHNO\FRP

SERVICE DIRECTORY Find the right business for your home, garden, pet, personal service needs and more right here! PAINTING

PAINTING

LAWN CARE

LAWN CARE

CASH FOR CARS

ELECTRICAL

The Happy Hooker

Allied Electric Service

Big Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawn Care Âş Handyman Âş Clean-up

FREE Hauling for Metal (253) 397-7013 LANDSCAPING

LANDSCAPING

ALEXâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Landscaping Painting, Weeding, Spring Clean-up, Pruning, Gutter Cleaning. Residential. Pressure Washing. Trees. Rototilling. Contact Alex 253-564-5743 Free Estimates

ROOFING Your Local Roof Experts â&#x20AC;&#x153;Repairs or Replacementâ&#x20AC;?

TriState Roofing, Inc. TRISTI*931QH

ROOFING

PAYS YOU! FOR YOUR Junk Cars

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

253-606-1647

www.alliedmarinecorp.com

Toll Free 1-877-272-6092 ALLIEE1963CQ

HAULING

CLEANING

Life is too short to spend it cleaning... So let us do it for you. Squeaky Clean 253.473.7621 Licensed & Insured

HAULING

HAULING

HAULING

Father AND Son Hauling Serving all your hauling needs. We will haul anything at any time. NOW Free Junk Car Removal!

1901 Center St. Tacoma, WA 98409 253-363-8280 www.tristate.pro

CONTACT US

CLASSIFIED DEADLINES

Phone: Mail:

Classified Display - Mondays @ 12 noon Classified Line Ads - Tuesdays @ 12 noon

253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma WA, 98417

CLEANING

CELL

OFFICE

253-222-9181

253-671-9951

fatherandsonhauling@hotmail.com

VISIT OUR WEBSITE www.tacomaweekly.com

Advertising Representatives: â&#x20AC;˘ Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com


Section B • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 2, 2012

NOTICES

NOTICES

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Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy

253-770-8552

VOLUNTEERS Looking for Members White River Valley Lions 3DFLÀF$OJRQD (GJHZRRG 0LOWRQ 6HUYLFH$UHDV /RRNLQJ IRU 0HPEHUV ´:H 6HUYHµ ,QIR 930- /LRQ *OHQ (PDLO OLRQJOHQ#KRWPDLOFRP0HHWLQJQG:HG 'DYH·V0LOWRQ30 Meals on Wheels Office Volunteer 'R \RX ZDQW WR SXW \RXU RIÀFH VNLOOV WR ZRUN LQ D UHZDUGLQJ YROXQWHHU RSSRUWXQLW\" :H DUH VHHNLQJ D YROXQWHHU ZLWK VWURQJ FXVWRPHUVHUYLFHDQGFRPSXWHU VNLOOVWRDVVLVWLQRXU0HDOV RQ :KHHOV 7DFRPD RIÀFH RQHPRUQLQJDZHHN0XVW HQMR\ ZRUNLQJ ZLWK VHQLRUV XVLQJ WKH WHOHSKRQH DQG FRPSXWHU LQSXWWLQJ GDWD DQG VHWWLQJ XS ÀOHV  )RRG KDQGOHU·VFDUGUHTXLUHG)RU PRUH LQIRUPDWLRQ FDOO /LQGD DW /XWKHUDQ &RPPXQLW\ 6HUYLFHV Become a Senior Companion today! 9ROXQWHHUV KHOS IUDLO RU GLVDEOHG VHQLRUV VWD\ LQ WKHLU RZQ KRPH DQG PDLQWDLQ WKHLU LQGHSHQGHQFH $FWLYLWLHV LQFOXGH UXQQLQJ HUUDQGVSURYLGLQJWUDQVSRUWDWLRQRUVLPSO\EHLQJDIULHQG +RXUO\VWLSHQGDQGPLOHDJH UHLPEXUVHPHQW SURYLGHG 5HTXLUHPHQWV PXVW EH VHUYHDWOHDVWKRXUV DZHHNDQGEHORZLQFRPH 'ULYHUVDUHHVSHFLDOO\QHHGHG FXUUHQWO\ )RU PRUH LQIR FDOO-XOLH.HUULJDQ3URJUDP 'LUHFWRU     H[W Help furnish hope to those in need! 1: )XUQLWXUH %DQN 9ROXQWHHUVQHHGHG´1:)%KHOSV UHVWRUH KRSH GLJQLW\ DQG VWDELOLW\ LQ RXU FRPPXQLW\ E\ UHF\FOLQJ GRQDWHG IXUQLWXUH WR SHRSOH LQ QHHGµ 7XHVGD\6DWXUGD\ 7UXFN 9ROXQWHHUV 1HHGHG  DP SP 7UXFN YROXQWHHUVULGHDORQJLQWKHWUXFN GHOLYHU IXUQLWXUH WR FOLHQWV DQG PDNH UHVLGHQWLDO DQG FRUSRUDWH SLFNXSV WKH\ DUHDQHVVHQWLDOSDUWRIWKH 1:)% 7HDP 7R YROXQWHHU FRQWDFW XV DW YROXQWHHU# QZIXUQLWXUHEDQNRUJ RU FDOO  Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs :H QHHG D YROXQWHHU WR KRVW SURJUDPV 7XHVGD\  7KXUVGD\     SP DW 3RUWODQG $YH &RPPXQLW\ &HQWHU 6HQLRU 3URJUDPV 9ROXQWHHU ZLOO EH FDOOLQJ %LQJR DQG GRLQJVRPHH[WUHPHFUDIWLQJ JDUGHQLQJ GXULQJ VSULQJ  VXPPHU DQG LQWR IDOO ,I LQWHUHVWHG FDOO %RQQLH #  0RQGD\ )ULGD\30

Ayusa International SeeksTacoma Host Parents for High School Exchange Students $\XVD,QWHUQDWLRQDOD \HDUROGQRQSURÀWWKDW SURPRWHVJOREDOOHDUQLQJ WKURXJKWKHKRVWLQJRIKLJK VFKRROIRUHLJQH[FKDQJH VWXGHQWVLVVHHNLQJ SDUHQWVIDPLOLHVLQ7DFRPD WRKRVWIRUWKHXSFRPLQJ VFKRRO\HDU $\XVDVWXGHQWVDUH \HDUVROGDQGFRPHIURP PRUHWKDQFRXQWULHV DURXQGWKHZRUOGLQFOXGLQJ %UD]LO-DSDQ*HUPDQ\ (FXDGRU)UDQFH3HUX 0RURFFR&KLQDDQG6SDLQ WKH\DUHDOOSURÀFLHQW LQ(QJOLVK)RUPRUH LQIRUPDWLRQSOHDVHYLVLWRXU ZHEVLWHZZZD\XVDRUJ AmeriCorps Opportunity Read2Me Program Specialist 7DFRPD &RPPXQLW\ +RXVH VHHNV DQ $PHUL&RUSVPHPEHUWRDVVLVWLQ WKH 5HDG0H 3URJUDP LQ ORFDO HOHPHQWDU\ VFKRROV 5HDG0HLVDRQHRQRQH DGXOWVWXGHQW UHDGLQJ SURJUDP IRU VWUXJJOLQJ ÀUVW VHFRQG DQG WKLUG JUDGH UHDGHUV 'XWLHV LQFOXGH JDWKHULQJ UHVRXUFHV IRU WXWRU VWUDWHJLHV UHFUXLWLQJ QHZYROXQWHHUVOHDGLQJLQ WXWRUUHFUXLWPHQWDQGUHWHQWLRQKHOSLQJWKH5HDG0H &RRUGLQDWRUV LQ DVVHVVPHQWWUDFNLQJVWXGHQWVXFFHVV DQG WXWRULQJ $SSOLFDQWVPXVWEH\HDUV RI DJH DW WKH VWDUW GDWH RI VHUYLFH 6HS  -XO  &RQWDFW.DUHQ 7KRPDVDW   RU NWKRPDV#WDFRPDFRPPXQLW\KRXVHRUJ IRU PRUH LQIRUPDWLRQ AmeriCorps Opportunity Employment Program Specialist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

Pet of the Week

“Jax” Have you met Jax? This laid back 4 year old lover is looking to meet you. Jax tries to play it off as one “cool cat” but in reality, he’s as lovable as they come. He’s extremely friendly, craves attention and loves to be pet. He doesn’t even mind the kisses all over his face. After you stare into his beautiful green eyes, or pet his soft black and white KDLUZH·UHFRQÀGHQW\RX·OOEHKRRNHG-D[FDPHWRXVDV DVWUD\FRYHUHGLQÁHDV'XHWRDQDOOHUJ\KLVOXVFLRXV hair had to be shaved off his back legs, but is growing in beautifully now. Jaxs needs a loving owner who will be GLOLJHQWDERXWJLYLQJKLPÁHDPHGLFDWLRQPRQWKO\7KLV wonderful kitty is going to make someone extremely happy, will it be you? Take Jax home today! Reference #A458049

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week

1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Daisy

Daisy is a shy loving girl who is patiently waiting for someone to stroke her beautiful coat. Make her part of your Forever Family today.

Sox Sox is a vocal little girl who lets you know when it is time for love! She is very demanding when it comes to quality love time and is patiently waiting for a Forever Family to call her own. www.MetroAnimalServices.org


Friday, August 2, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV Stephanie Lynch

Doug Arbogast (253) 307-4055 Over 20 Years Real Estate Experience

253.203.8985

Tired of renting? Jennifer Pacheco Monthly payments Mortgage Officer on a new home Loan NMLS #486264 could be less than 253-926-4131 your rent. Call me www.umpquabank.com/jpacheco jenniferpacheco@umpquabank.com for details!

Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award Recipient 2008-2012

REPRESENTING BOTH BUYERS AND SELLERS Proven Results Experienced Integrity High Service Standards 2914 N 30th St $399,950

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Loan products subject to credit approval

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

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HOMES FOR SALE

WATERFRONT 1RUWK6DOPRQ%HDFK&RPPXQLW\ on Tacoma Narrows, 35-feet RYHUZDWHUIURQWDJHOHDVHKROG SURSHUW\'HFNZ SDUNLQJORW rights. $25,000 &RQWDFW6DOPRQ%HDFK1RUWK 5RJHU(GZDUGV

3 bed 1.75 bath 2,340 sf. Majestic views. Move in ready mid-century modern. Near Proctor District & Ruston Way waterfront. Minutes from I-5 for easy commuting. 6WXQQLQJ Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFH JOHDPLQJ KDUGZRRGV ORYHO\  HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW NLWFKHQ D VHFOXGHG  EDFN\DUGGHFNZYLHZ0/6

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Call me todayâ&#x20AC;Ś I am happy to help you with your Real Estate needs.

4424 6th Ave Suite 1, Tacoma, WA 98406

www.stephanielynch.com

HOMES FOR SALE

Low interest rates + affordable prices = great investment opportunities.

Dougarbogast.com douga@johnlscott.com

Let me help! Call today.

HOMES FOR SALE

Now is the time to invest in Real Estate for your future!

Foreclosure & Investment Specialist

We are now experiencing a sellers market which brings more money when selling your home. Call me today if you are thinking about selling for your free market analysis and learn how I will sell your home for the most dollar to you!

HOMES FOR SALE

CALL 253.922.5317

Better Properties Shannon 253.691.1800

Captivating Puget Sound View! 3011 N 33rd St, Tacoma, WA 98407

For qualifications contact Jen HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

5007 S Alaska St Cozy, warm & inviting are usually words one uses to describe a small cottage- not todaythis house has room for everyone. W/ 4 bedrooms, EDWKVRIĂ&#x20AC;FH MLS#518929 workshop, enclosed $174,950 covered patio, a media/den area, greatroom/kitchen, plus formal livingroom & diningroom- this house OLYHVHDVLO\ HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWO\$ODUJHIHQFHG\DUG tons of offstreet parking & an inviting master VXLWHDUHDZRZQĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHPDNHWKLVKRPH even more welcoming; add proximity to HYHU\WKLQJ DJUHDWĂ RRUSODQDKKK+RPH

Better Properties Shannon 253.691.1800

North End Charmer!

Margo Hass Klein Coldwell Banker Bain

(253) 279-9949 margohassklein@cbbain.com www.margohassklein.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I act in your best interest, not mine. You deserve respect from the first time we shake hands to the last.â&#x20AC;?

3310 N. 30th

P 3 BR, 1.75 BA, Approx. 2,586 sq ft P Huge wrap-around deck perfect for entertaining P Hardwood floors, crown molding, great details P Custom granite & stainless kitchen

P Formal living & dining room w/VIEW P Multi-purpose bonus room on lower level P Fenced backyard, 2-car garage P Located near Ruston Way & Proctor shopping

$375,000

Sound Views! )DEXORXVORFDWLRQFORVHWR3URFWRU836WKH waterfront and freeways. EHGVEDWKVKDUGZRRGĂ RRUVDQGFRYHG FHLOLQJV2QHFDUJDUDJHRYHUVL]HGWZRFDU JDUDJHZLWKKHDWHGVKRS DPHFKDQLFZRRG ZRUNHURUDUWLVWVGUHDP ([FHSWLRQDO VTIWORWSRVVLEOHVXEGLYLGH EX\HUWRYHULI\  1HZHUURRIZLQGRZVDQGIXUQDFH7HUULĂ&#x20AC;F KRPH7HUULĂ&#x20AC;FORFDWLRQIDEXORXVRSSRUWXQLW\ &DOO3DP   IRUPRUHGHWDLOVRUDSULYDWHVKRZLQJ 0/6 %HWWHU3URSHUWLHV1RUWK3URFWRU

33 N Salmon Beach

$555,000 Call Margo today to schedule a private showing. MLS # 477936

REAL ESTATE I N V E S T M E N T

SERVICES REIS

For Sale

www.REISinvest.com www.REIS4rentbyowner.com Property Management Receiverships Condo/Home Owners Association Management Bank REO Acquisitions Commercial Sales/Leasing

For Rent

For Lease

1LFHVW6SRW$W6DOPRQ%HDFKIW2I6: ([SRVXUH6DOW:DWHUIURQW7KLVFRPSRXQG IHDWXUHV¡[¡VHSDUDWHVKRSKRWWXE ZFRYHUHGJD]HERFRYHUHGERDWVWRUDJH WRQK\GUDXOLFERDW/LIWEULFNZRRGEXUQLQJ Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHZLWKLQVHUWH[SDQVLYHGHFNLQJRQ DOOVLGHVRIKRPHGURSGHDGJRUJHRXV GHJUHHSDQRUDPD([WHQVLYHUHPRGHODQG UHEXLOGWKURXJKRXWWKHODVW\HDUVLQFOXGLQJ URRIVLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZVGRRUVGHFNLQJ ERDWKRLVWZDWHUV\VWHPKHDWHUVNLWFKHQ master suite, stairway, and more.

Dave Peterson Better Properties (253) 222-8480

15 Salmon Beach Professional Office 4412 6th Ave Tacoma For Lease Also 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Mixed Use REO $350,000 4141 6th Ave 1 Comm. unit; 8 res 253-752-9742

Lakewood Move In Special $850 4820 Yew Lane SW 2br 1 bath w/garage 253.752.9742

www.REISinvest.com

University Place Stratford Heights Apt 1, 2 or 3 bd w/ Garage On Site 253-565-0343 253-752-9742

Office/Warehouse 3875 Steilacoom Blvd, Lakewood From 2500 sq ft 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com www.REISinvest.com

Office/Retail 7609 Steilacoom Blvd SW Lakewood 1340 sq ft. $12.95 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

MLS # 493836 2 Condos $295,000 6319 19th, #s 9 & 11 1921 sq ft In UP across from TCC 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Waterview Crossing $13,900,000 1600 Unit Dev.Des Moines. Currently 3 Mobil Parks. GI $563,168 253-752-9742

Tacoma (253) 752-9742

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University Place 4 Plex $850 1100 sqft 3731 S. Orchard St #4 2br 1 3/4 bath 253-752-9742

Professional Office 4412 6th Ave Tacoma For Sale or Lease 253-752-9742

Center St Apt $450-$475 3872 Center St Studio & 1br 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Gig Harbor (253) 514-6539

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Downtown Office Condos 705 S 9th. Tacoma for Sale & Lease 253-752-9742

DuPont (253) 207-5871

Seattle South Lake Union (206) 319-5981

)DQWDVWLF1R%DQN:DWHUIURQW+RPH:*RUJHRXV 6Z([SRVXUH3HUIHFW)RU6XPPHU)XQ$EVROXWHO\ $ZHVRPH4XDOLW\LQWKLV5HEXLOW6WRU\+RPH /DYLVK8VHRI*UDQLWH/LPHVWRQH7UDYHUWLQH ([SDQVLYH'HFNV&RYHU2YHU6T)W RI$PD]LQJ2XWGRRU6SDFHIRU(QWHUWDLQLQJ  5HOD[LQJ&RQYHFWDLU+HDWLQJ &RPPHUFLDO*UDGH &KHI¡V.LWFKHQ7RR6RDNLQ\RXUMHWWHGWXELQWKH UGà RRU0DVWHU6XLWHDV\RXZDWFKVHDOLRQV HDJOHVVDLOERDWV WXJVGULIWE\6SHFWDFXODUVHWWLQJ

Dave Peterson Better Properties (253) 222-8480


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 2, 2013

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You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


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