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FREE s Friday, May 23, 2014

PUYALLUP NATION KINGS

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RNR COMMUNITY EVENT

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SUMMER CONCERT PREVIEW

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Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

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PHOTO COURTESY OF POINT DEFIANCE ZOO

BIG LOVE. A handsome and

amiable E.T. In healthier days.

Wishes wash in to Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium for an ailing E.T. By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

Behind the scenes at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, E.T. is basking in the worry and love of his fans, and the care of his keepers and veterinary staff. The walrus is ill, and hundreds of the people who have made him one of the zoo’s best-loved creatures X See ET / page A11

Jen Bruce wins Teacher of the Week award

TOP PHOTO BY GPE/ALEXANDRA HUMME / LEFT PHOTO BY GPE/ANDY ANDY / RIGHT PHOTO BY GPE/JAWAD JALALI

LEARNING. (Top photo) Students at the Hidassie Primary School in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia greet a GPE team member

visiting the school. The school has received funds through Ethiopia’s General Education Quality Improvement Program, which is supported by the Global Partnership for Education and many other development partners. (Left photo) A student building with blocks at Tokuma Primary School. (Right photo) Girls at Ayno Meena Number Two school in the city of Kandahar, Afghanistan, which was built in late 2008 with support from GPE funding.

ENDING POVERTY THROUGH EDUCATION By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Members of the Tacoma chapter of RESULTS-Washington are calling on local voters to support a global effort to end poverty in developing countries by letting their federal legislatures support a $250 million budget item slated for next month. It would provide seed money for a global program under the $3.5 billion Global Partnership for Education. Education for All is a global commitment to provide quality basic education for all children, youth and adults. “The international community has veered off course in our pursuit of quality education for all. The Global Partnership for Education’s pledging conference is our chance to get back on track,” said Joanne Carter, executive director of RESULTS and RESULTS Educational Fund. “By investing $250 million over the next two years in the Global Partnership, the U.S. can help build lasting education systems to reach the poorest and most vulnerable children worldwide.” The amount of $250 million represents just 34 minutes and 45 seconds of the federal government’s annual budget, which comes in at $7,264,020 each minute of every hour of every day. This might not seem like a lot of money in the scheme of the overall budget, but it is much more

than the $20 million America currently funds and much more than other developed nations, namely Britain, France and Canada fund. “This would be a big leap forward,” said Senior Global Grassroots Associate for RESULTS Educational Fund Lisa Marchal. Federal funding of the effort would be matched with grants and funding from around the world to provide educational programs, infrastructure and materials in third world countries as a way to boost self-sufficiency and economic development as a path to ending poverty. The world made unprecedented progress on access to education in the early 2000s, cutting the number of children out of school nearly in half. But progress on education has stalled since 2008, paralleling a decline in financial support from donor countries, including the United States. Still today, 57 million primary school age children are out of school, and nearly 40 percent of all primary school age children cannot read or write. The cycle of poverty in many African countries is simply a matter of economics. Families can’t afford the books, uniforms or materials for schools, so children stay home to make ends meet for the family. Lacking students and adequate funding, schools aren’t priorities and teachers lack proper training. “All of these things impact the edu-

cational system in Ethiopia,” said Selamawit Adugna Bekele, an education, youth and gender activist from Ethiopia during a Tacoma stop last week on a national tour to promote the program. Bekele has worked as a teacher, community leader and education advocate in her country, with a special focus on women and girls. Most recently, she was appointed a Global Youth Ambassador by A World at School, an international advocacy organization headed by Sarah Brown. Core to her effort is to bring awareness to the struggles of girls who are marginalized by problems of early marriage, risky migration, domestic labor and street-involvement, working to ensure their enrollment in school and improving learning outcomes. She started her career as a teacher in Addis Ababa, working directly to address the challenges students face in accessing a quality education in her country. Thanks to the dedication of advocates around the world, Ethiopia has seen great strides in its education system, including increasing the number of children enrolling in primary school from 23 percent in 1999 to 94 percent in 2011 and spending about 25 percent of its national budget on educational efforts. “To everything, education is the solution,” Bekele said. HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE

Water Sampling A4

TCC rekindles winning ways A7

ARIES (Mar. 21 – Apr. 19) The series of delays that have been irritating you will start to reverse. Communication is highlighted encouraging you to express yourself and let others know how talented you really are. A long term goal or project is moving forward but don’t try to rush it. Think positive. TAURUS (Apr. 20 - May 20) Stagnant or old relationships may take a turn to a more positive direction. Because of all that you have overcome in the past years, you are rewarded by the cosmos with the gift of enduring energy. Take advantage of this to the fullest extent. Someone may surprise you. GEMINI (May 21 – Jun. 20) The sun has entered your sign energizing your social sign. Time to show the world your versatility and vigilance. Something that seems worthwhile despite the challenges may be worth going for. Prepare to take on a new project or career path. CANCER (Jun. 21 – Jul. 22) After all the cleaning and getting rid of old things it’s time to decorate or tackle that DIY project. Ask experts for advice when needed so you don’t get over your head. Then make sure to take time to relax and recharge. Romance is in the air. LEO (Jul. 23 – Aug. 22) Your week is socially charged with good company. Old friends may try to contact you through social media. Share your cherished memories with others. Make sure to save some time for that special someone between gatherings. Enjoy your personal spotlight. VIRGO (Aug. 23 – Sep. 22) Financial delays that you may be experiencing will come to an end as Mars turns direct in your finance sector. Important plans that have been in the works for a long time may start to turn favorable. A team effort may help you achieve your goals.

HERO DEPUTY: Kittitas County Deputy Chuck Berg saved the life of Sara Clerget. PAGE A3

Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

LIBRA (Sep. 23 – Oct. 22) The end of all those delays is finally here. You can proceed with plans that have been neglected. New career prospects or a change in position may give you a chance to earn more money. Travel or thoughts for higher education may expand your horizons. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 – Nov. 21) Good conversations may help your financial and personal relationships. Develop a closer relationship with your body and tackle those health and wellness issues. Focus on shared finances, intimacy and transformation for long term stability and success. Perk up.

WORD SEARCH P H E L Q I X N S T T F I U Y Q D

S T R E E T F A I R X H H Q Z Y V

S T U P I D C R I M I N A L S A B

B C Q H U I O Y V G G S U A O N F

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E S T R E C N O C B P I O Z Y F Y

W E E K E E R G Y M R O O R Q N N

S G C R M I P J D X V J D W A L M

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 – Dec. 21) A long held dream may come true. There are plenty of opportunities for happy times with friends and that special someone. Working as a team could prove more productive than trying to do it all yourself. Give praise and acknowledgment to those who deserve it. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 – Jan. 19) You will start to see progress on the work front. Frustrations subside and things get back on track. The way you handle daily affairs will get noticed. Take some time to focus on wellness and health concerns that you have been neglecting. Conserve your energy and use it wisely. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 – Feb. 18) Delays or frustrations on legal or financial issues should show improvements. Romance is in the air and may tempt you to bouts of daydreaming. Enjoy the escape as long as you are productive. You may seek advice on a deep-seated issue. A friend could help ease a burden. PISCES (Feb. 19 – Mar. 20) Opportunities are arising to consolidate your finances and mange any debt. Get all your things in order during this phase and make concrete plans. Social activities are also highlighted as you may entertain friends or throw someone a surprise party. Give someone the benefit of the doubt.

ANAGRAM

STUPID CRIMINALS

Z L R A A L S E T I V G Z J U S C

Horoscope, word search and more B6

PHOTOS BY WILLIAM PAINTER

BIG SURPRISE. (Top) STAR

101.5 traffic reporter Marina Rockinger presented teacher Jen Bruce with a giant $100 check. (Bottom) Jen Bruce’s 5th-grade class gathered to celebrate. By Derek Shuck Derek@tacomaweekly.com

While students at Elmhurst Elementary school quietly took their Measures of Student Progress tests on May 15, a group of strangers with cameras and a giant check wandered around the halls shushing kids who were stunned to see a camera crew prowling around the colorful classrooms of the school. The crowd had come from STAR 101.5 to award 5th-grade teacher Jen Bruce with their Teacher of the Week award, presented by DJ Marina Rockinger of “Kent and Allan in the Morning” fame, and she brought the class plenty of goodies for students and teacher alike. Though the award came as a surprise to Bruce, she credited the relationship with her students as a main contributor to the nomination. “It’s the connection to the stu-

X See TEACHING / page A4

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Sports ........................A7 Make A Scene ........B5 A&E ....................... ....B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

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Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK VISIT US ON FACEBOOK MHJLIVVRJVT[HJVTH^LLRS`

Center and Gunnison Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.� And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holes, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

Lighthouse Laundry SPRING CLEANING in Our Big Washers!

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5IL>I@*C@?-ONL?;=B Recovery classes for: $'',&7,216Â&#x2021;$%86(Â&#x2021;9,2/(1&( C2'(3(1'(1&<Â&#x2021;*A0%/,1*

LAQUINTA INN 1425 (. 27th, Tacoma Classes on Thursday, June 5th at 7pm Registration on May 29th at 7pm Refreshments will be served. For more info: Sandra Little 253-495-5942

Bulletin Board LOTS GOING ON AT JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION JUNE 7 â&#x20AC;&#x153;From Slavery to Captivity: Reclaiming Our Freedomâ&#x20AC;? is the theme for this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Juneteenth celebration on June 7, showcasing African American and black-owned/operated businesses, agents, consultants, representatives, vendors, groups, clubs, organizations and more. The Juneteenth mission: To educate all people, particularly children, about Juneteenth and Freedom Days and to present all positive achievements of Americans of African descent since slavery ended on Jan. 1,1863. Festivities begin at 1 p.m. at Family Life Center, 4818 E. Portland Ave., with an opening ceremony featuring a drummers processional, greetings, prayer, pouring of the libation, and songs including â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lift Every Voice and Sing,â&#x20AC;? Juneteenth and Freedom Days histories, proclamation, community representatives, keynote speaker and more. From 2:30-6 p.m. there will be entertainers and guest speakers, singers, choirs, groups, quartets, spoken word, praise dancers, step teams, drill teams, fashion show and more. Free hot dogs to children up to 12 years old, free drawings, vendors, food and raffles. Presented by New Century Justice Network. Entertainers, vendors or volunteer information call (253) 759-0373 and leave a message for Miss Schaffer. (5+,9:65>0339<5<56776:,+(:*6<5;@(<+0;69 Pierce County Auditor Julie Anderson has filed for reelection and has drawn no opposition. Anderson, who became Auditor by unseating an incumbent in a 2009 special election, has earned a reputation for efficient, transparent governance during her tenure. Her emphasis on community outreach and listening reflect Andersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passion for restoring trust in local government. While Anderson described herself as â&#x20AC;&#x153;honored by the publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trustâ&#x20AC;? in standing unopposed, she stressed the importance of competitive elections to good government. Said Anderson: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a strange feeling to be unchallenged for the first time in my political life. While a normal person might rejoice at a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;free ride,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a little concerned. Citizens will miss the opportunity to focus on the important work of the Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office and examine it thoroughly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Too often, uncompetitive races and unchallenged incumbents donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t appear in candidate forums or editorial endorsement interviews. The responsibilities of the Pierce County Auditor are not well-understood. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Skippingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; this election certainly doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help to raise the profile of our services.â&#x20AC;? Despite her concerns, Anderson is excited to be able to focus on the job at hand, calling herself â&#x20AC;&#x153;happy to be free of distractions and able to apply myself fully to the job of Pierce County Auditor.â&#x20AC;? Andersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tenure in public service also includes two terms on Tacoma City Council, and work with the YWCA of Pierce County and Washington State Association of County Auditors. She has previously been named as Best Elected Official by Tacoma Weekly, and under her leadership the Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office has received numerous awards for integrity and technological innovation. 9,.0:;,956>-69;/,4(@A64)0,2 The Captain Meriwether Lewis Chapter (JBLM) of the Association for the United States Army (501c3) is an active voice for soldiers and families. In 2013 the chapter raised almost $300,000 to support Joint Base Lewis-McChord. In 2014, the goal is to increase membership, in a big SCARY way! On Saturday, May 31 at Fort Steilacoom Park in Lakewood, the chapter will have a membership drive in the form of their First Annual AUSA Zombie Apocalypse 5K! Runners will not only have to run 3.1 miles, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have to escape and evade the zombie apocalypse! Registered runners and registered zombies will be given a wicking T-shirt and membership to the local Chapter of AUSA. There may even be a Thrillerdance party! Register at www.ausazombie5k.racewire.com and go to https://www.facebook.com/AUSAZombie5k. )3(52,;:67769;<50;,:.9,(;*(<:,: Give your blankets a new life! Artist Marie Watt is accepting 400 blankets to create a new community sculpture to be installed along Pacific Avenue in front of Tacoma Art Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new Haub Family Galleries next November. You can help. Bring two blankets to Tacoma Art Museum through the end of May: one for art, and one for rescue. Two great community causes! If you would like to document the blanketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story, the Admissions Desk will have a tag to fill out. Old or new, noteworthy or not, your blanket can be transformed into bronze and become a lasting part of this special project. Contribute one blanket and receive a screen print by Marie Watt. Contribute a second blanket to provide comfort to the 475 men, women, and children who the Tacoma Rescue Mission shelters each night. The Rescue Mission uses more than 800 blankets per year in their six local shelters and on-the-street services. Bed linens are equally helpful. Donations for Rescue Mission can be new or used in clean, good condition. Meet Watt on Thursday, May 15, 5-8 p.m. and sit with her and create memories with the community through the art of sewing. No experience necessary, all ages welcome. For more information visit www.TacomaArtMuseum.org/Blanket. .,;65,6565,/,37>0;/(--69+()3,*(9,(*; Need help finding affordable health insurance? Washington State certified in-person assisters provide information and enrollment help with Washington Apple Health (Medicaid) and qualified health plans under the Affordable Care Act. Assisters will be at the University Place Pierce County Library, 3609 Market Place W., Suite 100, from 4-6 p.m. on the following Mondays: June 2, 16 and 30; July 14 and 28; Aug. 11 and 25. Find more information at piercecountylibrary.org, search site: ACA. -(:;,5@6<9:,(;),3;/(5.<7(5++90=, On the heels of the first-ever statewide distracted driving extra enforcement campaign, law enforcement officers will be out once again searching for not only unbuckled drivers but distracted drivers as part of the annual â&#x20AC;&#x153;Click it or Ticketâ&#x20AC;? patrols. In Pierce County, during the recent distracted driving campaign, which took place between April 10 and 15, 401cell phone and texting violations were written. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Handheld Cell Phone Useâ&#x20AC;? law became a primary law in Washington in June 2010. Prior to that law taking effect, the number of citations issued for cell phone use averaged 700 per month statewide. After the law went into effect, the number of tickets issued increased and has stayed consistent at approximately 4,000 per month. This is without funding for extra enforcement! Likewise, after the primary seat belt law took effect in June 2002 seat belt violations initially increased and then the seat belt use rate increased. This model of high visibility enforce-

ment has proven to change behaviors and is now being applied to distracted driving. Texting and cell phone usage is aggravating to so many motorists and it remains a growing public health and traffic safety issue. That is why between now and June 1 motorists in Pierce County can expect to see extra seat belt AND distracted driving patrols. Last year, during this same time period, officers on extra patrols statewide issued 2,963 seat belt violations amongst the 11,666 motorists who were stopped. Also last year during this time period, 1,897 cell phone and texting violations were written. However, taking a historical look, in 2010, (when the primary law went into effect) only 63 drivers were cited statewide at this time. In Pierce County, the Bonney Lake, Fircrest, Gig Harbor, Lakewood, Puyallup, Sumner and Tacoma Police Departments as well as the Pierce County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department and the Washington State Patrol will be teaming up and participating in these extra patrols, with the support of the Tacoma-Pierce County DUI and Traffic Safety Task Force. These and all extra patrols are part of Target Zero â&#x20AC;&#x201C; striving to end traffic deaths and serious injuries in Washington by 2030. For more information, visit www.targetzero.com. Additional information on the Washington Traffic Safety Commission can be found on the website, www.wtsc.wa.gov.

.9(5+*05,4(;(*64(:@47/65@;,(4<7 Two of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most cherished arts non-profits are teaming up for a celebration of music and cinema. The Grand Cinema and The Tacoma Symphony are proud to announce that they are co-producing a concert titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;An Evening of Cinematic Musicâ&#x20AC;? on June 20 at Urban Grace Church. Narrated throughout by NWPRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Steve Reeder, the concert will feature the Tacoma Symphony Orchestraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s string nonet (nine musicians) as well as local singer-songwriters performing iconic songs and scores from throughout film history. The local singer-songwriters performing are Grace Sullivan (Apartment Lights), Kye Alfred Hillig, William Jordan, Elliot Stockstad, and duos Elk and Boar (Kirsten Wenlock and Travis Barker) and The Tenants (Mitchell Dorn and Ally Dorn). â&#x20AC;&#x153;A few months ago while listening to the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;film scoresâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pandora station in our office we had the idea for a concert celebrating cinematic music,â&#x20AC;? shares Grand Cinema Director of Marketing Zach Powers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not really in the concert programming business so we pitched it as a partnership to the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra and they loved the idea as well!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Symphony frequently performs music that has been featured in or written for film,â&#x20AC;? explains Tacoma Symphony Orchestra Engagement Manager Jody Suhrbier. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This presentation of our favorite cinematic pieces in collaboration with Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art-house movie theater is one that we are confident both organizationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; patrons are going to love.â&#x20AC;? A benefit concert, all of the proceeds from â&#x20AC;&#x153;An Evening of Cinematic Musicâ&#x20AC;? will go directly towards programming at the two downtown arts organizations. Tickets are $30 and are on sale now at TacomaSymphony. org, GrandCinema.com and The Grand Cinema Box Office (606 S Fawcett Ave., Tacoma, WA). 73<7(9;5,9:>0;/.66+>033 -69+69496649,*@*3,,--69; The end of the school year means dorm donations and sustainable cleanup for 1,500 students at Pacific Lutheran University. From May 19 through June 3, Goodwill donation trailers will be staffed adjacent to recycle stations at four sites on campus from 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Goodwill will collect couches, lamps, dressers and other donated items for eventual future student use. PLU and Goodwill of the Olympics and Rainier Region are partnering to reduce waste in the landfill, promote recycling and to raise revenue for job training and placement in Pierce County. With more donation stations, PLU hopes â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moveout 2014â&#x20AC;? will top their record of 38,000 pounds that left campus last year through donations to Goodwill, the Trinity Lutheran Church Food Bank and Nativity House. Goodwill resells dorm goods in their 34 home furnishing and other retail stores, raising funds for job training and job placement in a variety of career fields. PLU is only one of 15 colleges across the country to partner with Goodwill, Keep America Beautiful and the College and University Recycling Coalition to launch â&#x20AC;&#x153;Give and Go! Move Out 2014,â&#x20AC;? a national effort in college sustainability living and job creation. Last year, PLU and its Sustainability Department diverted 62 percent of its waste for reuse or recycling (Goodwill 10,500 lbs., Food Bank 2,000 lbs., Toiletries 257 lbs., recycling plastic and paper 19,800 lbs., glass 2,500 lbs., and metal 3.200 lbs.) The department looks for active partnerships to advance sustainability efforts. PLU is taking the lead on sustainable campus life with school move-out periods playing a critical part. Goodwill is seeking other colleges to partner for similar efforts in the future. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So much can be reused and repurposed,â&#x20AC;? said Christine Cooley, Sustainability Manager at PLU. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If someone else can reuse the item, we want to make sure they have that opportunity.â&#x20AC;? For convenience of move-out, stations accepting toiletries for Nativity House, as well as compostable items and nonperishable food items will be placed inside the hall entrances. Lobby donation stations will also accept small items such as shoes and clothing. Larger Goodwill trucks will be located outside Harstad, Pfleuger, South Hall, near Kriedler and Hinderlie halls. Dumpsters for items that cannot be recycled or reused will be located near Stuen, Pflueger and outside Harstad halls. Sustainability at PLU focuses on three key components: care for people, care for the planet, and prosperity, both now in the future. Each year, the university recycles more than 70 percent of its waste stream and has committed to be carbon neutral by 2020. Each year, the university consistently ranks in the top 15 colleges in the national â&#x20AC;&#x153;Recyclemaniaâ&#x20AC;? competition. Goodwill and PLU have similar strategic goals in sustainability. In 2014, critical community and school household clean-up efforts will collect 1,250,000 pounds of donations, generating funds to help 9,000 southwest Washington residents with job training and placement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Together, we can turn student donations into something that will strengthen our economy and help the environment,â&#x20AC;? said Terry Hayes, President and CEO of Goodwill of the Olympics and Rainier Region. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cleaning that dorm room and supporting Goodwill will go a long way towards helping the unemployed in Washington.â&#x20AC;? Goodwillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s regional recycling activity includes participation in school donation drives, city and organization recycling events, college semester-end drives, and pickups after community garage sales. What Goodwill doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell, it repurposes (sells) as raw material, keeping household goods out of landfills. On year two of itsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; zero waste initiative this year, Goodwill is the most efficient and beneficial way to recycle household goods in America. :,,469,)<33,;05)6(9+0;,4: (;;(*64(>,,23@*64


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TACOMA MOTHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LIFE SAVED BY HERO DEPUTY By David Rose Correspondent

Kittitas County Deputy Chuck Berg was honored as Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wantedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;May Officer the Monthâ&#x20AC;? for his DAVID ROSE quick action in saving a Tacoma motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life at the Seahawks 12K race at the Landing in Renton on April 13. Sara Clerget and her family are huge Seahawks fans. She, her mom and sister ran the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 12K race on April 13 but when she crossed the finish line, her heart stopped. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I felt fine but the second I stopped thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when I started to feel super, super dizzy,â&#x20AC;? said Clerget. The 35-year-old mother of a two young boys had gone into cardiac arrest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coming to grips with what happened, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still surreal, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fathom, I died, I died for two minutes.â&#x20AC;? Clerget was very lucky that

PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID ROSE

:<7,9/,96 Kittitas County Deputy Chuck Berg (second

from left) saved the life of Sara Clerget (in Seahawks jersey), here surrounded by her husband, mother, sisters and kids.

day. Kittitas County Deputy Chuck Berg and his wife also ran the race. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Me and my wife had just finished the 12K and we kind of high-fived and my wife actually noticed it first. She brought the lady to my attention. I looked over there and saw that

she collapsed; so we went over there immediately, got down and ended up checking on her and could see sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in cardiac arrest,â&#x20AC;? said Deputy Berg. He teaches Advanced CPR and was able to save Clergetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. Near the finish line in Renton

last week, he surprised her with a visit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was dead and he saw me laying there. He knew that I had no pulse and immediately did what he knew to do. I mean I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t thank him enough.â&#x20AC;? Clerget and her family had been in touch with Deputy Berg through social media but had not met him again in person to thank him. Saraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mom Julie McKee was especially moved to tears. She watched as Deputy Berg worked on her daughter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taking a breath.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like you gave my life back to me so thank you. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ever thank you enough,â&#x20AC;? she told Deputy Berg as she hugged him. Clerget has a defibrillator and is doing well now. Next year, she and Deputy Berg plan to run the race together, then to compete for two minutes using CPR mannequins to draw attention to the importance of learning the life-saving technique. The winner buys the other dinner.

SAVE YOURSELF: STEP AWAY FROM KITS IN THE CHECK-OUT LINE By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

Chemo makes me meaner. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re lucky, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never notice. But if you want to stay lucky, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d best step clear of me in grocery stores, parking lots and anywhere else we might get on each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last nerve. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not grateful to the chemicals that are taking down the breast cancer cells that my dear friend Technology found before Christmas. I am. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be a happy wrapper next Christmas because of them. Cytoxan and adriamycin went to war on the cancer with every-other-week infusions in February and March. They feasted on every fast-dividing cell they found and left me breathless, also hairless, at their force and initiative. Whoever invented the electric recliner surely spent a few months with these drugs. How else to explain a chair that understands that you do not have the energy to flatten yourself? Taxol took over in April. It is refueling weekly for three months of search-anddestroy missions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be easier,â&#x20AC;? all the health professionals say. True, but at this point thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The ocelot will only eat three of your

toes.â&#x20AC;? Those chemicals have been snacking away not just on malignant cells, but on the reserves of civility that kept you, Dear Reader, safe in random encounters with me. To compensate, I have a new policy of offering you my place in the checkout line if you appear to be on your lunch break, tired after work or have kids with you. Karma counts. Still, these drugs are challenging the manners my mom instilled, and all the optimism I brought to these five months. Not that I regret harboring optimism born of incomprehension. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been one of my best tools, especially when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taken the character of a cattle prod and poked me into exercising, getting to community events, even writing. Without it, how would I know that six goats and eight donkeys live on the perimeter of the 1.7-mile walk my husband takes me on in our neighborhood? How would I have noticed that Connellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dahlias are ready to be bought, planted and offered to marauding slugs? Or that you had to act quickly on that red pickup so enticingly priced on an elevated front lawn? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the very world in which chemo invites you to lose interest. It would be so easy to click on Netflix and finally get into â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Good Wife,â&#x20AC;? from season one, instead of replanting the pots

Criminals arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t often known for their honesty. They are criminals after Tacoma Weekly is interested in all. what is happening in our community. oneyour drunk drinker brokeideas from PleaseBut send news and story stereotype when he was arrested tothat news@tacomaweekly.com. around midnight on May 20. A bartender at a bar in the Dome District called police when the man was seen staggering to his Jeep across from the bar. The responding officer arrived to see the man drive off, after hitting the Link light rail tracks along the roadway. The officer then saw the driver stall for about 30 seconds at a green light. The officer pulled the driver over and asked if he had been drinking. The driver said â&#x20AC;&#x153;plenty.â&#x20AC;? Routine to any traffic stop, the officer asked for his license and registration. The driver gave the officer his debit card instead and stated that he was too drunk to drive home and would just take a cab home. The officer opted against that plan and arrested the man. He later tested three times the legal alcohol limit. He was taken to jail. An officer spotted a car with its high beam headlights on in the mid morning hours of May 20 during a patrol along Pacific Avenue. The officer stopped the driver, who said she was unaware that her high beams were on. The officer immediately smelled booze. The driver admitted to having a few beers and a shot of vodka. She later tested almost twice the legal limit, a fact that she found shocking. She was taken to jail for processing. Compiled by Steve Dunkelberger

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on the front porch. It would be so easy to fall into a book instead of talking with a friend. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done both, and disappointed myself. What happened to that optimism? One of the bravest guys I know gave me a clue. For grit and educated confidence, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t top the people you meet in a chemotherapy infusion center. We with the tubes in the ports in our chests can talk about anything. We can, if need be, whine to a nurse about fatigue, and be told itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s okay to feel that way. Chemo is cumulative, and we did great through the grueling part. X See CANCER / page A4

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Tacoma Police detectives need your help to locate Mardelle Carmickle, who has been missing under unusual circumstances since June of 2013. Mardelle Carmickleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family reported her missing in late August of 2013 after failing to see or hear from her in two months. Carmickleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family members have visited her apartment in downtown Tacoma several times and found no indications she has been there since she disappeared. At the time of her disappearance

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Mardelle Ann Carmickle was a white female, 59 years old, 5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;7â&#x20AC;? tall, 115 lbs., with brown hair and hazel eyes. She does not drive, and is not known to have a vehicle or a cell phone. Carmickle suffers from several medical conditions requiring medication. She has no previous disappearances and it is unusual for her to not be in contact with her children. Detectives are looking for any information regarding Mardelle Carmickleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disappearance and/or her whereabouts.

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WATER MONITORING KEEPS SWIMMERS FROM FECAL TROUBLES By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Warm summer weather sends water seekers to local beaches in search of a quick dip in Puget Sound. The stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s B.E.A.C.H. (Beach Environmental Assessment, Communication and Health) Program tests those cool waters every week to make sure the water doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do anything more than cool off swimmers. The Department of Ecology and the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department test nine beaches around Pierce County, 58 around the state, to make sure that the water isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t contaminated by pollution, specifically fecal bacteria. Exposure to fecal-contaminated waters can cause stomachaches, skin rashes, swimmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s itch, upper respiratory infections, and other illnesses. Children and the elderly may be more vulnerable to waterborne illnesses. Water samples are taken on Mondays through the summer so that tests can be made in time to alert weekend swimmers about the hazards with signs and notifications. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We focus on the high traffic beaches,â&#x20AC;? said B.E.A.C.H. Program organizer Debby Sargeant. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just like to keep people safe when they are at the beach.â&#x20AC;? Tacoma beaches that are monitored

WCancer From page A3

We can go to sleep with the big dose of IV Benadryl and wake up wondering if we snored. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no problem, even if we did. Our sinuses lined, as they are with the fast-multiplying cells chemo hits on its forays, arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t what they were a few months ago, before the nosebleeds. We can ask if our sore, sore fingernails, turning orange after a month of drugs, will fall off, or just stay hideous. FYI, they will just stay ugly, and it is not a good time to take up knot-tying or needlepoint or to enter dime-picking-up contests. We can ask if sometimes, not always, anyone else is too fatigued for a meaningful, or even casual, conversation. Yes, said my brave friend, that happens. I asked the nurse about the guy who backed into our car in the McLendonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parking lot. Would it have been okay to punch him in the nose? His excuse: Our car, though entirely in its space, was close to the

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

:(47305. Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department water monitor

Lindsay Tuttle ventures into Commencement Bay to take water samples.

include Owens, Titlow, Tacoma Sand Spit and Browns Point. High readings are then investigated to find the sources of the contamination. Such was the case last year, when officials issued a no-contact advisory for the waters at Cummings Park and Marine Park along

WTeaching

white dividing line. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t punch him, but I wanted to. I wanted to so much that I looked at his weasel face, said I did not have time for his brand of jerk and stalked inside, leaving my poor husband to deal with him. Granted, it was cruel to my husband, but it was less problematic than explaining to a Pierce County deputy that I am too tired for this kind of manure, and the guy was overdue for a flat nose. To her credit, the nurse did not inch away. Instead, she listened as I told her about the guy riding the auto cart around the grocery store, blocking aisles and, when he did not want to steer around me, beeping at me until I moved. I have a set of particular skills, I told the nurse, and they include executing swift, precise turns with a shopping cart. I deployed one such maneuver, a rapid turn, very near to that man in the dairy aisle, I told her, and felt better for it. But would it have been okay to punch him in the nose? Chemo wears us out, she said. It may bring us to edges weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never visited. Still, no nose punching.

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Ruston Way in Tacoma due to high bacteria counts. Samples along the waterway tracked the contamination to a blocked sewage line above Marine Park that was bubbling sewage through a manhole that was then leeching the contaminated water into a nearby storm drain that emptied into

From page A1

dents,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twenty-Two of the 24 of them Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had for two years in a row.â&#x20AC;? Bruce was nominated by student Micah Moore, a 5ht-grader in Bruceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s class who believed her instructor deserved special recognition in her last year as a teacher, as Bruce is moving on to become a librarian in the same district next year. After spending the last two years with the same group of students, Bruce had the opportunity to connect with her students both in and outside the classroom. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have enjoyed reaching out to [the students],â&#x20AC;? Bruce said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities we do in the classroom or outside, they really appreciate seeing their teachers out and about and supporting them not just in Elmhurst activities, but activities outside the school as well.â&#x20AC;? Bruce received a $100 giant check, her own trophy plaque courtesy of Trophies2go, a $50 gift card to Sky Nursery gardening center in Seattle, and a makeover courtesy of Blanc Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Schwartz salon in Kent. Students got complimentary apple slices and juice from McDonalds and everyone got a free T-shirt, proudly proclaiming their teacher as the STAR 101.5

Commencement Bay. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We work very hard to protect water quality,â&#x20AC;? said Tacoma Environmental Services Director Mike Slevin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once alerted, we are able to respond and fix issues and concerns very quickly.â&#x20AC;? The pipe had been clogged for some time. By the time the sewage sleuthing ended, the city identified a large area of land that needed to be cleaned up, including land owned and operated by a railroad company. The clean up cost about $50,000, and the caution signs have since been removed. Fecal contamination is caused in several ways, including people not properly washing their hands after using the restroom, someone defecating in the water, improper disposal of diapers, malfunctioning sewage or septic systems or contaminated water entering the storm water system. Swimmers are advised to avoid swimming in open water within 48 hours of a heavy rain since bacteria counts are higher during that time. People are also asked to clean up after themselves and their pets when they are around water where people swim and to avoid getting beach water into their mouths. More information is available at ecologyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blog Fecal Matters at ecologywa. blogspot.com.

Teacher of the Week. The crew surprised Bruce during a morning lesson, and her classroom full of 22 5th-graders applauded their teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efforts, proudly wearing their brand new shirts and taking pictures for KOMO 4 News, STAR 101.5 and the Tacoma Weekly. Bruce has taught in the area for over 18 years, and coaches high school softball in addition to her day job of watching over 5th-graders, exemplifying the commitment to community that got her nominated in the first place. Dealing with small children in the morning and high school girls in the evening deserves some kind of award. Elmhurst Elementary principal Carrie Adrian was also present for the surprise award. She believes Bruceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to connect with students in new and unique ways helped her get nominated for the award. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Bruce] uses a lot of new technology in her classroom,â&#x20AC;? Adrian said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think students appreciate learning in new ways and she provides that for them.â&#x20AC;? Adrian was present for the surprise award, and the commotion also attracted several other staff members of Elmhurst who joined in the festivities, congratulating their peer on her accomplishment. If you know of a teacher who deserves to be STAR 101.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Teacher of the Week, nominate him or her at www.star1015.com.

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Guest Editorials

Of Henny Penny and bookstores By Michael P. Huseby If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in business â&#x20AC;&#x201C; no matter what business â&#x20AC;&#x201C; you know that having to listen to the odd Henny Penny is an occupational hazard. You remember Henny Penny, the childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s storybook character who felt an acorn drop on its head and believed the sky was falling. The folk tale has become the seminal example of a hysterical, uninformed and mistaken belief that disaster is imminent. Recently, some Henny Pennys have begun clucking about the future of bookstores. The rise of digital content, online selling and broader retail distribution, they say, will kill bookstores. Why, they ask, will people go to a bookstore when they can buy books online or at department stores? Feeding the hysteria are the bankruptcy two years ago of Borders, the national bookstore chain, and recent speculation that Barnes & Noble will accelerate its bookstore closings in coming years. Some have even suggested the demise of B&N is so imminent that gift cards should be used immediately upon receiving them because the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial foundations are shaky. To paraphrase one of our nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great writers, Mark Twain, the reports of bookstoresâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; death have been greatly exaggerated. Here are the facts: Barnes & Noble has not adjusted its plan for store closings. Historically, we have closed about 15 stores a year for the past 10 years. Of that number, some of the stores were closed because they were unprofitable, while others were relocations to better properties. Barnes & Noble has great real estate in prime locations and the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new management team is

fully committed to the retail concept for the long term. Why are we so committed? There are several reasons, all focused on delighting our customers. No other retailer can match the selection of books available at every Barnes & Noble location, supported by awardwinning customer service. Just look at the success of last holiday season to see if we are getting it right. Our financial foundation is solid, and we have a strong balance sheet. Barnes & Noble ended the most recent quarter with $490 million in cash, $276 million higher than the prior year, with no draw on its $1 billion credit facility. As for the threat of the digital revolution, Barnes & Noble has one of the industryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading E-commerce sites in BN.com, as well as worldclass fulfillment centers. In fact, Barnes & Noble can offer something online-only competitors cannot â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a unique in-store experience that allows our customers to interact with knowledgeable booksellers who provide exceptional customer service. We also have one of the best e-readers on the market â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the NOOK. Given the competitive landscape, we are extremely proud of all we have accomplished with the NOOK business. In fact, while we may not be a consumer electronics retailer, we have sold more than 10 million NOOK devices because we offer a great reading experience, unmatched content and we have an army of booksellers supporting them. Behind these offerings are our strong partnerships with industry leaders like Microsoft and Pearson. They say you can judge someone by the company they keep â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and we keep

some pretty good company. Moreover, we have strong relationships with our publishing partners and our prices are competitive with any other outlet selling books. Plus our stores offer a broad range and deep selection of books, including not only bestsellers but also the backlist. The upshot: Publishers want to work with Barnes & Noble because we understand and support the business. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the kicker that no Henny Penny wants to hear. People are actually coming back to bookstores more often than they have in years. Improving bookstores sales trends during fiscal 2014 indicate that customers are reigniting their love affair with physical books. This trend supports industry reports that suggest eBook growth has moderated and was essentially flat in 2013. As this trend continues, we believe we are well positioned to delight our customers on whatever platform they choose to connect with us -- in our stores and online, and digitally on our NOOK platform. And we back it up with more than 40,000 knowledgeable booksellers across the country ready to recommend every customerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next great read. We have openly acknowledged the challenges within our business and the industry and are adapting to the changing business. But, the next time Henny Pennys suggest that the sky is falling on bookstores, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take their word for it. Step into your local Barnes & Noble store and enjoy the extraordinary experience that delights millions of our customers every day and has made us one of the most beloved brands in the country. Michael P. Huseby is chief executive officer of Barnes & Noble, Inc.

The great leaders who forged the future of Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forests and fish By Don C. Brunell Billy Frank, Jr. and Stu Bledsoe came from very different backgrounds, yet their friendship and determination laid the groundwork for what today is known as Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic Forests and Fish agreement. Those accords paved the way to revitalized wild salmon habitats, cleaner water and better forest management. Frank, who died early this month, was raised along the Nisqually River. An avid fisherman, he was arrested more than 50 times defending tribal fishing rights. Frankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activism earned the respect of tribal leaders and others. He served as the chair of the Northwest Indian Commission for 30 years. Bledsoeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father was a Vice Admiral in the U.S. Navy. A graduate of UCLA, Stu was a World War II fighter pilot who settled on his Ellensburg cattle ranch. He rose through the ranks of the state legislature and was appointed Secretary of Agriculture by Gov. Dan Evans in 1976. In 1978, Bledsoe became executive director of the Washington Forest Protection Association, the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s private forestland organization. Stu was raised with financial means. Billy was not. Stu spoke for forest landowners. Billy spoke for the tribes. A landmark decision by Tacoma federal judge George Boldt brought them together. In 1974, Boldt ruled that tribal fishermen had the right to half the

salmon harvest. Bledsoe soon realized that the most crucial part of Boldtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ruling was the mandate that the state protect fish habitat. Since salmon spend a critical part of their young lives in streams and rivers flowing through Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 23 million acres of forestlands, traditional logging and forest management practices would have to change dramatically. Roads would be constructed differently; clearcuts would be smaller and land along streams, near wetlands and on steep slopes would be put off limits. It would be an expensive proposition. Bledsoe had to convince forest landowners to make the changes. Frank had to persuade tribal leaders to trust the forest landowners to keep their end of the bargain. Over the next 10 years, Frank and Bledsoe led the effort to figure out how to create this new future. The process became known as Timber, Fish and Wildlife. The Timber, Fish and Wildlife agreement created the framework for the Forests and Fish law, an historic, science-based set of forest practice regulations that protect 60,000 miles of streams running through 9.3 million acres of state and private forestland. Designed to comply with both the federal Endangered Species Act and the Clean Water Act, the agreement is the largest and most comprehensive environmental agreement in the U.S. Bledsoe, who died in 1988, never lived to see the Forests and Fish Agreement implemented, but its

foundation was laid before his passing. Billy Frank, Jr. lived to become a legend and see salmon return to our rivers, streams and lakes in increasing numbers. Today, forest landowners develop Habitat Conservation Plans, which are long-term forest management agreements between a landowner or local government and federal agencies. HCPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s are one of the most innovative conservation programs designed to protect fish and wildlife under the Endangered Species Act. Their purpose is to reduce conflict and encourage the development of â&#x20AC;&#x153;creative partnershipsâ&#x20AC;? between the public and private sector. Frank and Bledsoe shared a spirit of mutual respect and collaboration that is rare these days. They were visionaries who knew that, if they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take risks to shape change, our state would be paralyzed by endless lawsuits, political infighting and losses for the natural resources they cared about so deeply. Let us hope that todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leaders can take heart and be inspired by their example to provide the same courageous and effective leadership in the future. Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He recently retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.

Downtown museums and summer festivals draw visitors from around the region. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all well and good, but building a sense of community downtown takes a program focused on locals. Such is the case with the Walk Tacoma series organized by Downtown On the Go and sponsored by Franciscan Health System. The free, eight-walk series has local history and architecture experts taking strolls around downtown every first and third Wednesdays, dispensing historical tidbits and urban design gold to whomever walks along. The walks were expected to draw a few dozen knowledge-seeking strollers. Hundreds have arrived during the tours held so far. Tacomans clearly love their city and want to know more about it. Tours have included the Brewery District, downtown architecture and notable spots of Tacoma history. The tours started four years ago when a group of downtown business owners and downtown boosters created downtown focused walking maps for tourists and local adventure seekers. That effort generated five downtown walking map routes that touch on the highlights of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history and architecture around the Brewery District, Hilltop, Wright Park, North Waterfront and South Waterfront. There was more information walkers might find interesting, so a museum-focused map was created last year. Branded as Walk Tacoma, each mapped route takes pedestrians through an interpretive tour of about 10 sites during a 1.5 mile walk through the city. But maps are one thing. Tours are quite another. The guided walks were born. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roster of guided tours walked through Wright Park, the Stadium District, the Museum District, an architectural tour of downtown and the Brewery District. The next walk will be held at noon on June 4, for a tour of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s First Neighborhood Walk starting at the Woolworth Building at 11th and Broadway presented by Deputy Mayor Victoria Woodards. Pacific Avenue Streetscape Artist Elizabeth Connor will then give a tour of public art at 5:15 p.m. on June 18, starting at Firemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Park at 7th and Pacific Ave. The Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum will be the tour focus at noon on July 16 and a Walking Scavenger Hunt will be offered at 4:30 p.m. on Aug. 6 starting at the Social Bar & Grill, 1715 Dock St. The walks are free and do not require a reservation. Walkers can just show up, rain or shine. Walking maps of the routes are also available for free at Downtown On the Go, 950 Pacific Ave, Suite 300, at many downtown businesses or downloadable at www.downtownonthego.org. Each of these tours offer pretty good stuff, and maybe, just maybe provide the information for an audio tour of the city that visitors and locals alike could simply download and enjoy at their leisure. Because the more people know about their city, the more they can appreciate what they have and dream about what could be in the future. Each tour does just that, creating Tacomans actively seeking ways to appreciate their city. The above opinion represents the view of Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s editorial board.

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2588 Pacific Highway, Fife, WA 98424  Â&#x2039;-(?!  7\ISPZOLY!John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com 6WLYH[PVUZ4HUHNLY!Tim Meikle / tim@tacomaweekly.com 5L^Z+LZR!news@tacomaweekly.com 4HUHNPUN,KP[VY!Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com :[HMM>YP[LYZ! Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Kathleen Merryman / kathleen@tacomaweekly.com Derek Shuck / derek@tacomaweekly.com ,U[LY[HPUTLU[,KP[VY! Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com :WVY[Z,KP[VY! Justin Gimse/ jgimse@tacomaweekly.com 7HNPUH[PVU!Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar >LI+L]LSVWLYZ! Cedric Leggin, Ed Curran, Mike Vendetti, Jacob Thiel 7OV[VNYHWOLY! Rocky Ross *VU[YPI\[PUN>YP[LYZ! Karen Westeen, Steve Mullen, Dave Davison, Sean Contris (K]LY[PZPUN!Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Colleen McDonald / cmcdonald@tacomaweekly.com, Marlene Carrillo / marlene@tacomaweekly.com

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PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT SUPPORTING THE ECONOMIC GROWTH OF OUR COMMUNITY

The Puyallup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s donation of $200,000 to Northwest Harvest will help keep food on the table for countless struggling families.

Considered among the most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians has grown to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its own membership but sharing its wealth among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County, with a payroll of more than 3,300 people

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 74 percent of whom are non-Native. Working in the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities, these employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits. In 2012, the Tribe spent over $445 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more. Even during the recession, the Tribe increased employment and funded substantial vendor purchases and construction projects,

keeping many businesses afloat and people employed. As the country continues to recover from past economic woes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians leads the way locally. From sponsoring dozens of local charities, nonprofit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer or cease to exist, to protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and health care, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its well-deserved reputation as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the generous people,â&#x20AC;? a reflection of the meaning of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very name.

Millions in funding for local governments

Washington State Patrol was approved to receive $75,000 to help mitigate [YHMĂ&#x201E;JZHML[`PTWHJ[LKI`JHZPUVWH[YVUZ

Each year, the Puyallup Tribe distributes 2 percent of its gaming revenue from its two Emerald Queen Casino locations to local governments. Over the years the Tribe has provided millions of dollars to fund vital projects and services, from police and fire to road and traffic improvements. Decisions on how to distribute this money are made by the Community Contribution Committee, which consists of representatives of the Puyallup Tribe; the cities of Tacoma, Puyallup and Fife; Pierce County; and the Washington State Gambling Commission. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approved distribution was for $1.9 million and was awarded as follows: The City of Fife was approved to receive $850,000, an amount determined by an interlocal agreement between the City and the Tribe.

This money will help fund a broad array of cityprovided services and infrastructure improvements. The City of Puyallup was approved to receive $30,000 for River Road safety and capacity improvements. The City of Tacoma was approved to receive $851,549 to help cover police, fire department and city attorneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s costs concerning casino-related calls. Pierce County was approved to receive $148,051 for emergency management services. This covers the cost of assigning county employees to assist the Tribe in preparing to deal with natural disasters. Washington State Patrol was approved to receive $75,000 for costs associated with mitigating traffic safety issues on state highways impacted by casino patrons.

Partnering to improve local transportation Partnering with local jurisdictions to improve local transportation, in the past six years the Tribe has spent more than $35 million on transportation projects and traffic safety services in neighboring areas. These are largely done in collaboration with state and local governments to benefit the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growing traffic infrastructure, which helps everyone. Projects range from lighting and safety improvements, to bridges and reconstruction projects, providing hundreds of jobs to local engineers, tradesmen, environmental and cultural resource consultants, construction contractors, and the like. Examples of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expenditures over the past six years to completed and ongoing projects include: 30th Street Safety Project, Tacoma Paving, lighting, ADA access, replacement of sidewalks on both sides of 30th Avenue from Portland Avenue to R Street, and one side of 31st Avenue, including relocation of public utilities. Permitted through the City of Tacoma. The project was completed spring of 2013. 31st Street Rehabilitation Project, Tacoma Funds will go towards repavement, establish curb and stormwater facilities, street trees, and relocation of public utilities. Permitted through the City of Tacoma, the project is in the design and engineering

phase and is slated to begin in summer 2014. Wilkeson Hatchery Access Roads Project Rehabilitation and stabilization of an unpaved road critical for fisheries access. Amenities include paving the road, building retaining walls, fencing and lighting. Project was completed fall 2013. Grandview Avenue/East R Street Construction Project, Tacoma This project involved construction of an access road off of Grandview Avenue for the Grandview Learning Center due to safety concerns related to increased traffic projections, and includes installation of a storm water conveyance system from Grandview Avenue to 32nd Street. In 2009, activities related to this project Workers construct an access road off of Grandview Avenue for the Grandview Learning Center. included preliminary engineering, of federal, state and local government Tribal staff has worked with WSDOT design, NEPA, right of way and completion agencies to plan and administer transregarding HOV improvements on I-5. of plans for the access road. The stormwater portation projects in the region. conveyance has been installed, and the project Â&#x2021; East Side Community Projects: Tribal Â&#x2021; Inspection Services: The Puyallup staff is working with the City of was completed in September 2012. Tribe pays for City of Tacoma Tacoma with respect to long-range inspectors for both the R Street and transportation planning involving sevTransportation Planning and Grandview projects, fees to exceed eral city streets. Collaboration with State and Local $100,000. Â&#x2021; Additional Transportation Planning Governments and Administration: Tribal staff Â&#x2021; I-5 HOV Project, Tacoma and Fife: works in collaboration with a number

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.


Sports

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SI DE

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, MAY 23, 2014

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 7

PUYALLUP NATION KINGS KICK-OFF REGULAR SEASON

BY THRASHING REIGNING CHAMPS

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

TITAN TIME. (Top) Much of the Titans’

championship hopes will ride on the right arm of freshman Justin Vernia and his 0.90 ERA. (Bottom) Despite recent struggles, TCC still brings the best record into the NWAACC finals at 37-6.

TCC REKINDLES WINNING WAYS AND EARNS PLAYOFF BERTH By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

A second-year franchise opens the regular season against the 2013 league champion, and one would expect they would be in for a battle, perhaps even taking it on the chin. Instead, the visiting champs found themselves in for a world of hurt May 17 at Chief Leschi Stadium. From the opening whistle to game’s end, the Washington Cavaliers were manhandled by the Puyallup Nation Kings and suffered a 68-7 defeat that signaled perhaps a changing of the guard for this year’s Western Washington Football Alliance season. As the score would suggest, the game was never close. The only time the Cavaliers seemed to get the better of the Kings was when the home team would shoot themselves in the foot by playing a little too loose and turn the ball over three times, which still yielded no points for Washington but at the least kept additional Kings points off of the scoreboard. On the other hand, the Kings turned Cavalier turnovers into points throughout the game, converting four out of six Washington turnovers into 21 points. Just over five minutes into the first quarter, the point barrage began when running back Donald McKee broke through an opening inside and rambled 13-yards for a 7-0 Kings lead. Puyallup began the three-play drive at the Cavalier 15-yard line after Marquise Henry intercepted Washington quarterback Mike Beasley at the 44-yard line and returned the ball 29 yards. After giving up zero yards on the next possession, Kings linebacker Kevin Graves blocked Michael Carlson’s punt and Puyallup was in business at the Cavalier 25-yard line. Two plays later, Kings quarterback Justin Southern had his eyes on the end zone and was picked-off by Cedric Ward who returned the ball to the 11-yard line. For most of the game, when dropping back to pass, the Cavaliers’ Beasley was under constant pressure and harassment. Ty Satiacum put him on his back for a two-yard loss to open the next drive followed by two incompletions where Beasley had Kings hitting him and hanging all over him. It was a wonder, both times, how he had gotten

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

SMOKED. (Top) Chris McCutchin kicks it into another gear for the Kings.

(Middle Left) Filbert Ford got in a few licks against his former teammates. (Middle Right) Darius Dennis welcomes Cavalier quarterback Mike Beasley to Chief Leschi Stadium. (Bottom) Isiah Syph would not be denied on this first quarter touchdown run.

rid of the ball. Following a 29-yard punt by Carlson out of bounds, the Kings went back to work at the 43-yard line. The Kings pounded the ball inside and outside seven times during the nine-play drive culminating in Isiah Syph’s five-yard touchdown, dragging defenders across the goal-line. Kings led 14-0 with 1:24 remaining in the first quarter. Shortly before the end of the first quarter, Chris McCutchin fielded a 38-yard punt by Carlson and returned it 27 yards to the Washington 33-yard line. Two plays and a Cavalier personalfoul penalty later, Southern hit a wideopen Joe Nagele for a 19-yard touchdown at the start of the second quarter. Kings were up 20-0 after the missed extra point by kicker Ryan Burks. On the next Cavaliers possession, Graves intercepted Beasley and Burks got redemption by drilling a 32-yard field goal through the uprights and the Kings went up 23-0. Ward fumbled the ensuing kick-off and four plays later Burks kicked a 40-yard field goal and

a 26-0 Kings led with 9:05 remaining in the game. Beasley was running for his life on the next series and winged a ball down the sidelines, trying to dump it out of bounds. Monster linebacker Nick Noga had been tracking Beasley the entire way and the 6-3, 285-pound linebacker snatched the ball out of the air and got both feet inbounds before hitting the sidelines. Tempers and play were getting fierce as the Cavaliers saw the game running away from them and the Kings unwilling to slow their attack. Six plays after Noga’s interception, Southern fumbled the ball after a blindside hit by Washington’s Jordan Randall. Teammate Joseph Kury picked up the ball and sprinted down the sideline for a sure Cavaliers touchdown. However, as the cornerback made his way toward the end zone, he turned and began taunting the Kings offense at the ten-yard line. The touchdown was nullified, as Kury was hit with an unsportsmanlike penX See KINGS / page A10

It was do-or-die time Saturday, May 17 for the Tacoma Community College Titans. After spending most of the baseball season racking up winafter-win and gaining national attention in the junior college polls, the Titans fell back to earth at the end of the season dropping four of their last five games and inexplicably surrendering the NWAACC West Region title to Pierce College. Now they faced a weekend-tilt against conference rival Lower Columbia for the final seed to the NWAACC championships. Winner moves on and the loser wonders how it all slipped away. It was the same Lower Columbia team two weeks prior that had snapped TCC’s nation-best 27-game winning streak. With his two best pitchers set to take the mound, Titans coach Ryan Mummert was hoping his club was going to be able to catch the spark again that had set the Titans on fire for most of the season; turning them into a scoring machine and rendering their pitching staff nearly untouchable. In game one of the Saturday doubleheader, Mummert rolled out his ace pitcher Justin Vernia and the freshman right-hander came out shaky before settling down. In the first inning, Vernia sent the first two batters down but then gave up a single to Trevor Lane. Lane advanced to second base on a balk by Vernia and scored on another single by Justin Jacobs. Vernia closed out the first by striking out Mason Dunning and Lower Columbia wouldn’t touch home plate again until the fifth. Meanwhile, TCC tagged pitcher Tanner Olson for runs in the second and third innings to take a 2-1 lead into the fifth. JJ Pino scored from second on a throwing error in the first and Josh Latta scored from third on an RBI single from CJ Hicks in the second. Vernia started the top of the fifth inning by hitting Ansel Webster with a pitch, who subsequently advanced to second base on a wild pitch. Lane brought Webster home with an RBI single and the game was tied 2-2 going into the bottom of the fifth inning. Joel Moore led off the inning for TCC with a single, and two batters later CJ Hicks came through again with another RBI single scoring Moore and TCC led 3-2. TCC tacked on two more runs in the sixth inning via RBI singles from Derik Bontempo and Latta to go up 5-2. Vernia was in lockdown through the eighth inning, surrendering the mound before the ninth following another Titan run in the bottom of the eighth courtesy of a double by Brett Nielsen and a wild pitch by Olson that brought home the run for a 6-2 TCC lead. Lower Columbia made it interesting in the ninth inning putting together a couple of hits, some good base-running and a throwing error by Hicks to tag relief pitcher Ryota Koiwai for two runs. Quinn Eldridge relieved Koiwai and put the game to bed and earned the save. Vernia earned his tenth win of the season (10-0), giving up just two earned-runs while striking out seven batters and saw his earned-run average actually rise to 0.90. In the second game, Mummert sent his second ace pitcher Joey Gamache to the mound and the big sophomore lefty brought his A-game in the 8-2 TCC victory. Gamache pitched a complete

X See TCC / page A10


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TACOMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HOT TICKETS MAY 23-JUNE 1

FRIDAY MAY 23 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; TRACK AND FIELD West Central District 2A/3A Meet Sunset Stadium, Sumner â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:30 p.m.

-90+(@4(@Âś.093:-(:;70;*/

West Central District 2A/3A Fastpitch Tournament Sprinker Fields, Spanaway Bonney Lake .vs. Wilson - Noon Winner .vs Prairie â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4 p.m. Loser .vs. TBA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6 p.m. Tyee or White River .vs. Fife â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 p.m.

FRI MAY 23 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MON MAY 26 ;9073,()(:,)(33

Reno Aces .vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Times Vary

SATURDAY MAY 24 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; TRACK AND FIELD

West Central District 2A/3A Meet Sunset Stadium, Sumner â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Field 9 a.m./Track 1 p.m.

:(;<9+(@4(@Âś)6@:)(:,)(33

4A Region III H.S. Baseball Championship Heidelberg Field â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Semis @ 10 a.m & 1 p.m. Title Game to Follow

:(;<9+(@4(@Âś)6@:)(:,)(33 1B Region I H.S. Baseball Championship Curtis H.S. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Semis @ 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Title Game to Follow

SATURDAY MAY 24 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MENS SOCCER

Vancouver Victory FC .vs. South Sound FC Harry Lang Stadium, Lakewood â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7 p.m.

SUNDAY MAY 25 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MENS SOCCER

Puget Sound Gunners .vs. Sounders U-23 Sunset Stadium, Sumner â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 p.m.

TUE MAY 27 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FRI MAY 30 ;9073,()(:,)(33

Salt Lake Bees .vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Times Vary

>,+4(@ ;/<9: Âś:;(;,/:.632A Boys @ Chambers Bay, University Place 2A Girls @ The Classic, Spanaway 1A Boys & Girls @ Lake Spanaway G.C. 1B/2B Boys & Girls @ Oakbrook, Lakewood

T/<9::(;4(@ Âś;9(*2(5+-0,3+ 2A/3A/4A State Track Meet Mount Tahoma Stadium â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Times Vary

FRIDAY MAY 30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MENS SOCCER

Vancouver Whitecaps U-23 .vs. Sounders U-23 Sunset Stadium, Sumner â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7 p.m.

:(;<9+(@4(@Âś>>-(-66;)(33 NW Cardinals .vs. Puget Sound Outlaws Harry Lang Stadium, Lakewood â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5 p.m.

Snohomish County .vs. Puyallup Nation Kings Chief Leschi Stadium â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6 p.m. Cowlitz Blackhawks .vs. Pierce County Bengals Sunset Stadium, Sumner â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6 p.m.

:<5+(@1<5,Âś4,5::6**,9

Bellingham United .vs. Puget Sound FC Harry Lang Stadium, Lakewood â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 p.m.

;(*64(>,,23@*64:769;:

7,5(3;@:/66;6<;:(9,56

FRIEND OF TACOMA SOCCER TEAMS By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

Chances seemed better-than-fair that a Tacoma boys soccer team was going to make it through the district tournaments this year and perhaps even make some noise in the state tournament. With three teams advancing from the 3A Narrows and another from the 4A Narrows, the odds must have been favoring Tacoma getting into the mix. As the scores rolled in Thursday, May 15, it read like some sort of twisted joke. One forgets about penalty shootouts during the regular season because matches end in ties prior to the playoffs. Four Tacoma teams took to the pitch in the opening round of the district playoffs and three went down with the loss via the penalty shootout. After regulation play ends in the playoff there are two sudden death, or â&#x20AC;&#x153;golden goal,â&#x20AC;? overtime periods of five minutes. If the teams are still tied after overtime, they will face-off in a five-shot penalty shootout. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the most exciting happenings in all of sports â&#x20AC;&#x201C; unless you happen to be from Tacoma this season. Mount Tahoma was the first to feel the sting of the shootout against Auburn Mountainview at Franklin Pierce Stadium. For the better part of the season, the Thunderbirds had played every game close, gave up very few goals (16) and turned it on in the last weeks of the season to gain the fourth seed from the Narrows into the playoffs. The big problem for Mount Tahoma this season was its ability to turn an easy goal into a head-scratching miss on a consistent basis. Armed with possibly the most athletic team in the 3A Narrows, the Thunderbirds made it to the post season on grit and determination, and with as few goals as possible (26 through 15 matches). Facing Auburn Mountainview, the Thunderbirds put X See SOCCER/ page A10

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

MISFIRE (Top) Eric Musica (left) and the Lions

would fall prey to the penalty shootout following the Gig Harbor showdown. (Above) MTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tony Nguyen (left) and Ivan Dimov (back) put the squeeze on Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kenneth Bwanika.

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SPORTSWATCH LADY ABES AND LADY LIONS ADVANCE TO DISTRICT TENNIS TOURNEYS

PHOTO BY JUSTIN GIMSE

HOT SHOT. Forty-five minutes later, Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Scott Diaz would end his high school career with an 80-yard Eagle on the 18th hole.

TACOMA GOLFERS MAKE MOST OF LAST-CHANCE DISTRICT ROUND By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

In most high school sports, the district playoffs or tournament is a stepping stone for the best-of-the-best to earn their spot in the state tournament. When it comes to the game of golf, the district tournament stands as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;last chanceâ&#x20AC;? for golfers that, for whatever reason, were unable to make it past their league tournaments. So while many of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best 4A and 3A golfers had the day off, 126 golfers took to the links at Bremertonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gold Mountain Golf Course Monday morning May 19. On the line were a handful of state-berths and, as was expected, the kids from Bellarmine were the cream of the crop. Bellarmineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lisa Zelasko was the medal winner and top qualifier for the 4A girls shooting a four-over-par round of 75. Zelasko will join five other Lady Lions who already qualified for state last week at the 4A Narrows tournament. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have been state champs the last four years and I do have all of my girls returning for this tourney,â&#x20AC;? said Bellarmine girls head coach Mark Bender. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Golf is a funny game but I would think we are the favorites going into next week. If they all play to their ability, we have a great chance of regaining the title.â&#x20AC;? On the boys side, Bellarmine finished at the top with Brett Manke shooting an even-par round of 72, followed by teammate Collin Bordeoux in second with a

73. Stadiumsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Michael Sibbett grabbed the fifth qualifying spot with a round of 78. Sibbettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brother Steve missed the cut by one stroke with an 82, while teammate Sam Malthsen also finished close with an 84. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brett and Collin played very good rounds at Gold Mountain considering the situation of making to state or not,â&#x20AC;? said Bellarmine boys coach Steve George. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They responded how I thought they would. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With them making state yesterday along with the four others that made it at league, I think we put ourselves in a position to make a run at the state title.â&#x20AC;? Another impressive showing was put in by Wilson sophomore Ethan Preston who shot an 88, followed by Fossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jacob Royâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s round of 91. Roy scorched the back-nine for score of 40, but was unable to overcome his front-nine 51. Wilson senior Scott Diaz couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t shake off a rough start to the day and struggled through a round of 104. However, the team captain of the Rams saved the best for last as he approached the eighteenth green and sunk an 80-yard chip for Eagle on the final swing of his high school career. The state golf tournaments will be held Wednesday and Thursday, May 28 and 29. The 4A boys are at Camas Meadows Golf Course, while the girls will play Club Green Meadows in Vancouver. The 3A boys will play Tri-Mountain Golf Course in Ridgefield, while the girls do battle at Lewis River Golf Course in Woodland.

The Lincoln junior doubles team of Lilly Le and Miriam Cabrera return to the playoffs after their surprise run to the State 3A tennis tournament in 2013. The Lady Abes will square-off against Avery Corcoran and Aine Dempseyâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Horstman from Kennedy Catholic at 8:30 a.m. in the opening round of the West Central District tournament at Auburn-Mountainview High School. The winners will play at 10 a.m. and the losing team plays at Noon. The semifinals and championship will take place on Saturday with a total of five teams earning state tournament berths. Bellarmine freshman sensation Rachel Katashina faces another freshman, Avery Leining of Todd Beamer, in opening round Singles play at the 4A West Central District tournament at Capitol City Court Club in Olympia. The pair will face-off Friday May 23 at 8 a.m. with the winner moving to the quarterfinals at Noon and the loser entering the consolation bracket also at Noon. The Lady Lions doubles team of senior Megan Yates and junior Mia Smith will play Megan Charlton and Kathryn Araki of Kentwood at 9:15 a.m. Winners and losers move-on to play at 1:30 p.m. The WCD will send seven players/teams to the state 4A tournament.

LIFE CHRISTIAN / CHARLES >90./;*64)67<5*/,: FIRST TICKET TO STATE

Fielding a team from two schools has moved beyond an experiment and has become a success for Life Christian and Charles Wright baseball. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;? earned the fourth seed out of the 1A

Tri-District and will face Woodland in the 1A round of 16 at Castle Rock High School Saturday May 24 at 1 p.m. The winner will play afterward in the quarterfinals with a trip to the state semifinals May 30 in Yakima on the line.

THREE LUTES SET FOR NATIONAL */(47065:/07:>/03,65, 36..,94(2,:;/,7(9;@

Pacific Lutheran will be sending three athletes to the NCAA D-III Track and Field Championships May 22-24 at Ohio-Wesleyan University in Delaware, Ohio. Senior Kyle Peart makes his thirdstraight appearance at nationals in the hammer throw. The former Wilson Ram currently rates twelfth coming into the event following his career-best mark of 189-4 set at the NWC conference championships where he placed second. Samantha Potter will be making her second national appearance in the discus. The senior Lute is ranked sixteenth nationally with a season-best mark of 145-3. Potter also placed second at the NWC championships. Teammate Stephanie McFarland will be making her first appearance at the national meet in the javelin. The senior ranks nineteenth nationally with a career-best throw of 137-0 set at the Washington Open on April 12. The lone Logger going to nationals is also one of the youngest. Sophomore Allanah Whitehall is a two-time NWC conference champion in the 100 meter dash and ranks nineteenth nationally with a time of 12.15. Teammate Alicia Burns missed the national cut for the 800 meter run by .05 seconds with a seasonbest time of 2:13:00. The senior was the NWC champion in the 800.

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From page A7

From page A7

game, giving up just two runs while scattering seven hits as the Titans brought in six runs in the bottom of the eighth inning to break a 2-2 tie and crush any hopes for Lower Columbia, extending the series to a game three on Sunday. The victory moved Gamache to 8-2 on the season with a 2.26 ERA. TCC (37-6) will play Treasure Valley Community College (34-10), winners of the NWAACC East Region in the opening round of the eight-team, roundrobin, double-elimination championship tournament Thursday, May 22 at David Story Field in Longview, Wash. at 12:35 p.m. West Region champion Pierce College (27-11) opens play against Columbia Basin (28-15) at 7:35 p.m. The tournament runs from Thursday until Monday when the NWAACC Champion will be crowned. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re proud to represent Tacoma and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll play hard,â&#x20AC;? said Mummert. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know our guys want to win it all and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our ultimate goal.â&#x20AC;?

WSoccer From page A8

in a full 80 minutes of textbook defense and another 10 minutes of overtime; shutting down and shutting out the Lions. When it came time for the penalty shootout, Mount Tahoma (6-8-1) just couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find the net, missing each shot while the

alty, and the Cavaliers offense had to start at the 25-yard line. The Kings defense pushed Washington back to the 36-yard line and forced the Cavaliers to turn the ball over on downs. With 3:40 remaining in the second quarter, the Kings followed by engineering an eight-play, 71-yard drive capped by a fouryard scamper by Syph. The Kings entered halftime with a 32-0 lead. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had a couple of wrinkles and we figured it out at halftime,â&#x20AC;? said defensive tackle Ty Satiacum. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We changed up our blocking schemes and we got on the white board and figured out who we were going to pick up on blitzes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We came out and showed it to them in the second half.â&#x20AC;? The Cavaliers offense opened the second half, much like the first; going backward or nowhere. After Carlson was stuffed on an ill-advised fake punt, the Kings took over at the Washington 15-yard line. Southern wasted no time getting the Kings back on the scoreboard, taking the first snap and hitting tight-end Ian Peterson in-stride up

Lions put in three and took the win. Up next for the penalty shootout night of misery was 4A Bellarmine squaring-off against Federal Way at Sparks Stadium. Bellarmine took a commanding 3-0 lead into the locker room at halftime only to be bombarded in the second half for four goals â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including a hat trick by Federal Wayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garrett Brewer.

The Lions went up 4-3 with five minutes to play only to have Brewer tie things up three minutes later. After a scoreless two overtimes, Bellarmine (7-6-2) was bitten by the penalty shootout and would muster just two goals to the Eagles four. Not to be outdone, 3A Narrows champion Wilson had their cleats full with a tough opening-round match-up against Kennedy Catholic who had just knocked-off top-ranked Bonney Lake to get into the match. Kennedy drew first blood midway through the first half and held-off

the middle and the Kings led 39-0. The highlight of the Cavaliersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; night was to follow. Capitalizing on four Kings penalties and the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first and second first-downs of the game, Beasley orchestrated a 17-play, 64-yard drive that chewed nearly nine minutes off the clock when running back Pat Groom ran it in from three yards out. The Kings lead had shrunk to 39-7. While the shutout was gone, the rout was anything but over when Southern connected with Nagele again for an 18-yard scoring strike. Nagele took a short pass near the right hash mark, juked toward the inside and burst back to the outside, beating the Cavalier defenders to the right pylon. The Kings led 45-7 with 1:23 left in the third quarter. The Kings followed-up a quick threeand-out Cavaliers possession with an eightyard touchdown run by McCutchin and a 52-7 lead. Beasley was picked-off three plays later by cornerback Sergio Brown who returned the ball 52 yards for a touchdown. Southern hit Ejai Curran in the flat for the two-point conversion and the score was 60-7 Kings with 11:28 to play in the game. Puyallup never let-up on either side of the ball and put one more touchdown on the the high-scoring Rams until Munassar Saleh punchedin the equalizer goal three minutes before the end of regulation. The teams battled to a draw through the overtime periods and Kennedy was a perfect five-for-five on penalty kicks while Wilson (10-7) could manage just three. The silver-lining was fact that Wilson would have another shot the following Saturday since they were the 3A Narrows champion and not playing a loser-out match. Foss was the bright spot for Tacoma in this district darkness. Facing a loser-



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out match against Hazen, the Falcons took care of business in regulation dropping the Highlanders by the score of 4-3 powered by two goals from 2014 3A Narrows co-MVP Jose Ramos. With the win, Foss moved to the fifth-seed to state/loser-out match on Saturday, May 17 against Auburn Mountainview, while Wilson would play in the fourth-seed/loser-out match against Mountain View. Both were early-day matches at Highline Stadium in Burien and both teams fell in regulation and for different reasons. Foss coach Mark Kramer sensed his team was off early on and never shookoff whatever it was that was slowing them down, as the high-scoring Falcons (9-2-2) were shutout by the Lions 2-0. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought we were a better team but for whatever reason it was not working for us Saturday,â&#x20AC;? said Kramer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Their goalie had

some great blocks on some shots that we had. It was an off day and you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have off days when you get to the last round.â&#x20AC;? Wilson coach Jason Gjertsen saw his team face a big and physical team in Mountain View. Outsized and outmuscled, the Rams dropped a heartbreaker 4-3 and Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s post-season dreams would have to wait until next spring. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were probably the most physical team we saw all year,â&#x20AC;? said Gjertsen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were in some battles this year, but we hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen a team that physical on and away from the ball. We went into the half down 3-1. The refs were letting it play and we were just rattled and more worried about the ref. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had to go in and regroup at the half and I thought we came out and pretty much dominated the whole second half. I think the other than their goal they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have another shot on goal and that was on a deflection.â&#x20AC;?

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board when Southern connected with Reggie Woods for a 19-yard score with 0:49 remaining. Former Cavalier Filbert Ford capped the pounding with a 2-yard run up the middle for the two-point conversion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Today was more about starting the season out right,â&#x20AC;? said Kings offensive coordinator Derrick Smith. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We came out to take care of business. No matter who the opponent is weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do what we have to do. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not taking our foot off the gas. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to scoreâ&#x20AC;Ś weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to scoreâ&#x20AC;Ś weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to score.â&#x20AC;? Defensively, the Kings (1-0) gave up a total of 34 yards on 45 plays. The Cavaliers (0-1) leading rusher was Mike George who carried the ball one time for five yards. Beasley was held in-check throughout, completing just four passes on 23 attempts for 15 yards and four interceptions. Justin Southern finished the night with 215 yards passing, going 15-for-28 with four touchdowns and one interception. Nine Kings ran the ball, led by McCutchinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eight carries for 54 yards and Donald McKee with 40 yards on two carries. For the game, the Kings gained 171 yards on 37 carries. The Kings return to WWFA action May 31 as they host the Snohomish County Vikings for a 6 p.m. kick-off at Chief Leschi Stadium.

 

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WE.T. From page A1

have been sending him their prayers, energy and wishes for a good recovery. E.T., who is 32, seemed lethargic and began refusing food the week of May 12, said zoo spokeswoman Kris Sherman. That, said head veterinarian Dr. Karen Wolf, is the behavior of an animal that does not feel well. The veterinary staff tried to use an ultrasound to help identify the problem, but the machine could not get a proper image of the interior of 3,350-pound blubber-based creature. Based on his blood work, they believe he is suffering from an infection. They moved him to a private area behind the scenes at Rocky Shores, the home he has shared with female walruses Joan and Basilla since they arrived in 2006 Meanwhile, on Point Defiance Zoo & Aquariumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook page, messages, memories and encouragement to walrus and staff piled up by the hundreds. Heather Toomey sent up a prayer for him: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dear Heavenly Father, please bless this loving, kind and gentle creature! Please help him to feel better very soon, and please bless and guide those taking care of him to make him better! Amen... Thank you for the updates, please keep them coming. E.T. is like a member of our family as well as a member of soooo many other peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s families...We love you, E.T.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh, E.T., please get well soon, buddy! You are the reason I decided to pursue a career in biology. Praying for a recovery,â&#x20AC;? wrote Krista Little. â&#x20AC;&#x153;E.T. is as old as I am, and ever since I can remember, when my family and I would drive down from Forks to come see my aunt and uncle in Tacoma, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d always go to the zoo. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been lucky enough to be sprayed by him many times,â&#x20AC;? wrote Christine Murphy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Prayers that he has a very speedy recovery and thank you for taking such great care of him.â&#x20AC;?

Ron Adamson recalled E.T.s first day on display: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was working there the day he arrived. We were working on the red wolf enclosure and would call E.T.!!! And he would answer...â&#x20AC;? John B. Donovan wrote: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Positive energy and herring to you, E.T. Miss swimming with you, buddy. Get well!â&#x20AC;? Jessica Bauml pleased, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh, E.T. Please get well soon. You are my favorite buddy at the zoo.â&#x20AC;? Leandra Bogartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son has a special bond with the car-sized mammal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh, no,â&#x20AC;? she wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We LOVE E.T. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a must-see when we go. Every time we go, my oldest son, who has severe autism, likes to lean over by the netting, and E.T. makes noises at him every single time. Special moment.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;My heart goes out to the vet staff and E.T.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s keepers. I personally know how much they care for him and how difficult it is to watch their â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;babyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; become ill, the feeling of helplessness at times is overwhelming. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also seen this staff overcome great odds and save lives of endangered animals. E.T. couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be in better hands. Hoping for a smooth recovery, so the sleepless nights are kept to a minimum,â&#x20AC;? J.K. and Grady Gilmartin posted. Crystal Engstrom was planning a permanent tribute to the walrus before he fell ill. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh sad,â&#x20AC;? she wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;E.T. is representative of my childhood, and I have an appointment to get a tattoo of him on Saturday.â&#x20AC;? E.T. has been a zoo star from the start, when the tale of his rescue and recovery was front page news. In 1982, the members of a Conoco drilling crew near Alaskaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s North Slope spotted a dot, a tiny walrus in the distance. They did what every wildlife biologist wished we all would: They left him alone and observed him, hoping his mother would return for him. She did not. After they had documented his three miles of waddling over the tundra for two days they notified

the pros. U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologists and Alaska Zoo staff came to the rescue of the infant, frail at a mere 155 pounds. At the zooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infirmary, keepers persuaded him to feed from a bottle. He was a wizened little critter who made weird noises and bonded with his helpers. That same year, a similar creature was earning millions for Steven Spielberg. Naming the walrus E.T. after the cinematic extraterrestrial was pretty much inevitable. The world of zoos is well connected, and the Alaskans knew that the people of Tacoma had paid for a new exhibit at Point Defiance. Rocky Shores, which opened that fall, was built to teach us about the creatures of the continentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s northwestern coastal waters. E.T. began his life in Tacoma behind the scenes, feeding on whipping cream, chopped clams and vitamins until he was sturdy enough to swim and bask in the exhibit and dine on a balanced diet of herring squid, mackerel, clams and capelin. His keepers say that, in technical terms, E.T. is a love, a sweetheart, laid back, the best walrus ever. And smart. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll flop onto the scale to be weighed, lie still to give blood samples, present his teeth to be brushed. (His tusks had a history of infection, so they were removed a few years ago.) He looks at his visitors, flaps and flops and has earned his place as one of the zooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s icons. He also has contributed to serious research. Keeper Lisa Triggs has cared for him for 18 years and studied his hormones and breeding behavior for seven, though he has not fathered a calf with any of what zoo staff technically refer to as his girlfriends. Triggs wrote her masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thesis on her research. Another scientist keeps records of E.T.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s girth measurements for a study on climate change. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s valuable information, as the three Point Defiance walruses are three of only 19 Pacific walruses in accredited U.S. zoos and aquariums.

E.T. has lived at the zoo longer than any other mammal there, Sherman said. There are elephants that are older, but they came to Point Defiance as adults. And there may be rockfish in the aquarium that are in their 30s, she said. But it is the rare rockfish that enchants at first meeting, as E.T. can, and has done over three decades. Teens who mugged at him when he was but a calf grew up and told their kids how adorable he is. Now those kids are explaining to their children that E.T. is sick, and we all hope he gets better soon.

FACEBOOK FRIENDS SHARE THEIR LOVE Here is a sampling of the messages sent to E.T. on Point Defiance Zoo & Aquariumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook page. â&#x20AC;&#x153;E.T is so friendly! I met him in 1986 or 1987 when I did a story for the local paper. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s curious and you just know heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a lot going on in that big head of his. Get well!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bob Fuller â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you leave us, you big goofball. Too many of us love you dearly. Hang in there.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kathleen Smith â&#x20AC;&#x153;No, no, no... Not my E.T. He is my favorite. Prayers will be said tonight.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Starlight Johnson â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tears in eyes....I love that walrus... have seen him since I was young, so 25+ years... my prayers go to him and his family (caregivers).â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Melena Gillihan â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just one of a lot of people who are thinking about him & hope he gets better soon.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Edie Vargas

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tepping into North Point Bar and Grill is like stepping back in time. Not only does the ability to smoke indoors give it an old school vibe, but the ability to walk into a bar where everyone knows your name may remind some of a certain 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bar. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We knew smoking inside would be big,â&#x20AC;? owner William Manzanares said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our menu side we focused on.â&#x20AC;? North Point Bar and Grill offers different daily specials seven days a week. Mondays are a burger and fries for $3.50, Tuesday Tacos, two for $2, and 50 cent wings on Saturdays. Thursdays offer a chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choice for a special, a unique concoction only available on that day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even like carrot cake and [a cook] made one from scratch, and I was like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;oh my God,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Manzanares said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We allow [the cooks] to have their own creativity.â&#x20AC;? Working from scratch is a reoccurring theme at North Point. â&#x20AC;&#x153;How many restaurants do you know that make their own buns? Their own burgers? Their own fries?â&#x20AC;? Manzanares said, emphasizing that North Point does all three. Other items at North Point Bar and Grill include breakfast options, highlighted by the North Point Pancake Stack â&#x20AC;&#x201C; buttermilk pancakes stacked four high for $4. French toast, eggs and a build-your-own omelet selection round out the breakfast items. A variety of sub and deli sandwiches are on the lunch menu, including the Philly sub â&#x20AC;&#x201C; sliced Angus beef, grilled bell peppers, onions, cream cheese and

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Swiss cheese for $8 for a six-inch, $13 for a foot long. Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pick is the barâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bacon cheeseburger for $9. Avoiding the soggy bacon, too often found on restaurant burgers, North Pointâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bacon is as crisp as a morning breakfast. The other side of the equation is the customers that give North Point a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cheersâ&#x20AC;?-like, homey vibe. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a neighborhood bar where everyone knows your name within the first week, â&#x20AC;&#x153; bartender Jeanie McCarthy said. The atmosphere at North Point is what Manzanares relies on to keep customers coming back. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really who make the place. I may own it but Jeanie and our customers are what make it,â&#x20AC;? Manzanares said. One of those customers is regular Diana Resignalo, who has been frequenting the bar and grill for over six years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The management, the bartenders, the people in here are all family, Resignalo said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great.â&#x20AC;? North Point Bar and Grill is open from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days a week. For more information, call (253) 927-7767 or email www. northpointtacoma.com.

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City Life

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B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, MAY 23, 2014

SECTION B, PAGE 1

From punk in the park to half of the real Kiss, 21 ways to have fun in the sun this summer

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER NELSON

ROCK ON. Fans will enjoy scenic views this summer at the Gorge. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

S

ummer is still another month away, but summer concert and festival season kicks off this week with Sasquatch and Northwest Folklife festivals; and there are dozens of shows and festivals to choose from. Here is a cross section of some of the season’s hottest.

Sasquatch Festival

May 23 to 25 Gorge Amphitheatre, 754 Silica Rd., George For the 11th year in a row, thousands of pasty hipsters will migrate East, risking spontaneous combustion in the desert sun and death by Honey Bucket, all in the name of witnessing Washington’s hippest and most scenic music festival. (They might have done it twice this year, but a second, Fourth of July weekend Sasquatch got canceled after all those $550 festival passes were slow to sell. More on that in a bit.) Reunited hip-hop duo Outkast will headline the main stage on May 23, popular post-punk band The National is up last on May 24, and Queens of the Stone Age will bat cleanup on May 25 with tunes from last year’s brilliant “... Like Clockwork” disc. The supporting cast includes former Tacoma girl Neko Case, Foster the People, M.I.A., Maya Rudolph and tons more playing multiple stages and tents. A few threeday passes are still available at $325 a pop at www.ticketmaster.com. Find the full schedule at www.sasquatchfestival.com.

Northwest Folklife Festival

11 a.m. to 10 p.m., May 23 to 26 Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St., Seattle This event has showcased the evolving folk and ethnic traditions of the Pacific Northwest since 1972. Its 43rd installment will emphasize the traditions of east India and feature more than 5,000 performers, representing about 65 different cultures and communities. New this year are PaperStock Poster Show, featuring some of the Northwest’s best known silkscreen poster

artists, and a partnership with Seattle International Film Festival to show dozens of free films; www.nwfolklife.org.

Old Town Park Summer Concert Series

6:30 p.m. Wednesdays, starting June 4 Old Town Park, 2350 N. 30th St., Tacoma Nearby Treos will kick off a new weekly concert series with popular Tacoma singer-songwriter Kim Archer on Wednesday, June 4. “Our goal in creating this series is to offer the community a quality, live concert that is family friendly, right in the middle of the week,” says Treos owner Brad Carpenter. “We know that people are looking for a nice outdoor activity that the entire family can enjoy, without a lot of travel and expense; so we’re bringing some amazing artists to this nice outdoor venue to provide it to them.” Future performers will be listed at www.treoslife.com.

KUBE Summer Jam

7 p.m. June 6 and 2 p.m. June 7 Gorge Amphitheatre There are a few reasons to be stoked about Summer Jam, the yearly hip-hop gala that’s hosted by Seattle’s KUBE-FM (93.3): It’s back at the scenic Gorge and it has expanded to two days; it’s got an old-schoolheavy lineup that includes Ice Cube, Too Short and Seattle rap legend Sir Mix-ALot, who showed he still has it when he performed in February at Jazzbones; and day-two performer Kendrick Lamar is likely to unveil some new tunes, since he plans to drop the follow-up to his brilliant sophomore disc “Good Kid, m.A.A.d City” in September. The downer, though, is Chris Brown who continues to parlay, with chart-topping releases and high-profile gigs like this, since he used ex-girlfriend Rihanna as a punching bag back in 2009. Assuming you can get past that, two-day passes are available for $75 online at www.ticketmaster.com.

Paradiso Festival 2014

21-year-old Des Moines man died and dozens of others went to the hospital after taking the drug Molly. Headliners for the event’s third installment are Bassnectar, Above & Beyond, Zedd and Krewella; www.paradisofestival.com.

Vans Warped Tour

12:30 p.m. June 28 White River Amphitheatre, 40601 Auburn Enumclaw Rd., Auburn In its second year west of the Cascades, the Ozzfest of pop-punk will include Falling in Reverse, The Ghost Inside, The Story So Far, For Today, Stray From the Path, Air Dubai, Mixtapes and many more playing five – count ‘em – five stages. The action starts at 12:30 p.m. Tickets are $23.50 to $48.50 and come with a CD compilation of this year’s artists; www. vanswarpedtour.com.

Kiss and Def Leppard

7 p.m. June 29 White River Amphitheatre It’s been a pretty good spring for Kiss – well, half of the band, at least. The face paint enhanced quartet – Gene Simmons, Paul Stanley, Ace Frehley and Peter Criss – was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame last month. Then fans learned that Frehley and Criss wouldn’t be part of the band’s 40th anniversary tour, right around the time Stanley was throwing those guys under the bus in his new autobiography “Face the Music: A Life Exposed.” “Ace, and particularly Peter, felt powerless and impotent when faced with the tireless focus, drive and ambition of me and Gene,” Stanley wrote. “As a result, the two of them tried to sabotage the band — which, as they saw it, was unfairly manipulated by [us] money-grubbing Jews.” Yikes, at least the Def Leppard guys are still getting along. We think. Tickets are $79.50 to $159; www.ticketmaster.com.

225,000 hungry revelers to Point Defiance every year where they graze at dozens of booths that serve up everything from lasagna to lumpia. While they’re munching they can also enjoy live rock, jazz, R&B and comedy; cooking demos by TV Tacoma’s Amanda Westbrooke; wine tasting and more. Admission is free. Learn more at www.tasteoftacoma.com.

Freedom Fair

July 4 Ruston Way waterfront The Northwest’s biggest fireworks display will draw 100,000-plus to a twomile stretch of Ruston Way Waterfront on Fourth of July for music, air shows, food and more. Freedom Fair is put on by the non-profit Tacoma Events Commission, which suggests a donation of $2 to $15 to attend the event. Fans can also make donations online at www.freedomefair.com.

Rockstar Energy Drink Mayhem Festival

1 p.m. July 8 White River Amphitheatre Since Ozzy quit taking Ozzfest on the road, this has become America’s premiere showcase of heavy metal mayhem. This year’s tour features four stages of head-banging, eardrum-shredding action with Avenged Sevenfold, Korn, Asking Alexandria, Trivium, Cannibal Corpse and Suicide Silence among the biggest names. Tickets are $23.50 to $79.50; www.ticketmaster.com.

Art on the Ave

July 13 In its 16th year, Tacoma’s biggest street fair will take over Sixth Avenue, from Cedar to Trafton Streets, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. The full schedule is not out, but expect lots from some of Tacoma’s brightest, up-and-coming bands to play the D.O.A., O’Malley’s, Jazzbones and Sixth Avenue Community stages. Plus, the Grub Crawl Challenge is back, allowing Sixth Ave’s chefs to battle it out for bragging rights. Admission is free, and you can find updates at www.artontheave.org.

June 27 and 28 Gorge Amphitheatre This electronic dance event will hopefully be a lot safer than last year when a

Taste of Tacoma

ment and space. It features the B2 debut of artist Yakime A. Brown, artist Judy Hintz Cox, a retrospective of the late Chuck Smart and Dale ART BY YAKIME A. BROWN Chihuly glass from private collections. “Wet” shows through June 14.

on the Square June 6, at 7:30 p.m., June 7 at 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., and June 8 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $16, $48. Visit www.broadwaycenter.org.

Band performs a wide variety of works for wind band. June: TCC Jazz Band performs favorites and jazz standards. Visit www. tacomacc.edu.

FOUR

FIVE

June 27 to 29 Point Defiance Park, 5400 N. Pearl St., Ruston “The ultimate family picnic” draws

‹ See SUMMER / page B4

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE BABY STUFF!

Bump Club and Beyond presents Gearapalooza: The Ultimate Baby Gear and Registry Event on June 3, 6-9 p.m. at Tottini in Seattle, 258 Yale Ave. N. Gearapalooza is the ultimate baby gear and registry event for expectant and new parents. The event features a presentation by TheBabyGuy Jamie Grayson, Q&A, giveaways, in store discounts and goody bags for all attendees. Register at www. eventbrite.com. Info: Caitlin Giles at caitlin@2momsmedia.com or (773) 3838461.

TWO WET @ B2 B2 Fine Art Gallery, 711 St. Helens Ave., is currently showing a Jackson Pollockinspired collection of artwork exploring abstract expressionism in fluidity, move-

TCC CONCERTS

‘BYE BYE BIRDIE’

Tacoma Community College’s Spring Quarter Concerts are underway, all free and open to the public (donations accepted, 7:30 p.m. in the TCC Auditorium (Building 2), accessed from the college’s main 12th Street entrance. May 23: TCC Orchestra featuring piano soloist Dr. Amy Grinsteiner: Dello Joio’s “Air for Strings,” Mozart’s “Piano Concerto no. 9” and Frank’s “Symphony in d minor.” May 29: Dr. Anne Lyman and Djhan ChristosD’Arby lead the TCC choral groups featuring a wide variety of musical styles, with student soloists. May 30: TCC Symphonic

Rock star Conrad Birdie is the biggest thing to top the charts. Women love him, men want to be him and teenage girls around the country scream with glee at the mere mention of his name. But when the U. S. Army drafts Birdie, things spiral out of control in the most hilarious ways in this beloved stage musical. Plays at Tacoma Little Theatre on Fridays and Sundays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. through June 1. Visit www.tacomalittletheatre.com.

THREE MEN ARE FROM MARS… “Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus LIVE” is a one-man fusion of theatre and stand-up based on the New York Times No. 1 best-selling book of the last decade by John Gray. Starring Peter Story, the performance moves swiftly through a series of vignettes, covering everything from dating and marriage to the bedroom. This hysterical show will have couples elbowing each other all evening as they see themselves on stage. Sexy and fast paced, it is definitely for adults, but will leave audiences laughing and giggling like little kids. Plays at Theatre


Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 23, 2014

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Telsa rocked EQC DURING MAY 16 SHOW

PHOTOS BY GLEN CASEBEER

ACOUSTIC DUO. Steve Earle and Shawn Colvin played some of their biggest hits and the occasional cover may 16 at Urban Grace Church.

COLVIN AND EARLE CHARM URBAN GRACE AUDIENCE By Glen Casebeer Special to Tacoma Weekly

I

t can sometimes be little bit tough getting people to go to church on a nice Saturday night in late spring; unless of course you have two incredible performers like Shawn Colvin and Steve Earle on the marquee. Urban Grace Church - located on the corner of Ninth and Market streets - did just that with an evening of great music and storytelling in a beautiful and historic setting. The venue was about three quarters of the way full as the show began. As the light lowered, the two accomplished musicians walked out together to a healthy round of applause. The stage was bathed in a sea of red as they started things off with the Everly Brothers classic, “Wake Up Little Susie.” After the song finished, Colvin sat down and dreamily gazed up at Earle as he began to tell the first of his funny and personal stories. It was about handgun missing from his home several years ago, and he was pretty sure that his now famous musician son, Justin Townes Earle, then in his teens, had found it. The boy wouldn’t come clean, so Earle sent him off to a teenage boot camp where he had to sleep in tent - in January. Justin called at 4:30 a.m. the next day to tell his dad where the gun was. And don’t forget this is Steve Earle, so there may or may not have had an occasional F-Bomb thrown in. The crowd erupted in laughter, and the tone for the evening was set. It was clearly going to be about telling jokes, intimate details of their lives and, of course, playing good music. The gruff looking entertainer plucked and picked his way through many of his classic tunes and threw in a fantastic cover of Townes Van Zandt’s “Pancho and Lefty,” a hit for Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard. Colvin had a cover tune of her own planned and tossed into the blender a version of the mega-hit by Gnarls Barkley “Crazy.” She demonstrated her very fine guitar picking skills on the tune and her

version was top-notch. One of the highlights of the night for sure was “Burnin’ It Down,” a protest song from last year’s “The Low Highway” album. Earle played with plenty of emotion, and the song clearly has personal meaning to him. His emotion was palpable as he weaved the tale of his friend “Mr. Kim” in New York City and about all the mom and pop stores that are dying because of corporate greed. He has a lot to say, that’s for sure. Throughout the evening, Colvin and Earle took turns underneath the spotlight and sometimes would provide backing vocals with incredible harmonies for each other. They were having a blast as they played through their respective set lists, with each one seemingly really enjoying listening when the other was playing. Watching Colvin close her eyes as Earle strummed made us feel that she was just as into it as we all were. They also, played off each other fabulously, with plenty of good-natured ribbing. They are no doubt very good friends and adore each other. At one point, Earle was playing his bouzouki – a stringed, Greek instrument he sometimes uses - but it wasn’t plugged in. Colvin asked him about it after the song started, but he insisted all was good. About 20 seconds later, he noticed the instrument cable dangling and she quipped, “I told ya.” That drew more laughter from the attendees. Earle also mentioned that they are thinking about making a record together and if this show is any indication of what to expect from it, it will be fantastic. The last song of the night was the second song of the encore and Steve Earle saved his biggest hit for last. He jokingly said that he’d better play “Copperhead Road” if he planned on getting out of the venue alive. He and Colvin did a blistering rendition with her on the guitar and backing vocals, while Earle strummed his mandolin ferociously. The crowd was satisfied; and he, of course, got out of there alive.

Roaming Tacoma Weekly freelance music photographer Bill Bungard checked out Tesla’s sold-out show at the Emerald Queen Casino on Friday, May 16. Tesla, previously known at City Kidd, still delivered a solid show to fans after nearly 30 years on the road. With seven studio albums and many hit, singles the band is still worth the price of admission.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, May 23, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 3

Summer installations appear in Woolworth Windows

CULTURE CORNER

A GUIDE TO THE MUSEUMS OF TACOMA

Muesum of the Week:

By Dave R. Davison

Museum of Glass

dave@tacomaweekly.com

1801 Dock St. Wed.-Sat.,10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sun., noon to 5 p.m. Info: museumofglass.org

A

new crop of installations has made its appearance in Woolworth Windows, Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 24-hour, open-air art gallery situated at Broadway and South 11th Street. The summer exhibits will run through Aug. 21. Furthest north are two installations by Ellen Hochberg, a prolific Seattle-based artist who does fantastic drawings and paintings of leaves and organic forms. Her installations, however, are another animal altogether. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Educating Girls,â&#x20AC;? features a mannequin of an adolescent girl standing in front of picture frames that contain no pictures. A school desk with books is nearby. According to an artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s statement on the window glass, the piece is about the â&#x20AC;&#x153;invisibilityâ&#x20AC;? of girls and women in societies around the world. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Boxesâ&#x20AC;? is Hochbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other installation. Here there are electronic boxes with descriptive labels written on them: Straight, Female, American, White, Middle-Aged, etc. Hochberg examines how identity works and asks whether we are not more than the sum of our boxes? A good question, but Hochbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s installations are visually uninteresting. They also come across as preachy and literalistic. Next is Kristin Giordanoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s photo exhibit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Radiance.â&#x20AC;? Giordano tells of a drive along River Road and her discovery of the Radiance housing development that was plopped down in the middle of a wetland. Fascinated on a number of levels, Giordano made the tightly clustered houses the subject of a photographic series. The photos themselves are gauzy and dreamy with peculiar lighting effects. Giordano notes

This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s events:

MAY

2014

May 16 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 23 Museum Week Northwest

PHOTO BY KRISTIN GIORDANO

AMERICAN DREAM. Photographer Kristin

Giordanoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s images of the Radiance housing development are visually evocative while they pose a variety of social and environmental issues.

that the housing development is both attractive and repulsive. The cookie cutter facades mask the â&#x20AC;&#x153;slapdashâ&#x20AC;? quality of the construction. The buildersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; scheme to erect structures as quickly and cheaply as possible in the middle of a wetland is apt to provoke outrage in the viewer of these innocentlooking images. Moving on, we come to the large-sized, linoleum block prints that were done via steamroller at last Aprilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wayzgoose print festival. (See Tacoma Weekly issue April 25, 2014.) The striking display of the steamroller prints has become an annual tradition: a cross-pollination between Wayzgoose festival and Woolworth Windows. Tacoma artist Chris Sharp did a large profile skull while the Cartoonistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; League of Absurd Washingtonians (CLAW) contributed an image of a head in a jar: a pipe-smoking, visorwearing man with cranium removed and brains showing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zombies Must Die,â&#x20AC;? reads the print. Students of the Pacific Lutheran University printed an image of a

scuba diver meeting up with a giant octopus. A number of the prints celebrate Tacoma and some of our local landmarks. The collaborative print made the dynamic duo of Jessica Spring and Chandler Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary is a two-color print that lists and depicts a number of our public parks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Green Keeps Tacoma Green,â&#x20AC;? says the print. An accordion book painted by Tacoma art genius Jeremy Gregory is stretched out on the floor beneath the prints. Down around the corner is Christian Frenchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Atlantis, Full of Cheer,â&#x20AC;? a reprise of the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2012 installation of the same name that appeared in Seattleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Storefrontsâ&#x20AC;? program. French refers to his installations as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Object Theater.â&#x20AC;? Figurines and broken glass form an arctic diorama of an Eskimo in a kayak with glass penguins. Various lighting effects make the display more spectacular at night. Presumably the artist will be changing the scenario throughout the span of the exhibit so that a crypto-drama will unfold over time.

During Museum Week Northwest, Museum of Glass will be one of more than 30 museums in the Puget Sound offering two for one admission! Many of the participating museums are using the STQRY app during Museum Week. The app allows visitors to scan QR codes located throughout museums, which offer a variety of unique stories that can only be accessed using STQRY. Download STQRY on your iPhone or Android to enhance your Museum of Glass experience during Museum Week Northwest!

May 23, 12-1 p.m. The Hot Shop Live Show with Preston Singletary

On Friday, May 23, Museum of Glass will broadcast its pilot webisode series, The Hot Shop Live Show. Visitors are invited to take a seat in the Hot Shop as hosts Greg Owen, Hot Shop emcee, and Katie Phelps, Visiting Artist Coordinator, discuss the work of Preston Singletary, who will be creating pieces for his upcoming exhibition, Raven and the Box of Daylight, during the entirety of the broadcast. The show will also include special guests Swil Kanim and Jeffery Veregge who will discuss various viewpoints and provide additional context for the work being created. Swil Kanim, a classically trained violinist, native storyteller and actor, is a member of the Lummi Tribe. The work of Jeffrey Veregge, from the Port Gamble Sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Klallam Tribe, melds Native American design motifs with pop culture and was featured last year in the exhibition In the Spirit at the Washington State History Museum. Visitors are invited to arrive early and pick up a boxed lunch from Choripan at Museum of Glass to enjoy during the show. For those who would like to watch remotely, The Hot Shop Live Show will be streamed live at museumofglass.org/glassmaking/livefrom-the-hot-shop. Viewers are also encouraged to join the conversation on social media. Ask questions and post comments on Twitter tagging MOG with the handle @ museumofglass.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

3ECTION " s 0AGE  s TACOMAWEEKLYCOM s &RIDAY -AY  

RNR Community Event showcases community involvement Carrillo hopes the event will help to inform citizens about the groups making a difference in the community, and change some preconceptions that may be present. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The biker community is wonderful in Tacoma, they do a lot more for the community than a lot of people know,â&#x20AC;? Carrillo said â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think a lot of people have that stigma about them, but they do things all year round for the community.â&#x20AC;? The stunt show will be putt on by Hollywood B and the West Coast Connection Stunt Team, a stunt performance team that has traveled all around PHOTO COURTESY OF HOLLYWOOD B the country perfecting STUNTED. Hollywood B and the West Coast Connection Stunt Team look to thrill Tacoma Citizens their craft. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re entertainat the RNR Community Event on June 8. ing, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got music and they might give By Derek Shuck kids rides,â&#x20AC;? Carrillo said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They will be the derek@tacomaweekly.com best entertainment there.â&#x20AC;? The team will perform three 20 minutes ommunity engagement is a sessions throughout the day at 11:40 a.m., major part of any town. Help1:40 p.m. and 2:40 p.m., in between a caving those around you to better alcade of musicians performing throughout a city can make everyone feel good. Howthe day including James Coates, The Los ever, it can be tough to know where to get Hermanos Brothers and the Rafael Traninvolved and many may ask themselves quilino Band. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What can I do? Who are these organizaâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a mix [of music] blues, hip hop,â&#x20AC;? tions giving back to Tacoma?â&#x20AC;? Carrillo said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because we have such a The RNR Community Event invites diverse neighborhood, we needed diversity citizens to come out for a day of fun and to [of bands.]â&#x20AC;? see who is giving back to the city on SunOne of the main attractions of the day, June 8 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 9825 street fair, the car show, is promising to be Pacific Ave. a huge event, Carrillo expects over 200 cars The event, hosted by RNR Bar and and 200 bikes will to be on display. Prize Steakhouse, includes a car show, a bike support will be offered for both shows. show, kids activities, vendors and even a The festival is expected to draw somestunt show that will take place three times where between eight and ten-thousand throughout the day, as well as several difTacomans. ferent Tacoma organizations holding live The diverse music, cars and bikes will fundraisers. also be enhanced with an assortment of The ability to see these groups in action food vendors. So far, a variety of vendors as well as support them is the main draw of have already signed up and Philly Cheese the festival for Event Coordinator Marlene Steak, Burgers and authentic barbeque are Carrillo. all on tap for the festival. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Its all about grassroots, [the organizaThe Rock the Rim Barbers will also be tions] arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like Goodwill, they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get at the event, offering free cuts with back to state funding. The groups that I know in school donations and $20 for designs. All Tacoma ask their brothers, sisters ,neighmoney from the designs will also go to the bors [and] businesses, tell them what they Rock the Rim Back to school event. need to they get money and 100 percent of To compete in the car show, a $10 it goes back to where it needs to go to, no donation is suggested. To become a venprofit at all,â&#x20AC;? Carrillo said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come out and dor, a $40 fee is involved or $45 if you see who really does things in your commudonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a valid City of Tacoma Business nity, give them some love, open your eyes license. and inform yourself just a little bit.â&#x20AC;?

C

WSummer

From page B1

Ethnic Fest

Noon to 7 p.m., July 26 and 27 Wright Part, 501 S. I St., Tacoma Since 1986, Ethnic Fest has celebrated the various cultures and ethnic groups that make up our community. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s festivities will include hands-on art projects, games, dance and live music. Metro Parks Tacoma is still taking applications for vendors and performers. Learn more at www.metroparkstacoma.org/ethnicfest.

Capitol Hill Block Party

July 25 to 27 Capitol Hill neighborhood, Seattle For indie-rock fans who think Sasquatch has gotten too bloated and corporate there is this block party, located smack dab in the middle of the most hipstery place in Washington. A$AP Rock, Spoon, Chromeo and more will be on the main stage outside with other stages located at nearby Neumoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and the Cha Cha Lounge. Three-day passes are $125, $250 for the VIP package. Find the full lineup at www.capitolhillblockparty. com. PBR and fixed-gear bike optional.

MĂ&#x2013; tley Cr Ă&#x153; e with Alice Cooper

7 p.m. July 27 White River Amphitheatre MĂśtley CrĂźe is billing this as â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Final Tour.â&#x20AC;? They even signed a legally binding document to keep them from going all Garth Brooks or Nine Inch Nails on us (though itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not entirely clear who would be suing them if they get back on the road. Whitesnake?) It should be a hoot seeing Alice Cooper, the godfather of shock rock, with a bigger stage and budget to work with than on his annual stop at the Emerald Queen. Tickets are $39.50 to $125; www. ticketmaster.com.

Jay-Z & BeyoncĂ&#x2030;

8 p.m. July 30 Safeco Field, 1250 First Ave., S., Seattle Popâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premiere power couple will take over the Marinersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; home field with their massive On the Run Tour. How big is this thing? Jay and Bey shot a slick, four-minute promo video for it, in the style of an action movie trailer, starring Sean Penn, Don Cheadle and Jake Gyllenhall; and the New York Daily News reports that fans are circulating a petition demanding a full-length movie based on the commercial. The coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s publicity team couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be behind that, right? Anyway, based on some other footage weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve given up hope that Solange has been tapped to open. Tickets are $69 to $254; www.ticketmaster.com.

Arcade Fire

7:30 p.m. Aug. 8 Gorge Amphitheatre Front man Win Butler and company made headlines when they insisted fans dress up or wear a costume to the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shows this summer, a â&#x20AC;&#x153;dress codeâ&#x20AC;? that made haters lose their minds. But seriously, why wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you want to be dressed like Green Man as the sun sets over the Gorge and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re belting out â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wake Upâ&#x20AC;? with 20,000 fans? (You know, aside from the risk of heat stroke.) Tickets are $24.50 to $64.50; www.ticketmaster.com.

Brew Five Three

1 to 9 p.m. Aug. 9 Broadway, between Ninth and 11th streets, Tacoma In its second year, this beer loversâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; block party will feature more than 30 Washington craft brewers, food trucks and lots of blues and soul, with Junkyard Jane, The Mark Riley Trio, West Coast Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blues Revue and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Voiceâ&#x20AC;? alumnus Stephanie Anne Johnson playing the main stage. Folks who werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t happy with last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tiny taster glasses will be happy to know that the $25 to $30 ticket gets you an actual pint glass this year and 10 beer tokens; and,

for another $10, you can pay a designated driver to get you safely home. Learn more at www.broadwaycenter.org.

Music and Art in Wright Park

Aug. 16 Wright Park Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most do-it-yourself, punkoriented festival turned 20 last year with a great lineup that included Furry Buddies, Gold Records, Big Wheel Stunt Show, Deathbed Confessions and Girl Trouble. Organizer Cody Foster said Seattle psychpop band the Purrs would return and that â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s Tacoma punk band Slingshot would reunite for this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event; but only if the non-profit group behind MAWP can come up with the $8,000 to $11,000 necessary to put it on, often a close call. Toward that end, the first of a series of benefit shows will be held at 8 p.m. on May 30 at the New Frontier Lounge, 301 E. 25th St., featuring Pioneers West, Oh Dear and Coma Figura; www.thenewfrontierlounge. com for details. Another show will be held on June 28 featuring Mos Generator, C.F.A. and ExGods (formerly Mahnhammer) on June 28 at the Swiss Tavern, 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. By then, organizers expect to have a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Music Conservation Compilationâ&#x20AC;? to give donors, featuring rare and unreleased works by Seaweed, Swelter, Dead Letter Office and other Tacoma bands. Follow â&#x20AC;&#x153;Music & Art in Wright Park Tacomaâ&#x20AC;? for updates and to find out how to donate or take part in planning meetings.

Nine Inch Nails with Soundgarden

7 p.m. Aug. 30 White River Amphitheatre Soundgarden was scheduled to play the Fourth of July Sasquatch Fest, and the up side of that experiment failing is that it paved the way for this tour to hit our market earlier. Last year at KeyArena, Trent Reznorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nails delivered a dazzling, high-tech set, loaded with newer, more experimental material from their â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hesitation Marksâ&#x20AC;? album. Expect extra emphasis on Soundgardenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s classic â&#x20AC;&#x153;Superunknownâ&#x20AC;? album, which turned 20 this year. Tickets are 39.50 to $99.50; www. ticketmaster.com.

Bumbershoot

11 a.m. Aug. 30 to Sept. 1 Seattle Center Unless youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a diehard Dave Matthews fan checking out his four-day run at the Gorge, Labor Day Weekend is all about Bumbershoot, Seattleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s end-ofsummer frenzy of music, comedy, dance, poster art, food, drink and more. Foster the People will return to the Washington festival circuit, after playing Sasquatch. Among the big names joining them on the main stage â&#x20AC;&#x201C; back at Memorial Stadium this year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; are Wu-Tang Clan, Elvis Costello, The Head and the Heart, The Replacements and J. Cole; www. bumbershoot.org.

Washington State Fair

Sept. 5 to 21 Washington State Fair Events Center, 110 Ninth Ave., SW, Puyallup Savor the last days of summer by â&#x20AC;&#x153;doinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; the Puyallupâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; you know, riding roller coasters, checking out the rodeo and gorging on Krusty Pups. The music and comedy headliners at the 11,000seat grandstand includes Clay Walker (Sept. 5); Colt Ford (Sept. 6); Sugarlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jennifer Nettles (Sept. 8); Chicago and REO Speedwagon (Sept. 9); Cody Simpson, MKTO and Coco Jones (Sept. 10); Fallout Boy and New Politics (Sept. 12); Keith Urban (Sept. 13); Teen Hoot (Sept. 14); Florida Georgia Line (Sept. 15); Michael W. Smith and Amy Grant (Sept. 17); Jeff Dunham (Sept. 18); and Toby Keith (Sept. 20). Fair tickets are $9 to $12.50 and free for kids ages 5 and younger. Concert ticket prices vary and can be found at www.thefair.com.

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

Watermelon Sugar plays Java Jive May 24

Friday, May 23, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 5

Nightlife

TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;M THE MANâ&#x20AC;? SINGER ALOE BLACC WILL KICK OFF MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND AT THE EMERALD QUEEN CASINO ON MAY 23. THE SHOW STARTS AT 8:30 P.M., AND TICKETS ARE $30-$60; WWW.TICKETMASTER.COM.

FRIDAY, MAY 23 LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: Witchburn, Antihero, Guilty Smoke (hard rock) 8 p.m., $10, AA

PHOTO COURTESY OF WATERMELON SUGAR

WATERMELON SUGAR. New Brooklyn band has Tacoma roots. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

B

r o o k l y n â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wa t e r m e l o n Sugar may be making its Tacoma debut on Saturday, May 24, at Bobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Java Jive; but the trio will look mighty familiar to anyone who spent much time in Tacoma rock clubs, circa 2010. The band was founded by singer-guitarist Kyle Brunette â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a fixture of the local indie-rock scene as a member of The Nightgowns, The Drug Purse and Friskey. Watermelon Sugarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s six-song, self-titled debut came out on Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Swoon Records last month and is available on iTunes. Recently, we caught up with Brunette to talk about this weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homecoming show. Tacoma Weekly: So what took you out to Brooklyn? Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been out there a year and a half, I think you said. Brunette: Basically, we started the band in Tacoma, and it was me, Kennon Christal and then Colin Reynolds. Kennon moved to Brooklyn, and I basically moved out here to play music with him with the idea we were going to get the band going in Brooklyn. Colin moved out last summer, and we started playing shows around New York in November. TW: Do you see that Trevor guy (Nightgowns singer-guitarist Trevor Dickson)? Brunette: Yeah, Trevorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out here. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually a lot of Tacoma people in Brooklyn right now. TW: Do you see each other much? Brunette: We see each other here and there. For example, tomorrow weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing a show with this band called Greenfield. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paul Dallyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s band; heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s from Tacoma. Ben Roth (of Oberhofer) is out here right now. Benâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s playing with Paul tomorrow. So we play shows together.

But New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty big. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not like we go to the local bar or something and everybody runs into each other.

Watermelon Sugar with Wheelies, People Under the Sun and Deep Kink 8 p.m. Saturday, May 24 Bobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Java Jive 2102 South Tacoma Way $5 (253) 475-9843 TW: So I guess the idea is you went out there for more opportunity. Brunette: Yeah, for sure, and it was a pretty easy move because I knew a lot of people out here. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like jumping in blind. TW: So how did this band get started? Brunette: Basically, it started with some songs that I had written. I wanted mainly just to record them, so I got Colin and Kennon to play with me. The EP was actually recorded in Tacoma. It came out in April, but it was basically finished over a year ago. TW: Who came up with the name? Is there a significance to it? Brunette: Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually a Richard Brautigan novel called â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Watermelon Sugar.â&#x20AC;? He was actually born in Tacoma â&#x20AC;Ś so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mostly just a reference to that. TW: Most people around these parts know you for the Nightgowns. How would you compare and contrast what you do with this band and what kind outlet it is versus the Nightgowns. Brunette: The Nightgowns was more a kind of a band I played in whereas this is more my project. I also wanted to do something, too, that was more straightforward. With the Nightgowns â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with the keyboards and the drum machine, occasionally â&#x20AC;&#x201C; we had to play proper

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venues. We were more serious in that regard, whereas with this new band, we could play a big rock venue or just play in someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basement. TW: Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard the stuff on the EP. What can we expect beyond those sounds for the live show? Brunette: We only play a couple of songs off the EP. A lot of the songs are recorded as studio productions that we would need a larger band to pull off. (On) the recordings, we tracked them all live as a three-piece, but there were more overdubs to fill in the sound; whereas the newer stuff, just the three of us can play, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fuller sound. TW: Whenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the last time you played here? Brunette: I think the last time I played was shortly before I moved, and Trevor was back for a minute, and we played a Nightgowns show. That was two summers ago. TW: So whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s it gonna be like playing your old stomping grounds? Brunette: The show at the Java Jive should be fun because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all good friends weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing with. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing with People Under the Sun and Wheelies and Spencer from Basement. He has a new project (Deep Kink) and I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s their first show. TW: What else is coming up for you guys? Brunette: Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do some recording and try to play around as much as possible, around New York. And hopefully in the fall weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do a more prolonged, proper tour.

B SHARP COFFEE: Kim Archer (singer-songwriter) 8 p.m., NC, AA EMERALD QUEEN: Aloe Blacc (R&B, pop) 8:30 p.m., $30-$60 GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Chapter 5 (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Dax Jordan (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 HALF PINT: Forceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (rock) 9:30 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: James King & The Outsiders (blues) 8 p.m., $7 MAXWELLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rockbot (karaoke with live band) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Kry (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: The Uncivil Union Tour with Mike Merryfield and Dave Landau (comedy) 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Stoned Evergreen Travelers (rock) 8 p.m., $3-$5 UNCLE THURMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jay Maybin & The Blues Penetrators (blues) 7:30 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Foam Fest 8 with DJ Pedro (dance party) 9 p.m., $10 NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 3 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Memorial Day Party with DJ Switch, 9 p.m.

MONDAY, MAY 26 B SHARP PIZZA: Creative Colloquy Marissa Meyer (spoken word) 7 p.m., NC, AA

GIG SPOT: Monday Mash-Up Open Mic and Trivia, 8 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino, Brooke Lizotte (experimen tal jam) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 8 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, MAY 27 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, MAY 24 JAZZBONES: Strypes reunion show with Strangely Alright, Vividal (new wave, rock) 8 p.m.

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) JAZZBONES: Ha Ha Tuesday hosted by Ralph Porter (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5

WEDNESDAY, MAY 28 B SHARP COFFEE: The Boneyard Preachers (blues) 8 p.m., NC, AA BOBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAVA JIVE: The Rallies (rock, pop) 8 p.m., $5 DOYLEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Oly Mountain Boys (bluegrass) 9:30 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Chapter 5 (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Dax Jordan (comedy) 8:30, 10:30 p.m., $15 THE SPAR: Richard Allen & The Louisiana Experience (zydeco) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Real Time (dance) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Sway (dance) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: The Uncivil Union Tour with Mike Merryfield and Dave Landau (comedy) 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: I Fell Down, Saintz of Mayhem (metal) 8 p.m.

SUNDAY, MAY 25

THE SWISS: Jazz open mic with Kareem Kandi, 9 p.m., NC

DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Dave Nicholsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, MAY 29 THE SWISS: The Barleywine Revue (bluegrass, country) 9 p.m., NC

THE SPAR: CD Woodbury Band (blues) 7 p.m., NC

B SHARP COFFEE: Open mic, noon; Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Belly Dance Revue, 6:30 p.m., NC, AA DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC HALF PINT: Rhythm of Cruelty, Criminal Code (hip-hop) 9:30 p.m., NC

DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Mike Marryfield, Dave Landau (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+ UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

   

CHEF (115 MIN, R)

Fri 5/23: 3:10, 6:00, 8:30 Sat 5/24-Mon 5/26: 12:30, 3:10, 6:00, 8:30 Tue 5/27-Thu 5/29: 3:10, 6:00, 8:30

BELLE (104 MIN, PG)

Fri 5/23: 1:50, 4:10, 6:35, 8:55 Sat 5/24-Mon 5/26: 11:30am, 1:50, 4:10, 6:35, 8:55 Tue 5/27-Thu 5/29: 1:50, 4:10, 6:35, 8:55

THE IMMIGRANT (120 MIN, R)

Fri 5/23: 2:50, 5:30, 8:45 Sat 5/24-Mon 5/26: 12:15, 2:50, 5:30, 8:45 Tue 5/27-Wed 5/28: 2:50, 8:45 Thu 5/29: 2:50, 5:30, 8:45

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (99 MIN, R)

Fri 5/23: 2:00, 6:45, 9:05 Sat 5/24: 11:40am, 2:00, 4:20, 6:45, 9:05 Sun 5/25: 11:40am, 2:00, 6:45, 9:05 Mon 5/26: 11:40am, 2:00, 4:20, 6:45, 9:05 Tue 5/27: 4:20, 6:45, 9:05 Wed 5/28: 2:00, 6:45, 9:05 Thu 5/29: 2:00, 4:20, 9:05

ON MY WAY (116 MIN, NR)

Tue 5/27: 2:00, 6:10

THE AMERICAN NURSE (81 MIN, NR)

Fri 5/23: 4:30 Sun 5/25: 4:30 Wed 5/28: 4:30 Thu 5/29: 7:00

606 Fawcett, Tacoma, WA

253.593.4474 â&#x20AC;˘ grandcinema.com

                           


Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 23, 2014

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: IAN KARMEL

Adults, $5 Children. Info: (253) 272- 2750

Thurs., May 29, 8 p.m. Tacoma Comedy Club, 933 Market St. Portland comedian Ian Karmel is eclectic and the universally appealing both to crowds who own homes in the suburbs, and crowds just staying with their parents in the suburbs until they figure some things out. Coming from an improv background, including time with The Groundlings and the Upright Citizens Brigade, Ian entered the world of stand-up with a unique perspective that helped him win the 2011 Funniest Person in Portland, 2010 Portland Amateur Comedy Competition and has given him the opportunity to feature at the Moontower Comedy Festival, Bridgetown Comedy Festival, Bumbershoot, Portland’s Helium Comedy Club, Philadelphia’s Helium Comedy Club, Minneapolis’ Acme Comedy Club, Austin’s Cap City Comedy Club, Seattle’s Comedy Underground and Los Angeles’ Comedy Store. Price: $10. Info: (253) 282 7203 COMICS AND PIZZA CLUB Fri., May 23, 7 p.m. Harmon Tap Room, 204 Saint Helens Ave. Join this book club adapted to mutants, aliens, technogeeks and puny humans who like to read comics. May’s book is “Daredevil, Volume 1” by Mark Waid, Paolo Manuel Rivera and Marcos Martin. Books available at King’s Books. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-8801 DOWNLOADING/EREADER CLINIC Fri., May 23, 1:30-3 p.m. Tacoma Public Library, Main Branch, 1102 Tacoma Ave. S. Sign up for a slot in this eReader clinic devoted to Nooks, Kindles and more. Meet with a library staff member for a short oneon-one session. You’ll become

familiar with navigating through screens, locating the user manual and general troubleshooting tips. Please have device charged and library card up to date. Registration required online or call Telephone Reference at (253) 292-2001. Price: Free. Info: (253) 292-2001 “PEEK IN OUR ATTIC AND SHARE IN OUR DREAM!” Fri., May 23, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Foss Waterway Seaport, 705 Dock St. The Foss Waterway Seaport’s premiere maritime heritage center is open Wednesdays through Sundays for its featured exhibits on Tacoma’s maritime history. Current exhibits include vintage SCUBA gear, the age of steam, the Balfour Dock exhibit, and several classic boats. Price: $8

STRYPES REUNION SHOW WITH STRANGLEY ALRIGHT AND VIVIDAL Sat., May 24, 8 p.m. Jazzbones, 2803 Sixth Ave. For nine years, from 1981 to 1990, Strypes rocked the Pacific Northwest and beyond. Formed by best friends, keyboardist Robert Richholt and guitarist Jesse Seales in the late 70’s, the Strypes lineup was completed with the addition of singer-songwriter-front man Regan Lane and drummer Andy Morrison. And filling out the bass playing duties in the bands final incantation was Bob D’Angelo, now of Mechanism. Price: $9.99. Info: (253) 396-9169 GIRLS’ DAY Sat., May 24, 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Computer Clubhouse of Tacoma, 1209 Martin Luther King Jr. Way With the support of mentors, girls will be able to discover their own voice while engaging in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) activities. They will learn web design, robotics, video production, mobile app development, game development, and much more! Price: Free. Info: (253) 627-3175 JOB SKILLS FOR TEENS Sat., May 24, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. STAR Center, 3873 S. 66th St. Workshop covers resume writing, interview etiquette, customer service and leadership with a focus on Metro Parks jobs. Teens are encouraged to dress professionally and will participate in mock interviews. Participation

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

qualifies teens for a job shadow position within Metro Parks. Subway lunch included. Ages 15-18. Call (253) 404-3939 to register. Price: Free. Info: (253) 404-3939

Jackson Pollock and each exhibited artist interpretation arriving at tension and flow “privileging the solid over fluid.” Price: Free. Info: (253) 238-5065

FOAM FEST 8! MEMORIAL DAY LONG WEEKEND PARTY! Sun., May 25, 9 p.m. Jazzbones, 2803 Sixth Ave. That’s right! Jazzbones is filling the dance floor with foam. DJ Pedro will be providing the beats for a Sunday funday you will never forget. You will get wet. Beach attire is strongly suggested. Price: $9.99. Info: (253) 369-9169

QUIZ NIGHT Tues., May 27, 7 p.m. The Swiss Restaurant & Pub, 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. It costs $2 per person to enter, and teams can have as many as seven members. There are five categories and the winning team takes home the cash! All ages! Price: Free. Info: (253) 572-2821 INTERMEDIATE GMAIL Tues., May 27, 1:30-3 p.m. Tacoma Public Library - Main Library, 1102 Tacoma Ave. S. In this class, students will explore more advanced features of Google’s email system, Gmail. Practice attaching documents to an email, use spell checker to catch typos, learn how to save emails and create files to organize received email. Requires ability to use a mouse. Advance registration required – register online or by phone. Price: Free. Info: (253) 292-2001; www.tacomapubliclibrary.org

LEMAY VALVE COVER RACES Sun., May 25, 1 p.m. LeMay Marymount Event Center, 325 152nd St. E. Take an engine valve cover, add wheels, and race it! Awards will be given for 1st-, 2nd-, and 3rd-place, as well as for Prettiest, Best Paint Job, and Most Unusual. Open to all ages. See the website for rules and how to enter. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-2336; www.lemaymuseum.org BLUES NIGHT Mon., May 26, 7 p.m. The Swiss Restaurant & Pub, 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. The world famous Swiss Blues Night featuring the best blues in the Puget Sound Region. Every Monday at 8 p.m. and always free. Info: (253) 572-2821

CLAW OPEN SWIM Wed., May 28, 7:30 p.m. King’s Books, 218 Saint Helens Ave. Join the Cartoonist’s League of Absurd Washingtonians (CLAW) for their monthly Open Swim. Participants will draw a word from the fez and incorporate that into their drawing. CLAW meets the fourth Wednesday of every month at King’s Books. Come cartoon with us. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-8801

‘WET’ Mon., May 26, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. B2 Fine Art Gallery/Studios, 711 Saint Helens Ave. The WET Exhibition explores “abstract expressionism in fluidity, movement and space,” inspired by artist

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE Kerri Bailey is a horticulturist and a certified herbalist. She makes custom blends and consults at Ubiquitous Journey (www.UBJourney.com) on 6th Avenue. Kerri owns two businesses – the online herb store www.HerbalElements.net and a water garden store inside Alpine Nursery in South Hill (www.AlpineGrows.com) called The Pond Pad (www.ThePondPad.com). She writes blogs on gardening, ponds, natural health and herbal remedies and teaches classes through Free University (www.FreeUNW.com).

ARIES (Mar. 21 – Apr. 19) The series of delays that have been irritating you will start to reverse. Communication is highlighted encouraging you to express yourself and let others know how talented you really are. A long term goal or project is moving forward but don’t try to rush it. Think positive. TAURUS (Apr. 20 - May 20) Stagnant or old relationships may take a turn to a more positive direction. Because of all that you have overcome in the past years, you are rewarded by the cosmos with the gift of enduring energy. Take advantage of this to the fullest extent. Someone may surprise you. GEMINI (May 21 – Jun. 20) The sun has entered your sign energizing your social sign. Time to show the world your versatility and vigilance. Something that seems worthwhile despite the challenges may be worth going for. Prepare to take on a new project or career path. CANCER (Jun. 21 – Jul. 22) After all the cleaning and getting rid of old things it’s time to decorate or tackle that DIY project. Ask experts for advice when needed so you don’t get over your head. Then make sure to take time to relax and recharge. Romance is in the air. LEO (Jul. 23 – Aug. 22) Your week is socially charged with good company. Old friends may try to contact you through social media. Share your cherished memories with others. Make sure to save some time for that special someone between gatherings. Enjoy your personal spotlight. VIRGO (Aug. 23 – Sep. 22) Financial delays that you may be experiencing will come to an end as Mars turns direct in your finance sector. Important plans that have been in the works for a long time may start to turn favorable. A team effort may help you achieve your goals.

LIBRA (Sep. 23 – Oct. 22) The end of all those delays is finally here. You can proceed with plans that have been neglected. New career prospects or a change in position may give you a chance to earn more money. Travel or thoughts for higher education may expand your horizons. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 – Nov. 21) Good conversations may help your financial and personal relationships. Develop a closer relationship with your body and tackle those health and wellness issues. Focus on shared finances, intimacy and transformation for long term stability and success. Perk up.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 – Dec. 21) A long held dream may come true. There are plenty of opportunities for happy times with friends and that special someone. Working as a team could prove more productive than trying to do it all yourself. Give praise and acknowledgment to those who deserve it. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 – Jan. 19) You will start to see progress on the work front. Frustrations subside and things get back on track. The way you handle daily affairs will get noticed. Take some time to focus on wellness and health concerns that you have been neglecting. Conserve your energy and use it wisely. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 – Feb. 18) Delays or frustrations on legal or financial issues should show improvements. Romance is in the air and may tempt you to bouts of daydreaming. Enjoy the escape as long as you are productive. You may seek advice on a deep-seated issue. A friend could help ease a burden.

ANAGRAM

STUPID CRIMINALS

How many words can you make out of this phrase?

PISCES (Feb. 19 – Mar. 20) Opportunities are arising to consolidate your finances and mange any debt. Get all your things in order during this phase and make concrete plans. Social activities are also highlighted as you may entertain friends or throw someone a surprise party. Give someone the benefit of the doubt.

Z L R A A L S E T I V G Z J U S C


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DISCRIMINATION Experiencing Workplace Discrimination? Retired City of Tacoma Civil Rights Investigator will provide assistance. Call 253-565-6179. Never a fee for my services.

648 Rivenhurst St. Bremerton, WA 98310

PLUMBING

360 440 5795 thehelpbyastrids.com

PLUMBING

LAWN CARE

Big Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawn Care

(253) 397-7013 LAWN CARE

GET READY FOR SUMMER.

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ELECTRICAL

Gutter Cleaning, Pruning, Trees, Pressure Washing, Rototiller.

Cash for Unwanted & Junk Cars & Trucks Free Removal 253-335-1232

Allied Electric Service

Contact Alex 253-564-5743 Free Estimates

PHOTOGRAPHY

1042285

FURNITURE

CASH REWARD: Looking for a Futon Bed. Can Pay Cash. Please Call Alex. (253) 564-5743

Furniture. Misc. Items. Full Mattress, Antiques. Cash Only. Call for More Information: (253) 756-1114

New 5 Piece Bedroom Set Full or Queen set includes: Headboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, & mirror. BRAND NEW! Only $400 253-539-1600

All New King Mattress Set 3 Piece King Mattress set for only $275. Still in original packaging with factory warranty. Can deliver. 253-5373056

5 Piece Dining Room Set Table & 4 Chairs. New in box. Only $300 253-539-1600

Adjustable Power Bed Brand New with memory foam mattress. Wall hugger with warranty. Delivery available. $995 253-537-3056

PHOTOGRAPHY

New Mission Style Bedroom Suite Solid wood Mission bedroom set. $699. Includes: headboard, footboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, and mirror. 253-5391600

Toll Free 1-877-272-6092

ROOFING Your Local Roof Experts â&#x20AC;&#x153;Repairs or Replacementâ&#x20AC;?

TriState Roofing, Inc. TRISTI*931QH

ROOFING

APPLIANCES

Reconditioned Appliances Quality Guaranteed 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Closed Sundays

  

PAINTING

CONTRACTOR

253-222-1136 TREE & STUMP

Retaining Walls â&#x20AC;˘ Sod Clean-Up & Maintenance Sprinkler Systems

´ Low Prices ´ Free Estimates

License & Bonded â&#x20AC;˘ JTLANLF94INA

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LANDSCAPING

Wood, Chain Link & Repairs Too!

TREE & STUMP

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Tree & Stump REMOVAL  

    '&&&"#$"$" " PAINTING

PAINTING

PAINTING

PAINTING

GMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Painting INSURED â&#x20AC;˘ BONDED â&#x20AC;˘ LICENSED

DISCOUNT For first time customers only! Offer only valid with coupon.

BRAND NEW! Queen Memory foam mattress set with 20 year warranty. Can Deliver. $400. 253537-3056

CONTRACTOR

FENCING

Service your painting needs with master painters, quality supplies and dedicated customer service.

15% OFF

PAINTING

253-606-1647



CONTRACTOR

New â&#x20AC;˘ Repairs Tear-Off & Re-Roof

(253) 267-1673

FREE Appliance and Junk Metal Removal (253) 241-5544

PAYS YOU! FOR YOUR Junk Cars

JT GENERAL CONTRACTOR

CASH FOR TRADE-IN 5042 Yakima Ave. Tacoma, WA 98408

The Happy Hooker

  

ROOFING

APPLIANCES



207-777-7117 CONTRACTOR

1901 Center St. Tacoma, WA 98409 253-363-8280 www.tristate.pro

CASH FOR CARS

     

HAULING



New Overstuffed Microfiber sofa & Love Seat Still in plastic with manufactures warranty. Can have for $700. Lifetime warranty on frame. 253-539-1600

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

CASH FOR CARS

    

Call us today for a FREE ESTIMATE!

425-351-3103 - Gume 425-793-8222 - Jesus

HAULING

HAULING

HAULING

Father AND Son Hauling

New Pillow Top Full Mattress Only $99. Never used! Comes with manufactures warranty. Delivery available. 253537-3056

Serving all your hauling needs. We will haul anything at any time.

ANTIQUES WANTED

NOW Free Junk Car Removal!

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105

CONTACT US Phone: Mail:

253.414.2221 ,)#%.3%$ s "/.$%$ s ).352%$

ALEXâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Lawncare

Work in King, Pierce & Snohomish

ANTIQUES WANTED

UNWANTED/JUNK VEHICLES 4/7).' !.$ 42!.30/24 s ,/#!, /2 ,/.' $)34!.#%

LAWN CARE

Graduation Any Occasion

Low Profile Leather Bed Frame Still in box. Available in Full or Queen. Very nice. Can deliver. $250 253539-1600

FREE Hauling for Metal

ALLIEE1963CQ

1-800-854-4410

Solid Wood Bunk Beds Available in 2 colors. Brand new in box. Can break down to two separate twin beds. Delivery available. $250 253539-1600

$ $ WE PAY CA$H FOR $

SERVING GREATER PUGET SOUND 10 YEARS

Weddings Starting at $499

All New Pillow Top Mattress Queen Size with warranty. Still in original plastic. Can deliver. $120. 253537-3056

TRANSPORT & RECOVERY

M C Cloutier Photography

FURNITURE

$

J.L.C.

Âş Storm Clean-up Âş Handyman

Licensed and bonded. Year round work. Great pay & benefits

FOR SALE

CASH FOR CARS

www.alliedmarinecorp.com

Need Pole Builder

Microfiber Sectional Brand New REVERSIBLE sectional with chaise lounge. NEW! Only $500 253-539-1600

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899047

CNA

LAWN CARE

SERVICES

253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma WA, 98417

CELL

OFFICE

253-222-9181

253-671-9951

fatherandsonhauling@hotmail.com

VISIT OUR WEBSITE

www.tacomaweekly.com

Advertising Representatives: â&#x20AC;˘ Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Colleen McDonald, cmcdonald@tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Marlene Carrillo, marlene@tacomaweekly.com


Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 8 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, May 23, 2014

NOTICES Homeless Project

Anything for the Homeless Wanted. Drop off Donations Before May 24. +Y)PYKÂťZ6MĂ&#x201E;JL!:1\UL[[:[ ;HJVTH>(  TO: Sylvia Carrillo & Damontay Whitaker ,QWKH:HOIDUHRI.5&:'2% $&: '2% &DVH1XPEHUV38<&:&: 38<&: &: YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Review Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of ,QGLDQVRQWKH3X\DOOXS,QGLDQ5HVHUYDWLRQZKLFKLV ORFDWHGDW(DVWWK6WUHHW7DFRPD:DVKLQJWRQ  You are summoned to appear for a Continued Initial +HDULQJRQ7KXUVGD\WKHVWGD\RI-8/<DW30 ,I\RXKDYHDQ\TXHVWLRQVSOHDVHFRQWDFWWKHFRXUW FOHUNVDW   127,&(38568$177275,%$/&2'(6(&7,21 7+(&28570$<),1'7+(3$5(17 *8$5',$125&8672',$1,1'()$8/7)25 FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT +($5,1*7+,60$<5(68/7,1<285&+,/' 5(1  %(,1*3/$&(',1$127+(5+20($1'7+( PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS.

72'DPRQ)*HRUJH ,QWKH0DWWHURI3X\DOOXS7ULEHYV*(25*('DPRQ F. &DVH1XPEHU38<)+6+(// YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe RI,QGLDQVRQWKH3X\DOOXS,QGLDQ5HVHUYDWLRQ ZKLFKLVORFDWHGDW(DVWWK6WUHHW7DFRPD :DVKLQJWRQ <RXDUHVXPPRQHGWRDSSHDURQ7XHVGD\-XO\WK DWDPIRUDQ,QLWLDO+HDULQJ ,I\RXKDYHDQ\TXHVWLRQVSOHDVHFRQWDFWWKHFRXUW FOHUNVDW   )$,/85(72$33($53/($'2527+(5:,6( DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT -8'*(0(17 TO: WINONA TARAYA ,QWKH:HOIDUHRI). ),'2%   &DVH1XPEHU38<*-9 38<*-9  YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an INITIAL Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian 5HVHUYDWLRQZKLFKLVORFDWHGDW(DVWWK 6WUHHW7DFRPD:DVKLQJWRQ You are summoned to appear for an INITIAL +HDULQJRQ7+856'$<WKH7+GD\RI$8*867 DW30

NOTICES That all persons having claims against the estate are required to present such claims in writing with SURSHUYRXFKHUVWRWKHDGPLQLVWHURI WKHHVWDWH5HEHFFD%HQQHWWDW ('6W7DFRPD:$ZLWKLQ days after notice is given.

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MERLE &'$9(13257'HFHDVHG

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE

1R Summons for Nonparental Custody Proceeding ,QUHWKH&XVWRG\RI-03&KLOG

TO: Angel Boyd

7R-DVRQ0F'DGHDQDFWLRQKDVEHHQVWDUWHG against you in the above court requesting that the petitioners be granted custody of the folORZLQJFKLOG-03

127,&(38568$177275,%$/&2'(6(&7,21 7+(&28570$<),1'7+(3$5(17 *8$5',$125&8672',$1,1'()$8/7)25 FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A &2857+($5,1*7+,60$<5(68/7,1<285 &+,/' 5(1 %(,1*3/$&(',1$127+(5+20( AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. TO: Michael D Hoskins &DVH1DPH&$/':(//+26.,16-HQQLIHUYV +26.,160LFKDHO &DVH1XPEHU38<&932 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe RI,QGLDQVRQWKH3X\DOOXS,QGLDQ5HVHUYDWLRQ ZKLFKLVORFDWHGDW(DVWWK6WUHHW7DFRPD :DVKLQJWRQ You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing RQWKHGD\RI-XQHDWDP ,I\RXKDYHDQ\TXHVWLRQVSOHDVHFRQWDFWWKHFRXUW FOHUNVDW   )$,/85(72$33($53/($'2527+(5:,6( '()(1'0$<5(68/7,1$'()$8/7-8'*0(17

Pet of the Week

Superior Court of Washington County of PIERCE

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Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy 253-770-8552

Need safe farms or barns for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. 7KH\DUHĂ&#x20AC;[HG vaccinated and de-wormed. Ages PR XS/HDYH message at  

'DWHRI)LUVW3XEOLFDWLRQ Personal Representative -DPHV+'DYHQSRUW 32%R[ %XHQD:$

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You are summoned to appear for a Continued Initial +HDULQJRQWKHWKGD\RI-XQHDW30

PETS

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YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup 7ULEHRI,QGLDQVRQWKH3X\DOOXS,QGLDQ5HVHUYDWLRQ ZKLFKLVORFDWHGDW(DVWWK6WUHHW7DFRPD :DVKLQJWRQ

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE -PML;V^PUN-PML9LJV]LY`:LY]PJL  5>;V^PUNH[(]L,-PML VU0UJVTWSPHUJL^P[O[OL 9*>H[!WT=PL^PUN VMJHYZMYVT!!WT9LNPZ[LYLK ;V^5\TILYZ  *HZO(\J[PVU6US` ^^^Ă&#x201E;ML[V^PUNJVT

IN PROBATE 12

The above Court has appointed me as Personal Representative of Decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: D %HIRUHWKHWLPHZKHQWKHFODLPZRXOGEH EDUUHGE\DQ\DSSOLFDEOHVWDWXWHRIOLPLWDWLRQV DQG E ,QWKHPDQQHUSURYLGHGLQ5&:  , %\ILOLQJWKHRULJLQDORIWKHFODLP ZLWKWKHIRUHJRLQJ&RXUWDQG LL %\VHUYLQJRQ or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by WKHODWHURI D 7KLUW\  GD\VDIWHU,VHUYHGRU mailed the Notice as provided in the claim is not SUHVHQWHGZLWKLQWKLVWLPHSHULRGWKHFODLPZLOO be forever barred except as provided in RCW DQG7KLVEDULVHIIHFWLYH for claims against both the Decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probate and non-probate assets.

You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication RIWKLVVXPPRQVWRZLWZLWKLQVL[W\GD\VDIWHU WKHWKGD\RI$SULODQGGHIHQGWKH DFWLRQLQWKHDERYHHQWLWOHGFRXUWDQGDQVZHU WKHFRPSODLQWRIWKHSHWLWLRQHUV/RQQLH3HQL[ DQG&DQG\3HQL[DQGUHVSRQGWRWKLVVXPmons and petition by filing a written response with the clerk of the court and by serving a copy of your response on the undersigned DWWRUQH\IRUSHWLWLRQHUVDWKHURIILFHEHORZ stated. + Your written response to the summons and SHWLWLRQPXVWEHRQIRUP:3)&8 Response to Nonparental Custody Petition. Information about how to get this form may be REWDLQHGE\FRQWDFWLQJWKHFOHUNRIWKHFRXUW by contacting the Administrative Office of the &RXUWVDW  RUIURPWKH,QWHUQHW at the Washington State Courts homepage: http://www.courts.wa.gov/forms If you do not file and serve your written UHVSRQVHZLWKLQGD\VDIWHUWKHGDWHWKLV VXPPRQVZDVVHUYHGRQ\RXH[FOXVLYHRI WKHGDWHRIVHUYLFHWKHFRXUWPD\ZLWKRXW IXUWKHUQRWLFHWR\RXHQWHUDGHIDXOWMXGJPHQW against you ordering the relief requested in the petition. If you serve a notice of appearance RQWKHXQGHUVLJQHGSHUVRQ\RXDUHHQWLWOHG to notice before an order of default may be entered. *LQD0'XQFDQ$WWRUQH\ 6RWK6W6XLWH 7DFRPD:$

VOLUNTEERS AmeriCorps Opportunity: Read2Me Program Specialist

Estate of Eric Bennett date of death UHVLGLQJDW('6W 7DFRPD:$QRWLFHJLYHQRQ 

,I\RXKDYHDQ\TXHVWLRQVSOHDVHFRQWDFWWKHFRXUW FOHUNVDW  

,QWKH:HOIDUHRI0-$'2% &DVH1XPEHU38<&:735

NOTICES

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brewsterâ&#x20AC;? If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the market for an especially sweet and loving kitty, Brewster is the guy for you! Brewster is one of our MANY declawed kitties here at the shelter, patiently waiting to meet their forever families. Brewster is an incredibly friendly and affectionate cat who will make a wonderful companion for an older couple or young family. This kitty is the best of both worlds-he can be mellow & quiet, but also loves to chase his toys around. This 4 year old brown and white bundle of joy loves people and will be at your side throughout the day. When the sun goes down, this cuddly fellow will make his way to your lap for a warm place to sleep. Brewster has a history of doing great around children of all ages and other cats. He doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any experience with dogs, so a slow introduction would be necessary. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss out on your chance to make this sweet boy yours! Meet Brewster today. Reference #A455778

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www.thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week 1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Cat SPECIAL of the Week! Lily is a cuddly 1.5 year old kitty looking for a Forever Family to call her own. She wants to be the only kitty in the kingdom, so no current pets please! She is already spayed, microchipped, and up to date on all her vaccines. Only $86 out the door! Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ready to go home today!!!

Tacoma Community House seeks an AmeriCorps member to assist in the Read2Me Program in local elementary schools. Read2Me is a one-onone adult/student reading program for struggling Ă&#x20AC;UVW VHFRQG DQG WKLUG grade readers. Duties include developing workVKRSVIRUWXWRUVVFKHGXOLQJ VWXGHQWV DQG WXWRUV JDWKHULQJ UHVRXUFHV UHsearching best practices for tutoring strategies DQG WXWRU WUDLQLQJ WUDFNLQJ VWXGHQW VXFFHVV DQG tutoring. You must be 18-25 years of age at the start date of service (Sep  -XO    Contact Karen Thomas DW   RU kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information.

AmeriCorps Opportunity: Employment Program Specialist Tacoma Community House seeks an AmeriCorps member to serve closely with the employment staff to develop and conduct work-readiness workshops for youth and adult participants. Duties include assisting adult and youth participants ZLWK RQOLQH MRE VHDUFK UHVXPHV DQG DSSOLFDWLRQV KHOSLQJ WR FUHDWH curriculum for employPHQW ZRUNVKRSV SURviding assistance in the planning and execution of ZRUNVKRSV  DQG PHQWRUing youth in the Career Pathways Program. You must be 18-25 years of age at the start date of VHUYLFH 6HS  -XO  &RQWDFW.DUHQ 7KRPDV DW    RU NWKRPDV#WDFRmacommunityhouse.org for more information.

Hospice Volunteers Needed To Provide a Special Kind of Caring Franciscan Hospice needs volunteers with helping hands and open hearts to support terminally ill patients in homes and nursing homes in our community. As part of the Franciscan HosSLFHFDUHWHDP\RXZLOO provide companionship and support to patients and their families in a variety of ways. Volunteers receive comprehensive training and support for this life-afĂ&#x20AC;UPLQJ ZRUN 7KHUH is a volunteer training starting soon. For more LQIRUPDWLRQ FDOO XV DW   EDGEWOOD COMMUNITY FISH FOOD BANK Seeking volunteers to staff 7KXUVGD\VIURPSP SPDQGRU6DWXUGD\V from 11am-2pm . Those interested contact ComPXQLW\&RRUGLQDWRU.DWH :ULJKW DW  $GGUHVVQG$YH E Edgewood Donate time and receive free groceries. Volunteers needed with VNLOOV LQ PDQDJHPHQW RUJDQL]DWLRQ FOHULFDO IRRG KDQGOLQJ ZDUHKRXVLQJ PDLQWHQDQFH etc. and receive free groceries from a Non3URĂ&#x20AC;W )RRG 'LVWULEXWLRQ Program. Older teens are welcomed to volunteer and gain valuable work experience. ConWDFW 0V /HH DW   IRUIXUWKHULQformation.

PAWS NEEDS WILDLIFE VOLUNTEERS PAWS in Lynnwood is looking for volunteers to help care for wildlife WKLV VSULQJ (YHU\ \HDU PAWS cares for more WKDQ  LQMXUHG RUphaned or abandoned ZLOGOLIH -RLQ WKH WHDP and you can help feed and care for these remarkable animals. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a remarkable experience \RXZRQ¡WĂ&#x20AC;QGDQ\ZKHUH else! For any questions please contact Mark &ROHPDQ &RPPXQLFDWLRQV 0DQDJHU DW  These are exciting times and you can make a difference! South Sound Outreach Services invites you to be trained as an In Person Assister Volunteer to help Pierce County residents enroll online for health insurance in the Washington Health Plan Finder. Open Enrollment is October 1 until March 31st. CoverDJH EHJLQV -DQXDU\ VW  IRU WKRVH HQUROOHG by December 15th. Interested trainees may call Heather at SSOS 253 <RX¡OO EH JODG you did!

Become a Senior Companion today! Volunteers help frail or disabled seniors stay in their own home and maintain their independence. Activities include UXQQLQJ HUUDQGV SURviding transportation or simply being a friend. Hourly stipend and mileage reimbursement provided. Requirements: PXVW EH  VHUYH DW least 15 hours a week and be low-income. Drivers are especially needed currently. For PRUHLQIRFDOO-XOLH.HUULJDQ3URJUDP'LUHFWRU     H[W 5686 Help furnish hope to those in need! NW Furniture Bank Volunteers needed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;NWFB helps restore KRSH GLJQLW\ DQG VWDELOLW\ LQ our community by recycling donated furniture to people in need.â&#x20AC;? Tuesday-Saturday 7UXFN9ROXQWHHUV1HHGHG DPSP7UXFNYROXQWHHUV ULGHDORQJLQWKHWUXFNGHOLYHU furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at volunteer@ nwfurniturebank.org or call  Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs We need a volunteer to host programs Tuesday & ThursGD\    SP at Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs. Volunteer will be calling Bingo and doing some extreme FUDIWLQJ JDUGHQLQJ GXULQJ spring & summer and into fall. If interested call Bonnie #  0RQGD\ )ULGD\30 Ayusa International SeeksTacoma Host Parents for High School Exchange Students $\XVD ,QWHUQDWLRQDO D  \HDUROG QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W WKDW promotes global learning through the hosting of high school foreign exchange VWXGHQWV LV VHHNLQJ SDUents/families in Tacoma to KRVWIRUWKHXSFRPLQJ  VFKRRO \HDU $\XVD students are 15-18 years old and come from more WKDQ  FRXQWULHV DURXQG WKH ZRUOG LQFOXGLQJ %UD]LO -DSDQ *HUPDQ\ (FXDGRU )UDQFH 3HUX 0RURFFR China and Spain; they are DOOSURĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWLQ(QJOLVK)RU PRUH LQIRUPDWLRQ SOHDVH visit our website: www. ayusa.org


Friday, May 23, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV HOMES FOR SALE

Stephanie Lynch

HOMES FOR SALE

Askthehometeam.com

We are now experiencing a sellers market which brings more money when selling your home. Call me today if you are thinking about selling for your free market analysis and learn how I will sell your home for the most dollar to you!

Let me help! Call today.

Sergio Hernandez (253) 431-2308

Heather Redal (253) 363-5920

Sergio@betterproperties.com

Heatherredal@gmail.com

253.203.8985 www.stephanielynch.com Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award Recipient 2008-2013

REPRESENTING BOTH BUYERS AND SELLERS

3578 E F St, Tacoma â&#x20AC;˘ $119,000 This home is completely remodeled and movein ready with a massive, fenced backyard. Updated plumbing & electrical. New carpet, paint, moldings, doors. New kitchen with hickory cabinets, range, dishwasher. 12 by 14 covered deck. Huge Outbuilding for storage, alley access. ( MLS # 582500)

Proven Results Experienced Integrity High Service Standards REALTORS

REALTORS

If I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell it to you and if I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live in it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t list it.

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

33 N Salmon Beach

NEW LISTING: VIEW LOT â&#x20AC;˘ $230,000 1116 N. Jackson, Tacoma 2 parcels : Build your dream home with a gorgeous view of Narrows Bridge and Puget Sound. The property is being sold as one to maximize the building envelope and open space but see what works best for you. Build on one lot, sell the other or build on the whole lot, there is so much opportunity here! (MLS # 612161)

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Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton K\GUDXOLFERDW/LIWEULFNZRRGEXUQLQJĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFH with insert, expansive decking on all sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout the last 9 years, including roof, VLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZVGRRUVGHFNLQJERDW hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more. $450,000

Shannon

Agent Extraordinaire

7OVUL!  -H_! ,THPS!ZOHUUVUZLSSZ'OV[THPSJVT FOR RENT

FOR RENT

Apartment For Rent! 2br/1bath. Full Kitchen, living room, W/D inside. parking lot... $700 Rent at Tacoma 8324 S. Park Ave. Contact 206-214-8538 SPACES

SPACES

Spaces for Rent. 10 x 10, 10 x 14. For Massage or Esthetician. At DaVinci Spa. Call (253) 588-1719 STABLES

STABLES

Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 222-8480

3728 N Gove St, Tacoma

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Cute little bungalow in Proctor! Nice upgrades include a new family room, windows, roof, energy package & carpet 6 years ago. Detached garage was converted to extra living space. It has a separate electric panel, heat & lights - lots of possibilities... music studio, art studio, exercise / yoga room, etc. Parking for 3 cars off the alley next to garage. Charming back yard, too! +DUGZRRGĂ RRUVXQGHUFDUSHWH[FHSWLQ family room. MLS# 518902. $195,000

i d n e p

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

2711 Henry Road N

Dillon Stables. Covered, well-lit riding arena. 12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x12â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Stalls. Full care. Riding Lessons. Horses for Sale. $400 per month. (253) 606-4994 HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

Fabulous VIEWS Awesome HOUSE Beautiful LANDSCAPING!

1018 S 61st St, Tacoma â&#x20AC;˘ $139,999 Charm and character galore in this 1920â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s &XWLH %HDXWLIXO KDUGZRRG Ă RRUV WKURXJKRXW high coved ceilings, large open kitchen, mud room, master bedroom w/2 closets, upstairs has KLJKFHLOLQJV)LUĂ RRUVDQGEHGURRPVZLWKORWV of closet space plus lots of storage. Backyard is fully fenced and is a gardenerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream with pond, mature landscaping and so much privacy. Garage is like a quaint cottage with a loft, new wiring and shop. House has 60 year roof, new insulation and is adorable! (MLS # 600824)

6711 36th St Ct NW, Gig Harbor

3 Bed, 1 3/4 Bath. 1,356 sq ft. Open Ă RRUSODQ YDXOWHGFHLOLQJVKLJKOLJKW this handsome rambler on a park-like corner lot in Artondale. Kitchen features an island, new smooth-top stove & convection oven, tile countertops & bay ZLQGRZV)DPLO\URRPZLWKĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHLV perfect for entertaining as is the large deck & fenced backyard. The master suite, one of three newly carpeted bedrooms, has French doors to the deck and a remodeled ž bathroom. 30-yr roof installed in 2005. 10 mins to schools, shopping, recreation & SR-16

$257,500

Debbie Houtz Better Properties 253-376-2280

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St.

Better Properties N. Proctor, Please call Pam (253) 691-0461 for details or private showing.

$204,950

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

2212 N Ferdinand St Tacoma

Wonderful turn of the century home w/ lovely upgrades AND original charm: New underground power, sewer & waterlines w/ new plumbing, new panel & wiring in home. Soaring ceilings & built-ins add character. MLS# 526817. $258,000

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

Nested behind the coveted gates of Madera, your elegant dream home awaits. Boasting an open, spacious Ă RRUSODQWKLV home is an entertainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream and chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s delight. Elaborately upgraded in 2013. MLS# 617879. $849,950

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

PROPERTY

PROPERTY

OLD TOWN $499,950

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract LAKEWOOD FLORIST SHOP Same location 30+ years, owners retiring, Asking $60,000 cash. e price hug n! reductio

PORT ORCHARD, DOWNTOWN Food & Beverage, annual gross sales, approx. $1,300,000, excellent net. Owner selling real estate & the business for $805,000, terms avail., same location over 100 years. ice

RURAL LIVING: pr reduced Restaurant/Lounge in Ashford, WA Price for business, $105,000 with $25,000 down. Price for the real estate, $390,000 with $75,000 down. Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract includes a 3 B/R house, laundromat, restr./lounge bldg. on 3.4 acre, commercial zoned parcel.

reduce

COLLISION CENTER Same owner 15 yrs. Retiring, 6621 So. Tacoma Way. $130,000 with terms to qualified buyer - some training provided at 0 cost to buyer.

3614 E G St, Tacoma

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

1232 S Adams St. Super charming home w/ the ease of newer amenities... Box beam ceilings, hardwood Ă RRUVPDUEOHHQWU\SLFWXUHSODWHUDLOV SHULRG VW\OHOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHVDGGWRWKHDPELHQFHZKLOH newer roof, furnace/heat pump, indoor/outdoor speakers, newer wiring/plumbing, & gas Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHDGGWRWKHDKKKKIDFWRU6SDFLRXV living room, large kitchen, HUGE dining room, a bedroom and cute remodeled bathroom JUDFHWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWĂ RRU*LJDQWLFGHFNZVHDWLQJ welcome home. Move in and make it yours.

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;CALLAHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB & GRILL IN KEY CENTER Business is for sale for $225,000 with $75,000 down, High gross sales. Saler will also consider leasing the space. Health price issue forces sale. d

Gil Rigell

Need space? This house is much larger than it appears... Want charm? We have it here- from the coved ceilings to the KDUGZRRGĂ RRUVWKURXJKWKHDUFKHVDQG the gorgeous woodwork- this house has appeal. MLS# 609404. $180,000

HOMES FOR SALE

Amazing development potential with this unique 2OG7RZQSURSHUW\&LW\KDVJLYHQĂ&#x20AC;QDOSODW approval for 4 lots on this prime 3 acre piece. Big views possible from all lots in this great neighborhood, tucked back & out of the way. Walk to the historic Old Town district with its coffee shops, wine bar & restaurants.; then stroll down to the waterfront & enjoy the gorgeous Puget Sound setting with walking paths, public docks, shoreline restaurants & more! MLS# 332653

Better Properties N. Proctor (253) 376-7787 Fabulous NW Contemporary perfectly designed to capture Amazing Sound and Mountain Views! 2892 Sq. Ft., 4bds/3bths, Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHVKHDWSXPSFDUJDUDJH w/workshop & newer 50 yr. roof. Many large windows & skylights provide an abundance of natural light...tons of storage! Beautifully landscaped 1/3 acre lot. Huge deck, charming brick patio (perfect for entertaining. Home sits up and back from the street...very quiet, private. Such a lovely home...Warm and inviting, meticulously maintained! MLS# 609502 $475,000

HOMES FOR SALE

11425 Madera Cir SW Lakewood

MLS# 573155

Absolutely Charming, Mediterranean Style, custom built North Tacoma view home. Enjoy Commencement Bay view from Mstr Br balc. ,QVLGHIHDWLQFO0DUEOHĂ RRUHQWU\6W6WHHO$SSO *UDQFRXQWWRSV&XVWEXLOW+LFNRU\FDE%HDXW %UD]LOLDQ&KHUU\KDUGZRRGĂ RRU%D\ZLQGRZV 0VWUVXLWHZ)3 /UJEDWKVWHDPVKRZHU &DOLFORVHW1HZ(QHUJ\(IĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWKHDWLQJ&HQW YDFXXPQHZSDLQWLQ RXWQHZFDUSHW)LQLVKHG %VPWZNLWFKHQ&ORVHWR6FKRROV3DUNV )UHHZD\+RVSLWDOV :DWHUIURQW$623,000.

CALL 253.922.5317

A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with no HOA. High &HLOLQJVJDVÂżUHSODFHVVHSDUDWHO\PHWHUHG &DOOIRUSULYDWHVKRZLQJWRGD\253.606.0689 BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME

$399,000

LAKEWOOD CAFE/LOUNGE Seller is very motivated, price is now $57,000 Another price reduction

CALL RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 23, 2014

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