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FREE s Friday, April 11, 2014

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Life Center empowers the community with Easter Community Fair PUBLIC IS INVITED FOR A DAY OF FAMILY FUN APRIL 20

DAFFODIL FESTIVAL GRAND FLORAL PARADE Daffodil Parade brings a sense of springtime amid overcast skies By Savannah Fry Correspondent

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

ROYAL GOOD TIME. (From top downward) Bringing a big splash of yellow to an overcast day, the Daffodil Princesses were a welcome sight to behold. Among the line-up of parade participants was Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland. Veterans from the Puyallup Tribe proudly carried the colors. A wealth of cultures makes the parade a truly Northwest event.

Overcast skies and slight showers were met with a steady stream of sunny yellow on Saturday, April 5, as the 81st Annual Daffodil Festival Grand Floral Parade wound its way through the four Pierce County cities of Tacoma, Puyallup, Sumner and Orting. Despite the cloudy weather and predictions of rain, the residents of Pierce County still lined the streets in all four cities, ready to take part in the annual celebration of community. “The weather didn’t scare us!” says Princess Lydia Mangan, from Henry Foss High School. “We kept our energy high.” Princess Ji Larson, from Lincoln High School, concurs. “It was a little chilly, but dancing around and smiling with all of my other Princesses cured that. It was wet here and there, but I am sure none of us would have minded, even if it was showering… there still would’ve been many people out to enjoy the parade!” The Parade marks the high point of the journey of the Daffodil Princesses, one that starts at school selections in October and November, sees their official crowning in February, and involves several high-energy months of Boys and Girls Clubs and Pierce County Libraries visits, interactions with community leaders and children alike. So you’ll excuse them for being a little preoccupied. “I didn’t really think about the rain,” says Princess Stephanie Jackson-Buena, from Chief Leschi High School, “All I really thought of was how I couldn’t believe the time had already arrived!” The morning of the parade also marked the beginning of a new event for the festival, the Daffodil 5K Challenge, which traveled through those same four cities as the parade, all in one day, utilizing each of the parade routes in Tacoma, Puyallup, Sumner and Orting as means of conducting four individual 5K races. The Challenge itself was in completing all four. “It was inspiring to see how many people came to run,” said Princess Kayla McElligot, from Fife High School. “I was also one of the princesses who got to hand out the medals to the runners who finished all four 5Ks… we handed out 138 medals!” When the big moment came and the princesses arrived to get on their float for the first time, it was a very poignant moment for the Royalty, something some of them had been building up to since they dreamed about it as children. Princess Sarah Schroeder, from Wilson High School, found herself getting a little more emotional than she had anticipated. “You can ask the other girls – I just couldn’t hold the tears back! I couldn’t help but cry, and I don’t mean mistyeyed! It was so, so special, and I know I’ll remember that

TCC Baseball A7

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) This may be a fast-past week, full of change. You may feel that you have had enough, but know that there are reasons for these changes that will come to light in the next few weeks. Avoid hasty decisions for the sake of liberation. Daily tasks help to keep you grounded. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) Those restless feelings inside of you are trying to tell you something. Something may happen soon that affects relationships in the next coming weeks. The universe may be hinting that this may be the end of the outdated that no longer serves you. Find answers to the obvious. GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) A creative project may take you to places you have never been before. Your energy is high and ready to take on the upcoming changes. Your inner strength relies on balance so stay in touch with your daily routine. Venus in your home zone brings peace. CANCER (June 21 – July 22) Career matters may bring unexpected changes this week. You may feel like you want to take matters in your own hands and fed up with others’ lack of follow through. Be respectful of tender feelings and take baby steps. LEO (July 23 – August 22) Create a compromise from your feelings to expand your horizons and keeping in touch with tedious responsibilities. Take some time and not hurry things. Change is coming but in its own time. Explore your potential. VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Financial issues are on your mind this week as you wait for answers on a loan or project. Tread with care and don’t overextend yourself. Stress and anxiety can burn out our inner batteries. Research your options.

CHARTER REVIEW COMMITTEE: The committee wants your thoughts and might even be calling you to get them. PAGE A6

games and 25,300 eggs to find, along with a variety of booths and vendors offering services to benefit the community. By Rachael Rice editorial_intern@tacomaweekly.com

Hunting for Easter eggs is fun. It’s fun to fill the plastic ones with prizes, decorate the real ones in colored dyes, and hide the eggs around the house. It’s fun to let the children loose and see them run and laugh and scramble to get as many eggs as they can within 10 minutes. It’s fun to see their faces light up with every one they find. Easter is a wonderful holiday. However in the hustle and bustle of decorating and hunting for eggs, it’s easy to forget that Easter isn’t all about finding the things the Easter Bunny left behind. On April 20, Life Center at Baker Middle School will be hosting their annual Community Easter Fair. There will be fun, games and 25,300 eggs to find, along with a variety of booths and vendors offering services to benefit the community. “Every person has a need,” said Alicia Mathurin, Children’s Director of Life Center at Baker MS. “Whether it’s a spiritual need, financial need, medical

X See EASTER / page A12

X See DAFFODIL / page A11 HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE

Child Rapist A3

COURTESY OF LIFE CENTER

EGG-CITING DAY. There will be fun,

Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Have that important conversation this week with that person that needs to hear your side of the story. You may feel feisty and not in the mood to compromise. Once you give in you will realize that it was for the best. It’s all about the little things. SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) Worry and stress can weigh us down at times. Relax tensions with daily exercise, meditation and yoga. Your mood will be lifted as you immerse yourself in routine. Write down your thoughts and feelings in a journal or notebook. Smiling is contagious.

WORD SEARCH E R H B A C J I E N J D A R J U X

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SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) Routines and responsibilities take center stage this week. You may come up with a brilliant idea that makes your life easier. Love and relationships bring surprises, so expect the unexpected. Stay in touch with those around you.

Work may be full of interruptions so you may benefit from having a backup plan. You plan meetings and make your deadlines with determination. Take some time to enjoy outdoor activities. Smell the fresh spring air. AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) Tensions may escalate this week making you feel like taking action. Release your inner stresses to help you make the appropriate decisions. Meditation or yoga may help to relieve anxiety. Find out what’s best for you. PISCES (February 19 – March 20) Financial decisions will be highlighted this week. You can no longer escape the unavoidable. Spending more won’t make it better. Come up with a plan of action to accomplish your goals and relieve the stress. As Venus enters your sign you will find more inner peace and have a better outlook.

ANAGRAM

NUCLEAR COWBOYZ

F S B C U L T U R E C O R N E R U

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Sports ........................A7 Make A Scene ........B5 A&E ....................... ....B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

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Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK VISIT US ON FACEBOOK MHJLIVVRJVT[HJVTH^LLRS`

18th and Woodlawn Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.� And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holeyness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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Bulletin Board /<4(5;9(--0*205.:<)1,*;6-7<)30*,=,5; SPIPA â&#x20AC;&#x201C;South Puget Intertribal Planning Agency â&#x20AC;&#x201C; would like to invite you to join us in our Sexual Assault Awareness Event on Human Trafficking. Human Trafficking is becoming more and more common in our community. Human Trafficking is a form of modern day slavery, sexual exploitation, and effects foreigners, American citizens and children. Human trafficking is a worldwide problem that is happening here in Washington State. Please join us on Thursday, April 24, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. We are working in collaboration with Rebuilding Hope Sexual Assault Center for Pierce County, Washington Engage, WARN â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Washington Anti-Trafficking Response Network, FBI Child Exploitation Task Force, and Safe Streets. The event will be held at the Pierce SPIPA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; TANF Office, 2316 S. State St., Suite #C, Tacoma WA 98405. Lunch will be served. Due to the sensitive topic, organizers are requesting that people not bring children to this event. Please call Pamela at (253) 722-0580 if you have any questions. If possible, RSVP to (253) 250-0550. >(32;(*64(:,90,:0:<5+,9>(@ The fifth annual Walk Tacoma series is underway, with the first walk on April 2 winding through historic Wright Park and the National Register-listed Stadium Historic District. Walk Tacoma 2014 is an eight-event walking series held on 1st and 3rd Wednesdays from April through August. Themed walks encourage downtown employees and residents to exercise and enjoy the outdoors and Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s built environment. Walk Tacoma events are free and no pre-registration is required. Free walking maps of the routes are available at Downtown on the Go, 950 Pacific Ave., Suite 300, at many downtown businesses, or by contacting the Downtown on the Go Coordinator at (253) 682.1734 or dotg@tacomachamber. org. For more information on the series, visit www.DowntownOnTheGo.com. For maps from previous years, including ones featuring the historic Brewery District and Hilltop neighborhood, visit www.downtownonthego.com/see/walktacoma-maps. 50,./)69/66+.96<7:05=0;,+ ;6,4,9.,5*@+0:(:;,979,:,5;(;065 On Tuesday, April 22, the City of Tacoma Emergency Management Team and the Washington Military Department Emergency Management Division will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Emergency Disaster Preparedness & Responding Procedure Presentation.â&#x20AC;? This is the first time ever that these two public services will come together to present this powerful presentation to neighborhood watch groups. The event is organized by Safe Streets Campaign and hosted by Stewart Safe Streets Neighborhood Watch Group. It will be held at The Chapel, 5010 S. G St., Tacoma (corner of South 50th and G St.). Schedule: 5:30 p.m. doors open; 6-6:30 p.m. socialize and light dinner); 6:30-6:45 p.m. open remarks; 6:45-8 p.m. presentations. Please RSVP with Darren Pen at (253) 272-6824 or dpen@safest.org. ;>65,>(9;05:;(33(;065:56>65=0,> Hilltop Artists staff has just finished installing a series of student-made glass artworks in the W.W. Seymour Conservatory for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Symbiosis: A Mutually Beneficial Relationship.â&#x20AC;? Hilltop Artists students invented, designed,and created imaginary glass birds, bugs and plants that represent symbiotic relationships that are now placed throughout the Conservatory. Now, until June 16, the installation will be open for public viewing. Admission to the Conservatory is $3, and children ages 11 and younger are free. Your first chance to view and purchase the glass art in the installation will be at the ticketed Sneak Preview Event on Friday, April 11 from 6-8 p.m. Beverages and hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres will be served. Tickets are $20 each, in honor of Hilltop Artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 20th Anniversary. The deadline to purchase tickets online is Thursday, April 10; however, guests will be able to purchase tickets at the door. You can also celebrate â&#x20AC;&#x153;Symbiosisâ&#x20AC;? at an opening reception for young artists and their families on Saturday, April 12 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Light refreshments will be served and door prizes will be available. Hilltop Artists students also created an installation for the Rhododendron Species Botanical Garden in Federal Way! â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Plant Hunterâ&#x20AC;? will be displayed from now through the end of May, and features imagined plant species throughout the Botanical Gardenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s live plant displays. Most of the glass plants are carnivorous species, so be sure to watch your step for Venus Fly Traps, spiky cacti and ferocious slugs. ;(*64(40++3,:*/663:769;: .,; +65(;065 Sports in Schools, a statewide organization that helps increase athletic opportunities in schools, donated $15,000

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to Tacoma Public Schools in support of expanding the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s middle school athletic program to include junior varsity teams. The donation, received at a March 22 Sports in Schools auction, offers students with financial hardships and other life challenges a bridge to a better life with the chance to participate in after-school sports activities, which keeps them healthy, active and engaged in school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are grateful for this donation and the support that Sports in Schools is creating for schools and youth across Washington state,â&#x20AC;? said TPS Student Life Director Jennifer Kubista. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are truly an organization focused on developing the whole child.â&#x20AC;? In January, Sports in Schools gave Jason Lee Middle School more than $900 worth of wrestling head gear. For information about TPSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; athletic opportunities and sports schedules, go to www.tacomaschools.org/athletics.

ANOTHER SUCCESS FOR COMMUNITIES 05:*/663:6-3(2,>66+ The hour was earlyâ&#x20AC;Ś but there was a buzz in the room. On March 27, 2014, over 200 guests from businesses, service clubs, agencies, JBLM, schools and the general public came together for the benefit breakfast at Old Country Buffet in support of Communities In Schools of Lakewood (CISL). Elected officials, including Senator Steve Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ban, Representative Dick Muri, retired Senator Rose Parks and Lakewood and Pierce County council members were in attendance. Superintendent Debbie LeBeau, Pierce College Chancellor, Dr. Michele Johnson, Fire Chief, Jim Sharp and JBLM Commander Col. Chuck Hodges Jr. also attended the annual Champions For Youth Breakfast. This annual breakfast highlights the impact CISL has in supporting 1500 Clover Park students each year. The $21,000 raised at the event will strengthen and expand After-School, Mentor and Readiness-to-Learn programs. Thirteen sponsors were generous with each providing $500 or more in underwriting this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s breakfast. Keynote speaker, Brandon Stodsgill, author of the book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Boy with a Gun: From Incarceration to Higher Education,â&#x20AC;? spoke passionately about the importance of surrounding young people with caring adults who can encourage them to pursue their dreams. Executive Director Dave Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keeffe emphasized the importance of close collaboration with school staff and the value that community partners add to schools. Thirty-five partners are currently active participants with CISL to â&#x20AC;&#x153;surround students with a community of support, empowering them to stay in school and achieve in life.â&#x20AC;? Champions Mentor Coordinator Leah Livingston recognized Kathryn VanWagenen and her mentee, Jacinda Farnsworth, for being the 100th active mentor match for Clover Park students, a milestone made possible by Livingstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leadership in the Champions Mentor Program. Livingston was recently honored as a national Unsung Hero by the CIS national office, which was noted by a video of her work with Tillicum students. Emcee Walter Neary brought the breakfast to a conclusion urging guests to support the work of CISL programs by volunteering or donating funds. Just one hour a week can make a big difference with a student who needs additional support at school. To volunteer or make a contribution, call (253) 5897489 or visit the website www.lakewood.ciswa.org. Again, thanks to all of the individuals and sponsors who contributed at the breakfast in support of our Lakewood youth. 705>/,,3:/0./30./;5,,+ ;6/,37()<:,+*/03+9,5 Pinwheels will spring up in surprising places this month. Pierce County volunteers known as CASAs (Court Appointed Special Advocates) will participate in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pinwheels for Preventionâ&#x20AC;? program to raise awareness about child abuse during April, which is National Child Abuse Prevention Month. Pinwheels for Prevention began in 2008 by a group called Prevent Child Abuse America. More information is available at www.pinwheelsforprevention.org. CASA volunteers provide advocacy for children who have been removed from their homes due to abuse and/or neglect. CASAs and CASA Program staff will plant pinwheels all over the county to bring attention to the 1,400 abused and neglected children in foster care locally. A display of 750 pinwheels will be installed on the lawn in front of Pierce County Juvenile Court, home of the CASA Program, to illustrate the number of abused and neglected children who do not have a CASA to advocate for them. The Pinwheels for Prevention campaign will make use of social networking as CASA staff snap pictures of the blue and silver pinwheels in various places throughout the county and post them on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. In addition to raising community awareness of child abuse, the CASA Program hopes to recruit more CASA volunteers to speak up for our countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most vulnerable young citizens as they make their way through the foster care system on their way home. 38th Annual

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CHILD RAPIST MISSING IN PIERCE COUNTY By David Rose Correspondent

Convicted child rapist Michael West is a Level III sex offender who is fresh out of prison and already missing in Pierce CounDAVID ROSE ty. West moved to Tacoma from Snohomish County where he was convicted of raping a 13-year-old girl. He met her at a bus stop, invited her to a party inside an abandoned home, got her extremely drunk and then raped her. Now, he is wanted for Escape from Community Custody and Failure to Register as a Level

III Sex Offender. This guy has been in prison multiple times and has always refused to take part in any sex offender treatment programs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was convicted of crimes against children, rape of a child, in Snohomish County,â&#x20AC;? said Pierce County Det. Ed Troyer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We believe he could be living anywhere in Western Washington because he has ties up and down the western corridor, so this is somebody we want to know where heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at and get him picked up on his warrants because he could be living next to a daycare, or school, or somewhere thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s children present.â&#x20AC;? This is the fourth time West has failed to register as a sex offender. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also

Auditor Julie Anderson announces re-election bid Julie Anderson will run for a second term as Pierce County Auditor. She kicks off her campaign on Thursday April 10 at 1625 Historic Tacoma (1625 South Tacoma Way). Barleywine Revue provides live music, starting at 5 p.m. The program begins at 5:45. Festivities will JULIE ANDERSON end at 7 p.m. The Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office is responsible for overseeing elections for as well as business licensing, public document recording, vehicle licensing, animal control, marriage licensing and passports. More than 250,000 people visit the Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office every year. Annual transactions exceed $2 million. During her first term, Anderson made it her top priority to de-politicize the office, focusing on professionalization and improved customer service. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My goal has been to restore faith in the efficiency and integrity of local government,â&#x20AC;? says Anderson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m committed to putting people before politics.â&#x20AC;? Since her election in a 2009 special election, Anderson has managed the transition to Vote-ByMail elections, instituted the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most-expansive ballot drop program, implemented same-sex marriage and made more transactions available to citizens online. Announcing her 2014 kick-off, Anderson noted her policy of not accepting contributions from elected officials, candidates, employees or the labor union that represents her employees. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s harder to run for re-election without taking these contributions. However, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want my re-election colored by any perception of favoritism. The Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office, more than any other, should be free from back-scratching. The outstanding employees who work in the Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office operate on merit, not favoritism.â&#x20AC;? For more information, visit www.JulieAnderson. org or contact the campaign at (253) 761-3602 or Julie@JulieAnderson.org.

MICHAEL WEST

been busted for a bunch of other crimes including burglary and robbery. Michael West is 39-years-old and known to go by the fake names Mike Chance, Chance West and

Eric Dion Jackson. If you know where deputies can find this highrisk child rapist, call an anonymous tip in to: CRIME STOPPERS: 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

COMMUNITY CLEAN-UPS BEGIN APRIL 26 The City of Tacoma will partner with more than 20 Tacoma neighborhood groups between April 26 and Sept. 6 as part of the 2014 Community Cleanup program. The Community Cleanup program is not really a public cleanup event, however the public is invited to participate by cleaning up their yards and throwing out larger items that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fit in their residential garbage containers at no extra charge when the City provides several dumpsters that are centrally located in the neighborhood for that communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scheduled cleanup. There will be 16 cleanups this year for specific neighborhoods to utilize. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are excited to have so much eager participation from neighborhood groups to work together to help create clean and safe neighborhoods,â&#x20AC;? said Lisa Wojtanowicz, Community Services Division Manager. The program, which offers each neighborhood area one cleanup day per calendar year up to 16 cleanup days throughout the city, is being fully utilized again this year. The City provides dumpsters for residential customers who live in single-family homes or duplexes on their neighborhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s day to spruce up their properties and save a trip to the Tacoma Landfill.

Fife Police detectives need your help to identify the suspects responsible for an armed robbery at a motel. At 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, March 20th, suspects tied up a man and robbed him at knifepoint inside a room at the Econolodge motel on Pacific Highway E. in the City of Fife. The victim went to the motel to meet an unidentified female suspect who was advertised on the website Backpage.com. When the victim entered the

THE SCHEDULE IS:

A man arrested at a 15th Street bus stop for an Weekly outstanding warrant may Tacoma is interested in have isbeen a little too as he was what happening in scared our community. transferred to Fife jail for booking. Please send your news and story ideas staying quiet in the patrol car, toWhile news@tacomaweekly.com. the man decided to urinate all over the backseat. When questioned about it, the subject, who appeared to be highly intoxicated, admitted to the act but offered no further explanation as to why he did it. The man was booked and the patrol vehicle was kept out of service until it could be decontaminated. Honesty is definitely the best policy when it comes to dealing with police officers. A man assaulted a patron of Dorkyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Arcade on Pacific Avenue by sucker punching him in the face. When a nearby officer noticed the commotion, he approached the men, when the victim began approaching the officer, the suspect once again sucker punched him in the head. After being restrained, the officer asked the man why he assaulted the victim. The man simply claimed to be an idiot, before admitting he had previously been drinking. The man was transported to Fife Jail and booked for assault. Compiled by Derek Shuck

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Neighborhood groups also can find the community cleanup schedule at cityoftacoma.org/communitycleanup. For more information contact Neighborhood and Community Services at (253) 591-5026 or cdegrosse@cityoftacoma.org.

Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to news@tacomaweekly.com.

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motel room, two unidentified male suspects tied up the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hands and robbed him. The suspects stole the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s keys and car, and then later Fridays at 10:30pm on

returned to the motel room after emptying the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bank account. The victim was then able to run out of the motel room and escape.

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PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT SUPPORTING THE ECONOMIC GROWTH OF OUR COMMUNITY

The Puyallup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s donation of $200,000 to Northwest Harvest will help keep food on the table for countless struggling families.

Considered among the most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians has grown to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its own membership but sharing its wealth among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County, with a payroll of more than 3,300 people

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 74 percent of whom are non-Native. Working in the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities, these employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits. In 2012 the Tribe spent over $445 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more. Even during the recession, the Tribe increased employment and funded substantial vendor purchases and construction projects,

keeping many businesses afloat and people employed. As the country continues to recover from past economic woes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians leads the way locally. From sponsoring dozens of local charities, nonprofit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer or cease to exist, to protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and health care, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its well-deserved reputation as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the generous people,â&#x20AC;? a reflection of the meaning of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very name.

Support For Our Native Community To the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;communityâ&#x20AC;? means more than their own membership circle. With over 4,600 Puyallup tribal members locally and across the country, and an Indian population of over 24,000 in the tri-county area, the Puyallup Tribe takes great pride in continuing its ancestral ways by caring for Native American people across the board. HEALTHCARE The Puyallup Tribal Health Authority (PTHA) opened in 1974 and today offers a wide variety of services annually to a patient population of over 12,000 from more than 200 tribes. Services provided include medical, pediatrics, dental, pharmacy, laboratory, radiology, mental health counseling, tobacco cessation programs, problem gambling programs, and alcohol and drug treatment programs. Following the vision of continuous improvement, the Health Authority recently completed a 10,000-square-foot expansion, and is in the process of a renovation project that at completion will provide much needed clinical space by adding 13 exam rooms, six pediatric exam rooms and three dental operatories. PTHA was the first tribal clinic in the country to start an Osteopathic Family Medicine Residency in 2012. It began with two residents, and it was quickly recognized that expanding to four would go a long way toward filling access gaps. Four new residents began training in July. The residency will reach full capacity in FY15 with 12 residents. The vision of this program is to train new doctors to work in Indian Country with full understanding of how health is affected by the cultural, environmental and familial aspects of tribal communities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to train healers not just technicians,â&#x20AC;? said Clinical Director Dr. Alan Shelton, MD. PTHA received national attention from the White House when President Obama addressed PTHAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great success in a speech at the 2013 Tribal Nations Conference (in part): â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś[T]he Puyallup Tribal Health Authority in Washington State created the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first tribal family medicine residency program. Patients are cared for in a culturally sensitive way, often by Native American staff. And weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re seeing results â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a young physician caring for a revered Tribal Elder; a doctor who has delivered babies in the community for years, and now his son is also doing the same. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creating more quality health care, but also sustaining bonds between generations. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s progress that we need to build on.â&#x20AC;? ELDERS Caring for their elders is a top priority for the Tribe, with $4.5 million spent last year on elder care services. The Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beautiful House of Respect Elders Center â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a $13 million facility opened in 2009 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; stands as testament to the Puyallupsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; deeply held reverence for their elder membership. The center, located on a historically significant site above the Puyallup River, offers a variety of health and recreational options for Puyallup elders over 45 years old.

Lieutenant Governor Brad Owenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (back row, left) archery classes at Chief Leschi Schools have been a real hit with children and adults.

YOUTH For the youth, the Tribe works to proactively instill positive values in its young members as early as possible through several important means: Puyallup Tribal Community Center â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This 34,000square-foot facility includes a 15,000-square-foot gymnasium and other areas for youth activities. The facility will also accommodate gatherings for meetings, weddings, funerals and cultural activities. Chief Leschi Schools â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Providing a Native-focused academic environment for children in pre-kindergarten through high school, Chief Leschi Schools serves Native American students from more than 60 different tribes with current enrollment of approximately 890 students. As one of the largest Bureau of Indian Education (BIA) schools constructed in the nation, the 200,000square-foot school is intended to be a model for Native American programs around the country. Grandview Early Learning Center â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Providing quality and culturally appropriate early childhood care for Native children in the community, during 2013 Grandview Early Learning Center served over 120 families and 210 children. Education opportunities within the Tribe donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop there. For its members seeking higher education after

high school, or their general equivalency degree (GED), the Puyallup Tribe ensures that funding is available for tuition assistance, books, tutoring and more. HOUSING Believing that everyone deserves a comfortable home to live in, the Puyallup Tribe and the Puyallup Nation Housing Authority (PNHA) strive to provide safe and sanitary housing for Puyallup tribal members and other Native Americans. During 2012, the Housing Authority spent over $4 million providing housing assistance to approximately 150 households. The recently completed Phase II of the Northeast Longhouse project in Tacoma added another 10 townhomes to the complex for a total of 20 townhomes. These housing units were built in an energy efficient manner and are culturally relevant to the community. Beyond providing safe and affordable housing, the Longhouse project also revitalized a struggling neighborhood. As the project came together, a long-stalled construction project across the street started up once again. Today, new singlefamily homes are now for sale on non-tribal land across the street.

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.


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BE AFRAID, TACOMA By Bill Johnston Be afraid, Tacoma - be very afraid! This is the standard warning from the voices of power and the status quo whenever there is the slightest hint of change on the horizon. Their favorite weapon is the â&#x20AC;&#x153;argument of imaginary horribles!â&#x20AC;? Just imagine if there were change and how horrible it would be. And if it did change, just imagine how it will cost you or all the freedom you will lose because â&#x20AC;&#x153;theyâ&#x20AC;? want to control everything. The current group issuing the warnings to us is firmly rooted in the 1950s, and the warning is about a possible change to the Tacoma City Charter, an outdated document harkening back to the 1900 Populist Era to deal with the corruption problems of big cities like New York and Chicago. Anyone seen Boss Tweed lately? A first-year political science student just fresh from PoliSci 101 will tell you, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The city manager form of government does not work in a city with over 50,000 population.â&#x20AC;? When Tacoma adopted the current charter it was already too populated for it to work. A city manager/council government puts the power and the actual operation of the city in the hands of bureaucrats. The council is merely advisory to set down a general policy they hope the manager and his minions will follow. The city manager controls all the information and with staff, who do not work for the council or you, make the final decisions. You voted for your city council member â&#x20AC;&#x201C; so what! If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe in democracy or just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care if Tacoma has a democratic form of government, you probably are not interested in what the Charter Review Commission is up too. If it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter if you can vote for the people who will actually

make the decisions as to the quality of life you and your family live in, the Charter Review Commission probably doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter to you. So you can quit reading this right now. If you are like me and do care about Tacoma and its future, consider this. I do believe in democratic government. I want to elect people who will have the power to carry out the programs they campaigned for when I voted for them. I want a thriving, healthy, safe city filled with the best of many diverse cultures living together in the most beautiful spot on the face of the earth. And we can have that, but our city government must be better than it has been in the past. I do not mean to pick apart past city councils or officials. Mayor Karen Vialle created the Neighborhood Councils. Mayor Brian Ebersole was certainly a driving force behind much of the wonderful UWT, Washington State History Museum, Federal Building development transforming part of Pacific Avenue. But this had much to do with Ebersoleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal abilities and political skills and Vialleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strong personality. Being Mayor of Tacoma simply opened up opportunities they knew how to use. But several other well meaning and bright people have been elected to the city council only to be stymied by the wall of bureaucrats in a city government controlled by the unelected city manager. Never forget why the city manager form of government was developed in the first place: because the promoters DID NOT TRUST THE PEOPLE! They believe you (the voter) cannot be trusted to elect the â&#x20AC;&#x153;rightâ&#x20AC;? people to govern. And we are seeing this core ideology raising its ugly head as the debate on whether or not Tacoma should throw the city manager form of government out and bring in an elected Mayor-Council system.

This very point has been put forward by the supporters of the status quo on the Charter Commission. One members asks plaintively how can we be sure the â&#x20AC;&#x153;rightâ&#x20AC;? people will be elected? The answer can be provided by quoting Winston Churchill: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Democracy is a very imperfect form of government but it is so much better than all the others.â&#x20AC;? Democracy comes with risks! The president of a local governance institute told the review panel, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most people believe the mayor controls the city, but it is really the city manager because the mayor has no authority.â&#x20AC;? He also pointed out because the system creates a continual turnover of council members, there is always a limited pool of knowledge about city affairs by the council as a whole. Since the mayor is just another member of the council with no authority, he/ she has no â&#x20AC;&#x153;bully pulpitâ&#x20AC;? to lead from so Tacoma has government by committee. By default and the charter, Tacoma city governance falls almost exclusively into the hands of the city manager and his â&#x20AC;&#x153;teamâ&#x20AC;? of bureaucrats. The word is the review commission may well recommend some major changes to the city charter. So be ready, citizens, because you will be warned â&#x20AC;&#x153;Be Afraid, Tacoma â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Be very Afraid!!! William F. (Bill) Johnston is a Vietnam-era veteran of the U.S. Air Force and a graduate of Western Washington University with a Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in journalism and history and a Masters in political science. He is a first-place award recipient for Excellence in Journalism from the Society of Professional Journalists and is a current member of the National Writers Union â&#x20AC;&#x201C; UAW 1981 (AFL-CIO).

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a mistake to rely on Russiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s space shuttle By Don C. Brunell When President Obama permanently grounded Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s space shuttles a couple of years ago, he made a huge mistake. He gave Russia carte blanche over the International Space Station, and we now pay $70 million each for our astronauts to hitch a ride. With Vladimir Putin flexing his muscles in the Ukraine and thumbing his nose at the United States and rest of the world, what happens if he gives our astronauts the boot? Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be up the creek without a paddle. Our shuttles were hauled off to museums. Not only did Obama tube the shuttles, he canceled the Constellation program, the successor to Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic space shuttle program. Although the complex program was plagued by delays and cost overruns, taxpayers lost the $11 billion theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d invested when the president shut it down. Obama says he also opposes returning to the moon â&#x20AC;&#x201C; another huge blunder. Instead, he plans to send astronauts to asteroids and, eventually, to Mars. To reach Mars from Earth, Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget funds the design and production of massive new heavy lift rockets. But because gravity on the moon is onesixth that of the Earth, it would be far easier to launch Mars missions from the moon. China thinks so, as well. In abandoning the lunar program,

the president missed the point. It is not about â&#x20AC;&#x153;been there, done that,â&#x20AC;? it is about having a place from which to launch deep space missions â&#x20AC;&#x201C; like his mission to Mars â&#x20AC;&#x201C; test new technologies and develop limitless supplies of clean energy. Space physicist David Criswell believes the moon could supply clean renewable energy for our entire planet. He and others envision a series of lunar power facilities to capture massive amounts of solar energy and beam it back to Earth. The moon receives more than 13,000 terawatts of energy and harnessing one percent of that energy could satisfy our planetary needs. Apollo 17 astronaut Dr. Harrison â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jackâ&#x20AC;? Schmitt, a geologist and one of the last two people to walk on the moon, believes Helium 3 found on the moon is the key to the second generation of fusion reactors. A light non-radioactive isotope, Helium 3 is rare on Earth, but plentiful on the moon and scientists believe it could produce vast amounts of electricity. Potential lunar colonization got a healthy boost a year ago when ice was discovered by NASA scientists at its south pole. That means there could be drinking water, oxygen for breathing and hydrogen for rocket fuel on the moon itself. China sees the strategic advantage of establishing bases on the moon and plans to start within 10 years. While

some in the scientific community support Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan, many highprofile astronauts oppose it. The first and last men on the moon, the late Neil Armstrong and Eugene Cernan, said Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposal â&#x20AC;&#x153;destines our nation to become one of second- or even third-rate stature.â&#x20AC;? Former astronaut Winston Scott, dean of the college of aeronautics at the Florida Institute of Technology, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t call yourself a leader if you have to hitch a ride with someone else.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Encouraging the private sector to provide shuttle transport in the future is a good idea. But that could be a long time coming. American space hero John Glenn proposed that our existing space shuttles keep flying until the private sector has a proven alternative. Through decades of risk, sacrifice, heroism and hard work, America has led the world in space exploration. Now, we are reduced to cosmic hitchhikers with our thumbs out begging a ride as Russiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Soyuz and Chinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shenzhou spacecraft pass us by. Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He recently retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.

There once was a time when Tacoma had neither a stadium nor a baseball team to play within it. Good thing that was a long time ago, and hopefully that will be a part of the City of Destinyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past that will stay part of its history. Whether people are fans of baseball or the Rainiers, specifically, Cheney Stadium and the Triple-A affiliated Rainiers play solid roles in community building and memory making for thousands of people both inside and outside the ballpark through entertainment, community pride and the promotion of athletics. It has always been thus, and it should always be thus. Conceived in 1957 by business icons Ben Cheney and Clay Huntington, Cheney Stadium was built for community baseball. Their dream gave rise in 1960 to the Tacoma Giants, the farm team of the San Francisco Giants, which moved from Phoenix into a new stadium in Tacoma. Construction took just three and a half months to finish in time for the season opener on April 16, 1960. Renovations have come and gone, but the heart of the stadium remains as it was those 54 years ago, during a time when the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name and affiliation have changed several times. Yeah, sure, there were additions of luxury suites, a restaurant, club seats that put spectators closer than any other seat in any other ballpark across the nation and a grass berm located along right field for blanket sitting families, but the heart of the stadium remains just as Cheney envisioned â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a place for family entertainment. Families, sports lovers or not, have flooded the seats to see the Tacoma Giants then the Giants, then with the Chicago Cubs system as the Tacoma Cubs, followed by Minnesota-affiliated Twins thanks to Huntington and fellow businessman Stan Naccarato. Then came that weird season when Tacoma was home to the New York Yankees farm team, but we wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t talk about that since it was followed by the Tacoma Tugs then, in 1980, Tacoma Tigers, with the Cleveland Indians and then the Oakland Athletics. But then a real marriage happened in 1995, when the Seattle Mariners adopted the Tacoma team as its downthe-block affiliate. The reign of the Rainiers was born, with championships in 2001 and 2010, a feat done with all of the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games being played on the road because of stadium renovations. Icons of the game have swung bats at Cheney. Gaylord Perry, Ron Herbel, Eddie Fisher, Dick Phillips, Jason Giambi, Scott Brosius, Jose Rijo, Alex Rodriguez, Jay Buhner, Ken Griffey Jr., Raul Ibanez, Felix Hernandez and JJ Putz all took bases on the diamond. While the â&#x20AC;&#x153;memorial wallâ&#x20AC;? of Tacoma teams gone by was removed to make way for the renovations in 2011, their legacy remains. It sure would be great to have that wall back (hint, hint, hint). But we love you Rainiers just the same. Play ball! The above opinion represents the view of Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s editorial board.

Letter to the Editor Dear Editor, Does the current Tacoma City Charter effectively serve the needs of working families? Does it sufficiently protect the environment? Does privatization serve our best interests? Currently, there is a Charter Commission appointed by the Tacoma City Council that will help to adopt a new city charter that will guide our government in the upcoming years. Public hearings are being held around the city, and citizens will have three minutes to voice their options. What would a better charter, one that serves working families, look like? I have a few ideas (everyone is entitled to my opinions.): 1.) The Charter Commission was hand-picked by the current Tacoma City Council. While I am sure that its members are well intentioned, it seems top-heavy with the usual crowd. The first thing that the Charter Commission should do is to provide for an elected Charter Commission. 2.) All members of the Charter Commission should actually live in Tacoma. 3.) The goal of the charter should be to expand democracy, accountability and transparency in Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s government. 4.) The city manager system should be discarded in favor of a system directly responsible to our elected leaders. 5.) The city council should be expanded to provide greater representation. At-large positions should be abolished in favor of neighborhood representation. We need to have a council that represents all of the constituencies in Tacoma â&#x20AC;&#x201C; particularly in underserved neighborhoods. 6.) The charter should provide express protections for working families, e.g., a living wage, paid sick days and paid vacations. 7.) No privatization of city services. No council takeover of Tacoma Utilities. It is my opinion that an expansion of democracy and neighborhood participation would position us to have a city council more adequately provide for neighborhoods. Jim Williams - Tacoma Former labor organizer and social worker

TACOMAWEEKLY Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC 2588 Pacific Highway, Fife, WA 98424  Â&#x2039;-(?!  7\ISPZOLY!John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com 6WLYH[PVUZ4HUHNLY!Tim Meikle / tim@tacomaweekly.com 5L^Z+LZR!news@tacomaweekly.com 4HUHNPUN,KP[VY!Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com :[HMM>YP[LYZ! Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Kathleen Merryman / kathleen@tacomaweekly.com Derek Shuck / derek@tacomaweekly.com ,U[LY[HPUTLU[,KP[VY! Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com :WVY[Z,KP[VY! Justin Gimse/ jgimse@tacomaweekly.com 7HNPUH[PVU!Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar >LI+L]LSVWLYZ! Cedric Leggin, Ed Curran, Mike Vendetti, Jacob Thiel 7OV[VNYHWOLY! Rocky Ross *VU[YPI\[PUN>YP[LYZ! Karen Westeen, Steve Mullen, Dave Davison, Sean Contris (K]LY[PZPUN!Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Colleen McDonald / cmcdonald@tacomaweekly.com, Marlene Carrillo / marlene@tacomaweekly.com


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*OHY[LY9L]PL^*VTTP[[LLJHSSZMVYJVTTLU[ZSP[LYHSS` By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Charter Review Committee is slated to hold a town hall meeting at 7 p.m. April 17 at City Hall to present recommendations to the way Tacoma operates. The committee wants your thoughts and might even be calling you to get them. The city has contract-

ed with Tele-Town Hall, a private vendor based in Virginia, to coordinate a telephone campaign to get questions and comments about the changes to Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s city charter, which is like the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s constitution. Issues under consideration include everything from how the Tacoma City Council is formed, to what oversight the council has over departments, what

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level of autonomy Tacoma Public Utilities has from other city departments and how the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decisions are made. Pretty much all functions of city hall are under review. Roughly 10,000 randomly selected telephone landlines in Tacoma will ring beginning April 16 with â&#x20AC;&#x153;robo callsâ&#x20AC;? informing residents of the April 17 event. Then minutes before the town hall begins, 7,500 randomly selected telephone landlines will ring a second time with another invitation to participate in the event. The telephone campaign follows a postcard barrage to every address in Tacoma announcing the event. Call recipients could then either stay on the telephone and make a com-

ment or ask a question by following automated prompts on their telephone keypads to be transferred to a live attendant who will pass their comments or questions on to the event moderator to ask the subcommittee chair. They could then choose to continue following the event over the phone or hang up and continue watching the event live since the town hall will be televised and streamed live on TV Tacoma. Due to time constraints, there will be no opportunity for live, interactive exchanges between event participants and Charter Review Committee members. Questions and comments are also being gathered through e-mail, Twit-

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ter and Facebook as well as in person at the town hall event. Questions and comments will then be gathered for review on the Charter Review section of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, which also has a roster of other documents about the process. About 1,100 telephone comments and questions are expected to be added to the 2,000 to 4,000 oral and written questions that will be gathered as part of the process, Charter Review Liaison Jeanne Harris said, noting that although participants arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t required to identify themselves they are encouraged to at least mention their neighborhood as a way to gauge representation from the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s five council districts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To the best of our ability, we would like to know at least where in Tacoma they are from so we can get a sense of participation,â&#x20AC;? she said.

HOW TO VOICE YOUR THOUGHTS:

Phone: (253) 591-5505 Email: charterreview@ cityoftacoma.org Twitter: send a post or message to @cityoftacoma Facebook: send a post or message to facebook. com/cityoftacoma In person: Attend the town hall at the Tacoma Municipal Building Council Chambers, 747 Market St., 1st Floor at 7 p.m. April 17. Online: cityoftacoma. org/charterreview All comments, questions and answers will be posted within 24 hours at cityoftacoma.org/charterreview. On television: Watch TV Tacoma on Channel 12 within Tacoma city limits and in Pierce County, with the exception of University Place, where it can be found on Channel 21 or streaming at tvtacoma. com.

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Sports

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SI DE

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 11, 2014

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 7

TACOMA RAINIERS

TACOMA’S NEW MANAGER BRINGS A WEALTH OF EXPERIENCE TO THE TEAM

TCC BASEBALL OFF TO INCREDIBLE START

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

WIND UP. (Top) Quinn Eldridge is 3-0

with a 1.39 ERA on the mound. (Bottom) Second baseman CJ Hicks has been a force at the plate and in the field. By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

PLAY BALL. (Top) Pitcher Brandon Maurer looks to regain the form that saw him start the 2013 with the Seattle Mariners. (Left) Left-Fielder Xavier Avery is sure to steal many bases this season. (Right) Catcher Jesus Sucre gets a hand from Manager Roy Howell after a homerun blast. (Below) Nick Franklin has spent some time with the Mariners and may return again. By Karen Westeen Missbaseball9@juno.com

W

hen spring training began this year, Roy Howell was expecting to break camp as a member of the Double-A Jackson Generals’ staff and John Stearns, Tacoma’s manager from last season, was scheduled to be the third base coach in Seattle. Then another game of manager-goround began. Stearns had unexpected surgery and had not recovered enough by the start of the season to coach. Rich Donnelly, who was scheduled to manage the Rainiers, was called up from Tacoma to replace him, and Howell was inserted as the Rainiers’ manager. Having spent parts of 14 seasons playing Major (with three teams) and Minor League ball as a third baseman, followed by six years as a coach and manager gave Howell excellent experience and perspective for this position. The 60-year-old Lompoc, Calif. native sat down recently with Tacoma Weekly baseball correspondent Karen Westeen to discuss his lifetime in baseball. KW: Where do you call home in the off-season? RH: My wife of 40 years and I live in Shell Beach, on the California coast near Pismo Beach. She’ll be here for the summer. KW: Do you have a family? RH: Yes, we have two adult sons. KW: What’s your earliest baseball memory? RH: When I broke my first window when I was 6 or 7, and then the game itself. I had a brother three years older than myself, my dad was coaching him when I was 7 or 8, and I was always catching BP, doing something for the older kids. KW: Did you play other sports besides baseball? RH: I played all sports, basketball,

football, baseball, Little League, youth football. KW: Where did you go to high school and college? RH: I graduated from Lompoc High School in 1972, and was drafted number one by the Texas Rangers right out of high school so I didn’t go to college. KW: How did being a hitting coach and a player help you as a manager? RH: All those things are correlated, they’re all about baseball. When I was in high school I coached a Little League team, I’ve been coaching and teaching this game my whole life, from high

school to collegiate and professional. You need to understand the whole aspect of the game. I was 20 years old when I first came to the Big Leagues in 1974 with Texas, with Billy Martin as my manager. He also managed me in the All Star Game in 1978. I listened to and learned a lot from him, and now I’m a manager. The hitting aspect is the technical part of it, managing is an understanding of all the game. It just evolves. Never stop learning, never stop watching. Am I a manager, am I a hitting guy? I’m a baseball guy. KW: When you were named TacoX See RAINIERS / page A10

This team wasn’t supposed to be this good, this fast. They were a playoff club a year ago and had nine players leave the program to play NCAA Division I baseball. There were some holes to fill. Tacoma Community College rolled over Green River CC on April 5 and 6 for a fourgame sweep. When the dust settled from the combined 48-8 beat down, the Titans could boast the best record in the Northwest Athletic Association of Community Colleges. TCC moved to 19-1 on the season and more importantly 6-0 in the NWAACC West Region. Fourteen straight wins since a loss to Walla Walla on the road. Fourteen straight wins giving up an average of two runs per ballgame. A coach is always challenged at the community college level because they’ve only got two years to work with a player. Some years more than half of the team will be graduating or transferring. With players leaving for the likes of Mississippi State University, the University of Washington and the University of AlabamaBirmingham last year, Titans head coach Ryan Mummert didn’t know what to expect from this team. “I didn’t think we were going to be as talented as we were last year,” Mummert said. “We lost a bunch of good players. Nine Division I players last year. I knew it was going to be difficult replacing those guys. We’ve just had some freshmen that are now sophomores make a big jump and we had some freshman come in that we were anticipating making an impact for us and they have.” Coach Mummert is now in his fourth season at TCC and while his teams have included 17 future Division I baseball players, they’ve also won their share of ballgames. With the sweep of Green River, Mummert now owns a 108-45 record as the Titans’ skipper and it looks as though he’ll be adding to that win total dramatically, if his club maintains anything close to their current pace. Apparently quality baseball players are seeing a developmental launching pad at TCC and are taking full advantage of the opportunity and experience. “They all come here for the same common goal of wanting to win a bunch of games and having an opportunity to play at the highest level afterward,” Mummert said. “I just think that the competition that these guys create every day at practice has allowed them to prepare themselves to play at a high level and the results of 19-1 are kind of showing that right now, “But obviously there’s still a lot of baseball left to play.” Whether it is pitching or hitting, the Titans’ individual statistics shed more light upon the amazing season so far. Nine players are batting over .306 and four pitchers, all logging over 20 innings of work, boast earned-run averages at 2.95 or less. Other teams are finding nowhere

X See TCC / page A10


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Professional golfers Michael and Andrew Putnam are catching fire on the PGA and Web.com tours. The Life Christian Academy alums have been moving up in their ranks and may find themselves playing together on the PGA Tour next season if they can maintain their momentum. Older brother Michael (30) has risen to number 94 on the PGA FedEx Cup rankings making the cut in 12 of 15 tournaments and earning $262,138 so far in 2014. Last week he finished tied for 24th, his highest finish of the season, at the Houston Open. He will retain his PGA Tour Card by finishing the year in the top 125 of the FedEx standings. Younger brother Andrew (25) is working to earn his PGA card on the Buy.com Tour where the top 25 earners of the year are awarded a promotion to the PGA Tour the following season. Andrew currently sits in fifth place in earnings with $134,375 and has already surpassed his previous yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winnings in just five tournaments. Michael regained his PGA card last season on the Buy.com tour finishing second in earnings with $515,184 won and was named the tourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s player of the year. He has earned over $2.7 million since turning professional in 2006.

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Jon Lester remains a force on the mound for the Boston Red Sox. The 6-4 lefty was the opening-day starter for Boston and has been the victim of little run-support from his teammates going 0-2 while giving up just four earned runs total. Boston has scored just one run in his two outings. Still, Lesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2.51 ERA is impressive, with just two walks and 14 strikeouts. The 2000 Bellarmine Prep graduate and Gatorade State Player of the Year has carved himself out a fine MLB career so far. A two-time All-Star, Lester has won two World Series rings with the Red Sox, including going 2-0 in

the 2014 Series. Since entering the Major Leagues in 2006, Lester is 100-58 for his career with a 3.75 ERA and 1,251 strikeouts.

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Tacoma is quickly becoming a favorite destination for amateur and professional runners from all around the Puget Sound. Following up another successful St. Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Half-Marathon, the Tacoma City Marathon Association will host the Ruston Way 5K on Saturday, April 19 along the beautiful Ruston Way waterfront. The race begins and ends at Point Ruston and is open to all ages and walkers, strollers and even dogs are allowed. There is also a 1K Kids Run. Registration is open all the way through race day, but it is advisable to register early, as the cost is lower ($30 until April 15). Go to rustonway5k.com for more details and registration.

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Wrestlers of all ages will be converging upon the Tacoma Dome May 3-4 for the Washington State Freestyle & Greco Championships. The competition is open to men and women of all ages and abilities with a current membership in the Washington State Wrestling Association. The event is open to the public and will have multiple mats of action throughout the day. Athlete registration closes May 1. More information on this and other wrestling events at washingtonstatewrestling.com.

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Comeback Sports, the largest adult sports league in the South Sound is finalizing teams and leagues for the spring and beginning sign-ups for the summer. The company offers weekly leagues for menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flag football, coed flag football, kickball, softball, volleyball, dodgeball, basketball and more. Over 6,000 men and women competed in a variety of leagues in 2013 and registrations are closing soon. Visit comebacksports. com or contact Vanessa Eskelin at (253) 326-5168 for more details.

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSHUA SEALS

By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

Having formed just two years ago, the University of Washington-Tacoma menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team, the UWT Huskies, continue going strong both on the court and out in the community. Whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s building team unity or participating in the vitality of their college, the UWT Huskies are true role models for young people and veteran basketball fans alike. The franchise was founded in the spring of 2012 by UWT alumnus Joshua Seals, who graduated in 2013 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Self and Society-Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences. He continues on as coach of the UWT Huskies, with himself and Jordan Williams as co-captains. A member of the South Sound Sports League, the UWT Huskies is a culturally diverse group of players that represents and accepts all ethnicities. The team consists of present and former UWT students as well as up-andcoming future UWT students.

The team certainly has talent. Ranging in ages between 19 and 25, the ballers know how to work the court and are very versatile in their positions. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taken a lot of hard work to get the team to where it is today, according to Seals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a great experience and an uphill battle but our competitiveness keeps us in the game,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These guys are tough, dedicated and determined.â&#x20AC;? Co-captain Williams said the team has had its hurdles, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve figured things out. The players love to play and really love basketball. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re dedicated to the team and wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop until they get a championship. We want to win not only for ourselves but for everyone at UWT as well.â&#x20AC;? This commitment to, and care for, their alma mater runs deep among the players. For example, team members recently attended UWTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memorial service for former chancellor Debra Friedman, who passed away on Jan. 26, 2014. Seals commented on the much-loved chancellorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strong legacy she left for the college to follow.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;She was very supportive of the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision and strongly encouraged us to continue building this team up,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The team is in the beginning stages of building a lasting legacy for the college. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historical. All great colleges need great basketball teams. Sports in college can put colleges on the map,â&#x20AC;? smiled Seals. The UWT Huskies will be involved in future social functions in the city and in public appearances. It is important for them to serve as role models for younger students and upcoming athletes. The vision of this team is to not only produce great players but to also promote camaraderie and brotherhood among the players and to promote character in each individual. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just want to do our best,â&#x20AC;? said Seals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need backers and supporters to help bring our vision to pass. So come out and support the UWT Huskies!â&#x20AC;? The team can be contacted at (253) 202-5821 and (253) 376-1267; e-mail uwtbball@ uw.edu.

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TACOMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HOT TICKETS APRIL 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;18

-90+(@(7903Âś/0./:*/663)(:,)(33 Mount Tahoma at Lincoln Heidelberg Field â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:45 p.m.

By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

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ost-season honors continue to roll in for some of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best high school basketball players. The Washington State Associated Press has released its all-state teams and included Josie Matz from Wilson and Arâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;mond Davis from Foss on the 3A first-teams. Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alphonso Anderson and Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ahmaad Rorie were given 3A Honorable Mentions. Matz had quite a remarkable year at point guard for the Lady Rams. The 5-8 freshman averaged 15.9 points, 4.4 assists and 3.5 steals per game while leading Wilson to a 21-7 record and just one victory short of the state 3A championship game. The Tacoma Weekly All-City first-team selection also garnered first-team Narrows league honors while pushing Wilson to another league championship. She made a big splash at the 3A State Hardwood Classic averaging 20.3 points and 4.7 rebounds for the tournament and was voted to the First-Team 3A All-Tournament Team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I certainly think at Districts and at the State level she showed what she can do; both individually and for the team itself,â&#x20AC;? Wilson head coach Michelle Birge said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Her confidence was higher, and she did a lot of things for us. I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really surprised at her making the AP team.â&#x20AC;? Matz is the only freshman voted to the first-team of any classification, boys or girls, by the Associated Press this year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The only thing that plagued her this year was obviously being a freshman and new situations and not knowing what to expect,â&#x20AC;? Birge continued. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a humble kid, and I think a lot of this has surprised her. She has high ambitions and dreams. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m blessed to have the opportunity to coach her.â&#x20AC;? The athletic Foss boys team fell one game shy of 3A Hardwood Classic this season and senior Arâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;mond Davis was leading the attack. The 6-5 shooting guard averaged 26.3 points, 6.1 rebounds and two steals per game for the 17-8 Falcons. Davis dazzled crowds throughout the season with high-flying dunks and a shooting range that sometimes seemed to be just inside of the half-court stripe. Davis led both the 3A and 4A Narrows league in scoring and topped 40 points in a game twice this season. He finished with 75 three-pointers and shot 81 percent from the free-throw line for the year. A first-team selection to the Tacoma Weekly All-City team, as well as first-team Narrows league honors, Davis has committed to play Division I college basketball for the Seattle University Redhawks. Ahmaad Rorie rejoined the Lincoln Abes at the mid-season mark after regaining his eligibility from the WIAA following a transfer from out-of-state. The 6-foot point guard helped lead a well-balanced Abes squad to a 22-4 finish and one game shy of the 3A Hardwood Classic. At one point Lincoln had risen to second in the 3A state rankings. Rorie scored 24 points and was a game-changer throughout for the Abes in their 80-70 West Central District finals victory over rival Wilson. Next season, Rorie will take his game to the next level after committing to the University of California at Berkley of the Pac12. Alphonso Anderson was a steady force inside and out for the Narrows League champion Wilson Rams. The 6-7 sophomore forward averaged 15 points and 12 rebounds per game and was named to the Tacoma Weekly All-City first team, Narrows first-team and 3A State Tournament first-team.

:(;<9+(@(7903Âś>64,5Âť:-(:;70;*/ PLU at UPS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Doubleheader U of Puget Sound â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Noon & 2 p.m.

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:5(7 (Top) Arâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;mond Davis led all Tacoma

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WTCC From page A7

to rest against TCC. Freshman pitcher Justin Vernia leads the team with a 5-0 record and an 0.28 ERA in 31.2 innings with 28 strikeouts and only six walks. The 6-1 right-hander has given up just one run this season and he may not be the best pitcher on the team. Joey Gamache, a 6-5 sophomore is following up a solid 8-1 first season at TCC with more of the same and better. The big lefty is 4-0 with a 1.32 ERA in 34 innings with 24 strikeouts and just seven walks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gamache has been as steady as ever,â&#x20AC;? Mummert said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doing exactly what we thought he was going to do and that was picking up where he left off last year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The whole staff has been quality and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re difficult to hit. The pitching staff has been the most consistent part of our team.â&#x20AC;? What about the hitting? Freshman outfielder Jeremy Spring is riding a 14-game hitting streak and is now leading the team with a .442 batting average. He has struck-out just five times in 52 at-bats while drawing eight walks. Leadoff hitter Connor Cloyd is leading the team in runs (26), stolen bases (12) and walks (15) and boasts a .338 batting average. The sophomore outfielder has just eight strikeouts in 65 at-bats.

CJ Hicks has been steady as a rock batting .328 in the two or three position in the order and has made a huge jump from last year according to coach Mummert. Brett Neilsen originally signed to become an Oregon Duck but ended up at TCC, leading the team in runs batted in and at-bats. The freshman is batting .333 and is just another reason why this team is not just matching last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s squad, but possibly surpassing it. In 20 games TCC has committed just 16 fielding errors. All of these statistics tell a tale of how and why this team is sitting high upon the NWAACC standings and why they have such high hopes for the remainder of the season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a real tribute to these guys,â&#x20AC;? Mummert said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been buying into everything we talk about. We talk about being good students, great athletes and being good people off of the field. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That definitely makes it fun for a coach.â&#x20AC;? Chances are they will drop another game or two along the way. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a long season, not quite at the midpoint for TCC. However, as it stands right now, at 19-1 theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the hottest team in the Puget Sound, at any level. TCC hosts Grays Harbor CC April 12 for a doubleheader starting at 1 p.m. and Centralia CC April 18 at 4 p.m. The Titans play their home games at Minnitti Field on the Corner of 12th Street and Pearl.

WRainiers From page A7

maâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s manager you were at spring training. What were you expecting to do this year? RH: I was going to Double-A Jackson (Tennessee) with our whole staff from High Desert the year before and be the hitting coach there. Then there was the unfortunate situation with John Stearns. The first time I saw John Stearns was in AA playoffs when he got traded to Reading, Pennsylvania in 1973 and I was with Pittsburgh. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve known Rich Donnelly for a long time. Rich was one of my managers in instructional league in 1973 with Texas. I probably hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen Rich in 25 years. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s funny how things happen. Both of those guys are my friends. When the situation in Tacoma came up I interviewed for the job and now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m here. KW: How is John Stearns? RH: Stearns is doing fine. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be doing some of the scouting (when heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s able.). Every job in our business is stressful but this is not as stressful as being on the field. He wants to be on the field. KW: Had you worked with a lot of the Rainier players during spring training when you were appointed manager? RH: I knew most of the posi-

tion players. Some of the pitchers no, because they were at a little higher level than I had been with, but our pitching coach Jamie Navarro knows them really well and had worked with some of them while he was bullpen coach in Seattle. We have a good staff with hitting coach Cory Snyder and Jamie.

Yes. At the time I was an All Star Ron Fairly was one of my team mates. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d spent 20 years in the Big Leagues and had never played in an All Star game, so in 1976 he went and I went in 1977. Some guys go their whole careers and never get into an All Star Game or get into a World Series so is it special? Yes.

KW: Do you have a philosophy of managing? RH: Yes, score more runs than the other guy - that makes you look really smart. Bottom line is play the game like youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re 12 years old and have fun.

KW: When did you play in the World Series? RH: In 1982 with Milwaukee. We lost in seven games to St. Louis. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m still mad, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ask me anymore.

KW: What are your expectations for this year? RH: Win every game. My goal with these guys is to have them ready when the phone rings and their call comes to the big leagues. All three of our coaches played in the big leagues and whatever we can do to help them get there is why weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here. KW: What are some of the highlights of your career as a player and as a coach and manager? RH: Walking on the big league field as a player is first and after that the hardest thing to do is to stay. Once youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re there then other goals begin to set in. I wanted to be an All Star and I was. I wanted to play in a World Series and I did. Would I like to play in six World Series and eight All Star games?

KW: And you were also MVP with Toronto? RH: Yes, in 1978. KW: Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d probably like to take this team to another championship. RH: You have to teach them to win at all levels. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t win in the Big Leagues if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how to win. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s part of teaching and coaching. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tremendously hard game.

Tacoma Sports Online Your ticket to online coverage [HJVTH^LLRS`JVTZWVY[Z

Local Restaurants MELON SEED DELI OFFERS A SWIRL OF THREE COURSE MEALS By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

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pork, ham, red onions, Swiss cheese, topped with pickles, mustard and mayo for $6.95 The frozen yogurt is priced by weight; you pick your size, ranging from 4 oz. to 24 oz cups for $1.25 to $7.25, adding $1 for toppings. Though Froyo is not the only dessert Melon Seed offers, with fresh cheesecake being served for $2.55. Personally, I enjoyed the BBQ Chicken sandwich slider with the restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own brand of coleslaw as a topping for $5.95. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Melon-slawâ&#x20AC;? brings a unique flavoring to the barbeque-slathered chicken. Even if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not a fan of coleslaw, give it a try on at least one of the two or three sliders Melon Seed provides in a meal and taste the kick for yourself. While Subway or Quiznos will offer you a bag of chips to complete a meal, Melon Seed Deli put the ball in the customersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; court by offering chips, soup, salad or a side of frozen yogurt to choose from as a side, offering complete customization. Charles and Page plan to expand into a nation wide chain. This Saturday, April 12, is customer appreciation day for the Melon Seed Deli, which includes free frozen yogurt for children under 12 from 2-5 and $2 hot dogs and chili cheese Fritos. Melon Seed Deli is open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days a week. Need it delivered? Call (253) 2790029 or check out Melon Seedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s facebook at facebook. com/themelonseed

hen most people pack sandwiches for a road trip, they go pretty basic: bologna, turkey and cheese, maybe. Mario Charles takes a different approach. When preparing for a trip, Charles goes all out with Hawaiian bread, cream cheese sauces and lunchmeats, making a Charles road trip a gourmet experience. One year ago, Charles and his fiancĂŠ, Tashia Page, decided to take their sandwich making skills to the next level by opening up Melon Seed Deli, located at 3807 S. Center St. Charlesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; restaurant was originally intended to be just a sandwich shop but the couple quickly realized they could incorporate their love of frozen yogurt into the mix. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I noticed that every time we would go out to get frozen yogurt, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be hungry afterward but just for something light,â&#x20AC;? Charles said, explaining why he feels the combination is perfect for business. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just thought it would be the perfect idea, gourmet style sandwiches and frozen yogurt.â&#x20AC;? The first thing youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll notice when entering Melon Seed Deli, besides the vibrantly colored walls fitting of the deliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, is the quality of service provided to the customers. When Charles or Page is behind the counter, both quick service and enthusiasm that only comes from running your own shop is presented. But whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quality service without an awesome product? Luckily, the Melon Seed Deli offers unique sandwiches in spades including the Jambalaya sandwich; grilled chicken, spicy 815A PACIFIC AVENUE, TACOMA beef sausage, bell pepMonday thru Thursday 11am-12am pers, red onions and Friday 11am-2am provolone cheese, and Saturday 9am-2am the Cubano; pulled Sunday 9am-12am

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WDaffodil moment forever.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a little bit surreal,â&#x20AC;? agrees Princess Lydia. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I felt like I needed to step back and wait a little bit. After all, we were going to be just like those princesses we looked up to when we were little, but on to the float we went! It was all kind of a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;go, go, go!â&#x20AC;&#x2122; attitude from there!â&#x20AC;? The 2014 Daffodil Parade also marked the second year of the Daffodil Festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s partnership with KING 5, as it was filmed during its run in Puyallup, and broadcasted later that evening, on KONG. For Schroeder, this was the proof she needed, that something sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d wished for had really come true. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was so awesome to see that it really happened, and it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just a dream!â&#x20AC;? While the network wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be airing it again anytime soon, you can still purchase a DVD recording of the event through the Festival. Says Princess Ji, â&#x20AC;&#x153;My mom is buying three.â&#x20AC;? As a whole, they found the experience completely rewarding. Princess Lydia found herself reminiscing on the time sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spent with her Court so far, as a part of the community experience that is the Daffodil Festival. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Completely indescribableâ&#x20AC;Ś we know we can make kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; days by showing up at their Boys and Girls Clubs or at the Children Museum and spending quality time with them. It was so rewarding to see these same kids weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve interacted with show up at the Parade and sit on a curb just to see us again.â&#x20AC;? Princess Delaney Fry, from Stadium High School, was appreciative of her fellow Court members. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just thought about how lucky I was, to get to experience all these special moments with each of these amazing young women. I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have managed to select a better or more self-

From page A1

less band of people.â&#x20AC;? Just because the parade is over for the year, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean the festival is done just yet. What comes after the celebration, for the princesses, is even more community outreach, as well as reaching a little farther, as the Official Ambassadors of Pierce County, traveling to 26 various out-of-town Festivals over the summer. For Princess Nina Thach, from Mt. Tahoma High School, the title is not one she takes lightly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I represent Pierce County with open arms and an open mindâ&#x20AC;Ś Pierce County is huge, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m happy to share the glory

of making a difference.â&#x20AC;? Princess Kaylaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s excitement comes from a place of deep appreciation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be more excited to represent the place that has blessed me more than I could ever imagine! I want to show the rest of the Pacific Northwest just how great Pierce County is, and how much love is in their communities.â&#x20AC;? However, that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t still be able to spot the 2014 Royal Court around Pierce County in the coming months. The Princesses will be making appearances at the Spring Fair in Puyallup, the Junior Daffodil Parade on Saturday, April 12 and the Tacoma Yacht Club Marine Parade, on Sunday, April 13.

For Princess Lydia, the end of the Parade certainly didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mark the end of her Daffodil journey. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think there was really a bring-it-all-together moment for me, and frankly, I hope there never will be. I want to continue to touch lives and serve in my communityâ&#x20AC;Ś itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good to think of all thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happened and be grateful, but I hope I never go through a season in which I have no further aspirations to achieve.â&#x20AC;? Princess Ji feels the same way. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really appreciate having all these people in my life, and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t plan on losing them anytime soonâ&#x20AC;Ś I only hope to be able to give back to them as much as theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve given me.â&#x20AC;?

DAFFODIL FUN CONTINUES THIS WEEKEND Junior Daffodil Parade April 12 Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss the 53rd Annual Junior Parade on Saturday, April 12 in Proctor District starting at 10 a.m. Geared to children, this special parade encourages fun and creativity for the young people of the area. Costumes, pets, music and non-motorized floats make this parade a special event! The Daffodil Princesses play a big role in the parade leading things off in the parade and then take a seat to watch all of the other entries perform.

Thank you to our presenting sponsor:

the Emerald Queen Hotel & Casino. We would also like to thank all of the spectators, participants and city personnel that made the 81st Daffodil Parade a success.

This Festival thrives, when Pierce County is at its strongest; when the support and spirit of its diverse communities come together. When they share their talents, and take part in a grand tribute to the land they live in, magic happens. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Parade, showcasing a community at its best.

Tacoma Yacht Club Marine Parade â&#x20AC;&#x201C; April 13 To wrap up the Daffodil Festival, the celebration is on water. The Tacoma Yacht Club hosts the Daffodil Royalty and dozens of other yachts and marine vessels in the Daffodil Marine Festival and Parade. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Neptuneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden.â&#x20AC;? Starting at 11:30 a.m., the events begin at the Tacoma Yacht Club near Point Defiance ferry terminal and continue along the waterfront to the Foss Thea Waterway in downtown Tacoma. There are many places to watch the parade and enjoy our beautiful day on the water.


:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNLÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;-YPKH`(WYPS

WEaster

From page A1

need, dental health need, language barrier need, anything. And I want everyone experiencing a need to be able to come to this event and gain a relationship with a person from an organization that can help them see

their need fulfilled.â&#x20AC;? With this goal in mind, Life Center at Baker Middle School is trying to get as many community vendors as possible, already planning to host such organizations as Lindquist Dental,

a private non-profit whose mission is to provide dental care for children in need regardless of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to pay. Also present will be representatives from YWCA; KidCo. Productions, a bullying prevention program that produces school assemblies aimed to transform schools by transforming the way chil-

dren view themselves; and Communities in Schools, which works to empower students to stay in school and achieve in life. Of course, all of this is not to say that having fun on Easter isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t important. Actually, it is vital to relax and take a break from work, or simply life whenever we have the opportunity, a fact that Life Center also recognizes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some people just need to have fun,â&#x20AC;? said Mathurin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just want there to be tons of joy and love at this event.â&#x20AC;? In the spirit of entertainment, this event will boast not only community support opportunities but also a variety of carnival games, food and prizes, all for free. There will be laser tag for the youth, inflatable obstacle courses, jousting,

giveaways, cotton candy and Easter egg hunts running throughout the day, segmented for different age groups. The eggs will be filled with all sorts of prizes, from candy to money. Every vendor will be asked to bring something to give away. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last year, we gave away a new Xbox 360,â&#x20AC;? said Mathurin. The event will kick-off with an 11 a.m. church service at Life Center at Baker MS. The Easter Community Fair will commence immediately after and will run as long there are community members in attendance. Last year over 2,000 people came to take part in the day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are hoping to double that number this year,â&#x20AC;? said Mathurin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a huge opportunity for the people of the 253 to find

the help they need and the event is just a lot of fun.â&#x20AC;? For more information about the Easter Community Fair, or to participate as a vendor, contact Alicia Mathurin at (253) 4680234.



    

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City Life

Dining Out for Life

B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 11, 2014

SECTION B, PAGE 1

THE PSYCHOTROPIC “SOUND OF MUSIC” PINK MARTINI TEAMS UP WITH VON TRAPP KIDS TO DELIVER ELEGANT POP

PHOTO BY CHRIS HORNBECKER

DO-RE-MARTINI. Pink Martini’s Thomas Lauderdale (center) will

be joined in Tacoma by Amanda, Melanie, August and Sofia von Trapp. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

P

ortland’s Pink Martini is among the most freewheeling pop ensembles in the Northwest, with a breezy, baroque sound that draws from jazz, classical and a wide range of world traditions; performances that should come with subtitles (vocalist China Forbes sings in about a dozen languages); and a knack for recruiting some seriously out of the blue collaborators, the likes of Wayne Newton and the cast of “Sesame Street” in recent years. Pink Martini’s most recent partners in crime are Sofia, Melanie, Amanda and August von Trapp. They’re the descendents of the original Von Trapp Family Singers, best known for their ties to the 1959 Broadway musical and related movie classic, “The Sound of Music.” They joined Pink Martini in the studio to record “Dream a Little Dream,” released on the band’s own Heinz Records on March 4, and will be with the band on April 18 at Tacoma’s Pantages Theater. Recently, Pink Martini founder Thomas Lauderdale checked in to reflect on his band’s roots and give us a little better idea of what to expect. TACOMA WEEKLY: It’s the group’s 20th anniversary. Are you especially reflective this year? THOMAS LAUDERDALE: It’s amazing to me that the whole band is still functioning. I thought I was going to go into politics and never imagined that I would be doing this – at all. It’s a total stretch. But, that said, it’s been a wonderful ride. TW: And the band actually has political origins, right? LAUDERDALE: Yeah, we started out by being the house band for progressive political causes. So we would do things for, you know, the Willamette River, the schools, arts education, affordable housing, civil rights – a lot of social justice issues. At a certain point, I realized that it was probably more fabulous to be in a band and travel the world ... than it was running for office, working under florescent lighting and having to face angry constituents every day. It gives me more latitude; and, as a lot of people have said, I’m more effective this way than I was in city hall

(where he worked under former Portland Mayor Bud Clark and City Commissioner Gretchen Kafoury). TW: You’re bringing the von Trapps up here, and you’ve got the new album. But you’ve also put out another disc (September’s “Get Happy”) within a relatively short period of time. What kind of live show are you putting together based on that? LAUDERDALE: It’ll be material from all the albums – everything – in addition to the two new albums. It’s been a while since we played in Tacoma. Are we at the Pantages Theater? TW: Yes, I believe you’re at the Pantages. LAUDERDALE: I love that theater. I wish that Portland had the Pantages Theater. … It’s wild because places like Tacoma or Eugene – some of these smaller cities – have better halls than we do. TW: Plus, we’re more fun than Seattle. LAUDERDALE: Seattle has always struck me as trying too hard. They’ve got these sort of cosmopolitan aspirations. The thing I’ve liked, historically, about Portland is Portland is “po-dunk” and hasn’t cared. But recently I’ve noticed there is a haughtiness to Portland that I think is really unattractive; a certain kind of smugness that’s come with the television show “Portlandia” and all the coverage and glowing reviews in the New York Times. TW: So “Portlandia” could be your Nirvana down there. LAUDERDALE: (Portland is) a little full of itself right now. TW: Oh, no. That’s too bad. LAUDERDALE: I know, it’s sad. TW: You’ve been touring with (singer) Storm Large, who’s been up here a few times on her own over the years. Is she in the lineup still, or is China back? (She was on hiatus following vocal surgery.) LAUDERDALE: They divide the time. They’re both in the band, but this particular show it’ll be China. It’s kind of great having two fantastic singers. TW: For the newer material you’ve worked with quite the range of people, everyone from Rufus Wainwright to Wayne Newton; and you’ve got the entire new album with the von Trapps. Is there a method to recruiting collaborators, or does it just happen organically.

LAUDERDALE: It’s pretty much luck of the draw. It’s like whoever we’re spending time with, that impacts the material that’s on the album. I found out, at a certain point in the recording process with the von Trapps, that they were friends with Wayne Newton. So, because they had this relationship … they decided to invite him to see if he would make an appearance on the album. He said yes and flew in with his mother-in-law, and wife and daughter; spent two hours in the studio recording “The Lonely Goatherd,” and then flew away. (He chuckles.) The whole thing has been sort of magical. TW: What was most enticing about working with the von Trapps, and what led to recording the whole album with them? LAUDERDALE: I first met them 2½ years ago at the Christmas tree lighting in Portland. The band was (performing at) the tree lighting, and the Oregon Symphony called up and said, “We’ve got the von Trapps. Do you mind if they come onstage with you?” I met them, they came onstage, and it was fantastic. They were kind of at a crossroads. They were trying to figure out what to do, because they had had a decade-long career traveling as “The Sound of Music” kids, singing songs like “Do-Re-Mi” and “So Long, Farewell.” Ten years into it … they wanted to branch out and do more things. I am sort of a historian as much as I am a musician. So I had a lot of ideas about repertoires that they could do that would be compatible with where they’d been (and) give them a certain kind of freedom. … We started working on the album, and eventually they moved to Portland; and two years later we’re traveling and touring together. TW: So they moved to Portland. Where are they from? LAUDERDALE: Montana. They had been home-schooled in Montana. They grew up not watching television, and their grandfather, Wernor, had taught them Austrian folk songs growing up. When their grandfather was sick, 13 years ago, they made him a tape of some of the songs he taught them; and somehow that tape got into the hands of somebody else, and suddenly they found themselves performing. They never really intended to.

But they’re magical. They’re wonderfully worldly and also earnest. It’s like walking onto the set of “The Sound of Music,” but they’re not actors. I always feel like I behave better when I’m around the von Trapps, so keeping them close is a good idea. TW: You do some of the “Sound of Music” material but tell me about some of your other choices. LAUDERDALE: Three things I immediately thought of, two of which are on the album. One was a piece by the Comedian Harmonists, who were a vocal group that was formed in 1928 that took Europe by storm and traveled all around, but were forced to disband in 1932 or ‘33 because half the members were Jewish. So I felt like one of their pieces would be really appropriate for the von Trapps to sing. (It was) a group of the same size and a story that I thought was just as interesting as the von Trapps. That piece is on the album. It’s called “Die Dorfmusic,” (which means) “the village music.” There’s another piece that was composed by Brahms that their grandfather and his brother and sister performed during their farewell tour in (1956). That piece is called “In Stiller Nacht,” “in the still of the night,” and that piece is on the album. TW: I’m guessing you’ll be on the stage doing a few of these songs together. LAUDERDALE: They’re integrated into our set. TW: So it’s one big production with all of you onstage. LAUDERDALE: Yes, it’s like Lawrence Welk meets “The Muppet Show” meets “Laugh-In.” Actually, somebody was walking out of a concert a couple of nights ago, maybe in Oklahoma City, and I overheard them say, “That was like Lawrence Welk on acid.” (He laughs.) I thought that was the best compliment ever.

PINK MARTINI with VON TRAPPS

7:30 p.m. April 18 PANTAGES THEATER 901 Broadway, Tacoma $48 to $94 broadwaycenter.org

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE TACOMA CONCERT BAND Tacoma Concert Band presents “See the USA: The Music of America,” a rousing concert of American music that is sure to stir your heart and your patriotic spirit! Included on the April 19 program will be such favorites as “America the Beautiful,” “Shenandoah” and “St. Louis Blues,” along with American composers Sousa, Morton Gould, Rodgers & Hammerstein and Aaron Copland; some classics including “Ghost Train” and “Rodeo,” and \several quintessentially American marches. Featured soloist will be popular soprano Erin Guinup. 7:30 p.m., Pantages Theater. Info: www. broadwaycenter.org.

TWO DIVERSITY FILM FESTIVAL The Grand Cinema will host that 4th Annual Diversity Film Festival April 13–27. Exploring individual and cultural differences through film, the festival offers an

international lineup featuring films from the U.S./ Mexican border to the West Bank to Cambodia. The full list is posted at www.tacomacc.edu/filmfestival. Prices: $7.50 matinee/$9.50 evening, $7.50 any showing for military and seniors with ID, $2 for Tacoma Community College students with TCC student ID. Sponsors include the TCC Foundation, TCC Student Life, The Grand Cinema, and X Group Restaurants.

THREE ‘BODY POLITIC’ Witness “Body Politic,” a dance performance produced by the BareFoot Collective, on April 11 and 12 at 7:30 p.m. and April 13 at 2 p.m. Featuring dance works by Katie Stricker Lappier, Michael Hoover, Faith Stevens, Celeste Reed, Sarah Kathryn Olds,

Sophie Nevin and Constance Villines, “Body Politic” explores the relationship between the body as an expressive medium, and society, community, personality, gender and politics.. $10 general admission, $5 children under 10, cash or check only at the door or purchase tickets in advance at BrownPaperTickets. BareFoot Collective is a community based dance company that creates unique shows in unusual venues, using community performers.

FOUR ‘ARCA FINDS AN EGG’ Author Alexis St. John will be holding a book signing for her newest work, a sweet adventure titled “Arca Finds an Egg,” on April 18, 4-7 p.m. at Creative Forces Gifts & Sundries inside the Hotel Murano. Come check out St. John’s wonderful new picture book and listen to some smooth jazz fusion from Andrew Sherbrooke Music. Kids can get a signed copy of the book and a photo of themselves

next to Baby’s giant egg! And for the adults, Hotel Murano and Bite Restaurant offer happy hour from 4-7 p.m. in the Lobby Bar and Bite Restaurant bar. Learn more at www.creativeforcesgallery.com.

FIVE THE PROPHETS OF ADDICTION To launch their 2014 USA tour to 50+ cities, The Prophets of Addiction are throwing a kickoff party on PHOTO BY JENN FINDLEY April 12 at the Rock N Roll Lodge and Steakhouse, 9825 Pacific Ave., at 7 p.m. and bands start at 9. Guests include Ravages of Time, Antihero and Baby and the Nobodies All ages welcome. Full bar with I.D. The Prophets will be playing new songs and will have tour merchandise available. Come out and support this top-notch hometown band and let your friends across the USA know about any tour dates that may be somewhat local to them. Get the full tour schedule at www.poarocks. com and give them a “Like” on Facebook.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 11, 2014

SCHOOL PAGE

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BELIEVE

INSPIRE

“I believe my picture fits the topic because my artwork has pictures of things you can dream about. It shows how people should keep on believing until their wish comes true.” Melany Juarez, 5th grade, Downing Elementary, Mrs. McCafferty-Lent.

JELLYFISH, JELLYFISH WHO ARE YOU? Jellyfish, jellyfish, just who are you? Why are you so amazing? I really want to know.

“Nature is inspiring to me because it goes on forever.” Hannah Essman, 1st grade, Point Defiance Elementary, Ms. Grassi

Jellyfish, jellyfish, I often dream of you, in strange, shimmering colors of pink, green, and blue.

Dreamland: “I made something that is make believe, and it’s a beautiful place with a green bird holding a banner of ‘Believe, Dream, Inspire.’ It would be my dream to go there. It could inspire people to dream about wonderful things.” Anna Wilson, 3rd grade, Grant Center for the Expressive Arts

Bright billowing angels you dance through the night, you blanket the dark sea like a cathedral of light. Beautiful but deadly, you sting before you strike; a bloom of angry mushrooms, I would not venture to fight.

The Growing Flower: “I chose to take a photograph of this flower because it dreamed of growing up to be a big and beautiful flower. It believed and it achieved its goal. This inspired me to grow up and have a good future, too.” PJ Stead, 5th grade, Downing Elementary

Is it true you have no feelings, no brains and no eyes? No blood, and no heart, and yet you survive. Maari’s Happy Place: “Maari is a girl that was in my class last year who died of brain cancer. I made this quilt after her because even though she was having all those things happening to her, she still tried to live a normal life.” Paige Carr, 5th grade, Point Defiance Elementary

“I always dream about trees, green, and flowers. The world around me inspires me to draw its natural beauty.” Alexus West-Girvan, 9th grade, Meeker Middle School, Ms. Kiesel

You lay your tiny babies at the bottom of the sea. You keep them all safe from their hungry enemies. The fish and the crab, they love you, I can see. You shelter your friends under your umbrella tree.

CITY BLOCK

To celebrate Black History month, 7th graders from Ms. Haddigan’s art classes created a portion of a city block in Harlem in the 1920’s modeled after Romare Bearden’s “City Block” which he did of Harlem in the Renaissance. He was known for his collage art.

You clearly are a creature so vastly different from me, made of such translucence so light and so carefree. What else can you tell me? What more can I know? You intrigue me forever. I’ll watch you as I grow.

Shiann Welch

Taras Snitko

Kirill Deshkin

GREAT MIGRATION

6th graders from Ms. Haddigan’s art classes modeled their work after Jacob Lawrence, known for his “Great Migration” series of panels of art, which when put all together, told stories of the migration of African-Americans from the south to the north in the early 1900s. Many settled in Harlem where the Harlem Renaissance began. The students were to pick 3 significant events from their lives that would tell part of their story. We’ve included one panel and story per student due to space constraints.

1) Ahmani Matthews

2) Katelyn Blanchette

ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN Times can be rough. Never stop believing. Don’t give up. Always believe and dream that you can push through everything. Inspire yourself to just do anything and be anything. Maybe make a change after a hard time. Believe. Dream. Inspire. Kailyn Ayres, 5th grade, Downing Elementary, Mrs. McCaffery-Lent

“I chose to write this poem because of the tragic events in the Philippines. This relates to our theme because you have to believe that you can deal with the event, inspire yourself and others to keep going, and dream of getting through it all.”

1) “This is the story of my 8th birthday. It was 1 week away and I had to start planning. I was planning and figuring out ideas for the theme and I started getting decorations. Once I figured out the theme of my party, (a dance party), I had to start figuring out the people I was inviting and making invitations. I started putting up decorations like my strobe lights, and I also figured out the food that I would have. It was the day of my birthday and people started arriving. Some people helped me get the food set up and the party began. Everyone was dancing to the music and my Mom brought the cake to us and the ice cream. We ate and then it was time for presents. I opened all my presents and I liked them all. This day was one of my favorite birthdays!” 2) “This is about driving with Grandma to the airport. I got into the car with Grandma, then we drove on the freeway. We parked the car at the airport. Getting to Disneyland, I boarded a big plane. The plane was full of people excited to visit Disneyland. I loved riding the rides! There are several roller coaster rides at Disneyland. I liked riding on the Magic Mountain, Winnie the Pooh, and Splash Mountain. I really want to go to Disneyland again!”

3) Man Le Dang

3) “Vietnam is my home country. I was born and lived in Vietnam twelve years. My country has temperatures a little bit hot. I could do anything I wanted because I knew Vietnamese, and I lived there a long time. When I was twelve, my family moved to the United States in a plane. The U.S. is a big and nice country. The temperature is cold, but I like that. At first, I didn’t know much English. Everybody was so big and taller than me. Now I feel better and know a little bit more English and I’m taller.”

ALL STARS: DISTRICT 10 CHAMPIONS A while back there was one thing I wanted to do, win the All-Star District Championship. Every night leading up to the softball tournament, I’d lay awake at night as nervous as I could be. I would be thinking, “What if we lost? What if I mess up? My Dad told me to just believe! When the day of the first game came, I told myself, I am going to pitch like Danielle Lawrie and Jenny Finch, the ones who inspired me to become a pitcher in the first place. When I pitched, I felt like no one could stop me. In the first inning after I pitched, I was up to bat twice, and scored 5 RBI’s, (runs batted in), for our team.

We ended up winning that game 16-2, and we all began to believe that we could actually go far in that tournament. When we got our All-Star sweatshirts, I saw that if we won we would get district champs on the back of them. I wanted that so badly. How cool would it be for someone to say, “Good job!” and to notice you play softball by reading your sweatshirt. Every night before each game, I dreamed that we’d win the next game. After a long week of games, that dream came true, and before my team knew it, we were in the championship game! My team was alert and ready. We were up by two with one out in the

last inning. There was a runner on third. If we got two outs, we would win. If they scored, we’d lose. The ball was hit to center field, and Taylor caught the ball and stepped on second base for a double play. WE WON! WE ARE DISTRICT CHAMPIONS! That meant we had made it to state, which was another dream come true! To advance to state was a HUGE deal. It was the first time ever that the Soundview Little League U10 girls had ever made it to state. We were headed to Vancouver, Washington. Road trip, here we come! After we won districts, the rest of my team and I traveled to La Center,

Jellyfish, jellyfish Just who are you? I want to be a marine scientist, all because of you! Catherine Rasgaitis, 4th grade, Browns Point Elementary

Note: Catherine’s poem received the Washington state PTA’s Outstanding Interpretation Award, and will go on to the national PTA contest!

YOU CAN MAKE IT THROUGH THIS I know that times are tough. I know you are going through a lot, but there are people in the world that are here to help. They are here to save you and your family. We are not here because we have to be. We are here because we want to help, and I believe that one day, everyone will be inspired to help. So stay strong and keep believing. Meredith McDougall, 4th grade, Downing Elementary, Mrs. McCaffery-Lent

“I chose to write and dedicate this piece to the people in the Philippines, because of how hard it has been for them. I also wanted this to be a note to everyone that the little things we can do make a difference.” Washington, (near Vancouver, WA), where we represented our district in a week long double elimination tournament. We made it to the semi-finals but lost to the number 2 team on the last day. In our age group, we took 3rd in the state! It was an incredible experience, and it was a great way to spend my 11th birthday, which was the next day! McKenna Braegelmann, 6th grade, Meeker Middle School

Teachers and students interested in submitting work may get guidelines or information from Shari Shelton, (253) 906-3769 or at ssheltonz@centurylink.net, or may contact Donna McCracken, (253) 475-8387 or donnamccra@comcast.net.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, April 11, 2014 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

MEMBERS OF TCC ART FACULTY CULTURE CORNER M PUT THEIR TALENTS ON DISPLAY A G UIDE TO THE

Muesum of the Week:

By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

Washington State History Museum

T

he Gallery at Tacoma Community College is hosting a show of work by members of the TCC Art Faculty. The show contains fine examples of work in ceramics, paint, drawing, printmaking and sculpture. The two ceramic instructors, Reid Ozaki and Rick Mahaffey, strut their stuff with a display of their wares. Ozaki presents a selection of his refined platters, vases, jars and bottles done in black clay glazed with crystalline, white crackle glaze that is edged in gold. Mahaffey’s woodfired vessels – tea bowl, jars and large vases – are inspired by Japanese ceramics such as Iga ware. Melinda Liebers Cox carries a heavy load in the show with drawings, prints and paintings. Her large charcoal drawings from her 2008 excursion to the Midwest have been shown at the gallery in the past. Her latest work is a series of paintings of ceramic dog figurines. These are posed as stilllifes executed in colorful gouache on watercolor paper. The dynamic Frank Dippolito has contributed several watercolors in which he explores atmospheric effects of sky, water and weather. Jenny Roholt’s cut paper compositions are delightful. “Looking Up” depicts a monkey on the back of an elephant. They are surrounded by a swirl of birds that is like an M. C. Escher drawing. Marit Berg’s etchings of portraits of Native Americans (after Curtis photos) juxtaposed with street signs are skillfully

USEUMS OF TACOMA

1911 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, WA 98402 Wed.- Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: www.washingtonhistory.org/ APRIL

2014

This week’s events:

April 12, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Guided Tour of Three Native Plant Gardens in Tacoma

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE GALLERY AT TCC

DUCKY. “Japan: Spaniel with Duck” is a

gouache painting by TCC art instructor Melinda Liebers Cox. She did a whole series of paintings of ceramic dogs that were collected by her husband when he was a child.

crafted. These have also been shown in past gallery exhibits. There are also a couple of examples of clay slabs that show the face of Venus from the famous Botticelli painting, “The Birth of Venus.” These are the result of collaborative experiments between Berg and Mahaffey. They are using lithographic techniques using ceramic pigments on clay. Sculpture instructor Kyle Dillehay is characteristically off-kilter with his untitled, wall-mounted piece. It is a lower case letter “f ” made of wood and filled with urethane casts of small, roast chickens. It is rumored to be a commentary on factory farming. Dillehay and others also made a series of cast iron blobs (imagine malformed brains or hunks of dinosaur guano) that are mounted on lengths of rebar sticking up from blocks of wood. These are not too impres-

Furnit u

re cos

ts less

at

sive until one watches the video (available on a laptop computer inside the gallery) of how they were created. Molten iron was poured onto giant blocks of ice and the resulting blobs came from the iron melting into a self made mold as it cooled. Mark Dungan presents abstract prints made with his iPhone. Karen Doten’s thick, encaustic collages of landscape and cityscape are quiet and refined. Alair Wells is less refined. His series of installations work with broken rope, which seems to be a metaphor that feels contrived at the same time that it is obscure. It is as heavy handed as something done by a high school student taking a first stab at expressing the “meaning of life.” The work also has a grubby, trashy appearance that brings down the level of the whole show.

A great day out touring three of the native plant gardens in Tacoma. Take in the exhibit “David Douglas: A Naturalist At Work” as well. Presented in partnership with guides from the Washington Native Plant Society, South Sound Chapter. Registration required. Limited to 20 participants. Tour begins and ends at the Washington State History Museum. $15 (includes museum admission). To register, contact Susan Rohrer at (253) 7985897 or susan.rohrer@wshs.wa.gov.

April 17, 5-6 p.m. and 6-7 p.m. Curator-guided tours of ‘Civil War Pathways in the Pacific Northwest’

Included in museum admission. Hear the stories from the “Civil War Pathways” exhibit from historian and exhibit curator Lorraine McConaghy.

April 17 (Third Thursdays at 6:30 p.m.) UWT Scholarly Selections

Local Political Cultures and the Cultural Politics of Place: The (Unlikely?) Case of Sheridan County, Montana

Current Exhibits: Civil War Pathways, Through July 6

The Pacific Northwest may have been far from the battlefield of the Civil War, but the debated issues of the war affected the lives of those living in our region as well as the development of Washington state. Told through the personal stories of people living at the time, the “Civil War Pathways in the Pacific Northwest” exhibit revisits the issues of the war and allows us to explore the mindset of the time, compared to where we stand today.

Hands At Work, Through May 4

This beautiful exhibit features the photography by Summer Moon Scriver and the stories of Iris Graville as collected from master craftsmen, musicians, artists, and workers from around the Pacific Northwest. Derived from the book “Hands At Work: Portraits & Profiles of People Who Work With Their Hands,” this show includes photographs, short writings, and objects from the people featured in the photographs and stories. The book “Hands at Work” has won numerous awards, including the National Best Books 2009 Award in Photography: People Category, an Outstanding Book award by Independent Publishers, and a gold Nautilus Book Award.

David Douglas, Through May 21

Naturalist David Douglas traveled the Columbia River and interior Northwest (18251833), identifying and collecting over two hundred species of plants, animals, and birds previously unknown to science. Learn of his interactions with native tribes and fur traders of the Columbia country. Explore a unique scientific legacy, including his namesake, the Douglas fir. Enjoy a multi-disciplinary experience that links geography, science, art, and cultural history.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 11, 2014

DINING OUT FOR LIFE MARKS 20TH YEAR More than 50 South Sound restaurants participating in April 24 fundraiser By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

I

n cities across the country, April 24 will be a day when anyone can take action to reach out and help those living with HIV/AIDS – and all that’s required is to go out to eat. Sound simple? It is. The 20th annual Dining Out for Life event is a brilliant and effective way to join the fight against AIDS, and makes a wonderful opportunity for families and friends of all ages to join together for a meal and to raise money for AIDS service organizations and programs. On just this one day of dining, $4 million dollars is expected to be raised at more than 3,000 restaurants in 60 cities. Here in the South Sound, 56 restaurants in three counties – Pierce, Lewis and Thurston – will donate 25 percent of your food and nonalcoholic beverage bill to Pierce County AIDS Foundation for prevention and care services provided to local people with HIV/AIDS. 7 Seas Brewing + Janz Catering is generously donating 100 percent for dinner. Find the full list below and at www.diningoutforlife. com/tacoma. This year also marks Dining Out for Life’s 20th anniversary, a testament both to its effectiveness and its ongoing need. This is why certain celebrities have stepped forward to offer their support year after year – Ted Allen, Pam Grier, Mondo Guerra and Daisy Martinez (and international corporate sponsor Subaru of America) consistently lend their fame and money to Dining Out, and when the media calls, they’re ready to talk.

GUERRA

PHOTO COURTESY OF PCAF

Denver-based fashion designer and “Project Runway” alumnus Mondo Guerra told the Tacoma Weekly that being asked to speak for Dining Out for Life fits him like a glove as a gay man living with HIV, which he revealed to “Project Runway” viewers in a memorable and touching season eight episode. “It was a perfect fit for me after coming off ‘Project Runway’ and getting so much support from the community. It’s encouraging for me. Whenever I hear a story or see an event like this or help with an organization, it encourages me and inspires me to work harder on myself and be proactive in my own health. An event like this is about bringing awareness to the subject and engaging people who may

MARTINEZ

PHOTO BY JD URBAN

not seek the information that’s out there. It starts a conversation. “I’ve been HIV-positive for 13 years now…,” Guerra continued. “For me, I really do think about the entire journey. In that journey, there is a lot of power and people always praise me for what I’m doing and how I encourage them to live their lives, and it’s important to remember that you have as much power as I do – this journey you live is really important in that you can accomplish anything you want.” This is celebrity chef, television personality and author Daisy Martinez’s third year to speak on behalf of Dining Out for Life. When asked about why she got involved in the event,

she thought back to the early days when AIDS was just coming to public awareness. “This is a cause that I hold very near and dear. Because of my age, I lost friends and family to the disease back in the beginning when nobody knew what was going on. When the opportunity came to join up with Dining Out for Life, it was serendipity and I’m quite honored to be involved. “I have children and as a mother, I advocate safe sex and awareness of HIV,” Martinez said, including working to recruit more cities to Dining Out for Life. “Here is shame of all of this, though – New York City is not one of the participating cities, which I am working to do something about. I’m trying to get Brooklyn on board, too.” Fans of Martinez are enjoying her website cooking show, which can be viewed at www. chefdaisymartinez.com. And for fans of Guerra, this spring he and Crocs, a world leader in innovative casual footwear, will release the first designs of their collaboration in the form of fun, colorful, comfortable shoes. Keep up with all Guerra is up to at www.mondoguerra. com. Guerra had some parting words of advice for those who may have recently discovered their HIV positive status. “For the younger generation and newly diagnosed, it’s important to surround yourself with people you trust and will support you. Honor your truth and know that you’re special and unique and everything does happen for a reason and this is part of a bigger picture. It’s not over – there’s so much more to explore. If you go into it with the intention that you can accomplish anything you set your mind to, you will.”

DINING OUT FOR LIFE PARTICIPATING RESTAURANTS: 7 SEAS BREWING + JONZ CATERING

3006 Judson St., #110, Gig Harbor, (253) 514-8129 Donating 100%, Dinner ADRIATIC GRILL

4201 S Steele St., Tacoma (253) 475-6000 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner ALFRED’S CAFÉ

402 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma (253) 627-5491 Donating 25%, Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.

5102 N Pearl St., Tacoma (253) 752-4069 Donating 25% Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

DIRTY OSCAR’S ANNEX

HILLTOP KITCHEN

2309 6th Ave., Tacoma (253) 572-0588 Donating 25%, Dinner

913 Martin Luther King Jr. Way (253) 327-1397 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

DOYLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE

THE HUB

208 St Helens Ave., Tacoma (253) 272-7468 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

203 Tacoma Ave. S., Tacoma (253) 683-4606 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

EAST WEST PROCTOR

IL LUCANO RISTORANTÉ ITALIANO

2514 N. Proctor St., Tacoma (253) 756-5092 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

3119 Judson St., Gig Harbor (253) 514-8945 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

THE FUNKY IGUANA

INDOCHINE ASIAN DINING LOUNGE

3802 S. Cedar St., Tacoma (253) 474-7879 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner GATEWAY TO INDIA (TACOMA)

ASADO CUCINA ARGENTINA

2810 6th Ave., Tacoma (253) 272-7770 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner COSMOPOLITAN TEA & CAFÉ

105 S Meridian, Puyallup (253) 445-8454 Donating 25% Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

2603 6th Ave., Tacoma (253) 552-5022 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

JOESEPPI’S ITALIAN RISTORANTE

2207 N. Pearl St., Tacoma (253) 761-5555 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

GATEWAY TO INDIA (GIG HARBOR)

6565 Kimball Dr., Gig Harbor (253) 851-2688 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

JOSEFINA’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

HARMON BREWERY & EATERY

1938 Pacific Ave., Tacoma (253) 383-2739 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

CROWN BAR

2705 6th Ave, Tacoma (253) 272-4177 Donating 25%, Dinner

4107 Harborview Dr., Gig Harbor (253) 858-3529 Donating 25%, Dinner

204 St. Helens Ave., Tacoma (253) 212-2725 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

211 5th Ave. SE, Olympia (360) 357-6229 Donating 25% Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

LA CRÉME BRÛLÉE

1606 Lafayette St., Steilacoom (253) 589-3001 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

HELLO, CUPCAKE

1740 Pacific Ave., Tacoma (253) 383-7772 Donating 25%, Dessert

DIRTY DAVE’S PIZZA PARLOR

LA FONDITA MEXICAN RESTAURANT

HERITAGE RESTAURANT

3939 Martin Way E., Olympia (360) 456-1560 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

2620 N. Proctor St., Tacoma (253) 752-2878 Donating 25% Lunch, Dinner

3211 56th St. NW, Gig Harbor (253) 853-6000 Donating 25% Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Short Term

2601 South Tacoma Way, Tacoma (253) 472-0157 Donating 25% Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner MARZANO ITALIAN RESTAURANT

516 Garfield St. S., Tacoma (253) 537-4191 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner MASSIMO ITALIAN BAR & GRILL

13802 Purdy Dr. NW, Gig Harbor (253) 514-6237 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner MAXWELL’S RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

454 St. Helens Ave., Tacoma (253) 683-4115 Donating 25%, Dinner MERCATO RISTORANTE

111 Market St. NE, Olympia (360) 528-3663 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner MEXICO MAGICO

1128 Broadway, Tacoma (253) 722-5196 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner MORSO

9014 Peacock Hill Ave., #100b/c, Gig Harbor (253) 530-3463 Donating 25%, Dinner THE OFFICE BAR & GRILL

813 Pacific Ave., Tacoma (253) 572-3222 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner OLD MILWAUKEE CAFÉ

3102 6th Ave., Tacoma (253) 761-2602 Donating 25%, Breakfast, Lunch

OLD SCHOOL PIZZERIA

THE SCHOONER PUB & GALLEY

108 Franklin St. NE, Olympia (360) 786-9640 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

5429 100th St. SW, Lakewood (253) 584-1919 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

OLY ROCKFISH GRILL

SHAKABRAH JAVA

700 4th Ave. E., Olympia (360) 753-5700 Donating 25% Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

2618 6th Ave., Tacoma (253) 572-2787 Donating 25% Breakfast, Lunch

PAESAN KITCHEN & BAR

THE SOCIAL BAR & GRILL

1701 Dock St., Tacoma (253) 301-2396 Donating 25% Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

1715 Dock St., Tacoma (253) 301-3835 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

THE PARKWAY TAVERN

2717 N. Proctor St., Tacoma (253) 761-7685 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

SOUL

313 N. I St., Tacoma (253) 383-8748 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner PETERSON BROS. 1111

1111 S. 11th St., Tacoma (253) 284-1111 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner POMODORO

3819 N. 26th, Tacoma (253) 752-1111 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner POUR AT FOUR - A WINE BAR

SOUTHERN KITCHEN

1716 6th Ave., Tacoma (253) 627-4282 Donating 25% Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner STEEL CREEK AMERICAN WHISKEY CO.

1114 Broadway, Tacoma (253) 627-1229 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner OSCANOS CAFÉ & WINE BAR

3814 N. 26th St., Tacoma (253) 761-8015 Donating 25%, Dinner

437 29th St. NE, Puyallup (253) 864-8600 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

PRIMO GRILL

TRADITIONS CAFE & WORLD FOLK ART

601 S. Pine St., Tacoma (253) 383-7000 Donating 25%, Dinner RAMBLIN JACK’S

520 4th Ave. E., Olympia (360) 754-8909 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner ROSEWOOD CAFÉ

3323 N. 26th St., Tacoma (253) 752-7999 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

300 5th Ave. SW, Olympia (360) 705-2819 Donating 25% Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner THE URBAN ONION

116 Legion Way SE, Olympia (360) 943-9242 Donating 25%, Lunch, Dinner

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

FORMER MAHNHAMMER MEMBERS NOW EX-GODS By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

O

ne of Tacoma’s most popular hard rock outfits will reemerge on Sunday, April 13 with a makeover and a bunch of new tunes. The band formerly known as Mahnhammer will perform for the first time under its new moniker, Ex-Gods, during a free show scheduled for 5 p.m. at Tacoma’s New Frontier Lounge. “We will be the same sludge rock that you have grown to love, and the same sinister, cathartic noise that you need from us,” vocalist Micah Hembree wrote in response to questions about the band’s evolving direction. “We will be playing some of the songs you are used to. But I believe that our direction will be more focused, and brutal.” Mahnhammer had been inactive since the departure of drummer Kristen Lyon, who split over creative differences in November. Guitarist Shawn “Lanksbury and I had disagreements on the vision of the band,” Lyon said. “I wanted to go more in a straight rock fashion, and they wanted to go a little more avante. “And, at the time, I was really busy in the middle of my transition, so I wasn’t giving it as much effort as I should have,” added the drummer, who was known as Kris Lyon before last year. Lyon started Mahnhammer with guitarist Dave Takata, who departed in 2012; and she decided to take the name with her. But the drummer insisted there were no hard feelings. “Those are some of my best friends in the world, I wish them all the best,” Lyon said. New drummer Israel Hickey joins bassist Sean Horst in the retooled rhythm section. But more than the new name and new look, fresh tunes that the quartet has added to its

Friday, April 11, 2014 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Nightlife

TW PICK OF THE WEEK: COUNTRY LEGEND GEORGE

STRAIT WILL TAKE OVER THE TACOMA DOME WITH HIS “COWBOY RIDES AWAY” TOUR ON APRIL 12. CHRIS YOUNG WILL OPEN AT 7:30 P.M., WITH TICKETS RANGING FROM $76.50 TO $98.50; WWW. TICKETMASTER.COM.

FRIDAY, APRIL 11 PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

REBRANDED. Mahnhammer vocalist Micah

Hembree performing at Wright Park in 2013. His band’s new name is Ex-Gods.

repertoire are sure to generate the biggest buzz. Mahnhammer went to Joshua Tree, Calif., last summer and recorded a new album’s worth of material at Rancho de Luna, the studio owned by rocker Dave Catching. The producer is best known as a contributor to Queens of the Stone Age, Eagles of Death Metal and Masters of Reality, among other popular acts, and for recording the Desert Sessions, a rotating cast of all-stars led by Queens’ front man Josh Homme. Needless to say, recording with such a high profile producer was quite a coup for an indie band from Tacoma. But Hembree said the future of those recordings is up in the air as his band writes more new material. Among the songs the band recorded last year are “Molecularize” and “It Can Be Found at the Bottom of the Lake,” which

had already become set staples. When asked about the newest songs fans could listen up for, Hembree provided two more foreboding titles: “The Trip Had Been Good Until the Malaria Set In” and “Two Guys, a Bag, and a Shovel.” Sunday’s bill also includes Tacoma punk trio Kramer and New Gods. The show is part of a threeday rock fest called Bleak Outlook, put together by promoter Brian Skiffington. Bleak Outlook will showcase 28 bands with shows taking place on April 11, 12 and 13 at the New Frontier, 2nd Cycle, the Aurora House and Fifth Dimension. Find updates and schedules on the festival blog, bleakoutlooktacoma. blogspot.com. THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (99 MIN, R) Fri 4/11: 1:45, 4:05, 6:40, 8:30, 9:05 Sat 4/12: 11:30am, 1:45, 2:15, 4:05, 6:40, 8:30, 9:05 Sun 4/13: 11:30am, 1:45, 4:05, 6:40, 8:30, 9:05 Mon 4/14-Thu 4/17: 1:45, 4:05, 6:40, 9:05

Ex-Gods, Kramer and New Gods in concert

LE WEEK-END (93 MIN, R) Fri 4/11: 1:35, 3:50, 6:15 Sat 4/12-Sun 4/13: 11:30am, 1:35, 3:50, 6:15 Mon 4/14-Thu 4/17: 1:35, 3:50, 6:15, 8:30

5 p.m. April 13 New Frontier Lounge 301 E. 25th St. No cover www.thenewfrontierlounge.com

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SUNDAY, APRIL 13

RIALTO: George Kahumoku Jr. and Stephen Inglis with Waipuna (Hawaiian slack-key guitar) 7:30 p.m., $19-$39

B SHARP COFFEE: Ty Elwin (acoustic) 8 p.m., NC, AA BROADWAY CENTER – STUDIO III: Drunken Telegraph (spoken word) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA EMERALD QUEEN: Bachman & Turner (classic rock) 8:30 p.m., $35-$90 FULCRUM: Constellation after party with DJ Uncivilized, Rowhouse, DJ Broam, Look Out Kid (electronica DJs) 9 p.m., $5 GIG SPOT: The Variety Show (alternative) 8 p.m., AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Idol Eyes (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Jimmy Della Valle (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: Guitar Shorty (blues) 8 p.m., $15 MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Yautja, Czar, Deathbed Confession (metal) 9 p.m., $5 PANTAGES: Tacoma Opera presents “Madama Butterfly,” 7:30 p.m., $28-$88, AA THE SWISS: Afrodisiacs (retro dance) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Tom Cotter (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAM’S: Hambone Blues Band (blues) 8 p.m., NC UNCLE THURM’S: Blenis-Ely Band (blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA

NEW FRONTIER: Kramer, New Gods, Ex-Gods (formerly Mahnhammer) 5 p.m., NC

B SHARP COFFEE: Tacoma’s Belly Dance Revue, 6:30 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Cambodian New Year show featuring Eang Chanthavy, Chhay Kosal and more (Cambodian pop) 8:30 p.m., NC IMMANUEL PRESBYTERIAN: Tim Sherman, Tom “T-Boy” Boyle (blues) 5 p.m., NC, AA MARINE VIEW CHURCH: Eugenie Jones (jazz) 5 p.m., NC, AA PANTAGES: Tacoma Opera presents “Madama Butterfly,” 2 p.m., $28-$88, AA 2nd CYCLE: Earth Control, Reivers, Blank Boys (rock) 8 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY: Jubal Flagg hosts Comedy Drag (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+ UPS – SCHNEEBECK HALL: Duane Hulbert (classical piano) 2 p.m., $8.50-$12.50, AA STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman Allstars (classic rock) 8:30 p.m., NC

MONDAY, APRIL 14 THE SWISS: Seth Freeman Band (blues, funk, rock) 8 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, APRIL 12 LOUIE G’S: Randy Hansen, A Lien Nation (Jimi Hendrix tribute, rock) 8 p.m., $10, AA

ACME: Brothers of the Sonic Cloth, Argonaut, Old Iron (metal) 9 p.m., NC B SHARP COFFEE: Leanne Trevalyan (singer-songwriter) 8 p.m., NC BOB’S JAVA JIVE: Florida, Masons Apron, Post Adolescence, Phobos, Deimos (indie-rock) 8 p.m., $5 FIRST PRESBYTERIAN: Tacoma Symphony Orchestra presents “Homeland: American Music, American Stories” (choral) 7:30 p.m., $20, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Idol Eyes (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Jimmy Della Valle (comedy) 8:30, 10:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: Inhale, Valley Green, Positive Rising (reggae) 8 p.m., $10 NORTHERN PACIFIC: Hot Hoodoo, Southender, Mister Master, Captain Algebra (alternative, punk) 8 p.m., $5 THE SPAR: Maia Santell (jazz, blues) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Spazmatics (‘80s hits) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Tom Cotter (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 WESTGATE: Klasx (classic rock) 9 p.m., $5

JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Jazz & Beyond (open jam) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino, Brooke Lizotte (experimental jam) 9 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, APRIL 15

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16

DAVE’S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, APRIL 17

GIG SPOT: Reign of Sun, Suite Clarity (punk, rock) 7 p.m., $8, AA DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Duane Goad (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

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Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 11, 2014

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: HOMELAND: AMERICAN MUSIC, AMERICAN STORIES Sat., April 12, 7:30 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 20 Tacoma Ave. S., Tacoma Tacoma Symphony Orchestra presents “Homeland: American Music, American Stories” with Geoffrey Boers, conductor, and the TSO Chorus. Featuring works by noted composers of new American music, Z. Randall Stroope’s “Homeland,” Ola Gjeilo’s “Luminous Night of the Soul,” Eric Barnum’s “Across the Fields,” Moten Lauridsen’s “Sure on this Shining Night” and many other works evoking sounds and images of the American landscape. Tickets: $20. Info: www.broadwaycenter.org TACOMA FREE FOR ALL: DRUNKEN TELEGRAPH Fri., April 11, 7:30 p.m. Broadway Center for the Performing Arts Catch six, thrilling real-life stories from local people who found themselves in a chase: on rollerblades, with government officials, after a murder suspect, for sexiness, for a reason to live and as fast as the speed of sound. After the main-stage performers, audience members can take their own turn sharing stories on the spot during the Story Slam. Drunken Telegraph is Tacoma’s live storytelling show, creating community by sharing stories about the experiences that make us who we are. Price: Free with Tacoma Free for All registration at www.surveymonkey.com Info: www.broadwaycenter.org GUITAR SHORTY Fri., April 11, 8 p.m. Jazzbones Legendary guitarist/vocalist Guitar Shorty is a giant in the blues world. Credited with influencing

both Jimi Hendrix and Buddy Guy, Guitar Shorty has been electrifying audiences for five decades with his supercharged live shows and his incendiary recordings. Price $15-$18. Info: (253) 396-9169. COMEDY WITH JIMMY DELLA VALLE Fri., April 11, 8:30 p.m. Comedy Underground at Big Whiskey Saloon, 100 S. 9th St., Tacoma Jimmy Della Valle, born and raised in New York and now living in Los Angeles, confesses “Once a New Yorker, always a New Yorker.” His streetwise edgy flare, macho vulnerability, and blue-collar twists are what allow Jimmy to keep audiences on the brink of laughter. Price $13. Info: (253) 961-4262. HILLTOP ARTISTS: “SYMBIOSIS: A MUTUALLY BENEFICIAL RELATIONSHIP” Sat., April 12, 11 a.m. W.W. Seymour Conservatory in Wright Park Join us for light refreshments and door prizes in honor of

the Hilltop Artists biennial installation at the W.W. Seymour Conservatory in Wright Park. This year’s theme is “Symbiosis” and Hilltop Artists students have been hard at work inventing, designing, and producing imaginary birds and bugs that rely on each other to survive, just as we rely on each other in our community. $3 adults, free ages 11 and younger. Info (253) 571-7670.

SPRING FAMILY NATURE WALKS Sat., April 12, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Swan Creek Park, 2820 Pioneer Way, Tacoma Explore Tacoma Parks during these seasonal naturalist-led family walks. Discover the amazing plants and animals that live in these parks and how they adapt in the different seasons. Not recommended for strollers or children under 3. Pre-registration requested. Meet at the Pioneer Street entrance. Price: Free. Info: (253) 591-6439. EUGENIE JONES Sun., April 13, 5-7 p.m. Marine View Presbyterian Church, 8469 East Side Dr., NE, Tacoma Eugenie Jones has very quickly become one of the finest vocalists in the Northwest, on the strength of her debut album Black Lace Blue Tears. Her songwriting is emotional and her styling impeccable. Having sung professionally for only three years, Jones has caught the ear of many critics with her passionate lyrics and raw emotion. Price: Free for all ages. Info: (253) 229-9206.

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

ABSOLUTE BEGINNER ARGENTINE TANGO CLASS Sun., April 13, 12 p.m. BackStreet Tango, 3505 S. 14th St., Tacoma BackStreet Tango teaches Argentine Tango by concentrating on the elements of the dance for relaxed free flowing movement and great partner connection. This is the most efficient way to learn this dance. Classes are small so there is plenty of one on one instructor attention. Come by for a free introductory lesson. No partner necessary. All partnerships welcome. Price $10 per class (first class is free). Info: (253) 312-0377

advantage of this information-only presentation and learn about how this insurance coverage might help or how it might be a total waste of your money. Get impartial information without the high-pressure tactics and heavy-handed sales pitch. Price: Free. Info: (253) 798-4600. REDUCE YOUR DEBT, INCREASE YOUR FREEDOM Tues., April 15, 6 p.m Tacoma Public Library – Moore Branch, 215 S. 56th Ave., Tacoma Do you want to be free of oppressive debt? Start on the path of financial freedom and learn how to prioritize your debts, establish a payment plan, identify spending issues and behavior change. These and other skills and techniques covered can help you manage the debt and pay it off. Free and open to the public. Registration requested. Price: Free. Info: (253) 341-4848

COMPUTERS FOR BEGINNERS Mon., April 14, 2 p.m. Summit Pierce County Library, 5107 112th St. E., Tacoma Covers basic computer skills and concepts, including identifying the parts of a computer, understanding basic computer terminology and navigating a window using a mouse and keyboard. Register for classes at a Pierce County Library, or online at www.piercecountylibrary.org/ calendar. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3321.

TCC DIVERSITY FILM FESTIVAl Tues., April 13-27 The Grand Cinema, 606 S. Fawcett Ave., Tacoma Exploring individual and cultural differences through film, Tacoma Community College and Tacoma’s Grand Cinema partner to present an international selection of films. Price: $7.50 matinee/$9.50 evening. $7.50 all shows seniors & military with ID. $2 for TCC students with TCC ID. Info: (253) 460-4334/www.grandcinema.com

LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE Mon., April 14, 7-8 p.m. Pierce County Soundview Building, 3602 Pacific Ave., Tacoma Most adults don’t consider buying – or choose not to buy – a long term care insurance policy. That may or may not be the best choice. Take

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE Kerri Bailey is a horticulturist and a certified herbalist. She makes custom blends and consults at Ubiquitous Journey (www.UBJourney.com) on 6th Avenue. Kerri owns two businesses – the online herb store www.HerbalElements.net and a water garden store inside Alpine Nursery in South Hill (www. AlpineGrows.com) called The Pond Pad (www.ThePondPad.com). She writes blogs on gardening, ponds, natural health and herbal remedies and teaches classes through Free University (www.FreeUNW.com).

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) In the past weeks you have found yourself questioning certain career decisions. Clarity will come to you during the Full Moon and Lunar Eclipse on the 15th. A lover’s spat or troubles with coworkers may be smoothed over with ease if you don’t over react. Don’t take things too personally. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) If you have been feeling like things are falling between the cracks, don’t worry! The Full Moon and Lunar Eclipse on the 15th should help bring your focus back. Do your own thing at your own pace and let others run themselves ragged. Show what you’re capable of. GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) Fun and games are in store for you during the Full Moon on the 15th. Enjoy the game as long as you resist needless risks. You are full of boundless energy and charm so use it to your advantage! Take a chance to make that change. CANCER (June 21 – July 22) Throughout the past few weeks you have been working on internal changes. It is now time to re-enter the world and let people see the new you. The Full Moon on the 15th could impact your career and ambitions. Do something good for yourself. LEO (July 23 – August 22) The Full Moon and Lunar Eclipse on the 15th influence your want for escape. Friends and family may tempt you to take that trip you have always wanted. Take that chance to explore new horizons. Do something special for yourself. VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Keep your needs foremost in your mind but remember to balance that with the needs of friends and family. The Full Moon on the 15th highlights important financial matters. Avoid risky or rushed deals. Carefully think things through.

LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) People may seem to envy your knack for ignoring ignorance and seeing the humor in life. Those that give you grief are really seeking your attention. The Full Moon and Lunar Eclipse on the 15th make you shine in full force. Laughter is the best medicine. SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) Reorganize or change something at home or at the workplace to remove mental clutter. This will improve your attitude and brighten your day. The Full Moon and Lunar Eclipse on the 15th energize you, helping you see things in a different light. Explore new horizons.

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SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) The urge to start new things or make major changes may overwhelm you during this month’s Full Moon on the 15th. You may see coworkers as a threat but soon realize their value. Evoke your positive qualities. CAPRICORN (December 22 – January 19) Silence, laughter and perspective are your mantras this week. Coworkers may be stepping on your toes or overlooking details.The Full Moon on the 15th helps you keep your focus on important matters. Practice diplomacy. AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) You may have made some bad decisions in the past but you have learned from them and now moved on. Doubts will drift away as the Full Moon and Lunar Eclipse on the 15th help you to focus on your immediate needs and how to attain them. Avoid needless distractions. PISCES (February 19 – March 20) You help solve someone else’s problems which ultimately helps you financially. The Full Moon and Lunar Eclipse on the 15th add to your charm and magnetism. Partners or loved ones are attracted to this and may reward you in a special way. Finances should continue to improve.

L J M S S A L G F O M U E S U M F

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NOTICES TO: SLATON, Clara- Casondra Marie ,QWKH:HOIDUHRI$'6'2% &DVH1XPEHU38<&:&: <28DUHKHUHE\VXPPRQHGWRDSSHDUIRUD5HYLHZ +HDULQJLQWKH&KLOGUHQ·V&RXUWRIWKH3X\DOOXS7ULEHRI ,QGLDQVRQWKH3X\DOOXS,QGLDQ5HVHUYDWLRQZKLFKLV ORFDWHGDW(DVWWK6WUHHW7DFRPD:DVKLQJWRQ  <RXDUHVXPPRQHGWRDSSHDUIRUD&RQWLQXHG,QLWLDO +HDULQJRQ7KXUVGD\WKH7+GD\RI-81(DW P.M

NOTICES Looking to start a New Cowboy Church in Greater Tacoma Area. Do you enjoy Country Music, Bluegrass, Southern Gospel? Contact Pastor John Pettit. Questions. Answers. (253) 686-5953

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EMPLOYMENT

PETS Need safe farms or barns for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. 7KH\DUHĂ&#x20AC;[HG vaccinated and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at  

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy 253-770-8552

Pet of the Week

,QWKH:HOIDUHRI.$''2% &DVH1XPEHU38<*-9 <28DUHKHUHE\VXPPRQHGWRDSSHDUIRUDQ,QLWLDO +HDULQJLQWKH&KLOGUHQ¡V&RXUWRIWKH3X\DOOXS7ULEHRI ,QGLDQVRQWKH3X\DOOXS,QGLDQ5HVHUYDWLRQZKLFKLV ORFDWHGDW(DVWWK6WUHHW7DFRPD:DVKLQJWRQ  <RXDUHVXPPRQHGWRDSSHDUIRUDQ,QLWLDO+HDULQJRQ Monday the 2nd day of June, 2014 at 3:00 PM ,I\RXKDYHDQ\TXHVWLRQVSOHDVHFRQWDFWWKHFRXUW FOHUNVDW   )$,/85(72$33($53/($'2527+(5:,6( '()(1'0$<5(68/7,1$'()$8/7-8'*0(17 :$51,1*127,&(38568$177275,%$/&2'( 6(&7,217+(&28570$<),1'7+( 3$5(17*8$5',$125&8672',$1,1'()$8/7 )25)$,/85(725(6321'25$33($5$77+( &2857+($5,1*7+,60$<5(68/7,1<285 &+,/' 5(1 %(,1*3/$&(',1$127+(5+20( $1'7+(3$5(1725'(5('72&255(&7 &(57$,1352%/(06 3,(5&(&2817<',675,&7&2857 930 Tacoma Avenue south, Room 601, Tacoma, WA +2:$5'*/25,$$113HWLWLRQHU HOWELL, JERRY L: Respondent NO: 4Z619667A 5(,668$1&(2)7(0325$5< $17,+$5$660(17 3527(&7,2125'(5$1' The Temporary Order for Protection issued on 01/30/14 ,VKHUE\H[WHQGHGWKURXJKWKHQHZFRXUWKHDULQJ GDWH$35,/#30 At 930 Tacoma Avenue South, Courtroom 936 5(6321'(179LRODWLRQRIWKHSURYLVLRQVRIWKLV order with notice of its terms is a criminal offense under RCW 10.14 and RCW 10.31.100 and you may EHVXEMHFWWRDUUHVW:LOOIXOGLVREHGLHQFHRIWKLVRUGHU PD\DOVREHFRQWHPSWRIFRXUWDQGVXEMHFW\RXWR penalties under RCW 7.21. A copy of this order has EHHQILOHGZLWKWKHFRXUW ͳǤÂ&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2020;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x203A;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;ÇŁ %DVHGXSRQWKHSHWLWLRQWHVWLPRQ\DQGFDVHUHFRUG the court finds the respondent committed unlawful KDUDVVPHQWDVGHILQHGLQ5&:DQG ,7,625'(5('WKDWWKH5HVSRQGHQWLVUHVWUDLQHG from: ǤÂ&#x2013;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x203A;Â?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022; Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2030;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2019;Â&#x160;ͳǤÂ&#x201E;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x203A;Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Ǥ ǤÂ&#x192;Â?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x203A;Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x203A; Â?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2030;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2019;Â&#x160;ÍłÂ&#x192;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2014;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D; Â&#x2022;Â&#x2014;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2026;Â&#x2021;Ǥ Ǥ Â&#x2018;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2039;Â?ͳͲͲͲ Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Č&#x2039;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2026;Â&#x2021;Č&#x152;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;ÇŻÂ&#x2022;     ǤÂ&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;ÇŁÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2039;Â? ʹͲÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;ǤÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x160;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x201E;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D; Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x203A;Ǥ ,7,625'(5('7+$7 The clerk hall forward a copy of this order on or EHIRUHWKHQH[WMXGLFLDOGD\WR South sound 911 (or the law enforcement agency where Petitioner lives) for entry into the computer EDVHGFULPLQDOLQWHOOLJHQFHV\VWHPDYDLODEOHLQWKLV 6WDWHXVHGE\ODZHQIRUFHPHQWWROLVWRXWVWDQGLQJ warrants. The petitioner shall forward a copy of this on or EHIRUHWKHQH[WMXGLFLDOGD\WR (Law Enforcement Agency where Respondent lives) and said agency shall personally serve the respondent with a copy of this order and shall promptly complete and return to this court proof of service.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pixiâ&#x20AC;?

CNA

Full or Part-Time Day Shifts, Weekends. Live-in Nights. In Lakewood. Fax Resume to (253) 589-0182

DISCRIMINATION Experiencing Workplace Discrimination? Retired City of Tacoma Civil Rights Investigator will provide assistance. Call 253-565-6179. Never a fee for my services.

,I\RX¡UH\RXORRNLQJIRUDEHDXWLIXONLWW\ZKRZLOOĂ&#x20AC;WLQ perfectly with your familyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss out on your chance to meet Pixie. This gorgeous 2 year old is extremely affectionate and will be at your side throughout the day. With her luxurious long white hair and piercing green eyes, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re sure to see a beauty queen sitting before you. This lovely lady will enjoy spending time curled up on your lap purring away. If Pixieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new forever home has children, it is recommended that they are over the age of 12. She has had positive interactions with other cats in the past, but not with dogs. This wonderful girl wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be around for long, stop by and meet Pixie today. Reference #A484393

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www.thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week 1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

ANTIQUES WANTED Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105

FOR SALE FURNITURE

FURNITURE

New 5 Piece Bedroom Set )XOO RU 4XHHQ VHW LQFOXGHV +HDGERDUG rails, nightstand, dresser, & mirror. %5$1' 1(: 2QO\ $400 253-539-1600

Adjustable Power Bed %UDQG1HZZLWKPHPRU\ foam mattress. Wall hugger with warranty. 'HOLYHU\DYDLODEOH 253-537-3056

5 Piece Dining Room Set 7DEOH &KDLUV1HZ LQER[2QO\ 539-1600 Microfiber Sectional %UDQG 1HZ 5(9(56,%/(VHFWLRQDO with chaise lounge. 1(:2QO\ 539-1600 All New Pillow Top Mattress 4XHHQ 6L]H ZLWK warranty. Still in original plastic. Can deliver. $120. 253-537-3056 Solid Wood Bunk Beds $YDLODEOH LQ  FRORUV %UDQGQHZLQER[&DQ EUHDN GRZQ WR WZR VHSDUDWH WZLQ EHGV 'HOLYHU\ DYDLODEOH $250 253-539-1600 Low Profile Leather Bed Frame 6WLOO LQ ER[  $YDLODEOH LQ)XOORU4XHHQ9HU\ nice. Can deliver. $250 253-539-1600 All New King Mattress Set 3 Piece King Mattress set for only $275. Still in original packaging with factory warranty. Can deliver. 253-537-3056

MOTORCYCLES

New Mission Style Bedroom Suite Solid wood Mission EHGURRP VHW   ,QFOXGHV KHDGERDUG IRRWERDUG UDLOV nightstand, dresser, and mirror. 253-539-1600 New Overstuffed Microfiber sofa & Love Seat Still in plastic with manufactures warranty. Can have for $700. Lifetime warranty on frame. 253-539-1600 BRAND NEW! 4XHHQ 0HPRU\ IRDP mattress set with 20 year ZDUUDQW\  &DQ 'HOLYHU $400. 253-537-3056 New Pillow Top Full Mattress Only $99. Never XVHG  &RPHV ZLWK manufactures warranty. 'HOLYHU\ DYDLODEOH  537-3056

WANTED FURNITURE

Looking for a Futon Bed. Can Pay Cash. Please Call Alex. (253) 564-5743 MOTORCYCLES

MOTORCYCLES WANTED Local Collector looking for Honda 750 motorcycles running or not. Also seeking Vespas with or without sidecars. (253) 441-8626 or 847-7772. Paperwork problems okay.

Alfred is a trooper, and has been such a sweetheart since he first arrived here at the shelter. Affection is his middle name, and he is more than willing to share. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind his bald patches, his body is working on filling those in. Help this big time lover find the Forever Family heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been dreaming of. Squirt would make any family lucky to have him. He is not your typical Chihuahua, as he bonds quickly with just about everybody that walks through the door. His happygo-lucky attitude is sure to put a smile on your face. What more could you ask for? Help this lap loving boy find a home today!

VOLUNTEERS Donate time and receive free groceries. Volunteers needed with skills in management, organization, clerical, food handling, warehousing, maintenance etc. and receive free groceries from a Non3URĂ&#x20AC;W )RRG 'LVWULEXWLRQ Program. Older teens are welcomed to volunWHHU DQG JDLQ YDOXDEOH work experience. Contact Ms. Lee at (253) 677-7740 for further information.

PAWS NEEDS WILDLIFE VOLUNTEERS PAWS in Lynnwood is looking for volunteers to help care for wildlife this spring. Every year, PAWS cares for more than 3,000 LQMXUHGRUSKDQHGRUDEDQdoned wildlife. Join the team and you can help feed and care for these UHPDUNDEOH DQLPDOV ,W¡V D UHPDUNDEOHH[SHULHQFH\RX ZRQ¡W Ă&#x20AC;QG DQ\ZKHUH HOVH )RU DQ\ TXHVWLRQV SOHDVH contact Mark Coleman, Communications Manager, at 206.419.6646. These are exciting times and you can make a difference! South Sound Outreach SerYLFHVLQYLWHV\RXWREHWUDLQHG DVDQ,Q3HUVRQ$VVLVWHU9ROunteer to help Pierce County residents enroll online for health insurance in the WashLQJWRQ +HDOWK 3ODQ )LQGHU 2SHQ (QUROOPHQW LV 2FWREHU 1 until March 31st. Coverage EHJLQV-DQXDU\VWIRU WKRVHHQUROOHGE\'HFHPEHU WK ,QWHUHVWHG WUDLQHHV may call Heather at SSOS <RX¡OOEHJODG \RXGLG

Become a Senior Companion today! Volunteers help frail or GLVDEOHG VHQLRUV VWD\ LQ

their own home and maintain their independence. Activities include running errands, providing transSRUWDWLRQ RU VLPSO\ EHLQJ a friend. Hourly stipend DQG PLOHDJH UHLPEXUVHPHQW SURYLGHG 5HTXLUHPHQWVPXVWEHVHUYH at least 15 hours a week DQG EH ORZLQFRPH 'ULYers are especially needed FXUUHQWO\)RUPRUHLQIRFDOO Julie Kerrigan, Program 'LUHFWRU     H[W Help furnish hope to those in need! 1: )XUQLWXUH %DQN 9ROXQWHHUV QHHGHG ´1:)% KHOSV restore hope, dignity and VWDELOLW\LQRXUFRPPXQLW\E\ recycling donated furniture to people in need.â&#x20AC;? TuesdaySaturday Truck Volunteers Needed- 9:00 am-2:00 pm. Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the 1:)% 7HDP 7R YROXQWHHU contact us at volunteer@ QZIXUQLWXUHEDQNRUJ RU FDOO  Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs We need a volunteer to host programs Tuesday & Thursday 9:30-12, & 1-2:30 pm at Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs. 9ROXQWHHUZLOOEHFDOOLQJ%LQgo and doing some extreme crafting, gardening during spring & summer and into IDOO ,I LQWHUHVWHG FDOO %RQQLH #  0RQGD\ )ULGD\30 Ayusa International SeeksTacoma Host Parents for High School Exchange Students $\XVD ,QWHUQDWLRQDO D  \HDUROG QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W WKDW SURPRWHV JOREDO OHDUQLQJ through the hosting of high school foreign exchange students, is seeking parents/

VOLUNTEERS families in Tacoma to host for the upcoming 2013-2014 school year. Ayusa students DUH  \HDUV ROG DQG come from more than 60 countries around the world LQFOXGLQJ %UD]LO -DSDQ *HUPDQ\ (FXDGRU )UDQFH Peru, Morocco, China and 6SDLQWKH\DUHDOOSURĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW LQ(QJOLVK)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQSOHDVHYLVLWRXUZHEVLWH www.ayusa.org

South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our ZHEVLWHDWZZZVRXWKVRXQGoutreach.org.

Project Homeless Connect is an annual event where homeless individuals can receive free services. The QH[W HYHQW ZLOO EH KHOG DW 7DFRPD 'RPH RQ 2FW UG )RU PRUH LQIRUPDtion visit www.pchomelessconnect.com or call 253.593.2111. Get involved with Metro Parks Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Citizen Advisory Councils! 7KH %XVLQHVV  5HVSRQsive Agency Council helps GLVWULFWOHDGHUVKLSZLWKEXVLQHVV SODQQLQJ Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO VXVWDLQDELOLW\ GHFLVLRQV revenue development DQG TXDOLW\ DVVXUDQFH Monthly meetings focus on issues that affect the future of our park system. Visit www.metroparkstaFRPDRUJEXVLQHVVYROunteer to learn more or FDOO %UHWW )UHVKZDWHUV &KLHI )LQDQFLDO 2IĂ&#x20AC;FHU DW %UHWWI#WDcomaparks.com. Metro Parks Tacoma 6SHFLDO HYHQWV EULQJ WKH community together and provide families with afIRUGDEOHIXQ0HWUR3DUNV Tacoma needs volunteers to help produce memoUDEOH HYHQWV  9LVLW ZZZ metroparkstacoma.org/ volunteer and signup to EHQRWLĂ&#x20AC;HGRIVSHFLDOHYHQW service opportunities. To learn more, contact Roxanne Miles, Volunteer 0DQDJHUDW Roxannem@tacomaparks. com.

Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports SURJUDP  6SRUWV YDU\ E\ season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national EDFNJURXQG FKHFN FOHDUDQFH SURFHVV  )RU PRUH information, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/nysa RU FRQWDFW 5R\ )OHWFKHU Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@tacomaparks.com or 253.305.1025. Join us in changing lives! &KDQJLQJ5HLQ(TXLQH$Vsisted Activities and TherDSLHV D QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W RIIHUV HTXLQHDVVLVWHGVHUYLFHVWR GLIIHUHQWO\DEOHG LQGLYLGXals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and adaptive lessons. Other volunteer opportunities include: grounds maintenance and administrative/clerical work. Must EHDWOHDVW\HDUVROGWR participate. Horse experiHQFH KHOSIXO EXW QRW QHFessary. Training provided. )RU PRUH LQIRUPDWLRQ FRQtact: Volunteer Coordinator at 253-370-1429 or volunteer@changingrein.org. The Tacoma Maritime Institute meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00 CONVERSATION PARTNERS NEEDED Help adults learn to VSHDN (QJOLVK 0RUQings, no experience or foreign language skills needed. South Tacoma. Contact Lee Sledd, 0DGLVRQ)DPLO\/LWHUDF\  EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION VOLUNTEERS NEEDED ,I\RXHQMR\KHOSLQJWRGdlers learn, you can help XV 6HHNLQJ UHWLUHG RU experienced volunteers to assist in expanding our capacity and provide TXDOLW\ OHDUQLQJ IRU EXV\ little people. (No diaper FKDQJLQJ  %DFNJURXQG FKHFN UHTXLUHG &RQtact Lee Sledd, Madison )DPLO\/LWHUDF\  Be a Big Brother! %HFRPLQJD%LJLVDIXQ and easy way to volunteer in your community DQG PDNH D %,* GLIference in the life of a child. There are severDOSURJUDPRSWLRQVWRĂ&#x20AC;W your schedule and interests, such as meeting your Little at school,

going on an outing or attending an agencySODQQHG DFWLYLW\ )RU more information, visit ZZZEEEVSVRUJRUFDOO 253.396.9630. INTERVIEWEES FOR A NON-PROFIT PROJECT â&#x20AC;&#x153;MEMORY COMMUNITYâ&#x20AC;? :KDW,W,V:HDUH0HPRU\ &RPPXQLW\ D QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W corporation). The Memory Community Project is a creative service to seniors. Our *RDOV 2EMHFWLYHV7RFUHDWHDQDFFHVVLEOHUHVRXUFH that: â&#x20AC;˘ helps our senior citizens tell their stories â&#x20AC;˘ connects the young and the old â&#x20AC;˘ increases our understandLQJRIWKRVHEHIRUHXVZKR KHOS XV EH ZKR ZH DUH Â&#x2021; KRQRUVWKHJHQHUDWLRQVEHfore us and show our apSUHFLDWLRQ E\ SUHVHUYLQJ their memories â&#x20AC;˘ All seniors are welcome to volunteer IRU Ă&#x20AC;OPLQJ WKHLU VWRU\ Â&#x2021; $W most two days of work durLQJ GD\WLPH ² 'D\  SUH production meeting, and 5HOHDVH)RUPVLJQLQJ'D\  Ă&#x20AC;OPLQJ LGHDOO\ ZUDSSHG ZLWKLQKDOIDGD\:KDWZH¡G OLNH\RXWRWDONDERXWLQWKH Ă&#x20AC;OP 8VH  PLQXWHV RU VR WRWHOOWKHPRVWPHPRUDEOH story from your life, the lessons that were learned, and the wise words you want to pass along to your children/ grandchildren. CompensaWLRQ D '9' LQ ZKLFK \RX are the leading character, and a free upload to our ZHEVLWH KWWSPHPRU\FRPmunity.org/ Contact: send your emails to deyung@ m e m o r y c o m m u n i t y. o r g 2U FDOO 'H\XQJ DW   IRU VFKHGXOLQJ D PHHWLQJ 7KH Ă&#x20AC;OPLQJ LV IUHH EXW GRQDWLRQV DUH DSpreciated to help the project continue. Knitters and Crocheters &RPH -RLQ 8V /RYLQJ Hearts is a group of volunteers who crochet or NQLW KDWV IRU FKHPR EDE\ LWHPV DQG EODQNHWV IRU GLIIHUHQW QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W RUJDQLzations with in the community. We meet twice a month. Once on the second Tuesday, from 1:00pm to 3:00pm and again on the fourth Thursday, from 7:00pm to 9:00pm. Please join us at the WayPoint Church, 12719 134th Ave .3 1 *LJ +DUERU :H DUH also in need of donations of \DUQ )RU PRUH LQIRUPDWLRQ please email: lovingheartsonkp@aol.com or call 9LUJLQLD DW Âł Loving Hearts also meets 1pm to 3pm 3rd Thur. at &OXEKRXVH0RELOH3DUN$UGHQD *DOH  WK$YH ()LIH The Backpack Program of the St. Leo Food Connection is looking for a volunteer WR SLFN XS EDFNSDFNV IXOO of food for the weekend for students at McKinley Elementary and Sheridan (OHPHQWDU\ IURP WKH )RRG Connection and deliver WKHP WR ERWK VFKRROV WKH 2nd and 4th Thursday or )ULGD\ RI HDFK PRQWK IRU the duration of the school year. Volunteers must have WKHLU RZQ YHKLFOH DQG EH DEOHWRFRPPLWWRYROXQWHHUing for the rest of the school year. This is a low time commitment way to make D ELJ GLIIHUHQFH WR NLGV ,I interested, please contact %ULWDQL +ROOLV MY#IRRGFRQnection.org Hospice is seeking compassionate, caring individuals to volunteer up to 4 hrs. per week with terminally ill patients. Comprehensive training and education provided. We support your service goals and your spirit to give. Training Jan. 2010 FDOOWRGD\ Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care-Life giving and Life changing ,I\RXKDYHDIHZKRXUVSHU week to sew, hold hands, listen to life stories, make phone calls, play cards or work puzzles, we have a need for your compassionate presence. Support patients/families in the home, nursing home, or Hospice +RXVH'D\WLPHYROXQWHHUV especially needed.Comprehensive training and on-going support are provided. Call 253-534-7050 or log onto www.fhshealth.org to learn more Brighten the day of a senior with Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s! Volunteer an hour or two visiting with a resident at +HDUWKVLGH 0DQRU LQ 8QLversity Place. Please contact Tashia Cress at 253460-3330. EDGEWOOD COMMUNITY FOOD BANK Seeking volunteers to staff Thursdays from 3:30pm 6:30pm and/or Saturdays from 11am-2pm . Those interested contact Community Coordinator, Kate Wright DW  $GGUHVV 3505 122nd Ave E Edgewood Tacoma/Pierce County Chamber of Commerce needs volunteers to help with special mailings. Call Janice Hutchins at 6272175.


Friday, April 11, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV HOMES FOR SALE

FEATURED LISTING

HOMES FOR SALE

Features include extensive hardwoods, wainscoting, architectural detailing, nine ft ceilings on main floor, granite and tile finishes, cherry-stained maple cabinets, CAT5e network, keyless entry, central A/C and much more. Fully-finished lower level. Living area extends to outdoor deck and hot tub overlooking meticulous grounds with auto sprinkler, fruit trees, garden; shed with power.

StephanieLynch

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I promise to follow through and follow up. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll discuss with you exactly how I work and what you can expect. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll communicate Â?Â? Top Producing Broker 2008-2014 Â?Â? regularly and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll know the process each www.stephanielynch.com step of the way. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m here to work hard for you and make the transaction as smooth as possible. Call me today for your personal consultation.â&#x20AC;?

253.203.8985

ROOMMATE

Roommate Wanted Share home. Rent includes private Bath. Laundry, All Utilities. Partially Furnished. No indoor pets. Horse area available on 1 acre. (253) 843-2781 MOORAGE

MOORAGE

Boat Moorage at Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dock. $9.50 per foot per month. 5 min. from I-5. Call Laura at (253) 627-3186 STABLES

STABLES

Dillon Stables. Covered, well-lit riding arena. 12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x12â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Stalls. Full care. Riding Lessons. Horses for Sale. $400 per month. (253) 606-4994

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

33 N Salmon Beach

Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton K\GUDXOLFERDW/LIWEULFNZRRGEXUQLQJĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFH with insert, expansive decking on all sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout the last 9 years, including roof, VLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZVGRRUVGHFNLQJERDW hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more. $450,000

Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 222-8480

805 N Steele St Want bragging rights & the ability to name drop? Hans Grohe, Duravit, Kohler, & Porcher to name a few... Then this is the house for you-high end everything & custom touches galore. Need this spelled out in layman terms? Fabulous, fantastic & close to hip 6th Ave Biz District, this 4 bed, 2.5 bath home has natural, original woodwork, is an entertainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream, and is ready for new owners... Leave your hammer DW\RXUROGKRXVHWKLVRQHLVĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGDQG Ă&#x20AC;QLVKHGZHOO,PLJKWDGG:HOFRPH $368,000

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3578 E F St, Tacoma â&#x20AC;˘ $124,000 This home is completely remodeled and movein ready with a massive, fenced backyard. Updated plumbing & electrical. New carpet, paint, moldings, doors. New kitchen with hickory cabinets, range, dishwasher. 12 by 14 covered deck. Huge Outbuilding for storage, alley access. ( MLS # 582500)

1018 S 61st St, Tacoma â&#x20AC;˘ $149,500

Michelle Anguiano Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood 253.720.6525

3 Bed, 1 3/4 Bath. 1,356 sq ft. Open Ă RRUSODQ YDXOWHGFHLOLQJVKLJKOLJKW this handsome rambler on a park-like corner lot in Artondale. Kitchen features an island, new smooth-top stove & convection oven, tile countertops & bay ZLQGRZV)DPLO\URRPZLWKĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHLV perfect for entertaining as is the large deck & fenced backyard. The master suite, one of three newly carpeted bedrooms, has French doors to the deck and a remodeled ž bathroom. 30-yr roof installed in 2005. 10 mins to schools, shopping, recreation & SR-16

936 S Sheridan $219,000

Askthehometeam.com

Sergio Hernandez (253) 431-2308

Heather Redal (253) 363-5920

Sergio@betterproperties.com

Heatherredal@gmail.com

3728 N Gove St, Tacoma Cute little bungalow in Proctor! Nice upgrades include a new family room, windows, roof, energy package & carpet 6 years ago. Detached garage was converted to extra living space. It has a separate electric panel, heat & lights - lots of possibilities... music studio, art studio, exercise / yoga room, etc. Parking for 3 cars off the alley next to garage. Charming back yard, too! +DUGZRRGĂ RRUVXQGHUFDUSHWH[FHSWLQ family room. MLS# 518902. $195,000 Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

2711 Henry Road N

Beautiful Victorian 4-plex in good location back on the market after remodel. Walking distance WR KRVSLWDOV GRZQWRZQ SDUNV 0DLQ Ă RRU XQLW has one bedroom plus attached bonus room, dining room, lg kitchen with nook, new carpet throughout, bay windows. Upstairs unit has 2 bedrooms, bath, lg living room, kitchen & balcony. Lower level has 2 studio apts & bath. Sep. utilities for main and upper units. 3,064 sq ft MLS# 523770

Better Properties Heather Redal 253.363.5920 PROPERTY

PROPERTY

MT. RAINIER VIEW $125,000 Beautiful Level Buildable Site! Located off of Ray Nash Drive NW, this 1.25 Acres of natural setting and mature Evergreen trees is perfect to build your dream home and enjoy the Country Lifestyle! Peeka-Boo View of Mt. Rainier. Just minutes away from sought after Schools, Uptown Gig Harbor Amenities, Restaurants, WA-Hwy 16, Hospitals, Boat launch/ water activities, tennis courts & Kopachuck State Park! Electricity is available at corner.

Michelle Anguiano, Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood 253.720.6525

OLD TOWN $499,950 Amazing development potential with this unique 2OG7RZQSURSHUW\&LW\KDVJLYHQĂ&#x20AC;QDOSODW approval for 4 lots on this prime 3 acre piece. Big views possible from all lots in this great neighborhood, tucked back & out of the way. Walk to the historic Old Town district with its coffee shops, wine bar & restaurants.; then stroll down to the waterfront & enjoy the gorgeous Puget Sound setting with walking paths, public docks, shoreline restaurants & more! MLS# 332653

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

COMMERCIAL Absolutely Charming, Mediterranean Style, custom built North Tacoma view home. Enjoy Commencement Bay view from Mstr Br balc. ,QVLGHIHDWLQFO0DUEOHĂ RRUHQWU\6W6WHHO$SSO *UDQFRXQWWRSV&XVWEXLOW+LFNRU\FDE%HDXW %UD]LOLDQ&KHUU\KDUGZRRGĂ RRU%D\ZLQGRZV 0VWUVXLWHZ)3 /UJEDWKVWHDPVKRZHU &DOLFORVHW1HZ(QHUJ\(IĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWKHDWLQJ&HQW YDFXXPQHZSDLQWLQ RXWQHZFDUSHW)LQLVKHG %VPWZNLWFKHQ&ORVHWR6FKRROV3DUNV )UHHZD\+RVSLWDOV :DWHUIURQW$623,000.

Gil Rigell Better Properties N. Proctor (253) 376-7787

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St.

COMMERCIAL

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract LAKEWOOD FLORIST SHOP Same location 30+ years, owners retiring, Asking $60,000 cash. PORT ORCHARD, DOWNTOWN Food & Beverage, annual gross sales, approx. $1,500,000, excellent net. Owner selling real estate & the business for $1,050,000, terms avail., same location over 100 years. ice

RURAL LIVING: pr reduced Restaurant/Lounge in Ashford, WA Price for business, $105,000 with $25,000 down. Price for the real estate, $390,000 with $75,000 down. Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract includes a 3 B/R house, laundromat, restr./lounge bldg. on 3.4 acre, commercial zoned parcel. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;CALLAHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB & GRILL IN KEY CENTER Business is for sale for $225,000 with $75,000 down, High gross sales. Saler will also consider leasing the space. Health price issue forces sale. d

$257,500 Debbie Houtz Better Properties 253-376-2280

MLS# 573155

Advertise Your Real Estate Listing in the Pierce County Community Classifieds CALL 253-922-5317

Super charming home w/ the ease of newer amenities... Box beam ceilings, hardwood Ă RRUVPDUEOHHQWU\SLFWXUHSODWHUDLOV SHULRG VW\OHOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHVDGGWRWKHDPELHQFHZKLOH newer roof, furnace/heat pump, indoor/outdoor speakers, newer wiring/plumbing, & gas Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHDGGWRWKHDKKKKIDFWRU6SDFLRXV living room, large kitchen, HUGE dining room, a bedroom and cute remodeled bathroom JUDFHWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWĂ RRU*LJDQWLFGHFNZVHDWLQJ welcome home. Move in and make it yours. $210,950

Charm and character galore in this 1920â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s &XWLH %HDXWLIXO KDUGZRRG Ă RRUV WKURXJKRXW high coved ceilings, large open kitchen, mud room, master bedroom w/2 closets, upstairs has KLJKFHLOLQJV)LUĂ RRUVDQGEHGURRPVZLWKORWV of closet space plus lots of storage. Backyard is fully fenced and is a gardenerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream with pond, mature landscaping and so much privacy. Garage is like a quaint cottage with a loft, new wiring and shop. House has 60 year roof, new insulation and is adorable! (MLS # 600824)

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

HOMES FOR SALE

Turn the Key & Move In! This Cozy 2Bd 1Bth has been freshly SDLQWHG  IHDWXUHV UHĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHG ZRRG Ă RRUVLQFKWULPDURXQGZLQGRZVGRRUV & custom tile throughout. Upgraded (OHFWULFDO 3OXPELQJ2IĂ&#x20AC;FH'HQDUHD and large windows to enjoy Country Living and Northwest Wildlife at your doorstep! Privacy & Beauty all around! Situated on 1.12 acres (2 parcels), this property has Boundless Potential for Investor/Builder. Centrally located near highly desired schools, parks, water recreation and minutes to HWY 16 & local stores. This home is ready for your Inspiration!

HOMES FOR SALE

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

6711 36th St Ct NW, Gig Harbor HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

1232 S Adams St.

4914 N Vassault St, Tacoma 98407  "ED  "ATH s  

ROOMMATE

CALL 253.922.5317

reduce

COLLISION CENTER Same owner 15 yrs. Retiring, 6621 So. Tacoma Way. $130,000 with terms to qualified buyer - some training provided at 0 cost to buyer.

A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with no HOA. High &HLOLQJVJDVÂżUHSODFHVVHSDUDWHO\PHWHUHG &DOOIRUSULYDWHVKRZLQJWRGD\253.606.0689 BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME

$399,000

LAKEWOOD CAFE/LOUNGE on a busy intersection, $71,000 CASH. ice

pr reduced

CALL RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 11, 2014

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You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


Twa 4 11 14 p01