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FREE s Friday, April 18, 2014

20th annual Historic Homes of Tacoma Tour TACOMA RAINIERS A7

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TACOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY

GRITTY CITY SIRENS

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Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

TACOMA GAY EVANGELICAL MINISTER

WORKS TO BUILD BRIDGES

PHOTO BY ERNEST JASMIN

FILTHY. This lot is set to be

“I simply suggest that evangelicals reposition the gay issue alongside all of the other unchangeable human circumstances that we embrace, such as divorce and remarriage.”

redeveloped into affordable housing after the former house that made it a member of the “Filthy 15” was torn down.

‘FILTHY 15’ MIGHT DROP BY ONE

– Dave Thompson

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

By Matt Nagle

The worst of the worst abandoned houses around Tacoma, known as the “Filthy 15,” might become the Filthy 14 if a lien on one of the properties is lifted and a partnership between local nonprofits moves forward. A deal is being worked by city officials that would have the Master Builders Association of Pierce County building a single-family home at a vacant lot at 811 S. L St. only to turn over the home to Habitat for Humanity that would then sell the home to a qualified, first-time buyer. MBA and Habitat would slit the proceeds to fund their efforts. HomeStreet Bank owns the property and would donate it to the effort to clear it off the bank’s balance sheet without paying the demolition costs. The location was the site of an abandoned house that was plaguing the neighborhood with crime and graffiti. The city spent $27,000 to demolish that building three years ago and put a lien on the foreclosed property that could otherwise hamper a sale. The site continued to be the focus of litter, crime and graffiti. Interest on the lien adds $12,790.18 to the back bill, essentially doubling the cost of the $41,700 site. The X See HOUSES / page A11

matt@tacomaweekly.com

A

mid all the controversies flying about these days over samesex marriage, Tacoma author Dave Thompson is working to build some brides. A gay, evangelical Christian minister, Thompson is actively inviting other Christian evangelical ministers to dialog with him on these sensitive issues in the hopes of fostering better understanding about “each side’s” point of view and, even better, to change some hearts and minds in conservative religious circles about how to welcome gay people in the church. Thompson planted the seeds for this mission in 2010, when he published his book “Over Coffee: A Conversation For Gay Partnership & Conservative Faith.” Set in the Old Milwaukee Café in Tacoma, the book is a faith-based conversation between himself and a small town pastor concerning a gay church member who wants to be openly coupled in the church. Page by page, DAVE THOMPSON the reader is a “fly on the wall” during this conversation, making “Over Coffee” an educational, engaging and easy read for evangelical leadership and church congregants alike. Thompson describes the book as being about his journey as a gay man wrestling through the conflicts between his faith and his sexual orientation, which included seeking reparative therapy at 15 years old in the hopes that he could change his sexuality. Later in life he would go on to pursue his calling in faith, attending Harvard Divinity School, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, Northwest University (Assemblies of God) and Trinity Bible College (Assemblies of God). He was associate pastor at Kings Circle Assemblies of God in Oregon and interim music pastor at Christian Life Center in Montana, among his other ministry experience. Combined with his same-gender attraction, Thompson decided to address the conflicts he was feeling so that others, including his parents and family, could learn from it. He also found a partner along the way and now the two are engaged. Thompson said his book is doing exactly what he intended. Since its publication he has met with more than 230 pastors in conservative denominations like Assemblies of God, The Foursquare Church, Nazarene and Southern Baptist, to name a few. “My position is fairly unique,” Thompson said. “I’m not asking evangelicals to change anything about their biblical interpretation. I simply suggest that evangelicals reposition the gay issue alongside all of the other unchangeable human circumstances that we embrace, such as divorce and remarriage. For gay people whose orientation is unchangeable and who are not gifted for celibacy, the most healthy and virtuous solution for them is to be partnered. This allows them to fulfill the greater moral lesson X See OVER COFFEE / page A12

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

SIGN OF SPRING.The 25th annual Spring Fair came and went last weekend with the standard run of food,

rides and hobby displays. On a sad note, a piglet died in a fire that gutted Evergreen Hall after the fair concluded but there were no other reported injuries. HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE

County eyes hospital A3

CHARTER REVIEW: Former mayor calls for disbanding of Charter Review. PAGE A4

Wilson Overcomes Mount Tahoma A7

Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) This may be an exciting and edgy week for you. A lot could happen tempting you to make impulsive changes. Your mind has been working overtime so try to slow down and focus on one task at a time. Allow your intuition to guide you. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) There has been a river of change about to open that will affect your destiny in the upcoming weeks. Resist the urge to rush things. Allow long awaited changes to develop in their own time. Follow your instincts and go with the flow. Keep your demeanor calm and grounded. GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) Break free of routine to socialize with friends and family and soothe your soul. Free yourself of limitations for greater liberty. Factor in the needs of important people in your life and compromise where necessary. An option may be too good to pass up. CANCER (June 21 – July 22) Your friends and family may be your biggest support team this week. Opportunities to advance at work may present themselves. Say good-bye to fears that have been holding you back. Decide to aim high and go for it!

LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Tensions are high this week so trend lightly. Relationships could turn volatile if not handled properly. Take the lead to make those important changes. Reflect on your priorities to see things more clearly. Move forward. SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) Communications with important or key people dominate your thought processes. You get a chance to release old mental clutter and replace it with more life-enhancing thoughts. Routine is necessary to help keep you grounded. Add an adventure that feeds your soul.

WORD SEARCH Q M D S P X I N O S L I W N S T W

H S O P A R K I N G K T S S A Y R

O J W G R Q Z Q D H N U A C B T T

O Y N Q O A T I L K A L O I Z E E

A K T P Z M D R X Y G M L L X H U

I E O S R Z T H D F A L C W X S D

P E W W U O K U O A Y J V H P T B

W R N V V H Z M R R N G N O S A A

F C Z K Q N U T A K A H D B Z D T

P T A K E E M Y D G C C Z C S I M

E S L Y S U H D I G A Y E P X U A

K R T U S A V K L S W X D J J M I

N I M E Y F Q K T L I N C O L N R

S F U E H Y B R E D R E L L O R O

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) Fantasizing, flirting and pleasure may be on your mind. You seek the extreme or extraordinary and are tempted by luxury. If you battle with a financial decision, let your conscience be your guide. Smiling is contagious. CAPRICORN (December 22 – January 19) Your plans to move may be in the cards in the near future. Family matters have been your current focus causing excess stress. Find some time to relax and let go of inner tension. Have some fun to take your mind off of it. Quick solutions may solve certain problems.

LEO (July 23 – August 22) The opportunity to stabilize your career may show up soon. All your hard work and tedious routine will reveal hidden rewards. Financial resources may be a result. Take some time to enjoy the sunshine. Enjoy life to the max.

AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) Many bright ideas have been coming your way. Look deep inside to get in touch with what you really want. You may be tempted to make a drastic move but will ultimately benefit by making a solid, long-term plan. Overthinking may give you a headache.

VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Bold aspects urge you to throw caution to the wind. Your hard work and connections may pay off. Fresh ideas or exciting elements may help you enhance your life. Balance desires with the needs of others. Play for higher stakes.

PISCES (February 19 – March 20) Try to avoid making hasty financial decisions that you may regret later. Make your best bet with slow and steady changes. An advisor can suggest a plan or options for you. Romance sizzles from the afterglow of the Blood Moon. An instant attraction may take you off guard.

ANAGRAM

GRITTY CITY

K M S R W L E D I S T S A E W E B

K L J M S S A L G F O M U E S U I

B B K S Y M G G V E A F R I G M I

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Sports ........................A7 Make A Scene ........B5 A&E ....................... ....B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Two Sections | 22 Pages


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Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK VISIT US ON FACEBOOK MHJLIVVRJVT[HJVTH^LLRS`

South 64th and ‘A’ Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.� And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holeyness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495. DIETING? GREAT FOR SWEET CRAVINGS!

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Bulletin Board HISTORIC SCHOONER ‘ADVERNTURESS’ TO VISIT TACOMA The 133-foot National Historic Landmark schooner “Adventuress� is underway for her 101st sailing season and is coming to Tacoma. She will be open for free public Dockside Tours on Saturday, April 19 from noon-2 p.m. at Tacoma’s Foss Waterway Seaport. “Adventuress� is offering three-hour Public Sails on Saturday and Sunday, April 19 and 20. Sails on both days will be from 3-6 p.m. Tickets for Public Sails are $55/adults and $25/youth (under 18). Sound Experience Members sail for free on all Public Sails (a 12-month membership costs $60/individual and $95/household). Register online at www.soundexp.org or by calling (360) 379-0438. During Public Sails, participants are invited to join the crew to raise the sails, take a turn at the helm, and learn more about emerging issues in Puget Sound waters and our world’s oceans from enthusiastic, knowledgeable shipboard educators. Puget Sound’s environmental tall ship, “Adventuress� is owned and operated by the nonprofit Sound Experience with a mission to educate, inspire, and empower an inclusive community for the future of our marine environment. The organization just completed a 5-year, $1.2 million restoration of “Adventuress,� which is one of only 25 National Historic Landmarks in Washington State. In addition to programs for schools and youth groups throughout the region, Sound Experience offers summer programs for teens and families in the San Juan Islands. For more information visit www.soundexp.org or on Facebook at “Sound Experience aboard the schooner Adventuress.� /,37-,,+-(4030,:(;-0:/ FOOD BANKS’ FRIENDRAISER Help feed hungry families in Pierce County while dancing the night away at FISH Food Banks’ FriendRaiser, on Saturday, April 19. Classic rock ‘n roll entertainment generously provided by Daryl & the Diptones. With your support, in one fun evening, FISH Food Banks can purchase three cargo containers full of nutritious food for families in need. Bring your blue suede dancing shoes and off-key singa-long voice to the McGavick Center at 4500 Steilacoom Blvd. in Lakewood. Doors open at 6 p.m. Enjoy the crooning of Lois Ann Marler, classic cars, a silent auction and games. Delectable dinner provided by Shake Shake Shake. Daryl & the Diptones hit the stage at 7:30 p.m. No-host bar; guests must be 21+. Tickets are just $35, which feeds a family in need for a week! Tickets available at http:// fishfoodbanks.brownpapertickets.com. FISH Food Banks is the largest food bank network in Pierce County, with seven food banks and an innovative Mobile Food Bank. The mission of FISH Food Banks is to provide food for individuals in need with compassion, dignity and respect. For every dollar donated, FISH can distribute $7 worth of food. More than 97 percent of funds raised go directly to putting food on the tables of people facing significant hardships. In 2013, FISH Food Banks served an astounding 562,188 individuals in crisis. Your support makes this possible! A huge thank you to generous event sponsors – “Rock Around the Clock� major event sponsors Olympic Eagle Distributing and Heritage Bank; “Daydream Believer� sponsors Merrill Lynch, J.P. Work & Associates and Immedia; “Love Me Tender� sponsors Gus Paine Insurance, Panagiotu Pension Advisors, Tacoma Exchange Club, Union Bank and Williams Kastner; and “I Got You Babe� sponsors Premium Fleet Service and State Farm Agents of Pierce County. For more information, please call (253) 383-3164, or email info@fishfoodbanks.org. GOT IDEAS ON HOW TO 796;,*;;(*64(>(;,9>(@:& The City of Tacoma’s Environmental Services Department is awarding Make a Splash grant rebates of up to $4,000 to anyone with a Tacoma project that will help educate residents and protect surface water resources. Stormwater projects should have a strong pollution prevention message or provide a direct benefit to local rivers, streams, lakes, Commencement Bay, or Puget Sound. Individuals, groups or businesses that have never before participated are encouraged to apply. “Part of this program’s strength is its ability to reach new segments within our community who might not normally participate in City efforts,� said Program Manager Desiree Pooley. “For our pollution prevention efforts to be successful, we know we need the general public’s support and help. I really enjoy seeing the span of informative, yet creative, projects that are submitted.� Applications are due May 23, and those that demonstrate partnerships are preferred. Visit cityoftacoma.org/ makeasplash for more information. Tacoma’s combined citizen efforts and surface water services are making a difference; tested rain runoff entering Puget Sound shows decreasing pollutant levels. And since Tacoma is home to some of the best community test-

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ing being done nationally, that’s good news. The City of Tacoma’s Environmental Services’ surface water efforts demonstrate environmental leadership through innovative and education-based efforts such as the Make a Splash grant program.

:;(;,(9;:*6440::065/63+:-69<4(;7(5;(.,: Washington State Arts Commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (ArtsWa) first Regional Arts Forum will be held May 5 at the Pantages Theater, 5:50-7 p.m. Admission is free. This will be an informal meet and greet event where you will have an opportunity to meet Karen Hanan, the new executive director of ArtsWa. This is Hananâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first stop on a year-long quest to meet community members across the state. Bring your questions and comments and learn more about the programs and opportunities supported by ArtsWA. Tacoma Arts Commission is organizing and hosting this event to welcome Hanan to our community. Additional ArtsWA Regional Arts Forums will be held over the course of the year in Vancouver, Bellingham, Yakima, Twisp, Spokane, and other Washington cities to be announced. *,3,)9(;,,(9;/+(@(;<)08<0;6<:16<95,@ The 34th annual Earth Day promises exciting things in the City of Tacoma. Local businesses, such as Ubiquitous Journey (Ubiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) on Sixth Avenue, will be celebrating this important holiday in unique ways. As a purveyor of high quality herbs, spices and teas, owner Robyn Liss is dedicated to bringing responsibly sourced goods to the community. In line with her vision for her business, Liss has planned a day focused on environmental education with three free classes for the community to attend. The April 22 festivities at Ubiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s begin with a presentation from the City of Tacoma at 3:30 p.m. Attendees will learn about programs the city has to offer for recycling. As reported by www.dosomething.org, 75 percent of waste created in the U.S. is recyclable yet we only recycle 30 percent, leaving a staggering 45 percent to be sent to landfills. Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs include food, yard and recyclable materials for residents and businesses to help reduce the impact of greenhouse gasses and other environmental risks created by garbage. At 4:15 p.m. local horticulturist, herbalist and Tacoma Weekly columnist Kerri Bailey will offer a class on organic gardening at home. Her second class on green cleaning will begin at 5 p.m. Both classes are designed to provide attendees with useful takeaways that can easily be put into practice: Tips for killing weeds and pests without pesticides and making your own non-toxic cleaning products. A local spice and tea merchant, Ubiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also features a cafĂŠ and coffee bar. Located at 2607 6th Ave. in Tacoma, the store will be offering $1 off all drinks on Earth Day. For more information about Ubiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, visit www.ubjourney.com or call (253) 572-2550. +65(;,;6:63+0,9*(9,7(*(2.,:05-0-,403;65 The cities of Fife and Milton are accepting deployment donations for mid-tour care packages for the 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment deployed to Afghanistan. Sponsored by the Association of United States Army Capt. Meriwether Lewis Chapter and Sgt. Patrick Gass Subchapter (www.ausa.org), donations are being accepted until Friday, May 9. The Sgt. Patrick Gass Subchapter of The Association of the United States Army supports the 32/75th Ranger Battalion based out of Joint Base Lewis McChord. Rangers recently re-deployed to the Middle East in the support of the global war on terrorism. One of the ways that AUSA supports the Rangers is a mid-deployment care package airlift. In this way, AUSA has an opportunity to express thanks for their service to our country, and to let them know that we have their backs in providing some relief during their extremely challenging mission. Drop off points are located at Milton City Hall, 1000 Laurel St; Fife City Hall, 5411 23rd St. E.; and Albertsons, 2800 Milton Way. The list of items the Rangers have indicated they would appreciate includes chewing gum, tuna/ chicken (individual packets), canned meats, protein shakes/ bars, energy drinks (Monster, Amp, Red Bull, 5-Hour Energy), trail mix/mixed nuts/sunflower seeds/pistachios/ nuts, drink powder (sports drinks, lemonade, iced tea), candy (no chocolate â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it will melt), Keurig K-cups (assorted flavors), dried fruit/beef jerky, Top Ramen, baby wipes, sunscreen/lip balm, shampoo/conditioner, personal fans, reading magazines for men and cash donations. Donors are also encouraged to include a note or letter of support along with their donation. For cash donations, the money will be used to buy items still needed. Please make checks out to Sgt. Patrick Gass/AUSA and mail to AUSA, PO BOX 33181, JBLM, WA 98433. Please write â&#x20AC;&#x153;2/75 Ranger Mid Deployment Care Packageâ&#x20AC;? in the memo line. Any cash collected beyond purchases will be applied to the chapter general fund and used for other Ranger functions such as the Award Ceremony or Ranger Ball. Cash collections are appreciated and necessary to continue efforts connecting with the Rangers. The AUSA represents every American solider by being the voice for all components of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Army, fostering public support of the Armyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role in national security and providing profession education and information programs.


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WASHINGTONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MOST WANTED CAPTURES 500TH FUGITIVE By David Rose Correspondent

A convicted sex offender and accused Tacoma rapist is the 500th W a s h i n g t o n â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wanted fugitive captured DAVID ROSE thanks to Crime Stoppers tips from viewers since the show started airing in November, 2008. The milestone was recognized by Governor Jay Inslee, who declared April 17, 2014 as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wantedâ&#x20AC;? Day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a criminal trying to hide in Washington state, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have a tough time,â&#x20AC;? said Inslee. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have six and a half million people working together to keep our communities safe. Thanks to the hard work of the men and women serving in law enforcement agencies throughout the state, and the vigilant viewers of Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wanted, there are 500 violent

offenders off our streets and behind bars.â&#x20AC;? King County detectives and the U.S. Marshalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pacific Northwest Fugitive Apprehension Task Force arrested Harvey Johnson in SeaTac less than a week after he was featured as the top fugitive. Johnson had a $100,000 warrant for failing to register in King County. He was designated a level 3 sex offender after being convicted in 1997 for grabbing a 14-year-old girl off her bike and raping her. Johnson was also wanted by Tacoma police after detectives say he dragged a woman from a bus stop last summer and raped her in the woods. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mr. Johnson is a violent offender who deserves to be locked up and off the streets for the rest of his life. And that is what we intend to do,â&#x20AC;? said Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist. Numerous tips from viewers started coming in to the Crime Stoppers hotline after Johnson

was featured on March 1. He was spotted riding the Route 8 bus on Rainier Avenue South several times. King County Det. Derrick McCauley, who works on the Marshalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Task Force, followed up on every lead. Five days after Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s case first aired on Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wanted, a viewer made an urgent call to the Crime Stoppers hotline. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was spotted near a bus stop on International Boulevard. Detectives saw him get on the bus.â&#x20AC;? said King County Sgt. Cindi West. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They stopped the bus. When they initially contacted him, he lied about his name, and then once they said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;look, we know who you are,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; he started crying like a baby all the way to jail.â&#x20AC;? Hours later, detectives say, Johnson had a seizure and fell off the top bunk in jail fracturing his neck. He underwent major surgery and is still in the hospital. When he recovers, Johnson faces a new rape charge in Tacoma. Prosecutors say on Aug. 1,

HARVEY JOHNSON

2013 he grabbed a woman from behind at a bus stop at South 74th and Cedar Street, pulled her into the woods and raped her. Public Information Officer Loretta Cool with Tacoma Police says Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arrest proves the relationship between the media, police and public is an invaluable tool. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thank you Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wanted for providing this avenue that allows the citizens to get involved with no fear of repercussions from the criminals.â&#x20AC;?

COUNTY EYES HOSPITAL FOR NEW OFFICES

County moves forward with Puget Sound General Hospital for consolidated offices, while Historic Tacoma calls foul By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Pierce County is fast tracking plans to demolish the abandoned Puget Sound Hospital along Pacific Avenue to then build an office complex to consolidate many of its operations that are now in leased spaces around the city. The former hospital at 3580 Pacific Ave. was closed in 2010 and was listed for surplus sale with no takers. Absent a new owner, it has sat vacant for four years. During that time, Pierce County officials started to study how to control their leasing costs and boost efficiencies by co-locating governmental services. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We actually leased more property than we owned,â&#x20AC;? Deputy Executive Kevin Phelps said during a briefing on the move to Tacoma City Council. The 66,000-square-foot

PHOTO BY CEDRIC LEGGIN

NEW DIGS. Pierce County is fast tracking efforts to develop a new office space at the abandoned Puget Sound Hospital site as a way to consolidate departmental services.

hospital, which has parts that date back to 1926, was expensive to heat and maintain. Renovations would be more expensive than new construction. The current leased spaces were also facing costly renovations as well, so locating county government offices at a

new facility on land the county already owned started making financial sense. Moving 1,000 county employees to the Lincoln District site would also provide an economic boost to the neighborhood and provide for future growth. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It met all of our main loca-

tion criteria as well as had all of these other benefits that were there,â&#x20AC;? Phelps said. Plans are to have design work done this year, with a new building springing up in 2015 and the actual move set for 2016. The staffing shuffle would move the Assessor-Treasurer, Auditor, Planning and Land Services, County Council, County Executive and Public Works operations into the 13-acre, former hospital site. Office spaces within the County-City Building and other county-owned facilities that would be freed up in the shuffle would be filled by other departments currently housed in leased spaces around the city, namely the County Annex, which was built originally to be a department store. The new facility would be privately built through a leaseX See OFFICES / page A11

Sometimes drunken drivers are subtle, sometimes are not. Two Tacoma Weeklythey is interested in what is drunken happening in our community. recent drivers were clearly in Please sendcamp. your news and story ideas the latter to news@tacomaweekly.com. An officer spotted a red Mustang speeding along the 1100 block of North Pearl Street and prompted a traffic stop, after clocking the driver at speeding 15 miles over the speed limit and crossing the double yellow line during a straight strip of roadway on April 11. The female driver had obviously bloodshot eyes, smelled of alcohol and slurred her words during the investigation. The woman said that she had just gotten off work at a liquor store and had a shot of â&#x20AC;&#x153;99 Whipâ&#x20AC;? before driving home. She failed all of the field sobriety tests and then did a breathalyzer that was double the legal limit. She was taken to Fife Jail. Also on April 11, an officer spotted a car speeding along Division and watched the car swerve around a corner, ignoring the fact that the driver was in the wrong lane. The officer activated the patrol carâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s emergency lights and followed the car, which drove for several blocks before turning a corner and finally coming to a stop. Yep, the man smelled like booze and couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t talk well enough to be easily understood. He then failed all the field sobriety tests. He was taken to jail without incident. Compiled by Steve Dunkelberger

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#1 DAFFODIL FESTIVAL GRAND FLORAL PARADE DAFFODIL PARADE BRINGS A SENSE OF SPRINGTIME AMID OVERCAST SKIES

#2 GO HUSKIES!

UWT MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BASKETBALL TEAM CONTINUES TO MAKE AN IMPACT BOTH ON AND OFF THE COURT

#3 TCC BASEBALL OFF TO INCREDIBLE START #4 BEST OF TACOMA 2014 WINNERS #5 OUT OF MY ELEMENT VOL. II: WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ROLLER DERBY

5.3/,6%$ (/-)#)$% The suspect is described as a black Tacoma Police detectives need your help to identify the suspect responsible male in his late teens or early 20â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, with for the murder of 19-year-old Charles a heavy build and hair worn in either â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chuckyâ&#x20AC;? Williams of University Place. short dreadlocks or curls. He was seen At 1:25 a.m. on Sunday March 23rd, wearing jean shorts and a black t-shirt 2014, victim Chucky Williams was shot with red and white lettering on the and killed by an unidentified suspect at front.

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the intersection of 6th Ave. and Fife St. in the City of Tacoma. The victim had just left a memorial party at a nearby dance hall when he became involved in a large fight involving several unidentified people. During the fight, an unidentified suspect displayed a handgun and fired multiple shots, striking the victim in the back.

Fridays at 10:30pm on

A video of the shooting can be viewed on KING5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website. At the time of the shooting there were over 30 people involved in or watching the fight, and investigators are asking anyone who may have been there to please come forward. Detectives are looking for any information regarding the suspect responsible for the crime.

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-VYTLYTH`VYJHSSZMVY KPZIHUKPUNVM*OHY[LY9L]PL^ By Steve Dunkelberger

By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Community boosters in Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eastside got a boost of good news from a city-funded study that determined a community center in their neighborhood is not only needed but would be successful â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that is, if a partnership can cobble together money to pay for it. The pricetag is $30 million to $35 million. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we are going to get there,â&#x20AC;? City Councilman Marty Campbell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And I think we are going to get there sooner rather than later because I think everyone agrees that it is needed and needed soon.â&#x20AC;? The proposal is being talked about among officials from the City of Tacoma, Metro Parks Tacoma, Tacoma Public Schools, Tacoma Housing Authority and the community group Team Billy Ray, which formed after 17-year-old Billy Ray Hayes was murdered in the neighborhood in 2011. Funding for the building will come from state, federal and local dollars including $6 million from the $198 million parks bond set for a public vote on April 22. The Washington State Legislature has already set aside $400,000 for the facility as well. Partnerships could also include the Puyallup Tribe since the facility would be located near tribal facilities. The proposed 58,000-squarefoot community center, fitness facility and swimming pool would be a step in replacing community amenities that have disappeared in recent years, namely the Eastside Boys & Girls Club and Gault Middle School, which the Puyallup Tribe has pondered as a community center as well. This new

Former Tacoma mayor Harold Moss wants Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland to scrap the Charter Review Committee and start over because of what he calls corruption in the process. Moss stated his case in an e-mail to the mayor this week, following statements by some of the committee members about their stance on discussions about a likely proposed shift to a more centralized mayoral system. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Charter Review Committee now has the stain of being disingenuous in their charge of review and recommendation to the City Council by leading the citizens into believing that their input had value,â&#x20AC;? Moss wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;According to the closed door, but open mic session after the meeting, the people who testified in favor of keeping the present Council-Manager form of government donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter anyway. Public hearings advertised as giving citizens a voice in its governance have now been proven to be a mockery.â&#x20AC;? His letter comes after the committee held a public hearing on the charter review process that was followed by a second, less attended but still open meeting, when a few of the committee members voiced whether they had heard enough from the public to make their recommendations. Committee Chairman and former mayor Bill Baarsma defended the process and said Moss had mischaracterized the follow-up meeting and the committee comments. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone is entitled to their opinion,â&#x20AC;? he stated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The meeting referred to was open, and there

IMAGE COURTESY OF CITY OF TACOMA

CENTER. A feasibility study of a proposed community center

in Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eastside calls for a partnership to cover the $30 million pricetag in a neighborhood with few public activity options.

facility would include a 31,600square-foot community center and a 26,800-square-foot aquatic center near First Creek Middle School and Swan Creek Park. Design concepts suggest a building that could draw from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Northwest themesâ&#x20AC;? or from Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s icons or from its heritage, specifically its ties to Native American tribes and Asian countries.

The next steps proposed for moving the project forward include spending the $400,000 from the state to develop more detailed plans and defining the roles and financial backing from each of the known partners as well as finding other funding sources. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we will be knocking on a lot of doors,â&#x20AC;? Campbell said.

was at least one member of the public in attendance. There was no â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hot micâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; because the meeting was called to order and thus the mic was on. There are varying opinions on the committee as demonstrated by the recording itself. The important thing is that there is no one particular point of view on the committee, and there are a good mix of views. I guess that is troubling to some people.â&#x20AC;? The 15-member committee, he continued, is tasked through council appointment to draft recommendations of charter changes that would then be considered by the City Council, so the committee itself has no power to bring change itself. The City Council will decide which, if any, of the recommendations will be forwarded to the public for a vote. Those recommendations are due April 19, and will be presented to the City Council on May 6. Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Charter will be the topic of a panel discussion at 6:30 p.m. April 24 at University of Washington-Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s William Philip Hall. The public is invited to this free event to learn more and hear pros and cons of what may fundamentally change how the city operates. Panelists include: Charter Review Committee Chairman Bill Baarsma, Michael Sullivan, UWT professor, Lyle Quasim, Tacoma-Pierce County Black Collective Co-chair, Lyz Kurnitz-Thurlow, Tacoma-Pierce County League of Women Voters 1st Vice President, and John Ladenburg, former Tacoma council member and Pierce County Executive.

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Local Restaurant Spotlight GINGER PALACE: BUILDING A REPUTATION ON QUALITY

By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

W

hile the Ginger Palace, located at 8736 S. Hosmer St., may look like it simply offers Asian cuisine, the food, much like the interior decorating, is a fusion of cultures brought to life by executive chef Merle Simpson and owner Phillip Tran. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all chefs here. We have high standards of quality because thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all we know,â&#x20AC;? Simpson said, backed by the restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s four and a half star average on popular review site Yelp.com. Though the restaurant is the second with the Ginger Palace name, the first being located in SeaTac, Simpson hopes the establishment can help boost the culinary reputation of the South End. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We really want to help Tacoma be all it can be, we want to build this city up,â&#x20AC;? Simpson said. Ginger Palace hopes to accomplish this with an impressive array of Asian food like its renowned Kung Pao chicken and Mongolian beef, but the true strength lies in the versatility of the Palaceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cooks. Among the chef â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s specials are unique fusions of French, American and Asian cuisine and meatloaf wrapped in bacon. Ginger Palace is not only a fusion of food, but

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a fusion of restaurant design. In one corner sits the bar, surrounded by seven large, high-definition televisions playing various sports. With 12 different beers on tap, the Ginger Palace could almost function solely as a tavern. But the restaurant also houses so much more, including a large banquet room, complete with a stage for karaoke, a dance floor and a large projector screen that can be rented out for special occasions including weddings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want all of Tacoma to know that this is the place to come and celebrate,â&#x20AC;? Simpson said. For a smaller affair, a private â&#x20AC;&#x153;firesideâ&#x20AC;? room is also available next to the spacious main dining area, which will need plenty of room when the Ginger Palace begins offering Dim Sum on the weekends starting April 26. Dim Sum is a Cantonese style of food in which individual servings of food are carted around the restaurant for customers to pick out. Starting April 26, the Ginger Palace will be the only location in Tacoma serving Dim Sum, according to Simpson. The Ginger Palace ties food and atmosphere together with an emphasis on family bonds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We treat our staff like family,â&#x20AC;? Simpson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Very few businesses touch on how they are a family and how they communicate with the community as a family.â&#x20AC;? For those who want to try the experience personally, Ginger Palace caters events as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You just tell us what you want, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get it for you,â&#x20AC;? Simpson said. Ginger Palace can be reached at (253) 5482419.

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The Puyallup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s donation of $200,000 to Northwest Harvest will help keep food on the table for countless struggling families.

Considered among the most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians has grown to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its own membership but sharing its wealth among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County, with a payroll of more than 3,300 people

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 74 percent of whom are non-Native. Working in the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities, these employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits. In 2012, the Tribe spent over $445 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more. Even during the recession, the Tribe increased employment and funded substantial vendor purchases and construction projects,

keeping many businesses afloat and people employed. As the country continues to recover from past economic woes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians leads the way locally. From sponsoring dozens of local charities, nonprofit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer or cease to exist, to protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and health care, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its well-deserved reputation as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the generous people,â&#x20AC;? a reflection of the meaning of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very name.

)0(%/)%0.%/!1)-,0 +./-3),'&7#)%,#61-/-1%#1!*+-, is checked for fish twice a day at dawn and dusk. During hatchery releases and high flow events, personnel remain onsite through the night to clear the trap of debris and to keep fish from overcrowding. Salmonids collected in the trap are identified by species, measured for length and checked for hatchery or wild origin. After this short sampling period, they are released back into the river to continue their migration. Data collected from the project is used to estimate juvenile abundance, which provides baseline information to allow managers to meet escapement objectives in the watershed, forecast future returns of hatchery and naturally produced adults and provide critical biological and life history patterns of each species. Data collected in the past 14 years by the Tribe has been, and will continue to be, critical in determining the trends in productivity and evaluating the health of the watershed. The Tribe also plays an active role in improving fish passage and survivability to ensure bountiful returns for tribal and sport fisherman. In 2013, the tribal fisheries staff worked endlessly to monitor and improve fish passage above Mud Mountain dam and through the fish trap A juvenile Chinook salmon with parr marks (characteristic operated by the Army Corps of Engineers in Buckley, vertical bands) captured in the screw trap. Puyallup Tribe operates two of the five hatcheries on the Puyallup River, playing a vital role in salmon restoration and commercial fishing alongside non-tribal facilities. The Tribe conducts the Puyallup River Juvenile Salmonid Production Assessment Project, which began in 2000. The Puyallup Tribal Fisheries Department started the project to estimate juvenile production of native salmonids, with an emphasis on natural Fall Chinook salmon production and survival of hatchery and acclimation pond Chinook. In 2011, a newly constructed trapping platform was put into place on the lower Puyallup at RM 10.6, just upstream of the confluence with the White River. Trap operation begins in early spring (early-February) and continues, when feasible, 24 hours a day, seven days a week until late summer (mid-August). The trap

A screw trap near the Main Street Bridge churns away on the Puyallup River.

Washington. The Tribe continues to play an active role in urging the Army Corps of Engineers to meet its obligations to move fish above the dam for spawning and improve passage to lessen an unacceptable mortality rate at the fish trap due to the trapâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outdated design and capacity. In addition to the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s innovative hatchery operations and work to improve fish passage, in 2013 the Tribe constructed an acclimation pond on private land in Clearwater to provide for spring Chinook runs and should see its first fish in the spring.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;This project fills a production hole weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had since the road washed away in 2009,â&#x20AC;? said Russ Ladley, resource protection manager for the Tribe. The Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hatchery is key in providing spring Chinook runs for tribal and non-tribal fishermen on the Puyallup River. In 2014, the Tribe plans to construct an additional acclimation pond that will hold steelhead. With successful completion of the acclimation pond, the Tribe will be the only entity producing and rearing 50,000 steelhead in the watershed.

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 )**)-,), Indian people pay taxes. They pay most of the same taxes non-Indians pay, and in some cases additional Tribal taxes as well. Indians have a few tax exemptions, just as non-Indians do. The Puyallup Tribe and its members are dramatic examples of these realities. Indian tribes collect taxes that are then sent to the appropriate taxing bodies. The Tribe withholds federal income tax from its employees (who include Puyallup Tribal members, other Indians and non-Indians), and from the per capita payments it makes to its members. As

federal law provides, the Tribe sends that money to the I.R.S., a total of over $43 million in FY 2013. As an employer, the Tribe pays its share of payroll taxes and withholds payroll taxes from its employees, which is then sent to the Social Security Administration and other government agencies. Those taxes added up to over $18 million in FY 2013. Under the terms of agreements with the State of Washington and local governments, the Tribe collects and pays tax funds to those governments, including about $11

million to the State of Washington, and over $300,000 to the City of Fife. Unlike all other governments, non-trust land owned by the Puyallup Tribal government is often subject to state and local property taxes. In 2013, the Puyallup Tribe paid nearly $1 million in property taxes to state and local governments. The total amount in taxes collected, withheld, or paid to the various governments by the Tribe in FY 2013 was over $75 million.

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Sports

TH

E

SI DE

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E

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 18, 2014

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 7

TACOMA RAINIERS

HALL OF FAMER TEACHES CRAFT OF PITCHING TO RAINIERS

WILSON OVERCOMES OFFENSIVE STRUGGLES TO EDGE MT 1-0

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

PHOTO LEAD. (Top) Vitaliy Dimov (left) and Burhan Saleh (right) battled the entire match. (Bottom) Tony Nguyen (left) gets his head on the ball before Andres Coronado (right) and Ethan Strenn (back). By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

PLAY BALL. (Top) Pitcher Chance Ruffin is still looking for his first win. (Left) James Jones has been a force in the batter’s box this season. (Right) Catcher Jesus Sucre has been rock-solid behind the plate. By Karen Westeen Missbaseball9@juno.com

T

his year the Rainiers have two new staff members— manager Roy Howell and hitting coach Cory Snyder—while Jaime Navarro returns as pitching coach, the position he held in 2010 when the Rainiers won the Pacific Coast League championship. He spent the next three seasons as the Mariners’ bullpen coach. Before coming to Tacoma, Navarro, now 46, coached in the Mariners’ minor league system for two years. He spent 2008 with single A Wisconsin and was with high-A High Desert (Cal.) in 2009. He pitched for 13 seasons with four major league teams (1989 to 2000, Milwaukee, both Chicago teams, and Cleveland.) From 2004 to 2006, he played in Italy with BBC Grosseto. His lifetime record with the American teams is 116-126, with an ERA of 4.72. KW: You were born in Puerto Rico

and have spent a lot of time traveling around the baseball world. Where do you call home now? JN: Winter home for me, my wife and my two children is Orlando, Florida. KW: How old are the children? JN: My son is 19, just starting college, and my daughter is 17, about to finish high school. KW: Does your family get to spend much time with you during the season? JN: They will be here quite a bit during the summer. KW: Where did you start playing professionally? JN: I started pitching right out of Miami-Dade Community College in Florida. I was drafted by the Orioles during my first and second years in college, but I didn’t sign. The Brewers drafted me in 1987, and I signed with them. That was the first team I played with, at the rookie level for a month

and a half. KW: Had you been to Cheney Stadium before you came in as a coach? JN: Yes, I played here once when I was with Colorado 20 years ago. This park has changed. KW: How did you wind up coaching for the Mariners’ organization? JN: I talked to my father Julio and I had a plan to go to the winter meetings (to talk to team personnel about a job.) I got a few offers. One was from Seattle, and I got a job. I had heard so much good about Seattle, how they signed a lot of Spanish kids. I thought being bilingual, I could help them. I’ve been grateful. KW: When the game is over your job is far from done. How many hours do you spend on reports? JN: A long time. I have a plan for each day. After the game I talk to the players, find out how they did, what we need to work on, put that into reports X See NAVARRO/ page A11

The Wilson Rams couldn’t get a good look at the opposing goal for over 65 minutes Tuesday night April 15 at Mount Tahoma Stadium. That meant zero shots on goal. A couple of long thirty-plus yard drives in the first half was all they could muster against the Thunderbirds as the two teams worked their way through a hard-scrabble match. In the 65th minute, the Rams were finally able to take advantage of a Mt. Tahoma error when senior Aarjay Narayan punched a crossing pass into the box to freshman Ethan Strenn who was slashing from the far side. With just one defender on his hip, Strenn dribbled the ball to his left, opening up just enough space to get off a left-foot strike past Thunderbird goalkeeper Jesus Mendoza and into the right corner of the goal for a 1-0 advantage and ultimately a Ram victory. “We were out of position and trying to push guys up,” said Mount Tahoma coach Scott Nelson. “The problem is, in a tight game like this, sometimes you force things and it comes back to bite you.” “We talked about it at halftime the way we’re going to get a goal is to get the ball wide and get them out of shape,” said Wilson coach Jason Gjertson. “They were a little bit slow shifting over. Aarjay played a good ball into Ethan and he pretty much did the rest.” For the second game in a row Mt Tahoma dictated the majority of the action and was unable to find the back of the nets. The Thunderbirds dominated the first half controlling the ball on the Wilson side of the pitch and was continuously hammering away with shots and runs toward Wilson goalkeeper Alek Greenleaf. Mt Tahoma had two breakaway chances snuffed out by offside penalties in the first half. Mt Tahoma’s Vitaliy Dimov and Ian Karanja were able to get behind the Wilson defenders several times in the second half, but each run was over before it began as the lead passes were too long and gobbled up by Greenleaf. In the final ten minutes, Mt Tahoma had five excellent opportunities to score the equalizer goal, but was unable to capitalize with a well-placed shot. Young Jae In missed the far post by a foot in the tenth minute. Greenleaf stabbed the ball out of the air on a corner kick at the eight minute mark. Karanja missed the upper corner of the box by a couple feet on X See SOCCER / page A10


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;(*64(9(050,9::(3;3(2,),,:;<,:+(@(7903

SPORTSWATCH TCC BASEBALL CONTINUES ONSLAUGHT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; NOW 25-1

Tacoma Community College has the hottest team in the Northwest right now. Ranked #1 in the NWAACC Coachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Poll, the Titans are now 10-0 in the West Region Conference standings and 25-1 overall. The team hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lost a game in six weeks and their recent contests havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even been close. Over their last seven games, the Titans have outscored their opponents by a total of 58-0. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seven consecutive shutouts. Danger looms near the end of the season. Currently, TCC sits just one game ahead of both Lower Columbia and Pierce College who are each 9-1 in Conference. As the regular season draws to a close, the Titans will face Lower Columbia four times on May 3 and 4 and close-out with four games against crosstown rival Pierce College on May 9 and 10.

),33(9405,79,7:;,9: MAKE SOME NOISE AT ARCADIA TRACK INVITATIONAL Senior Hannah Derby and sophomore Jack Yearian represented Bellarmine Prep at the prestigious Arcadia Track and Field Invitational April 11 and 12 in Los Angeles. Derby finished second in the girlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 800 meter invitational and Yearian won the boyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rising stars one mile run. Derbyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time of 2:10.59 in the 800 is currently the fifth-best high school time in the United States

this year. The three-time 400 meter 4A state champion recently signed a letter of intent to run for the University of Washington next year. Derby heads to the Oregon Relays in Eugene on April 18 and 19. Yearian won the rising stars one mile in 4:17.48. The race was limited to the best underclassmen at the Arcadia Invitational and was ultimately the fourth-best one mile time overall.

LIFE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY RETURNS TO CLASS 2B IN FALL OF 2014

Life Christian will be joining the Pacific 2B league next school year after four years competing at the Class 1A level. The school anticipates shorter travel times for away games and better opportunities to compete at the state and district levels. Plans are underway to retain games against current rival Nisqually 1A schools for non-league contests.

7(*0-0*3<;/,9(5Âť:(1 2(5676:20;0,:)(:,)(33 SAVE RECORD

Junior AJ Kanoposki has been closing the door for the Lutes all season long. The right-handed closer notched his eleventh save of the season on Tuesday April 15 in a 10-5 win over Saint Martins â&#x20AC;&#x201C; tying the school record set by Aaron Roetcisoender in 1994. Kanoposkiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eleven saves leads all closers in NCAA Division III. In 27 appearances, Kanoposki is 2-0 with a 1.30 ERA.

BE WELL

inside & out

56;(01<(5>(32,9 )<;9(050,9:;67),,: By Steve Mullen

smullen@tacomaweekly.com

The Rainiers were riding high after a 8-6 win over the Albuquerque Isotopes in New Mexico city on Monday night, which extended the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winning streak to four games, and with the much anticipated rehab start of Taijuan Walker on Tuesday night at home, there was excitement in the air. The excitement was tempered when it was learned before game time that Walker developed a sore shoulder and was unable to start. With Walker being shut down for an undetermined period of time, James Gillheeney scattered three hits over five innings, and the Rainiers extended their winning streak to five games with an 8-5 win over the Salt Lake Bees. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We tried to change it up early,â&#x20AC;? said Tacoma manager Roy Howell, who was referring to his teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s penchant of falling behind early. The Rainiers jumped out to a 8-1 lead after four innings of play and held on late for the win. With the

concern over Walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoulder, Howell held an extended after the game meeting with Mariner General Manager Jack Zuriencik to no doubt discuss possible options, pending the news on Walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoulder after he is examined tomorrow. â&#x20AC;&#x153;His (Walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) shoulder was tight and he could not get loose, we obviously wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rush him and he will be examined tomorrowâ&#x20AC;? said Howell. No worries about the Tacoma bats. The Rainiers scored often and early with Nick Franklinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tape measure two-run homer over the right field wall in the first inning that gave the Rainiers a 2-0 lead, it was a lead they would not surrender. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our pitchers did a nice job too, we are a better team when we jump out to an early lead,â&#x20AC;? said Howell. A major force in the Rainiers early seven run outburst was centerfielder James Jones who went 2 for 4, scored two runs and stole a base. A 2009 fourth round draftee out of Long Island University in New York, Jones has steadily progressed up the Mariner

ladder. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The travel in triple A is long, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m adjusting and trying to pick up opposing pitchersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; habits when I get on baseâ&#x20AC;? said Jones. Nursing an 8-1 lead entering the sixth inning, Howell gave the ball to Zach Miner who quickly gave up a tworun home run to Brennan Boesch and the Tacoma lead was trimmed to 8-5. Howell then turned to Steven Pryor who would give up a walk and a single but then would close the door, finishing with a strikeout of Matt Long to pick up a save and preserve the 8-5 win and improve the Rainiers record to 6-5 on the early season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was a little too excited to start the inning but settled down in time to pick my team up, it felt good to finally find the strike zoneâ&#x20AC;? said Pryor who was not throwing real hard with a high of 94 on the Jugs gun. Pryor, who was expected to start the season in the Mariner bullpen wants to gradually get back to his old self, but will not rush his rehab. X See RAINIERS / page A10

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;<,:+(@(7903Âś.093:;,550: 3065Âť:+,5. Bellarmine Lady Lions huddle up and plan their comeback.

*3<;*//0;;05.30-;:3(+@ 3065:;6=0*;69@ By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

It was a game both teams desperately wanted to win and had a playoff feel to it. The Bellarmine Prep Lady Lions needed the victory to keep pace with Olympia and Yelm ahead of them in the 4A Narrows Fastpitch standings. South Kitsap was simply looking for their first win and a ticket out of last place and they nearly pulled it off. Bellarmine used a lead-off triple in the bottom of the seventh inning by sophomore shortstop Alyssa McKiernan and a firstpitch single by senior pitcher Courtney Schwan to break a 5-5 tie and break-up any hopes for the Wolvesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first win of the season. The 6-5 victory pushes Bellarmine to 2-2 in the Narrows and 5-4 overall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;South Kitsapâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good team and I think theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still trying to find themselves,â&#x20AC;? said Bellarmine

coach Craig Coovert. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They lost some key seniors last year and some tough games this season. They won the league last year and made it to State and I think a lot of people thought they would have a chance to do it again this year. We knew regardless of their record that this was going to be a tough game for us.â&#x20AC;? Things didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t start so well for the Lady Lions. In the first inning, South Kitsap (0-4 Narrows, 3-4 overall) jumped out to a 3-0 lead thanks to a couple of singles, a walk and a two-base throwing error. Bellarmine clawed back in the third inning starting with a single by freshman right fielder Charlotte James. With two outs, James stole second base on a wild pitch and McKiernan drove her home with a double to deep right field. Schwan brought McKiernan home smacking a frozen-rope single to left-center field to close the score X See FASTPITCH / page A10

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From page A9

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not on any sort of timetable but with my particular type of injury (right shoulder) I want to take as much time as I need to get back to 100 percentâ&#x20AC;? he said. At gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s end Howell had a lot of praise for Gillheeney. â&#x20AC;&#x153; It was a great start, James went on three days rest and gutted out five good innings, surrendering only three hits and turning it over to our bullpen with a big lead, it was a great start when we needed itâ&#x20AC;? said Howell. There was plenty of praise to go around the Rainier clubhouse and two other players who caught Howellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes in the early going are Chris Taylor and Nick Franklin. Taylor, who split time between single A High Desert and AA Jackson earned the honor of the Mariners minor League player of the year and Franklin spent much of last year in Seattle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are two great young talents who have a great future ahead of them, the skyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the limit for themâ&#x20AC;? said Howell.

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GLOVED. Sophomore shortstop Alyssa McKiernan digs out a hot grounder.

up in the mesh-netting before firing the ball back in. By that time McKiernan was standing at third. Next up would be the future Washington Husky Courtney Schwan and she took no time in ending the game pounding a shot into left-center and that was the ballgame.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had three freshmen in the outfield today and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m excited about the heart we showed today coming back from three runs down,â&#x20AC;? said Coovert. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not always how you do it, just as long as you get it done. Hopefully better things will continue to come for us.â&#x20AC;?

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a free kick at the six minute mark. Tony Nguyen led Dimov too far on a wide open run to the net that Greenleaf scooped up at the 2:45 mark. A minute later, Dimov had a tenfooter blocked by Greenleaf and missed high on the rebound over the goal. Just before time expired, Anthony Garibaldi lofted a

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WNavarro From page A7

for the Mariners. My job is to make sure that the pitchers are ready for the show physically and mentally. That preparation is about 80 percent mental and 20 percent physical. KW: You coach both starters and relievers here. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s different being just the bullpen coach? JN: In the Big League bullpen you just work with relievers, keep track of how many pitches theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re throwing, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s available, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sore or not sore. Here, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m in charge of everyone. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the main difference. When I went up to the big league, I was in the pen, but I learned how to work at the big league level. Now coming back down here I put (both parts) together. KW: Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been with a lot of teams. What advice did you pick up from the coaches you worked with that you try to pass on to your pitchers?

JN: Be patient, be specific about your pitching style. I look the players straight in the eyes and try to convince them to stay healthy. My father Julio played baseball, too, so that helped me a lot. He was also a scout as well as a minor league pitching coordinator for the Atlanta Braves. He helped me a lot, telling me how to work with a pitching staff. Every time I have a question I can call him. I learned a lot from him about the mental game. Baseballâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not all on the field. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all human. I want to pass on what I know, so the young pitchers will be better than I was, not make the same mistakes I did when I was young. KW: Does your father live near you in Florida? JN: No, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still in Puerto Rico, but heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s planning to move to Florida soon so he can be near the family. KW: What are the highlights of your career? JN: As a pitcher, to have been consistent for as long as I was. As a coach, I just want to be better, to grow and learn from others. Some-

body knows something I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know and I try to learn something every day, or teach something to someone else. I think the most memorable thing thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coming up now is I will be installed in the Milwaukee Brewersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hall of Fame in June. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking forward to being in there with guys like Robin Yount, Paul Molitor, Cecil Cooper, Rollie Fingers. It was a surprise and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m proud. (Navarroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s record with Milwaukee was 62-64, with an ERA of 4.18.)

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2588 Pacific Highway, Fife, WA 98424  Â&#x2039;-(?!  7\ISPZOLY!John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com 6WLYH[PVUZ4HUHNLY!Tim Meikle / tim@tacomaweekly.com 5L^Z+LZR!news@tacomaweekly.com 4HUHNPUN,KP[VY!Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com :[HMM>YP[LYZ! Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Kathleen Merryman / kathleen@tacomaweekly.com Derek Shuck / derek@tacomaweekly.com ,U[LY[HPUTLU[,KP[VY! Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com :WVY[Z,KP[VY! Justin Gimse/ jgimse@tacomaweekly.com 7HNPUH[PVU!Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar >LI+L]LSVWLYZ! Cedric Leggin, Ed Curran, Mike Vendetti, Jacob Thiel 7OV[VNYHWOLY! Rocky Ross *VU[YPI\[PUN>YP[LYZ! Karen Westeen, Steve Mullen, Dave Davison, Sean Contris (K]LY[PZPUN!Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Colleen McDonald / cmcdonald@tacomaweekly.com, Marlene Carrillo / marlene@tacomaweekly.com

KW: The last time you were here was 2010 when the Rainiers were Pacific Coast League champions. How do you compare this staff to that one? JN: I had good pitchers, lots of prospects that I knew through my time in the Minor Leagues. And I saw some of them in the Seattle bullpen, so now I have to get to know them one by one, what they throw, make them feel good about themselves and develop a sense of camaraderie, give them confidence that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have a winning season.

Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. Tacoma Weekly welcomes letters to the editor, your opinions and viewpoints. Anonymous letters will not be published. Tacoma Weekly reserves the right to edit letters for length, content and potentially libelous material. Please send them to above address or e-mail us at letters@tacomaweekly.com.

WHouses From page A1

business would donate the labor and materials for the new home construction. The redevelopment of the site would be the latest product of a partnership called House for Hope fronted by MBA member businesses. A House for Hope site, located in the Rock Creek development in Spanaway, was completed last year and showcased during the 2013 South Sound Parade of Homes and benefitted Communities in Schools, which provides children with communitybased resources in order to help them learn, stay in school, and prepare for life. Municipal Code allows for the waiving of debts in excess of $25,000 only after it is reviewed and approved by the Tacoma City Council. City staffers working on the details that will face a council decision this summer.

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From page A3

to-own agreement, Phelps said, adding that a $100 million pricetag would translate to $4 million a year for 30 years at which time the county would own the facility outright. Detailed costs will come out during the design phase. As part of the process, county officials are accepting public comment through Friday. And local historians have concerns. Historic Tacoma, for example, points out that the environmental review mentions nothing about the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historical significance, which was surveyed in 2012 by the state Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation. The group also worries that the building will be demolished before the redevelopment plans have been finalized and that the county is conducting an environmental review of its own project.

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WOver coffee of God, that â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; should not be alone.â&#x20AC;? By not aiming to persuade church leaders to any specific conclusion, but rather by sharing his thoughts and experiences heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had with the many churches and pastors he has engaged, Thompson said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s found success at find-

From page A1

ing some common ground. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been really exciting to see pastors moved and changed on this issue,â&#x20AC;? he said, noting that 80 percent of those he has met with have expressed the willingness to endorse Thompsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s point of view. However, the rub is in changing minds beyond the ministers with

Creating Beautiful

whom he has met. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They (the ministers) want to welcome gay people but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re terrified of the professional and political fallout that could happen.â&#x20AC;? A perfect illustration of how this fear is based on reality can be seen in the recent fallout World Vision suffered after announcing last month that the child relief organization would allow employees to be in same-sex marriages.

Almost immediately a backlash occurred. World Vision President Richard Stearns estimated that around 5,000 of World Visionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s child sponsors cancelled their sponsorships. A couple of days later World Vision reversed its decision about married gay employees, but this only made matters worse. Not only did World Vision end up alienating a healthy section of its conservative donors; the reversal left a bad taste in the mouths of gay people, their friends, family and supporters whether or not they gave to World Vision. In response to the reversal, Thompson authored and open letter to World Vision that is as remarkable in its non-combative, understanding approach as it is in its offering of a solution to what may seem to be an impossible dilemma. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I found this approach to be successful with conservative audiences and pastors because they already see a problem in the church,â&#x20AC;? Thompson explained, â&#x20AC;&#x153;They see the reality that it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t right to turn peo-

ple away from the church and the national leadership donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t provide any answers.â&#x20AC;? Read the full letter at http:// authordavethompson.blogspot.com/2014/03/an-openletter-to-world-vision.html. Continuing in his outreach efforts, Thompson is in the planning stages for a series of community conversations he aims to begin early this summer with conservative evangelicals and others who have expressed opposition to gay marriage like former Mozilla CEO Brendan Eich, who resigned this month following public outcry over his support of Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Proposition 8, which sought to ban samesex marriages in that state. Thompson is also eager to invite World Visionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sterns to the table. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to give (Sterns) the opportunity to talk about what happened and what led them to make the initial announcement,â&#x20AC;? Thompson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was pretty brazen for someone so connected to the evangelical world to step out and do that and even more shocking is why didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t he think this through

before he threw the line out there? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so much worse of him to have recanted than to not do anything at all. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This conversation is not going to go away for evangelicals,â&#x20AC;? Thompson continued. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The millennial generation is leaving the church in large numbers. According to the Barna Group, 91 percent of young non-Christians and 80 percent of young churchgoers agree that present-day Christianity is â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;anti-homosexual.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Despite the common anti-gay perception about evangelicals, the majority wants change. Having spoken personally now with thousands of evangelical pastors, an overwhelming majority have expressed a desire to welcome gay couples as equal members in their congregations.â&#x20AC;? Thompson has set late May/early June at the timeframe to begin the community conversations heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s planning. To stay abreast of developments and to learn more about Thompson and his efforts, visit www. authordavethompson.com.

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City Life

Historic Tacoma Homes Tour

B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 18, 2014

SECTION B, PAGE 1

PHOTO BY LOCK AND KEY PHOTOGRAPHY

Fanny Siren, Ava D’Jor, Polly Pucker Up and Kitty Kisses are off to see the wizard.

By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

I

n the 1950’s, Victor Fleming’s version of “The Wizard of Oz” enthralled families when it aired on CBS. The Judy Garland classic continues to integrate itself into American pop culture these 60 years later, with many reinterpretations along the way. This Saturday, April 19, the Gritty City Sirens, Tacoma’s premiere burlesque troupe, look to introduce their own risqué, adults only take of “The Wizard of Oz in “Adventures in Oz” at the Temple Theater. With monkeys now turned into hunky henchman and lion becoming a sexy feline, the audience will quickly learn this isn’t your grandparent’s “Wizard of Oz.” Viewers will know they aren’t in Kansas anymore when the iconic opening tornado is brought to life with a stripper pole and a course of Daft Punk’s “Around the World,” as a prim and naïve Dorothy is swept away in a flurry of “tornadoes,” (dancers strutting their stuff on the pole.) The mix of classical Oz tunes with current rock, rap and Latin music modernizes the classic even further than the burlesque dancing, and with each siren getting a solo spotlight throughout the show, each song is given its due time. “We gave everyone the freedom, for the most part, to pick their own music,” said Siren member Johanna Gardner, a.k.a. Rosie Cheex. Cheex plays Glinda the Good Witch, who just wants to be naughty. “I like that it’s very diverse musically and everyone’s been able to put their own creative energy into the acts.” While the show has many similarities with the classic, Dorothy’s journey down the yellow brick road is a little sexier, and the climactic battle with the wicked witch plays out slightly differently. We won’t spoil it here but it may involve Dorothy finally coming out of her shell with a little help from Guns N’ Roses and her bling wearing dog, Toto.

“We’re so excited about it because we put our own burlesque spin on it,” Wicked Witch of the West Heather Tolbert, a.k.a. Heather Hostility said. “It’s not the same classic story but all the players are there. We’ve made it unique in that we’ve turned Dorothy into a showgirl that is gaining her confidence as a performer, which is something that all of us real life ladies have had to do as performers.” The Gritty City Sirens have been working on their risqué interpretation of the Judy Garland classic since November, with not only the Sirens playing their part in the show but a whole slew of guests from around the Pacific Northwest, including Seattle and Olympia acts Hattie Hotpants and Cannoli. A cast of monkeys, cardcarrying lollipop guild members, and a singing, drunk crow help round out the cast, making this production one of the most expansive the Gritty City Sirens have ever put on. “This is the largest show we’ve done that we’ve entirely produced ourselves,” Hostility said, “making the support we’ve been shown all the more flattering.” With such a large production, there was no better place to perform than the City of Destiny. “I love performing in Tacoma because we have an amazing community here. I’ve lived here since I was about eight and I’m the first to admit Tacoma is where my heart lies. Its arts community is so involved and supportive,” Hostility said. The Gritty City Sirens, who are Rosie Cheex, Ava D’Jor, Polly Pucker Up, Heather Hostility and Kitty Kisses, were established in 2010 and their glamorous shows have helped further their fan base over the past four years. The Sirens will perform “Adventures in Oz” on April 19 at 8 p.m., with doors opening at 7 p.m. at the Temple Theater. The show is for adults only. Tickets are $25 and can be purchased at the door, through Ticketmaster or in person at The Eleven Eleven or The Spar Tavern. Proceeds will benefit the Carol Milgard Breast Center of Tacoma.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MORROW STUDIOS

SEE THE WIZARD. Polly Pucker Up’s Dorothy (right) and Kitty Kisses’ Scarecrow (center right) help Cannoli’s Tin Man (center left) find a heart while Olivia Phaze’s Toto (left) looks on.

YELLOW BURLESQUE ROAD. Polly

Pucker Up’s Dorothy and Olivia Phaze’s Toto prepare for their trip down the Yellow Brick Road.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE ‘LITTLE WOMEN’ Tacoma Youth Theatre, Tacoma’s all-youth theatre company presents Louisa May Alcott’s timeless story “Little Women.” The story is adapted for the stage by Scott Campbell and features adult acting mentors Syra Beth Puett, Dana Galagan, and Tom Birkeland. The show opens on April 18 at Tacoma Youth Theatre’s innovative new facility located at 924 B, Broadway. ‘Little Women’ runs two weekends only. Don’t delay, seating is limited. Tickets are on sale now at www. tacomayouththeatre.org.

Brown Music and the University of Puget Sound to present these performances, which take place in Schneebeck Hall on campus and features the percussion family of instruments, including music from “The Pink Panther,” the story of “Mr. Brown Can Moo,” and other works. There will be an instrument petting zoo, an opportunity to hold and try out various instruments, held one hour prior to the concert. Tickets $7 for children, $10 for adults. Call (253) 591-5894 or visit www.tacomasymphony.org/index.php/TSOMiniMaestros.

TWO

THREE

MINI MAESTROS In its second season, Tacoma Symphony Orchestra’s Mini Maestros family concert series presents its final concert “The Wild, Wacky World of Percussion” on April 27 at 2:30 p.m. The Symphony partners with Ted

URBAN SKETCHING Urban sketching outings are a great way to meet fellow artists, a fantastic way to know your area better and a time and place to regularly exercise and grow your sketching skills. All skill levels are welcome and

it’s free. No special materials are required – just bring materials you enjoy. Urban Sketchers-Tacoma meets the first Saturday each month, but a special event happens on April 19 – International Sketchcrawl Day with Seattle and Tacoma area sketchers. Gather at 1:15 p.m. at the front doors of the Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) in Seattle (860 Terry Ave. N.) to sketch outdoors in the area around the MOHAI: Seattle and Lake Union views, Center for Wooden Boats and historic ships.

ancestors, who they were, how they lived, how they experienced the customs and traditions they celebrated? This magical story takes the reader by the hand on a journey back in time, creatively blending a fairytale character of Swedish folklore and the author’s desire to reconnect to her heritage into an enchanting tale.

FIVE CREATIVE COLLOQUY

FOUR ‘ENCHANTMENT ÄDVENTYR’ Pacific Lutheran University alum Carol Elizabeth Skog will be presenting her new book, ‘Enchantment Ädventyr, H.C.A. & I Understand,’ on April 27 from 2-4 p.m. at Pacific Lutheran University’s Scandinavian Cultural Center, University Center, Room #100. Have you ever wondered about your

Admirers of the written word and lovers of the literary are invited to B Sharp Café (706 Opera Alley) on April 28, 7 p.m. for “Creative Colloquy. Come imbibe in libations or sip on roasted bean concoctions and watch storytellers do the thing they do best, narrate their tales. Featuring a line-up of confirmed local authors who will be reading from selected pieces of work immediately followed by an open mic. Learn more at www.creativecolloquy.com or e-mail jackiecasella@creativecolloquy.com.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 2 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, April 18, 2014

Bachman Turner Overdrive TACOMA ART MUSEUM ANNOUNCES at Emerald Queen Casino OPENING DATES FOR GRAND EXPANSION

T

Bachman & Turner â&#x20AC;&#x201C; featuring Randy Bachman and Fred Turner of Bachman Turner Overdrive â&#x20AC;&#x201C; delivered timeless rock classics and a few new tunes Friday night at the Emerald Queen Casino. The 70-year-old, Canadian guitar heroes played to a full house, and energized fans immediately rushed the stage. Set staples â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let It Ride,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;You Ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Seen Nothing Yet,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Takinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Care of Business,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hey Youâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Roll On Down the Highwayâ&#x20AC;? still receive play on classic-rock stations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Takinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; care of Businessâ&#x20AC;? was ranked by Guitar Magazine at in the top 10 most covered songs. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been delivering their BTO hits in this stripped down version of the band since 2009, and released an eponymous studio album in 2010. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bill Bungard, special to Tacoma Weekly

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;SCANDALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; STAR COMES TO UPS

STANCHFIELD

PHOTO BY DON FLOOD

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scandalâ&#x20AC;? fans, take note. The University of Puget Sound has announced that a limited number of free tickets will be made available to see alumnus Darby Stanchfield, who plays Abby Whelan on ABC-TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hit show and will appear at the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kilworth Chapel on April 21. Most tickets have been set aside for students, but the general public will be able to get their hands on a few starting at noon the day of Stanchfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s appearance. Reservations can be made by calling (253) 8793100 or online at ups.universitytickets.com. Ernest Jasmin, Tacoma Weekly

acoma Art Museum is counting down the days until its new wing and renovations open to the public on Sunday, Nov. 16. The projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s centerpiece is the new Haub Family Galleries, showcasing the Haub Family Collection of Western American Art. The collection places the museum among a select few in the United States, and the only museum in the Pacific Northwestern region, with a Western American Art Collection of this caliber. Tacoma Art Museum will develop an entirely new dimension of cultural and educational opportunities related to the collection, offering programs for Tacoma, the state of Washington, and the Pacific Northwest, as well as contributing nationally and internationally to scholarship in the Western American art genre. The building expansion doubles the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gallery space. Renovations will support larger community activities, improve the visitor experience, and increase the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s connection with downtown Tacoma. Award-winning firm Olson Kundig Architects of Seattle designed the expansion and renovation. This will be Tom Kundigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first completed museum design project. The project team includes the landscape architecture firm Murase Associates, construction company Sellen Construction, and Bonewitz Project Leadership as project management. Approximately 61 percent of the total construction budget is going to local Tacoma area companies. To celebrate the opening, Tacoma Art Museum will host special events leading up to the public opening day on Sunday, Nov. 16, including a Gala

PHOTO COURTESY OF TACOMA ART MUSEUM

Ed Mell, Rain and Runoff. Oil on canvas, 36 x 54 inches. Tacoma Art Museum, Haub Family Collection, Promised gift of Erivan and Helga Haub.

on Friday, Nov. 14 and a Members-Only Day and Evening celebration on Saturday, Nov. 15 (details will be announced soon). â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are immensely grateful to Erivan and Helga Haub and family for their remarkable vision and amazing generosity to Tacoma. They built their collection with such care, joy and purpose â&#x20AC;&#x201C; even making additional purchases of art to strengthen the collectionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public appeal and scholarly scope during discussions with the museum about their gift,â&#x20AC;? said Stephanie A. Stebich, director of Tacoma Art Museum. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With great foresight, they took care to provide for the collection by donating substantial endowment funds and providing support for glorious new gallery spaces. These are extraordinary donors and absolutely delightful people who have made the single largest gift in the history of Tacoma Art Museum. The community has welcomed this gift and contributed generously to the building project, which is fully funded.â&#x20AC;? Construction will have taken approximately one year from start to finish for the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $15.5 million, 16,000 square foot expansion, and adds 32 percent new space to the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 50,000 square foot AntoinePredock designed facil-

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ity, which opened in 2003. Tom Kundig designed the Haub Family Galleries as an elegant horizontal structure with a nod to Native American longhouses and railroad boxcars. This state-of-the-art project includes four gracious new galleries, a sculpture hallway and an enlarged light-filled lobby. A hands-on art-making area for all ages will be available off the lobby free of charge. New visitor amenities include an orientation space, and redesigned entrances on Pacific Avenue and on the parking level with a new glass enclosed vestibule. Beautiful new landscaping and major outdoor sculptural works will be added. Improvements are also planned for the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s store and cafĂŠ. The museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main entrance and the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation Plaza will be transformed with a soaring canopy that ties together the existing building and the new Haub Family Galleries. The canopy provides a covered outdoor gathering space and establishes a strong visual presence for the museum along Pacific Avenue, Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main thoroughfare. Outdoor art installations will activate the environment around the museum, including three newly commissioned sculp-

tures by Northwest artists Scott Fife, Julie Speidel, and Marie Watt. The museum worked with Sellen Sustainability to incorporate sustainable practices into the design and construction, including: recycling of site debris, energy efficiency, reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, and resource conservation through use of materials with recycled content. The façade of the new building will be clad in a deep bronze colored Richlite, a dense material made with recycled paper and resin, created by the Tacomabased Richlite Company. Innovative sliding screens along the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exterior recall railroad boxcars and allow the museum to adjust the amount of sun and heat coming into the new wing. Erivan and Helga Haub donated 295 Western American works of art from their private collection to the Tacoma Art Museum, along with endowment funds for the future care and educational opportunities related to the collection, as well as substantial support of the new Haub Family Galleries. The Haubs, inspired by their love of art and nature, began collecting Western American art in the early 1980s and developed one of the most important collections in private hands. Their passion for the West helped shape their artistic choices, which chronicle the land, people, wildlife, and history of the great American West. The collection spans 200 years, from famed early artists/explorers to notable present day masters. Novemberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening celebrations mark the first nearly comprehensive public exhibition of this collection. This news release has been edited for length. To read the full version, go to www.tacomaweeekly.com.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, April 18, 2014 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

KANIECKI, MASTER OF LIVELY LINES, SHOWS AT MOSS + MINERAL

CULTURE CORNER

A GUIDE TO THE MUSEUMS OF TACOMA

Muesum of the Week: Fort Nisqually Living History Museum Point Defiance Park, 5400 N. Pearl St. Wed.-Sun., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Info: http://FortNisqually.org

By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

Fort Nisqually is a living history museum where volunteers and staff, in period clothing, demonstrate the crafts of the 19th century and engage visitors in historic dialogue. Visitors discover what life was like in the 1850s at Fort Nisqually, the region’s premier living history museum. This Hudson’s Bay Company trading post was the first non-Native settlement on Puget Sound. Visitors can explore the award winning restoration of the fort’s National Historic Landmark buildings and try 19th century games and find out what life was like before electricity!

T

he art of drawing is something of a high wire act. Every mark on the paper is going to show. It takes a deft hand to record a form with just a few strokes. It takes a cultivated sensibility to impart expressive power to the form conveyed. Tacoma artist Michael Kaniecki has mastered the art of drawing and many of his works are currently on display at Moss + Mineral in a show appropriately called “Drawings.” Kaniecki works in charcoal, India ink, conté crayon, tempera and other media. Stylistically versatile, Kaniecki’s art ranges from the classical to the expressionistic. A pair of nudes displayed side by side shows this range. “Reclining Nude I” is spare, executed with a minimum of lines in India ink. “Reclining Nude II,” meanwhile, resembles something from a Henry Moore sketchbook. The nude form (done in charcoal and conté crayon) has been pared down to soft, blocky shapes. The majority of the works in the show are nude figures resulting from life drawing sessions at local colleges. There are also a few small landscape drawings of a marina in Astoria, OR and two of industrial areas of Tacoma. Along one wall is a sequence of four abstract prints called “Creation Story.” The original set was purchased for the permanent collection of the Grand County Library in Moab, UT. In one corner of the

APRIL

2014

This week’s events:

April 19, 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Sewing to Sowing

PHOTO COURTESY OF MOSS + MINERAL

“Recling Nude II.” Charcoal and conte crayon by Michael Kaniecki

space is a long sheet of paper upon which Kaniecki did an abstract composition in watered down, black tempera. The paper is folded fan-like and made into a serpentine shape on the wall. This is an echo of Kaniecki’s 2010 Spaceworks installation in which the artist spent three months in a storefront window working on a 40-foot scroll. The show is full of visual gems. There is a small, male nude done in India ink. Thin, lively lines define the figure, which is animated with just a few notes of bright red tempera. Strokes of black ink function as shadows and echo the red marks within the composition. Kaniecki has so many drawings in the show that not all of

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them fit on the walls. There are a couple of wooden racks with more drawings – mounted and shrinkwrapped – amidst the furnishings in the space. The works are quite affordably priced. Moss + Mineral, the latest enterprise by Lisa Kinoshita, is part art gallery, part design shop. Kaniecki’s art is experienced amidst midcentury modern furniture, displays of Kinoshita’s raw gem jewelry and the cacti, succulents and minimalist terrariums that liven up the place. Moss + Mineral is located downtown across the street from the Rialto Theater. “Drawings” runs through May 31. For further information visit www. mossandmineral.com.

Experience springtime in the 1850s at Fort Nisqually Living History Museum during Fort Nisqually’s Sewing to Sowing: A Living History Day. Come into the Fort’s buildings or explore the outdoor areas and mingle with several dozen re-enactors. They’ll be cheerfully cooking in the kitchen, spinning yarn in the Laborers’ Dwelling, or hammering in the blacksmith’s shop while woodworking and spring gardening takes place outdoors. Guests are invited to participate in hands-on activities such as 1800s games, butter churning and laundry techniques or take a turn at the rope-making machine. Learn about hand sewing from the Fort’s seamstresses and see demonstrations of one of the world’s earliest sewing machines, the Wheeler and Wilson. Visit with the Fort’s gardeners and help sow seeds. At the Kids’ Outstation, youngsters can play quoits, graces and checkers, grind coffee and walk on stilts to their hearts’ content.

Current Exhibits: Dr. Tolmie, The Naturalist April 12 to July 21, 2014

Its common name is the Piggyback Plant, but its scientific name is Tolmiea menziesii. It was named for William Tolmie, the on-site manager of Hudson’s Bay Company operations at Fort Nisqually from 1843 until 1859. A new exhibit at Fort Nisqually reveals the exploits of a younger Tolmie as he collected plants and animals of the Pacific Northwest. Tolmie’s mentor, botanist William Hooker, named the Piggyback Plant (also known as Youth-on-age or Pig-on-a-back) after his then 20-something student. “Hooker hoped that Tolmie would make great discoveries in the Pacific Northwest,” said Exhibit Curator Chris Erlich. Perhaps Hooker hoped Tolmie would collect as much as one of his other former students, David Douglas, who collected more 200 new specimens, including the Douglas Fir which is named in his honor. Tolmie’s first botanizing expedition in the Northwest was history making. In 1833, he became the first European to enter into what is today Mount Rainier National Park. Images of several of the original specimens he collected on that adventure are included in the exhibit. Also on display are modern specimens of plants that were named in Tolmie’s honor, as he was the first to successfully collect them. Through the 1830s, Tolmie developed a collecting network for both plants and small animals (some of his original bird specimens are in the collection of the Smithsonian). In the early 1840s, Tolmie determined that the best course for his future was to put his full attention and energies into the Hudson’s Bay Company, and he left his naturalist exploits in his past.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 18, 2014

20th annual Historic Homes of Tacoma Tour

Tacoma Historical Society’s “Tour of Homes” takes place May 3 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and May 4 from 1-5 p.m. Tickets are $20, available at Pacific Northwest Shop, Stadium Thriftway, Columbian Bank branches at 21st and Pearl and S. 19th and Union, or e-mail hometour@tacomahistory.org. Tickets available on day of event at Central Lutheran Church, 409 Tacoma Ave. N. Get more info at www.tacomahistory.org or call (253) 472-3738.

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The Achilles House, 414 N. C St.

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The Branscheid House, 502 N. E St.

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illiam H. and Hattie Branscheid built this five-bedroom, 4,824-square-foot, Queen Anne-style home in 1889 at a cost of $6,000. Typical of the Queen Anne style is the fullwidth, wrap-around veranda that graces the home. The spacious entry retains its original double doors. The entry, living room and dining room feature oak floors and ornate woodwork with medallions characteristic of the period. The wide fireplace in the living room is now flanked by leaded-glass bookcases (a late addition). The bow window in the living room is matched by one across the home in the dining room. The light fixture in the dining room is original. The dining room table and chairs date from 1915. The c. 1900 walnut buffet and china cabinet were made by Berkey and Gay. The kitchen has been updated. Current owners Peter and Johnette Maehren, who purchased the home in 1994, renovated the family room, an addition to the original floor plan, installing period

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windows and woodwork. The main stairway features a curved wall and an ornate railing with turned finials. The master bedroom has a sitting area and a master bath where a nursery or closet once was. The brass light is original. The bedroom to the right of the main stairway has an angled entry.

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block “window” behind the cooktop. The livingroom fireplace and kitchen backsplash are stainless steel. The room behind the kitchen is dual-use, serving both as a crafts room, when the desk is down, and as a guest bedroom, when the Murphy bed is lowered. The laundry room has a built-in ironing board. The half bath across from the laundry room has a colorfully painted highchair, which is a family heirloom.

Central Lutheran Church 409 Tacoma Ave. N.

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entral Lutheran Church is a contemporary Gothic design of reinforced concrete, with brick veneer. The bell tower is crowned by a 25foot-high cross, the top of the cross reaching 110 feet above street level. The church has a chapel, a choir loft, and 27 rooms available for Sunday school. The first service in the new church was held in June 1957, and the church was dedicated on Oct. 13, 1957. Among the church’s most striking features are the 14 stained-glass windows on the mainfloor level that symbolically relate the life of Jesus. They were removed from original church and reinstalled. The upper stained-glass windows, including the chancery window, were made for the new church. The pipe organ, built in Illinois in1874, was removed from the old church and updated before being reinstalled in the new church. Another striking feature of the church is the 21- by 8-foot cross on the chancel wall,

wing contained the district courtroom and chambers; the 12th Street wing accommodated the circuit courtroom and chambers. When federal court operations relocated to the renovated and expanded Union Station in 1992, the upper floors of the building emptied. The U.S. Postal Service maintains retail services on the first floor. The Tacoma School District’s School of the Arts has occupied the second floor of the building since 2012.

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The Fitch House, 412 N. C St.

backlit by white tube lights, which have been turned on continuously since the church was finished. Also noteworthy are the hand-carved symbols that adorn the communion table, altar, lectern, and pulpit. They are the work of Fred Rice, a member of the congregation. The chapel has stained-glass windows on its rear wall. The circular inserts were most likely relocated from the old church and set into new stained-glass windows.

n 1889, A. Norton and Helen W. Fitch had this Queen-Anne style home of over 4,900 square feet built for $5,500. Current owners Jon Douglas Rake and Jeffrey Stvrtecky, founders of Tacoma Musical Playhouse, have completely renovated and restored the home to its original grandeur. The foyer has an oak, parquet floor and walls with chinoiserie stenciling. Original pocket doors led to the front parlor, which has period Quezal-signed light fixtures and fireplace. The stained-glass windows, also original, have been restored. New moldings of clear fir match the original moldings. A display cabinet houses a pottery collection of Van Briggle, Rumrill, and Niloak pieces. A brick terrace with a wrought iron fence was installed below the front parlor. The dining room, with its period light fixture and new wainscoting, also has inlaid oak floors. The spacious kitchen now has a large “grand piano” island – with black granite “lid” and a white “keyboard”,

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a butler’s pantry, and tin tiles behind the cooktop. The all-new bathroom is elegantly done in period style. Salvaged from the Bavarian Restaurant, the “new” stairway banister has been reworked and stained. The master bedroom has a large sitting area and a new, period-style bath. All the custom-made woodwork and doors (of stained, clear fir) are styled to match the original pocket doors. The third-floor attic has been converted to a stylish apartment.

The Love House, 620 N. 8th St.

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ames Knox Taylor, supervising architect of the U.S. Treasury Department, drew up plans for the Federal Building and provided 59,632 square feet of floor space, not including the basement. The exterior is of Bedford, Indiana, limestone. The interior of the building featured oak doors and extensive oak woodwork. The first floor and much of the basement was given over to the post office. The A Street side of the building, dedicated to retail postal customers, featured letter and parcel post mailing stations as well as 1,878 ornamented, brass post office boxes to serve its downtown clientele. The center of the building on the Court A side is just one story high, with skylights in the ceiling to admit natural light for mail sorting rooms. The 12th Street wing of the second floor housed the customs office, the Marine Hospital Service, and the immigration office; the 11th Street wing housed the Internal Revenue service. On the third floor, the 12th Street

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The Brodsky/Heaton House 905 N. Stadium Way

n 1926, William T. Post built this home and nine others on a new cul-de-sac extension of Stadium Way. Current owners Robert and Linda Heaton bought the home in 1989. After extensive planning of alternatives and options, they undertook major remodeling of the home in 2005. The entire upper floor of the home was removed, and the structure was expanded to the rear to take full advantage of the marine view. The interior of the home is now exceptionally appealing, with a contemporary décor and striking design details. The entry has double, etched-glass doors and features a dramatic painting by local artist Liz Keller and colorful, freeform carpets in the entry and living room. The custom cabinets in the entry, living room and kitchen are maple with inlaid ebony inserts. The circular island in the custom kitchen features an etched-glass top. Owner Linda Heaton designed the glass

Federal Building, 1102 A St.

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his Queen Anne home, built for Henry L. and Gertrude Strong Achilles in 1889, is the mirror image of the home at 412 North C St. Architect Frederick A. Sexton “flipped” the plan of the two homes. The large, paneled, fir front door of the home is just the same as that of its sister house next door. The original matching front door of the entry hall was removed in the remodel, resulting in an L-shaped foyer. The home retains its original banister and original pressed-tin stairway ornamentation. The living room has its original stained-glass windows, painted fir floors and fireplace – with tiles and oak surround. Note the extensive butterfly collection. The dining room has striking, diagonally-laid black and white tiles and period furniture appropriate to the 125-year-old home. The dining room fireplace retains its original green tile and carved surround. The kitchen is updated with a cooktop in a large island and a generous sitting area, which overlooks the garden. A study and office area adjoins the kitchen, and there is a half bath beyond. There are four bedrooms and two baths on the second floor, which retains its original doors and woodwork. The master bedroom on the left front of the home has its own master bath. One bedroom is used for arts and crafts. Note the oak antique child’s wardrobe in the rear bedroom.

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r. Leonidas L. Love and his wife Margaret had this Mediterranean Revival 4,330 square-foot home built on the corner of North 8th and G Streets in 1910. The house occupies three lots of the site of the former Western Washington Industrial Exposition Building, which burned in 1898. The home remains largely unchanged and intact. The original exterior consisted of a white stucco finish with brick and concrete accents and a clay tile roof. This home features three fireplaces with a large entry and living room adorned in finely crafted quarter-sawn oak millwork. The dining room features the original sliding doors and patterned glass door to the kitchen. The kitchen has been expanded to accommodate modern appliances and a casual dining area. A half bath adjoins what was originally the servant’s room. A very fine stained glass window at the stairway landing is alleged to be by Waterford. The second floor features three bedrooms, two

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bathrooms, and a sleeping porch that has been enclosed – with a deck added beyond. The bedrooms retain their original doorknockers. The tiling in the second bath, including exquisite water lily trim tiles, appears to date from the 1930s. The basement features a billiard room with bow window and fireplace, and a second kitchen, laundry, workroom, and boiler room.

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Provident Building, 919 Pacific Ave.

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n 1903, Henry Longstreth, Tacomabased West Coast mortgage manager of The Provident Life and Trust Co., engaged architect George W. Bullard to design this 100 foot by 120 foot six-story building. Bullard fashioned a symmetrical Romanesque design of reinforced concrete, faced front and back with brick. The building is supported by 23 cast iron columns. The walls are 26 inches thick at the base and taper to 12 inches at the top. The five upper floors were originally configured for 168 offices and provided space for a diverse array of tenants, including physicians, lawyers, realtors, insurance brokers, and mortgage companies. The first floor provides space for retail establishments. Renamed the Security Building in the early 1950s, the building was given a facelift in 1953. The original hydraulic elevator, operated by steam pressure, was replaced, many offices were remodeled, and the lower two floors saw the installation of terra cotta tile and aluminum facing as

well as recessed store fronts. When the building was sold in the mid-1970s, the new owner undertook a second facelift and had aluminum-frame bronze-glass windows installed. When new owners purchased the building in 2006, they restored the original name and brought the exterior and lobby back to its original appearance. The Tacoma Historical Society moved this spring into its new home on the first floor of the Provident Building.


Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

KING OF COUNTRY SAYS GOODBYE WITH EPIC SHOW

PHOTO BY ERNEST JASMIN

RIDE ON. George Straitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last hoorah is his â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cowboy Rides Awayâ&#x20AC;? tour, which came through the Tacoma Dome April 12. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

I

n pop music there are retirements, and then there are â&#x20AC;&#x153;retirements.â&#x20AC;? On one end of the spectrum are the Beatles, a band that burned out at the height of its powers, leaving fans forever thirsting for more. On the other, we have the likes of Jay-Z, Garth Brooks and Kiss, acts that prematurely announced they were hanging it up only to come back and parlay later. Good thing fans broke the bank picking up all those â&#x20AC;&#x153;farewell tourâ&#x20AC;? tickets. It remains to be seen what sort of retirement George Strait will enjoy. But, a year and a half ago, the King of Country announced that his Cowboy Rides Away tour would be his last, prompting local fans to snatch up tickets for his April 12 stop at the Tacoma Dome at a faster clip than usual. The show was toward the end on the 61-year-old legendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tour, which will wind down this weekend in Oklahoma; and it promised to be an unforgettable evening with one of the most beloved and influential artists in all of popular music. As on previous local stops, Strait and his 11piece Ace in the Hole Band played in the greatly underutilized in-the-round configuration, with the stage set up in the middle of the arena floor ensuring great sight lines for all. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nashville Starâ&#x20AC;? alumnus Chris Young warmed up the crowd, and then Strait made his entrance around 9 p.m., looking dashing and clean cut in his black cowboy hat, checkered shirt and jeans.

With dozens of albums to choose from, not to mention 60 No. 1 singles, one can imagine how daunting it must have been for the Country Music Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Entertainer of the Year to come up with the definitive set list. But Strait managed to summarize his 30-plus year career quite well, delivering a whopping 31 songs in two and a quarter hours onstage. King George got the party started with â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Fireman,â&#x20AC;? his boisterous 1985 hit about â&#x20AC;&#x153;puttinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; out old flames,â&#x20AC;? and from there held fans spellbound with a balanced mix of honky tonk swagger and earnest balladry. Among the most enthusiastically received of his hits were â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amarillo By Morningâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Chair,â&#x20AC;? which fans sang along to toward the end of the set, and tonguein-cheek set staple, â&#x20AC;&#x153;All My Exes Live in Texas,â&#x20AC;? which made an appearance during the four-song encore. Among the most poignant selections were â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Believe,â&#x20AC;? a spiritual number he said was inspired by the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting of December 2012, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Always Remember You,â&#x20AC;? a reflective love letter to his fans that rang truer than ever given the occasion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sayinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m through, by any means,â&#x20AC;? he sang in his rich baritone. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still things I want to say and do; I hope you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget me â&#x20AC;Ś and just know that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll always remember you.â&#x20AC;? (Hmmm, anyone else sensing that olâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; George has given himself a little wiggle room with the whole â&#x20AC;&#x153;retirementâ&#x20AC;? thing?) Adding to the heart-

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warming vibe on Saturday was a presentation by the Military Warriors Support Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Homes 4 Wounded Heroes program. Retired Army Gen. Leroy Cisco presented Chris Atkins, a soldier who had been injured by an I.E.D., and his fiance the keys to a new home in Spokane, sparking one of the most raucous ovations of the entire evening. Set list: The Fireman, Check Yes or No, Ocean Front Property, Marina del Rey, Blame It On Mexico, A Fire I Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Put Out, Nobody In His Right Mind Wouldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve Left Her, Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s What Breaking Hearts Do, Arkansas Dave, Here For a Good Time, When Did You Stop Loving Me, River of Love, You Look So Good in Love, How Bout Them Cowgirls, I Saw God Today, I Can Still Make Cheyenne, Drinkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Man, I Believe, Give It Away, Lead On, Amarillo By Morning, Give It All We Got Tonight, The Chair, I Got a Car, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Always Remember You, Troubadour Encore: You Wreck Me (Tom Petty), All My Exes Live in Texas, Run, Folsom Prison Blues (Johnny Cash), The Cowboy Rides Away THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (99 MIN, R) Fri 4/18: 1:45, 4:05, 6:40, 9:05 Sat 4/19-Sun 4/20: 11:30am, 1:45, 4:05, 6:40, 9:05 Mon 4/21-Thu 4/24: 1:45, 4:05, 6:40, 9:05 JOE (117 MIN, R) Fri 4/18: 2:45, 5:30, 8:10 Sat 4/19-Sun 4/20: 12:00, 2:45, 5:30, 8:10 Mon 4/21: 2:45, 5:30, 8:10, Tue 4/22: 5:30, 8:10, Wed 4/23: 2:45, 5:30, 8:10 Thu 4/24: 5:30, 8:10 PARTICLE FEVER (99 MIN, NR) Fri 4/18: 1:40, 3:55, 6:20, 8:35 Sat 4/19-Sun 4/20: 11:30am, 1:40, 3:55, 6:20, 8:35 Mon 4/21: 1:40, 3:55, 6:20, 8:35 Tue 4/22: 3:55, 8:35 Wed 4/23-Thu 4/24: 1:40, 3:55, 6:20, 8:35 LE WEEK-END (93 MIN, R) Fri 4/18-Thu 4/24: 4:15, 8:50 THE LUNCHBOX (104 MIN, PG) Fri 4/18: 1:55, 6:30 Sat 4/19-Sun 4/20: 11:30am, 1:55, 6:30 Mon 4/21: 1:55, 6:30, Tue 4/22: 1:55 Wed 4/23: 1:55, 6:30, Thu 4/24: 1:55 LIKE FATHER LIKE SON (121 MIN, R) Tue 4/22: 1:20, 6:15 BIG WORDS (93 MIN, NR) Tue 4/22: 2:00, 6:30

TW PICK OF THE WEEK: RENOWNED BLUES MAN

JOE LOUIS WALKER WILL HEADLINE JAZZBONES ON APRIL 18 IN SUPPORT OF HIS LATEST RELEASE FROM ALLIGATOR RECORDS, â&#x20AC;&#x153;HORNETS NEST.â&#x20AC;? THE SHOW STARTS AT 8 P.M., AND TICKETS ARE $15; WWW.JAZZBONES.COM.

FRIDAY, APRIL 18

SUNDAY, APRIL 20

PANTAGES: Pink Martini, the von Trapps (jazz, pop, world) 7:30 p.m., $48-$94

502 MARTINI: Caribbean Flava with Erica Dixon, Zintasha Williams, etc. (zumba class) 7 p.m., $20-$35 B SHARP COFFEE: The LAZ open mic (spoken word) 8 p.m., NC, AA GIG SPOT: The Orange Version, Sons of the Sound, DedElectric (rock) 8 p.m., $5, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Harmonious Funk (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Andy Peters (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 HALF PINT: Mirror Gloss (indie-rock, pop) 9 p.m., NC MAXWELLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: WYRDOZ, Phasers on Kill, Legends on Heroin (punk) 9 p.m., $5 STONEGATE: Rumble Underground (rock) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Sin City (dance) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Duane Goad (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Mutilation, Executioner, Hereticon (metal) 8 p.m. UNCLE THURMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Urban Rhapsody (funk, jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA

NEW FRONTIER: Night Beats, Cosmonauts, The Pharmacy, People Under the Sun, Milk, Black Seas (indie-rock) 4:20 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Aaradhna, Sammy J, Stay Grounded (soul, R&B) 8 p.m., $10 STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman Allstars (classic rock) 8:30 p.m., NC UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: 4/20 Smoker featuring Church of Hate (metal) 4:20 p.m.

MONDAY, APRIL 21 STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino, Brooke Lizotte (experimental jam) 9 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Jazz & Beyond (open jam) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Gin Creek (blues) 8 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, APRIL 22 DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock)

SATURDAY, APRIL 19 GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Thanh Ha, Nhu Nguyen, Lai Anh Tu, Hoang Thanh (Vietnamese pop)

502 MARTINI: Goody Bagg (jazz, funk, R&B) 9 p.m. B SHARP COFFEE: The Boneyard Preachers (blues) 8 p.m., NC, AA BOBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAVA JIVE: Jesus on the Moon, Thunders of Wrath, Devilwood, The Celestials (rock) 8 p.m., $5 GIG SPOT: Jim Basnight (rock) 8 p.m., $10-$15, AA GRIT CITY COMEDY: Andy Peters (comedy) 8:30, 10:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: The Wailers, Mighty High (reggae) 7 p.m., $20 LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Pariahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Revolt, Sanction VIII, Letzer Geist, The Rikk Beatty Band, Amadon, Mr. Von (rock, hip-hop) 5 p.m., AA PANTAGES: Tacoma Concert band featuring Erin Guinup present â&#x20AC;&#x153;See the U.S.A.,â&#x20AC;? 7:30 p.m., $16-$34, AA THE SPAR: Champagne Sunday (folk, rock, pop) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rumble Underground (rock) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Kry (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Duane Goad (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 TEMPLE THEATRE: Gritty City Sirens â&#x20AC;&#x153;Adventures in Ozâ&#x20AC;? (burlesque) 8 p.m., $45 UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Belles Bent on Leather, The Sickness (rock) 8 p.m., sold out

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23

DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ STONEGATE: Dave Nicholsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, APRIL 24

B SHARP COFFEE: Lucas Smiraldo (spoken word) 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., N GRIT CITY COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC RIALTO: From the Top Live with Christopher Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Riley (NPR broadcast) 7:30 p.m., $19-$49, AA THE SWISS: Barleywine Revue (bluegrass) 9 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Joe Koy (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+ UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

   

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Friday, April 18, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 5

                           


Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 18, 2014

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: SOUTH SOUND DINING OUT FOR LIFE Thurs., April 24 Pierce County AIDS Foundation

For the 20th year in a row, the Pierce County AIDS Foundation will be hosting Dining Out For Life. Eat at any participating South Sound restaurants on April 24 and 25 percent of your food and non-alcoholic beverage bill will support HIV/AIDS prevention, and care services in Pierce, Thurston and Lewis Counties. For a list of participating restaurants, visit www.diningoutforlife.com/tacoma. Info: (253) 383-2565 DOWNLOADING/ EREADER CLINIC Fri., April 18, 1:30-3 p.m. Tacoma Public Library – Main Branch Sign up for a slot in this eReader clinic devoted to Nooks, Kindles and more. Bring your eReader and meet with a library staff member for a short one-on-one session. You’ll become familiar with navigating through screens, locating the user manual and general troubleshooting tips. Price: Free. Info: (253) 591-5666 DUANE GOAD Fri., April 18, 8 p.m. Tacoma Comedy Club, 933 Market St. Comedian Duane Goad has entertained audiences all over the U.S and Canada with his quick, sarcastic and hilarious brand of comedy, whether he’s tackling subjects like relationships and family life, or today’s trending topics in pop culture. Price: $10. Info: (253) 282-7203

PROPAGANDA POSTERS Fri., April 18, 11 a.m. Tacoma Public Library – Main Branch The U.S. government, as well as all of the nations participating in the war effort, produced thousands of posters during World War I, urging citizens to buy war bonds, ration food, grow victory gardens, limit travel and avoid loose talk. See a selection of these posters at “Defending America’s Freedom: It’s Everybody’s Job! Propaganda Posters of World War I.” Price: Free. Info: (253) 591-5666 THE ORIGINAL WAILERS Sat., April 19, 7 p.m. Jazzbones, 2803 6th Ave. Carrying the torch passed on by Bob Marley himself, original guitarist Al Anderson and original keyboardist and background singer Tyrone Downie have united along with a group of handpicked musicians to honor the his-

tory and integrity of Marley’s music with The Original Wailers. Price: $19.99. Info: (253) 396-9169

“SEE THE USA” Sat., April 19, 7:30 p.m. Pantages Theater, 901 Broadway, Tacoma The Tacoma Concert Band proudly presents “See the USA: The Music of America,” a rousing concert of American music that is sure to stir your heart and your patriotic spirit! Price from $16. Info: (253) 591-5894 or 1-800-291-7593 EASTER BRUNCH BUFFET Sun., April 20, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Allenmore Events Center, 2125 S. Cedar St., Tacoma Enjoy a delicious Easter brunch buffet with friends and family at the new Allenmore Events Center in Tacoma. Catered by Smoke + Cedar Catering, the critically acclaimed new restaurant by Chef Gordon Naccarato, this brunch is not to be missed. Price: adults $28.95; child 611 $16.95; child 2-5 $6.95. Info: (253) 272-6469 EASTER SUNDAY CELEBRATIONS Sun., April 20, 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saint Andrew’s Episcopal Church. 7410 S. 12th St. Both Easter celebrations include choir and music, Holy Communion (all are welcome to receive the sacrament), and sermon on the meaning of Easter for our lives today. Nursery care offered for both services. An Easter egg Hunt for children follows the 10 a.m. service. Info: (253) 564-4402

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

FEELING FEARLESS Mon., April 21, 7-8:30 p.m. Meditate in Tacoma, 1501 Pacific Ave., Ste. 301 Fear is a cause of some of our deepest mental pain and tension. Buddha explained many methods to train our mind in states of fearlessness that offer us inner protection from worry, stress and anxiety. In this series we will look at the inner causes of our fear and train in techniques to free our mind from them. We will learn new ways of relating to circumstances that evoke fear and develop an inner experience of protection. Info: (360) 754-7787

that meets at the Moore Branch Library on the fourth Tuesday of each month, February through May. Books for the following month will be handed out at the monthly discussions and can also be picked up at any Tacoma Library location. If you enjoy reading, sharing your opinion about what you’ve read, and maybe make some new friends, come join. Price: Free. Info: (253) 341-4848 LADIES SING THE BLUES Wed., April 23, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Garfield Book Company at PLU, 208 Garfield St. S. An overview of the unique style and perspective of women who have sung the American musical art form - the Blues. Dr. David Deacon-Joyner, professor at PLU, will play “live” and studio recordings from these musicians from the 1920’s and 1930’s, whose popularity crossed racial lines. Walk-ins welcome. Price: $10. Info: (253) 241-4166

BLUES NIGHT Mon., April 21, 7 p.m. The Swiss Restaurant & Pub, 1904 Jefferson Ave., Tacoma The world famous Swiss Blues Night featuring the best blues in the Puget Sound Region. Every Monday at 8 p.m. and always free. Info: (253) 572-2821 UWT LEADERSHIP FORUM Tues., April 22, 5-7 p.m. UW Tacoma Campus, Philip Hall The public is invited to attend a University of Washingon-Tacoma Leadership Forum “Science Scholars of Color: A Critical Earth Day Panel.” Earth Day typically raises awareness of the impact humans have on our global environment. This panel takes a unique approach on Earth Day by centering scientists of color who remind our communities that focusing on the environment cannot happen in a vacuum. Price: Free. Info: (253) 692-5753

DR. TOLMIE, THE NATURALIST Wed., April 23, 11:00 a.m. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum, 5400 N. Pearl St. Its common name is the Piggyback Plant, but its scientific name is “Tolmiea menziesii.” It was named for William Tolmie, the on-site manager of Hudson’s Bay Company operations at Fort Nisqually from 1843 until 1859. A new exhibit at Fort Nisqually reveals the exploits of a younger Tolmie as he collected plants and animals of the Pacific Northwest, including his history-making expedition to Mount Rainier in 1833. Price: Included with fort admission. Info: (253) 591-5339

‘MOORE GOOD READS’ Tues., April 22, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Tacoma Public Library – Moore Branch, 215 S. 56th Ave. A new book discussion group

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE Kerri Bailey is a horticulturist and a certified herbalist. She makes custom blends and consults at Ubiquitous Journey (www.UBJourney.com) on 6th Avenue. Kerri owns two businesses – the online herb store www.HerbalElements.net and a water garden store inside Alpine Nursery in South Hill (www. AlpineGrows.com) called The Pond Pad (www.ThePondPad.com). She writes blogs on gardening, ponds, natural health and herbal remedies and teaches classes through Free University (www.FreeUNW.com).

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) This may be an exciting and edgy week for you. A lot could happen tempting you to make impulsive changes. Your mind has been working overtime so try to slow down and focus on one task at a time. Allow your intuition to guide you. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) There has been a river of change about to open that will affect your destiny in the upcoming weeks. Resist the urge to rush things. Allow long awaited changes to develop in their own time. Follow your instincts and go with the flow. Keep your demeanor calm and grounded. GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) Break free of routine to socialize with friends and family and soothe your soul. Free yourself of limitations for greater liberty. Factor in the needs of important people in your life and compromise where necessary. An option may be too good to pass up.

LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Tensions are high this week so trend lightly. Relationships could turn volatile if not handled properly. Take the lead to make those important changes. Reflect on your priorities to see things more clearly. Move forward. SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) Communications with important or key people dominate your thought processes. You get a chance to release old mental clutter and replace it with more life-enhancing thoughts. Routine is necessary to help keep you grounded. Add an adventure that feeds your soul.

WORD SEARCH Q M D S P X I N O S L I W N S T W

H S O P A R K I N G K T S S A Y R

O J W G R Q Z Q D H N U A C B T T

O Y N Q O A T I L K A L O I Z E E

A K T P Z M D R X Y G M L L X H U

I E O S R Z T H D F A L C W X S D

P E W W U O K U O A Y J V H P T B

W R N V V H Z M R R N G N O S A A

F C Z K Q N U T A K A H D B Z D T

P T A K E E M Y D G C C Z C S I M

E S L Y S U H D I G A Y E P X U A

K R T U S A V K L S W X D J J M I

N I M E Y F Q K T L I N C O L N R

S F U E H Y B R E D R E L L O R O

CAPRICORN (December 22 – January 19) Your plans to move may be in the cards in the near future. Family matters have been your current focus causing excess stress. Find some time to relax and let go of inner tension. Have some fun to take your mind off of it. Quick solutions may solve certain problems.

LEO (July 23 – August 22) The opportunity to stabilize your career may show up soon. All your hard work and tedious routine will reveal hidden rewards. Financial resources may be a result. Take some time to enjoy the sunshine. Enjoy life to the max.

AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) Many bright ideas have been coming your way. Look deep inside to get in touch with what you really want. You may be tempted to make a drastic move but will ultimately benefit by making a solid, long-term plan. Overthinking may give you a headache.

VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Bold aspects urge you to throw caution to the wind. Your hard work and connections may pay off. Fresh ideas or exciting elements may help you enhance your life. Balance desires with the needs of others. Play for higher stakes.

PISCES (February 19 – March 20) Try to avoid making hasty financial decisions that you may regret later. Make your best bet with slow and steady changes. An advisor can suggest a plan or options for you. Romance sizzles from the afterglow of the Blood Moon. An instant attraction may take you off guard.

K L J M S S A L G F O M U E S U I

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SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) Fantasizing, flirting and pleasure may be on your mind. You seek the extreme or extraordinary and are tempted by luxury. If you battle with a financial decision, let your conscience be your guide. Smiling is contagious.

CANCER (June 21 – July 22) Your friends and family may be your biggest support team this week. Opportunities to advance at work may present themselves. Say good-bye to fears that have been holding you back. Decide to aim high and go for it!

K M S R W L E D I S T S A E W E B

ANAGRAM

GRITTY CITY

How many words can you make out of this phrase?

B B K S Y M G G V E A F R I G M I


Friday, April 18, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

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www.metroanimalservices.org Leno is a young lad searching for a Forever Family that has the time and energy to play. He is such a lover, and is incredibly playful. Leno would make a great companion dog for someone that is looking to take him along on their daily adventures. Help this young man and many others find loving homes today!

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New Pillow Top Full Mattress Only $99. Never used! Comes with manufactures warranty. Delivery available. 253-537-3056

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MOTORCYCLES WANTED Local Collector looking for Honda 750 motorcycles running or not. Also seeking Vespas with or without sidecars. (253) 441-8626 or 847-7772. Paperwork problems okay.

Miles just wants to roll around on the ground and have you rub his belly. He is sure to win you over with his laid back personality, and the adorable rumbling of his purr. Let this big man curl up in your lap. Are you his Forever Family?

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w w w. t a c o m a w e e k l y. c o m


Section B â&#x20AC;¢ Page 8 â&#x20AC;¢ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;¢ Friday, April 18, 2014

NOTICES Looking to start a New Cowboy Church in Greater Tacoma Area. Do you enjoy Country Music, Bluegrass, Southern Gospel? Contact Pastor John Questions. Answers. (253) 686-5953

NOTICES

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Friday, April 18, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV FEATURED LISTING

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

StephanieLynch

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I promise to follow through and follow up. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll discuss with you exactly how I work and what you can expect. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll communicate Â?Â? Top Producing Broker 2008-2014 Â?Â? regularly and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll know the process each www.stephanielynch.com step of the way. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m here to work hard for you and make the transaction as smooth as possible. Call me today for your personal consultation.â&#x20AC;?

253.203.8985

ROOMMATE

ROOMMATE

North Lakewood Single Unit Apt. 1 Bed Above Laundry Room Plus RV Spaces. No Pets. No Smoking. Screen $45. $550 Rent. Deposit $500 (253) 381-8344

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

Turn the Key & Move In! This Cozy 2Bd 1Bth has been freshly painted  IHDWXUHV UHĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHG ZRRG Ă RRUV  LQFK WULP around windows/doors & custom tile throughout. 8SJUDGHG (OHFWULFDO   3OXPELQJ 2IĂ&#x20AC;FH'HQ area, and large windows to enjoy Country Living and Northwest Wildlife at your doorstep! Privacy & Beauty all around! Situated on 1.12 acres (2 parcels), this property has Boundless Potential for Investor/Builder. Centrally located near highly desired schools, parks, water recreation and minutes to HWY 16 & local stores. This home is ready for your Inspiration!

Michelle Anguiano, Real Estate Broker

Better Properties Lakewood 253.720.6525

CONDOS & HOMES TACOMA

LAKEWOOD

11420 19TH AVE CT S

8416 PHILLIPS RD SW #58

$895

$775

2 BED, 1.5 BATH 900 SF. REMODELED HOME HAS BRAND NEW APPLIANCES, NEW FLOORS, WASHER/DRYER INCLUDED AND MORE.

1 BED 1 BATH 800 SF. CONDO HAS HARDWOODS, SS APPLIANCES, GREAT AMENITIES AND PETS WELCOME.

TACOMA

TACOMA

752 S 68TH ST A

14406 PACIFIC AVE S #3

$750

$650

2 BED 1 BATH 920 SF. AMAZING DUPLEX HAS NEW CARPET, FRESH PAINT, EAT IN KITCHEN, W/S/G INCLUDED & MORE.

1 BED 1 BATH 575 SF. PERFECT APT INCLUDES W/S/G, EAT IN KITCHEN, 6 MONTH LEASE AND ONSITE LAUNDRY.

TACOMA

TACOMA

6450 S MASON AVE #8

1515 DOCK ST #422

$735 1 BED 1 BATH 800 SF. APT HAS ALL APPLIANCES, NEWER WINDOWS, ONSITE LAUNDRY AND W/S/G INCLUDED

$1995 2 BED, 1.75 BATH 1368 SF. LAVISH CONDO HAS ALL APPLIANCES, 6 MONTH LEASE AVAIL , W/S/G INCLUDED & GREAT AMENITIES.

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200 View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Professional Management Services

MOORAGE

MOORAGE

Boat Moorage at Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dock. $9.50 per foot per month. 5 min. from I-5. Call Laura at (253) 627-3186 STABLES

STABLES

Dillon Stables. Covered, well-lit riding arena. 12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x12â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Stalls. Full care. Riding Lessons. Horses for Sale. $400 per month. (253) 606-4994 REALTORS

33 N Salmon Beach

Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton K\GUDXOLFERDW/LIWEULFNZRRGEXUQLQJĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFH with insert, expansive decking on all sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout the last 9 years, including roof, VLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZVGRRUVGHFNLQJERDW hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more. $450,000

3578 E F St, Tacoma â&#x20AC;˘ $124,000 This home is completely remodeled and movein ready with a massive, fenced backyard. Updated plumbing & electrical. New carpet, paint, moldings, doors. New kitchen with hickory cabinets, range, dishwasher. 12 by 14 covered deck. Huge Outbuilding for storage, alley access. ( MLS # 582500)

1018 S 61st St, Tacoma â&#x20AC;˘ $144,500

i d n

pe

Sergio Hernandez (253) 431-2308

Heather Redal (253) 363-5920

Sergio@betterproperties.com

Heatherredal@gmail.com

3728 N Gove St, Tacoma Cute little bungalow in Proctor! Nice upgrades include a new family room, windows, roof, energy package & carpet 6 years ago. Detached garage was converted to extra living space. It has a separate electric panel, heat & lights - lots of possibilities... music studio, art studio, exercise / yoga room, etc. Parking for 3 cars off the alley next to garage. Charming back yard, too! +DUGZRRGĂ RRUVXQGHUFDUSHWH[FHSWLQ family room. MLS# 518902. $195,000 Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

2711 Henry Road N

Agent Extraordinaire

7OVUL!  -H_! ,THPS!ZOHUUVUZLSSZ'OV[THPSJVT

Absolutely Charming, Mediterranean Style, custom built North Tacoma view home. Enjoy Commencement Bay view from Mstr Br balc. ,QVLGHIHDWLQFO0DUEOHĂ RRUHQWU\6W6WHHO$SSO *UDQFRXQWWRSV&XVWEXLOW+LFNRU\FDE%HDXW %UD]LOLDQ&KHUU\KDUGZRRGĂ RRU%D\ZLQGRZV 0VWUVXLWHZ)3 /UJEDWKVWHDPVKRZHU &DOLFORVHW1HZ(QHUJ\(IĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWKHDWLQJ&HQW YDFXXPQHZSDLQWLQ RXWQHZFDUSHW)LQLVKHG %VPWZNLWFKHQ&ORVHWR6FKRROV3DUNV )UHHZD\+RVSLWDOV :DWHUIURQW$623,000.

Gil Rigell

6711 36th St Ct NW, Gig Harbor

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St.

$257,500 Debbie Houtz Better Properties 253-376-2280

MLS# 573155

Better Properties Heather Redal 253.363.5920 PROPERTY

PROPERTY

MT. RAINIER VIEW $125,000 Beautiful Level Buildable Site! Located off of Ray Nash Drive NW, this 1.25 Acres of natural setting and mature Evergreen trees is perfect to build your dream home and enjoy the Country Lifestyle! Peeka-Boo View of Mt. Rainier. Just minutes away from sought after Schools, Uptown Gig Harbor Amenities, Restaurants, WA-Hwy 16, Hospitals, Boat launch/ water activities, tennis courts & Kopachuck State Park! Electricity is available at corner.

Michelle Anguiano, Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood 253.720.6525

OLD TOWN $499,950 Amazing development potential with this unique 2OG7RZQSURSHUW\&LW\KDVJLYHQĂ&#x20AC;QDOSODW approval for 4 lots on this prime 3 acre piece. Big views possible from all lots in this great neighborhood, tucked back & out of the way. Walk to the historic Old Town district with its coffee shops, wine bar & restaurants.; then stroll down to the waterfront & enjoy the gorgeous Puget Sound setting with walking paths, public docks, shoreline restaurants & more! MLS# 332653

COMMERCIAL

If I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell it to you and if I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live in it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t list it.

Shannon

Beautiful Victorian 4-plex in good location back on the market after remodel. Walking distance WR KRVSLWDOV GRZQWRZQ SDUNV 0DLQ Ă RRU XQLW has one bedroom plus attached bonus room, dining room, lg kitchen with nook, new carpet throughout, bay windows. Upstairs unit has 2 bedrooms, bath, lg living room, kitchen & balcony. Lower level has 2 studio apts & bath. Sep. utilities for main and upper units. 3,064 sq ft MLS# 523770

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

Better Properties N. Proctor (253) 376-7787

3 Bed, 1 3/4 Bath. 1,356 sq ft. Open Ă RRUSODQ YDXOWHGFHLOLQJVKLJKOLJKW this handsome rambler on a park-like corner lot in Artondale. Kitchen features an island, new smooth-top stove & convection oven, tile countertops & bay ZLQGRZV)DPLO\URRPZLWKĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHLV perfect for entertaining as is the large deck & fenced backyard. The master suite, one of three newly carpeted bedrooms, has French doors to the deck and a remodeled ž bathroom. 30-yr roof installed in 2005. 10 mins to schools, shopping, recreation & SR-16

936 S Sheridan $219,000

Askthehometeam.com

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

REALTORS

Super charming home w/ the ease of newer amenities... Box beam ceilings, hardwood Ă RRUVPDUEOHHQWU\SLFWXUHSODWHUDLOV SHULRG VW\OHOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHVDGGWRWKHDPELHQFHZKLOH newer roof, furnace/heat pump, indoor/outdoor speakers, newer wiring/plumbing, & gas Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHDGGWRWKHDKKKKIDFWRU6SDFLRXV living room, large kitchen, HUGE dining room, a bedroom and cute remodeled bathroom JUDFHWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWĂ RRU*LJDQWLFGHFNZVHDWLQJ welcome home. Move in and make it yours. $210,950

Charm and character galore in this 1920â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s &XWLH %HDXWLIXO KDUGZRRG Ă RRUV WKURXJKRXW high coved ceilings, large open kitchen, mud room, master bedroom w/2 closets, upstairs has KLJKFHLOLQJV)LUĂ RRUVDQGEHGURRPVZLWKORWV of closet space plus lots of storage. Backyard is fully fenced and is a gardenerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream with pond, mature landscaping and so much privacy. Garage is like a quaint cottage with a loft, new wiring and shop. House has 60 year roof, new insulation and is adorable! (MLS # 600824)

805 N Steele St

ng

HOMES FOR SALE

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 222-8480

Want bragging rights & the ability to name drop? Hans Grohe, Duravit, Kohler, & Porcher to name a few... Then this is the house for you-high end everything & custom touches galore. Need this spelled out in layman terms? Fabulous, fantastic & close to hip 6th Ave Biz District, this 4 bed, 2.5 bath home has natural, original woodwork, is an entertainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream, and is ready for new owners... Leave your hammer DW\RXUROGKRXVHWKLVRQHLVĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGDQG Ă&#x20AC;QLVKHGZHOO,PLJKWDGG:HOFRPH $368,000

HOMES FOR SALE

1232 S Adams St.

4914 N Vassault St, Tacoma 98407  "ED  "ATH s   Features include extensive hardwoods, wainscoting, architectural detailing, nine ft ceilings on main floor, granite and tile finishes, cherry-stained maple cabinets, CAT5e network, keyless entry, central A/C and much more. Fully-finished lower level. Living area extends to outdoor deck and hot tub overlooking meticulous grounds with auto sprinkler, fruit trees, garden; shed with power.

CALL 253.922.5317

COMMERCIAL

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract LAKEWOOD FLORIST SHOP Same location 30+ years, owners retiring, Asking $60,000 cash. PORT ORCHARD, DOWNTOWN Food & Beverage, annual gross sales, approx. $1,500,000, excellent net. Owner selling real estate & the business for $1,050,000, terms avail., same location over 100 years. ice

RURAL LIVING: pr reduced Restaurant/Lounge in Ashford, WA Price for business, $105,000 with $25,000 down. Price for the real estate, $390,000 with $75,000 down. Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract includes a 3 B/R house, laundromat, restr./lounge bldg. on 3.4 acre, commercial zoned parcel. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;CALLAHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB & GRILL IN KEY CENTER Business is for sale for $225,000 with $75,000 down, High gross sales. Saler will also consider leasing the space. Health price issue forces sale. d reduce

COLLISION CENTER Same owner 15 yrs. Retiring, 6621 So. Tacoma Way. $130,000 with terms to qualified buyer - some training provided at 0 cost to buyer.

A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with no HOA. High &HLOLQJVJDVÂżUHSODFHVVHSDUDWHO\PHWHUHG &DOOIRUSULYDWHVKRZLQJWRGD\253.606.0689 BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME

$399,000

LAKEWOOD CAFE/LOUNGE on a busy intersection, $71,000 CASH. ice

pr reduced

CALL RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 18, 2014

Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo

CageSport MMA XXX

Tesla

April 26, 8:30pm

May 3, 7pm

May 16, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $35, $50, $75, $80

I-5 Showroom $35, $55, $100

I-5 Showroom $25, $35, $55, $60

Spike & the Impalers

Aloe Blacc

Battle at the Boat 96

May 17, 8:30pm

May 23, 8:30pm

June 7, 7pm

I-5 Showroom $30, $40, $50, $55

I-5 Showroom $30, $45, $55, $60

I-5 Showroom $25, $40, $100

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


Twa 4 18 14 p01