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Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

Tacoma Celebrates Future looks brighter, if not altogether certain, for Freedom Fair

FLOWERS FOR the SOLDIERS Community asked to help make yellow flowers for RAIDERS RETURN Welcome Home Event

PHOTO BY MATT NAGLE

FLOWER POWER. Community

artist Lynn Di Nino (right) shows Tacoma philanthropist and patron of the arts Babe Lehrer how to make tissue paper flowers at Di Nino’s most recent workshop.

DI NINO’S NEXT FLOWER MAKING WORKSHOP

JULY 22 6-9 P.M. For location, e-mail her at lynndin@msn.com or call 3960774. Leaders of community organizations are welcome.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF FREEDOM FAIR

FABULOUS FOURTH. People come from miles around to watch Freedom Fair’s fabulous fireworks show

(top), some choosing to enjoy the full day out on the water (above left). Before the rockets’ red glare lights up the night sky, the daytime air show (above, right) will soar over Commencement Bay featuring some of the best aviation acts in the country. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

F

ederal budget cuts kept the Blue Angels from appearing at Seattle’s Seafair last weekend. But rest assured: There will be planes roaring across the sky at Freedom Fair this Fourth of July. They just may not rattle as many windowpanes as they did last year. “The air show itself is still going to be a spectacular show. The one thing that’s going to be missing is the military support – the big, thunderous jets that they usually bring,” said Gary Grape, director of events for Tacoma Events Commission, the mostly volunteer group that runs Freedom Fair. Tacoma’s big Independence Day celebration is expected to draw more than 100,000 revelers to Tacoma’s Ruston Way Waterfront on July 4 for the air show, music, food, libations and, of

course, fireworks. “We’re one of the few areas that still has an air show and a fireworks display of this magnitude,” said Lori Linenko, who took over as the commission’s chairwoman and president after longtime director Doug Miller stepped down last fall. Government cutbacks and sagging donations have presented challenges for many summer festivals. But organizers say Freedom Fair has bounced back, if only slightly, after an uncertain 2012. Freedom Fair costs about $900,000 to produce each year, according to Grape. Toward that end, Tacoma Events Commission – a non-profit 501(c)3 hired by City of Tacoma to run the event – receives lots of “in kind donations,” pledges of free advertising and services provided by Tacoma Police, Tacoma Public Works and other agenX See FREEDOM / page A12

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ON STAGE: Entertainment schedule for Taste of Tacoma. PAGE B4

EV ENTS SC HEDU LE A partial schedule of Freedom Fair events, which will take place July 4 along Ruston Way Waterfront except where indicated:

Tacoma Air Show (1:30-3:30 p.m.):

This year’s flight demos will include appearances by the Ace Maker T-33 Shooting Star, the P-51 “Speedball Alice” and other classic aircraft.

Freedom Fair Fireworks Extravaganza (10:10 p.m.):

“Bombs” will burst in air, flags will still be there and the fireworks soundtrack will be broadcast from Les Davis Pier, audible on Click-FM (98.9) and KLAY-AM (1180) for those watching from a distance.

X FOR MORE EVENTS / See page A12

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Pothole Pigs..............A2 City Briefs ...............A3

Wilde in Lakewood B3

Sports ......................A6 A&E ....................... ..B1

By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma artist Lynn Di Nino is leading the charge in a community art project for the City of Lakewood’s first-ever event Sept. 15 to welcome troops home from Afghanistan. The goal – for people across the South Sound, or anywhere for that matter, to help make approximately 4,000 (or more) yellow flowers to decorate an arch for the front of the main stage. To get the project going, Di Nino has held four public workshops to demonstrate how to make the flowers. “The workshops are mostly to show people how to do it so they can go back and show their own groups,” Di Nino said. (Also, this YouTube video explains the very easy process: http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=aK6QBG6IhX0.) She is looking for individuals, families and members of organizations who can enlist others to help. Di Nino’s next flower making workshop will be held on July 22 from 6-9 p.m. For location, e-mail her at lynndin@msn.com or call (253) 396 -0774. Leaders of community organizations are welcome. X See FLOWERS / page A11

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Make A Scene ........ B5 Calendar ................. B6

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Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK

6th and Skyline Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.” And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The 1930 Lincoln Brougham, designed by the Brunn and Co. of Buffalo, N.Y., had everything a passenger of the “chauffeured class” of the post-Gilded Age could possibly ask for when it came to an all-around vehicle. Brunn called the car an All Weather Brougham because of the configuration of the two retractable tops that allowed the passengers to be in the sun while the driver could remain in the shade. The passenger compartment’s roof could even be folded back while a mixed middle section remained in place if the forward-seated passengers wanted to see the sky while the rearseated passengers in the “jump seats” remained under the cover. The car’s design also shows the evolution of the Lincoln Motor Co., which was founded in 1917 by Henry Leland to produce Liberty engines during World War I. Leland founded Cadillac and sold the company to General Motors in 1909. After the war

PHOTO COURTESY OF LEMAY COLLECTION

was over, he decided to re-enter the luxury car market with a new car, the Lincoln. His first production model, the Model L, was produced from 1921 to 1930. It was a V-8 machine that overpowered the Cadillac. Costing up to $6,600 each, it was also a car reserved specifically for the well to do, although sales were disappointing because it lacked the fashionable stylings other car makers were offering. Leland sold the line to car giant

Henry Ford in 1922, which marked a turning point of the now iconic line. Lincoln was refined through the styling ideas of Edsel Ford, who crafted an elegant look that would soon make Lincoln one of the premier motor cars in the world. The 1930 model is seen as the top of that peak during the golden age of car making. The Lincoln Brougham town car offered a 90 horsepower, V-8 engine that was controlled through a three-speed transmission.

TACOMA QUIRK

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Only $36!!! For details check out piercetransit.org 253.581.8000

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

WHERE’D EVEL KNIEVEL GO? Riderless in the sky, this motorcycle flies

somewhere over Tacoma.

By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

We stumped you with our first Tacoma Quirk contest, which proves three things: You probably don’t drink enough. You don’t visit us enough. (But if you did, we’d give you lettuce.) Our question was too tough, and that nice Steve Dunkelberger obscured too much of the object by hugging it. So we’re taking it easy on you this week, at least with the object. If you come from the right part of town, you’ll recognize it. But how much do you know about it? Where is the Motorcycle on a Stick? Wrench. What does that have to do with anything? What’s the nearest park? The nearest bar? What do they have to do with the Motorcycle on a Stick? What’s keeping that mini-chopper in the air? What does F.R.O.M. mean? What’s the significance of the base of the nearby granite structure? The person who e-mails kathleen@tacomaweekly. com first with the correct answers will win two Rainiers tickets, a box of sidewalk chalk and a locator map for Frost Park.

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City Briefs 4TH OF JULY WITH ‘FISHES’

Music artists with Tacoma’s Maurice the Fish Records will be packing up their gear and heading to SeaTac on July 4 for free concert at Angle Lake, 19408 International Blvd. The live music event runs from 1-10 p.m., then the fireworks begin. Performers include Rebekah Curtis, Champagne Sunday, The Lush Tones, Tin Man, Hook Me Up, Raymond Hayden & The Monsters In The Dark, The Rikk Beatty Band, AMADON, Mr. Von and Late September Dogs.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR A GREENER TACOMA

Got a passion for great recycling? The City of Tacoma needs volunteers willing to share how to go green by helping attendees properly sort recyclables at this year’s Fourth of July Freedom Fair. Last year, Freedom Fair-goers generated 60,000 gallons of trash that was sent to the landfill. This year, City staff want to reduce that number. Volunteer teams will staff two recycling stations near food vendors to educate and remind fair-goers about how to properly recycle their cans and bottles. As a thank you, the City will provide volunteers who work a two-hour shift with a food voucher redeemable at several food booths. Volunteers must be 16 years of age. Volunteers may visit http://www.cityoftacoma.org/ cms/One.aspx?portalId=169&pageId=31267 to reserve a space. Other efforts to reduce trash at this year’s Freedom Fair include setting up temporary drinking fountains to reduce bottled water waste and composting pre-consumer vendor food scraps.

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Acting on a tip, police went to an East Pierce County home early June 16 and arrested a couple for allowing their residence to be used for an after-graduation underage drinking party for their daughter. Upon obtaining a search warrant to search the property, officers found a keg in the garage that was strewn with beer cans, wine and hard liquor bottles. Police also discovered an unconscious 18-year-old male inside a tent next to a beer cooler in the back yard and immediately summoned Central Pierce Fire and Rescue. Once on site, first responders also evaluated the homeowner’s daughter for alcohol poisoning when officers found her on her bed unresponsive amid pools of vomit. Thirty-two underage drinkers, primarily from Puyallup and Emerald Ridge high schools, were arrested for minor in possession along with an additional four youths in a vehicle parked outside the party. The driver of the car had a large amount of marijuana in his vehicle, which partygoers told police had been sold to some of the students earlier in the evening. Officers working the emphasis also arrested a motorcyclist who tested three times over the legal limit to drive. After years of Party Intervention Patrols in

Pierce County, “you’d think parents would rethink their ‘don’t ask, don’t tell policy’ when it comes to alcohol use, especially during prom and graduation season,� said Bob Thompson, sergeant with the Puyallup Police Department and law enforcement coordinator for the multiagency Party Intervention Patrol last weekend. Parent volunteers who met with the parents of the arrested youth when they came to pick up their children emphasized that parents can keep their kids safe by keeping close tabs on their nighttime activities and asking for the details of their alcohol-free plans, especially when the plans involve events on family property. The parents arrested told police their daughter said the party would be alcohol-free. Parents also have the option of reporting to police the addresses of houses where suspected juvenile parties take place throughout the year, with or without adults present. “Silence is never good when parents don’t report the parties in their own neighborhoods. Our goal is to get kids home safe and to give them another day to make a better decision,� said Liz Yotty, a parent volunteer with Party Intervention Patrol.

TACOMA GOODWILL COMMITS TO WOMEN VETS

On June 21, Goodwill Industries International in Washington, D.C. committed on behalf of 165 agencies across the U.S. and Canada to help 3,000 women veterans find employment over the next year. Tacoma Goodwill and its 15-county area of operations stand on the front lines of this issue in Washington State. Operation: GoodJobs, Goodwill’s partnership with the Walmart Foundation to serve veterans and their families with the tools they need to succeed in the workplace, will be Tacoma Goodwill’s primary program to address these emerging needs. Tacoma Goodwill was one of three Goodwill agencies in the country selected in May 2012 to participate in a pilot program to empower military veterans with the tools they need to find employment, succeed in the workplace and permanently support their families. The other two Goodwill agencies are Houston and Austin, Texas. Funded by a $1 million grant from the Walmart Foundation, and administered by Goodwill Industries International, Operation: GoodJobs assists veterans with job training and placement, but also plans for each participant’s continued success by designing individualized, holistic plans that encompass the needs of their entire families, helping ensure their long-term financial stability. Tacoma Goodwill hired Mike Tassin as Veteran’s Career Navigator to head up the Operation: GoodJobs efforts here in the area. “I was a sergeant in the U.S. Army where I served for eight years with tours of duty in Korea, Iraq and numerous state side locations,� says Tassin. “I have been fortunate as a disabled veteran to experience a successful transition from military to civilian life. I am passionate to serve veterans and their families in achieving their post military goals.� Each participant in the Operation: GoodJobs program receives a complete career assessment and an individualized development plan that will

encompass a range of family needs, from basic needs like nutrition, shelter and child care, to specific job training identified in the assessment process. Veterans will be encouraged to include their spouses and other family members in the process so Goodwill can holistically support their personal and financial goals. To date the program has helped more than 300 transitioning veterans, of which 50 are women.

SOUTH TACOMA CELEBRATES JON KITNA DAY SATURDAY

Jon Kitna and the South Tacoma Grocery Outlet crew are teaming up Saturday to raise money for the Lincoln Abes Booster Club – and to spread the fun. A former Seattle Seahawk, Kitna spent 16 years in the NFL. Instead of retiring, he returned to his alma mater, Lincoln High School, to teach math and coach football. That choice, and his family’s support of the booster club have earned him local hero status. “I got the opportunity to play on a world stage in the NFL. Now I want to be able to pass the torch on to these kids and see them have the same opportunity,� he said. “There is so much power in a dream and having someone telling you to believe in yourself.� The message resonates with David and Jessalynn Greenblatt, the Grocery Outlet owners with a mission of community service. In addition to running food drives, sock drives and supporting community projects, they’re signing on as sponsors of the Lincoln Abes Booster Club. “We are so honored to be working with the Kitna family for such an event for Tacoma and the kids in this community,� Jessalyn Greenblatt said after working with Jeni Kitna to plan Saturday’s celebration and fund-raiser. The fun will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 29 in the Grocery Outlet parking lot at South 56th Street and South Tacoma Way. Chris Caillier, the store’s Chief Fun Officer, promises live music, food, community vendors and appearances by local celebrities. In a neighborhood fueled by civic activism, the roster is likely to include city officials ready to listen. Jon Kitna will be there from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., signing autographs, and having fan photos taken for a small donation. All those donations will benefit Lincoln Abes Booster Club.

HOUSING AUTHORITY GROUNDBREAKING FOR NEW HILLSIDE TERRACE

Demolition munchers are making short work of Tacoma Housing Authority’s old Hillside Terrace apartments. Good riddance. The buildings were badly designed and built, and the housing authority has been working for years to raise the money to replace them. THA has funding for the first phase of the redevelopment, which will add units, a community center and more open space to the site at 2520 South G Street. Tuesday, it will celebrate the end of demolition and the beginning of construction with a groundbreaking ceremony from noon to 1 p.m. Everyone is welcome to attend, and learn more about Phase One of the two-phase project. MORE CITY BRIEFS AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

Police Blotter MAN ROBS BANK

Police seek the public’s help to identify a man who robbed a bank on June 24. The suspect entered the U.S. Bank branch in the 800 block of South 38th Street at about 10:45 a.m. He handed a note to a teller demanding money and said he had a gun. He was given cash and ran out of the bank. He is described as a black male in his 20s, between 5-foot-6 and 5-foot-8 inches tall, with a thin build and short, black hair. He wore dark blue jeans, a black North Face jacket, a black Chicago Bulls cap and black gloves. Anyone with information about the robbery is asked to call Tacoma/Pierce County Crime Stoppers at (253) 591-5959. A reward of up to $1,000 is available for information leading to an arrest and charges filed.

CAR HITS MOTORCYCLE

State troopers are looking for the driver of a car that hit a motorcycle on June 23. The incident occurred on northbound Interstate 5 near South 72nd Street. A car, believed to be silver and similar to a Honda Accord, hit one motorcycle, causing it to hit a second motorcycle. The car continued driving. The two men on the motorcycles were injured and transported to a hospital for treatment.

#1 DEATH RACE

TACOMA MAN WILL PUSH HIMSELF TO THE LIMIT

#2 PARENTS ARRESTED FOR HOLDING TEEN GRAD DRINKING PARTY #3 CYNDI LAUPER DELIVERS FUN BUT FLAWED SET AT PANTAGES #4 BANANA SLUGS RULE! (NO, REALLY, THEY’RE KIND OF COOL) #5 RECENT DEVELOPMENT DEALS MIGHT MEAN DOWNTOWN IS ON THE MEND

Local Restaurants Poodle Dog celebrates 80 years in business By John Larson jlarson@tacomaweekly.com The Poodle Dog celebrated its 80th birthday on June 24 in grand style by rolling back prices on selected items as they were sold when the Fife dining institution opened in 1933. Lorissa Williamson, general manager of the restaurant, came up with the idea to offer guests 1933 prices, something last done when the Poodle Dog marked 50 years of operations in 1983. “I thought it would be an awesome way to give something back to the community,â€? PHOTOS BY JOHN LARSON she remarked. The special prices were offered from Stella Hare, left, and her brother Connor Hare are among the new generation of 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. A hamburger and fries Poodle Dog customers. basket went for 30 cents. Steak and eggs More staff was scheduled than would Williamson believes the was only 45 cents. For those with a sweet tooth, a piece of cake was 10 cents, establishment set a record for the be on a typical Monday to handle the a slice of pie 20 cents and milkshakes number of customers on a Monday. The big crowd. “Everybody who was able to were 15 cents. A cup of coffee was only sales were about the same as a typical worked,â€? Williamson said. $ PDQ PDGH DQLPDO Ă€JXUHV ZLWK 0RQGD\ EXW ZLWK Ă€YH WR VL[ WLPHV DV a dime. balloons, which were handed out to Information on the promotion had much food being served. children. Among them were Stella Hare “The customers thought it was been on the reader board out front for months. Employees had been telling absolutely great,â€? she continued. Some and her brother Connor Hare of Browns FXVWRPHUVDQGWKHUHZHUHĂ \HUVRQWKH of the regulars are in their 90s and have Point, who had lunch with their mother. Stella had a peanut butter and jelly wall with information. The promotional been eating at the Poodle Dog since efforts worked. The Poodle Dog was the 1930s. Williamson heard from sandwich and a cup of chicken noodle packed on a Monday for breakfast and people talking about their parents and soup. Connor had a hamburger and fries. grandparents being customers in the Price of a meal for three came to about $2. lunch. early days.

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Stephanie Butow began dreaming up a workplace garden 20 years ago. Three years ago, she began work on the Kapowsin Elementary School PTA Giving Garden and Fruit Forest. Last week Tacoma Garden Club honored her with its first Green Visionary Award. “One of the core values of our Tacoma Garden Club is to be supportive of cutting-edge gardening ideas in our community,� club member Sue Stibbe told Butow at the club’s annual meeting. “We wish to recognize outstanding individuals who are working to do something unique and creative to enhance gardening and the care of the environment in our community.� Butow, who lives in Seattle, has for 20 years been a social worker at Kapowsin Elementary School in Graham, and she admits the garden has a tinge of self-interest. “I live in a city where land is scarce, and I work in the country, where there’s lots of land,� Butow said. So there was garden dreaming, lots of it, on her commute. “My dream was to encircle the school perimeter with espaliered fruit trees,� she said. “Asian pears, pears, plums, apples, frost peaches, golden and red raspberries, tons of strawberries, lots of vegetables and herbs and many different kinds of flowers.� She’s specific because those pickable trees are all planted now, and the bushes, and the veggies in raised beds. “About three years ago, a former PTA president, Alexis Derry, told me about a Washington State Potato Commission garden grant three days before the deadline,� she said. “I went to the kids, and in three days, they pumped out potato artwork and poems and put them in a scrap book.� The book and the application

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

.96> Students love harvesting what they’ve grown. brought in $1,000 and a greenhouse, which they could not put up on school grounds. “We’ve written, and won, a lot of grants since then,� Butow said. “Welch’s Grape Juice for $200, Home Depot for $1,000, Lowe’s Toolbox for Education for $4,000. Many individuals have donated money, plants, tomato cages, used rain barrels. I take anything. Wood chips, horse manure.� That includes advice from Master Gardeners, and support from school principal Machelle Beilke, staff and PTA members. It’s paid off from the classroom to the lunchroom to the office where children go for help with their personal troubles. Stibbe complimented team garden treasure hunts and vocabulary building exercises. She said the students write a Garden Gazette, composed a theme song, “We’re Out in the Garden,� and are experimenting at home with alternative garden containers and styles. Students know their garden is a privilege, Butow said. “Their school work must be done. They have to earn it.� Stibbe noted two programs, “Seeds of Tolerance� and “Cooperation Soup.� “Students learn seeds come in many sizes, shapes and colors, and

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they have different habits â&#x20AC;&#x201C; just like people. Like seeds, even though we have so many differences, we all produce something wonderful,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When it comes to the soup, kids learn to cooperate, and the final activity or reward is to make cooperation soup from the garden veggies and serve it to their classmates. The lessons feature cooperating as gardeners and cooks, and also how the weather and other aspects of nature cooperate in helping us grow food.â&#x20AC;? They also follow food past the lunch table. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done lessons on composting and worm bins and built four worm bins,â&#x20AC;? Butow said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We did a waste audit, sorting through the garden to determine how much could be recycled and composted.â&#x20AC;? The kids love it, she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;This is funner than recess.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to compete. In the garden, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just between them and the plants. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard several times kids when they are sad or angry say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I feel better now.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had kids who are furious, and they are able to do that physical labor and get distracted. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had kids sobbing. This one little girl just started singing.â&#x20AC;? Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one more thing this garden does for the students who tend it: It feeds them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The food goes to local students in need during the year, and we supplement holiday baskets with it,â&#x20AC;? Butow said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I also push the cart out when the buses come, and, oh my gosh, they mob it,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even the chives.â&#x20AC;? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your weekly gardening tip, compliments of Travis Valbert of Gardensphere: Earlier in the season tomatoes are prone to blight, a fungal condition causing blackening of the leaves, be sure to water your tomatoes at the base of the plant and not the leaves!

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

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3VJHSMPYT[HRLZ[OL ^VYY`V\[VM[OL^LI By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

No matter how large or small a business is these days, it canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exist long without access to the Internet, whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s emailed orders or online-traffic watching. Having â&#x20AC;&#x153;technological issuesâ&#x20AC;? can cost big dollars in lost sales and lost productivity. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you engage in activity using software, network or the Internet, you have your business at risk,â&#x20AC;? said IntuPlex Manager Ryan Hallock. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You may be compromised by hackers, domestic or global, that threaten your security, or you may be surpassed in your core business by competitors, if you or your staff focus on IT instead of the business, or you may miss perfect opportunities due to outdated IT software, hardware or network. IntuPlex can help with these issues and more.â&#x20AC;? The Tacoma-based technology firm was founded by experienced â&#x20AC;&#x153;techiesâ&#x20AC;? with the idea that they would handle the technology so businesses could focus on building their companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s operations. They provide a comprehensive suite of services that include communication and technology support, data backup and cloud computing that is backed by a reliable, local service team available around the clock. But on top of providing the support for todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business essentials, the firm also works to find affordable solutions that nontechies might not know exist. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Core to our approach is rigid cost control, cost predictability and cost efficiency,â&#x20AC;? according to the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission statement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We believe IT resources should contribute to your companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success, not be a drain.â&#x20AC;? True to that pledge, IntuPlex has a tiered pricing model to fit any business budget. Clients pay for what they use, and nothing more with an Ă  la carte roster of options. The firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s managed services come at fixed costs that provide on-going preventive maintenance to minimize those â&#x20AC;&#x153;surprise outagesâ&#x20AC;? and helps businesses to budget for technology costs that include upgrades and replacements of equipment when the end of its life-cycle nears. IntuPlex has a staff of Microsoft-certified support specialists who manage business systems 24/7 so business owners and managers can focus on whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really important, the business. IntuPlex can manage email, computer networks, hosted phone systems, servers and secure cloud synchronization of mobile devices and tablets. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We specialize in small office suites for core business functions and many specialized applications used by various small businesses,â&#x20AC;? Hallock said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The hardware is just a tool, and we use all tools that are available if they meet the mission of the business and within the budget. New hardware is fun and full of features, but may have features not needed for your business.â&#x20AC;? To learn more, visit www.intuplex.com, e-mail info@ intuplex.com or call (253) 303-3829.

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Sports

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s new sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 8

ISAIAH THOMAS RETURNS HOME TO LEAD YOUTH SKILLS ACADEMY Former Husky guard active in instruction, encouragement

RAINIERS BATS EXPLODE EARLY TO ROLL PAST FRESNO

Miller extends hitting streak to 20 games By Jeremy Helling

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

RUNNING THE DRILLS. Players ran

through several drills on the first day of the Isaiah Thomas Skills Academy, as coaches were active in instructing the group.

jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

B

rad Miller has been hitting everything in sight lately, and his teammates followed suit early on June 24 as the Tacoma Rainiers scored 10 runs in the first four innings and banged out 15 hits in cruising to a 14-4 win over the Fresno Grizzlies. “When you score that many runs it’s a luxury,” said Rainiers manager John Stearns. “You’re able to kind of relax during the game. You don’t have many of these, but you enjoy having them.” Abraham Almonte and Miller led off the bottom of the first with backto-back doubles, Dustin Ackley had a run-scoring groundout and Carlos Peguero notched a sacrifice fly to center to quickly make it 2-0. Miller and Ackley then drew one-out walks to start a rally in the third, as Rich Poythress drew a bases-loaded walk to plate Miller, Nate Tenbrink followed with a bases-clearing double to left center and Brandon Bantz plated Tenbrink with a single to left to make it 7-0. “That was fun,” said Miller, whose double in the first extended his hitting streak to 20 games, currently the highest in the PCL. “Everybody was clicking. First hitter of the game, Abe ropes a double off the wall. It just kind of went from there.” Brandon Maurer, making his fifth start with the Rainiers after being demoted from Seattle, cruised through the first three innings, retiring nine straight batters after a leadoff walk in the top of the first. But he ran into some trouble in the fourth, as Brett Pill crushed a two-run homer to left and Carter Jurica later added

X See RAINIERS / page A10

By Steve Mullen Correspondent

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

EARLY OFFENSE. (Top) Carlos Peguero, who finished 4-for-4 with

three runs batted in, watches the flight of his sacrifice fly in the first inning. (Bottom) Abraham Almonte scores the Rainiers’ first run on a groundout by Dustin Ackley.

After stellar careers at both Curtis High School and the University of Washington, Isaiah Thomas decided two years ago to do something for the community and city that helped him reach the pinnacle of basketball. For the second straight year, Thomas held the Isaiah Thomas Youth Skills Academy, which ran from June 24-27 at the Henry T. Schatz Boys & Girls Club in University Place. “This is the second year of the camp, and I’d like to make sure that these kids get some topflight instruction for the three days that they are here,” said Thomas on June 25. Thomas has also added another former Washington Husky, Dave Hudson, to help run the camp. Hudson brings a wealth of collegiate playing experience from 1999-2003 to go along with another key ingredient: discipline. “You make the kids understand early that you must have their attention at all times to pick up all the things they are being taught, or else it’s five-pushup-time,” said Hudson. Ages of the campers ranged from 6 to 18 years old, and the always-gregarious Thomas liked to get in the middle of the drills and take a hands-on approach with the boys and girls. “They like all the encouragement they can get, and I give them a whole lot of it,” Thomas said. With his rise to the top of the basketball world, Thomas gives a whole lot of credit to a coach that was more than just a coach to him. “(University of Washington Head Coach Lorenzo) Romar was a great father figure to me also who made me a better person both on and off the court,” Thomas said. “I owe him a lot. “The three years I spent at the UW were the best three years of me life, surrounded by a lot of great friends and teammates. I would not trade them for anything.” With much media attention focused on Sacramento lately with the possible move to Seattle, Thomas decided to take another approach when looking at the California capital city. “The fans have been great to me, and it’s

X See CAMP / page A10


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SPORTSWATCH TROLIA SET TO HOST *(47(;*<9;0: Curtis grad and former Seattle Mariners draftee Aaron Trolia is again set to host his week-long baseball instructional camp at Curtis High School on July 8-12. Joining him again will be Curtis High head baseball coach Bryan Robinson, with featured appearances from Jon Kitna, Tacoma Rainiers catcher Brandon Bantz and Seattle Mariners coach Scott Budner. The camp is open to those ages 6 to 16, with a full-day option open to those ages 11 to 16 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day. There is a halfday option as well for those ages 11 to 16 from 9 a.m. to noon, while players ages 6 to 10 will train from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. “The afternoon option is going to be a lot more competitions, events, prizes,” Trolia said. “We’re going to grind the skills and drills in the morning. The afternoon is going to be the time to see it work out.” While this is the main camp during the summer for his organization AT Baseball, Trolia and his staff will continue to hold clinics and camps throughout the summer. For more info on the camp or upcoming clinics visit www.atbaseball.com. By Jeremy Helling

CHAMBERS WINS 400 (;1<50695(;065(3: Recently graduated Foss athlete Marcus Chambers won the 400meter dash at the U.S. Junior Outdoor Track & Field Championships on June 21-23 in Des Moines, Iowa to qualify for the 2013 Pan American Junior Championships. Chambers, who won the 400and 200-meter titles at the 3A state meet in late May, finished in a time of 46.55 seconds in the finals of the 400 on June 23 to edge Juan Paul Green of Illinois by nine hundredths of a second. “It was great experience racing against all the top guys of the country,” said Chambers, noting that a brutal wind at Drake Stadium – on the campus of Drake University – was a difficult challenge. “That last 110 meters was hard for all of us. We had to push through. I just

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

/0;;05.;/,+0(465+ Curtis grad Aaron Trolia will host his week-long baseball camp at Curtis High School on July 8-12. told myself to keep my arms pumping and my legs would follow.” Chambers noted that with professional athletes competing concurrently at the venue in the U.S. Outdoor Track & Field Championships, the event was unlike any other he has competed in. “It was a place with a great atmosphere,” he said. “It was one of the biggest meets I’ve been in.” With the win Chambers qualifies to run in the 400-meter dash and the 4X400-meter relay at the Pan American Junior Championships, which will take place in Medellin, Colombia on Aug. 23-25. But first, he will run the 200 and 400 at the U.S. Junior Olympics on July 22-28 at North Carolina A&T University in Greensboro, N.C. as part of his ongoing training. By Jeremy Helling

:6<5+,9:<: -(33;6=(5*6<=,9 Despite a pair of goals from forward Sean Okoli, the Sounders U-23s fell 4-2 at Vancouver on June 22 to drop to fourth in the PDL standings. The Whitecaps’ Bobby Jhutty tallied a hat trick, including his first strike in the 13th minute to give Vancouver a 1-0 lead. Okoli

tallied his first goal in the 24th minute on a diving header off a cross from Steve Mohn to equalize, but Jhutty answered in the 32nd minute with his second goal off a pass from Niall Cousens. Okoli again equalized in the 61st minute with his second goal, sending in a rebound after Blake Wise’s shot was deflected. But Jhutty drove in a penalty kick four minutes later, and Harry Lakhan added a goal off Jhutty’s corner in the 68th minute to put it away. The Sounders dropped to 4-4-1 in league play, sitting nine points behind first-place Victoria in the standings. They will take on the Washington Crossfire – whom they have already beaten twice this season – on June 30 at 6 p.m. at Redmond High School before travelling to take on the North Sound SeaWolves on July 4 at 4 p.m at Edmonds Woodway High School. The Sounders’ next, and final, home game will be against Victoria on July 7 at 2 p.m. at Sunset Chevy Stadium in Sumner.

:;<+:>05;/9,,6--6<9 With the summer season well underway, the Cheney Studs won three of four games at the Marysville GoldSox on June 20-23 to

improve to 17-7 on the year. The Studs won 5-3 in the weekend opener on June 20, as University of Puget Sound grad Taylor Thompson picked up the win in pitching one and two-thirds innings of scoreless relief. Second baseman Jared Van Hoon was 2-for-4 with two runs batted in for the Studs. The GoldSox picked up a 6-5 walk-off win on June 21, despite being outhit by the Studs 12-5. Left fielder Kyle Boe was 2-for-4 with a triple and three runs batted in for the Studs, and catcher Kyle Sutherland was 3-for-4 with a double and an RBI. The Studs responded with an 8-3 win on June 22, as they scored five runs in the sixth inning to put the game away. Starter Ross Humes picked up the win in pitching six innings of one-run ball, allowing six hits and one walk with seven strikeouts. Shortstop Yusuke Akitoshi and designated hitter Lee Stoops had two RBIs apiece for the Studs. They finished the weekend with a 6-4 win on June 23, as left fielder Jordan Copeland had a two-run triple in the sixth inning and Stoops gave the Studs the win with a bases-clearing double in the eighth inning to make it 6-4. Boe finished

3-for-5 with two runs scored. The Studs will travel to Kelowna, B.C. for the Canada Day Tournament from June 28 to July 1, and will host the North Sound Emeralds on July 3 at 5:30 p.m. at the University of Puget Sound.

VOLLEYBALL 6--0*0(3:>(5;,+ The Tacoma-Pierce County Volleyball Officials Board is in need of individuals who are interested in officiating middle school, junior high, senior high, college and recreation department volleyball matches throughout Pierce County. A comprehensive training program, starting Aug. 22, is offered for all new officials and the opportunities to advance in the organization are extensive. For students, retirees or former athletes looking to reconnect with a sport, officiating high school and middle school sports is also an excellent way to earn some extra income and provide a great service to the teams. Registration is due no later than Aug. 5. For additional information on becoming a volleyball official, please visit www. tpcvob.com or contact Marc Blau at (253) 848-1360 or blaumarc@ qwest.net.


:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNLÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;-YPKH`1\UL

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

5)(790+,. A player sports a Boston

Celtics NBA jersey as he runs through a drill at the Isaiah Thomas Skills Academy.

WCamp

From page A8

still pretty close to home, but hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hoping we do get a team here in Seattle in the near future,â&#x20AC;? he said. With the drills winding down in the morning session on day two, Thomas decided to liven it up a little bit. With split up teams running four-on-four fast break drills, Thomas began to lead cheers for both units. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It makes me feel young again, and I love to see the smiles on both the boys and girls faces, they can tell their parents an NBA player was cheering for them.â&#x20AC;? With headlines involving name athletes popping up in the police blotter pages more and more, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s refreshing to see over 100 kids having a blast learning basketball from an NBA player from your home town. These kids will take away more than just the new skills they learned in the four-day duration of this camp, they will also take away the memories of a real hometown hero who gave more than just his time and money to improve these kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; basketball skills. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll tell their kids down the road of their experience with Isaiah Thomas.

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

.66+)(:,9<5505.. Rainiers left fielder Nate Tenbrink slides in with a stolen base as Fresno second baseman

Cole Gillespie (15) is unable to apply the tag.

WRainiers From page A8

a run-scoring single to cut it to 7-3. The Grizzliesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Johnny Monell would add a monster solo homer well over the wall in right field in the fourth off Maurer, who finished by giving up four runs on five hits in five and two-third innings, with two walks and nine strikeouts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He definitely has the body, and the arm, and the head to be a major league starter for a long time,â&#x20AC;? Stearns said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to get him there. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not there yet.â&#x20AC;? The Rainiersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; offense kept on churning in the bottom of the fourth, as Peguero â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who finished 4-for-4 with two doubles and three runs batted in â&#x20AC;&#x201C; sin-

gled to score Ackley and Alex Liddi followed with a mammoth homer over the bullpen in left to plate Peguero and make it 10-3. That capped a very unpleasant outing for Fresno starter Fabio Castillo, as he gave up 10 earned runs on 10 hits in four innings, with four walk and four strikeouts. Liddi and Tenbrink added run-scoring singles in the sixth inning to extend the lead, while Peguero plated Almonte with a double in the seventh and Poythress later singled to bring in Ackley and cap the scoring. The 14 runs were a season high at home this season for the Rainiers, who also matched a season high with eight doubles. Almonte, Miller and Ackley combined for seven runs scored in hitting 1-2-3 in the order, as each player sported a batting average of at least .324

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to that point. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those three guys at the top of our lineup are really outstanding hitters,â&#x20AC;? Stearns said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how long weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have all three of those guys.â&#x20AC;? Miller was batting .386 (32-for-83) during his 20-game hit streak to that point, as it began on May 29. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just trying to get a routine and be aggressive, really let it fly all the timeâ&#x20AC;Śnot give away any at-bats,â&#x20AC;? Miller said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the main thing is just going up there trying to be really aggressive and be on the attack.â&#x20AC;? The win put the Rainiers at 46-33 overall on the year to maintain their lead atop the PCL Northern Division, as they were scheduled to begin a four-game series against Las Vegas at Cheney Stadium on June 27.

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WFlowers From page A1

“People in the community can express their own caring by doing this,” Di Nino said, as the finished product – the decorative arch with thousands of flowers – will have a high visual impact and allow for many people to welcome the service members home. “We want everyone in the community to express their gratitude that these troops have returned safely.” All you need are two materials – anything yellow that can be made into a flower and pipe cleaners (preferably green). Di Nino encourages recycling – yellow wrapping paper (predominately yellow), crepe paper, tissue paper, yellow plastic bags (like the kind from Grocery Outlet), feathers, old yellow tablets, plastic tablecloths, fabric, newsprint (not newspaper) spray painted yellow (afterward), and even silk/plastic flowers can be part of the mix if you have some lying around. It’s important to use something bendable (like green pipe cleaners) to make the flowers so that they can be securely fastened to the chicken wire stage arch. Looking through the boxes and bags full of flowers made so far reveals a multitude of textures, styles and shades of yellow. Some are even made with goldglittered paper, which blends in beautifully with the yellow flowers. “Everybody can do them according to their skill level,” Di Nino says. “We are finding that napkins

RENDERING BY JOHN CARLTON

WELCOME HOME. This rendering shows how the main stage arch will look once it’s covered in thousands of yellow paper flowers.

work the best because they look so great.” The deadline is Sept. 1 to have all the flowers made. There are two drop-off points where finished flowers can be delivered, and Di Nino asks that flowers be packed in boxes in order to protect them: Washington Women’s Employment and Education (WWEE) at 3516 S. 47th St., Suite 205, Tacoma, WA 98409; and Little Church on the Prairie at 6310 Motor Ave. S.W., Lakewood, WA 98499.

THE RAIDERS RETURN

The Raiders Return Welcome Home Event on Sept. 15 is being organized by the City of Lakewood in coop-

eration with the 4-2 Stryker Brigade Combat Team (SBCT), the Lakewood SubChapter of the Association of the US Army (AUSA), and other community partners. The day will include two welcome home events for the 4-2 SBCT after their nine-month deployment to Afghanistan. First up will be a Raider Welcome Home Parade starting at 9 a.m. The route will go from the Lakewood Police Department (Lakewood Drive and 95th St.) to City Hall (6000 Main St. S.W.). Mary Dodsworth, director of parks, recreation and community services for the City of Lakewood, said the parade will be all about the

troops, with about 2,000 of them marching. “It’s really a procession of the troops,” she said. The Raider Welcome Home Celebration will then start at 1 p.m. at Fort Steilacoom Park (9200 Steilacoom Blvd. S.W.) and run until 6 p.m. There will be music and entertainment; a public market full of arts and crafts vendors and booths representing non-profits and businesses; a motorcycle rally sponsored by Northwest Harley Davidson; kids inflatables and a petting zoo; a classic car display with police, fire and EMT vehicles; competitive activities like baseball throws and tug-of-war; a beer garden

and more. Dodsworth said the city isn’t planning for this to be an annual event, as it is being held for the specific purpose of welcoming home the 4-2 Stryker Brigade Combat Team. “It’s a way of just saying welcome home and thank you for your service and to recognize those lost to the battle.” Di Nino’s involvement in this project stems from her participation in the American Leadership Forum of Tacoma/Pierce County (www.alftacomapiercecounty.org), the local chapter of this national organization that works to connect, and strengthen diverse leaders for the public good in their

own local communities. Di Nino is part of the just-graduated ALF Class XIX and as they are required to do a project to enforce their learning, her class chose to support RallyPoint/6 and this organization’s part in the Raiders Return Welcome Home Event. Headquartered in Lakewood, RallyPoint/6 is a new non-profit consortium of public, private and community partners in Washington State working to help returning veterans with reintegration issues. RallyPoint/6 is, in the simplest terms, a “one-stop shop” resource center for active and reserve military, veterans and their families. Developed by a coalition of more than 55 veteran and military-serving organizations, nonprofits and government agencies, RallyPoint/6 aims to inspire, equip and mobilize veterans to engage their local communities through meaningful service in eight impact areas: community, reintegration, employment, education, family strength, health/ behavioral health, finance/ legal, housing stability, and volunteerism. ALF Class XIX is assisting RallyPoint/6 reach military, veterans and families at the welcome home event. Sponsors are still needed for the Raiders Return Welcome Home Event, and space is still available for those non-profits or businesses that wish to participate in the public market. Visit www.cityoflakewood. us for applications and additional information. To learn more about RallyPoint/6, visit www.theunfinishedmission.org.

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Laura Winkelman H: 253.858.3779 C: 253.514.0309 lw7707@comcast.net


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WFreedom

We Specialize in Small Businesses Phone: Web:

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF FREEDOM FAIR

AIR SHOW. Between 1:30 and 3:30 p.m. the Tacoma

Freedom Fair Air show will take to the skies over Commencement Bay. For a prime location to view the air show go to Marine Park between the Lobster Shop and Katie Downs.

WEvents From page A1

America BE Strong Stage at Camp Patriot

(4015 Ruston Way):

10116 171st St Ct E, Puyallup

   Meridian Ave E

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Duke’s Chowder House Blues Stage (3327 Ruston Way):

Pierce County Airport Thun Field

D hts Heig r. E

Featuring performances by Maia Santell and House Blend (noon); Back to Beale Street blues competition finalists Palmer Junction (3:30 p.m.), Crazy Texas Gypsies (4:45 p.m.), Cody Rentas Band (6 p.m.) and Randy Oxford Band

Sunrise Blvd. E

176th Rd. E

Evening hours, plus open Sunday! Monday - Friday 7:00 a.m.- 7:00 p.m. Saturday 7:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. Sunday 8:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m.

Standard Oil Change

$21

99

Save thru 7/31

For the slickest oil change in town. We’ll install new oil filter, refill up to 5 qts. Kendall GT-1 High Performance Synthetic Blend with Liquid Titanium motor oil, lubricate chassis (if applicable). Most vehicles. Price includes oil filter recycling fee.

Featuring Duffy Owens and Rev Denial (11 a.m.), Michael Crain Band (noon), Tony La Stella & the Goombas performing “America Be Strong” (3:30 p.m.), Rural Route 3 (6 p.m.), Shambala (8 p.m.)

Standard Brake Service

$50 Off

Ask about our Lifetime Brake Service. We’ll install new brake pads, resurface rotors and inspect brake components. Most vehicles. Savings off regular price, per axle.

Save thru 7/31

See store for complete service description and details. Redeem coupons at your participating Firestone Complete Auto Care store. Not to be combined with another offer on same product or service and not to be used to reduce outstanding debt. No cash value. Offer void where prohibited.

FirestoneCompleteAutoCare.com 1 - 8 0 0 - L O C A T E - U S ( 1-800-562-2838 )

Shop supply charges in the amount of 6% of labor charges will be added to invoices greater than $35. These charges will not exceed $25 and represent costs and profits. Shop supply charges not applicable in CA or NY. Non-mandated disposal or recycling charges, if any are disclosed above, may also represent costs and profits. Specific product offerings and tread designs may vary. Prices, warranties, car service, credit plans and other offers available at Firestone Complete Auto Care; see affiliated dealers for their competitive offers and warranties. †MINIMUM MONTHLY PAYMENTS REQUIRED. Applicable to purchases made January 1 through December 31, 2013. APR: 22.8%. Minimum Finance Charge $1.00. CFNA reserves the right to change APR, fees and other terms unilaterally.

From page A1

cies that would otherwise add up to $700,000 to $750,000. Then the commission must come up with another $200,000 to pay for fireworks and other entertainment. That seemed like an especially shaky proposition this time last year with donations lagging and no title sponsor to foot the bulk of the bill. In the end, Tacoma Events Commission managed to put the festival on without significantly scaling back, but there briefly were discussions about discontinuing the event altogether. “The last couple of years have really been tough,” said Grape. “Not that it hasn’t been tough this year, but a lot of pocket books are opening up more than they have in the past few years. Just that the Emerald Queen is considering being a major sponsor is a real plus; and we have a few grant foundations that we’ve never been able to tap into.” “We’re still nailing down some of the sponsorships that said they would help us,” Linenko said. “Some of the sponsors who have given generously before have scaled back due to the economy, and we don’t have the funding we once did to cover (the budget.) So we are asking people to give generously and donate in hopes that we can rekindle some of the relationships that we had lost in the past and develop new relationships.” Tacoma Events has set up a Paypal account to solicit donations online at www.freedomfair. com. Donors that give $45 can join the Freedom Fair Fan Club and gain VIP privileges on July 4. And while there is officially no entry fee to attend Freedom Fair, organizers are requesting that attendees voluntarily contribute when they arrive, with a suggested donation of $2 to $15. “If we continue the way we have been, I have no doubt we’ll be back in 2014,” Linenko said.

(7:15 p.m.); and a Memphis All-Star Jam (8:30 p.m.) Cars from the Rod and Custom Car Show will also be on display from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Spike from Spike & the Impalers and the Fabulous Johnsons (4 p.m.), Rokkerbox (6 p.m.) and Blues Brothers Revue (8 p.m.)

Katie Downs Stage (3211 Ruston Way):

Worthy Music Ministries Stage

Featuring alumni from Ted Brown Music Outreach’s Live It Out Loud youth program, Destination Unknown, Fistful of Dollars and Insuburban Avenue (staring at 11:30 a.m.), Midnight Rambler (Rolling Stones tribute, 3 p.m.) and Northwest garage-rock super-group, Freddie & the Screamers (6 p.m.)

Ram Bighorn Stage

(3001 Ruston Way):

Featuring BMX bike shows (11:30 a.m. and 1:15, 3:30, 5:30 and 7:30 p.m.) and music from the Adventurers (noon), Staxx Brothers (2 p.m.),

(Dickman Mill Park):

With performances by Martin Henry Project (11 a.m.); Jasmine Fuller (12:15 p.m.); Tiger & Sydney Paulsen (12:30 p.m.); Foxley (3:30 p.m.); Tony Easterly (4:45 p.m.); Upward Bound in the 5th Dimension (5:30 and 6:30 p.m.); Swing Low (6 p.m.); Toyin Adekal (8 p.m.); Stacy Shown (9 p.m.)

Music by the Bay Stage (Jack Hyde Park):

With performances by Steve Cooley and the Dangerfields (5 p.m.), Victrola (6 p.m.), Charles Mack Band (7 p.m.), Tin Man (8 p.m.) and Cody Rentas Band (9 p.m.)

Congo Productions Drum Circle (2-8 p.m., the east end of Marine Park)

Freedom Fair Wings & Wheels

(11 a.m. to 5 p.m., July 6, Tacoma Narrows Airport):

This post-Freedom Fair aviation, car and motorcycle show will also feature vendors, food booths, military displays and other entertainment. Admission is $15 for adults, $5 for kids, ages 6 to 17 and free for children ages 5 and under. For more information, visit www.freedomfair. com/


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City Life

Spamalot

B3

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

SECTION B, PAGE 1

PHOTOS BY JESSE GARDNER MICHENER

FOR THE FIT AND DARING:

A playground in the trees By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

Metro Parks Tacoma is kicking the concept of “playground” into a new dimension. We are not talking about the snazzy new spray parks and climbing structures throughout Tacoma. Fun, healthy, safe and adventurefilled all at once, they dare kids to test their muscles, balance and imagination. They are why play is good for kids every day. And they are good practice for the new big thing. Even while Metro Parks is investing in the neighborhoods, it has partnered with Deep Forest Challenge to build a new set of adventures at Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium and Northwest Trek Wildlife Park. They have put swings 50 feet in the air and launched climbing walls into the tree canopy. They are challenging us to get over heights, and test – or discover – our limits. They are an incentive to develop, or reclaim, the strength and skill to take them on. Trek’s complex of four courses is a marvel of engineering, with zips, tunnels and wobbly bridges built over and around each other – and the paths walkers take around the park. The quartet begins with the Super Kid Course, for kids 6 and older, then moves on to the Discovery Course, with a minimum age of 8, and Adventure Course for people 10 and up. Last year, word spread that Adventure was extreme. From the 30-foot wall at the

beginning to the 55-foot high tightrope, it was a challenge beyond Point Defiance Zoo’s Discovery Course, itself no walk in the park. This spring, Sensation opened. It is Adventure times two: Higher, tougher, wobblier. On a warm, drizzly day, a collection of soldiers, theater people and an educator brought their best to test Sensation. Photographer Jesse Gardner Michener had invited them to be the faces, feet and muscles on the Metro Parks website. You can see her gallery, and shots of the course at www.nwtrek.org/zipwild. Deep Forest Challenge course manager Jennifer Robinson put those photos in context. “When people complete Sensation, they will know they’ve had an incredible workout, and they’ll walk away with a triumphant sense of satisfaction,” she said. That’s what you see on the faces: exertion, concentration, triumph and elation. That’s what the loose team experienced, or, more accurately, contributed. As individuals, they may be competitive, but cinched into their harnesses and clipped onto the safety wires on the course they were cooperation incarnate. On the rope ladder to the first platform, they experimented with technique, shared tips, and for the least acrobatic suggested anchoring the bottom of the ladder, rather than allowing it to flail. They took the spaced slats of the first rope bridge at a good pace, demonstrating how smooth one step at a

time, or a two step to each plank, can be. They clipped and zipped. On the monkey ropes, they called back a warning about the harness clip catching on bolts on the safety cable. The bolts are there to prevent anyone who slips between the rope loops from sliding backward on the inclined wire, explained guide Victor Robinson. And so it went through the 12 challenges, including the Cherokee Net, Monkey Bridge, Tyrolean Zip Line, Tightrope, Barrel Bridge, Himalayan Bridge, Squirrel Bridge and two daunting Corsair nets. “Lean to your left,” soldiers and dancers yelled 30 feet up to Michener on the treacherous zig zag of the Kodiak Beams. Her camera was swinging around her neck, an extra impediment just when she didn’t need it. “Now reach ahead with your right hand! That’s it! You’ve got it! You’re doing great! You’re almost there!” Her new fast friends sent up a mighty cheer when she stepped onto the platform, then the Corsair Net to climb up to the final zip line. Michener is an adventurous, conscientious mom who, if you add up the hours, has spent weeks on playgrounds with her daughters. When, on that drizzly morning, she stepped off the net onto the duff-covered ground, she found a new balance, tested her limits and played well with others. She had faced the Deep Forest Challenge. She had conquered Metro Parks’ playground of the next dimension.

Northwest Trek Wildlife Park’s Zip Wild courses by Deep Forest Challenge offer: ‡ 683(5 .,' &2856( - For ages 6 and older. The course has nine challenges and two zips, with a maximum height of 5.5 feet. Young people 17 and under must be accompanied on the course by a parent or legal guardian, with a maximum of two children per guardian. Minimum height is 3 feet, 3 inches. Maximum weight is 275 pounds. Ticket prices are in addition to park admission. Price per child is $19.95. Price per guardian is $9.95. ‡',6&29(5<&2856( – For ages 8 and older. The course has 10 challenges and two zips, with a maximum height of 17.5 feet. Young people 17 and younger must be accompanied on the course by a parent or legal guardian, with a maximum of two children per guardian. Minimum height is 4 feet. Maximum weight is 275 pounds. Price per person is $29.95, in addition to park admission. ‡ $'9(1785( &2856( – For ages 10 and older. Course challenges include suspended bridges, a cargo net and a high wire tight rope 55 feet in the air, plus six zips. Young people 17 and younger must be accompanied on the course by a parent or legal guardian, with a maximum of two children per guardian. Minimum height is 4 feet, 7 inches. Maximum weight is 275 pounds. Price is $39.95, plus admission.

Groups of 15 or more get a 10 pert cent discount. Call (360) 832-6117 to make a group reservation. Military discount is 10 percent with identification and can be purchased at the Deep Forest Challenge Cabana.

Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium’s ZOOM courses with Deep Forest Challenge are: ‡ 683(5 .,' – For ages 5 and older. The course has 15 challenges plus zips. Five-year-olds must be accompanied on the course by a parent or legal guardian. Minimum height is 3 feet, 3 inches. Maximum weight is 275 pounds. Price is $19.95, plus zoo admission. ‡',6&29(5<&2856( – For ages 8 and older. Course challenges include suspended bridges, climbing walls, a cargo net, plus zips with heights up to 30 feet. Young people 8-13 must be accompanied on the course by a parent or legal guardian. Minimum height is 4 feet. Maximum weight is 275 pounds. Price is $29.95, plus admission. Call (253) 970-0807 or click on www.pdza.org/zoom for more information.

‡6(16$7,21&2856( – For ages 18 and older. The course has 12 challenges and six zips, with heights up to 80 feet. Minimum height is 5 feet, 2 inches. Maximum weight is 275 pounds. Price is $59.95, plus admission. Reservations are required.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE KITE FESTIVAL

Don’t miss out on a free fun-filled day at the Kite Festival on Chambers Bay, June 29 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m at Chambers Creek Regional Park, 9850 64th St. W. – Central Meadow – in University Place. The first 250 kids will be able to make their own kite compliments of Pierce County KiteFliers Association. There will also be kite vendors, food, face painting, and more. Following this year’s event there will be a free concert – saxophone quartet from the Tacoma Concert Band, provided by the Pierce County Arts Commission. Info: (253) 798-4141 or www.piercecountywa.org/parks.

TWO STADIUM FARE Stadium Fare is an eclectic neighborhood market that will begin on July 6 and

continue every other Saturday until Sept. 28. The Fare will take place in the parking lot of the First Presbyterian Church (corner of Division and Sout ‘G’ St.) from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Fare is all about enjoying wonderful local foods and beautiful Wright Park. Pick up a tidbit, or a full meal, and meander among musicians and street performers including mimes, jugglers and fire walkers, as well as a wide variety of specially selected vintage and formerly owned wares to tempt a wide range of tastes and budgets.

THREE

ROCK THE BOWL Get a taste of adventure at the Taste of Tacoma! Rock the Bowl @ Point D is back for its second year during the EQC Taste of Tacoma. Rock the Bowl is a family fun zone produced by Metro Parks Tacoma, operating in conjunction with Taste of Tacoma each day from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Activities

es, legends, history and more. 6 p.m., tickets $25. Visit www.broadwaycenter.org.

FIVE NEIL HULBERT QUARTET include: Kidzone Family Fun Stage sponsored by 94.1 KMPS; Northwest Trek zip line; Center at Norpoint rock climbing wall; Meadow Park Golf Course chipping green; human hamster balls; adventure obstacle course; STAR Center ropes course; and picnic at The Point. Get details at MetroParksTacoma.org/ RockTheBowl.

FOUR NATIBU HACHA & FRIENDS The beautiful islands of Hawaii and the culture of aloha come to the Pantages Theater on June 30 with “Natibu Hacha & Friends” featuring Jesse Bais, Ruby Santos and Jack Larimer. Through traditional song and dance, “Natibu Hacha” celebrates creation, the gods and goddess-

The Neil Hulbert Jazz Quintet will perform at noon on July 3 as part of the Listen Live at Lunch concert series at First Lutheran Church, 524 S. ‘I’ St., in Tacoma, adjacent to Wright Park. The quintet features Neil Hulbert on trumpet, Zach Miller on tenor sax, Peter Adams on piano, Evan Hulbert on bass and Michael Volz on drums. Their program will include “Scrapple from the Apple” (Charlie Parker), “Some Skunk Funk” (Randy Brecker), “Straphangin’“ (Michael Brecker), “Laura” (Mercer/Raksin), and “Invitation” (Webster/Kaper) Info: (253) 272-1538.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 28, 2013

2013

RAM

Restaruant & Brewery

LIVE MUSIC STAGE

12:00pm RockerBox

2:00pm Staxx Brothers

Emerald Queen Casino and the RAM present

Rock the 4th

s "IGGEST AND BEST BEER GARDEN PLUS LIQUOR AND WINE AND MUSIC STAGE 4:00pm Fabulous Johnsons with Spike

s !LL AGES WELCOME s 'REAT &OOD s 4ACOMA 2AM %NTER TO WIN A NEW &ORD

6:00pm AdVentures

s 3EA 4AC #OBRAS &OOTBALL 4EAM 0$&, WILL BE IN THE LOT s 3HENANIGANS +IDS INmATABLES -ECHANICAL "ULL RIDES

8:00pm Blues Brothers


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, June 28, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 3

LAKEWOODâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;IMPORTANCEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Spamalotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; hams it up GOES WILDE WELL at Paradise Theatre

PHOTO BY DEAN LAPIN

SEATED. Algernon (Andrew Kittrell) and (in window) Cecily (Cassie

Fastabend) and Gwendolen (Deya Ozburn) star in the Lakewood Playhouse production of Oscar Wildeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Importance of Being Earnest.â&#x20AC;? By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

P

owerfully nuanced acting in Lakewood Playhouseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s staging of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Importance of Being Earnestâ&#x20AC;? brings the 118-year-old play to the current day without losing its heritage. Oscar Wildeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s farcical comedy, after all, had created the formula of compounding white lies into mistaken identities and fast-talking that pretty much every modern sitcom uses to this day. On one level, the play is a comedy, while on another, it is a biting commentary about social norms told through the adventures of two well-travelled men about town who use fictional â&#x20AC;&#x153;cover storiesâ&#x20AC;? to live separate lives in the country than they do in the city. Their separate ruses come to light when they inadvertently merge lies and struggle to keep them straight when they fall in love along the way. The trick to staging a British â&#x20AC;&#x153;period pieceâ&#x20AC;? of this caliber is that while the script is a proven hit, weak acting in a show that is so word heavy could bring ruin. The play lacks fight scenes, deep drama and over-the-top comical lines machine gunned from the stage. It just rolls along with giggles here and there brought by subtle delivery and strategic eye rolls and nods. Unskilled actors and untrained directors could miss the moments. Such is not the case with Lakewoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show. Director Marilyn Bennettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doctoral work

in Theatre History and Criticism was well used in staging this season-ending show. Each scene seems to have been hammered and folded and hammered again to forge a sharp sword of theatrical awesomeness. The multi-layered lines were allowed to soak and age to perfection. At the center of the awesomeness are John Worthing (played by Bryan K. Bender) and Algernon Moncrieff (Andrew Kittrell), who find themselves in love with Hon. Gwendolen Fairfax (Deya Ozburn) and Cecily Cardew (Cassie Jo Fastabend), respectively. The trouble is, their loves know them both as Ernest, their cover story names. Their portrayals are three dimensionally realistic but over the top in their hilarity. Fastabend is just adorable as the youthful but cutting ward in love, and Ozburn owns the stage every time she does a period piece. This show continues that trend. Wilde must have had a premonition five generations ago that Ozburn would handle his words like she were wearing a pitcherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mitt â&#x20AC;&#x201C; each line was worked and oiled and tooled for a full delivery. Ozburn delivered. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Importance of Being Earnestâ&#x20AC;? runs at 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and at 2 p.m. on Sundays. Tickets are $24 with student and military discounts. The theatre is located within the Lakewood Towne Center, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd. Contact (253) 5880042 or lakewoodplayhouse.org.

PHOTO BY ERIN LUND

LAUGH-A-LOT. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spamalot,â&#x20AC;? the musical inspired by British comedy classic â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monty Python and the Holy Grail,â&#x20AC;? runs weekends through July 7 at Gig Harborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paradise Theatre. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

G

ig Harborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paradise Theatre opened the Northwestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premiere of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monty Pythonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spamalotâ&#x20AC;? on Friday as a way to end its regular season with a hearty helping of British humor all dressed up in outrageous accents. The gig includes flying stuffed cows, killer rabbits, taunting Frenchmen, mothers who bear a striking resemblance to hamsters and fathers who apparently smell like Elderberries. All this and more left the audience with aching sides from laughter. Winner of the 2005 Tony Award for Best Musical and nominated for 13 other awards, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spamalotâ&#x20AC;? pulls from the 1975 comedy â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monty Python and the Holy Grailâ&#x20AC;? in its musical retelling of the adventures of the King Arthurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Knights of the Round Table. All the great scenes are there, including â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Knights Who Say Ni,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Knights of the Round Tableâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brave Sir Robin,â&#x20AC;? and a shout out to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monty Pythonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Life of Brianâ&#x20AC;? with the addition of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Always Look on the Bright Side of Life.â&#x20AC;? Anyone who is a fan of the movie will know what is in store during the stage production. Those unwashed heathens unfamiliar with the celluloid gem will be surprised. The book and lyrics by Eric Idle and music by Idle, with help from John Du Prez, take the best of the movieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s humor and wrap it into a stage show that plays like

a movie on a stage. The costumes and dance numbers are period and tight in a show where timing is everything. There are no big laugh moments, just a machine gun of vaudevillian one liners and deadpan deliveries that only work with practice and British accents. Anchoring the show are King Arthur (played by Jonathan Bill) and his â&#x20AC;&#x153;horseâ&#x20AC;? Patsy (Gary Fetterplace) as they venture around their Middle Age realm to find knights worthy of the quest to find the vessel used at the Last Supper between Jesus and his followers. Along their route, they find the famed Lady of the Lake turned spritely diva (Alicia Ross) and the likes of Not Dead Fred (Jake Atwood) and Sir Robin (John Mobus). Solid acting was done by all, however, the translation from film to stage could have used a bit more energy and antics. The movie played well in theaters because it included so many oddball close-ups and subtle line deliveries that simply canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t shuttle to a stage version without some impact loss. But it was well worth the trip across the bridge, nonetheless. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spamalotâ&#x20AC;? runs at 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and at 3 p.m. on Sundays through July 7. The theater will host a special dinner show at 6 p.m. July 6 as well. Paradise Theatre is located at 9911 Burnham Dr. N.W. in Gig Harbor. Tickets are: $20 for adults, $17 for seniors and $10 for students and are available at www.paradisetheatre.org.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 28, 2013

GOLDFISH TAVERN TO HOST BEER GARDEN DURING TASTE OF TACOMA

TASTE OF TACOMA LINEUP ROCK THE BOWL STAGE June 28 11 a.m.: Hip-hop dance Noon: Woodland Folktale Theater 1 p.m.: Eatonville Dancers 2 p.m.: KC Critters 3 p.m.: Eatonville Dancers 4 p.m.: Jeff Evans 5 p.m.: KC Critters 6 p.m.: Jeff Evans June 29 11 a.m.: Animal Crackers Noon: Jump rope show 1 p.m.: Dance 4 Dios 2 p.m.: Predators of the Heart 3 p.m.: Predators of the Heart 4 p.m.: Jump rope show 5 p.m.: Te Fare O Tamatoa 6 p.m.: Reptile Man

PHOTO BY ERNEST A. JASMIN

FISH TALES. Closed last Halloween, The Goldfish Tavern will operate an outdoor beer garden during the upcoming Taste of Tacoma. Under new ownership, the venerable establishment will be fully functional later this year. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

T

acoma’s Goldfish Tavern will reopen for Taste of Tacoma. Well, sort of. “We’re not open inside, we’re just opening a beer garden,” said Teresa Smith, whose family owns the iconic watering hole, which has stood at 5310 N. Pearl St. since 1933. Previous business owner Sandie Stevens shuttered the Goldfish last Halloween, unable to keep up with lease payments. The building’s owners – also Smith’s sons-in-law, John, and Bill Eberhardt and their mother Carol Gore – have since applied for a new liquor license, intent on reopening later this year. Smith said they are awaiting approval of a loan needed to do $150,000 to $200,000 worth of renovations, and they hope food and beer sales this weekend will allow them to continue the work of bringing the building up to code. The Goldfish beer garden will be open during Taste of Tacoma, which will take over adjacent Point Defiance Park with more than 50 food booths, music and other entertainment June 28-30. About 225,000 hungry attendees are expected to turn out this weekend, an opportunity that Goldfish owners felt they

couldn’t pass up. “A few weeks ago, we were looking at the time ticking down until the Taste of Tacoma, and we knew we had to do something there,” Smith said.

“[The Goldfish Tavern] will look a lot like its old self, only better. We don’t want to change it so much that people don’t recognize it.” – Teresa Smith Owners’ resources were tapped from making improvements to the building, she said. They held a rummage sale and turned to the fundraising website Kickstarter.com in hopes of making enough money to set up shop before a benefactor came

through in the 11th hour. “This actually just solidified over the last few days. It’s flying by the seat of your pants, but we did it,” Smith said. “We have the event license that will carry us for another couple of months, so we might do the Fourth of July there, too.” Smith said the Goldfish needs many improvements just to bring the building up to code, repairs to its floor, plumbing, roof and frayed wiring. But she said owners also plan to make other changes aimed at expanding the tavern’s menu and making the building more comfortable. “It will look a lot like its old self, only better. We don’t want to change it so much that people don’t recognize it,” Smith said. “We’re gonna have a little kitchen there. We’ll be able to do sandwiches and soup and food to go and things like that.” “Our intention is to be open about 7 o’clock in the morning and have coffee and breakfast sandwiches and stuff like that for walkers. There’s a lot of traffic that goes by there.” The Goldfish beer garden will be open during festival hours, which are from 11 a.m. until 9 p.m. on June 28 and 29, and 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. on June 30. See sidebar for lineup of entertainment at this weekend’s festival.

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• Participants will learn how to make kimchi, and they will take home what they make. • There will also be two other kinds of kimchi for participants to sample, and they will learn how to use over-fermented kimchi.

• All workshop recipes will be available for participants. • The Lakewood H-Mart is our participating sponsor and will have a table with all the needed Kimchi ingredients for sale on that day.

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June 30 11 a.m.: Animal Crackers Noon: Jump rope show 1 p.m.: Animal Crackers 2 p.m.: Jeff Evans 3 p.m.: Jump rope show 4 p.m.: Jeff Evans 5 p.m.: Recess Monkey 6 p.m.: Reptile Man

JAZZ STAGE June 28 1 p.m.: Cara Francis, vocal jazz 2:30 p.m.: The Wicks, folk/ soul 4 p.m.: Beth Whitney, indie folk/pop 5:30 p.m.: Champagne Sunday 7 p.m.: Susy Sun, indie folk/pop June 29 Noon: Paul Richardson, smooth jazz 1:30 p.m.: Edward Paul Trio, rock/pop/blues/soul 3 p.m.: Lance Randall & the Nu Jazz Playas, funk/jazz 4:30 p.m.: Geoffrey Castle, electric violinist 6 p.m.: Natalie Hames, originals and cover tunes 7:30 p.m.: Scott Lindemuth, jazz guitarist June 30 Noon: Stephanie Porter, jazz vocalist 1:30 p.m.: Stickshift Annie with Kimball & the Fugitives, blues/jazz/swing 3 p.m.: Michael Powers, jazz/ blues guitarist 4:30 p.m.: Keely, soul/jazz 6 p.m.: Angelo Pizarro, Latin/ pop/jazz guitarist

BOWL STAGE (CLASSIC ROCK) June 28 Noon: Third In Line 1 p.m.: School of Rock, classic and contemporary rock 2 p.m.: Don’t Say It Ain’t Soul, R&B/soul/funk/rock 3 p.m.: Destination Unknown 4 p.m.: Insuburban Avenue, alternative rock 5 p.m.: Raucous 6 p.m.: Jessica Lynne, country 7 p.m.: Michelle Taylor & the Blues Junkies, blues/rock 8 p.m.: Tumbling Dice, Rolling Stones tribute June 29 11:30 a.m.: Blue Thunder & Soundwave Noon: Brian Green Band, country/rock 1 p.m.: Po’okela Street Band, reggae 2 p.m.: Strangely Alright, alternative/pop

3 p.m.: Michael Anthony Pratt Band, country 4 p.m.: The Diamond Experience, Neil Diamond tribute 5 p.m.: Rural Route 3, original rock ‘n roll 6 p.m.: Jukebox Heroes, Foreigner tribute 7 p.m.: Two-Story Zori, reggae 8 p.m.: High Life, reggae June 30 Noon: Rich Wetzel’s Groovin’ Higher Orchestra, jazz 1 p.m.: Southbound, Southern rock 2 p.m.: Longstride, reggae/ rock/pop 3 p.m.: Rockaraoke 4 p.m.: Tin Man, rock/country 5 p.m.: C-Leb & the Kettle Black, blues/rock 6 p.m.: Guns Of Nevada, rock ‘n roll 7 p.m.: 93 Octane, original rock

POND STAGE (R&B, FOLK, GOSPEL, WORLD BEAT) June 28 Noon: Palatine Avenue, alternative/country 1 p.m.: Inside Outlaws, classic rock, top 40 2 p.m.: Innocent Bystander, indie rock 3 p.m.: Lush Tones, pop/rock 4 p.m.: Vividal, rock/funk/R&B 5 p.m.: E. Pruitt Band, instrumental R&B/funk 6 p.m.: The Good Hurt, indie pop/rock 7 p.m.: Hearts In Motion, top 40 8 p.m.: Black Market Revue, soul/R&B/funk/blues June 29 Noon: Fabulous Party Boys, funk 1 p.m.: Social Network, top 40 2 p.m.: Zarni, piano pop 3 p.m.: Sonic Funk Orchestra 4 p.m.: Imagine the Giant, rock/soul 5 p.m.: Chapter 5, funk 6 p.m.: Tip To Base, funk 7 p.m.: Radio 80, ‘80s covers 8 p.m.: Shownuff Funk June 30 Noon: Vibe Central, R&B/soul/ top 40 1 p.m.: Eclectic Approach, pop/funk/rock 2 p.m.: Perry Acker, rock/pop 3 p.m.: Eldridge Gravy & the Court Supreme, original funk/ soul 4 p.m.: Down North, alternative/soul/rock 5 p.m.: Rhythm Nation 6 p.m.: Sway, top 40 7 p.m.: Readymade Family

COMEDY STAGE June 28

2:40 p.m.: Jerry Percio 3:40 p.m.: Andrew Rivers 4:40 p.m.: Adam Norwest 5:40 p.m.: Gabe Rutledge June 29

1:40 p.m.: Rodney Sherwood 2:40 p.m.: Susan Jones 3:40 p.m.: Drew Barth 4:40 p.m.: Jerry Percio 5:40 p.m.: Adam Norwest 6:40 p.m.: Gabe Rutledge June 30

1:40 p.m.: Drew Barth 2:40 p.m.: Rodney Sherwood 3:40 p.m.: Chris Alpine 4:40 p.m.: Susan Jones 5:40 p.m.: Brad Upton


Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

Etiquette Records recognizes great Northwest musicians

Friday, June 28, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Live Music TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

LANCE BULLER TRIO WILL BRING THEIR JAZZ MUSIC TO MAXWELL’S ON JUNE 28. THE SHOW BEGINS AT 7 P.M. AND THERE IS NO COVER CHARGE.

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

GUITAR HERO. Buck Ormsby holds court at the Pantages during a reunion of the Sonics. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

B

assist Buck Ormsby formed Etiquette Records in 1961 with his Fabulous Wailers band mates, Kent Morrill and Lawrence “Rockin’Robin” Roberts. During the next few years, Etiquette would issue some of the most influential recordings in Northwest rock history: the Sonics’ garage classics “Boom” and “Here Are the Sonics;” the Wailers’ own iconic rock revamp of Richard Barry’s doowop gem “Louie Louie,” a template that Portland’s Kingsmen would ride to international stardom. “It’s still active, but I haven’t done anything other than release Kent Morrill’s album,” Ormsby said of Etiquette’s latest output, a reissue of Morrill’s solo work released after the Wailers singer and keyboardist died in 2011. LOVE IS ALL YOU NEED (116 MIN, R) 6/28-6/30: 1:00, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30 7/1-7/2: 3:30, 6:00, 8:30 7/3: 3:30, 8:40 7/4: 1:00, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30 MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING (107 MIN, PG-13) 6/28: 1:50, 4:10, 6:35, 9:00 6/29-6/30: 11:30am, 1:50, 4:10, 6:35, 9:00, 7/1-7/3: 1:50, 4:10, 6:35, 9:00 7/4: 11:30am, 1:50, 4:10, 6:35, 9:00 THE EAST (116 MIN, PG-13) 6/28-7/1: (1:30), 6:15, 8:45 7/2: 8:45, 7/3-7/4: (1:30), 6:15, 8:45 BEFORE MIDNIGHT (108 MIN, R) 6/28: 2:05, 4:25, 6:50, 9:15 6/29-6/30: 11:35am, 2:05, 4:25, 6:50, 9:15 7/1-7/3: 2:05, 4:25, 6:50, 9:15 7/4: 11:35am, 2:05, 4:25, 6:50, 9:15 KON TIKI (118 MIN, PG-13) 6/28: 4:00, 6/29-6/30: 11:25am, 4:00 7/1-7/3: 4:00, 7/4: 11:25am, 4:00 THE ZEN OF BENNETT (84 MIN, NR) Tue 7/2: 2:00, 6:30 MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL (91 MIN, PG) Wed 7/3: 7:00

But Ormsby was inspired to fire up the Etiquette machine once again as he trotted the globe with the resurgent Sonics, a band he managed until recently. Australian and European fans constantly queried about the label’s current output; and thus encouraged, Ormsby finds himself immersed in “The Guitarists,” his first new Etiquette project in years. “We have some great talent up here,” he said. “It’s not just guitar players, it���s excellent everything. The Northwest has always been known for being inspirational to a lot of other areas of the world. But when people like Rod Cook – who is an absolute killer guitar player – is not recognized in the world of guitar players, to me it’s important that he gets recognized.” The idea is to capture live performances of great Northwest guitarists past and present. Ormsby and a small crew have been recording local guitar heroes with their bands at Tacoma’s Swiss Tavern, and early sessions have captured Mark Riley, Jho Blenis and Jerry Miller, the Tacoma boy who – thanks to his work with Moby Grape – made Rolling Stone’s 2003 list of 100 greatest guitarists of all time. Ormsby said he has invited other Northwest greats to participate – the Ventures’ Nokie Edwards, the Sonics’ Larry Parypa – and that he also plans to dust off from Etiquette’s vaults unreleased recordings featuring the Wailers’ iconic guitarist, the late Rich Dangel.

And Ormsby already has his sights set on the next recording in the series. “I’m going to do the singers,” he said. “The singers are going to be Kent Morrill, Rockin’ Robin Roberts, stuff that people haven’t heard; Gail Harris, Little Bill (Engelhardt). I want to do that and promote some history. It starts with history, and hopefully it will be inspirational for a lot of people who listen.” Scheduled performances for “The Guitarists” series at the Swiss Tavern, 1904 S. Jefferson Ave., in Tacoma, are as follows: Rod Cook (July 8): A stylistically versatile guitarist best known as the leader of Rod Cook and Toast and for past collaborations with Seattle singer-songwriter Laura Love and Tacoma girl turned “The Voice” star Vicci Martinez. In 2012, Cook received a lifetime achievement award at Washington Blues Society’s Best of the Blues Awards. Neil Andersson (July 24): Andersson learned how to play guitar in high school and joined the Fabulous Wailers in 1964. Nearly three decades later, he became a founding member of popular gypsy jazz outfit Pearl Django, but retired from that band in 2010 to focus on art and other musical projects. Dean Reichert (July 29): Reichert is probably best know for Butterbean, his band with drummer Michael Kinder and keyboardist Buck England. He is also a veteran of the New Blues Brothers Revue.

Lighthouse Laundry GET READY FOR CAMPING!

FRIDAY, JUNE 28 EMERALD QUEEN: Idol Eyez (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC

C.I. SHENANIGAN’S: Collaborative Works Jazz, 8 p.m. DAWSON’S: Northwest Chill, 9 p.m. EAGLES LOUNGE: Darrell Data (Vocals/guitar) 6 p.m. GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Witchburn, Amadon, Petting Zoo, Riot In Rhythm (Metal) 8 p.m., $5, AA MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (Jazz) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER LOUNGE: Electric Falcons, Mosquito Hawk, 9 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Knee Deep, 9 p.m. SWISS: Radio 80 (80s covers) 9 p.m. TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (Jazz guitarist) 5 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Have At Its, Cake & Bowls, Killshot, Anticulture, 8 p.m. UNCLE THURM’S: Gary Cook (Jazz guitarist) 5:30 p.m., NC, AA UNCLE THURM’S: Kareem Kandi Band (Jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA VARSITY GRILL: Rock-Bot live band karaoke, 8 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, JUNE 29 GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC

C.I. SHENANIGAN’S: Collaborative Works Jazz, 8 p.m. DAWSON’S: Northwest Chill, 9 p.m. DOYLE’S: Kareem Kandi Band (Jazz) 9:30 p.m., NC EMERALD QUEEN: Idol Eyez (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Spazmatics, Mr. Pink (80s covers) 9 p.m. JOHNNY’S DOCK: Blues Redemption, 5 p.m. LOUIE G’S: Tahoma Souls Alive, Taist Of Iron, 4 Play (Rock) 7 p.m., $5, AA NEW FRONTIER: Shotgun Kitchen, guest, 9 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Knee Deep, 9 p.m. SPAR: New Orleans Jazz Café Quintet, 8 p.m. SWISS: Kry (Rock covers) 9 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Dixxon Boots, 8 p.m.

STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman & All-Star Band, 8 p.m.

MONDAY, JULY 1 SWISS: Maia Santell & House Blend (Blues/jazz) 8 p.m.

STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino (Blues jam) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Bill Pease, Paul Buck, Chris Gartland (Blues) 8 p.m.

TUESDAY, JULY 2 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (Acoustic open mic) 8 p.m.

ANTIQUE SANDWICH SHOP: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (Blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSONS: Jho Blenis, Shelly Ely (Blues jam) 8 p.m. LOUIE G’S: (Acoustic open mic) 6 p.m. NEW FRONTIER: (Open jam), 9 p.m., NC UNCLE THURM’S: Blenis/Ely Band (Blues jam) 7:30 p.m., AA

WEDNESDAY, JULY 3 TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (Jazz guitarist) 5 p.m.

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Rubber Band (Jam session) 8 p.m. DAWSONS: Crazy Texas Gypsies (Jam session) 8 p.m. GIBSON’S (STADIUM DISTRICT): Ephraim Richardson (Open mic) 7 p.m. STONEGATE: Dave Nichols, 9 p.m., NC

THURSDAY, JULY 4 UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (Blues) 7 p.m.

SUNDAY, JUNE 30 UNCLE THURM’S: Kareem Kandi (Jazz) 3 p.m., NC, AA

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ANTHEM: Taxi Driver (Jazz) 7 p.m. DAWSONS: Tim Hall Band (Blues jam) 8 p.m., NC HOTEL MURANO: Kareem Kandi Band (Jazz) 8:30 p.m., NC, AA NEW FRONTIER: (Bluegrass jam) 3 p.m. SPAR: Todd Wolfe (Blues) 7 p.m., NC

DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (Jam session) 8 p.m., NC EAGLES LOUNGE: Biff Moss (Ukelele/guitar) 6 p.m. JAZZBONES: Kry (Rock covers) 11 p.m., $7 ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lafferty (Open mic) 8:30 p.m. STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (Jam) 9 p.m. TOWER BAR & GRILL: Denny Foreman (Jazz)

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older


Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 28, 2013

SAT., JUNE 29 UNDY 5000 Come run this USA Track and Fieldcertified 5K in your undies to fight colon cancer! That is right – run in your underwear for a good reason – to bring attention to the part of the body affected by colon cancer. Instead of a typical race shirt to add to your extensive collection, every participant will receive a pair of boxer shorts. No, running in your underwear is not required but you will see some great outfits as we make colon cancer a disease that is okay to talk about. Friends of Tacoma City Marathon Association receive a special discount to this race. Enter TACOMA4 for $10 off your registration. The race starts at 9:30 a.m. at Cheney Stadium. Info: http://support.ccalliance.org. HAPPENINGS –

COMING EVENTS

BULLETIN BOARD BUY A SOLDIER DINNER AND A CRUISE HAPPENINGS – Have you ever seen a soldier in uniform and wanted to say thank you? Now you can! On July 3, Rock The Dock Pub, the Tacoma Yacht Club and Patriots Day Events are partnering up to buy a soldier dinner. The goal is to provide 30 soldiers and their significant others a night of dinner, drinks and a cruise on Commencement Bay as a humble way of saying thank you for their service, sacrifice and continued dedication. During June the staff will be accepting any donation large or small and 100 percent will go directly to Patriots Day Events to help organize this event as well as many more. Ask your server or bartender for details. Info: http://rockthedockpub.com.

production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

EMERALD QUEEN CASINO’S TASTE OF TACOMA IS BILLED AS “THE ULTIMATE FAMILY PICNIC,” AND 225,000 PEOPLE ARE EXPECTED TO SHOW UP TO GRAZE AT DOZENS OF BOOTHS MANNED BY LOCAL RESTAURANTS. THE EVENT TAKES PLACE JUNE 28-30 AT POINT DEFIANCE PARK IN TACOMA. NEW THIS YEAR IS “THE TASTE COOKS!,” A LIVE COOKING DEMONSTRATION HOSTED BY TV TACOMA’S AMANDA WESTBROOKE. THERE WILL BE BEER AND WINE TASTINGS FOR THE GROWN UPS AND AN ECLECTIC MIX OF COMEDY, ROCK, JAZZ, R&B AND OTHER STYLES ON MULTIPLE STAGES. THE FESTIVITIES TAKE PLACE FRIDAY AND SATURDAY FROM 11 A.M. TO 9 P.M., AND SUNDAY FROM 11 A.M. TO 8 P.M. ADMISSION IS FREE. INFO: HTTP://WWW.TASTEOFTACOMA.COM.

VALUE VILLAGE DONATION DRIVE HAPPENINGS – Visit the University Place Value Village, 6802 19th St. W. and proceeds from all donations of quality, reusable clothing will benefit The Arc of Washington. The organization helps to empower individuals with disabilities. There will be a drawing for a $50 gift certificate, as well. Info: www. valuevillage.com. TEDDIE BEAR MUSIC MUSIC – Teddie Bear Music is a child and parent musical adventure. Join instructor Janice Berntsen as she shows students how to share the gift of music and movement with their children, ages 1-4. Sessions are held Thursdays at 8:45 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. at Ted Brown Music, located at 6228 Tacoma Mall Blvd. Info: www.tbmoutreach.org. HOT HULA FITNESS ETC – Every Monday through Wednesday, Asia Pacific Cultural Center hosts hot hula fitness classes from 7-8 p.m. Inspired by the dances of the Pacific islands, hot hula fitness incorporates easy to perform dance moves set to the sounds of traditional Polynesian drum beats fused with funky reggae music, resulting in a modern, hip fitness workout. Hot hula fitness is a fun, new and exciting dance workout that isolates your larger muscle groups, quads and arms, providing a total body workout in 60 minutes. All ages and fitness levels will enjoy hot hula fitness. Admission: $6 (discount with APCC membership). APCC is located at 4851 South Tacoma Way.

BILL BARCLAY TALK ETC – King’s Books welcomes Bill Barclay as he discusses “The Failure of Neoliberalism: Financial Panic, Economic Stagnation and What We Can Do About It.” Barclay was in financial services for 22 years before retiring in 2004. The event starts at 2 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com.

BOOK ARTISTS EXHIBITION HAPPENINGS – This exhibition at the Collins Memorial Library on the University of Puget Sound campus in Tacoma marks the third annual membership show of the Puget Sound Book Artists. It features a wide variety of handmade books by 30 artists from the Puget Sound area and beyond. The exhibit has grown in popularity during the last three years, and this year new members from Oregon, New Mexico and Indiana are featured. These talented artists interpret the book in exciting and original ways that push the boundaries of tradition. The exhibition runs through July 31. Info: http://www.pugetsound. edu/news-and-events/campus-news/details/1185.

class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater

TW PICK: EQC’S TASTE OF TACOMA

TACOMA TWILIGHT CRITERIUM CLASSIC HAPPENINGS – The Criterium is unlike any other type of bicycle race – taking place on a short, closed city street circuit, this style of race gives spectators the opportunity to see the high speed – up to 35 mph or more – action up close. Whether or not you are aware of the intricacies of competitive cycling, the excitement of the race will be enjoyed by all. The race starts at 2 p.m. in Proctor District. Info: http://www.tacomatwilight.com.

THURS., JULY 4

Promote your community event,

EXPLORE THE SHORE HAPPENINGS – Explore the Shore will provide hands-on learning about sea creatures and train participants how to be citizen scientists. Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium staff will teach children, adults and families more about Puget Sound’s beaches and the creatures that live there. The zoo’s Explore the Shore programs are set for July 7, July 22 and Aug. 20 at Owen Beach in Point Defiance Park. All are timed to take best advantage of the low minus tides that reveal many of Puget Sound’s most interesting shoreline creatures. The events and programs are free and open to the public and reservations are not required. Bring sunscreen and wear shoes and clothing appropriate for walking on rough beach terrain. Zoo naturalists accompany participants on low tide beach walks, where kids and adults will learn to identify tide pool animals and record their presence and location for addition to the scientific Nature Mapping database (www.naturemappingfoundation.org). Participants will learn about the biological diversity of local beaches and better understand how to protect them. Info: www.PDZA.org or call (253) 404-3665. ROCK THE BOWL This year, Point Defiance Park’s bowl area will be filled with fun, fresh, cool experiences. While you are at the Emerald Queen Casino Taste of Tacoma filling up on gyros, pizza and other great local food treats, take a break to get active with a zip line, rock climbing, hamster ball and more! The festivities take place June 28-30. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org. HAPPENINGS –

T-TOWN SWING Get your Tacoma swing dance fix every Thursday at Urban Grace Church, located in downtown. Intro to swing dance: 8:30-9 p.m., free with dance admission. Social dancing, 9-11:30 p.m. is $5. The atmosphere is super laid-back and fun, and features great guest instructors and DJs playing awesome swing music from the 1930s and 1940s, and it is sure to keep all the dancers hopping all night long! In addition, blues will be played every second and fourth Friday of the month and kizomba every fourth Sunday. HAPPENINGS –

BROWNS POINT LIGHTKEEPERS COTTAGE – The Browns Point Lightkeepers Cottage, Gardens and Museums are now open every Saturday from 1-4 p.m. through November. Tour the 1903 cottage and view the new exhibit in the basement museum called “Dash Point Since 1906” – a collection of old and new photos and fun artifacts celebrating the Dash Point community. Visit the historical vignettes in the basement including kitchen, sewing room and old-fashioned school. Also on the grounds is the Boathouse museum that houses a replica Coast Guard surfboat, information on its construction and a collection of antique tools. View the original lighthouse bell, and visit the recently restored Jerry Meeker Real Estate office on the grounds. This is the original 1906 office from which Meeker sold Hyada Park building lots. The park is a great place to picnic, fly a kite, beachcomb and more. Admission is free. Great for HAPPENINGS

all ages. Limited entrance to people with disabilities (stairs). Group or school tours may be arranged by calling the message phone (253) 927-2536. Location is in the Browns Point Lighthouse Park at 201 Tulalip St. N.E. Limited parking or access the park through the adjacent Browns Point Improvement Club parking lot. Info: http://www.pointsnortheast.org or (253) 9272536. BALLROOM DANCING HAPPENINGS – The STAR Center hosts ballroom dancing on the first Sunday of every month and every Monday afternoon from 1-3 p.m. There is live music. Admission is $5. It is a good idea to come with a dance partner. This dance was formerly held at South Park Community Center. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org/star or (253) 404-3939. ZIP LINE NOW OPEN HAPPENINGS – Two courses at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium test physical agility and mental toughness – and anyone can conquer them. Zoom is more than a zip line; it is an aerial activity course that includes a number of challenges such as a swinging log bridge strung between trees, a high wire to walk and a fishermen’s net strung between trees to climb through. And, yes, there are sections of zip line to put some zing into the adventure experience. There are two distinct circuits to Zoom, one for kids as young as 5, sized just right for smaller children, and one with appeal for a range of ages, including adventureseeking adults. Info: www. pdza.org/zoom.

DRUM CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages drum circle every Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. You do not need to have a drum to participate. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com. CHARITY BOOT CAMP ETC – Jeff Jowers, owner and founder of Tacoma’s Ultimate Fitness Boot Camps, is hosting charity fitness boot camps every Saturday morning at 8:15 a.m., benefiting Campfire USA. These drop-in classes are $10 apiece, with all proceeds going to charity. Info: www.tacomabootcamps. com. FREE FIRST WEEKENDS ETC – Bank of America bankcard holders and employees receive free admission to the Tacoma Art Museum the first weekend of every month as part of Bank of America’s national Museums on Us program. Info: museums.bankofamerica.com. THE VALLEY CHORALE ETC – The Valley Chorale, a soprano-alto-tenor-bass singing group, meets every Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Lutheran Church of Christ the King, located at 1710 E. 85th St. in Tacoma. If you like singing, contact Joy Heidal at (253) 848-1134 or Dixie Byrne at (253) 677-5291 for more information and a personal invitation to join the group. UKULELE CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages ukulele circle every Wednesday from 6:30-8 p.m. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic. com.

Many more calendar listings available at www.tacomaweekly.com


Friday, June 28, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

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Point Defiance CafĂŠ and Casino. Fully operational with unique card room and gambling facility. Only licensed casino between Lakewood and Bremerton. Or as an alternative, this facility could be used as full service restaurant with banquet rooms. Many other possibilities including day care, private pre- school, dance studio, and the list goes on. All handicap accessible.

DEER RIDGE HOME, PUYALLUP

Beautiful home crafted by Steve Jensen and meticulously cared for. All the Jensen signature touches - soaring spaces, coffered ceilings, crown molding, wainscoting, 6â&#x20AC;? base trim, tile, granite, and expansive windows. Sited on an elevated lot that adjoins natural area to the rear. Listen to the birds and your private waterfall from your patio. Wonderful landscaping

Food & Beverage Businesses

GIG HARBOR ž ACRE BUILDING LOT

designed for beauty and easy care. Sensational island kitchen opens to stunning family room. Huge master suite with fireplace. MLS #479207

Beautifully wooded, water and power available. $79,000. Perfect setting for your custom home. Owner/agent

UNIQUE BOUTIQUE BISTRO With Beer and Wine License. $20,000 Full Price.

www.jeanbonter.com

Evergreen Commercial Brokerage FOR RENT

FOR RENT

4 Sale with Owner Contract

HIGH GROSSING, VERY PROFITABLE COFFEE SHOP CAFE FOR SALE $130,000 High trafic Count location. VINOTIQUE WINE SHOP/BAR/ DELI IN LAKEWOOD Business is for sale for $150,000. Cash/ terms. GREEN PUP SPORTS ice pr BAR & GRILL reduced (famous for its pizza) $189,000, cash. LOCAL HIGH GROSSING POPULAR BAR & GRILL $220,000, terms negotiable, ngcap. endiseating 74, great kit.p PORT OF TACOMA DINER Breakfast & Lunch, M-F, Price $70,000. Long-time established & great location. VERY SUCCESSFUL/ PROFITABLE SPORTS BAR e $320,000 Terms Business is Forpr Sale icfor reduced are avail. LAUNDROMAT W/ DROP SHOP. Same location 15 years in Lakewood. Excellent lease with contract terms. price $36,000 reduced LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? Restaurant/Lounge Huge Price Reduction - For Sale For $565,000 (R.E. $525K) Bus. $40K. Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports bar and grill. â&#x20AC;&#x153;UNDISCLOSEDâ&#x20AC;? BEAUTY SALON In Puyallup, Great Location, $35,000 Cash. Call Angelo, price d reduce (253) 376-5384. RURAL LIVING: ASHFORD, WARestr./Lounge, $125,000 with $50K Down, Real E. Avail: 3.4 Commercial Acres for Future Devel., 3 BR Remodeled Home, price laundromat. duced re

CALL RICHARD PICTON or ED PUNCHAK 253-581-6463 253-224-7109

FOR SALE

COMMERCIAL

Selling Your Commercial Building or Business? Call

CONDOS & HOMES DUPONT

UNIVERSITY PLACE

1955 HAMMOND AVE

4212 BECKONRIDGE DR W

$1850

$1395

4 BED, 2.5 BATH 2425 SF. ELEGANT HOME HAS EAT IN KITCHEN, FAMILY ROOM, FENCED YARD, PATIO AND PETS WELCOME.

3 BED 1.5 BATH 1675 SF. BEAUTIFUL HOME HAS FORMAL DINING, FRESH PAINT, 5 PIECE MASTERS, FENCED YARD AND PETS OK.

TACOMA

TACOMA

3228 S UNION AVE # 309

1111 S VILLARD ST C-18

$575

$1050

1 BED, 1 BATH 450 SF PERFECT UNIT HAS FRESH PAINT, EXTRA STORAGE AND ALL UTILITIES IN RENT INCLUDING BASIC CABLE.

2 BED, 1.75 BATH 950 SF. STUNNING CONDO HAS ALL APPLIANCES, CERAMIC TILE, SMALL PETS OK & W/S/G INCLUDED IN RENT.

LAKEWOOD

TACOMA

8416 PHILLIPS RD SW #5

1515 DOCK ST #422

$650

$2200 2 BED 1.75 BATH 1368 SF. INCREDIBLE CONDO HAS GRANITE COUNTERS, TILE FLOORING, AMAZING MASTERS SUITE AND PETS OK.

1 BED 1 BATH 573 SF. AMAZING 1 BED INCLUDES SS APPLIANCES, HARDWOODS, GRANITE COUNTERS AND PETS WELCOME.

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200 View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Professional Management Services

REALTORS

REALTORS

CALL 253.922.5317

EMPLOYMENT

FURNITURE

FURNITURE

NEW!!! 7 Piece Cherry Bedroom Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, 1 Nightstand, Headboard, Rails. Plus New Mattress Set still in plastic $499 (253) 539-1600

Black Iron Canopy Bed w/Orthopedic Mattress Set. New, Still in %R[ 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH  (253) 539-1600

5 Piece Pub Set Table & 4 Chairs New in Box List $1,000 Sell $350 253-537-3056 3 Piece Living Room Set New in plastic. Lifetime Warranty On Frame. $495 (253) 537-3056 Free Mattress Set with Cherry Wood Sleigh Bed Never Used. In Plastic. $380 (253) 537-3056 All New Pillow Top Mattress Set! Queen Size w/ Warranty, Still in Original Plastic. Can 'HOLYHU 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH $149 (253) 5391600 Full or Twin Mattress Set New Factory Sealed. Delivery Available. $120 Will Take. (253) 539-1600

All New King Pillow Top Mattress Box Set 3 Pieces. New & Factory Sealed w/Warranty.. $249. Can Deliver (253) 537 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3056 New Adjustable Bed With Memory Foam Mattress. Wall Hugger with Warranty. $2,800 :LOO6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FHIRU 253.539.1600 New Platform Bdrm Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, Nightstand, H e a d b o a r d , Footboard, Rails. Still Boxed. Retails at $2,600. Will Take $850. 253.539.1600 New Overstuffed 0LFURĂ&#x20AC;EHU 6RID Loveseat. Still in plastic Can have for $750 (253) 539-1600 Absolutely New! Memory Foam Mattress Set! Can Deliver. Worth $2,000 Asking $450 (253) 537-3056

If I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell it to you and if I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live in it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t list it.

7OVUL!  -H_! ,THPS!ZOHUUVUZLSSZ'OV[THPSJVT

Web Developer & IT Technician Pierce County Community Newspaper Group (PCCNG) is the premier producer of community newspapers in the Tacoma and Pierce County area. Along ZLWKRXUĂ DJVKLSSXEOLFDWLRQWKH7DFRPD:HHNO\ZH SXEOLVKWKH)LIH)UHH3UHVV0LOWRQ(GJHZRRG6LJQDO DQG3X\DOOXS7ULEDO1HZV3&&1*LVLQQHHGRID :HE'HYHORSHU ,77HFKQLFLDQ Â&#x2021;$QXQGHUVWDQGLQJRI WEB DEVELOPER SKILLS 6RFLDO1HWZRUNLQJDQG NEEDED/PREFERRED KRZWRPDUNHWZLWKLW Â&#x2021;([SUHVVLRQ(QJLQH Â&#x2021;:LQGRZV;3  Â&#x2021;3+3M4XHU\-DYDVFULSW management and repair Â&#x2021;0\64/ VNLOOV Â&#x2021;'RPDLQ KRVWLQJ Â&#x2021;0DF26;   management management and repair Â&#x2021;*RRJOH$SSV VNLOOV NICE TO HAVE Â&#x2021;$ELOLW\WRPDQDJHURXWÂ&#x2021;:RUNLQJNQRZOHGJHRI HUVVZLWFKHVDQGFDEOH $GREH&UHDWLYH6XLWH modems ,Q'HVLJQ3KRWRVKRS Â&#x2021;([SHULHQFHPDQDJLQJ ,OOXVWUDWRU

3%;6\VWHPV Â&#x2021;([SHULHQFHLQWKH QHZVSDSHUSXEOLVKLQJ industry Please send all resumes to tim@tacomaweekly.com

Pierce County Community Newspaper Group is seeking an

Experienced

ADVERTISING SALES Representative

,I\RXWKLQN\RXZRXOGEHDJRRGĂ&#x20AC;WIRURXUFRPSDQ\ ZHZRXOGOLNHWRKHDUIURP\RX3OHDVHVXEPLW\RXU UHVXPHWRHPSOR\PHQW#WDFRPDZHHNO\FRP

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105.

Shannon

www.cityoftacoma.org/jobs

The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated selfstarter with a proven record of achieving sales goals. They will demonstrate the ability to develop new business and possess excellent time management skills. Additionally, they should be able to manage all aspects of the sales cycle: prospecting, cold calling, setting appointments, performing needs analysis, presentation, negotiation, and closing, all while maintaining a high level of customer service to existing customers.

ANTIQUES WANTED

Agent Extraordinaire

City of ma o Tac Jobs

Advertise Your Employment Listing in the Pierce County Community Classifieds CALL 253-922-5317

SERVICE DIRECTORY 253.922.5317 www.tacomaweekly.com

BOOKKEEPING

BOOKKEEPING

Accountant/Bookkeeper for hire.

Looking for 20 hr. per week. Contact ralphhunter@outlook.com

PAINTING

PAINTING

LAWN CARE

LAWN CARE

CASH FOR CARS

ELECTRICAL

The Happy Hooker

Allied Electric Service

Big Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawn Care Âş Handyman Âş Clean-up

FREE Hauling for Metal (253) 397-7013 LANDSCAPING

LANDSCAPING

ALEXâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Landscaping Painting, Weeding, Spring Clean-up, Pruning, Gutter Cleaning. Residential. Pressure Washing. Trees. Rototilling. Contact Alex 253-564-5743 Free Estimates

ROOFING Your Local Roof Experts â&#x20AC;&#x153;Repairs or Replacementâ&#x20AC;?

TriState Roofing, Inc. TRISTI*931QH

ROOFING

PAYS YOU! FOR YOUR Junk Cars

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

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Toll Free 1-877-272-6092 ALLIEE1963CQ

HAULING

CLEANING

Life is too short to spend it cleaning... So let us do it for you. Squeaky Clean 253.473.7621 Licensed & Insured

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CONTACT US

CLASSIFIED DEADLINES

Phone: Mail:

Classified Display - Mondays @ 12 noon Classified Line Ads - Tuesdays @ 12 noon

253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma WA, 98417

CLEANING

CELL

OFFICE

253-222-9181

253-671-9951

fatherandsonhauling@hotmail.com

VISIT OUR WEBSITE www.tacomaweekly.com

Advertising Representatives: â&#x20AC;˘ Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com


Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 8 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, June 28, 2013

NOTICES

NOTICES

VOLUNTEERS Changing Rein Volunteer Orientation & Training Sunday, June 30th, 2013 12pm through 6pm 6204 288th St E Graham, WA 98338 253-370-1429 www.changingrein.org

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE

TO: Byron Lyle Fryberg In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs Byron Lyle Fryberg &DVH1XPEHU38<)+6+(// 0015

5VY[O^LZ[;V^PUNH[7HJPĂ&#x201E;J /^`: (-LKLYHS>H`VU 0UJVTWSPHUJL^P[O[OL 9*>H[!WT=PL^PUN VMJHYZMYVT!!WT9LNPZ[LYLK ;V^5\TILYZ *HZO(\J[PVU 6US`^^^Ă&#x201E;ML[V^PUNJVT

<28DUHKHUHE\VXPPRQHGWRDSSHDU for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 13th day of August, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 6805585. )$,/85(72$33($53/($'25 27+(5:,6('()(1'0$<5(68/7 ,1$'()$8/7-8'*(0(17 TO: Teresa Marie Lenk In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs Teresa Marie Lenk &DVH1XPEHU38<&97 <28DUHKHUHE\VXPPRQHGWRDSSHDU for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 6th day of August, 2013 at 10:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 6805585. )$,/85(72$33($53/($'25 27+(5:,6('()(1'0$<5(68/7 ,1$'()$8/7-8'*(0(17 TO: Dennis Robert Ryan In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs Dennis Robert Ryan &DVH1XPEHU38<&97 <28DUHKHUHE\VXPPRQHGWRDSSHDU for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 6th day of August, 2013 at 10:45 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 6805585.

The City of Milton City Council will be holding an Executive Session at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, July 1, 2013, for the purpose of labor negotiations as per RCW 42.30.140. The City of Milton City Council will be holding a Special Meeting during its regularly scheduled Study Session on Monday, July 1, 2013 at 7 p.m. for the purpose of taking action on the World Trade Center Memorial project. Please contact Milton City Hall at (253) 922-8733 with any questions or to request ADA accommodations. CITY OF EDGEWOOD PLANNING COMMISSION VACANCY

The City of Edgewood is soliciting applications from its residents to serve on the Planning Commission. This Commission serves as the principle advisory body to the City Council with responsibility for providing guidance and direction for land use policy, pursuant to the authority granted by RCW 35.A63.020. Each member of the commission must be a City resident. If you have any questions or wish to obtain an application, please contact the Deputy City Clerk at (253) 9523299 or bonnie@cityofedgewood. org. Applications are also available on the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www. cityofedgewood.org. Deadline for VXEPLWWLQJDSSOLFDWLRQVIRUĂ&#x20AC;UVWUHYLHZ is 5:00 p.m., Monday, July 22, 2013. Applications will continue to be accepted until vacant positions are Ă&#x20AC;OOHG<RXULQWHUHVWLQRXUFRPPXQLW\LV greatly appreciated. Published in the June 28, 2013 edition of Signal.

VOLUNTEERS

)$,/85(72$33($53/($'25 27+(5:,6('()(1'0$<5(68/7 ,1$'()$8/7-8'*(0(17 TO: Richard R. Iyall In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs Richard R. Iyall &DVH1XPEHU38<)+ <28DUHKHUHE\VXPPRQHGWRDSSHDU for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 6th day of August, 2013 at 11:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. )$,/85(72$33($53/($'25 27+(5:,6('()(1'0$<5(68/7,1$ '()$8/7-8'*(0(17 TO: Ron Zollner In the Welfare of: Z., A. DOB: 08/16/2010 &DVH1XPEHU38<*-9 <28DUHKHUHE\VXPPRQHGWRDSSHDU for an Initial Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 31st day of October, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. )$,/85(72$33($53/($'25 27+(5:,6('()(1'0$<5(68/7,1$ '()$8/7-8'*0(17

Volunteer Opportunities at Tacoma Freedom Fair July 3rd Set-up for Freedom Fair on Ruston Way July 4th Freedom Fair Event on Ruston Way July 5th&OHDQ8SDQG'HOLYHU\IRU:LQJVDQG Wheels July 6th Wings and Wheels Event at Tacoma Narrows Airport :HZDQWWRRIIHULQGLYLGXDOVDQGQRQSURĂ&#x20AC;WJURXSVWKH opportunity to choose the job you or your group would most like to do. Volunteer positions are available for: Admissions Team â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Control entry to the venue and accept donations. Operations â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sign in/out golf carts and other HTXLSPHQWWRLGHQWLĂ&#x20AC;HGWHDPPHPEHUV Parking Team â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Control access to parking areas on Ruston Way Action Team â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Deliver and ensure everything gets where it belongs on time. Les Davis Pier â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Welcome and check in VIP quests and help out with the reception. Venue Maintenance -- Keep our venues clean and safe, during and after the event. Zone Managers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Experienced volunteers to manage main areas of the venue. Access Control Team â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Provide a visible presence at venue and control secure access areas. Volunteers Team â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Welcome and check in volunteers, provide information for assignments, and give directions and coordinate transportation to assignment site. Clean Up Crew/Tear Down â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Remove all equipment and resources at end of the day/event. Freedom Fair Cleanup Crew/Prep for Wings and Wheels â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5HWXUQDQ\PLVVHGUHVRXUFHVĂ&#x20AC;QDOFOHDQ up of Ruston Way venue, preparation and delivery of equipment to Wings and Wheels venue at Tacoma Narrows Airport. Please go to our website: www.FreedomFair.com and FOLFNRQWKH´9ROXQWHHUÂľWDEWRĂ&#x20AC;QGWKHRQOLQHYROXQWHHU application. As always, volunteers will receive a free parking pass, event t-shirt and snacks/beverages during their shift -- and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be right there to enjoy the great event. If you have any questions please contact our new Volunteer Coordinator, Jen at jlinenko@gmail.com , 253-507-9357 and go to our web site at www. FreedomFair.com to submit a volunteer registration form. We look forward to partnering with you! If you know others who are interested please forward our contact and volunteer information. Thank you for all you do!

AmeriCorps Opportunity Read2Me Program Specialist Tacoma Community House seeks an AmeriCorps member to assist in the Read2Me Program in local elementary schools. Read2Me is a one-on-one adult/ student reading proJUDPIRUVWUXJJOLQJĂ&#x20AC;UVW second, and third grade readers. Duties include gathering resources for tutor strategies, recruiting new volunteers, leading in tutor recruitment and retention, helping the Read2Me Coordinators in assessment, tracking student success, and tutoring. Applicants must be 1825 years of age at the start date of service (Sep 1, 2013-Jul 15, 2014). Contact Karen Thomas at (253)-3833951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse. org for more information. AmeriCorps Opportunity Employment Program Specialist Tacoma Community House seeks an AmeriCorps member to serve closely with the employment staff to develop and conduct work-readiness workshops for youth and adult participants. Duties include assisting adult and youth participants with online job search, resumes, and applications, assisting in the planning and execution of workshops, assisting with afterschool tutoring for refugee and immigrant youth, and mentoring youth in the Career Pathways Program. Applicants must be 18-25 years of age at the start date of service (Sep 1, 2013-Jul 15, 2014). Contact Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information. Help teach English to Spanish Speaking Seniors We need a volunteer to teach ESL to a group of Spanish speaking seniors Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10:30-11:30am weekly. Maybe also stay to help translate during the other programs until 2:30 pm. The class is at Portland Ave Community Center 3513 Portland Ave E Tacoma, Contact Bonnie Elliser at 253-591-5391. Volunteer with Paint Tacoma-Pierce Beautiful! Make your neighborhood more beautiful and help your neighbors in need! Volunteer with Paint Tacoma-Pierce Beautiful! Apply now as an individual or crew to paint houses of low-income homeowners during the summer of 2013. Learn more at: http:// associatedministries. org/community-mobilization/paint-tacoma-piercebeautiful/volunteer/ Contact Info: Megan Shea at 253-383-3056*142 or megans@associatedministries.org Volunteer needed to teach exercise class for seniors Tai Chi, sails class or yoga. Tuesday & Thursday mornings 10 or 11 AM. Portland Ave Community Center, 3513 Portland Ave E Tacoma, WA 98404. Call and speak with Bonnie @ 253591-5391 South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www.southsoundoutreach.org. Project Homeless Connect is an annual event where homeless individuals can receive free services. The next event will be held in Sumner, WA on Friday, May 17th. For more information visit www. pchomelessconnect.com or call 253.593.2111. Get involved with Metro Parks Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Citizen Advisory Councils! The Business & Responsive Agency Council helps district leadership with business SODQQLQJ Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO VXVWDLQability decisions, revenue development and quality assurance. Monthly meetings focus on issues that affect the future of our park system. Visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/business-volunteer to learn more or call Brett Freshwaters, Chief Finan-

FLDO2IĂ&#x20AC;FHUDW Brettf@tacomaparks.com. Metro Parks Tacoma Special events bring the community together and provide families with affordable fun. Metro Parks Tacoma needs volunteers to help produce memorable events. Visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/volunteer and signXS WR EH QRWLĂ&#x20AC;HG RI VSHFLDO event service opportunities. To learn more, contact Roxanne Miles, Volunteer Manager, at 253.305.1068. Roxannem@tacomaparks.com.

Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@tacomaparks. com or 253.305.1025. Join us in changing lives! Changing Rein Equine Assisted Activities and 7KHUDSLHVDQRQSURĂ&#x20AC;WRIfers equine assisted services to differently-abled individuals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and adaptive lessons. Other volunteer opportunities include: grounds maintenance and administrative/clerical work. Must be at least 14 years old to participate. Horse experience helpful, but not necessary. Training provided. For more information contact: Volunteer Coordinator at 253-370-1429 or volunteer@changingrein. org. The Tacoma Maritime Institute meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00

VOLUNTEERS Ă&#x20AC;OP8VHPLQXWHVRUVR to tell the most memorable story from your life, the lessons that were learned, and the wise words you want to pass along to your children/grandchildren. Compensation: a DVD in which you are the leading character, and a free upload to our website http://memorycommunity. org/ Contact: send your emails to deyung@memorycommunity.org Or call Deyung at 253-858-2445 for scheduling a meetLQJ 7KH Ă&#x20AC;OPLQJ LV IUHH but donations are appreciated to help the project continue.

IHUHQW QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W RUJDQLzations with in the community. We meet twice a month. Once on the second Tuesday, from 1:00pm to 3:00pm and again on the fourth Thursday, from 7:00pm to 9:00pm. Please join us at the WayPoint Church, 12719 134th Ave KP N, Gig Harbor. We are also in need of donations of yarn. For more information please email: lovingheartsonkp@aol.com or call Virginia at 253-884â&#x20AC;&#x201D;9619 Loving Hearts also meets 1pm to 3pm 3rd Thur. at Clubhouse Mobile Park Ardena Gale 4821 70th Ave. E., Fife 98424

Donate time and receive free groceries. Volunteers needed with skills in management, organization, clerical, food handling, warehousing, maintenance etc. and receive free groceries from D 1RQ3URĂ&#x20AC;W )RRG 'LVtribution Program. Older teens are welcomed to volunteer and gain valuable work experience. Contact Ms. Lee at (253) 677-7740 for further information.

The Backpack Program of the St. Leo Food Connection is looking for a volunteer to pick up backpacks full of food for the weekend for students at McKinley Elementary and Sheridan Elementary from the Food Connection and deliver them to both schools the 2nd and 4th Thursday or Friday of each month for the duration of the school year. Volunteers must have their own vehicle and be able to commit to volunteering for the rest of the school year. This is a low time commitment way to make a big difference to kids! If interested, please contact Britani Hollis: jv@foodconnection.org

Knitters and Crocheters &RPH -RLQ 8V /RYLQJ Hearts is a group of volunteers who crochet or knit: hats for chemo, baby items, and blankets for dif-

PETS

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy

Need safe farms or barns for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. They DUHĂ&#x20AC;[HGYDFFLQDWHG and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 298-0913

253-770-8552

Pet of the Week

CONVERSATION PARTNERS NEEDED Help adults learn to speak English! Mornings, no experience or foreign language skills needed. South Tacoma. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy, 253-5711887. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION VOLUNTEERS NEEDED If you enjoy helping toddlers learn, you can help us! Seeking retired or experienced volunteers to assist in expanding our capacity and provide quality learning for busy little people. (No diaper changing!) Background check required. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy 253-5711887 Meals on Wheels at Federal Way Senior Center seeks morning volunteers: One Co-coordinator, Friday and Monday; two Callers, Monday; three Packers, Wednesday; two Drivers, Thursday. To learn more, call 206-727-6250.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Claraâ&#x20AC;? Our Featured Pet this week is 6 year old purr-a-holic named Clara. This sweetie loves attention and lets you know it. Give her a scratch on the head (preferably behind an ear) and her motor will start roaring. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a fan getting her coat brushed when you have an extra moment to spare. When itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not time to relax, this gray and white Tabby loves to play. She doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind being teased with one of her toys, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of her IDYRULWHJDPHV$IWHUSOD\WLPHLVRYHUVKHGHĂ&#x20AC;QLWHO\ enjoys being rewarded for her sportsmanship with a kitty treat or two. Spend some time with Clara and fall in love today. Reference #A474390

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week

1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Be a Big Brother! Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG difference in the life of a child. There are several proJUDP RSWLRQV WR Ă&#x20AC;W \RXU schedule and interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agency-planned activity. For more information, visit www.bbbsps.org or call 253.396.9630. INTERVIEWEES FOR A NON-PROFIT PROJECT â&#x20AC;&#x153;MEMORY COMMUNITYâ&#x20AC;? What It Is: We are Memory Community (a nonSURĂ&#x20AC;W FRUSRUDWLRQ  7KH Memory Community Project is a creative service to seniors. Our Goals & Objectives: To create an accessible resource that: â&#x20AC;˘ helps our senior citizens tell their stories â&#x20AC;˘ connects the young and the old â&#x20AC;˘ increases our understanding of those before us who help us be who we are â&#x20AC;˘ honors the generations before us and show our appreciation by preserving their memories â&#x20AC;˘ All seniors are welcome WR YROXQWHHU IRU Ă&#x20AC;OPLQJ their story! â&#x20AC;˘ At most two days of work during daytime â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Day 1: pre-production meeting, and Release )RUPVLJQLQJ'D\Ă&#x20AC;OPing, ideally wrapped within half a day What weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like you to talk about in the

Babs

Babs is a sweet little thing who is ready for a Forever Family to call her own.

Sapphire Sapphire is a gorgeous pure white kitty with amazing blue eyes. She would prefer to be the only animal in the house and is waiting for her Forever Family to take her home! www.MetroAnimalServices.org


Friday, June 28, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV FEATURED LISTINGS

Doug Arbogast (253) 307-4055 Over 20 Years Real Estate Experience

RENTON CONDO

Tired of renting? Jennifer Pacheco Monthly payments Mortgage Officer on a new home Loan NMLS #486264 could be less than 253-926-4131 your rent. Call me www.umpquabank.com/jpacheco jenniferpacheco@umpquabank.com for details!

Stephanie Lynch

4OP 0RODUCING "ROKER Â?Â?  Â?Â?

www.stephanielynch.com



2914 N 30th St $419,000

For qualifications contact Jen

Loan products subject to credit approval

HOMES FOR SALE

Call me todayâ&#x20AC;Ś I am happy to help you with your Real Estate needs.

4424 6th Ave Suite 1, Tacoma, WA 98406

 "ED  BATH s 'REAT AMENITIES   s -,3 

HOMES FOR SALE

Low interest rates + affordable prices = great investment opportunities.

Dougarbogast.com douga@johnlscott.com

/PEN (OUSE s 3UNDAY     s -,3   $EKOVEN $R 37

HOMES FOR SALE

Now is the time to invest in Real Estate for your future!

Foreclosure & Investment Specialist

LAKE STEILACOOM WATERFRONT

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I promise to follow through and follow up. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll discuss with you exactly how I work and what you can expect. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll communicate regularly and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll know the process each step of the way. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m here to work hard for you and make the transaction as smooth as possible. Call me today for your personal consultation.â&#x20AC;?

CALL 253.922.5317

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE 723 S. Tyler

3 bed 1.75 bath 2,340 sf. Majestic views. 0RYH LQ UHDG\ PLGFHQWXU\ PRGHUQ 1HDU 3URFWRU 'LVWULFW  5XVWRQ :D\ ZDWHUIURQW Minutes from I-5 for easy commuting. 6WXQQLQJ Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFH JOHDPLQJ KDUGZRRGV ORYHO\  HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW NLWFKHQ D VHFOXGHG  backyard, deck w/ view. MLS# 489114

HOMES FOR SALE $219,000

Better Properties Shannon 253.691.1800

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

Classic Brick home in amazing condition with 3 bedrooms and 1.75 baths. Living rm. with newer pellet stove to keep you warm in the winter months! Retro kitchen w/newer appliances and eating nook, VHSDUDWHGLQLQJUPDQGEHDXWLIXOKDUGZRRGVPDLQĂ RRUEHGURRPV and a full bath. Basement has 1 bedroom and 3/4 bath with space for Ă&#x20AC;QLVKLQJDQDGGLWLRQDOUHFIDPLO\URRP3ULYDWHIXOO\IHQFHGEDFN\DUG with mature landscaping and a sprinkler system! Really great house. Come see! MLS# 391728 &DOO3DP/LQGJUHQ 253 691-0461 for more info or for a private showing! %HWWHU3URSHUWLHV13URFWRU

1505 S Mason Ave, Tacoma WA 98405

Pre-Sales Available Now! Lexington Square, 2301 S G St, Tacoma, WA 98405

$224,000 MLS # 479914

3 Beds, 1.75 Baths, 2,040 sf Bring your vision and you are set! Lovely roomy 3 bedroom home with formal dining and rec room. Plus, an extra bonus room. Large back yard with plenty of shade; deck off kitchen with hot tub. Imagine your barbecues. Locate on nice quiet street. Good access to bus lines and freeways. Shopping and entertainment just blocks away. Home has a heat pump system for HIÂżFLHQWFRVWHIIHFWLYHKHDWLQJDQGFRROLQJ

Margo Hass Klein

Ralph Garlington Real Estate Specialist

Coldwell Banker Bain

206-399-6764 Ralph@johnlscott.com

(253) 279-9949 margohassklein@cbbain.com www.margohassklein.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I act in your best interest, not mine. You deserve respect from the first time we shake hands to the last.â&#x20AC;?

TWO FOR THE PRICE OF ONE

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

BRAND NEW townhouses! 3 BR, 2.5 BA, approx. 1,304 square feet Personal rooftop deck adds even more living space Wood floors, granite, stainless appliances Oversize 1-car garage with lots of storage City, Puget Sound and Mt Rainier VIEWS Buy now and choose your colors! Call Margo today to schedule a private showing.

Priced from $226,950

REAL ESTATE I N V E S T M E N T

SERVICES REIS

For Sale

Professional Office 4412 6th Ave Tacoma For Lease Also 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

2 Condos $295,000 6319 19th, #s 9 & 11 1921 sq ft In UP across from TCC 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Mixed Use REO $350,000 4141 6th Ave 1 Comm. unit; 8 res 253-752-9742

Waterview Crossing $13,900,000 1600 Unit Dev.Des Moines. Currently 3 Mobil Parks. GI $563,168 253-752-9742

Tacoma (253) 752-9742

Property Management Receiverships Condo/Home Owners Association Management Bank REO Acquisitions Commercial Sales/Leasing

u

Newly Remodeled $1275 7034 S Junett St 3br 2 bath 1250 sf 253.752.9742

University Place Stratford Heights Apt 1, 2 or 3 bd w/ Garage On Site 253-565-0343 253-752-9742

Beckenridge Rambler $1,450 9051 Ridgeview Circle W 3br 2 bath, 1557 sqft 253-752-9742

Newly Priced $1500 2429 163rd St CT E 3br 2.5 bath 2256 sqft. 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

For Lease

www.REISinvest.com

Gig Harbor (253) 514-6539

u

Office/Warehouse 3875 Steilacoom Blvd, Lakewood From 2500 sq ft 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com www.REISinvest.com

Office/Retail 7609 Steilacoom Blvd SW Lakewood 1340 sq ft. $12.95 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Professional Office 4412 6th Ave Tacoma For Sale or Lease 253-752-9742

Downtown Office Condos 705 S 9th. Tacoma for Sale & Lease 253-752-9742

DuPont (253) 207-5871

Seattle South Lake Union (206) 319-5981

$179,500

3614 Tacoma Ave S - A&B

3614 A A spacious charming Craftsmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s with 4 %HGURRPVRUEHGURRPVDGHQRIÂżFHZLWK7KLV LQFOXGHVXSVWDLUVPDLQĂ&#x20AC;RRUDQGEDVHPHQW 3614 B A charming mother-in-law unit approximately 64IWZLWKRQHEHGURRPOLYLQJNLWFKHQXWLOLW\ The combined living space is over 3000 sq. ft; located in the historic Lincoln district. And is block away from Lincoln High School, bus and shopping. Both units come with washer, dryer and refrigerator.

Ralph Garlington

www.REISinvest.com www.REIS4rentbyowner.com

For Rent

MLS # 472004

206-399-6764

Real Estate Specialist

Ralph@johnlscott.com

WATERFRONT

WATERFRONT

WATERFRONT 1RUWK6DOPRQ%HDFK&RPPXQLW\RQ 7DFRPD1DUURZVIHHWRYHUZDWHU IURQWDJHOHDVHKROGSURSHUW\'HFNZ  parking lot rights. $25,000 &RQWDFW6DOPRQ%HDFK1RUWK Roger Edwards 253-752-7010

REALTORS

REALTORS

If I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell it to you and if I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live in it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t list it.

Shannon

Agent Extraordinaire

7OVUL!  -H_! ,THPS!ZOHUUVUZLSSZ'OV[THPSJVT


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 28, 2013

CageSport MMA

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You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


Twa 6 28 13 p01