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WHAT’S RIGHT WITH TACOMA

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Lincoln LAWGS are Tacoma’s newest welcome figures By Kathleen Merryman

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PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

CLAIMING THE WALL. With the paint on their new mural dry, the artists stood for

a portrait. From left, they are Devin Quiton. LeRoy Schmidt, Darren Pen and Sally and Chuck Budack.

ally and Chuck Budack claimed victory last week in the turf war they’ve been fighting with gang taggers for five years. They did it with paint, a coat of gangbusters sealant, volunteers, permits, $1,900 of their own money and their vaca-

tion time. Their new mural celebrates the power of the Lincoln District, and their resolve to fight blighters. It stretches along the curve of State Route 7 as it rises from Interstate 5 to 38th Street and it features a greengrass, blue-sky picture of a diverse and united neighborhood. The Budacks consider it their 25th anniversary gift. Sally put the last dabs X See LAWGS / page A12

PLAY BALL? Visions of a Fife sports complex resurface By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Two years after the City of Fife sold a site that was being targeted as a location for a multi-million dollar soccer complex, the city is looking at funding a study to see if developing a sports complex would bring athletic tourists to the city. Fife City Council recently approved the submission of a grant request for $37,500 from the city’s Lodging Tax Advisory Committee to fund a detailed study of the issue after a preliminary report found such a complex would draw sports crowds. The application for more money to pay for a consultant to study a topic the city had just abandoned was not lost on council member Pat Hulcey, who saw the request for more money as spending good money after bad. “We have been down this road,” he said. The city had been pondering a sports complex for a 54-acre site along on 20th Avenue East only to sell the site for $12 million in 2011 because the economic downturn mothballed plans and the city found itself in need of cash. The original plans envisioned a sports complex that would host regional soccer tournaments and flood visitors into local hotels. A study at the time concluded the facility would have been a regional draw. The land, however, was sold to the Washington State Department of Transportation for open space. Proceeds from the sale beefed up the city’s bottom line, but about $8 million was put into the city’s Miscellaneous Capital Projects Fund, which could be used for funding a future sports facility. And much like the last consultant’s report on the concept, a preliminary study has

PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

NATURE. Family, friends and coworkers gathered to walk on a beach that was once an environmental disaster.

ST. PAUL WATERWAY MARKS ENVIRONMENTAL MILESTONE By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

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ew Tacomans don’t remember when the Tacoma Aroma was more than a Seattledriven catchphrase to diss its smaller sibling. Tacoma stunk. Industries on the waterfront were filling the sky with rotten-eggsmelling chemicals like hydrogen sulfide. Commencement Bay was once considered one of the most polluted bodies of water in the country. It is now a national model of restoration of urban waterways. The journey from being a Superfund site to the envy of other restoration efforts is 25 years old this month. Simpson Tacoma Kraft Co. marked that transformation with tours of the St. Paul

“What we see today is a healthy habitat that stemmed from hard work and cooperation among the company and community partners with a steadfast commitment to restoring our urban bays.” – Dave McEntee, Simpson Tacoma Kraft Co. Waterway beach for workers, their families, environmentalists and officials up and down the ranks who led the restoration and Superfund cleanup project. The cardboard and lumber maker sits at ground zero of the cleanup. “When we purchased the pulp and paper

X See COMPLEX / page A9

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2013 PROCTOR ARTS FESTIVAL: With more than 150 vendors committed, there’s a lot going on a this year’s Proctor Arts Fest. PAGE B3

John Stearns A13

City Briefs ................A2 Pothole Pig ...............A3

Dreamfest 13 B4

mill in 1985, the shoreline had been polluted for more than 60 years,” said Dave McEntee, vice president, Operations Services. “But we had a vision not only for Simpson, but to restore the bay’s natural habitat and prevent future pollution.” X See CLEANUP / page A12

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Sports .....................A13 Make A Scene ........ B5 A&E ....................... ..B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Two Sections | 24 Pages

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City Briefs SOUTHBOUND SCHUSTER CLOSURE EXTENDED

Although drivers traveling south on Schuster Parkway expected to have the road fully open on Friday, July 19, they will have to wait a few more days, possibly through July 30. During this additional time the project contractor, Ceccanti Inc., will finish the wall repairs. “We know how much people are looking forward to having the road fully open and really wanted to open it on Friday,” said project manager Mark D’Andrea. “We’re doing what we can to help the contractors finish as quickly as possible.” Though contractors will work late this week, the road will continue to remain open for the peak travel time in the morning, overnight after 9 p.m. and weekends. The detour at South 4th Street will remain the same – following South 4th Street onto Dock Street onto South 15th Street. Those with questions may contact D’Andrea at mdandrea@cityoftacoma.org or (253) 591-5518.

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Tacoma Public Schools will host a career fair Tuesday, Aug. 13, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Geiger Montessori School cafeteria, 7401 S. Eighth St., Tacoma. The fair will be open to the public. The district is looking for qualified candidates for the following positions: paraeducators, office professionals, IT technicians, nutrition services, transportation, custodial, security, tutors, noon hour supervisor, crossing guard, health room assistants (LPN), and substitutes. To apply for positions, go to www.tacomaschools.org. Click on “Careers.”

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Do you care about what is happening in your schools? A huge part of policy change in our schools has to do with those on the Tacoma School Board. Come hear candidates Dexter Gordon and Debbie Winskill speak and answer questions surrounding policy, history, and the future for the youth in our community. The Candidates Forum is happening August 6, 4-6 p.m. at Peace Community Center, 2106 S. Cushman Ave. Enjoy snacks and refreshments, courtesy of Vibrant Schools member Stand for Children, while learning about the two candidates and

what they are able to do for the youth you most care about. Vibrant Schools will have a set of questions but will also provide an opportunity for public comment and questions. This is your moment to share your voice, concerns, and hopes for our schools. For questions contact Info@VibrantSchoolsTacoma.org. Vibrant Schools has 29 different member organizations from different backgrounds, social, political and religious views, and cultural vantage points at one table sharing with one voice the hope that all youth are successful in life. Learn more at www. vibrantschoolstacoma.org.

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Samantha Camp – owner, operator and Goddess of Soap for Pip & Lola’s Everything Homemade – has announced that Pip & Lola’s Everything Homemade has now had its doors open for a year in historic Freighthouse Square. To commemorate the occasion, Pip & Lola’s will be having a First Anniversary Extravaganza on Thursday, Aug. 1, (one year to the date from its grand opening) from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. The storefront began with a dozen vendors and now has over 70 artisans. Camp knows it is no easy feat to survive the first year of business and she and her vendors feel it is worthy of a celebration. “We could not have done it without the vendors and the amazing customers.” Camp says. “The least I can do is give them love and cake.” And much more. There will be live music throughout the day in addition to free “birthday” cake and sales throughout the shop. Final plans are still being solidified but Camp promises it will be worth the trip. “Throwing parties is one of my superhero powers,” Camp says. Currently, there are knit and crochet items, pottery, jewelry, wood turnings, stained and fused glass, BBQ rubs, clocks, chain mail jewelry and accessories, candles, young girls’ dresses and skirts, aprons, synthetic hair pieces, blankets, paintings, cards – plus, of course, the SOAP and a whole lot more. Pip & Lola’s is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 7 p.m. and Sundays noon to 5 p.m. For more information call (253) 256-5660 or email pipandlola@ gmail.com.

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Due to popular demand, LeMay – America’s Car Museum has reinstated its successful “Pave the Way”

paver program, which officially ended in April 2012. The museum is launching a new Paver Campaign, which will run through the end of the year. For a donation of only $100 or more, you can have a personalized, granite paver permanently installed in the Christine & Karl Anderson Plaza at America’s Car Museum. Purchasing a paver is a great way to honor a loved one, promote your business or commemorate a special occasion such as a wedding, anniversary or birthday. If you buy a paver by Sept. 30, 2013, you’ll receive a laser-etched museum coffee mug as a gift. To purchase, visit www.lemaymuseum.org and click on “Support,” or call the membership department at (877) 902-8490.

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Puget Sound residents have an unprecedented opportunity to participate in the third installment of a historic research study that has the potential to change the face of cancer for future generations. To participate, the American Cancer Society is looking for passionate individuals interested in enrolling. The Prevention Study-3 (CPS-3) call to action is to educate and recruit 2,000 participants in King, Pierce and Thurston County. CPS-3 will enroll a diverse population of men and women between the ages of 30-65 across the United States and Puerto Rico, to help researchers better understand the lifestyle, environmental, and genetic factors that cause or prevent cancer. Researchers will use the data from CPS-3 to build on evidence from a series of American Cancer Society studies that began in the 1950s, which have collectively involved millions of volunteer participants. Data from past studies have helped establish monumental findings, including the link between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. “My mom is a two-time cancer survivor and I’m doing all I can to make sure my children don’t have to say that; I really believe CPS-3 is part of the answer,” stated one study participant. To participate in the study, individuals will spend between 20-30 minutes at a local enrollment site to complete a brief survey, have their waist circumference measured and give a small blood sample. At home, individuals will complete a comprehensive survey packet that asks for information on lifestyle, behavioral, and other factors related to their health. Participants should expect a follow-up survey to update informa-

tion every few years. “CPS-3 will help us better understand what factors cause cancer, and once we know that, we can be better equipped to prevent cancer,” said Alpa V. Patel, Ph.D., principal investigator of CPS-3. “The study holds the best hope of identifying new and emerging cancer risks, but we can only do this if members of the community are willing to become involved.” The Hammond-Horn Study and previous Cancer Prevention Studies (CPS-I, and CPS-II) have played a major role in understanding cancer prevention and risk, and have contributed significantly to the scientific basis and development of public health guidelines and recommendations. Those studies confirmed the link between cigarette smoking and lung cancer, demonstrated the link between larger waist size and increased death rates from cancer and other causes, and showed the considerable impact of air pollution on heart and lung conditions. For more information or to learn how to become a CPS-3 Community Champion, visit cps3pugetsound.org or call 1-888-604-5888.

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By placing a spotlight on Tacoma’s growing community of entrepreneurs focused on arts and crafts, food and beverages, design and other creative disciplines, the City of Tacoma’s next quarterly Monday Mixer on July 29 will have a decided focus on all things made in Tacoma. The free networking event will take place at the Harmon Tap Room (204 St. Helens Ave.) from 5-6:30 p.m. “We’re going to take a closer look at what it means to be an entrepreneur in today’s economy, and exchange ideas on how our local entrepreneurs can leverage their creativity and expertise for greater success,” said Mayor Marilyn Strickland, who has made it a personal priority to host each Monday Mixer. Attendees will have the opportunity to network with representatives from some of the City of Tacoma’s partner organizations, established business owners in creative fields who have achieved long-term success, and key staff from the City of Tacoma’s Community & Economic Development department. Topic experts will cover funding and financial assistance, permitting, business plan development, and copyright and trademark law issues. Monday Mixers are free to attend and open to all. Bookmark and visit tacomameansbusiness.com for updates.

Police Blotter

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Tacoma Police Department investigators are on the hunt for witnesses to an incident on June 29 that involved an officer shooting a panhandler at the corner of East 28th Street and East Portland Avenue. The six-year police veteran shot the 53-year-old man after he allegedly attacked the female officer with a pipe-like object during a police stop that include a request to leave the area. The officer reportedly first used a department-issued stun gun to control the man but fired her service weapon when he charged her. She suffered minor injuries in the attack. The man was sent to a local hospital and is being treated for his injuries, which are reportedly nonlife threatening shots to his arm, stomach and chest. Specific to the case, investigators are looking for people who were in a blue minivan, a red SUV or a black Jeep near the intersection about 3:15 p.m. at the site if the incident. Witnesses are asked to contact the police department at (253) 591-5968.

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#1 NW FURNITURE BANK DOES RIGHT BY OLD MATTRESSES #2 HIT-MAKING T-TOWN DUO IS ON THEIR WAY TO THE BIGTIME #3 WALMART OPENS #4 TACOMA ASKS DEVELOPERS FOR PLANS AT KEY DOWNTOWN SITE #5 METRO PARKS TAKES STANCE ON SPERRY DOCK

The Pierce County Sheriff’s Department needs your help to identify three suspects responsible for stealing numerous digital cameras. At 12:15 a.m. on Tuesday, July 2, the pictured suspects entered the Walmart store on Mountain Highway E. in Spanaway. The suspects attempted to remove several laptops from a locked case, then took 11 digital cameras and placed the cameras into a shopping cart. The suspects pushed the cart out of the store and fled with the stolen cameras in the pictured SUV. The stolen cameras were valued at over $2,500, including: · 3 Nikon L280 digital cameras · 2 Fuji S4830 digital cameras · 2 Olympus 820UZ digital cameras · 2 Fuji S8200 digital cameras · 2 Sony DSCH200 digital cameras The suspects appear to be white males in their 20’s, approximately 5’6” to 5’11”, with medium builds.

The suspects fled in a newer maroon Chevrolet Tahoe with custom chrome rims.

1,000

$

Receive up to for information leading to the arrest and charges filed for the person(s) in this case.

Call 253-591-5959 All Callers will remain anonymous

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 â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;Š GgSs By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

General Motors decided to craft a ride that rivaled the Ford Thunderbird in the muscle car wars of the 1960s. Tasked with a car to pit against the giant of the marketplace was GMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chief stylist, Bill Mitchell, who wanted the car to â&#x20AC;&#x153;look like a Rolls-Royce with the flavor of a Ferrari.â&#x20AC;? The Buick Riviera was born and was seen as a styling marvel of its time. The first car rolled off the line in 1963, but it only lasted for two years. The Riviera Gran Sport was unusual from the start and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t share its body shell with any other GM car, which was standard practice of the company. The 1965 model received an update from previous years that included the offerings of the landmark dual-quad Super Wildcat 425 V8 engine and a heavier suspension. The dual exhaust

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK

PHOTO COURTESY OF LEMAY COLLECTION

of the Riviera was boosted from two inches to two and a quarter inches and had fewer turns to reduce back pressure. The later model also had a cassette player in the sound system, cruise control, power brakes, power

steering and power windows. The Buick Riviera is one of the most coveted cars of the 1960s. It sold for $4,316 when it rolled off the factory floor but now sells to collectors for between $27,000 and $53,000.

CONNECTING VETS TO BENEFITS Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?

PCMARVETS volunteer connects with Puyallup Tribe By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

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hristopher Winters was a senior at Barnsdall High School in Barnsdall, Okla., when a U.S. Army recruiter invited him to go fishing. Sergeant Cooley was a persuasive man, said Winters. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The military would be my ticket to a different horizon. Little did I know how it would completely change my life. Twenty-two days after I graduated from high school, I was in basic training.â&#x20AC;? Winters, who is an enrolled member of the Muscogee Nation, discovered both sides of Washington thanks to the Army. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I got stationed at Fort Lewis,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I turned 21 at the Yakima Firing Center. I was on my second enlistment.â&#x20AC;? He did two tours in Germany in the late 1980s, and trained in marksmanship and nuclear, biological and chemical warfare, then returned to Fort Lewis, where he met his wife. They married in May, 1990. In August, Iraq invaded Kuwait. He deployed to Saudi Arabia, then Kuwait, then joined the push across Iraq toward Baghdad. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It changed my life completely,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was hell on earth. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never seen this much carnage in my life. The whole of Highway 1 was a graveyard. On both sides there were vehicles for headstones. There was no grave registration. We saw dogs carrying body parts.â&#x20AC;? It was disturbing in the extreme. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A kid in my unit was college-bound,â&#x20AC;? Winters said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He volunteered at the Cincinnati Zoo. He was going to be a zoologist.â&#x20AC;? After that, the soldier couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bear to be around dogs. He changed his career plans. There were fires burning in the oil fields, and the air was fouled. No one knew what, exactly, they were breathing, Winters said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A number of us encountered

Pothole pigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRISTOPHER WINTERS

IN IRAQ. Chris Winters calls this snapshot, taken

during the first Iraq War, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reflections From the Sands of Hell.â&#x20AC;?

carcasses of animals who convulsed until their backs broke and their stomachs came out of their mouths.â&#x20AC;? He believes some kind of nerve agent killed them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My last operation was detonating munitions,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of stuff we detonated was from the Iraq-Iran war. Explosives, chemicals, we had no idea.â&#x20AC;? People began charting the plumes of smoke, and later linked them to what came to be known as Persian Gulf War Syndrome. Winters began hearing about veterans reporting health and mental health issues to Veterans Affairs, and getting the run-around. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d left the Army with shrapnel from mines in his

body and with bad foot problems he traces to rough marches in boots that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fit. He felt as if his body had aged 15 years. Home again, he fell into nightmares he ties to PTSD. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I go to bed at night, I see a lot of people who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t here anymore,â&#x20AC;? he said. He built a career as a painter, and was finding strength in volunteering with his union. The more he learned about the war and what he was exposed to, the more he encountered other damaged veterans, the angrier he got. The more he challenged the VA to shoulder its responsibilities, the angrier he got when it failed.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;It took a long time to not hate the situation I was in, to look at the flag and not say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;What did you do to me?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Winters said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To deal with that, I dedicated myself to volunteering, to giving back. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m volunteering on just about every veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; outreach.â&#x20AC;? He has focused on working with the Puyallup Tribe of Indians. Through that work he met the team from PCMARVETS, a non-profit that uses its Mobile Veterans Service Office â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a 1997 Fleetwood motor home - to find veterans and connect them to the benefits they have earned. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These guys sought me out,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I introduced them to the Puyallup Tribal Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Committee, and we have been blanketing the area, driving up and down the county.â&#x20AC;? While PCMARVETS veterans service officer Erica Westling is helping clients file claims, Winters is connecting them with peer groups, helping them find jobs, and pushing for funding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The need for veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; organizations could not be any greater than it is today,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The people who set the budget for the VA have to be reminded of the mission of the VA.â&#x20AC;?

Puyallup and McKinley Ave. Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;pothole initiative.â&#x20AC;? And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or return â&#x20AC;&#x201C; each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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4P[aLSÂťZWV\YZP[ZSHZ[J\WVMJVMMLL By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweeky.com

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

FAREWELL. The 10-year-old Mitzelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s location in Fife has

closed, leaving only the Kent restaurant open, although the chain is looking for other Pierce County sites.

The wait staff at Mitzelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s American Kitchen is gone. The last cup of coffee has been poured, and the last sausage omelets are now history. The restaurant had operated at the site for more than 10 years. The stove and coffee makers were auctioned off Tuesday, after the Fife eatery lost its lease. The Puyallup Tribe, which had bought the location years ago for future development, opted to not renew the breakfast-and-burger providerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lease last month.

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The Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber recommended a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Noâ&#x20AC;? vote by Tacoma City Councilmembers to City Council Resolution No. 38700 which would levy a 2 percent tax on gas, phone and electric companies. The City has stated that these new tax revenues would go toward transportation improvements. The measure, however, passed and faces voters on Nov. 5. The Chamber supports efforts and investments to improve roads with responsible and sustainable planning. The City of Tacoma estimates that it needs roughly $800 million in additional revenue to fix existing transportation infrastructure inadequacies. The proposed tax increase would raise roughly $10 million per year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;An 80-year-long â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;road fixâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is not acceptable. Not only is it an unnecessarily excessive time period to implement such a fix, but there has been no accountability put in place for a solid plan,â&#x20AC;? said Tom Pierson, Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber President & CEO. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why not consider a

The tribe now plans to redevelop the site for a tribally owned restaurant although specifics are still in the works, Tribal spokesman John Weymer said, noting that the Tribal Council is pondering several options. The restaurant, known for its Toll House cookie pie, caramel apple crisp, triple berry cobbler, homemade carrot cake, rotisserie turkey and prime rib, was one of two locations in the Mitzelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chain. The Kent location remains open. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have been scouting locations in the Tacoma and Fife area,â&#x20AC;? owner Jack Emmons said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are also looking at other areas outside Pierce County.â&#x20AC;?

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PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

:;9,,; Tacoma City Council has plassed a tax measure for the Nov. 5 ballot

that would raise money for road in Tacoma.

proposal that would actually provide sound investments for the needed road repairs and maintenance in our lifetime while including transparency in the process.â&#x20AC;? Since the proposal did

not go before any of the four City of Tacoma created bodies that might typically see this type of proposal, the Chamber is concerned with the short timeline and lack of preparedness the Council had

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before presenting the proposal as a ballot measure. The Chamber realizes the necessity of a solution that addresses the poor conditions of Tacoma roads but advises city leaders to consider more analysis and study on impacts to its citizens and businesses before putting forth a plan to vote.

Regularly scheduled bridge inspections will start next week on the northbound State Route 167 Puyallup River Bridge in Puyallup and the westbound State Route 16 Tacoma Narrows Bridge in Tacoma. WSDOT bridge crews will begin their work by inspecting the northbound Puyallup River Bridge. Because of its narrow width, crews will close the bridge to all traffic from 3 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday, July 27. SR 167 traffic will be reduced to one lane in each direction, and those two lanes of traffic will be routed over the parallel southbound bridge. Inspection activities will continue on Sunday, July 28, when crews will again close the northbound SR 167 bridge from 5 a.m. to 10 a.m., and route all SR 167 traffic onto the southbound bridge. Bridge inspection crews will then move to the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. Each day from Monday, July 29, through Thursday, Aug. 1, bridge inspection crews will close one westbound SR 16 lane across the 1950 Tacoma Narrows Bridge between 8 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Because the lane closure will occur in the non-peak travel direction, motorists should experience only minimal delays. Three westbound lanes will remain open. WSDOT bridge inspectors inspect every state highway bridge every two years. These two inspections will involve reviewing all components of the bridges. Crews will access areas under the bridge decks using an â&#x20AC;&#x153;Under-Bridge Inspection Truckâ&#x20AC;? with a specialized arm that reaches around the bridge railing and below the deck.

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WORKPLACE GARDEN CHALLENGE

Tacomans deserve a chance to beautify the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s planters By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

Empty planters are an insult to a city of gardens. And Tacoma is rife with them. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re relics of lost generations of garden dreamers. You can count and date those generations in the plantersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; style and materials. Some are large enough to give a tree a home, some small and elegant enough to complement a patch of impatiens. At best, they go unnoticed. Noticed, they give the impression that Tacomans donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care enough about beauty, grace and clean air to add seed and water. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as wrong as impressions get. This is a city of gardeners. And, in most cases, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a city that supports gardeners with the land, water and soil it has committed to its growing community garden, street tree and adopt-a-spot programs. But the planters have fallen into a glitch. They have no process attached to them. Without one, there is no permission. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is no process that covers it, but we can look at requests on a case-by-case basis,â&#x20AC;? said city spokeswoman Carrie McCausland. There is still time to fix that this summer, or to push the issue for next year. Last week we showed you how Sue Goetz, owner of The

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

BLOOM. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not too late to make city planters, and the surrounding town, beautiful this summer. Urban Gardener transformed the big city planter at the corner of D Street and Puyallup Avenue into a workplace garden filled with corn, beans, cosmos, squash and tomatoes. At the end of the halfhour, $25, TAGRO-based job she asked â&#x20AC;&#x153;Can we get in trouble for this?â&#x20AC;? Tacoma Weekly has spent the last week asking city officials if it is okay for people to plant and maintain the little rounds of dry blight downtown. The answer

should be a simple yes, or a baffling no. The closest we came to an answer was when a Public Works supervisor said of Goetz, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not going to tear down her vegetable garden.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a relief, but not a real answer. We had an easy process before Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget crisis. City crews installed and maintained flowers, shrubs or trees. It was a lovely benefit we can no longer afford.

HOW DOES YOUR WORKPLACE GARDEN GROW?

Are you and your employer up for the challenge of a workplace garden? If so, we want to hear from you. Tell us the kind of space you have, the work you do, and why you think a garden is a good fit. Let us know how you decided the size and form. Are you going raised bed or in-ground? What is your planting medium? Will you go with food, flowers or a combination? What will you do with the things you grow? Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your position on garden art? Do you fear gnomes? How about clown gnomes? Over the summer, we will share tips and award prizes. Let us know what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re growing at work at kathleen@tacomaweekly.com.

PHOTO BY CEDRIC LEGGIN

In those days, union crews could, and did, file grievances against people planting in cityowned dirt, even if it was lying fallow. The memory of that lingers around those city planters and complicates the yes or no answer. So does the whole issue of maintenance, which is key to any successful garden. As community development specialist Carole Wolfe noted, once people see something beautified, they expect it to remain that way. If it goes to seed, they might complain to the city. Mike Teskey, a city program development specialist, has gotten plenty of those complaints about Adopt-a-Spot sites, especially traffic circles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a volunteer situation,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Circles get adopted. People move away. We get complaints. It defaults to the city to take care of it. Adopt-a-Spot primarily focuses on litter pick-up now.â&#x20AC;? Still, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s planters, Teskey and Wolfe thought, might fall into the adopt-a-spot process, provided the unions okayed it. Volunteers could sign up for them.

The city could keep a list. If a complaint came in, the city would know whom to contact. It would be a process, but one without a wisp of enthusiasm to it. By contrast, the planting strip permit process is flourishing, and carries just the right amount of obligation with it. Tacoma has encouraged residents to get no-fee street occupancy permits then beautify the strips between street and sidewalks, and to stop referring to them as parking strips. The idea is to keep people from parking on sidewalks and junking up the neighborhood. Drive though the North End, around Hilltop or on Fawcett Avenue to see the exuberant results. If maintenance is needed, the permit holder is responsible. The fallow planters are closer to planting strips than traffic circles. In Sue Goetzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; case, the purpose was almost identical. She heard the planter was put there to stop truckers from taking tight turns and driving on the sidewalk. That no-fee permit looks like a process that fits the planters to a tree. Residents of, say, The Winthrop Hotel, could, call for a permit for any of the planters across the street at the Theater District Link Light Rail stop. If the city had no other plans for the site, they could get the permit, found the Winthrop Garden Club and make the currently crummy site lovely. The owners of Mad Hat Tea Co. could, for example, get a permit to maintain aromatic flowers in the planter on their grim little chunk of sidewalk and turn it into a workplace garden. Any bank could do it. Any boutique could do it. If city officials would rest easier with a process in place, they might wish to get a move on. There are great sales, right now, on gorgeous flowers and vegetables, and straight TAGRO to mix into the soil is always free. Downtown Tacoma could bloom yet this year. Just add watering cans.

Local Restaurants Stink Cheese-Meat puts the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;happyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in happy hour HAPPY HOUR

The new â&#x20AC;&#x153;aroma of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;? sure smells good and it represents all thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tasty about old world IRRGDQGGULQN7KLVLVZKDW\RX¡OOĂ&#x20AC;QGDW7DFRPD uber-deli, Stink Cheese-Meat at 628 St. Helens Ave. If you are willing to step out of the box, the experts at Stink will show you a beer or wine that has stood the test of time. Their beverages not only taste amazing, they tell a story. Add a hunk of cheese or cured meat to the equation and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to take a journey you will want to take again, and again. On the daily beverage menu, house wines by the glass, $5, feature Pinot Noir, Red Blend and Chardonnay. More wines by the glass are available â&#x20AC;&#x201C; just ask your server! Draft beers on tap, $4.50, include Bitburger Pilsner (Germany) and Indian Pale Ale along with seasonal and dark beers.

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Happy hours at Stink are 3-5 p.m. everyday, and all day Tuesday and Wednesday. This means you pay just $3.50 for all draft beers and house wines by the glass. While youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re sippinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, nosh on Caprese Flat Bread, $5. While youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re there, check out the full menu of savory sandwiches, salads/greens served with warm rosemary bread, soup of the day, and weekly delights that will satisfy any growling tummy. Read all about it on the Stink website, www.stinktacoma.com. STOCK PHOTO

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Our View

New Crime Stoppers feature will help empower community

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Guest Editorials

The Magic of Washington Business Week By Don C. Brunell Each summer for the past 38 years, students and adult leaders from across our state have gathered at university campuses for week-long free enterprise â&#x20AC;&#x153;boot campsâ&#x20AC;? called Business Week. There are other summer youth camps and school programs that focus on potential business careers, so whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so special about Business Week? What happens in Business Week is different. It has a magical quality that transforms the lives of both the students and the adults who mentor them. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been involved as an adult leader in Business Week since 1980. From the beginning, we wanted to ensure ethnic and economic diversity among the students, and we wanted to involve teachers as leaders and mentors. To make that possible, we asked employers and service clubs to subsidize the program and provide scholarships so high school juniors and seniors from all backgrounds could attend. It worked. At Business Week, students cover the spectrum of economic backgrounds. Some participants have never been on a college campus, while others are world travelers. Kids that are sometimes shunned in school interact with star athletes and student leaders. Skin color and the size of bank accounts simply donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter at

Business Week. When they first arrive, many of the students are unsure and skeptical, but by the second day, the magic has begun. By Friday graduation day hesitant strangers are transformed into confident enthusiastic friends who have a difficult time saying goodbye. How does that magic work? First, friends who arrive together are separated. Any clique, relationship or history that previously defined a student in their eyes or the eyes of their peers is gone, replaced by an opportunity for a fresh start, a chance to remake yourself. At Business Week, students are placed in groups of 10. Each group forms a company, creates an innovative product, figures out how to produce it efficiently, and crafts a marketing strategy. The teams live together, eat together, work together and learn together. Students are encouraged to share their experiences, to listen and understand. They learn how to work in teams, but they also learn how to lead. At weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s end, the teams participate in a trade show where they sell their ideas to â&#x20AC;&#x153;investorsâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; business, educators and community leaders from across the state who donate their time to Business Week. Seeing these young people come together, to watch as their confidence grows, to see them transform into self-assured, enthusiastic, imaginative people â&#x20AC;&#x201D; often surprising themselves

in the process â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is a phenomenon that is difficult to describe. It happens with the adults too, as major business leaders bond with teachers and students theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never met and may never see again. So what transforms people? First, the program is about learning life skills. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more than just being tops in the business simulation program. It is the realization that you have untapped ability and potential. Second, it is unconventional because students are challenged to be grounded and creative at the same time. Innovation is the order of the day. Third, Business Week offers students firsthand experience with risk and responsibility. Adults provide guiding hands, but the students develop their companies, find solutions to problems and create something the world has never seen before. Finally, it is about bringing disparate people together to work, live and have fun. Traditional class, ethnic and economic barriers evaporate for a week. Diversity, creativity and unlimited potential have drawn generations of immigrants to Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shores for over 200 years. All of that is compressed into just one week at Washington Business Week. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the magic of Business Week. Don Brunell is the president of the Association of Washington Business.

Perplexing parking problem solved

Varying price rather than time limits is key to successful parking management By Erik Bjornson Tacoma Parking Technical Advisory Group has recently made a number of recommendations to the Tacoma City Council in response to the increasing demand for parking in downtown. Two of them: expanding paid parking to 8 p.m. and charging full rate on Saturdays by the UWT, are sound in principle and practice and should be promptly implemented by the City Manager and council. However, the third proposal: to reduce time limits from 2 hours to 90 minutes by the UWT is misguided and would increase congestion and pollution on Pacific Avenue and create a number of related problems. The proposal is also contrary to the best practices for parking management and the methodologies of model comparative cities. This well-intentioned proposal should be respectfully declined by the City. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;head and shoulderâ&#x20AC;? authority on parking, one that incorporates hundreds of parking studies, is the 733-page text â&#x20AC;&#x153;The High Price of Free Parking,â&#x20AC;? written by UCLA Urban Planning professor Donald C. Shoup (updated 2011) and published by the American Planning Association. With refreshing clarity, professor Shoup explains that â&#x20AC;&#x153;the purpose of right-priced curb parking isâ&#x20AC;? to set â&#x20AC;&#x153;the lowest price that will avoid shortages.â&#x20AC;? In order to avoid such shortages, â&#x20AC;&#x153;traffic engineers usually recommend that about 15 percent of curb space â&#x20AC;&#x201C; one space every seven â&#x20AC;&#x201C; should remain vacant to ensure easy

ingress and egress.â&#x20AC;? Shoup points out that â&#x20AC;&#x153;[t]his cushion of vacant spaces eliminates the need to cruise...â&#x20AC;? Professor Shoup specifically warns against the Tacoma Parking Technical Advisory Group suggestion to reduce time limits in response to increased demand: â&#x20AC;&#x153;time limits are an inefficient way to manage parking spaces: such regulations are, almost unnecessarily, high inefficient in the regulations of parking space.â&#x20AC;? Instead, Professor Shoup suggests that â&#x20AC;&#x153;rather than limit the duration of curb parking, cities can charge the right price for it.â&#x20AC;? Professor Shoup also points out that this erroneous approach reduces parking revenue collected, increases traffic congestion, yet increases tickets and conflicts between drivers as they jostle to acquire underpriced parking spaces. Traffic congestion is already a significant issue on this stretch of Pacific Avenue. Hence, reducing time limits in response to increased parking demand would exacerbate many of the problems the parking commission seeks to remedy despite their intentions. Increasingly, other model cities such as San Francisco and Redwood City are moving to increase or eliminate time limits altogether. It is also incumbent on the City Manager to comply with the 2009 city ordinance TMC 11.05.260 that originally implemented paid parking and mandated that parking rates be set in a manner to obtain a 15 percent vacancy rate. The City Managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role is to implement this Council policy (not

create his own) by simply measuring occupancy rates in downtown Tacoma and setting the appropriate price to obtain 15 percent occupancy. Because the demand for parking in downtown Tacoma varies wildly depending on the area, Tacoma should follow the lead of other cities and calibrate the fee for parking with the demand in each area. While Seattle has seven different rates it charges for curbside parking depending on the demand in the area, Tacoma has refused to take a nuanced approach and continues to charge one rate for the entire downtown. This has resulted in overpricing and massive vacancies in some areas of downtown and under-pricing and congestion in others. Even Olympia, with a population of less than one-fourth of Tacoma, is still able to manage four separate parking rates corresponding with the demand in various areas of downtown. Managing Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parking resources competently has been a critical factor to Fitch, the company that recently assigned Tacoma a new bond on the debt of the City of Tacoma. Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic future and the attractiveness and quality of life largely hinge on the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s willingness to implement best practices in managing itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public resources, including parking. Erik Bjornson is a mechanical engineer and an attorney who works in downtown Tacoma and often writes about downtown urban issues and edits the blogs Tacoma Urbanist and the Tacoma Sun.

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll notice a new feature in this issue of Tacoma Weekly: A half-page Crime Stoppers report on page A2. In practical terms, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your chance to earn up to $1,000 by busting three camera thieves who drive a nice looking Chevy Tahoe with custom rims. Thanks to the Spanaway Walmartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s excellent surveillance cameras, we have great images of the guys, which means someone who knows them has a good shot at the reward, and the rest of us have a shot at getting the felons out of the community for a while. At Tacoma Weekly we operate by our motto, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because Community Matters,â&#x20AC;? so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re proud to be part of this Crime Stoppers Tacoma/Pierce County and Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wanted effort. We admit that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be tickled if our newspaper helps bust these bad guys, and scores more yet to be caught on camera. But wait, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more. Lauren Wallin, who compiles this new feature, will take it beyond busting felons. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be inviting our top crime fighters to write about their work, and how we, the lawful majority, fit into it. Look for pieces by Pierce County Sheriff Paul Pastor and Prosecutor Mark Lindquist in the next few months. She will invite us to jump into Crime Stoppersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fun activities and community-building projects. They include Toys for Tots, Charlieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dinosaur, three middle school drum lines and delivering surplus emergency vehicles â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including ambulances and fire trucks â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to poor communities in the United States and South America. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our main primary goal is to use media and the police working together to reduce crime,â&#x20AC;? said Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department spokesman Ed Troyer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That is our main goal. My new goal is to find people who are capable and want to help with the different volunteer opportunities for people in the community.â&#x20AC;? Troyer understands that a strong community is better than crime-free. It is knit together by people who volunteer on one project, meet new people and join in on the next project. They make it a lifestyle, and an enjoyable, fulfilling one. When a new need arises, people from that cadre rise to deal with it. Troyer mentioned young people paralyzed in accidents or crimes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When kids get hurt, we have a strike team called people with a little bit of money and experience,â&#x20AC;? he said. Members with funds and skills help with adapting homes for wheelchairs. Team members who get around by wheelchair listen to fears and share their perspectives. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll learn about all of this and be among the first to know about projects and events as you follow this new feature. Tacoma Weekly staff members have been sucked into this vortex of community good and promise that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be surprised by how much fun is involved. There is satisfaction, too, in helping law enforcement officers get bad people off the streets of Tacoma, Puyallup, Fife, Milton, Orting, Sumner, Lakewood and unincorporated Pierce County. Every law enforcement agency in the area collaborates with Crime Stoppers Tacoma/Pierce County. They know they cannot bust crime by themselves. That is why they support block watches and mobilized neighborhoods. That is why youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see so many of them at National Night Out parties. They want to give people the tools to be effective elements of law enforcement. To that end, expect the new feature to ask for your help. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is about public safety, public education and public awareness,â&#x20AC;? Troyer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We will show you pictures of habitual criminals and sex offenders that have absconded and we believe are hard core, with warrants out. They could be living by day cares and kids.â&#x20AC;? The new feature will evolve, Troyer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something that is not set in stone. When we find things that work, we will stick with them. When we find things that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, we will change them up until they do.â&#x20AC;? The power will flow both ways, creating a stronger, safer community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are only a few hundred of us,â&#x20AC;? Troyer said of law enforcement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are 850,000 citizens who are the eyes and ears, standing up and taking part. We want the eyes and ears to call us and be good witnesses. If you engage the community, we are everywhere, and we can take care of business together.â&#x20AC;? The above opinion represents the view of Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s editorial board.

Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC

2588 Pacific Highway, Fife, WA 98424  Â&#x2039;-(?!  7\ISPZOLY!John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com 5L^Z+LZR!news@tacomaweekly.com 4HUHNPUN,KP[VY! Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com :[HMM>YP[LYZ! Kate Burrows / kburrows@tacomaweekly.com Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Kathleen Merryman / kathleen@tacomaweekly.com Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com :WVY[Z,KP[VY!Jeremy Helling/ jhelling@tacomaweekly.com 7HNPUH[PVU!Tim Meikle / tim@tacomaweekly.com; Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Tammy Vince Cruz >LI+L]LSVWLYZ! Cedric Leggin, Ed Curran, Monica Rice 7OV[VNYHWOLY! Rocky Ross *VU[YPI\[PUN>YP[LYZ! Karen Westeen, Steve Mullen, Dave Davison (K]LY[PZPUN!Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. Tacoma Weekly welcomes letters to the editor, your opinions and viewpoints. Anonymous letters will not be published. Tacoma Weekly reserves the right to edit letters for length, content and potentially libelous material. Please send them to above address or e-mail us at letters@tacomaweekly.com.

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PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT TRIBAL IMPACT

SUPPORTING THE ECONOMIC GROWTH OF OUR COMMUNITY

Over the years, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians has transformed itself and its role in the community. The Tribe’s determined protection of its natural resources, its pivotal role in development of Tacoma’s port area, the Tribe’s major donations to other governments and to charitable organizations, the new-concept Tahoma Market gas station and convenience store, and the development and expansion of the Tribe’s Emerald Queen Casinos are examples of the Puyallup Tribe’s economic progress. Through its two Emerald Queen Casino locations, Administration, Health Authority, Housing Authority, economic development corporation, and school, the Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County with a payroll of more than 3,500 people – 74 percent of whom are non-Native – and total spending in 2011 of nearly $430 million. This spending supports the community by paying good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and by purchasing goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors and construction companies. Assistance provided to the broader Native American community and the Puyallup Tribal membership also has a far-reaching impact in the community as most of these dollars are in turn spent in the local economy. The Puyallup Tribe is continuously living up to its name, which means, “generous and welcoming behavior to all people.” As such, the Tribe is a key sponsor of countless local charities, non-profit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer in today’s tight economy. Despite economic uncertainties across the country, the South Sound is doing well, and the Puyallup Tribe of Indians plays a key role in keeping that a reality. From funding education, jobs, healthcare, city improvement projects, crime prevention and environmental efforts, the Tribe’s tradition as the “generous people” is as strong today as it ever was.

Tribe donates to help local people and charities Donations to Northwest Harvest, Food Lifeline, Toys for Tots and more helps families and communities in need

Puyallup Tribal Vice Chairman Bill Sterud (holding left side of check), along with Council Members David Bean, left, and Sylvia Miller, far right, presented Northwest Harvest Board 4LTILY4PRL/HYNYLH]LZ^P[OH JOLJR[OH[^PSSILULÄ[MVVKIHURZ[OYV\NOV\[[OLZ[H[L During the 2012 fiscal year, the Puyallup Tribe pumped more than $3 million from its charity and general funds into the local community with donations to various charitable organizations, churches, and schools that support food banks, literacy programs, medical research, education and job training, and other programs. Staying true to its tradition as the “generous people,” the Puyallups donated $250,000 each to two key area food distributors in both December 2011 and 2012 – Food Lifeline and Northwest Harvest – which feed thousands of families in need during the holidays. As Washington’s largest hunger relief agency, Food Lifeline distributes more than 35 million pounds of food annually – the equivalent of more than 27 million meals – to feed hungry people throughout Western Washington. Northwest Harvest is the only non-profit food bank distributor operating statewide with a network of more than 325 food banks, meal programs and high-need schools. It provides more than 1.7 million meals every month through this network. Northwest Harvest distributed more than 26 million pounds of food last year. All food and operating funds come from individuals, businesses and foundations, with 92 percent of the total budget going to food distribution. Yearly in December, Northwest Harvest hosts its largest oneday event of the year: the KING 5 Home Team Harvest. Northwest Harvest volunteers and staff spend the day collecting food and funds at numerous sites throughout the Seattle/Tacoma area. Throughout the day, members of the community drove carloads full of food donations to help Northwest Harvest reach its goal for the event. “We were taught as children that the biggest thing a person will be remembered by is what they do for their people – not what they do for themselves,” said Council Member David Bean. “We recognize that the economy is still recovering, and the need for help is still there.” Puyallup Tribal Council Vice Chairman Bill Sterud presented the check to Northwest Harvest Volunteers at the event. “It is an honor and a privilege to be in a position to help people, especially during the holidays,” Sterud said. “We are deeply grateful to the Puyallup Tribe for their generosity and spirit of potlatch giving, at a time when revenue is down and need is up,” said Northwest Harvest Executive Director Shelley Rotondo. The half-million dollars the Tribe donated to

Northwest Harvest over the past two years will provide approximately 2,174,000 meals. “This donation means so much to us, because the need is growing in the community,” said Mike Hargreaves, board member of Northwest Harvest. “Our overhead is so incredibly low, and it’s amazing what we can do with a dollar. This donation makes a huge impact on the organization.” The Tribe’s contributions to Northwest Harvest and Food Lifeline combined equals more than 3.5 million meals to individuals and families in Washington. “A lot of these food banks are down 80 percent in donations. We were sure some families were going to go without,” said Puyallup Tribal Council Member Marguerite Edwards. “Our donation makes a big difference.” Also in December 2011 and 2012, Tribal representatives presented Toys For Tots organizers with checks for $250,000, for a total contribution of $500,000, during the annual KIRO Day toy drive at the Veterans of Foreign Wars hall in South Tacoma. They also brought with them truckloads of toys, accounting for $10,000 in additional donations to support local families who do not have the means to purchase Christmas gifts for their own children. “Christmas is just not the same for a child without presents. We had the capacity to provide these toys to children who need them, and it’s really exciting,” said Edwards. In 2012, the total monetary donation to the drive equaled 50 times more toys for tots. “That’s 50 more vans full of toys.” Tribal Council Member Sylvia Miller said the Tribe’s contributions in food and toys are just a small way to help countless local families. She said the Tribe is proud to play an important role in helping those in the community who need it most. “It is such a good thing that the Tribe can share its wealth with the people in need in the community.” In September 2012 the Puyallup Tribe of Indians gifted a third food bank with a $50,000 grant to FISH Food Banks of Pierce County to be used for food purchases by the Southeast FISH Food Bank. The award is the largest the food bank has ever received from the Puyallup Tribe. “Any time we make a donation to a food bank, it’s a very positive thing,” said Miller. “Many of us come from poor families, so it is a good thing to help another person feed a family no matter who they are.”

Southeast FISH, located at 1704 E. 85th St., is the largest and busiest of FISH Food Banks’ seven fixed locations, serving about 17,000 people each month. “This incredibly generous donation will go a long way toward serving clients in our busiest food bank,” FISH Food Banks Executive Director Beth Elliott said. “We deeply appreciate the Puyallup Tribe’s compassion for our neighbors in need.” Founded in the late 1970s and incorporated in 1983, FISH Food Banks of Pierce County is the county’s oldest and largest food bank organization, now serving 40 percent of the county’s food bank clients. In 2011 FISH served more than 446,000 individuals through its seven food bank sites and its mobile food bank. Through careful stewardship and bulk purchasing, FISH is able to distribute $7 worth of food for every $1 donated. In other areas of charitable giving, the Puyallup Tribe made a $125,000 contribution to Evergreen Council on Problem Gambling for the launch of a therapeutic justice program for problem gamblers in Pierce County. In addition, $400,000 went to fund problem gambling programs at the Puyallup Nation Health Authority. A few years ago, MultiCare Health System embarked on a capital campaign to make much needed improvements to the emergency departments of Tacoma General and the adjoining Mary Bridge Children’s Hospital, which had been facing similar challenges with its 32,000 patients per year. This significant expansion to both emergency departments was a massive undertaking, made possible in large part due to a $1 million donation from the Puyallup Tribe. Thanks to this contribution, the adjoining emergency departments of Tacoma General and Mary Bridge expanded from a small footprint to spanning the length of an entire football field – including both end zones. The Tribe has already seen benefits that extend far beyond improved care, as MultiCare has made significant efforts to not only understand tribal culture, but to make adjustments and policy changes to accommodate these practices. In April 2012 Metro Parks Tacoma Youth Sports received $35,000 from the Puyallup Tribe Charity Trust Board, thanks to a grant submitted by the Greater Metro Parks Foundation. The funding will provide much needed sports equipment and financial aid scholarships, sustaining Metro Parks’ services that may have otherwise been scaled back.

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.

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,8*^VYRLYZZH]LSPMLVMMLSSV^LTWSV`LL By Kate Burrows

over for Savage, who had revived the employee. During a recognition ceremony on July 23, Tababa, Savage, Perea and Mendoza-Jackson were honored for acting quickly and saving the life of a fellow employee. During a recognition event to honor the efforts of these standout employees, officials presented the casinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first lifesaving award to each one involved in the incident. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Emerald Queen Casino is honored to have employees who are not only able to recognize a serious situation, but who chose to respond and show such care and concern for a fellow employee,â&#x20AC;? the casino said in a statement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The actions of Marcelino, Curtis, Steve and Wendy all contributed to the survival of the injured employee. With pride, the EQC Safety Department recognizes these employees for going above and beyond the call.â&#x20AC;?

kburrows@tacomaweeky.com

Thanks to the quick thinking and skills of four Emerald Queen Casino employees, a potentially tragic incident ended well on May 28 when they discovered an employee on the ground and unresponsive. When his co-worker Marcelino Tababa, groundskeeper in the facilities department, heard a loud noise and noticed the employee had collapsed, he immediately called for help, as plumber Curtis Savage and maintenance worker Steve Perea responded. When Savage realized the injured man had no pulse and was not breathing, he administered CPR while Perea stabilized the manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head. Sitting in her first-floor security shed, Wendy Mendoza-Jackson noticed the commotion and immediately called for additional help. Security and medics arrived within minutes and took

PHOTO BY KATE BURROWS

READY AND ABLE. From left, Steven Perea, Curtis Savage, Marcelino Tababa, and a co-worker standing in for Wendy Mendoza-Jackson, were recognized for their efforts in saving the life of their co-worker, Charles (kneeling).

Musuem of Glass holds online auction

WComplex From page A1

concluded that a sports complex would succeed. The city had opted to spend $7,500 on a preliminary study for the Milton Edgewood Chamber of Commerce rather than for a full report since much of the questions were answered in previous reports. The chamberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original Lodging Tax funding request was for $45,000. A second application is now being drafted for the remainder. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lodging tax fund totals about $557,000 a year and funds tourism-related and marketing activities that range from the Fife Historical Society, Harvest Festival, the Daffodil Festival and float and membership in the Tacoma-Regional Convention and Visitors Bureau. â&#x20AC;&#x153;$37,000 is not necessarily a lot of money to give to one project, but it really depends on the project,â&#x20AC;? Fifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Marketing Specialist Laurel Potter said. Fifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s LTAC members will gather all funding requests and provide the City Council with recommendations, which could then approve the list outright or remove some funding requests or send the list back for further review. A new state law does not allow the City Council to change the amount of the funding recommended by the committee. Sportsplex USA from California prepared the pre-feasibility study and would likely do the work of the full study if the request is approved. The initial study concluded that there is strong support from the

RENDERING COURTESY CITY OF FIFE

76::0)030;0,: Fife City Council has greenlighted an application for lodg-

ing tax grants to pay for a full study to determine if a sports complex would draw visitors to the city.

community and its leadership for a sports complex in Fife and that there is a need for a facility of this sort in the Puget Sound. A sports complex within Fife would have great freeway access, be located close enough to Seatac International Airport to draw outside athletes but also be located close enough to local users for more predictable sports events. Fife, however, lacks mid and higher end hotel rooms that are sought after by traveling athletes. Troubles with the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rainy weather would be solved by installing

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synthetic turf on the playing surfaces as a way to maximize the days of use. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ultimately, the pre-feasibility study recommends that a full and comprehensive feasibility study be prepared given the sizable investment necessary to construct a tournament quality sports complex,â&#x20AC;? the city report stated. The sites listed as potential locations for a sports complex are along Levee Road, one at the corner of 45th Street and 70th Street, a Freeman Road site and a patch of land along Frank Albert Road.

From now through Monday, Aug. 5, Museum of Glass will be holding the second annual Fuel Their Fire online auction in support of the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Visiting Artist Program. Bidders have the unique opportunity to sponsor an artist for a five-day residency in the Hot Shop. Bidding takes place online at www.biddingforgood.com/ museumofglasswa. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fuel Their Fire directly connects donors to a program which is pivotal to the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creative exploration. With financial constrictions lifted and access to our world-renowned team of three glassblowers for five days, artists experience unparalleled freedom to experiment and explore,â&#x20AC;? notes Susan Warner, executive director of Museum of Glass. This year bidders can select from the following artists: Rik Allen, James Carpenter, Dan Dailey, Tammy Garcia, John Grade, John Kiley, Donald Lipski, Sibylle Peretti, Jenny Pohlman and Sabrina Knowles, Richard Royal, Therman Statom and Akio Takamori. Winning bidders will receive recognition on the Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website and in the Hot Shop during the residency, a piece created during the residency and the option to attend a private lunch or reception with the artist. Bidding begins at $5,000 and continues in increments of $500. Over the past 11 years, the Museum has hosted over 300 artists from 17 countries. Live stream of the Hot Shop annually reaches 93 countries and has over 55,000 viewers.

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By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweeky.com

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aitlin Ringus apparently is all smiles when she goes to her doctor appointments. So much so, that she wants to make it a career. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whenever I go to the doctor, I want to do it because they treat me so nice,â&#x20AC;? the Fife High School junior said last week during MultiCare Health Systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual Nurse Camp to introduce high school students to medical careers. She attended the camp with eyes on becoming an Intensive Care nurse or pediatrician. She was not alone. Not only did her fellow classmates Alan Cardenas, Tonya Than, Christian Borja and Madison Nevin join her from Fife High School, more than 100 high school students from King and Pierce County earned spots in the 10th-annual MultiCare Nurse Camp that includes hands-on lessons in modern medical equipment as well as job shadows and tours of medical facilities. The goal of the camp is to increase diversity in health care careers as well as provide a way to fill the ranks of the chronically short-handed nurse and technical positions. In 10 years, more than 800 students have attended Mul-

PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

/(5+:65 Top Left: Sydney Russell of Curtis Senior High School receives

tips on suturing techniques from classmate Jordan Scott. Top Right: Fife High School juniors Kaitlin Ringus and Madison Nevin work on their needlework by suturing a pig leg during Nurse Camp. Bottom: High School students from around Puget Sound learned hands on about the career options of nursing.

tiCareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nurse Camp. The students this year represented 31 Western Washington cities and towns. The four-day camp gave high-schoolers inside looks at careers in health care, that range from all departments of MultiCareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hos-

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pitals, as well as provided visits to Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma Community College and Pierce College to see their medical training programs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very pleased to have a diverse group of high school students who are interested in nursing join the MultiCare family for a week,â&#x20AC;? said Nurse Camp Director Jamilia Sherls, MPH, BSN, RN. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nurse Camp allows students to explore nursing and other health careers through hands-on activities, job shadowing and discussions with health professionals, vis-

its to local nursing schools, and much more. They also receive a stethoscope and medical scissors to use during assessment activities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From these experiences, it is my hope that Nurse Camp students begin to visualize themselves as future nurses and become even more motivated to pursue this career path. It would be great if these students returned to MultiCare one day as a nurse or another health professional.â&#x20AC;? They certainly got a look at the various career fields medicine has to offer. Activities included everything from classes on nutrition and exercise to lessons on suturing a pigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s foot with the proper stitch and tours of everything from the linen and food service departments and walk through tours of operating and emergency rooms. All of the sights along the tour were just another day at work for Registered Nurse Mary Walls. She has been a nurse for 30 years, which included stints in the Air Force, a psychiatric ward, surgical rooms and orthopedic centers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can do a lot of things as a nurse,â&#x20AC;? she said while taking a break between groups of students learning about surgical tools. Students learned how to form fiberglass splints for broken bones, how to sterilize medical equipment and how to remove candies using medical tools during the campâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s famous â&#x20AC;&#x153;Skittlectomies.â&#x20AC;? Another favorite activity during Nurse Camp is the alcohol awareness training that includes students wearing â&#x20AC;&#x153;beer gogglesâ&#x20AC;? that simulate the affects of alcohol on vision, response time and coordination.

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FEEDING KIDS WHEN SCHOOL IS OUTâ&#x20AC;Ś A summer meals update from St. Leo Food Connection I

n response to the increasing rates of hunger for children across our community, the St. Leo Food Connection is sponsoring the Simplified Summer Food Program for Children, which began June 20. The Food Connection is serving sack lunches and snacks at Summer Meals sites in Tacoma, Lakewood, Fife and Fircrest on weekdays throughout the summer. Due to demand, several changes have been made in program sites and hours. See sidebar for sites and meal service times. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know from the growth of our Backpack Program, which provides two days worth of food on Fridays to more than 600 children at numerous Tacoma and Clover Park Public Schools, that many children in our community are at risk of going hungry, and that this sad truth is only exacerbated during the summer when school breakfasts and lunches are not available for many of the children who rely on them during the school year,â&#x20AC;? said St. Leo Food Connection Director Kevin GlackinColey. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last year we served more than 700 children daily throughout the summer, but we know that the need is even greater. With the program expansions that we are putting into place we anticipate that we will be serving close to 800 children on

weekdays throughout the summer.â&#x20AC;? Meals will be prepared daily at McCarver Elementary (2111 S. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Jâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; St., Tacoma) and then delivered to the various sites. The Food Connection is partnering with local agencies, including the Tacoma Housing Authority, Mercy Housing, Lakewood, Fife and Fircrest Parks and Recreation Departments, to maximize the number of children they are able to serve. In addition to funding from the USDA, this program is funded in part by the City of Lakewood. Lunch and snacks will be made available at no charge to attending children 18 years of age and younger. All meals are available without regard to race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. If you believe you have been treated unfairly, you may file a complaint of discrimination by writing, USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866) 632-9992 (Voice). Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339; or (800) 845-6136 (Spanish). USDA and the St. Leo Food Connection are equal opportunity providers and employers.

TACOMA SUMMER MEALS SITES Free sack lunches and snacks for all children age 18 and younger Bergeson Terrace, 5303 S. Orchard â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lunch noon to 12:30 p.m.; snack 1:45-2 p.m. Colburn Park, 5410 20th St. E., Fife â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lunch 12:30-1 p.m.; snack 2-2:15 (Monday through Thursday only, closes Aug. 15) Christ the King Church, 5410 20th St. E., Fife â&#x20AC;&#x201C; dinner 6-6:30 p.m. (Wednesdays only) Fircrest Community Center, 555 Contra Costa Ave., Fircrest â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lunch 12:30-1 p.m.; snack 2-2:15 p.m. (Monday through Thursday only) Guadalupe Vista, 1305 S. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; St. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lunch noon to 12:30 p.m.; snack 2-2:15 p.m. Hillside Gardens, 1708 S. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; St. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lunch noon to 12:15 p.m.; snack 1:45-2 p.m. Hillside Terrace, 2330 S. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; St. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lunch noon to 12:30 p.m.; snack 1:45-2 p.m. McCarver Park, 2111 S. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Jâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; St. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lunch noon to 12:30 p.m.; snack 1:30-1:45 p.m. Peace Community Center, 2106 S. Cushman Ave. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lunch noon to 12:30 p.m.; snack 1:30-2:45 p.m. (through Aug. 8 only) Salishan, 44th and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Street â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lunch noon to 12:30 p.m.; snack 1:30-1:45 p.m. Tyler Square, 3202 S. Tyler St. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lunch noon to 12:30 p.m.; sack 1:30-1:45 p.m. FIND MORE LOCATIONS AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

Goodwill holds free career planning conference Tacoma Goodwill has announced their first free career planning conference, followed by their 2013 job fair. The series is designed to help job seekers with career planning and employment. Free Career Planning Employment Conference will be held Aug. 6, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., at Tacoma Goodwillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Milgard Work Opportunity Center, 714 S. 27th St. Lunch is provided, space is limited: Contact Wendy Martindale at (253) 5736629 or e-mail wmartindale@tacomagoodwill.org. Develop a career plan based upon your areas of interest. Breakout sessions

include financial education/budgeting, career success, interview preparation, ways to prepare for college, college 101, using social media for career advancement, overcoming disabilities, and strategies for mature workers. Sponsored by Washington Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Employment & Education, Recovery Innovations, Brandman University, Washington State WorkSource, Suited for Success a Program of Catholic Community Services and Tacoma Goodwill. The free job fair will be held Aug. 22, 1-4 p.m., at Tacoma Community College Student Services Building 11, 6501 S.

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19th St., Tacoma. Preregister with Wendy Martindale at (253) 573-6629 or wmartindale@ tacomagoodwill.org Jump-start your career and get hired. The job fair is open to everyone and will include a special emphasis on assisting women and military veterans. Organizers expect more than 300 job seekers and 25-30 businesses representing youth services, marine industry, banking, grocery, hardware and other retail, education, food service, security and police. Job Fair 2013 is sponsored by Tacoma Community College and Tacoma Goodwill.

Local leaders join Workforce Development Council At its Executive Board meeting on July 18, WorkForce Central announced three new appointments to the Tacoma-Pierce County Workforce Development Council (WDC). The Pierce County WDC is one of 12 workforce development boards in Washington, which joins a network of 600 nationwide. The purpose of these organizations is to oversee the implementation, local planning and management of the federal Workforce Investment Act. Working on behalf of and in coordination with the local elected officials, the Pierce County council represents a broad cross section of the local community interested in workforce development issues. The new WDC members are Isa Nichols, CEO of Maxine Mimms Academies (MMA), Dr. Charles Horne, Corporate Affairs Officer at MMA and Tacoma Ministerial Alliance, and Blaine Wolfe, Project Executive for Absher Construction in Puyallup representing business interests. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local leaders recognize that workforce development programs are valuable tools with long-term benefits for the economic growth of the region,â&#x20AC;? stated Linda Nguyen, CEO of WorkForce Central. â&#x20AC;&#x153;More and more company executives are citing a skilled, trainable workforce as a primary reason for relocating to our area. We are fortunate so many of the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leaders are willing to join the WDC to develop value-added services to build this quality workforce.â&#x20AC;? These leaders join others working collaboratively to bring innovative training, education and business solutions to further the economic growth of Tacoma and Pierce County. This public and private partnership convenes monthly to identify skill and training gaps within the local workforce and to develop strategies to address those gaps. The end goal is the development of a job-ready workforce. WorkForce Central is the workforce development organization for Tacoma/ Pierce County. It provides a pathway to employment for job seekers and is a single point of contact for businesses needing to address their talent gaps. WorkForce Central also develops and implements innovative training and business solutions to further the economic growth of the county by partnering with business, education, government, labor and community organizations.

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Cedar River Clinics provides supportive, respectful healthcare Since its inception more than 30 years ago, Cedar River Clinics have developed a reputation for high-quality healthcare services provided in a supportive, respectful environment. With many patients touting the compassionate care they receive at Cedar River Clinics, the organization strives to provide access to high-quality reproductive healthcare services to all patients. The clinic, run by Feminist Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health Center, calls itself a social justice organization combining direct services such as abortions, birth control and wellness services with community outreach and activism. Most recently, the organization has developed a program geared to the LGBTQ community, providing services unique to their needs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We saw a very real need for the LGBTQ community to get the healthcare services they need, because they face a number of challenges from discrimination to a lack of provider training,â&#x20AC;? said Development and Communications Director Mercedes Sanchez. The organization was well represented at Tacoma Pride, offering educational materials while getting the word out about Cedar River Clinics. Simon Ellis, ARNP and CNP, is the LGBTQ wellness programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main provider, and hopes to counter the stigma and shame surrounding sexuality and reproductive choices. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is to offer the LGBTQ community,

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especially lesbian and transgender people who tend to be underserved, healthcare in a safe and culturally responsive environment that focuses on their needs,â&#x20AC;? he said. Services offered include annual exams, cancer screenings, birth control, SANCHEZ HGXFDWLRQ JHQGHU DIĂ&#x20AC;UPing hormone therapy, and surgical referrals and follow-up. 7KHRUJDQL]DWLRQDOVRRIIHUVLGHQWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQFOHULFDOVHUYLFHV for its transgender clients. While services are available during regular hours in Cedar River Clinicsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; two locations in Renton and Tacoma, one day a month will be dedicated to LGBTQ wellness services program. The clinic also accepts private insurance, DSHS medical assistance, and also offers services on a sliding fee scale for those without insurance. &HGDU 5LYHU &OLQLFV¡ 5HQWRQ RIĂ&#x20AC;FH LV ORFDWHG DW  5DLQLHU$YH6DQGWKH7DFRPDRIĂ&#x20AC;FHLVORFDWHGDW Martin Luther King Way. For more information about Cedar River Clinics, visit www.cedarriverclinics.org.

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WCleanup From page A1

The former mill operator, Champion International, and other logging operations had left toxic chemicals in the water and in the soil. The St. Paul Waterway soon became the first Superfund project and habitat restoration in U.S. coastal waters. Simpson Tacoma Kraft and Champion worked out an agreement with the EPA to cap the contaminated sediment along the spit and change water treatment methods ahead of requirements to do so. Simpson officials met with City of Tacoma, the Puyallup Tribe, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington Department of Natural Resources, public officials and environmental and citizen groups to develop a restoration plan. Just three years later, 17 acres of underwater sediment was replaced with 300,000 cubic yards of clean soil and seven acres of vital marine habitat where the Puyallup River enters. Citizens for a Healthy Bay took form to rally beach clean ups, monitor the waterways and promote the cause. The project is now recognized as a model for industrial and environmental partnership. It is one of the few Superfund sites around the country to be restored without litigation. Ponder that. Everyone agreed on the cleanup plan

WLAWGS of paint on it on her birthday, and before sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scheduled for knee replacement surgery. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Look at how many new legs I got for my birthday,â&#x20AC;? she said pointing to the letters spelling out â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lincoln LAWGS,â&#x20AC;? the name of their Safe Streets group. The letters stand for Lincoln Area Watch Group, and each of them is a cartoon person. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are us,â&#x20AC;? Sally said of the letters Showing off the mural, the first thing out of her mouths was a thank-you note with a sharp edge at the end. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have done it without the City of Tacoma, especially Allyson Griffith,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And the Department of Transportation, the State Patrol, Sherwin Williams, Safe Streets and Tacoma Rail. They have all participated and supported,

and who was going to pay for it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There really is no precedent for this,â&#x20AC;? Simpsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Legal Counsel Ken Weiner said. Robert Clark walked the beach overlooking Simpsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pulp facility last week, and for him it was like a trip to see an old friend. Clark is now retired from the National Marine Fisheries Service. The cleanup of the St. Paul site was one of his projects. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It has been a lot of fun to see how it all worked out,â&#x20AC;? he said. A native Tacoman, he remembers going sailing on Commencement Bay and constantly having to dodge driftwood and industrial trash. The water is now clear of debris and plants. Fish and birds have returned as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It has gone from a Superfund site to a home to marine organisms.â&#x20AC;? The St. Paul site also marked the first cleanup that now touches dozens of sites around the tideflats and every inlet and waterway. Those sites too are seeing progress. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The beach restoration has been a tremendous success,â&#x20AC;? McEntee said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What we see today is a healthy habitat that stemmed from hard work and cooperation among the company and community partners with a steadfast commitment to restoring our urban bays. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a beautiful setting that will continue to provide critical habitat for marine life and economic opportunity for our employees and the community.â&#x20AC;?

From page A1

and done everything to make this happen and keep us safe. This is a community. If we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t collaborate, the people who want to destroy this community will take it over. This is the message that we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want our community destroyed and tagged.â&#x20AC;? They have been putting that message on the wall for five years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the gateway to our neighborhood,â&#x20AC;? Sally said. She and Chuck were beyond irked that anyone coming off of Interstate 5 to visit them would pass a panorama of spray-painted claims and threats. They have worked hard to create a beautiful and safe neighborhood, but the entrance to it reinforced the misconception that Tacoma is a town that is overrun by dangerous punks. So five years ago the Budacks went after it the

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way so many other anti-tagging squads do: They rolled donated paint over the gang signs. They gathered partners â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Darren Pen of Safe Streets, Tacoma City Councilman Marty Campbell, neighbors. They did it lawfully and safely, with permission each time from Tacoma Rail, which owns the tracks along the wall, and which let them know when trains were due. The strategy failed. Taggers used the fresh paint as canvasses. If theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d had any manners at all, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have spray painted thank-you notes. Instead, when they happened to see the Budack crew painting, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d yell insults and try to intimidate at them. The Budacks just laughed at them and formed a plan to foil them. They studied the retaining wall and noticed that taggers do not generally spray over street art, including graffiti and murals. It could be that they appreciate the work. More likely, they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

-0,3+;907 Simpson Kraftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s David Whited brought his family to

work to so they could walk the beach outside his â&#x20AC;&#x153;officeâ&#x20AC;? to celebrate the environmental cleanupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 25th birthday.

waste paint where their signs donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stand out against a busy background. So the Budacks organized teams to put up busy backgrounds. They brought lots of donated color to each foray and rolled it on in complicated patterns, from plaids to pigs to volcanoes. It worked pretty well, and it was interesting. But it was not beautiful. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our 25th anniversary was a month ago,â&#x20AC;? Sally said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We decided to paint the town. This is our vacation. This is our mission trip.â&#x20AC;? Usually, Sally, a nurse at St. Joseph Hospital, and Chuck, who works at PABCO roofing, volunteer with a humanitarian project over their vacation. In 2011, for example, they went to Cambodia to build a bathroom for a school. This year, they arranged for permits to paint a permanent mural and researched the materials, from solvents to sealants.

Local. Handmade. Goodness.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We removed 100 pounds of stripped paint off of this little section,â&#x20AC;? Sally said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then we used concrete sealer that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let water come through from the back, and then we applied the base coat.â&#x20AC;? Sherwin-Williams gave them a discount on the colors, and on top-quality sealant that survives when tagging is removed. They did the grunt work on their own in near-record heat, always getting the allclear from Tacoma Rail to get on the tracks. Darren Pen of Safe Streets called and asked if there was anything they needed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We told him warm bodies,â&#x20AC;? Sally said. Enter LeRoy Schmidt and Devin Quiton, 17-yearold Lincoln High School students. LeRoy is a veteran volunteer from the HAWCS Safe Street group named for the neighborhood streets: Hosmer, Alaska, Whitman, Cushman and Sheridan. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s helped the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department bust retailers who sell cigarettes to minors. He helped build, and works at, a new community garden, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

in ROTC. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My senior project is on community involvement against crime, and I need 30 hours of service, so I e-mailed Darren,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The more I look for things to do, the more I find.â&#x20AC;? Devin came because LeRoy invited him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have anything better to do, so why not?â&#x20AC;? he thought at first. Now heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sold on volunteering. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had more fun than he expected, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s met the Budacks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are really good people,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whenever I see this, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to feel like I helped with that, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s awesome.â&#x20AC;? Now that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s done, the Budacks have plans for the new mural: They want it to attract more painters. They have mapped out the retaining wall and are taking reservations for panels from community groups and businesses. This strip of highway, this stretch of wall, Chuck said, is the gateway to the heart of Tacoma. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a welcome to the neighborhoods,â&#x20AC;? he said, inviting us to help make it bright and inviting.

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Sports

TH E

SI

DE LIN E

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s new sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 13

JOHN STEARNS REVIEWS HIS FIRST THREE MONTHS He looks ahead to the rest of the season

PHOTO COURTESY OF RAINIERS

NEW MANAGEMENT. Since being named

Rainiers manager on May 2, John Stearns has helped keep the team in first place in their division and in first place overall in the Pacific Coast League. By Karen Westeen Correspondent

LAKES PASSING LEAGUE OFFERS GLIMPSE INTO UPCOMING SEASON By Steve Mullen Correspondent

KW: Describe your first couple of months with the Rainiers. JS: It’s been a lot of fun. We’ve got a great group of kids here, a lot of prospects and we’ve been able to win. The kids are gelling together as a team. It’s been a really easy transition for me to come in here. I tried to just carry forward what was already going on here. We’ve had over 100 turnovers in our personnel and we’ve been able to keep that same winning process going and hopefully we can continue to do that. We’re trying to keep people here to continue to compete at this level and get ready to help the big league club. So far we’ve been lucky to win about six out of 10 games and we have a long way to go. We’re not stopping and thinking we’re the best team in the league. We’ve got a lot of work to do here. We have a lot of young new guys and that can change in a hurry.

C

oming off of a long off-season, local high school football coaches wonder if the weight-room work put in by their returning players will result in improved play on the field, both in individual play, plus wins and losses – the ultimate measuring stick for any football program. The annual gathering of some of the local offensive talent at the Lakes Passing League at Lakes High School gives Lancer head coach Dave Miller a chance to evaluate both his own talent and also see if any improvements should be made to the annual two-day event. “This really gives the kids on every team here a chance to stretch their legs and get a feel for competition before they go to camp in mid August,” Miller said. “They will get a jump on kids who won’t experience this type of activity.” Coming off tough seasons and getting ready for the next has certain coaches scratching their heads, wondering about the season to come and what kind of work ethic they’ll see. Not so at Foss High School. “We’ve had a great summer to this point,” said second-year head coach Pat Johnson, who played under Dave Miller at Lakes on the offensive line. Opponents and scores don’t matter at all in these games, just skill, player performance and staying healthy. “We pretty much know what we have,” said Bellarmine head coach Tom Larsen. “Coming off of the last three years with the success that we had helps out quite a bit,” Larsen said. His teams went to the 4A state finals,

X See FOOTBALL / page A14

John Stearns was named Rainiers manager on May 2, taking over for Daren Brown, who was promoted to a coaching position with the Mariners. Since then Stearns has helped keep the team in first place in their division, and in first place overall in the Pacific Coast League, for most of the first half. As of July 21 the Rainiers were tied with Salt Lake City for top of the Pacific North division and had been in first place for all but 30 of the first 102 games. Just before the All Star Break he sat down with Tacoma Weekly’s baseball correspondent Karen Westeen to discuss some of the events of those two-plus months, and look ahead to the rest of the season.

KW: You are the best team in the league right now (as of July 13) but you’re only a couple of games ahead of the second place team and if you’re not on top of your division at the end you don’t go to the play-offs so there’s no room to relax. JS: We try to come out here every day and present a program that gives the kids a chance to relax but play hard. We’re working on fundamentals, trying to get them ready for the next level. That’s what our goal is and so far we’ve been able to do a decent job.

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

BRIGHT FUTURES. (Top) Bellarmine’s Will Roberson shows an amazing

amount of skill. (Above) Bellarmine player Garrett McKay looks to help take his team to post-season success again this year.

KW: Anything about this team that’s surprised you after the first two and a half months? JS: The only thing that’s surprised me is the amount of turnovers we’ve had (over 100), even guys that aren’t available currently like Taijuan Walker, who’s going to the All Star Futures Game in New York. We had to call up two players from Everett just today on an emergency basis, so you can see that our roster is constantly rotating. But it’s a big plus for us to have these minor league teams so close so we can mix and match when we have to. It’s fun being here in a suburb of Seattle with our major league just up the road. Most Major League clubs don’t have

X See RAINIERS / page A14

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WFootball state quarterfinals, and the state semi finals the last three years and, with minimal roster turnover this year, they should taste post-season success again. Losing only six players off his team from last year, and with the tremendous amount of work that his team has put in over the summer, Coach Johnson sees things on the upswing at Foss. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a lot of talent returning, including fullback Patiole Pestesea who received a full ride scholarship offer from Eastern Washington University,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. Now that last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inaugural season is history, Johnson is looking forward to better things for the Falcons. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our returning squad has a yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experience of our system under their belts, and our coaching staff expects to see improvement on both sides of the ball and if that happens, the wins and losses will take care of themselves.â&#x20AC;? Like with Coach Larson at Bellarmine, Dave Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lancers have high expectations from year to year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we get the strong work ethic, especially from our team leaders, then the rest of the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work ethic should fall into place and we should be competing for both the SPSL 3A championship and a deep run in the postseason,â&#x20AC;? Miller said. Asked to comment on one of his former players, Miller could only think of one word to describe this particular former player: commitment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pat Johnson will turn things around in time at Foss,â&#x20AC;? Miller said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He has a great ability to communicate, and it will be a matter of time before his players buy into the system and that will be reflected in the wins and losses.â&#x20AC;?

WRainiers

From page A13

From page A13

their Triple A club sitting right here next to them geographically. For instance the New York Mets have their Triple A team in Las Vegas. Can you imagine the problems that presents when they want to call somebody up in a hurry and have to fly a player all the way across the country?

KW: Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got two players (OF Carlos Peguero and relief pitcher Brian Moran) going to the Triple A All Star Game in Reno and another (Walker) selected to the Futures game in New York. If you could name one other player that would be an All Star from the Rainiers, who would that be? JS: If I had to name some other All Stars on our team Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have to look at players who have been here all year. Stefan Romero is a possibility. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had a really good first half, hitting .295. Carlos Triunfelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hitting .293, he had a call up to the big leagues and he certainly deserves some consideration. From a pitching standpoint Brian Sweeney is 8-3, has had a good first half. He just keeps going as a strike thrower, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s successful in the game. Of course weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got Logan Bawcom, our closer, who has 16 saves and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had a good first half. We try to pitch him more than one inning because when he goes to the big league club heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not going to be restricted to just one inning. KW: Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the feeling among the team members because there are other teams so close on their heels? JS: We like that. We have to compete every day. We may be in first place but there are several teams right on our heels. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to get complacent. And weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just down the road from our big league club so our guys are motivated in several ways to go out and play as good as they can. They know that at any time they could go to the big team or to another team, with the trading deadline coming up the end of July. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a player here you have to be ready to come here every night and play the best you can play. KW: Any players that the fans might see the rest of the season who are with the lower level teams at present? JS: I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t name any players who could be up here this year but I know that in the future we have a whole group who will be playing here. Our goal in player development is to keep developing these players. Guys like Mike Zunino, who was drafted last year, and Nick Franklin and Brad Miller who just streaked through the minor leagues within the last year. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good feeling for us down here in player development because it means weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing our job. KW: What are your plans for the All Star

break?

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

WINNING. Players like Fossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Mike CockĂŠ, Jr. (right) give coach Pat Johnson

reason to look forward to the season.

JS: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going down to San Luis Obispo, Calif., and spend two days with my son. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be nice to relax and maybe play some golf with him. Then I have to be back up here on Wednesday afternoon (July 17) for a workout with the team before we fly to Fresno for the series there.

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FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

SECTION B, PAGE 1

in errified in Tacoma T REAL GHOST HUNTERS LEAD TOURS OF GRITTY CITY’S HAUNTED HISTORY By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Some people know some of the stories. Not everyone knows all of them. There are hundreds of tales, after all. Tacoma historians Charlie and Andrew Hansen have researched about 50 ghost sightings and paranormal experiences in downtown Tacoma, but they only mention about 25 of them in their “Terrified in Tacoma” tour because they strive to weave Gritty City’s past with its haunted history by visiting the sites on their walking tour. Some of the great hauntings occur in the suburbs and residential neighborhoods. The tours started slowly last October but are now picking up in popularity, thanks to a marketing and reservation partnership with Spooked in Seattle Ghost Tours. The man behind those tours, Ross Allison, is a Tacoma native and founder of AGHOST, the Advanced Ghost Hunters of Seattle Tacoma and author of a handful of books on all things ghostly. He runs the Pacific Northwest Paranormal Research Center and has been a guest on Sci-Fi’s “Ghost Hunters” television show and a host of other paranormal TV and radio programs. He is also working on a book with Teresa Nordheim, titled “Tacoma’s Haunted History,” through Arcadia Publishing. “Tacoma doesn’t get the attention it deserves,” Allison said of the walking tours. “It has a lot of great history. What we try to do is keep it real. It is run by real ghost hunters. A lot of these types of tours make up stuff to scare people. We don’t do that. We give the history and talk about what we have found in our investigations, so if you are not really into ghosts you are going to walk away with some history.” The Hansens cover the better-known ghosts of downtown, including “Gus” in the Old City Hall, the sightings linked to Alexander Pantages and Klondike Kate in the Pantages theater, the Case of Allan Mason and his cursed mummy and the mysterious sinking of the Andelana. On Jan. 14, 1899, the chains to the ballast logs broke during a squall during the night. The ship capsized at the mouth of the Puyallup River. The master and crew of 18 drowned. Two divers also died while trying to recover the ship, making it Tacoma’s largest maritime disaster. But the tours also cover the tale of Jack the Bear, who was the mascot of the Tacoma Hotel before he was accidentally shot by a Tacoma police officer while wandering downtown. The story of the Native American “sky stone” on what is now a pocket park along Pacific Avenue also gets a mention since it overlooks what had been called “the Harbor of Phantoms.” Of course, the tour mentions the legend of the “Shanghai tunnels” running from the infamous Bodega Saloon, which is now Meconi’s, since every visitor on the tour asks about them. But there are other stories as well. “Even though I was born and raised here, there are a lot of things we are still finding out,” Charlie Hansen said. Commencement Bay, for example, was the site of an incident in 1947 that first coined the phrase “UFO” and actually involved federal investigators – the original “Men in Black.” For folks not in the

know about such matters, writer Steve Edmiston is producing a short film based on the story of the “Maury Island Incident” – taken directly from declassified FBI documents – of Harold Dahl’s June 21, 1947 UFO sighting. An investigation followed that resulted in a mysterious crash of a B-25 carrying evidence from the incident. The investigation went all the way to the FBI’s top desk, J. Edgar Hoover, who expressed personal interest in it. While not ghostly enough for a tour, the UFO sighting also gets a mention along with the fact that Pierce County has the highest number of Bigfoot sighting claims in the state, which has the highest number of sightings in the nation. That fact makes it ground zero for those investigations as well. Pof! hiptu! tupsz! uibu! gfx! mpdbmt! ibwf! ifbse!pg!jowpmwft!uif!dbtf!pg!Kblf!Cjse-!xip! dpvme!ibwf!cffo!uif!nptu!qspmjgjd!tfsjbm!ljmm. fs!jo!Bnfsjdbo!ijtupsz/!Cjse!xbt!tfoufodfe!up! efbui! jo! Ubdpnb! gps! uif! byf! nvsefs! pg! uxp! xpnfo!boe!dvstfe!bmm!uiptf!jowpmwfe!xjui!ijt! tfoufodjoh/!Boe!uif!dvstf!dbnf!usvf/

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MORE INFORMATION: Terrified in Tacoma tours are offered at 6 p.m. Thursday to Sunday. Reservations are booked by calling Spooked in Seattle (425) 954-7701.

OLD HAUNTS. Tacoma historians Charlie and

Andrew Hansen researched Tacoma’s haunted past and have now partnered with Spooked in Seattle Ghost Tours to create Terrified in Tacoma.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE JAZZ UNDER STARS Pacific Lutheran University’s “Jazz Under the Stars” series continues Aug. 1 with Grammy Award winning trumpeter Tracey D. Hooker, 7-9 p.m. in the Mary Baker Russell Amphitheatre. Hooker, a 22-year veteran of the United States Navy Music Program, has traveled extensively throughout the United States and Europe as a featured trumpet soloist. He brings his current band, “Hook Me Up” to PLU. Complimentary coffee provided by Seattle’s Best Coffee. Admission is free.

TWO PAGODA YOGA Wake up your mind, body and soul with weekly outdoor Vinyasa flow yoga instruction on the lawn at Point Defiance Pagoda. A complimentary refreshing pomegranate tea or fresh lemonade is included.

Instructor Bev Pinkerton has 20 years of yoga experience to share, as well as a life-changing yoga story of her own. Saturdays in August, 9-10 a.m. Bring a yoga mat, block, strap and water bottle. Cost: one class $15, five classes $70, drop-in $20. Register at www.metroparkstacoma.org/fitness or call (253) 305-1022.

women to learn construction skills to build homes. Donations (of books, clothing, small appliances in working condition, furniture, and kitchen/housewares) are greatly appreciated! Email Jasmine at jkaneshiro@pugetsound.edu.

FOUR

and love and hate. All performances take place at Curtis High School on Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m. Info: www.tmp.org.

FIVE

LADIES NIGHT OUT

‘RAGTIME, THE MUSICAL’

THREE

RUMMAGE SALE Ta c o m a / P i erc e County Habitat for Humanity Women Build is having a rummage sale on July 27 at Immanuel Presbyterian Church, 901 N. J St., 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Funds will benefit Women Build projects, which encourage and empower

Tacoma Musical Playhouse continues its all-time community favorite “Ragtime, The Musical” through Aug. 4. A beautiful story with a gloriously diverse score, “Ragtime” intertwines the lives of three distinct families of the early 20th Century and poignantly illustrates history’s timeless contradictions of wealth and poverty, freedom and prejudice, hope and despair,

The “Ladies Night Out Concert Series – Summer Groove Edition” hits the Showare Center on Aug. 2. Hosted by comedian Ralph Porter and music by DJ Funk Daddy, the evening includes performances by Ginuwine, Jon B, J. Holiday, Case, Adina Howard, Soul for Real and Changing Faces – with increased speakers and video screens added. Doors open at 7 p.m., show starts at 8. Tickets: (253) 856-6999 and at www.showarecenter.com.

Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, July 26, 2013

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

There’s something for everyone in the family at Ethnic Fest. Use this map to plan your day...or simply wander and see what types of sights, sounds tastes and smells await you!

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT MUSIC,

Friday, July 26, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

ART, PUPPETS, JUGGLERS,

BITE

OF

PROCTOR…

THERE’S A LOT GOING ON AT THIS YEAR’S PROCTOR ARTS FEST By Kate Burrows kburrows@tacomaweekly.com

W

ith more than 150 vendors committed for the 2013 Proctor Arts Festival, this year’s event is sure to entertain the masses. Now in its 17th year, the event is taking place Aug. 2-4, with a variety of musical performances, vendor booths, food and arts and crafts demonstrations slated to occur throughout the weekend. A juried art show featuring more than 80 pieces will take place each day, and visitors will have a chance to purchase artwork straight from the artists themselves. “This is a great way to support local art, and keep the arts community alive in Tacoma,” said Carolyn Burt, who is displaying her own scratchboard engraving art in her booth during the event. The festival will have a designated Family Stage located near the Wheelock Library with events and performances geared to children. The Kids Fest includes a puppet theater, the Olympia Family Theater performing “The Lion, the Witch

and the Wardrobe,” a comedian juggler, musical performances and more. The Bite of Proctor will be taking place on Saturday throughout the festival from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., along with the usual Farmers Market vendors selling their own items. The market will have a stage with various performances, as well. Nearby stores and restaurants will be participating in the festivities with sidewalk sales and other activities. The Blue Mouse Theater will be offering a free showing of the film “Epic,” from the creators of “Ice Age,” at 1 p.m. on Saturday. “This year’s festival will be so exciting, especially with everything we will be doing on the family stage and kids’ festival,” said Eugene Kester, who has helped organize the event for the past 15 years. “We provide a great event that creates a sense of community, which is very important to me.” For more information about the festival and for a complete schedule of events, visit www.proctorartsfest.com.

PHOTO BY MAKS ZAKHAROV

PHOTO COURTESY OF PROCTOR ARTS FEST

VIBRANT. This original piece of art, which will be on display at the

Proctor Art Gallery during this year’s festival, was created by local artist Maura Desimone.

DANCE THEATRE NORTHWEST. The Proctor Arts Fest includes

a wide variety of the arts, including dance. The uber-talented Dance Theatre Northwest will be performing musical theatre, jazz, tap and contemporary dance at 11 a.m. on the Chalet Bowl Stage.

Quick and Dirty

Boatbuilding Teams Forming!! On August 24th, the exciting 9th Annual Quick and Dirty Boat Building Competition pits up to 10 three-person teams against each other in a bid to build a boat using limited materials - in just 6 hours. The boat, powered solely by its own team members, will then race on a couse in the Foss Waterway. Will yours float? How fast will it go? • All Materials Provided • No Experience Necessary • Desire for a Good Time - Building and Racing Your Boat • Fun for Everyone - Fantastic Fun

2013 MARITIME FEST

Call Joe Petreich for additional information at:

(253) 227-8580

100 MPG

SCOOTERS Sales & Service ALL Brands

MAX-MPGSCOOTERS.COM (253) 312-1636 6910 27th Street West; University Place 98466

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, July 26, 2013

ART INSPIRES ART LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SEEKS SPONSORS FOR

Dance Theatre Northwest performs â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;One More Voiceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; at Museum of Glass

DREAMFEST â&#x20AC;&#x2122;13

PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD/BILLBUNGARD.COM

DREAMING BIG. Louie Galarza (middle), owner of Louie Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizzeria in Fife, and his crew of co-

organizers are busy lining up the second annual Dreamfest music festival featuring some of the hottest bands in Washington State, many from the South Sound. Just like last year (when the above photo was taken), fans of all ages are invited to come out and rock the casbah. By Matt Nagle

weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve helped raise over $600,000,â&#x20AC;? Galarza said. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s looking forward to filling up a two-day DreamFest this year with local bands to play. Last year he booked 10 ast year, Louie Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizzeria in Fife put on an outbands and this year heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s looking to book 20-plus over the two door music festival showcasing Washington State days. bands that proved to be a huge hit with the crowds â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last year everybody wanted to play it, and a lot of and a lucrative benefit for Northpeople heard about it afterward west Harvest. In fact, DreamFest and now as soon as I said Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m was so well attended that this booking DreamFest the floodyear it will be a two-day event, gates opened, all the way from scheduled for Sept. 21 and 22 in here to New York,â&#x20AC;? Galarza said. the parking lot of Louie Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to have a day two In preparation for the second because we can get some of these annual DreamFest, Louie Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kid bands that have been playowner and event co-organizer ing here to get on that stage and Louie Galarza has put out the call experience it so thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s huge.â&#x20AC;? for sponsors to hop on board and Some major favorites will be support what has quickly become rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; the stage at DreamFest one of the most buzzworthy hapâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;13, including Randy Hanson, penings in the South Sound and The Fame Riot, Ben Union, Sweet beyond. This year, proceeds will Kiss Mama, Riot in Rhythm and â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Louie Galarza benefit the Everett-based Burned more. There might be a few surChildren Recovery Foundation prises as well that Galarza has up (www.burnedchildrenrecovery. his sleeve. org), founded in 1989 to provide emotional and financial â&#x20AC;&#x153;DreamFest is huge among people in the local music assistance to families struggling during their childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recovery scene,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nobody does what this does.â&#x20AC;? from their burn injuries. Sponsors will receive a lot of expoAdmission will be $20 for one day, $30 for two days, and sure through logo and banner placements during DreamFest, free to those 13 and under. Galarza serves $5 meals all day, in addition to perpetuating a family-friendly event that seeks and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s considering adding a beer garden this year as well if to help local musicians and bands get in front of as many funding comes through. people as possible. Those wanting more information about â&#x20AC;&#x153;DreamFest is like a dream come true for me,â&#x20AC;? Galarza sponsorships can contact Galarza at (253) 740-6018 or e-mail said on the eve of last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very first DreamFest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not only him at dreamfest2013@comcast.net. am I able to provide a mega stage for the talented musicians Ever since opening for business in 2008 Louie Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s has I admire, but I am able to help the community on a larger been a reliable go-to place for fundraisers for all kinds of scale than I could have only imagined. And I am able to do it causes such as Relay for Life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just in five and a half years because of the help of so many people I love.â&#x20AC;? mnagle@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO BY MAKS ZAKHAROV

DANCING ON GLASS. Museum of Glass is

hosting Dance Theatre Northwest on July 27 featuring a lecture demonstration and performers Katie Neumann and Chhay Mam who will dance two pieces choreographed in response to MOG exhibition artwork.

Dance comes to Museum of Glass on July 27, 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., as Dance Theatre Northwest Artistic Director Melanie Kirk-Stauffer presents a lecture demonstration accompanied by classical and contemporary ballet and jazz dance, music, costumes and slides highlighting the glass artistry of Benjamin Moore, Dick Weiss, Ben Edols, Kelly Knickerbocker, Richard Royal and Dante Marioni. Featured performers include Katie Neumann and Chhay Mam who will dance two pieces choreographed in response to MOG exhibition artwork. This event is free with museum admission. MOG is located at 1801 Dock St. Tacoma, WA 98402-3217. Dance Theatre Northwest is a 501c3 regional performing company and school based in University Place, at 2811 Bridgeport Way W., Ste. 24. DTN is committed to making dance as an important art form accessible to individuals and groups and to assisting future dancers and artists. DTN is currently offering ballet, jazz, tap, musical theatre, stretch, conditioning, dance exercise classes and performance opportunities for adults, teens and children. For more information visit www.DTNW. org or call 253-778-6534.

L

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last year everybody wanted to play it ... and now as soon as I said Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m booking DreamFest the floodgates opened, all the way from here to New York.â&#x20AC;?

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK: 502 MARTINI BAR & LOUNGE AND GRIT CITY COMEDY CLUB

Friday, July 26, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Live Music

TW PICK OF THE WEEK: CALIFORNIA COMEDIAN NGAIO BEALUM WILL DELIVER SPLIFF-CENTRIC STANDUP JULY 26 AND 27 AT GRIT CITY COMEDY CLUB, LOCATED INSIDE OF MALARKEY’S, 455 TACOMA AVE. S. SHOWS START AT 9 P.M., AND TICKETS ARE $15; WWW.GRITCITYCOMEDY.COM.

PHOTO BY ERNEST JASMIN

ON THE MOVE. Grit City Comedy club co-owner Aaron Flett in his new home, at the 502 Martini Bar and Lounge. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

A

long list of nightclubs has paraded through 100 S. 9th St., the tiered structure that has been home to Seven Cities, Taboo, Cans, Big Whisky and Comedy Underground in recent years. And now there are two new tenants: The 502 Martini Bar & Lounge and Grit City Comedy Club. The 502 had its soft opening on July 19. Owner Chuck Haines took over the lease from Big Whisky as that club’s owners took their country and western theme to another downtown holding, the Varsity Grill, which was rebranded Steel Creek. Haines’ plan is to create an upscale lounge that specializes in craft cocktails and live music, the latter skewing toward jazz, blues and other rootsy styles. (Popular Tacoma singersongwriter Kim Archer was on premises ironing out the details for a weekly happy hour gig when Tacoma Weekly visited.) The 502 is also positioned to capitalize on the FRUITVALE STATION (90 MIN, R) FRI 7/26: 2:15, 4:40, 7:00, 9:00 SAT 7/27-SUN 7/28: 11:55AM, 2:15, 4:40, 7:00, 9:00 MON 7/29-THU 8/1: 2:15, 4:40, 7:00, 9:00 THE WAY, WAY BACK (103 MIN, PG-13) FRI 7/26: 2:00, 4:25, 6:50, 9:10 SAT 7/27-SUN 7/28: 11:35AM, 2:00, 4:25, 6:50, 9:10 MON 7/29-THU 8/1: 2:00, 4:25, 6:50, 9:10 20 FEET FROM STARDOM (91 MIN, PG-13) FRI 7/26: 1:20, 3:45, 6:15, 8:30 SAT 7/27-SUN 7/28: 11:30AM, 1:35, 3:45, 6:15, 8:30 MON 7/29-WED 7/31: 1:35, 3:45, 6:15, 8:30 THU 8/1: 1:35, 3:45, 8:40 UNFINISHED SONG (93 MIN, PG-13) FRI 7/26: 1:50, 6:35, 8:50 SAT 7/27-SUN 7/28: 11:45AM, 1:50, 6:35, 8:50 MON 7/29: 1:50, 6:35, 8:50 TUES 7/30: 8:50 WED 7/31-THU 8/1: 1:50, 6:35, 8:50 THE KINGS OF SUMMER (95 MIN, R) FRI 7/26-THURS 8/1: 4:10 AUGUSTINE (102 MIN, NR) TUES 7/30: 1:50, 6:35 SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN (103 MIN, NR) THURS 8/1: 6:45

606 Fawcett, Tacoma, WA

influx of new workers headed downtown. “I want more daytime traffic,” Haines said. “I think Big Whisky and Cans and Taboo, all of them, were oriented toward night activity, maybe a lot of alcohol, not too much entertainment per se. And I want to do just the opposite. “I want more of an upscale menu, and I want different types of music. From six o’clock and on we want to create some type of daytime activity. We have a lot of business, including State Farm insurance moving in across the street. So we kind of want to step up, in a sense.” Haines was joined opening weekend by Grit City Comedy Club owners Aaron Flett and Vince Miller, who took over the basement space that was occupied by the floundering Comedy Underground. Flett and Miller have been running Grit City out of Malarkey’s, 445 Tacoma Ave. S., since 2011. “We’re actually going to be running both clubs for a while,” said Flett, who also does standup comedy under the alias Riggs. “Our plan is to keep Grit City where it’s at for a little while and then put some comics in at the 502 to give them a chance to get their legs under them. It’ll be Grit City East and Grit City Stadium – I don’t know.” “Not that Malarkey’s was a bad place, but this will be a better place for our demographics,” said Miller. “Our average person is between 30 and 50 and female; and they’re gonna want to come to a nice martini-jazz bar much more than they’re gonna want to go to a pool hall.” Grit City Comedy will remain in the basement until the duo finishes renovating a spacious, secondfloor space that overlooks Commencement Bay. Also possibly on the horizon at the 502 is a can-

nabis club. The venue’s name is a reference to Initiative 502, which passed last November legalizing recreation use of marijuana in Washington; and Haines has an extensive background with medical marijuana. He said he has used it for years to alleviate symptoms he’s suffered from an arthritic condition called Reiter Syndrome. And, in 2010, he founded CannaHealth, a company with clinics in Tacoma, Seattle and Olympia that provides authorizations for medical marijuana cards. Initiative 502 prohibits the use of marijuana and marijuana-infused products in the view of the general public. And the Washington Liquor Control Board recently instructed Tacoma’s Stonegate Pizza to shut down its Vape Club, which allowed members to vaporize cannabis-infused oil in the bar’s upstairs lounge. But, as rules for marijuana licensing are being finalized, Haines speculates that the private clubs could return. “I don’t know what’s gonna happen; but I know by the end of January they’re going to start issuing licenses,” he said. “I’m going to be looking real close at the attitude of the Liquor Board, because compliance is so important to me. I think whatever the rules are, you play within the rules. So I’m really waiting for the Liquor Board to say how they’re going to handle this so I can design some kind of model around it.” The 502 is open Tuesday through Saturdays, and will eventually open Sundays for football. The venue has yet to launch it’s web site, but updates can be found on its Facebook page, which can be found by searching for “502 Downtown.” The latest schedule for Grit City Comedy Club can be found online at www. gritcitycomedyclub.com.

FRIDAY, JULY 26

MONDAY, JULY 29

JAZZBONES: Kim Archer (singer-songwriter) 8 p.m., $6

UNCLE SAM’S: Billy Pease, Paul Buck, Chris Gartland (blues)

STAR CENTER: Ballroom dancing, 1 p.m., $5 SWISS: Dean Reickard (blues) 9 p.m, NC

TUESDAY, JULY 30 DAVE’S OF MILTON: Travis Nelson, Chris Moran, etc. (comedy) 8 p.m., $10 GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (top 40) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Ngaio Bealum (comedy) 9 p.m., $15 THE LOCH’S: DJ Mike Yoda (dance music) 9 p.m. METRONOME COFFEE: Sean Gaskell (African Kora) 8 p.m. NEW FRONTIER: Bandolier, Old Age, The Nadir (rock, pop) 9 p.m. STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman & Tattoosh (blues, rock) 9 p.m., NC SWISS: Sin City (top 40 rock) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA CABANA: Dave Roberts (singer-songwriter) 6:30 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY: Kristin Key (comedy) 8, 10:20 p.m., $10-$15 UNCLE THURM’S: Kareem Kandi Band (jazz) 7:30 p.m., AA, NC

SATURDAY, JULY 27

ANTIQUE SANDWICH SHOP: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (rock, blues) 7 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open jam, 9 p.m. STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 31 TED BROWN MUSIC: Ukulele circle, 6:30 p.m., NC, AA

JAZZBONES: Randy Hansen (Jimi Hendrix tribute) 8 p.m., $9.99

GRIT CITY COMEDY: Ngaio Bealum (comedy) 9 p.m., $15 HARMON TAPROOM: Dogstrum MAXWELL’S: Kareem Kandi Band (Jazz) 8 p.m., NC, AA NEW FRONTIER: Red Hex (indie rock) 9 p.m. SWISS: Kry (top 40 covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 STONEGATE: Triggerhand (blues, country) 9 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Kristin Key (comedy) 8, 10:20 p.m., $10-$15 WRIGHT PARK: Ethnic Fest (miscellaneous) noon, NC, AA

STONEGATE: Humpster Jam, $8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+

THURSDAY, AUG. 1 TACOMA COMEDY: Jay Hollingsworth (comedy) 8 p.m., $10

SUNDAY, JULY 28 JAZZBONES: Paula Fuga + Mike Love (reggae, soul, pop) 8 p.m., $15

253.593.4474 • grandcinema.com

NEW FRONTIER (downstairs): Bluegrass jam (rock), 3 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER (upstairs): MAWP (rock) 1 p.m., $5 WRIGHT PARK: Ethnic Fest (miscellaneous) noon, NC, AA

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Open jam, 8 p.m. PLU: Tracey D. Hooker (jazz) NC, AA ROCK THE DOCK: Open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC TED BROWN MUSIC: Drum circle, 6:30 p.m., NC, AA UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m.

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, July 26, 2013

SAT., JULY 27 NINA SCHUYLER BOOK TALK ETC – Join Tacoma native Nina Schuyler as she talks about her new novel, “The Translator.” When renowned translator Hanne Schubert falls down a flight of stairs, she suffers from an unusual but real condition — the loss of her native language. In elegant and understated prose, Schuyler offers a deeply moving and mesmerizing story about language, love, and the transcendence of family. Schuyler’s first novel, “The Painting,” was nominated for the Northern California Book Award, and named a Best Book of the Year by the San Francisco Chronicle. The event starts at 3 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. in Tacoma. Info: www.kingsbookstore. com.

COMING EVENTS

MON., JULY 29 COOKIES FOR GROWN-UPS ETC – Come and meet Kelly Cooper, author of “Cookies for Grown-Ups,” and enjoy both a sweet and savory cookie! Cookies for grown-ups are savory and sweet recipes in a cookbook created to intrigue and satisfy the adult palette. More than 90 recipes with fun and unique flavor combinations, as well as drink pairings, encourage great conversation with friends and family. The event takes place at 7 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com.

BULLETIN BOARD ETHNIC FEST For more than 25 years, Ethnic Fest has celebrated culture and community of Pierce County. Ethnic Fest offers everything from Bulgogi to Gelato, reggae to rhumba, and is enjoyed by tens of thousands of people each year. Festival-goers on July 27-28 from noon to 7 p.m. can feast on exotic flavors, vivid costumes and dynamic rhythms as they experience two full days of music, dance, art, and foods from around the world. Two stages will spotlight music such as Brazilian drum and dance, Celtic and Irish music, HAPPENINGS –

class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

TW PICK: TACOMA MENTALIST ATLAS BROOKINGS

ENJOY THE MIND READING OF TACOMA MENTALIST ATLAS BROOKINGS ON JULY 27 AT 7 P.M., WHILE SIMULTANEOUSLY HELPING TO FUND THE CHARITABLE EFFORTS OF THE SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST ASSOCIATION AS THEY DILIGENTLY SEEK TO PLACE EMERGENCY LIFE-SAVING DEFIBRILLATORS INTO EVERY HIGH SCHOOL IN TACOMA. ALL PROCEEDS FROM THIS SHOW WILL BENEFIT THE SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST ASSOCIATION AND YOU CAN BE ASSURED THAT, NOT ONLY WILL YOU BE ENTERTAINED, BUT YOU WILL BE HELPING TO SAVE LIVES! DOORS WILL OPEN AT 6:15 P.M., WITH SEATING HAPPENING ON A FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED BASIS. TICKETS ARE $5, BUT ARRIVE EARLY AS SPACE IS LIMITED. THE EVENT TAKES PLACE AT THE NARROWS BRIDGE VFW HALL, LOCATED AT 4741 N. BALTIMORE ST. IN TACOMA. INFO: HTTP://WWW.ATLASMENTALISM.COM/TICKETS.HTML

VALUE VILLAGE DONATION DRIVE HAPPENINGS – Visit the University Place Value Village, 6802 19th St. W. and proceeds from all donations of quality, reusable clothing will benefit The Arc of Washington. The organization helps to empower individuals with disabilities. There will be a drawing for a $50 gift certificate, as well. Info: www. valuevillage.com. TEDDIE BEAR MUSIC MUSIC – Teddie Bear Music is a child and parent musical adventure. Join instructor Janice Berntsen as she shows students how to share the gift of music and movement with their children, ages 1-4. Sessions are held Thursdays at 8:45 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. at Ted Brown Music, located at 6228 Tacoma Mall Blvd. Info: www.tbmoutreach.org.

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY RUMMAGE SALE ETC – Tacoma/Pierce County Habitat for Humanity Women Build is having a rummage sale at Immanuel Presbyterian Church, located at 901 N. ‘J’ St. Funds will benefit Women Build projects, which encourage and empower women to learn construction skills to build homes. Donations (of books, clothing, small appliances in working condition, furniture, and kitchen/housewares) are greatly appreciated! Email Jasmine at jkaneshiro@ pugetsound.edu. SAFE AND HEALTHY FAMILY FAIR ETC – Be One Step Ahead. The Safe & Healthy Family Fair is about the value we place on our family. Our lives are dependent on how safe and healthy our families are in body, mind, and spirit. Come out to Tacoma Mall JCPenney Court at 10 a.m. to learn about ways to keep your family safe and healthy. There will be information about access to community resources, tips on how to prepare for any emergency, plus activities for the kids and much more. This is a free event. Info: www.facebook.com/ events/603942342972557/ ?ref=22.

Promote your community event,

jazz, reggae, and much more. Ethnic Fest’s rich blend of cultures and musical celebrations brings people to their feet. Food vendors featuring tasty treats from a variety of cultures will satisfy festivalgoers’ appetites while craft booths highlight handcrafts, clothing, art, and jewelry from local artisans. Community information booths will feature local agencies along with the resources and services that reflect Tacoma’s diversity. Info: EthnicFestTacoma.com. BOOK ARTISTS EXHIBITION HAPPENINGS – This

exhibition at the Collins Memorial Library on the University of Puget Sound campus marks the third annual membership show of the Puget Sound Book Artists. It features a wide variety of handmade books by 30 artists from the Puget Sound area and beyond. The exhibit has grown in popularity over the last three years, and this year new members from Oregon, New Mexico and Indiana are featured. These talented artists interpret the book in exciting and original ways that push the boundaries of tradition. The exhibition runs through July 31. Info: www.pugetsound.edu/news-and-events/ campus-news/details/1185/. EXPLORE THE SHORE HAPPENINGS – Explore the Shore will provide handson learning about sea creatures and train participants how to be citizen scientists. Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium staff will teach children, adults and families more about Puget Sound’s beaches and the creatures that live there. The zoo’s Explore the Shore program is set for Aug. 20 at Owen Beach in Point Defiance Park. All are timed to take best advantage of the low minus tides that reveal many of Puget Sound’s most interesting shoreline creatures. The events and programs are free and open to

the public and reservations are not required. Bring sunscreen and wear shoes and clothing appropriate for walking on rough beach terrain. Zoo naturalists accompany participants on low tide beach walks, where kids and adults will learn to identify tide pool animals and record their presence and location for addition to the scientific Nature Mapping database (www.naturemappingfoundation.org). Participants will learn about the biological diversity of local beaches and better understand how to protect them. Info: www.PDZA. org or call (253) 404-3665. T-TOWN SWING Get your Tacoma swing dance fix every Thursday at Urban Grace Church, located in downtown. Intro to swing dance: 8:30-9 p.m., free with dance admission. Social dancing, 9-11:30 p.m., is $5. The atmosphere is super laid-back and fun, and features great guest instructors and DJs playing awesome swing music from the 1930s and 1940s, and it is sure to keep all the dancers hopping all night long! In addition, blues will be played every second and fourth Friday of the month and kizomba every fourth Sunday. HAPPENINGS –

BROWNS POINT LIGHTKEEPERS COTTAGE HAPPENINGS – The Browns Point Lightkeepers Cottage, Gardens and Museums are now open every Saturday from 1-4 p.m. through November. Tour the 1903 cottage and view the new exhibit in the basement museum called “Dash Point Since 1906” – a collection of old and new photos and fun artifacts celebrating the Dash Point community. Visit the historical vignettes in the basement including kitchen, sewing room and old-fashioned school. Also on the grounds is the Boathouse museum that houses a replica Coast Guard surfboat, information on its construction and a collec-

tion of antique tools. View the original lighthouse bell, and visit the recently restored Jerry Meeker Real Estate office on the grounds. This is the original 1906 office from which Meeker sold Hyada Park building lots. The park is a great place to picnic, fly a kite, beachcomb and more. Admission is free. Great for all ages. Limited entrance to people with disabilities (stairs). Group or school tours may be arranged by calling the message phone (253) 927-2536. Location is in the Browns Point Lighthouse Park at 201 Tulalip St. N.E. Limited parking or access the park through the adjacent Browns Point Improvement Club parking lot. Info: www.pointsnortheast.org or (253) 927-2536. BALLROOM DANCING HAPPENINGS – The STAR Center hosts ballroom dancing on the first Sunday of every month and every Monday afternoon from 1-3 p.m. There is live music. Admission is $5. It is a good idea to come with a dance partner. This dance was formerly held at South Park Community Center. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org/star or (253) 404-3939. ZIP LINE NOW OPEN HAPPENINGS – Two courses at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium test physical agility and mental toughness – and anyone can conquer them. Zoom is more than a zip line; it is an aerial activity course that includes a number of challenges such as a swinging log bridge strung between trees, a high wire to walk and a fishermen’s net strung between trees to climb through. And, yes, there are sections of zip line to put some zing into the adventure experience. There are two distinct circuits to Zoom, one for kids as young as 5, sized just right for smaller children, and one with appeal for a range of ages, including adventure-seeking adults. Info: www.pdza.org/zoom.

HOT HULA FITNESS ETC – Every Monday through Wednesday, Asia Pacific Cultural Center hosts hot hula fitness classes from 7-8 p.m. Inspired by the dances of the Pacific islands, hot hula fitness incorporates easy to perform dance moves set to the sounds of traditional Polynesian drum beats fused with funky reggae music, resulting in a modern, hip fitness workout. Hot hula fitness is a fun, new and exciting dance workout that isolates your larger muscle groups, quads and arms, providing a total body workout in 60 minutes. All ages and fitness levels will enjoy hot hula fitness. Admission: $6 (discount with APCC membership). APCC is located at 4851 South Tacoma Way. DRUM CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages drum circle every Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. You do not need to have a drum to participate. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com. CHARITY BOOT CAMP ETC – Jeff Jowers, owner and founder of Tacoma’s Ultimate Fitness Boot Camps, is hosting charity fitness boot camps every Saturday morning at 8:15 a.m., benefiting Campfire USA. These drop-in classes are $10 apiece, with all proceeds going to charity. Info: www.tacomabootcamps. com. FREE FIRST WEEKENDS ETC – Bank of America bankcard holders and employees receive free admission to the Tacoma Art Museum the first weekend of every month as part of Bank of America’s national Museums on Us program. Info: museums.bankofamerica.com. THE VALLEY CHORALE The Valley Chorale, a soprano-alto-tenor-bass singing group, meets every Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Lutheran Church of Christ the King, located at 1710 E. 85th St. in Tacoma. If you like singing, contact Joy Heidal at (253) 848-1134 or Dixie Byrne at (253) 677-5291 for more information and a personal invitation to join the group. ETC –

UKULELE CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages ukulele circle every Wednesday from 6:30-8 p.m. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com.

Many more calendar listings available at www.tacomaweekly.com

Friday, July 26, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL

Jean Bonter 253-312-2747 FOR LEASE

Point Defiance CafĂŠ and Casino. Fully operational with unique card room and gambling facility. Only licensed casino between Lakewood and Bremerton. Or as an alternative, this facility could be used as full service restaurant with banquet rooms. Many other possibilities including day care, private pre- school, dance studio, and the list goes on. All handicap accessible.

DEER RIDGE HOME, PUYALLUP

Beautiful home crafted by Steve Jensen and meticulously cared for. All the Jensen signature touches - soaring spaces, coffered ceilings, crown molding, wainscoting, 6â&#x20AC;? base trim, tile, granite, and expansive windows. Sited on an elevated lot that adjoins natural area to the rear. Listen to the birds and your private waterfall from your patio. Wonderful landscaping

Food & Beverage Businesses 4 Sale with Owner Contract

UNDISCLOSED RESTR./ LOUNGE/SPORTS BAR, very high annual food & drink sales, great food. Business is for sale, $165,000 with $75,000 down, motivated seller. HIGH GROSSING, VERY PROFITABLE COFFEE SHOP ice CAFE FOR SALE pr n reductio $99,000 High trafic Count location.

designed for beauty and easy care. Sensational island kitchen opens to stunning family room. Huge master suite with fireplace. MLS #479207

UNIQUE BOUTIQUE BISTRO With Beer and Wine License. $20,000 Full Price.

GIG HARBOR ž ACRE BUILDING LOT

Beautifully wooded, water and power available. $79,000. Perfect setting for your custom home. Owner/agent

www.jeanbonter.com

Evergreen Commercial Brokerage

AUTOS DANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S QUALITY CARS 253.221.2209 429 ST HELENS AVE â&#x20AC;˘ TACOMA, WA

VINOTIQUE WINE SHOP/BAR/ DELI IN LAKEWOOD Business is for sale for $150,000. Cash/terms. GREEN PUP SPORTSprice BAR & GRILL reduced (famous for its pizza) $189,000, cash. PORT OF TACOMA DINER Breakfast & Lunch, M-F, Price $70,000. Long-time established & great location.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;05 LINCOLN LS V6

LEATHER LOADED, THIS CAR IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION! WE OFFER GREAT FINANCING FOR ANY TYPE OF CREDIT!

VERY SUCCESSFUL/ PROFITABLE SPORTS BAR Business is For Sale for $320,000 Terms price are avail. ced

BUY HERE. PAY HERE. NO CREDIT CHECK!

LAUNDROMAT W/ DROP SHOP. Same location 15 years in Lakewood. Excellent lease with contract terms. price $36,000 duced

ANTIQUES WANTED

redu

re

LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? Restaurant/Lounge Huge Price Reduction - For Sale For $510,000 (R.E. $485K) Bus. $25K. Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports bar and grill. price

RURAL LIVING: ASHFORD, WARestr./Lounge, $125,000 with $50K Down, Real E. Avail: 3.4 Commercial Acres for Future Devel., 3 BR Remodeled Home, e laundromat. pric duced re

CALL RICHARD PICTON or ED PUNCHAK 253-581-6463 253-224-7109

EMPLOYMENT

FURNITURE

FURNITURE

NEW!!! 7 Piece Cherry Bedroom Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, 1 Nightstand, Headboard, Rails. Plus New Mattress Set still in plastic $499 (253) 539-1600

Black Iron Canopy Bed w/Orthopedic Mattress Set. New, Still in %R[ 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH  (253) 539-1600

5 Piece Pub Set Table & 4 Chairs New in Box List $1,000 Sell $350 253-537-3056 3 Piece Living Room Set New in plastic. Lifetime Warranty On Frame. $495 (253) 537-3056 Free Mattress Set with Cherry Wood Sleigh Bed Never Used. In Plastic. $380 (253) 537-3056 All New Pillow Top Mattress Set! Queen Size w/ Warranty, Still in Original Plastic. Can 'HOLYHU 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH $149 (253) 5391600 Full or Twin Mattress Set New Factory Sealed. Delivery Available. $120 Will Take. (253) 539-1600

All New King Pillow Top Mattress Box Set 3 Pieces. New & Factory Sealed w/Warranty.. $249. Can Deliver (253) 537 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3056 New Adjustable Bed With Memory Foam Mattress. Wall Hugger with Warranty. $2,800 :LOO6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FHIRU 253.539.1600 New Platform Bdrm Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, Nightstand, H e a d b o a r d , Footboard, Rails. Still Boxed. Retails at $2,600. Will Take $850. 253.539.1600 New Overstuffed 0LFURĂ&#x20AC;EHU 6RID Loveseat. Still in plastic Can have for $750 (253) 539-1600 Absolutely New! Memory Foam Mattress Set! Can Deliver. Worth $2,000 Asking $450 (253) 537-3056

City of ma o Tac Jobs www.cityoftacoma.org/jobs Hostess Wanted. Part-time, weekends. Also need part-time waitress. Come in and fill out application. Tower Lanes, 6323 6th Ave.

Drivers CLASS A CDL Black Horse Carriers is one of the fastest growing transportation companies in the country. When you join our team of dedicated Drivers, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll understand why. Black Horse has just signed new business in the TACOMA, WA area and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for Class A CDL Drivers. Dedicated routes, 5-day work-week, Home daily. AM and PM routes. Automotive parts delivery experience a plus. Earn $900 - $1200 a week. These are IXOOWLPHSRVLWLRQVZLWKEHQHĂ&#x20AC;WV,I\RXKDYH\UV([S and a Class A CDL with a clean MVR, we want to hear from you. Call 708 478 6020 or email michelle.gillette@ blackhorsecarriers.com. EOE. Drug Testing is a condition of employment.

Hair Station for Rent. Davinci Salon and Spa, Lakewood. (253) 588-1719

EMPLOYMENT Pierce County Community Newspaper Group is seeking an

Experienced

ADVERTISING SALES Representative

reduced

â&#x20AC;&#x153;UNDISCLOSEDâ&#x20AC;? BEAUTY SALON In Puyallup, Great Location, $35,000 Cash. Call Angelo, price d reduce (253) 376-5384.

FOR SALE

COMMERCIAL

Selling Your Commercial Building or Business? Call

CALL 253.922.5317

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

(253) 752-8105

DIRECTV is currently recruiting for the following position in Lacey:

The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated selfstarter with a proven record of achieving sales goals. They will demonstrate the ability to develop new business and possess excellent time management skills. Additionally, they should be able to manage all aspects of the sales cycle: prospecting, cold calling, setting appointments, performing needs analysis, presentation, negotiation, and closing, all while maintaining a high level of customer service to existing customers.

Warehouse Manager

,I\RXWKLQN\RXZRXOGEHDJRRGĂ&#x20AC;WIRURXUFRPSDQ\ ZHZRXOGOLNHWRKHDUIURP\RX3OHDVHVXEPLW\RXU UHVXPHWRHPSOR\PHQW#WDFRPDZHHNO\FRP

If you are not able to access our website, DIRECTV.com, mail your resume and salary requirements to: DIRECTV, Attn: Talent Acquisition, 161 Inverness Drive West, Englewood, CO 80112. To apply online, visit: www.directv. com/careers. EOE.

SERVICE DIRECTORY Find the right business for your home, garden, pet, personal service needs and more right here! PAINTING

PAINTING

LAWN CARE

LAWN CARE

CASH FOR CARS

ELECTRICAL

The Happy Hooker

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Big Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawn Care Âş Handyman Âş Clean-up

FREE Hauling for Metal (253) 397-7013 LANDSCAPING

LANDSCAPING

ALEXâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Landscaping Painting, Weeding, Spring Clean-up, Pruning, Gutter Cleaning. Residential. Pressure Washing. Trees. Rototilling. Contact Alex 253-564-5743 Free Estimates

ROOFING Your Local Roof Experts â&#x20AC;&#x153;Repairs or Replacementâ&#x20AC;?

TriState Roofing, Inc. TRISTI*931QH

ROOFING

PAYS YOU! FOR YOUR Junk Cars

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

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www.alliedmarinecorp.com

Toll Free 1-877-272-6092 ALLIEE1963CQ

HAULING

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Life is too short to spend it cleaning... So let us do it for you. Squeaky Clean 253.473.7621 Licensed & Insured

HAULING

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CONTACT US

CLASSIFIED DEADLINES

Phone: Mail:

Classified Display - Mondays @ 12 noon Classified Line Ads - Tuesdays @ 12 noon

253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma WA, 98417

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VISIT OUR WEBSITE www.tacomaweekly.com

Advertising Representatives: â&#x20AC;˘ Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com

Section B • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, July 26, 2012

NOTICES

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PETS Lost Pied Cockatiel, Male Missing in Fife area since June, 2012. I just want to know that he is safe and be part of his life. He has medical & nutrition needs. Contact Susan (253) 517-3809. We Really Miss Him!

Pet of the Week

“Gracie” If there was an award for “Most Fitting Name” Gracie ZRXOGGHÀQLWHO\WDNHWKHFDNH7KLV\HDUROG3LW%XOO 7HUULHUDQG'DOPDWLDQPL[LVWUXO\DVSHFLDOSXS+HU KDSSLQHVVFOHDUO\VKRZVWKURXJKKHUSXSS\JULQDQG DGRULQJH\HV1RWWRPHQWLRQKHUWDLOZDJVOLNHFUD]\ DWWKHVLJKWRIDFDULQJIDFH+HUFDOPDQGORYLQJ SHUVRQDOLW\LVIHOWLQVWDQWDQHRXVO\UHPLQGLQJ\RXWKDW WUXHORYHFRPHVLQIXUU\IRXUOHJJHGSDFNDJHV6KH GRHVZHOODURXQGFURZGVDQGRWKHUGRJVDOZD\V KDSS\WRPHHWDQHZIULHQG*UDFLHZLOOÀOOWKHSDUWRI \RXUKHDUWWKDW\RXQHYHUNQHZZDVHPSW\7DNHKHU KRPHWRGD\5HIHUHQFH$

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week

1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Panda Cute as a button, you won’t be able to resist taking this little one home.

Junior Junior is a happy boy who loves affection and scratches behind the ears. He is patiently waiting for his Forever Family to take him home today. www.MetroAnimalServices.org


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