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FREE s Friday, April 4, 2014

SPECIAL SECTION INSIDE!

A7

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WHAT’S RIGHT ųWITH TACOMA

;OL3\JR`>VTHU»Z .\PKL[V)YLHZ[ *HUJLY!*OLTPJHS >HYMHYL*HSLUKHY ,KP[PVU By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF DAFFODIL FESTIVAL

-36>,9.093: After participating in over 6,000 hours of community service, and making 250 public appearances throughout Pierce County, the Daffodil Queen and her court of princesses are ready for the big parade day. By Savannah Fry

2014 Daffodil Festival Princesses. When asked what she is most excited for about Parade Day, Princess Lydia Mangan, from Henry Foss High School, responded, “Everything!” What in particular has her so enthusiastic? “Seeing everyone who came to watch... Not everyone likes to sit out in the cold… but a crowd that does so, and is happy about it, will definitely make my day!” Princess Delaney Fry, from Stadium High School, is looking forward to seeing some familiar faces along the parade routes, as well. “On parade day, I’m most excited to see my family out in the crowds. They’ve been so supportive of me throughout this entire process, and having them out there, cheering me on as I’m on top of the world, is just

Correspondent

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s April begins and daffodils are seen growing in abundance, Pierce County is reminded that it is once again time to celebrate its unique agricultural heritage with the 81st Annual Daffodil Grand Floral Parade taking place Saturday, April 5. More than 150 participating organization and their floats, cars, motorcycles, and more will wind through the four Pierce County cities of Tacoma, Puyallup, Sumner, and Orting, just as they have been for over the past 80 years. And, similar to years past, it seems like no one is quite as excited for Parade Day as the 25 young women serving their year as

going to be the icing on the cake.” Same goes for Princess Nina Thach, from Mt. Tahoma High School, who knows how invested her community is the parade, regardless of the inclement that sometimes coincides with the event. “This parade is going to be big! A lot of my friends and family, and supporters from Mount Tahoma, will be coming whether it’s rain or shine.” In fact, the often unpredictable weather seems to be a recurring theme in what the princesses are least worried about. It’s the crowds – those fans of the festival that can be found throughout Pierce County – that matter the most. “I am so excited to see all the smiling

X See DAFFODIL / page A12

Keep a chemo calendar, my husband told me. Log your treatments, he said, and every day, note how you feel. That way, he said, we’ll get the pattern of how the drugs hit my body. We’ll be able to predict how I’ll feel. We’ll have a sense of what I can eat, when I have the energy to write, and when we can try a walk. It’s the best advice anyone has given me since I started on chemotherapy in February. Naturally, I did not follow it. I was a doof, and I regret not bothering to build what could have been one of the most valuable tools in managing my response to the effects of chemo. I did not recognize that chemo would shift my status with my own body from owner to observer, and that I would need every bit of predictive data I could muster. Welcome to “The Lucky Woman’s Guide to Breast Cancer, Chemical Warfare Calendar Edition.” Chemotherapy, as every nurse, doctor and pharmacist who gets the drugs into us will tell you, is always improving. So are the drugs that mitigate its effect on us. But the basic tactic remains the same: It goes after greedy, fast-dividing

X See CANCER / page A12

;5;(+=,9;0:05. )<5+3,:*65;05<, ;60929,:0+,5;: By Steve Dunkelberger

SISTER CITIES MEET

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

:;(+0<4/0./:*/663:0.5:,?*/(5., (.9,,4,5;>0;/1(7(5,:,/0./:*/663 By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

Students from Stadium High School got a look into Eastern culture when they welcomed a contingent of Japanese students from Tacoma’s sister city Kitakyushu, Japan to celebrate a new contract for exchange programs between Stadium and Kitakyushu High School. The contract signing was held at the Hampton Hotel in Lakewood on March 27 and was a celebration of both American and Japanese culture, with host families exchanging gifts with their Japanese exchange students who had visited for the past week. The delegates were sent off with a swirl of cultural fusion, a mix of pizza and sushi serving as dinner for the event. The contract stating that exchange programs would take place was signed by Stadium Principal Kevin Ikeda and Kitakyushu Kocho Sensei Kobayashi. “I think the foreign exchange programs are important for our students because of the nature of the global economy and the kids are not only going to be facing competition within the state, within the classrooms, but globally and we see that in even the high end fields. We see it in electricians, engineers, entrepreneurs and researchers,” Ikeda said. “When other countries are supplying cheaper labor with higher skill, we’re in a different business operation environment, so knowledge and understanding of that is critical. Understanding cultural differences when in business, the only way to do that is to learn someone’s culture and understand that.”

PHOTOS BY TERRY SPUCK

Principal Ikeda (right) and Kocho Sensei Kobayashi came together to make the exchange program between schools official.

The set-up will bring Kitakyushu students to Tacoma one year, and Tacoma students to Kitakyushu the next. The amount of time the students spend in the sister city will vary depending on available scheduling and finances.

X See SISTER / page A10 HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE

3PUKX\PZ[ *HTWHPNU 2PJRVMM A2 WASHINGTON’S MOST WANTED: Who killed Tacoma father of five in 1994? PAGE A3

9VSSLY +LYI` A7

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) This may be a fast-past week, full of change. You may feel that you have had enough, but know that there are reasons for these changes that will come to light in the next few weeks. Avoid hasty decisions for the sake of liberation. Daily tasks help to keep you grounded. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) Those restless feelings inside of you are trying to tell you something. Something may happen soon that affects relationships in the next coming weeks. The universe may be hinting that this may be the end of the outdated that no longer serves you. Find answers to the obvious. GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) A creative project may take you to places you have never been before. Your energy is high and ready to take on the upcoming changes. Your inner strength relies on balance so stay in touch with your daily routine. Venus in your home zone brings peace. CANCER (June 21 – July 22) Career matters may bring unexpected changes this week. You may feel like you want to take matters in your own hands and fed up with others’ lack of follow through. Be respectful of tender feelings and take baby steps. LEO (July 23 – August 22) Create a compromise from your feelings to expand your horizons and keeping in touch with tedious responsibilities. Take some time and not hurry things. Change is coming but in its own time. Explore your potential. VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Financial issues are on your mind this week as you wait for answers on a loan or project. Tread with care and don’t overextend yourself. Stress and anxiety can burn out our inner batteries. Research your options.

Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Have that important conversation this week with that person that needs to hear your side of the story. You may feel feisty and not in the mood to compromise. Once you give in you will realize that it was for the best. It’s all about the little things. SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) Worry and stress can weigh us down at times. Relax tensions with daily exercise, meditation and yoga. Your mood will be lifted as you immerse yourself in routine. Write down your thoughts and feelings in a journal or notebook. Smiling is contagious.

WORD SEARCH E R H B A C J I E N J D A R J U X

K Y L S N A K E L A K E Z M R I D

A S N Q C H A R T E R Y N M V U L

H D M B M N F X E T A G L O H X J

S R N U C L E A R C O W B O Y Z M

E O G O O Z S T A B L E S Z I W Y

K C T C I R T S I D Y R E W E R B

A E T X R E G R E B L E K N U D M

H R M G R B W P R K M L V Z O H O

S D T E L P A N T A G E S E T T V

E L H S P U Y A L L U P R I V E R

K O U Q R U J O G Y W A Z S R Q D

A G E D A F R I T M O G T H B O P

H T K F F R E I G H T H O U S E M

S F Q B N O X N Q S F G X J M X Q

D H J S T A C O M A D O M E W R L

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) Routines and responsibilities take center stage this week. You may come up with a brilliant idea that makes your life easier. Love and relationships bring surprises, so expect the unexpected. Stay in touch with those around you.

Work may be full of interruptions so you may benefit from having a backup plan. You plan meetings and make your deadlines with determination. Take some time to enjoy outdoor activities. Smell the fresh spring air. AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) Tensions may escalate this week making you feel like taking action. Release your inner stresses to help you make the appropriate decisions. Meditation or yoga may help to relieve anxiety. Find out what’s best for you. PISCES (February 19 – March 20) Financial decisions will be highlighted this week. You can no longer escape the unavoidable. Spending more won’t make it better. Come up with a plan of action to accomplish your goals and relieve the stress. As Venus enters your sign you will find more inner peace and have a better outlook.

ANAGRAM

NUCLEAR COWBOYZ

F S B C U L T U R E C O R N E R U

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The News Tribune’s practice of delivering bundles of advertisements in clear and pink bags throughout selected zip codes around Tacoma has moved to include suburban areas, prompting another round of complaints about the bundles collecting on streets, sidewalks and around empty houses. Jim Emley first spotted the advertisements outside his University Place home in late February. He said he called TNT Publisher David Zeeck to get placed on the “opt out” list so that the bundles wouldn’t litter his lawn and announce to burglars that he wasn’t home. “Usually when the publisher of a newspaper wants something, things got done,” Emley said. The delivery of bundles continued. Emley said he has made eight different calls and emails requesting the end of the bundles appearing on his lawn, but the bagged advertisements continued to be tossed in his yard every week since. “Every weekend, there it is again,” Emley said. “Systematically, they can’t control it. They are destined to fail. I like David Zeeck. I really do. I’ll give a guy like that X See TNT / page A10

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Sports ........................A7 Make A Scene ........B5 A&E ....................... ....B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Two Sections | 22 Pages


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Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;pothole initiative.â&#x20AC;? And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holeyness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or return â&#x20AC;&#x201C; each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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The 2013-2014 Season

See the USA April 19, 2014 Saturday s 7:30 PM Pantages Theater

Join us for a musical trip across the country the music of America by American composers Erin Guinup soprano soloist

Bulletin Board /,37-<5+4(90;04,796.9(4-69:7,*0(35,,+:20+: The Tacoma Youth Maritime Academy is a maritime program for special needs children and young adults in Tacoma. The program needs funding to restore and modify the academyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flagship, the USS Defiance â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a 72-foot retired U.S. Navy boat. She is in need of repairs, new paint and accommodations for children with special needs, and disabilities. To help raise money, Tacoma Youth Maritime Academy has set up a page at www.gofundme.com. The academy is in need of community support and volunteers to help bring the USS Defiance to the condition she needs to be in to serve kids. To donate, go to http://www.gofundme. com/7xstjs. For more information on the Tacoma Youth Maritime Academy, visit www.sailondefiance.com. ),:;:,3305.(<;/69*6405.;6;(*64( Journalist and best-selling author Max Blumenthal is coming to Tacoma on Monday evening, April 7 to talk about â&#x20AC;&#x153;Israel Today, Unadorned & Unsanitized.â&#x20AC;? Sponsored by the Tacoma chapter of Jewish Voice for Peace, he will be speaking at 7 p.m. at Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave., Tacoma WA 98402. Blumenthalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s writings have appeared in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, The Daily Beast, The Guardian, the Huffington Post and many other publications. His 2009 book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Republican Gomorrah: Inside The Movement That Shattered The Party,â&#x20AC;? is a New York Times and Los Angeles Times bestseller. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goliath: Life and Loathing in Greater Israelâ&#x20AC;? is his current book. In the preface, he wrote that it is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Americansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tax dollars and political support that are crucial in sustaining the present state of affairsâ&#x20AC;? in Israel and that, in the book, he wanted to show what that money is paying for and to present the facts, using the same journalistic methods used in his previous book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Republican Gomorrah.â&#x20AC;? Blumenthal says that pro-Israel zealots arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t happy with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goliath.â&#x20AC;? Jewish Voice for Peace invites you to come and hear what this is all about. For additional information, write to Tacoma@JewishVoiceforPeace.org or visit www.JewishVoiceforPeace.org. :/(9,@6<90+,(:-69)96>5:7605;30./;/6<:,7(92 A public meeting will be held April 15 at 6 p.m. to discuss the Browns Point Lighthouse Park. MetroParks Tacoma wants to know your ideas about parking options, accessibility improvements and general park enhancements. The meeting will be held at the St. Matthew Episcopal Church Parish Hall, 6800 Eastside Dr. NE. Get more info at www.metroparkstacoma.org/browns-point-lighthousepark. Questions? Call Roger Stanton at (253) 305-1082 or e-mail rogers@tacomaparks.com. 7<)30*057<;5,,+,+65:;694>(;,9+6*<4,5;: The City of Tacoma is inviting interested members of the public and construction and development professions to attend a technical workshop on proposed changes to Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Stormwater Management Manual, Public Works Design Manual and the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s municipal code from 4-6 p.m.

Thursday, April 10. At the workshop, Environmental Services staff will take comments and present an overview of draft changes to the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Stormwater Management Manual. The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Stormwater Management Manual outlines mitigation measures for new and re-development projects. Many of the proposed changes are designed to encourage low impact development, a stormwater and land use management strategy to minimize impervious surfaces, retain natural plants and decrease stormwater runoff. Staff will also discuss their process for updating the Tacoma Municipal Code to encourage low impact development, including changes to the Public Works Design Manual. The Public Works Design Manual, last updated in 2004, regulates: street design, wastewater and stormwater systems design, street lighting, traffic signals, channelization, pavement markings and planning and design elements. The updates are a requirement of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Municipal Stormwater Permit, which is regulated by the Washington State Department of Ecology under the Clean Water Act. The full Stormwater Management Manual is available at cityoftacoma.org/stormwatermanual. Environmental Services is hosting the free workshop at the award-winning Center for Urban Waters, 326 E. D St. RSVP to the workshop or submit public comments in writing by April 18, 2014 to swmupdates@cityoftacoma.org.

;(*64(4(33;6/6:;,(:;,9,=,5;-69*/03+9,5 >0;/:7,*0(35,,+: Tacoma Mall has announced the return of its Caring Bunny Photo Experience. The event is intended to offer families of children with special needs a subdued environment to participate in the Bunny Photo Experience. Caring Bunny will take place Sunday, April 13, from 9-10:30 a.m. in Tacoma Mallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s JCPenney Court. Pre-registration is required and can be completed at www.tacomamallcaringbunny. eventbrite.com. Many steps will be taken to reduce sensory triggers at the Caring Bunny event, creating a more comforting environment for childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cherished visit with the Bunny. The subdued environment is likely to include (specific elements or aesthetics may vary): ¡ Turning off in-mall music, stopping escalators located near the photo set, dimming the lights and shutting down fountains for the duration of the event. ¡ Eliminating queue lines through the use of a numbering system whereby guests approach the set when their number is called. ¡ Special activities geared toward the needs of the child during the â&#x20AC;&#x153;waitâ&#x20AC;? period to help the child understand what activities will occur during the visit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re so thrilled to offer Tacoma Mall as a location for this unique experience during this time of year,â&#x20AC;? said Director of Marketing and Business Development Sarah Bonds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We look forward to welcoming local families to be a part of Caring Bunny.â&#x20AC;? Caring Bunny has been developed by Simon Property Group and is guided by AbilityPath.org, a national online resource hub and special needs community. Over 80 Simon properties will host the Caring Bunny this season.

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ierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist will formally announce his bid for re-election on April 4, Friday, 6 p.m., at the Landmark Temple Theatre in Tacoma. Governor Jay Inslee, Sheriff Paul Pastor, Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland, and Detective Ed Troyer, Executive Director of Crime Stoppers, will be the featured speakers for the campaign kickoff. Everyone is invited to the festivities at 47 St. Helens Avenue. Musical guests include Peter Buck of R.E.M., actress and singer Molly Ringwald, and The Beatniks. Governor Inslee is expected to speak at 6:45 p.m. PHOTO BY BLAKE KREMER People are encouraged to arrive early. The 1(4405Âť-691<:;0*, Pierce County Prosecutor Mark suggested donation for the fundraiser is $50. Lindquist (holding guitar) really knows how to throw a reâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Under Markâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leadership, the Pierce election kickoff party like he did in 2010 with Pierce County County Prosecutorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office has earned a Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Detective Ed Troyer (next to Lindquist) and The state-wide reputation for vigorous prosecu- Beatniks to their left. tion, public service and professionalism,â&#x20AC;? and I greatly appreciate the privilege of serving our said Troyer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This will be a great event to support our diverse community.â&#x20AC;? Prosecutor.â&#x20AC;? As Prosecutor, Lindquist formed a Gang Unit, which The former Chief Criminal Deputy, Lindquist was has successfully prosecuted hundreds of violent gang appointed as Pierce County Prosecutor in a bipartisan members and associates, reducing gang violence in Pierce and unanimous vote of the County Council in 2009. He County by over 50 percent. He also began the Elder Fraud was elected in a landslide in 2010, winning with over 61 Unit that focuses on aggressively prosecuting offenders percent of the vote. who victimize our most vulnerable citizens. Announcing for his second term, Lindquist said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Shortly after Lindquist was appointed, the Prosecutorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s honored to lead an office of dedicated public servants Office filed charges against those who assisted Maurice who are committed to pursuing justice. I love this job, Clemmons in one of the worst crimes in our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history. Clemmons ambushed and murdered four Lakewood Police Officers. After a massive manhunt, a Seattle Police Officer killed Clemmons. Lindquist vowed to hold all those who assisted Clemmons accountable. Six went to prison, including getaway driver Dorcus Allen, who was 1602 Tacoma Ave S convicted of four counts of murder as an accomplice and Tacoma, WA 98402 was sentenced to 420 years. 253-503-0945 More recently, Lindquist and Deputy Prosecutor Phil Hours: Sorensen tried Tyler Savage for the murder and rape of Mon.-Fri. 6am-7pm Special Olympian Kimmie Daily. Savage was convicted Sat. 9am-5pm Dawg Town: as charged and sentenced to life in prison. Â&#x2021;DOG TRAINING BY OUR CERTIFIED In addition to vigorous criminal prosecution, the ProsDOG TRAINERS ecutorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office has a reputation for strong stands against baseless lawsuits, protecting taxpayer money, accessibilÂ&#x2021;PROFESSIONAL DOG GROOMING ity and professionalism. Â&#x2021;10,000 SQ FT DOG DAYCARE Lindquist serves on the Foundation Board for Tacoma Â&#x2021;DELUXE DOG BOARDING Community College, is a member of Rotary 8, and is a Boarding (on 2 days or more) Group Dog Training Specials: nationally-acclaimed author. His books have been bestsellers and published in several languages. He also writes book reviews for the Seattle Times and a column for the local Bar News. As our Prosecutor, he speaks to community groups With coupon. Not valid with any other offers or throughout the county and welcomes invitations. discounts. One coupon per customer. Expires 8/1/14. Lindquist lives in Tacoma with his wife Chelsea and their daughter.

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MURDER MYSTERY: WHO KILLED TACOMA FATHER OF FIVE IN 1994? By David Rose Correspondent

Tacoma Cold Case Detective Gene Miller is determined to find out who killed a father of five in south Tacoma 20 years DAVID ROSE ago. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s processing evidence in the murder of 53-year-old Bonny Brooks. Brooks was shot and stabbed in his home on Sept. 12, 1994. Detective Miller told Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wantedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cold Case Correspondent Parella Lewis that there was no sign of forced entry, but money and possibly a firearm

were stolen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My hope is that the person or persons responsible for this, based upon the injuries sustained by the victim, would quite likely have had not only the personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s property but potentially the personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blood on their person,â&#x20AC;? Miller said. He also believes there are people who know who killed Brooks who havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come forward. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The victim was last seen alive by his wife and two step children when they left around 5:30 in the morning.â&#x20AC;? Brooks was scheduled to see a doctor at 8 a.m. for a back injury but never left his home. His oldest daughter Isabelle Hommel remembers her father as an avid outdoorsman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We used to go camping every single week-

end â&#x20AC;&#x201C; winter, spring, summer, fall,â&#x20AC;? said Hommel. She said her father taught her how to fish and was involved with all of the kids. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He coached basketball, my brotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer, and my sisterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they were doing gymnastics,â&#x20AC;? Hommel said. Brooksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; family believes it will probably take someone coming forward with information to give answers theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been seeking for almost two decades. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If anyone could think back on that time, if they lived in that area and remember, maybe they heard someone talking about something and has any information. We would

greatly appreciate it so that we can move on with the story that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s solved,â&#x20AC;? Hommel said. If you know anything about this crime, you are asked to call Crime Stoppers of Tacoma-Pierce County anonymously at 1-800222-tips.

PROSPERITY SLOWLY BREWING IN DISTRICT with the city stating the goal of selling properties to â&#x20AC;&#x153;catalyze the revitalization of the Brewery District and South Downtown.â&#x20AC;? AmmGen principal John Lewis had floated plans for the area in 2009, in response to those recommendations, but those plans went nowhere. They have now grown to three properties, with PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER the addition of two PJ Hummel and Co.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event and dĂŠcor facility is looking to partners: PJ Hummove to the Brewery District as a way to host events and mel and Denny be home to a farmers market in the area, along with two Anderson, to repother developers known as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brew Crew.â&#x20AC;? resent housing, business and comBy Steve Dunkelberger munity amenities stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com like a farmers market and restaurants. The total market value of the master-planned It has been more than five years since deal is about $100 million. That is, if their taxpayer dollars funded a consultant to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brew Crewâ&#x20AC;? bid for the property gets city develop a roster of recommendations to approval. boost Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s downtown. Key to those The review on their Request for Proposrecommendations was creating a vibrant als is set for April 22, but that is a soft date hub of student and commerce activity in the as the process has been revised and delayed cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s slumbering Brewery District by movfour times since the initial deadline last ing the city operations from the area and November. open the building up for commercial use. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are giving them exactly what they Not much has happened since then even

want,â&#x20AC;? Anderson said of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s requests and stated economic development goals. The self-called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brew Crewâ&#x20AC;? wants to buy the city-owned maintenance facility at 2308 Holgate, a Public Works facility at 2304 C St., which started out as the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s horse stables 100 years ago, and an underused storage facility at 2335 Jefferson. Hummel would move her event and dĂŠcor company to the Holgate site for storage of her banquet supplies and ornaments that would also allow for part of the building to be event space. Purchase and renovation costs have been set at about $765,000 plus renovation costs. The large bay doors could also provide for farmers market options under her plans to offer self-contained and movable vendor booths. Anderson, of Real Estate Investment Services, would buy the former horse stable facility with plans to renovate the building for restaurants and brewing operations for brew pubs at a cost of about $600,000. Lewis, of real estate development company AmmGen, would purchase the Jefferson site for $810,000 and build a $38 million, multi-family residential complex offering 250 units. The three sites would create a central plaza for a 24-hour market space in common areas and be located along the Prairie Line Trail near the University of Washington-Tacoma campus. While each of the investors would handle the financing of their own property

Some criminals think that wishing hard enough may keep them out of trouble Tacoma interested in with the law.Weekly A womaniswas arrested for what is happening in our on community. hindering a police officer March 24 Please send your news and story ideas at a Puget Sound Avenue residence when to news@tacomaweekly.com. she decided to ignore his commands during a fight with her boyfriend. However, she eventually decided, quite simply, that she was in fact not under arrest. As she was read her rights, she kept insisting she was not under arrest, and demanded to be released immediately. As she was being transported to Fife Jail, she asked if the arresting officer could text her work place and tell them she was taking a sick day, as she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want them to know she was in jail. The officer politely refused. When she finally made it to the jail, she refused to cooperate further, claiming that since she was already under arrest, what could they really do to her? Immediately after this, she demanded release once again. Despite what the suspect believed, she was booked into Fife Jail. A man pulled over at Sixth Avenue on March 24 also decided that the refusal route was the way to go. After being pulled over for swerving across lanes, the man staunchly refused to admit he had been drinking, despite a heavy odor of alcohol. The man continued his staunch streak by refusing to submit to voluntary alcohol tests. He was then placed under arrest for DUI, but refused to acknowledge his Miranda Rights. After being transported to Fife jail, the man contacted a lawyer (his father) and stated that he would only acknowledge his Miranda Rights if they were read to him three times. After the arresting officer finished reading the rights three times, the man once again refused to acknowledge them. Despite his antics, the man was booked into Fife jail. Compiled by Derek Shuck

X See BREWERY / page A10

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  Tacoma Police detectives need your help to identify the suspects responsible for a high-dollar credit card fraud. On March 6th, 2014, the pictured suspects used a cloned credit card multiple times to fraudulently purchase over $25,000 in Target gift cards. The purchases were made at a Target store located on S. Meridian in the City of Puyallup, a Target store on S. Commons in the City of Federal Way, and at a Target store on 156th St. E. in South Hill. The suspects appear to be two asian males in their late 20â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or early 30â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Fridays at 10:30pm on

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The Puyallup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s donation of $200,000 to Northwest Harvest will help keep food on the table for countless struggling families.

Considered among the most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians has grown to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its own membership but sharing its wealth among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County, with a payroll of more than 3,300 people

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 74 percent of whom are non-Native. Working in the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities, these employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits. In 2012, the Tribe spent over $445 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more. Even during the recession, the Tribe increased employment and funded substantial vendor purchases and construction projects,

keeping many businesses afloat and people employed. As the country continues to recover from past economic woes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians leads the way locally. From sponsoring dozens of local charities, nonprofit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer or cease to exist, to protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and health care, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its well-deserved reputation as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the generous people,â&#x20AC;? a reflection of the meaning of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very name.

' %$)()%"&"%"&%&"$' ) (. '%# $)*$'-)%(*&&%') $)')( ' !&(%##*$ ) (()'%$ During the 2013 fiscal year, the Puyallup Tribe contributed more than $2 million from its charity and general funds into the local community with donations to various charities and organizations such as hospitals, healthcare and medical research, schools, food banks, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s literacy programs, education, job trainingâ&#x20AC;Śthe list goes on. In 2013 alone the Tribe provided much needed funds to more than 130 of these charities reaching north to Seattle and southward to Tacoma and beyond. Staying true to its tradition as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;generous people,â&#x20AC;? the Puyallups donated $200,000 each to two key area food distributors in December 2013 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Food Lifeline and Northwest Harvest â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which feed thousands of families in need during the holidays and throughout the year. Food Lifeline provides food to 275 members of the non-profitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program network throughout Western Washington that encompasses food banks, food pantries, hot meal programs, shelters and after-school programs. Northwest Harvest is Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s statewide hunger relief agency comprised of more than 360 food banks, meal programs and high-need schools as unique as the communities they serve. In Tacoma, St. Leo Food Connection received $90,000 from the Tribe in 2013. Director Kevin Glackin-Coley said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The support from the Puyallup Tribe is an essential component in our ability to fight hunger in our community. Their funding has helped us provide healthy, nutritious food at our St. Leo Food Bank as well as provide, throughout the school year, weekend food for kids who otherwise would go hungry all weekend.â&#x20AC;? During 2013, the Tribe donated $80,000 in funds to FISH Food Banks of Pierce County, which serves over half a million clients with more than 6 million pounds of food in the course of a year. And just in time for the holiday season, in December 2013 the Tribe gifted $50,000 to the Puyallup Food Bank. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s such a great feeling to be able to take care of those in need,â&#x20AC;? said Tribal Councilmember David Bean. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As Indian people, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re taught to take care of our land and community, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wonderful

From left to right: Don Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil (of KIRO 97.3 FMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ron & Don Showâ&#x20AC;?), Puyallup Tribal Councilmember David Bean, Emerald Queen Casino General Manager Frank Wright, Libby Denkman (producer of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ron & Don Showâ&#x20AC;?) and Ron Upshaw (of KIRO 97.3 -4ÂťZ¸;OL9VU +VU:OV^šOLSWLKWYLZLU[[OLJOLJR[V;V`ZMVY;V[ZHUK*YPTL:[VWWLYZVMĂ&#x201E;JPHSZ

to be in the position to be able to make contributions to help others.â&#x20AC;? In other areas of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s giving, public safety has long been a concern of the Puyallup Tribe, which actively works to help ensure safe and sound communities by providing funds to organizations like Law Enforcement Youth Camp, Violent Crime Victim Services, Northwest Gang Investigators Association and Behind the Badge. In December 2012 and 2013, Tribal representatives presented Toys For Tots/ Crime Stoppers organizers with checks for $250,000, for a total contribution of $500,000. The Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2013 donation came just in time, says Pierce County Detective Ed Troyer. Thanks to the Puyallup Tribe, the gift blessed 25,000 children with 52,180 toys. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Without the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s donation and the monetary ability to go out and

buy toys so close to Christmas, many kids would have gone without Christmas gifts this year,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were short â&#x20AC;&#x201C; we had zero in the distribution box for infants, 2-year-olds and kids 9, 10 and 11. We were able to go out and purchase those gifts and get them to distribution sites so kids would have something under the tree.â&#x20AC;? Children, seniors and veterans alike all benefit from the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sense of community, with contributions in 2013 going to organizations such as Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alliance, Boys & Girls Clubs of South Puget Sound, Tacoma Lutheran Retirement Community and Bonney Lake Senior Center, National Association for Black Veterans and the 9th and 10th Horse Cavalry Buffalo Soldiers, among others. Harriett Williams, Community Advocate for the Boys & Girls Clubs of South Puget Sound, said the organization

is grateful for the Puyallup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gift of $10,000 to support the Project Learn Program at the Al Davies Branch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With the generous donation, we are able to serve additional members and extend a childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s learning beyond the classroom, by offering homework help, tutoring and academic enrichment activities.â&#x20AC;? Working to preserve and support the arts and culture, Tacoma Art Museum, Gig Harbor Film Festival, Wisdom of the Elders, Inc., Museum of Northwest Art, Steilacoom Tribal Museum Cultural Center and more benefitted from the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s charitable giving in 2013. Even our furry, four-legged companions come under the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s watchful eye. In 2013, the Tribe gave generously to the Humane Society for Tacoma and Pierce County and South Sound Critter Care.

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BRIDEGROOM

          

    A Film by Linda Bloodworth Thomason

BRIDEGROOM A LoveStory. Story. Unequaled. A Love Unequaled.

  

   



   

Senior Special

PHOTOS BY KATIE BAUMANN

9(05,+6<; PLU filmmakers Kortney Scroger (left) and Haley Huntington, seen here in St. Louis conducting interviews aboard a Mississippi River repair vessel, are members of a team that spent 18 months researching and producing a new documentary titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tapped Out,â&#x20AC;? which explores global threats to water. By Amanda Brasgalla Special to the Weekly

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our Pacific Lutheran University students who spent more than a year investigating water problems around the world will premiere a new documentary film in the South Sound this week titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tapped Out: Unearthing the Global Water Crisis.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tapped Outâ&#x20AC;? focuses on waterrelated issues in the U.S., Canada and elsewhere. Specifically, the research team traveled across North America â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from the Puget Sound Region to the Rocky Mountains, Texas, the Gulf of Mexico, the East Coast and the Great Lakes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to study areas adversely affected by drought, population growth and questionable management practices. Kortney Scroger, a PLU senior communication major who served as the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chief videographer and editor, said while the news media almost exclusively report about water scarcity in developing parts of the world, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tapped Outâ&#x20AC;? uncovers serious water challenges right here in North America. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an attempt to communicate the current status of water and how the developed nations arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as prepared as we think that they are,â&#x20AC;? Scroger said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have as much water as we think we do.â&#x20AC;?

Scroger, along with senior communication major Katherine Baumann, senior business major Haley Huntington and junior Valery Jorgensen, a communication major, researched waterrelated topics for more than a year. The women are all members of MediaLab at PLU, a multimedia applied research program that produces documentaries and other media content. The organization has been nationally recognized for many of its productions, four of which have received Emmy Award nominations over the last six years, including one Emmy win in 2009. Most recently, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tapped Outâ&#x20AC;? received a 2014 grand prize award from the National Broadcasting Society. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tapped Outâ&#x20AC;? team spent much of 2013 traveling more than 10,000 miles across the U.S. and Canada to produce the film. To learn about the current state of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oceans, rivers, lakes, glaciers and aquifers, the team conducted dozens of interviews with geologists, hydrologists, officials from the United Nations, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, business leaders, representatives of environmental organizations, average citizens and many others. Their travels also took them to places that are hard to believe exist in resource-rich North America. For example, the filmmakers

+9@:7,33 Filmmakers from Pacific Lutheran University traveled to the U.S. Gulf Coast earlier this year to conduct interviews pertaining to threatened water resources in North America and elsewhere. 0ICTURED ABOVE LEFT TO RIGHT ARE FILMMAKER +ORTNEY 3CROGER WETlands specialist Andrew Barron and Haley Huntington, one of the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s producers.

/6/56 MediaLab researchers from Pacific Lutheran University

traveled to the U.S. Gulf Coast earlier this year to conduct interviews about threats to North Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s waterways. Pictured, left to right, are filmmaker Kortney Scroger, environmental activist Matt Rota of the Gulf Restoration Network and Haley Huntington, one of the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s producers.

visited Spicewood, a community of roughly 7,000 people in north central Texas about an hour outside of Austin, the state capital. About two years ago, local wells in Spicewood went dry after a prolonged drought. Since then, water has been trucked into the community four times each day to supply the town with water. Inhabitants now live under severe water use restrictions. Residents say, for instance, they no longer take daily showers. Activities such as watering lawns or washing cars are strictly prohibited. And they are urged by the local water authority to flush toilets â&#x20AC;&#x153;only when necessary.â&#x20AC;? Karen Bruett, a resident who has lived with her husband in Spicewood for much of the last decade, said she is resigned to the situation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If I could do a rain dance and make it rain tomorrow, I would,â&#x20AC;? Bruett said. Until then, â&#x20AC;&#x153;we pray for rain.â&#x20AC;? Haley Huntington, who served as senior producer on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tapped Out,â&#x20AC;? said meeting Bruett and others underscored for her that the U.S. is not immune to hardships or resource challenges. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s amazing. They have no water,â&#x20AC;? Huntington said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really hard to wrap your mind around someone not having water.â&#x20AC;? Among their many stops, team members also visited St. Louis and other communities in southern Illinois where record-low water levels along the Lower Mississippi River threatened to shut the waterway to all commercial shipping and barge traffic. In addition, the filmmakers visited Northern Colorado, where water demands from growing cities, industrial users and nearby farmlands are causing tensions to run high. Others interviewed for the film included global water expert and author Maude Barlow. A Canadian who is in constant demand on the worldwide lecture circuit as a guest speaker and water issues consultant, Barlow is cofounder of the Blue Planet Project and serves as National Chairwoman of the Council of Canadians. Population growth, pollution, climate change and incorrect public assumptions and attitudes all represent threats to water resources around the world, according to Barlow. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one thing to know about water,â&#x20AC;? said Barlow, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is that the lesson you learned in grade six, that you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t run out of it, that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s there forever, is wrong.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tapped Outâ&#x20AC;? premieres at 6 p.m., Thursday, April 10, in the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts Studio Theatre on the campus of PLU. More information about the film can be found at: www.tappedoutdoc. weebly.com. Ultimately, the documentaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s objectives are to provide thought-provoking information and increase overall public awareness, said Huntington. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just so blessed with all of this rain that we getâ&#x20AC;? in the Pacific Northwest, Huntington said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are people in Texas and other parts of the world that would die for the amount of rain we have.â&#x20AC;? Amanda Brasgalla is a freelance writer based in Parkland, and a member of MediaLab at Pacific Lutheran University. She can be reached at brasgaal@plu.edu.

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The story â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tommy Castro brings new band The Painkillers to Tacoma, Seattleâ&#x20AC;? (Tacoma Weekly, March 28) should have identified Tommy Castro and the Painkillers keyboard player as James Pace. The band will headline Jazzbones on April 4.

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Local Restaurant Spotlight EDISON CITY DINER TAKES CUSTOMERS BACK IN TIME

This is real chicken fried steak,â&#x20AC;? Susee said. The diner also offers homemade corned beef hash, with three eggs of any style and a choice of toast or a biscuit for $12.95. For lunch, Edison City offers a unique chili burger, a burger served open-face and smothered in house made chili, topped with diced onions and Tilamook cheddar cheese for $ 11.25. For a lighter affair, sandwiches are also available, for example, the Clubhouse, three layers of toasted bread spread with mayo and piled high with lettuce, cheddar, Monterrey jack cheese, ham, turkey bacon and tomatoes for $10.95 All of these menu items are made from scratch, with fresh ingredients right in the restaurant. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cut corners,â&#x20AC;? Susee said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I crack eggs, I use fresh butter, fresh milk and all that stuff makes a huge difference.â&#x20AC;? Edison City Diner is open on Tuesday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays for breakfast only from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. The diner can be contacted at (253) 473-1517.

By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

W

hile Edison City Diner, located at 5640 South Tacoma Way, may be themed like a 1940â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diner, the actual history of the restaurant reaches even further back. In 1909, when South Tacoma was known as Edison City, it served as a wagon wheel repair shop and was turned into an eat-in diner in 1917. Today, Edison City Diner is owned by Leian Susee, whose sweets and eats do the old school restaurant proud. While looking for a place to sell her freshly made desserts, she found the Edison City Diner location in 2012. The restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long history as a diner was too much to ignore. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was such a diner atmosphere that it just sung towards making it that,â&#x20AC;? Susee said. Edison City Diner offers various lunch and dinner menu items including chicken fried steak â&#x20AC;&#x201C; hand breadTHUNDERBIRD RESTAURANT ed and griddle fried TRADING POST INC. steak smothered 6725(Â&#x2021;/281*(Â&#x2021;&,*$5%$5 in delicious bacon :DOOHU5RDG(7DFRPD:$Â&#x2021;   gravy and served with three eggs of Buy 1 entree & 2 drinks and get the 2nd entree of equal any style and your or lesser value 1/2 OFF. Must have coupon to redeem. choice of potatoes Not valid with All You Can Eat menu items. Not valid with and toast or a bisany other offer. Must present coupon at time of order. cuit. Coupon void if altered. Expires 04/30/14. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s handmade.

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Sports

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 2014

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 7

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PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

:;90205. (Top) Mt. Tahoma’s Ian

Karanja was a danger to Decatur throughout the match. (Bottom) Vitaliy Dimov had several scoring opportunities for the Thunderbirds. By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO BY JUSTIN GIMSE

73(@)(33 The Rainiers unveiled two retro neon signs to welcome baseball fans at the 19th Street and Tyler Street entrances.

By Karen Westeen Correspondent

When the Rainiers play the opening series of their 55th season at Cheney Stadium vs. Albuquerque April 3-6, Tacoma baseball fans will find many new players to cheer for. But they won’t find some familiar names in the lineup. Pitchers Taiwan Walker and James Paxton, who were lights out for Tacoma at the end of the 2013 season, are now pitching in Seattle, while outfielder Abraham Almonte was in the Mariners’ line-up on Opening Night earlier this week. Before the season began, a new manager had already been brought in; no, make that two. John Stearns, who managed the team for all but 27 games in 2013, leading the Rainiers to a 59-58 record, was named Seattle’s third base coach earlier this spring, and Rich Donnelly was sent to Tacoma as manager. Then Stearns went on the DL after he had surgery to repair a hiatal hernia, and Donnelly replaced him in Seattle, while Roy Howell became Tacoma’s new skipper. Howell had been with the Mariners’ organization in 2012 and 2013 as the manager in single A High Desert. Former manager Daren Brown is serving this year as the Mariners’ roving Minor League bunting and baserunning coordinator. When he transferred to Seattle in 2013 after managing 27 games in Tacoma, Brown was the winningest manager in Tacoma franchise history, accumulating a record of 433-429 from 2007-2013. Last year Tacoma’s overall record was 76-68, two games out of first place in the Pacific Coast League’s Pacific Conference Northern Division As of opening day, Howell’s staff consists of pitching coach Jamie Navarro, and hitting coach Cory Snyder. Navarro held the same position here in 2010 before being promoted to bullpen coach in Seattle from 2011 to 2013. Snyder spent 2011-2013 as the hitting coach with Seattle’s Double A team in Jackson. Other members of the coaching staff include trainers Tom Newberg and B.J. Downie, and performance coach Gabe Bourland. The Rainiers who take the field Opening Night will be a combination of players from last year (15 in all) and five of the top 30 prospects in the Mariners’ farm system. If Nick Franklin, who played 102 games as a rookie in Seattle last year, will spend at least part of his third consecutive season in Tacoma, where he played in 39 games last year. If Chris Taylor, who was drafted in 2012, will make his Rainiers’ debut after being chosen Mariners Minor League Play of the Year in 2013 in Advanced Single A High Desert and Double A Jackson. Taylor is the organization’s ninth ranked prospect. Playing in a combined 122 games at High Desert, Jackson and Tacoma, first baseman Ji-Man Choi, the organization’s 25th ranked prospect, made his Tacoma debut at the end of the 2013 season, He batted .295 with 18 homeruns and 85 RBIs. OF James Jones, the 27th ranked prospect, also closed out 2013 with the Rainiers. Jones ranked fourth among Mariner minor leaguers with 28 steals. RHPs Carson Smith and Dominic Leone are ranked as the 14th and 22nd prospects in the Mariners’ farm system and

should make their Triple A debuts this year. Smith earned the organization’s Minor League Relief Pitcher of the Year in 44 appearances at Double A Jackson. Leone wound up the year with a 2.25 ERA in 48 appearances with Single A Clinton, High Desert and Double A Jackson. Also returning to Tacoma are infielders Jesus Montero, Ty Kelly, and Nate Tenbrink, along with pitchers Blake Beavan, Brandon Maurer, James Gillheeney and Chance Ruffin. The Rainiers bullpen will be bolstered by relievers Logan Bawcom, Nick Hill and Lucas Luetge. Bawcom’s 2.91 ERA in 51 appearances earned him Rainiers’ Pitcher of the Year for 2013. Former Major Leaguers Zach Miner and Ramon Ramirez are also expected to contribute to the Rainiers relief staff in their first year as players in the Mariners organization. Ten year MLB veteran Endy Chavez is expected to play his second consecutive season in Tacoma’s outfield alongside former Diamondbacks, Giants and Cubs player Cole Gillespie. Veteran catcher Humberto Quintero will share time behind the plate with Jesus Sucre, who made his Major League debut with the Mariners in 2013. The Rainiers open the season against the Albuquerque Isotopes April 3 to 6, followed by the El Paso Chihuahuas April 7-10. For this home stand, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday games begin at 7:05 p.m., with Monday and Tuesday games starting at 6:05 p.m. The game on Saturday, April 5, starts at 5:05 p.m. and on Sunday, April 6 the game has a 1:35 p.m. start. There will be fireworks following the games on April 3 and April 4. Tickets range from $7 (grass berm seats) to $25 (box seats). Reserved seat prices are: adult $13, children (14 and under), seniors (60 and over) and military $12. All general admission seating is on the grass berm located at the end of the right field line. Fans sitting there can bring blankets to sit on but are not allowed to bring in folding chairs or other seating. All Rainiers games can be heard on KHHO 850 AM radio. Mike Curto begins his 16th year as the team’s play-by-play announcer. Once again legendary sportscaster Bob Robertson will join Curto on the air for every Monday home game. Robertson was the radio voice of Tacoma baseball from 1984 to 1998. He did play-by-play for Washington State University football games from 1964 to 2013 and is still part of the broadcast team, helping do pre-and post-game and half-time coverage. Robertson has been named Washington State sports broadcaster of the year 12 times. In 2004, he won the Chris Schenkel Award, given by the National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame. So get out the Sharpies and oil the gloves. The 55th season of Triple A baseball in Tacoma is about to begin (and 20th as the Mariners’ Triple A franchise). With a great mix of new and experienced players it should be an amazing year for all involved. Even the Canadian geese will probably do an opening night fly-over to commemorate the occasion. One final note: fans might want to bring along umbrellas as the forecast calls for increasing showers, just as it did on the first Opening Night at Cheney Stadium in 1960. In fact that game was delayed for two days.

An errant Mount Tahoma handball in the box put Decatur’s Marco Bravo in position to put his team ahead 1-0 just ten minutes into the April 1 non-league match and the senior punched it into the back of the net at Mt Tahoma Stadium. For the next 70 minutes, Mt. Tahoma (1-3-1) controlled the ball, dictated the flow of the game and had several chances for an equalizer goal, let alone a handful more. Instead, the Thunderbirds were plagued by numerous offside calls, poorly struck kicks in front of the goal and a few headers that were almost good enough. The Gators (2-1) played a strong game, especially freshman goalkeeper Jose Barbosa, who saw nothing but Mt. Tahoma runs and corner kicks at the Decatur goal for most of the match. “The last couple of years I maybe wouldn’t have wanted to even schedule a game against Decatur because I might be afraid of what might happen,” said MT coach Scott Nelson. “So now I think it shows the advancement of the program. I can take guys off the bench and they still contribute. It’s not like we’ve got seven or eight players and everybody else is kind of making up the numbers. I’ve got a real squad here.” Thirty minutes into the match, Mt. Tahoma’s Shina Arborowa punched a near-perfect left-footed crossing pass from outside of the box that Vitaliy Dimov headed just a foot over the crossbar. “That header was a little too high. I tried to get it in there,” said Dimov. “I think we controlled this game and our other two losses, but we just didn’t finish the game.” Dimov and the Thunderbirds had numerous opportunities in the second half but were whistled for three offside penalties within the first five minutes that looked to be solid chances. Eleven minutes in, Anthony Garibaldi saw an uncontested 10-yard kick sail just right of the goal. It would be a trend for Mt. Tahoma the remainder of the half. While constantly pressuring and on the attack, the results were offside, wide-right, over the crossbar or wideleft. “If we play the same, control the game and just finish, we’ll start winning,” Dimov said. “We want to win league, but we’ve got to get some goals to get some wins.” Coach Nelson felt confident, following the game, that his squad was getting very close to turning the corner on the season and becoming a threat in the 3A Narrows League race. “You don’t get points for style or for the number of shots and possessions and things like that,” Nelson said. “You get points for goals in the net, and that’s the part we’ve got to work on. I feel like we’ve got the personnel to win games and do well enough to make the playoffs and that’s our goal. Next up we’ve got Wilson and that game’s for real.” Mt Tahoma hosts Wilson at 6:30 p.m. April 15.


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UPS senior sprinter Alicia Burns was awarded Northwest Conference Athlete of the Week honors after a busy weekend Saturday, March 29. Burns set a Peyton Scoring Meet record of 2:19.86 in the 800 meters and clocked a NWC qualifying mark of 1:00.02 in the 400-meter dash. She ran the third leg of the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4x400 meter relay that finished with the first sub-4:00 time for the Loggers since 1996 (3:59.17). Burns owns the fastest 800-meter time in NCAA Div-III this season at 2:14.94.

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Tejay van Garderen finished in an impressive third-place at the seven-stage, 727.7 mile Tour of Catalonia road bicycle race, which completed Sunday, March 30 in Catalonia, Spain. The 25-yearold Tacoma native is a member of the international BMC Racing Team. He finished seven seconds behind Spainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Joaquim Rodriguez and three seconds behind Spainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alberto Contador. Van Garderen was the mountainous fourth stage winner (103 miles) and is becoming a force to be reckoned with internationally. He recently finished second at the 568.9 mile Tour of Oman in February.

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Tacoma Community College is staking its claim as the team to beat in the 39-school Northwest Athletic Association of Community Colleges. The Titans have rattled off 10 straight victories since dropping its lone loss of the season at Walla Walla. Head coach Ryan Mummert recently notched his 100th win as the Titansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; skipper in a 5-3 win over Bellevue CC. Mummert is now 104-45 in his fourth year at TCC. Freshman Pitcher Justin Vernia has been lights-out on the mound so far this season, compiling a 4-0 record and a 0.36 earned run average with 24 strikeouts in 24.2 innings of work. The 6-1 righthander has walked just 5 batters and surrendered only 15 hits.

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The First Tee of South Puget Sound has been using the game of golf to help develop life skills for area youth since 2011. The program has expanded from two to eight golf courses and is open to boys and girls ages 7-17. Since its inception, First Tee has served over 9,500 youth throughout the South Puget Sound on the golf course and in the classroom. First Teeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s national school program is now in 35 Tacoma public schools and offers an avenue for all children, especially at-risk youth, to play the game of golf. Registration has begun for the six-week spring session, which begins April 28. Contact Program Director Ryan Kallenberger at (253) 777-7597 for more information and visit www.thefirstteesps.org.

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Former Stadium Tiger and Tacoma Tide midfielder Raphael Cox has signed with the Harrisburg (Penn.) Islanders of the USL Pro league. Cox was originally drafted by Real Salt Lake in the fourth-round of the 2009 MLS Super Draft and appeared in six games for Salt Lake before being released. Cox has since played for the Tacoma Tide of the USL Premier Developmental League and the Atlanta Silverbacks and Tampa Bay Rowdies of the North American Soccer League. Harrisburg plays in the USL Pro League, which is considered the third-tier of American Professional Soccer. A 2008 first-team PAC-10 selection as a Washington Husky, Cox continues his quest to return to the MLS.

OUT OF MY ELEMENT VOL. I: BRAZILIAN JIU JITSU Not quite the MMA I was expecting By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

I was excited and thought I was in for a Mixed Martial Arts overload. The question was how many flying knees, hammerfists and elbow strikes was going to be enough for me? The Revolution XXIV Tournament Internet advertisement had me prepared for an array of eight mats â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all with competitors squaring-off â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all at once. To be honest, I was fairly certain it was going to be too much for my senses. How on earth was I expected to pay attention to this much destructive action at one time? As is expected for this new â&#x20AC;&#x153;Out of My Elementâ&#x20AC;? series, I PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do much research on the -307705. Over 600 competitors ranging from age 4-49 spent the subject matter â&#x20AC;&#x201C; on purpose. Just day grappling at the Revolution XXIV Tournament at PLU. throw me in there and letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s see what happens. in front of me again. Eight mats of it. I walked into the packed gym at Pacific Lutheran I found myself a spot at the rail surrounding the University and immediately knew my hopes of a leg rings and gave it all my attention. The more I watched, sweep or flying crane kick from the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Karate Kidâ&#x20AC;? the more it drew me in. I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going to get the slugmovie was out the window. fest I came for but this was going to be some serious I had forgotten what Brazilian Jiu Jitsu actually business. The grabbing, the bending, the flipping, the was. exhaustion. Five and six minute bouts seemed to take My memory quickly recalled the early days of 20 minutes. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m still struggling to explain it all. the Ultimate Fighting Championship. There was a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an exciting vibe. If somebodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not familiar Brazilian grappler who took over the young world of with the sport or the camaraderie thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s involved in mixed martial arts: Royce Gracie. Most of these other it, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an eye opener,â&#x20AC;? event founder Jeff Bourgeois men were trying to beat each other senseless at the told me. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an energy and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a buzz that time, but Gracie was too busy comes with it. Because although itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a competition, the taking his sweet time wressportsmanship and brotherhood and respect that haptling around on the ground pens is something pretty cool. We may be competing, looking for an opportunity to but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re friends.â&#x20AC;? slap a rear choke hold or an This didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t explain how time stood still on me, arm-bar, knee-bar, ankle-bar, but it did shed some light upon the atmosphere in the whatever-bar submission on building. People were just friendly everywhere. The you. competitors, their families, the folks at the snack bar The deal was â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I hated â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I even had a little kid say â&#x20AC;&#x153;excuse meâ&#x20AC;? after he ran him. He was too awesome in front of me chasing some other little guy. and too boring at the same Twilight Zone stuff right here. time. It drove me nuts. And here it was going on X See MMA / page A11

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OUT OF MY ELEMENT VOL. II: WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ROLLER DERBY Impressive display of speed, sass and wipeouts

TACOMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HOT TICKETS FOR APRIL 4-11 -90:<5(7903;9073,()(:,)(33 Albuquerque Isotopes at Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium

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465+(@(7903Âś/0./:*/663)(:,)(33 North Thurston at Wilson Heidelberg Field â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:45 p.m. Gig Harbor at Bellarmine Bellarmine HS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4 p.m.

465Âś>,+(7903 Âś;9073,()(:,)(33 El Paso Chihuahuas at Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium

>,+5,:+(@(7903 Âś/0./:*/663.63Foss at Stadium â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Boys & Girls North Shore GC â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2:45 p.m.

>,+5,:+(@(7903 Âś.093:;,550: Lincoln at Stadium Stadium HS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:30 p.m.

PHOTOS BY STEVE CAMPAGNA

>,+5,:+(@(7903 Âś)6@: .093: ;9(*2 Wilson & South Kitsap at Mt Tahoma Mt. Tahoma HS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:30 p.m.

963305. Chocolate Coma (left) put the brakes on Gingersnap Ya Leg (right) and the Trampires to help advance the Hellbound Homewreckers to the Championship Finals.

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By Justin Gimse

page for the sports section, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d probably fill it with pro wrestling news and action photos. Also, I still refer to them as the WWF and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m never going to change that, I Before I begin, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll admit that I had several people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care what they call themselves. question my judgment about this assignment. They told I kid of course (except for the WWF part). Sports me roller derby wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a sport and was more akin to WWE pages are meant for real sports and not â&#x20AC;&#x153;sports entertainWrestling than anything else. ment.â&#x20AC;? Of course, if the Tacoma Weekly handed me a fifth And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also true that back in the day, roller derby was considered a rigged game just like pro wrestling was, is and always will be. It was all about the spectacle and apparently it needed to be controlled to maintain a certain level of excitement and interest. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just cut to the chase â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pretty much a Disciple of Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roller Derby now. I know, I know. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re probably thinking, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Justin, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re already jumping the shark and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been such a relatively short run.â&#x20AC;? Sometimes you need to seek out and find those sports and events that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never witnessed or maybe even heard of. I thought covering a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu tournament and the Dockyard Derby Dames semifi30:;,5<7 Coaches Grim Streeper (stocking cap) and Da Line King (glasses) huddle the Hellbound Homewreckers up for a victory talk. X See DERBY / page A11

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WTNT From page A1

a couple of times to get things right, but it has just gotten ridiculous.â&#x20AC;? At the heart of the issue, Emley believes, is the TNT practice of hiring paid-by-thepiece contractors to deliver the advertising bundles; contractor turnover and poor record keeping mean the bundles are tossed on his lawn despite him â&#x20AC;&#x153;opting outâ&#x20AC;? several times. He is not alone. Tacomans have been complaining about the practice for months, calling the bundles â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zeeckbaggingâ&#x20AC;? on social media. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Citizens for Tacoma, Not Trashâ&#x20AC;? chronicles what organizers call

WBrewery From page A3

purchases, they are coordinating their efforts to feed off each other to provide a singular live-work-play collection of amenities. The market value of the combined properties has been predicted on investment documents to be worth almost $100 million. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These three partners understand the symbiosis of their plans to offer the greatest opportunity for community acceptance and long-term success,â&#x20AC;? the plans state. But pitching the plan has not been easy, with four sets of delays and requests for more information that included responses to 558 pages of city studies and reports. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have responded to every one of those pages,â&#x20AC;? Lewis said, noting that the price for the properties have gone up each time despite being the only known response to the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s call for offers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one tells us why this is being delayed,â&#x20AC;? Hummel said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If there is someone else out there, then let us know. It just seems like the city is spinning our wheels.â&#x20AC;? All that happens, she said, is that city officials ask for more information and announce a delay in the process when the deadline comes and goes. The Brew Crew provides more information; the price goes up and city officials ask for more information while issuing another due date. Historic Tacoma has since submitted a request to have the former horse stables placed on the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s registry of historical sites. The public hearing on that request is set for April 23, the day after the next deadline in the development proposal timeline, although the actions are not linked. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is a little confusing,â&#x20AC;? Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Historic Preservation Officer Reuben McKnight said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But they are separate timelines.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;carpet bombingâ&#x20AC;? with the offending advertising bags. The group now has more than 700 members. Members post pictures of the signature bags on sidewalks and in gutters several times a day with warnings about specific neighborhoods that were targeted that day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is still a huge issue with these things laying on the sidewalk, driveways and in yards of people who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want them,â&#x20AC;? community organizer L. Lisa Lawrence stated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As progressive communities ban single-use plastic bag, ours allows tens of thousands to be dumped on our sidewalks, streets and gutters.â&#x20AC;? Several of the residents frustrated by what they consider to be corporate littering of their streets with 50,000 advertising bundles a week have since stepped up their

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Exchange students and host families got together to celebrate as sister cities with sushi and pizza.

WSister

From page A1

Though the contingent of Kitakyushuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s students were only here a week, they got an in-depth look at what makes Tacoma tick, including meeting Mayor Marilyn Strickland. Kitakyushu has been Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sister city since 1959, when the cities of Koji, Kokura, Wakamatsu, Yahata and Tobata were amalgamated to form Kitakyushu, with a population of over 1 million people. Because of the city amalgamation, Norfolk, VA also serves as a sister city for Kitakyushu. Since its development, the city has become one of the largest iron and steel producing cities in Japan. The exchange system between Stadium and Kitakyushu began in 2002, and has been in place on and off since then. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The mission is peace through people and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just strengthening the relation culturally, socially, maybe politically,

protests with sign waving in front of the businesses that advertise in the bundles. People have also blasted the TNT with poor reviews on Yelp and other sites as well as sent letters to the State Attorney Generalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office and the Better Business Bureau tho voice their frustration. Talks between TNT and city officials continue to try to solve the rise of complaints after a group of residents protested at a City Council meeting in January that also included a news story on KING 5 News. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The city managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recent conversations with Mr. Zeeck were consistent with their initial discussions,â&#x20AC;? city spokeswoman Gwen Schuler wrote in a statement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The city manager encouraged the TNT to continue to focus on responsiveness to individual customer concerns and to continue to improve

maybe eventually economically,â&#x20AC;? said Kitakyushu Sister City Committee Chair Terry Spuck. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rely on everyone speaking English. We have to respect the other culture. This is important globally.â&#x20AC;? After the contract was signed, students from both sides of the ocean exchanged gifts and the Kitakyushu delegates got to stand up and say goodbye, in English, through teary eyes. Some claimed they would never forget the experience they had here, even if it was just a week, while others vowed to return one day, perhaps through the new exchange program at both schools. Four to five students at Stadium have already expressed interest in traveling to Kitakyushu in the summer of 2015, as Kitakyushu and Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relationship continues to grow. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Previously, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tried to do this, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of fallen through due to financial issues on both sides. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking to get back on track,â&#x20AC;? Spuck said.

and refine their delivery and customer service methods to help reduce citizen concerns. He also shared with the TNT that the city will continue to inform them of concerns we are hearing and have every expectation that they will continue to make efforts to correct the problem going forward.â&#x20AC;? Attempts by Tacoma Weekly to discuss the concerns residents raised did not prompt responses from TNT officials, although Zeeck has said that more people have requested the advertisement bundles than have opted out of receiving them and that the company continues to monitor the situation for quality assurance and delivery. Anyone with complaints or comments can contact customerservice@ thenewstribune.com or call (800) 2898711.

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Tacoma has a long history with beer making that has gotten several boosts in recent years. Tacomans have always, apparently, been thirsty. The first brewery in Tacoma was Puget Sound Brewery, which operated at South 25th and Jefferson starting in 1888, according to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacoma Illustrated: Her History, Growth & Resources - A Comprehensive Review of the City of Destiny.â&#x20AC;? Buyouts and mergers then created Pacific Brewing & Malting Co. with the addition of the Milwaukee Brewery, which had only operated for two years before the merger. Columbia Brewing Co. entered the local beer scene in 1900, with Pacific owners being major backers but allowing it to operate independently. By 1909, Pacific was the second largest brewing company in the Northwest, losing out to Seattle Brewing & Malting, brewers of Rainier Beer. These were good years for beer, but then Prohibition ended the sale of alcohol around the state in 1916, four years before it became federal law. Brewers shifted to making soft drinks. Pacific, for example, produced a nonalcoholic beer called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pacific Foamâ&#x20AC;? and also opted to keep brewing at its operations in San Francisco. Other breweries made soap instead of sudsy brews during the dry times. But Pacific closed in 1919. The Columbia brewery later became the Heidelberg Brewing Co., which operated until 1979, the last of the local breweries. The facility was torn down in 2011. Beer making returned to Tacoma with Harmon Brewing Co. in 1997. A new Pacific Brewing and Malting Co. has also since taken shape, set to enter the market this spring.

For more info contact: Asia Pacific Cultural Center 4851 South Tacoma Way, Tacoma (253) 383-3900 // faalua@comcast.net WWW.ASIAPACIFICCULTURALCENTER.ORG


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WDerby

From page A9

nals in one day was a fantastic example of scheduling some serious bang for my buck â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and I feel that I grew as both an individual and a lover of odd sports. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right, roller derby is a sport. If you saw the hip-checks, the elbows, the welts, the sweat and the crashes that I saw Saturday night at Pierce College, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pretty sure you would walk away sold on it as a sport, and probably with a new T-shirt or beer cozy. It was the semifinal round of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dockyard Dames Roller Derby League with the Femme Fianna facing off against the Marauding Mollys and the Hellbound Homewreckers against the Trampires. If the team names donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lure you in, the playersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; names might seal the deal for you. Some of my per-

WMMA

sonal favorites were Alicat Tastrophe and Lt. Stryk-her from the Femme Fianna Booty Trapp, Slim Sayde, Verona Hematoma and Dara Sheblows from the Marauding Mollys â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Judy Asa Punk, Gingersnap Ya Leg and Pretty in Punk from the Trampires and from the Hellbound Homewreckers I have to go with Ivanna Pound-U, Jess Add Whiskey, Noodle Caesar and Mytai Smashya. How can this not be fun? Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s talk about the rules. On second thought, they make my head hurt and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re better off just watching and absorbing the action. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two 30-minute periods, so after awhile you begin to sense what is going on. Perhaps itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an osmosis-type happening. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not a brain scientist. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t explain it, but something begins to push back the

From page A8

Jeff explained that contestants may be competing against someone, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not necessarily an opponent. That itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as much of a challenge against yourself as it is against the person youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re rolling around on the ground with â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all the while trying to put them in an arm-bar or a chokehold.

I met a soft-spoken man named Henry Buentello who traveled down from Bremerton to compete in the White Belt Masters Division at 220 pounds and over. He had taken first place just moments before and the other men in his division hugged him and there were smiles on their faces. What was going on

fog of confusion and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll exclaim to the person next to you â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hey, I get it!â&#x20AC;? Just trust me on this. About 500 fans cheered on their favorite roller girls and many were dressed for the occasion. There were pirates supporting the Marauding Mollys, a leprechaun, a gentleman dressed from head to toe in a purple leotards, plenty of team shirts, face paint and a whole mess of folks wearing sombreros in the beer garden â&#x20AC;&#x201C; although I still canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find the connection for the sombreros, but they looked like they were having fun nonetheless. In the end the Marauding Mollys were too much for the Femme Fianna, beating them 195-125 and the Hellbound Homewreckers handled the Trampires 241-117. The two winners will face each other for the championship May 10 at Pierce College. A grudge match between the other two teams will kick off the evening.

I was impressed by how family-friendly the night was. Other than a few seminaughty names worn by some skaters, there was just some great music bumping all night, some hilarious

MCs talking up the action throughout and plenty of happy people in attendance. The Dockyard Derby Dames have got themselves a new fan in yours truly. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t promise regular cover-

age of roller derby in the Tacoma Weekly, but I can assure you the phony days are long gone and this is definitely a sport â&#x20AC;&#x201C; albeit one that has rules that I find hard to fully comprehend.

here? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The focus is all about coming here and having fun,â&#x20AC;? Henry said to me. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We believe that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really lose; you learn from defeats and get better. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winning and one of the biggest things is respect in the Jiu Jitsu world. Respect, have fun and learn. Not knowing your competitor and then trying to figure him out â&#x20AC;&#x201C; not only his technique, but his strength â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and try-

ing defeat that technique in a short amount of time is a challenge every single time and it just makes you better.â&#x20AC;? Another man told me he had been in trouble with the law when he was younger and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu had straightened him out. Instead of living scared and out-of-control, he had become a successful salesman and told me it all started with the Jiu Jitsu. He

was soft-spoken and polite; an easy smile on his face. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to have to look into this Jiu Jitsu further. Over 600 people squared-off on the mats at Revolution XXIV. The youngest was four years old and the oldest just shy of fifty. The next tournament will take place July 26 at PLU. Bring the kids. As I walked out of the gym I realized that I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t disappointed in the least.

I saw one bloodied nose during the day and it really didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do anything for me. My cravings for a slugfest had abated and I was a man at peace. I walked past a pickup in the parking lot whose bumper sticker read â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d rather be choking you out.â&#x20AC;? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure it was meant in the nicest way though.

PHOTO BY STEVE CAMPAGNA

567(:: Dara Sheblows (center) and Briann SexyBack (right) of the Marauding Mollys will skate for the championship May 10.

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WDaffodil

From page A1

children with their parents, sitting out there through rain and sunshine, to come and enjoy the festival with us princesses,â&#x20AC;? says Princess Ji Larson of Lincoln High School. The Daffodil Festival Grand Floral Parade is a tradition for Pierce County, born from the beauty of the daffodil fields that grew abundantly in the fields of Puyallup and Sumner, after a dearth of hops harvest left farmers looking for something new to grow. While over the many decades, a celebration that was once dedicated to the flowers and fields has now turned to local schools, organizations, philanthropic service and a focus on arts and education in our communities. What truly remains is the spirit of fostering the continuation of the great things growing in Pierce County, and the people who have helped the festival itself blossom throughout these many years. Despite the festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic cultural significance to the area, it almost seems like everyone has their own Daffodil Festival history to celebrate. For instance, for Princess Kayla McEl-

WCancer

ligot thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a personal festival backstory to consider in the crowds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m excited to see my family and my family friends but I have people I used to march with in the parade as well, so it would be really cool to see them supporting me and the other princesses.â&#x20AC;? Heading the parade this year, in keeping with the 2013 Festival theme â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ready, Set, Grow,â&#x20AC;? is Parade Grand Marshall Ciscoe Morris, from KING 5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gardening with Ciscoe,â&#x20AC;? along with Community Grand Marshall Ed Hume. New to the festival this year is a coinciding event, the Daffodil Festival 5K Challenge, a 5K race that winds along the same routes that the parade will take, through the four cities. The event is sponsored by Nike, South Sound Running, and the YMCA Organizations of Pierce and Kitsap Counties, and hopes to promote community and fitness. Princess Nina Thach, Mt. Tahoma, has been taking special efforts to promote the new event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have gone to any YMCAs and my old middle and elementary schools to promote the parade and get interested in the Daffodil 5K Challenge.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be a blast!â&#x20AC;? says Wilson High School Daffodil Princess Sarah

From page A1

cancer cells â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and any cell that acts like cancer. Those include hair follicles, the soft linings of our mouths and guts and the white blood cell factories in our bone marrow. The symptoms vary with the drugs we get â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be surprised by how many different variations and combinations there are. Thanks to science, we get the medicine best equipped to kill our personal tumors and rogue cells. Still, all chemo meds have brute force in common, and they all threaten us with symptoms. We can go bald and get mouth sores. We can forget why we ever loved food, what with it tasting like coppery crud and all. Once we get it down, we can resort to great new drugs that help us keep it down. We might get bone pain. Imagine being a length of metal siding, and having people shake you at both ends. Lucky for us, someone figured out that a daily dose of the antihistamine Claritin chases that pain away. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pill for most every chemo ill, and I am nothing but grateful to the miracle of modern chemistry. But then there is the fatigue. It lays us so low as to amaze and alarm even the people who are on to our secret slacker ways. That is why I feel so guilty about not doing the one simple thing my husband requested. I should add that he even proffered the 2014 Longs Drugs â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kauai â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Garden Isleâ&#x20AC;? 99-cent calendar to keep that chemo log. It would have been a great help to him, as it would be to anyone who is kind and strong enough to be helping someone through any kind of cancer treatment.

Schroeder. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m doing my best to spread ances throughout Pierce County. the word about the parade and the new Despite those long hours logged togethDaffodil 5K for this year.â&#x20AC;? er, for Princess Stephanie Jackson-Buena, Though not all princess life is about the from Chief Leschi High School, the very gloryâ&#x20AC;Ś people sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s looking forward to seeing In discussing further preparations for most on parade day are one of the very the big day, Princess Sarah adds, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aside things that makes each princessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; time so from that, of course, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be washing and special: the court she shares her title with. hemming my dress within the next few â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bonding time with the girlsâ&#x20AC;Ś I mean, days.â&#x20AC;? itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cool to be able to wave at all the people The wardrobe touch-up comes as no whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come to see us and everything, but surprise, as those same iconic yellow what would the Parade be without the rest dresses that will be on full display with of the princesses, too?â&#x20AC;? their 24 proud princess owners on the The Daffodil Festival Grand Floral Queenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Float in the parade this Saturday, Parade will pass through Tacoma at 10:15 have already been getting quite the work- a.m., Puyallup at 12:45 p.m., Sumner at out in the past few months. 2:30 p.m., and Orting at 5 p.m., and will Between Pierce County Libraries, also be aired on KONG at 7:30 p.m., all on Boys and Girls Clubs, visiting elementary Saturday, April 5. schools, meeting legislators in Olympia and community leaders at Lions and Eagles clubs, these amazing young ladies have already done their fair amount of running around, 9512 Canyon Rd E even without Nikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s help. Puyallup, WA 98371 By the end of their reign, they will have participated 253-535-6110 in over 6,000 hours of community service, and have OUR OWN HOME MADE made 250 public appear-

  



The log would put every appointment, weeks out, on the bulletin board or refrigerator. It would show the difference between a blood draw or a shot and a doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visit followed by three hours of infusion. It would give an idea of whether I can go by myself, or whether it would be a good idea to have another set of ears in that meeting with the doc, or someone to drive. It would show when I need to be drinking a gallon of fluids a day. That takes nagging, and hot tea, and ice water, and sherbet sodas and Jell-O. No beer, though. That would be too easy. That log would track the fatigue. It would alert us to the days when, after an exhausting night of deep sleep, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d get up, have a banana, juice and yogurt, then need a four-hour nap. It would flag the day we need to hit the library to stock up on recliner reading. That calendar would prove that the good days come around with every treatment. It would tell my sweet husband when we could maybe catch a matinee, or a late lunch of fish and chips. It would tell him when we could go for a drive punctuated by errands, just to prove that we remember normal, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ready for it â&#x20AC;&#x201C; any day now.

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City Life

Comedian Tom Cotter

B2

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 2014

SECTION B, PAGE 1

NUCLEAR COWBOYZ BRING MOTOCROSS, KUNG FU AND FIREWORKS TO THE DOME

PHOTO BY CHRIS TEDESCO

FIRED UP. The Nuclear Cowboyz tricks are often highlighted with various pyrotechnics used throughout the show. By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

P

yrotechnics and motorcycles cross frequently. It’s tough to go to any motor show without seeing some kind of fireworks. Touring entertainers the Nuclear Cowboyz have decided to take it a step further by not only incorporating fireworks, but also a full fledged storyline and elements of kung fu, elevating their performance from a motocross show to a full fledged high-energy circus spectacle. You can witness this motocross/kung fu/pyrotechnic fusion when the Nuclear Cowboyz come to town on Saturday, April 5 and Sunday, April 6 at the Tacoma Dome. “It’s almost like its own Broadway show,” said Jayme Dalsing, tour director for the Nuclear Cowboyz. The story takes place in a post-apocalyptic future, where the Nuclear Cowboyz battle the evil Shakra and his minions (The Shaolin Warriors) in the arena of destruction. Luckily, the riders in the Nuclear Cowboyz are up to the task. “We are taking Nuclear Cowboyz to a whole new level in 2014 for the tour’s fifth anniversary,” said Juliette Feld, producer and executive vice president of Feld Entertainment, which sponsors the event. “For the first time ever, the show will feature incredible acts of athleticism and bravery from the Shaolin Kung Fu Warriors alongside an award-winning cast of the world’s most decorated freestyle

athletes defying the laws of physics. Together, they are taking what’s humanly possible to the limit.” Some of the riders involved with the Nuclear Cowboyz include 16-time X-Games gold medalist Jeremy Twitch, as well as gold medalists Mike Mason and Matt Buyten. Though there is a storyline, the riders and the stunts they perform are still the major draw of the show. The Nuclear Cowboyz are known for their death-defying feats, including doing tricks while on fire as well as performing three and four-man wide jumps, and the new storyline spares no expense in letting the riders flaunt their stuff. “The guys are so close they high-five,” Dalsing said, explaining the tight four-man jumps. If the stunts aren’t enough to keep you entertained, maybe kung fu is your cup of tea. The Nuclear Cowboyz team has brought in Shaolin Kung Fu Warriors all the way from China to add to the show. “We found [the Warriors] through our circus connections,” Dalsing said. “They’ve been a great addition, they bring a lot of things to the table.” The Warriors will oppose the Cowboyz with their kung fu skills, bending metal bars and balancing themselves on the tips of sharp spears. These spectacles are overlaid with pyrotechnics that could literally be a show of its own. The pyrotechnic display is the largest arena-based pyrotechnic show in the

world, with more than 1,000 unique explosive bursts occurring during the show. “I would buy a ticket just to see our pyro show, but it’s all added into the mix, which just makes it better,” Dalsing said. The entire spectacle is set to the backdrop of an eclectic soundtrack, a laser show and dancers, giving the audience a variety of places to direct their attention. A traveling circus of explosions is not an easy thing to set up, but the Nuclear Cowboyz team has become adept at the art of constructing elaborate sets. The show is one of the few motocross events that doesn’t use dirt. What they do use are 11 trucks of equipment to prep the show, along with a crew of 35 Cowboyz employees and 40 local laborers. In a 12-hour span, these 75 people will transform the Tacoma Dome into an arena of aerial stunts that includes 10 ramps (seven take off ramps, three landing ramps) and multiple platforms for the trials, riders and acrobatics. Nearly 30,000 hours were needed to construct the look and feel of the post-apocalyptic environment. Ticket prices range from $15 for kids, to $25-$35 for adults depending on the seating. For those looking for an up close and personal experience, Gold Circle tickets are $50 a seat while VIP Fallout tickets are $85. Visit www. tacomadome.org for tickets or charge by phone at 1 (800) 745-3000.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE MOLLY RINGWALD Prosecutor Mark Lindquist is holding his campaign kickoff event on April 4, 6 p.m. at the Temple Theatre, and the general public is welcome to attend. The musical guests themselves will be something to see – Peter Buck of R.E.M., actress and jazz singer Molly Ringwald (“The Breakfast Club,” “Sixteen Candles,” “The Secret Life of the American Teenager”) and The Beatniks. Should be a festive time.

TWO F A I STUDIO SALE Attention: crafters, designers, artists, and jewelers! As F A I Accessories for Life at 3401 N. Proctor St. makes room in their studio for new projects, they we are selling

past booth displays, canvas walls and floors, painted valances, and stacks of fabric, flight form cases, bags of beads, ethnographic textiles, display items and props, odds and ends and fun stuff. One day only, April 5, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

THREE DANCE AT PLU Dance Concert 2014 at Pacific Lutheran University is a repertory dance concert comprised of dances created by PLU student choreographers, PLU’s Dance Team, and two works of professional choreography by director Paula J. Peters and guest choreographer Mary Reardon. The variety of choreographic works feature upbeat rhythms,

strong and succinct movements, and elegant sophistication revealed through serious and comical pieces. April 11, 12 at 7:30 p.m., Eastvold Auditorium Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, PLU campus. Tickets: (253) 5357411. SPRING FAIR

Mayhem monster truck show, Slamfest demolition derby, concerts, rodeos… Read all about it and get tickets at www.thefair. com.

FIVE FALL OUT BOY

FOUR

It’s time to roll out the sunglasses (or umbrellas), dust off those winter blues and get ready for four glorious days of the Washington State Spring Fair, April 10-13. There will be rides, a Motorsport

Popular emo-pop band Fall Out Boy will headline the Washington State Fair grandstand in Puyallup on Sept. 12, organizers announced over the weekend. The quartet – best known for “Dance, Dance,” “Sugar, We’re Goin’ Down” and other hits – is touring in support of its fifth studio album, “Save Rock and Roll.” Tickets to their local stop go on sale at 10 a.m. on Saturday, April 5, with prices ranging from $45 to $55. Find more details on the Washington State Fair web site, www.thefair.com.


Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 4, 2014

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

TOM COTTER’S GOT TALENT (but try convincing his dad) By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

W

alter Cotter served in the Navy during World War II. He came home, put himself through college on the G.I. Bill, and eventually become a well-regarded neurosurgeon. His profession allowed him to put six kids through private school, including his son, Tom, who was studying pre-law at Ohio’s Denison University when he dropped a horrifying bombshell. “After that investment, of all that money, he finds out that I want to tell jokes about my penis to strangers in bars. He was not thrilled,” recalled Tom Cotter, who will headline Tacoma Comedy Club for five big sets April 10, 11 and 12. “It was not something he could brag about. It wasn’t a badge of honor,” he said. “But when I did ‘The Tonight Show’ he realized, finally, that I was not a wasted sperm. We grew up watching Johnny Carson religiously in our house. So he knew I wasn’t a complete failure. “My oldest brother is a colonel, so he is the favorite, of course. I’m still joke boy, and I know my place. But that’s okay with me.” The 50-year-old standup comedian is being somewhat facetious, of course. His star has been rising for a while, and he’s been an especially hot commodity since he lasted the entire seventh season of NBC-TV’s “America’s Got Talent” in 2012. He ultimately finished second to animal act Olate Dogs. But he’s not bitter about it. “People always ask me that,” he said. “They think I went out that night and just started randomly kicking dogs, which is not the case. I’ve always loved dogs. That hasn’t changed. I did draft Michael Vick to my fantasy football team the next day, but that was coincidental. “‘Britain’s Got Talent’ was won by a dog act that year, also. So it was the year of the dog, and I’m fine with it. In all honesty, I didn’t expect the dog act or me to even be in the finals. I didn’t think we’d make the top six. ... So the fact that we were the two standing there at the end, I was flabbergasted.” Cotter only had 90 seconds to impress judges Howard Stern, Howie Mandel and Sharon Osbourne on the show, and thinks he benefited from the lightning round delivery he developed working Boston comedy clubs early in his career. “The style of comedy’s kind of a rapid-fire style,” he said. “It’s for A.D.D. people. You’re banging out a lot of jokes in a short amount of time, and so that’s what I’ve always done. I added misdirection to that with just a lot of one-liners and left turns; double-entendre and misdirection,

all those things. So my act was perfectly suited for that show; and for six years everyone – managers, agents, casting people – would call me every and say you’ve gotta go out to the show. It’s perfect for you.” He just had one hangup. “I wouldn’t (try out) because Piers Morgan was a judge,” Cotter said, recalling the English pundit’s penchant for trashing comedians. “With a British accent he’d say, ‘You’re not funny. I didn’t laugh once. You’re not original.’ And not only would he not advance their careers, but he would set them back in front of millions of people. So I said, ‘I’m not gonna let this snobby British (jerk ruin) me in front of the world.’” Cotter may be best known for “America’s Got Talent,” but some of his earliest accolades came 20 years ago here in the Pacific Northwest. He took first place in the Seattle International Comedy Competition in 1994, something that might not have happened had his geography been any worse. “I probably shouldn’t be telling people this, but the truth is, I’m a moron,” he said. “I was going to a wedding in San Francisco – and I’m an East Coast Guy (so) I thought I could drive. I thought it was like an hour away. “It was a surreal thing because it was at a time when the grunge thing that was big. … One night you’d be in a basement in Seattle with a bunch of people wearing tie dyes and Birkenstocks sandals. They had just come in off the street from getting stoned. The next night you’d be at a Naval sub base, so it would be a completely different demographic. Some of the guys were doing the exact same set for both audiences, and I couldn’t believe they weren’t mixing it up a little bit. “So that’s what I remember learning from that. You play to your audience.” Cotter’s set times in Tacoma are at 8 p.m. on April 10 and 8 and 10:30 p.m. on April 11 and 12. Tickets are $10 for the April 10 show and $15 for the others. For further details, call (253) 282-7203 or visit www.tacomacomedyclub.com.

Tom Cotter in concert with Rodney Sherwood 8 p.m. April 10 8 and 10:30 p.m., April 11, 12 Tacoma Comedy Club 933 Market St., Tacoma $10 to $15 (253) 282-7203 or www.tacomacomedy.club

PHOTO BY VIRGINIA SHERWOOD

QUICK WIT. Tom Cotter is known for his fast-paced one liners, as featured on “America’s Got Talent.”


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, April 4, 2014 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

‘The Junk Chime’

Perennial favorite at Spring Fair

CULTURE CORNER

A GUIDE TO THE MUSEUMS OF TACOMA

Muesum of the Week: Slater Museum of Natural History

University of Puget Sound 1500 N. Warner St. #1088 www.pugetsound.edu/academics/academic-resources/slater-museum/ APRIL

2014

This week’s events:

Insects & Insectivores Night at the Museum April 9, 6-7:30 p.m., 295 Thompson Hall

PHOTO COURTESY OF WASHINGTON STATE SPRING FAIR

HANDMADE MUSIC. Benson Smith’s “Junk Chime” has long been a

favorite of fair-goers. It will be at the Washington State Spring Fair April 10-13. By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

A

nyone who has been to the Puyallup Fair or the Spring Fair has no doubt encountered the “Junk Chime,” a collection of miscellaneous metallic junk arranged on a steel framework. It is there to be banged, beaten, bonged and batted with the readily available drumsticks (chopsticks wrapped in duct tape). People of all ages, but especially kids, are inevitably drawn to it. “I like when the kids play the “Junk Chime,” said Benson Smith, the “Junk Chime” inventor. “Sometimes late at night, the older people come and we can get a jam going.” The humble appearing “Junk Chime” has the stuff of magic about it. Smith, a Seattle-based artist and musician, is a bus driver by day. Smith’s true calling, however, is the making of music and the building of sculptural works. The “Junk Chime” started in 1985 and has continued to evolve ever since as Smith has added more

and more to it. “I can’t add too much more to it now,” he asserted. “It’s getting too big for my truck.” Anything that might make an interesting sound is incorporated into the “Junk Chime” – coffee cans, pots and pans, various car parts, light fixtures, bucket lids, bicycle sprockets, springs and things unidentifiable. “People like to guess what’s what,” Smith said. When not at the fair or a festival somewhere, the “Junk Chime” framework resides in Smith’s backyard. “It’s exposed to the elements,” he noted, “getting a nice patina of rust.” The sound-making objects are housed in a backyard shed. In addition to the Washington State Spring Fair and the Washington State Fair in the fall, “Junk Chime” will appear at the Longview Earth Day Fair in April, the Lacey Spring Fair in May and several other events. Smith plays clarinet and saxophone in a couple of Seattle bands: Mighty Tiny and D20 Brass Band.

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The latter is a “honk” band that plays arrangements of video game music and bills itself as “a street band for nerds.” Other works by Smith include “Drum Cage,” a wearable contraption of junk-on-a-frame. Smith’s “Penta Spiral,” a motion activated light and sound device, was in the Seattle Children’s Museum for a number of years. For many years now, the “Junk Chime” has been a fixture at both the spring and fall fairs in Puyallup. It has become something of an institution. It would not feel quite like the fair without the funky-clunky tones of the “Junk Chime” enlivening the fairgrounds. People love to pause in their fair-wide promenade to pick up a pair of drumsticks and tap out a rhythm. “Junk Chime” will be appearing at the upcoming Washington State Spring Fair that runs April 10-13. Be sure to stop by and give it a rap-tap-tapping. For further information visit www.thefair.com/fun/ details/junk-chime.

HOT DEALS

This is part of a free, family-friendly, community event series. The museum will have its collection of over 4,000 pinned insects on display, along with the plants they pollinate and the organisms that eat them. You can expect to see bugs, bats, birds, moles, hedgehogs, and even some carnivorous plants. Come learn about the role insects play in ecosystems while getting up-close and personal with real museum artifacts.

Special Guest: Renowned naturalist Dennis Paulson will be present to discuss his

life-long work with dragonflies around the world, and his many publications on the subject.

Kid’s Activity: Come build a bug out of re-useable materials with the EnviroChallengers and learn the anatomy of an insect.

Live Animals: You can expect to see live animals and plants including Venus flytraps, tarantulas, and aquatic nymphs.

Museum Features: Nature in the Classroom

Nature in the Classroom is a multidisciplinary science-based curriculum for 4th and 5th graders in the Puget Sound region. The curriculum brings the rich diversity of Puget Sound’s natural history into the classroom using teaching specimens from the Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound. Students will gain an appreciation for and familiarity with the natural world as they practice observation skills and study structure, function, adaptations and interactions among species.

Nights at the Museum

The Nights at the Museum series is designed to give visitors an insider look at the research and teaching specimens that make up the Slater. Each Night at the Museum features a subset of the collection, including touchable artifacts. That’s right, even YOU can touch a Sumatran Tiger skull or hold a Golden Eagle! Get the details on the latest Night at the Museum event at: facebook.com/slatermuseum

Visit the Slater Museum, ‘Where dead things come alive!’

The Slater Museum of Natural History is home to more than 80,000 specimens spanning the last century and a half from around the world. In just a short visit, you can meet a polar bear up close, touch the most common owl in Washington State, or hold the “original” Cascade Frog. Visits are free of charge and family friendly. Stop in during the weekly -pen Hours, Wednesdays and Thursdays, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., to explore the collection with one of the student docents. Take a tour of the museum or just pop in for a few minutes.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, April 4, 2014

Life Christian Academy alumnus Ayesha Brooks competes on â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Voiceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

PHOTO COURTESY OF ARTIST

ALL IN. Fans can see local singer Ayesha Brooks, a.k.a. Music Box, on

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Voice,â&#x20AC;? which airs 8 p.m. Mondays and Tuesdays on NBC-TV. Also view episodes online at www.nbc.com/the-voice. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

T

acoma singersongwriter Vicci Martinez was a big hit on the inaugural season of NBC-TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Voice,â&#x20AC;? ultimately finishing second in the TV talent search before recording â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come Along,â&#x20AC;? her duet with pop mentor Cee Lo Green. It was fellow Tacoman

Stephanie Anne Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s turn to make waves last year; and now, with the sixth season in full swing, another local singer has her eyes on first prize. Federal Way native and Life Christian Academy alumnus Ayesha Brooks â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a.k.a. Music Box â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is competing on Team Usher, after being stolen from pop singer Shakiraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s squad last week. She couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell us if

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sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be in both of this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s episodes, which aired at 8 p.m. Monday, March 31 and Tuesday, April 1, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve sure got our fingers crossed. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s some of what she had to say about the impact her national platform has had on her so far. Tacoma Weekly: How did you get your stage name? Brooks: When I was younger, I had really bad

stage fright so I decided to come up with an alias to kind of help me describe how I feel. â&#x20AC;Ś I just needed to separate who I am around my friends and family from the person I am on the stage. TW: People see you on the show now. But where might they remember seeing you perform around here? Brooks: Right now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m trying to do the solo thing, just as Music Box. But, before being on â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Voiceâ&#x20AC;? I performed with a group called Imagine the Giant. We performed a lot in Fremont and Portland. We did a lot of West Coast shows. We were kind of like a garage band. We did rock-soul music. TW: Obviously, you want to win. But how else do you hope to build on this experience? Brooks: I really wanna be a voice for people that have stage fright â&#x20AC;Ś and I also want to be a voice for single parents, people that are doing it on their own. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a really scary thing to wake up every day and have to take care of another human being (while) also not giving up on your dreams, and showing your children how to pursue â&#x20AC;Ś a life of passion. For me, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deeper than winning the show. Also, this is just a platform to show who I am as an artist and to show my love for my city. I love being from Washington. I love being from Federal Way, and I love how musical this state is. I mean, we have Allen Stone. We have Nirvana. We have Jimi Hendrix. We have so much amazing music that has come out of Washington. So I just want to be a part of that legacy. TW: Well, the past few seasons theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had some local folks on there. Vicci Martinez was the favorite on season one, and Stephanie last season. Brooks: Yeah, Stephanie and Austin (Jenckes, from North Bend). TW: Is there anything you learned from those

The Best of

guys or that you took away from their appearances? Brooks: Absolutely, I would say having pride in where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re from and sticking to who you are as an individual. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotten to meet Stephanie, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotten to meet Austin, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just really positive people, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m the same way. I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s given me pride in where I come from because we kind of all have the same outlook on life, and I think that just comes from being from Washington. TW: Most recently, we saw the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eternal Flameâ&#x20AC;? episode. Take me back to that experience. Brooks: I took a chance, and I was like, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m gonna put myself in the song. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m gonna do it the way I feel this song touches me.â&#x20AC;? That was a risky thing to do, I feel, because Shakira wanted me to be a little bit more vulnerable. I kind of wanted to take it more to church. In the end, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m glad I did because it really resonated with Usher. But I was really nervous because I felt Deja (Hall) had the advantage in the fact that she is so young, and she sings so vulnerably, just naturally. She has a softer voice. And we became really close, so I wanted her to progress on, too. TW: Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s it been

like working with Usher versus being on Team Shakira? Brooks: I think where I relate to Shakira is sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a mother, and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s juggling being a mother and being an international superstar. So she was able to just tell me not to think so much. I think, as Moms we try to control, and a lot of times on stage you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any control. You have to be a vessel to the music and allow yourself to be flexible. I learned that from Shakira. From Usher, I think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just going to learn how to really be a little more confident in who I am as an artist and make decisions that have purpose. TW: Is there anything behind the scenes that has surprised you or been different than you expected? Brooks: I think the thing that surprises me the most is how down to earth the celebrities are. You have an idea of how Shakirah would be, and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really very fragile and kind of a little bit more shy than I would think she is. That has shocked me the most, how human they are. TW: I know you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say too much, but can you tell us anything about whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coming up next? Brooks: All I can really say is stay tuned and watch. (She laughs). Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m allowed to say.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Big Brotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; casting call From â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Voiceâ&#x20AC;? contestant Music Box to â&#x20AC;&#x153;American Idolâ&#x20AC;? phenom Sanjaya Malakar, many South Sound residents have enjoyed 15 minutes of fame on reality TV. Could you be the next one? CBS-TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big Brotherâ&#x20AC;? will hold an open casting call for its 16th season from noon to 3 p.m. on April 12 at South Hill Mall, 3500 South Meridian, in Puyallup. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bring your outgoing, fun personality â&#x20AC;&#x201C; no need to bring anything else,â&#x20AC;? reads the announcement from CBS. The premise of the show is a group housemates living together in a specially constructed house, having their every move monitored by in-house television cameras. Contestants are evicted throughout each season, and the last one standing takes home $500,000. Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make it to the Puyallup casting call? Aspiring contestants can also apply online at bigbrothercasting.tv. Ernest A. Jasmin, Tacoma Weekly

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

OSO MUDSLIDE BENEFIT SHOWS TAKING SHAPE AROUND TACOMA

Friday, April 4, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 5

Nightlife

TW PICK OF THE WEEK: PORTLAND BANJO DUO THE

LOWEST PAIR (PICTURED) AND MINNESOTAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DEAD PIGEONS WILL PLAY A SPECIAL THURSDAY NIGHT AMERICANA SHOW AT 8 P.M. ON APRIL 10 AT B SHARP COFFEE HOUSE, 706 OPERA ALLEY, IN TACOMA. THE SHOW IS FREE AND OPEN TO ALL AGES UNTIL 11 P.M.; BSHARPCOFFEEHOUSE.COM.

FRIDAY, APRIL 4

SUNDAY, APRIL 6

B SHARP COFFEE: Ty Elwin (singer-songwriter) 8 p.m., NC, AA

TACOMA COMEDY: Clean Comedy with Mark Christopher Lawrence, 5 p.m., $10; Celebrity Roast of the Tooth Fairy, 8 p.m., $10, 18+

PHOTO COURTESY OF BAND

MUSIC FOR A CAUSE. Rich Wetzelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Groovinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Higher Jazz Orchestra is among local bands that will play to benefit Oso mudslide victims on May 4. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

O

n March 22, a rain-saturated slope near Oso collapsed, unleashing a lethal torrent of mud and debris that pulverized most of the town. Forty-nine homes were destroyed, and the death toll had reached 27 earlier this week with dozens still missing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who would think the whole mountain would slide down like that?â&#x20AC;? local jazz musician Rich Wetzel marveled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just mind-boggling â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the size of it and the randomness of it. It hits everybody so hard, and you think, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I want to do something. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best thing we can do?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Wetzel was among those who recruited local event promoter Merri Sutton to organize a response. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some musicians contacted me within days of this happening and said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;So, whenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the benefit?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? she recalled, describing three big fundraisers that are taking shape for May 4. Landslide Blues is the bill that Sutton is putting together for that day at the Swiss Tavern, 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. The lineup so far consists of local favorites Steve Stefanowicz, the Little Bill Trio, Junkyard Jane, Andrea Miller with the Collective, Linda Myers Band, Burnham Drive, Steve Cooley and the Dangerfields, 9 Pound Hammer and the Dean Reichert Band. Music will start at 2 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coming out of the woodwork, and lots of help and donations are coming in,â&#x20AC;? Sutton said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These things just

put themselves together. Tacoma is so amazing when it comes to helping. I just canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say enough about this town.â&#x20AC;? For his part, Wetzel decided to expand a regular Sunday gig that he and his big band, Groovinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Higher Orchestra, play at Stonegate Pizza, 5419 South Tacoma Way. Local blues act Tatoosh has been confirmed for that show with more to be announced. The Stonegate show will also kick off at 2 p.m. Both events will feature silent auctions. Organizers of those shows are asking patrons to donate what they can by way of cover charge, with net proceeds going to a relief account set up by Arlingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cascade Valley Hospital Foundation (www. cascadevalley.org/foundation). As of Tuesday, the Cascade Valley Hospital Foundation had raised more than $555,000 toward its relief efforts, according to spokeswoman Heather Logan. She said the Foundation Board had voted to disperse about a third of the fund this week on first responder support, funeral costs and other local family needs. Meanwhile, the creators of regional online rock hub Northwest Music Scene (northwestmusicscene.com) have put together an affiliated rock fundraiser that will kick off at 5 p.m. on May 4 at Jazzbones, 2803 Sixth Ave. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The reason I am so involved with it, though, is I have relatives that grew up in Darrington, very close to Oso,â&#x20AC;? said Glen Casebeer, the co-founder

of the regional music site, Northwest Music Scene. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We used to go up there when I was a kid, a lot,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So it is a personal thing. I know how tightknit the community is, and how an event like this has devastated them. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also had the chance to talk to a few people from Oso. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not really so much about the money weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re raising. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more about showing them that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s people out there that really care about them and what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going through.â&#x20AC;? The lineup at Jazzbones will include Antihero, Witchburnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jamie Nova, Kertson (formerly Jason Kertson & the Immortals), Black Powder Country, the Mothership and guest emcee, Wanz. The show is open to all ages. Tickets are $10 in advance, $12 the day of the show. Casebeer said proceeds from the show will not be donated directly to specific families impacted by the Oso slide and not through any non-profit organization. The Northwest Music Scene site also lists dozens of other benefit shows being held around the state. Find a comprehensive list at www.northwestmusicscene.com. THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (99 MIN, R) Fri 4/4: 11:30am, 1:45, 4:05, 6:40, 8:00, 9:00 Sat 4/5-Sun 4/6: 11:30am, 1:45, 4:05, 4:30, 6:40, 8:00, 9:00 Mon 4/7-Thurs 4/10: 1:45, 4:05, 6:40, 9:00 A BIRDERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GUIDE TO EVERYTHING (86 MIN, PG-13) Fri 4/4: 2:15, 4:30, 6:50, 8:50 Sat 4/5-Sun 4/6: 11:55am, 2:15, 6:50, 8:50 Mon 4/7- Tue 4/8: 2:15, 4:30, 6:50, 8:50 Wed 4/9: 2:15, 4:30, 8:50 Thu 4/10: 2:15, 4:30, 6:50, 8:50 THE WIND RISES (126 MIN, PG-13) Fri 4/4: 11:45am, 5:15 Sat 4/5-Sun 4/6: 11:45am, 2:30, 5:15 Mon 4/7: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 Tue 4/8: 5:15, 8:00 Wed 4/9-Thu 4/10: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00

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SATURDAY, APRIL 5 THE SWISS: Gray Sky Blues featuring Cee James, Cody Rentas Band, Brian Lee and the Orbiters, Arthur Migliazza Trio, (blues) 1 p.m., $8-$10 after 3:30 p.m.

B SHARP COFFEE: The Rusty Cleavers (â&#x20AC;&#x153;drunkgrassâ&#x20AC;?) 8 p.m., NC, AA BOBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAVA JIVE: Battersea, Service Animal, Low Hums, Universe People (indie-rock) 9 p.m., $5 EMERALD QUEEN: Michael McDonald (pop, rock) 8:30 p.m., $40-$100 GIG SPOT: Oso Benefit Show featuring the Barefoot Band, Steven Curtis, Jody Ellis and Con (xxx) 8 p.m., $10 GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Chapter 5 (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: David Leon, Scott Losse (comedy) 8:30, 10:30 p.m., $15 HARMON BREWERY: Gray Sky Blues featurin Fistful of Dollars, Mark Riley Trio, Maia Santell and House Blend, Jack Gaffney and Nolan Garrett (blues) noon, NC JAZZBONES: General Hydroponics after party with Mighty High, Stick Figure (reggae) 9 p.m., LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: TerraNova (rock) 2 p.m., AA NEW FRONTIER: Joy Subtraction, Gold Records (punk, alternative) 9 p.m., $5 THE SPAR: Vibe Project (reggae) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Gray Sky after party featuring Steve Cooley and the Dangerfields and Junction (blues) 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Theo Von (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jam night, 8 p.m., NC UPS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCHNEEBECK HALL: An Evening of Opera Scenes, 7:30 p.m., $5-$12.50, AA

DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 4 p.m., NC THE SPAR: Butterbean with Mike, Dean and Buck (blues) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman Allstars (classic rock) 8:30 p.m., NC

MONDAY, APRIL 7 STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino, Brooke Lizotte (experimental jam) 9 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Jazz & Beyond (open jam) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Blue Night, 8 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, APRIL 8 JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5

DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9

DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ STONEGATE: Dave Nicholsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, APRIL 10 UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Billy Shew band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC HALF PINT: Open mic, 8 p.m., AA till 10 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY: Tom Cotter (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

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GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Chapter 5 (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: David Leon, Scott Losse (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: Tommy Castro and the Painkillers (blues) 8 p.m., $15-$17.50 LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: AKA Kevin Johnson (rock) 8 p.m., AA MAXWELLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: The Of, The Rallies (rock) 9 p.m., $5 TACOMA COMEDY: Theo Von (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jam night, 8 p.m., NC UNCLE THURMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Delvon Lamarr Trio (funk) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA UPS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCHNEEBECK HALL: An Evening of Opera Scenes, 7:30 p.m., $5-$12.50, AA

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Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 4, 2014

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: VOCALIST EUGENIE JONES

Sat., April 13, 5 p.m. Marine View Church, 8469 Eastside Dr. NE, Tacoma With the 2013 release of her debut CD “Black Lace Blue Tears,” Eugenie Jones has very quickly established herself in the upper echelon of vocalists in the Northwest. This week, Jones was the recipient of the Earshot Jazz 2013 “Recording of the Year” award, a fitting accolade for such a passionate singer with raw emotion and impeccable styling. Her love of poetry and writing inspired her to pen nine of the 11 tracks on her CD, based on her life experiences. Singing professionally for only three years, she has already drawn a devoted following to her unique artistry. Appearing with her at Marine View will be renowned bassist Clipper Anderson, Earshot Jazz 2013 “Instrumentalist of the Year,” drummer D’Vonne Lewis and innovative pianist John Hansen. This is a “must-see” concert if you love jazz. Price: Free Info: (253) 229-9206 MASTERPIECE SERIES III Fri., April 4, 7:30 p.m. The Great Hall of Annie Wright School, 827 N. Tacoma Ave., Tacoma Women composers form the centerpiece of this program featuring three of the region’s finest wind players – Wendy Wilhemi, flute; Florid Rothenberg, clarinet; and Elizabeth Paterson, bassoon. Price: $27. Info: (253) 5728863

Price: $17.50. Info: (253) 396-9169

TOMMY CASTRO AND THE PAINKILLERS Fri. April 4 Jazzbones, 2803 6th Ave., Tacoma The critically acclaimed Bay area bluesman and awardwinning guitarist/vocalist/ songwriter Tommy Castro and his band headline a CD release party for their new album “The Devil You Know.”

GRAY SKY BLUES MUSIC FESTIVAL Sat., April 5, Starts at noon The Swiss, The Harmon, Stonegate Pizza The 7th Annual Gray Sky Blues Music Festival, immediately following the Daffodil Parade, features live blues all day at The Harmon, The Swiss, and an after-party at The Stonegate. The year’s headliner is blues singer Cee

CULINARY ARTS WORKSHOP Fri., April 4, 10 a.m. to noon Bates Technical College, 1101 S. Yakima Ave., Tacoma Chef Roger Knapp gives a class covering the basics of cooking, knife skills, and use of herbs and spices. Price: $10. Info: (253) 241-4166

Cee James. Price: Free. Info: (253) 230-6851 THE UNUSUAL SUSPECTS COMEDY SHOW STARRING BOE BLAST Sat., April 5, 8:30 p.m. Rock ‘n’ Roll Lodge, 9825 Pacific Ave., Tacoma Comedy Mob Entertainment presents “The Unusual Suspects Comedy Show” starring one of Tacoma’s funniest comedians Boe Blast. The show is hosted by Kareem “The Last Super Hero” Walters and will include seven guest appearances by some of the wildest comedians in the game. Price: $10-$15. Info: (253) 906-8225 INDOOR GARDENING EXPO Sun., April 6, Noon to 5 p.m. Greater Tacoma Convention and Trade Center, 1500 Broadway, Tacoma Washington’s vibrantly evolving garden scene is in for a treat when the 2014 Grow Like a Pro Indoor Gardening tour makes its first stop in Tacoma. Perfect for hobby gardeners looking to discover a more efficient method of producing healthy, faster growing plants all year long. Price $10/door, or free VIP ticket at www.indoorgardenexpo.com. Info: (253) 8306601 ‘JAVA TACOMA: EPISODE 4, THE MERRY WIVES AMERICANO’ Sun., April 6, 2 p.m. Dukesbay Theater, 508 S. 6th Ave., Tacoma Best friends and fellow coffee lovers Jeri, Kate and Linda join forces once again to unleash mayhem over at Tacoma’s Perky’s Coffee

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

House. This time, a suave but untrustworthy stranger enters their lives. Could this mean romance for one of our ladies, or a reason for comic revenge? Price $10. Info: (253) 267-9869

accompanying adult. When: Second Tuesday of the month Ages: Children 6 and under with accompanying adult. Price: Free with Museum admission. Info: (253) 779-8490

JOB SEARCH WORKSHOP Mon., April 7, 11 a.m. Parkland Spanaway Pierce County Library, 13718 Pacific Ave., S., Tacoma Navigate sticky situations such as age, background, and reason for leaving a job. Create a winning resume and an effective cover letter you can target for specific positions. You will receive the newly updated Resume Kit. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3304

LINE DANCING FOR FUN AND FITNESS Tues., April 8, 6-8 p.m. Asia Pacific Cultural Center, 4851 S. Tacoma Way Learn to line dance every Tuesday. Dance to all styles of music. Great exercise for both mind and body. Info: (253) 383-3900 AARP FREE TAX ASSISTANCE Wed., April 9, Noon to 5 p.m. Tacoma Public Library – Moore Branch, 215 S. 56th Ave., Tacoma AARP volunteers will be available to provide free tax assistance and preparation. Please bring a government issued photo I.D., your Social Security Card, and all tax documents. Price: Free. Info: (253) 341-4848

SPECIAL FAMILIES OF PIERCE COUNTY Mon., April 7, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Pierce County Library Processing and Administration Center, 3005 112th St. E. SPECIAL Families of Pierce County is a support group for families that have children with special needs. Each month we provide an expert speaker that discusses a topic relevant to special needs. For upcoming speakers, topics, and more, visit our website. This program is free and we welcome donations to help with program expenses. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3300

PARENTING IN A DIGITAL WORLD WORKSHOP Wed., April 9, 6-7:30 p.m. Charles Wright Academy, 7723 Chambers Creek Rd. W. Join educators and technology experts Sam Harris and Holly Gerla for the annual “Parenting in the Digital World” workshop. Find out about “hot topics” of the moment, review research and trends in the realm of kids and technology. Ask questions and share your experiences in our “digital village.” Price: Free. Info: (253) 6208373

CAR STORY & PLAYTIME Tues., April 8, 10:30-11:30 a.m. LeMay-America’s Car Museum, 2702 E. ‘D’ St. Rev up your engines and take your little ones for an adventurous, imaginary journey. Children six years and younger will engage in a story and creative playtime with their

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE Kerri Bailey is a horticulturist and a certified herbalist. She makes custom blends and consults at Ubiquitous Journey (www.UBJourney.com) on 6th Avenue. Kerri owns two businesses – the online herb store www.HerbalElements.net and a water garden store inside Alpine Nursery in South Hill (www. AlpineGrows.com) called The Pond Pad (www.ThePondPad.com). She writes blogs on gardening, ponds, natural health and herbal remedies and teaches classes through Free University (www.FreeUNW.com).

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) This may be a fast-past week, full of change. You may feel that you have had enough, but know that there are reasons for these changes that will come to light in the next few weeks. Avoid hasty decisions for the sake of liberation. Daily tasks help to keep you grounded. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) Those restless feelings inside of you are trying to tell you something. Something may happen soon that affects relationships in the next coming weeks. The universe may be hinting that this may be the end of the outdated that no longer serves you. Find answers to the obvious. GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) A creative project may take you to places you have never been before. Your energy is high and ready to take on the upcoming changes. Your inner strength relies on balance so stay in touch with your daily routine. Venus in your home zone brings peace. CANCER (June 21 – July 22) Career matters may bring unexpected changes this week. You may feel like you want to take matters in your own hands and fed up with others’ lack of follow through. Be respectful of tender feelings and take baby steps. LEO (July 23 – August 22) Create a compromise from your feelings to expand your horizons and keeping in touch with tedious responsibilities. Take some time and not hurry things. Change is coming but in its own time. Explore your potential. VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Financial issues are on your mind this week as you wait for answers on a loan or project. Tread with care and don’t overextend yourself. Stress and anxiety can burn out our inner batteries. Research your options.

LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Have that important conversation this week with that person that needs to hear your side of the story. You may feel feisty and not in the mood to compromise. Once you give in you will realize that it was for the best. It’s all about the little things. SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) Worry and stress can weigh us down at times. Relax tensions with daily exercise, meditation and yoga. Your mood will be lifted as you immerse yourself in routine. Write down your thoughts and feelings in a journal or notebook. Smiling is contagious.

WORD SEARCH E R H B A C J I E N J D A R J U X

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SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) Routines and responsibilities take center stage this week. You may come up with a brilliant idea that makes your life easier. Love and relationships bring surprises, so expect the unexpected. Stay in touch with those around you. CAPRICORN (December 22 – January 19) Work may be full of interruptions so you may benefit from having a backup plan. You plan meetings and make your deadlines with determination. Take some time to enjoy outdoor activities. Smell the fresh spring air. AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) Tensions may escalate this week making you feel like taking action. Release your inner stresses to help you make the appropriate decisions. Meditation or yoga may help to relieve anxiety. Find out what’s best for you. PISCES (February 19 – March 20) Financial decisions will be highlighted this week. You can no longer escape the unavoidable. Spending more won’t make it better. Come up with a plan of action to accomplish your goals and relieve the stress. As Venus enters your sign you will find more inner peace and have a better outlook.

ANAGRAM

NUCLEAR COWBOYZ

How many words can you make out of this phrase?

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NOTICES Auction Notice

Abandoned Vehicle 2nd Thursday Monthly Lakewood Towing Inc. #5002 9393 Lakeview Ave SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 Ph. 253-582-5080 Auction 04102014 Date 04/10/2014 View @ 11 am Auction Starts @ 2 pm In accordance with RCW 46.55.130 Lakewood Towing Inc. will sell to the highest bidder. See complete listing @ lakewoodtowing.com or posting at our office

TO: Sylvia Carrillo & Damontay Whitaker In the Welfare of: K.R. C-W. DOB: 05/21/08 & A. C-W. DOB: 07/23/13 Case Numbers: PUY- CW-CW-2014-0010 & PUYCW-CW-2014-0009 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Review Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Continued Initial Hearing on Monday the 30th day of JUNE at 1:30PM If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS.

NOTICES PIERCE COUNTY DISTRICT COURT 930 Tacoma Avenue south, Room 601, Tacoma, WA HOWARD, GLORIA ANN: Petitioner HOWELL, JERRY L: Respondent NO: 4Z619667A REISSUANCE OF TEMPORARY ANTIHARASSMENT PROTECTION ORDER AND The Temporary Order for Protection issued on 01/30/14 Is herby extended through the new court hearing date: APRIL 14, 2014 @ 1:15 PM. At 930 Tacoma Avenue South, Courtroom 936 RESPONDENT. Violation of the provisions of this order with notice of its terms is a criminal offense under RCW 10.14 and RCW 10.31.100 and you may be subject to arrest. Willful disobedience of this order may also be contempt of court and subject you to penalties under RCW 7.21. A copy of this order has been filed with the court. ͳǤÂ&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2020;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x203A;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;ÇŁ Based upon the petition, testimony, and case record, the court finds the respondent committed unlawful harassment as defined in RCW 10.14.080, and IT IS ORDERED that the Respondent is restrained from: ǤÂ&#x2013;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x203A;Â?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022; Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2030;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2019;Â&#x160;ͳǤÂ&#x201E;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x203A;Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Ǥ ǤÂ&#x192;Â?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x203A;Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x203A; Â?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2030;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2019;Â&#x160;ÍłÂ&#x192;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2014;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D; Â&#x2022;Â&#x2014;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2026;Â&#x2021;Ǥ Ǥ Â&#x2018;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2039;Â?ͳͲͲͲ Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Č&#x2039;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2026;Â&#x2021;Č&#x152;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;ÇŻÂ&#x2022;     ǤÂ&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;ÇŁÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2039;Â?ʹͲÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013; Â&#x2018;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;ǤÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x160;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x201E;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x203A;Ǥ IT IS ORDERED THAT: The clerk hall forward a copy of this order on or before the next judicial day to: South sound 911 (or the law enforcement agency where Petitioner lives) for entry into the computer based criminal intelligence system available in this State used by law enforcement to list outstanding warrants. The petitioner shall forward a copy of this on or before the next judicial day to: (Law Enforcement Agency where Respondent lives) and said agency shall personally serve the respondent with a copy of this order and shall promptly complete and return to this court proof of service.

PIERCE COUNTY DISTRICT COURT 930 Tacoma Avenue south, Room 601, Tacoma, WA HOWARD, ANGELA M., Petitioner

TO: Farrah Bradley and Harold Chad Tom

HOWELL, JERRY L, Respondent

In the Welfare of: T., R.L. DOB: 09/24/2013 Case Number: PUY-CW-CW-2013-0042

NO: 4Z619666A

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Adjudication Hearing Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Guardianship Hearing on Monday the 7th Day of July, 2014 at 9:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. TO: Juarez, Anthony J. In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs Juarez, Anthony J. Case Number: PUY-FH-SHELL-2014-0017 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on Tuesday June 10, 2014 at 10:30am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: SLATON, Clara- Casondra Marie In the Welfare of: A.D.S. DOB: 11/27/2013 Case Number: PUY-CW-CW-2013-0048 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Review Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Continued Initial Hearing on Thursday the 26TH day of JUNE at 2:00 P.M If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. TO: BROOKS, Elysha M. In the Welfare of: K.A.D. DOB: 12/06/2002 Case Number: PUY-G-JV-2013-0041 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on Monday the 2nd day of June, 2014 at 3:00 PM If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT. WARNING: NOTICE , PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.750, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT THE COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS.

REISSUANCE OF TEMPORARY ANTIHARASSMENT PROTECTION ORDER AND The Temporary Order for Protection issued on 01/30/14 Is herby extended through the new court hearing date: APRIL 14, 2014 @ 1:15 PM. At 930 Tacoma Avenue South, Courtroom 936 RESPONDENT. Violation of the provisions of this order with notice of its terms is a criminal offense under RCW 10.14 and RCW 10.31.100 and you may be subject to arrest. Willful disobedience of this order may also be contempt of court and subject you to penalties under RCW 7.21. A copy of this order has been filed with the court. 1.Minors addressed in this Temporary Order: NONE Based upon the petition, testimony, and case record, the court finds the respondent committed unlawful harassment as defined in RCW 10.14.080, and IT IS ORDERED that the Respondent is restrained from: A. Attempting to contact the petitioner and any minors named in paragraph 1. Above in any manner. B. Making any attempts to follow the petitioner and any minors named in paragraph 1 above or keep them under surveillance. C. Going within 1000 Feet (distance) of the petitionerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s RESIDENCE CONFIDENTIAL D. Other: Respondent is restrained from being within 20 feet of Petitioner. Petitioner has a reasonable fear for her safety. IT IS ORDERED THAT: The clerk hall forward a copy of this order on or before the next judicial day to: South sound 911 (or the law enforcement agency where Petitioner lives) for entry into the computer based criminal intelligence system available in this State used by law enforcement to list outstanding warrants. The petitioner shall forward a copy of this on or before the next judicial day to: (Law Enforcement Agency where Respondent lives) and said agency shall personally serve the respondent with a copy of this order and shall promptly complete and return to this court proof of service.

VOLUNTEERS PAWS NEEDS WILDLIFE VOLUNTEERS PAWS in Lynnwood is looking for volunteers to help care for wildlife this spring. Every year, PAWS cares for more than 3,000 injured, orphaned or abandoned wildlife. Join the team and you can help feed and care for these remarkable animals. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a remarkable experience you ZRQ¡W Ă&#x20AC;QG DQ\ZKHUH HOVH For any questions please contact Mark Coleman, Communications Manager, at 206.419.6646. These are exciting times and you can make a difference! South Sound Outreach Services invites you to be trained as an In Person Assister Volunteer to help Pierce County residents enroll online for health insurance in the Washington Health Plan Finder. Open Enrollment is October 1 until March 31st. Coverage begins January 1st, 2014 for those enrolled by December 15th. Interested trainees may call Heather at SSOS 253-593-2111. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be glad \RXGLG

Become a Senior Companion today! Volunteers help frail or disabled seniors stay in their own home and maintain their independence. Activities include running errands, providing transportation or simply being a friend. Hourly stipend and mileage reimbursement provided. Requirements: must be 55+, serve at least 15 hours a week and be low-income. Drivers are especially needed currently. For more info call Julie Kerrigan, Program Director: 1(800) 335-8433, ext. 5686

Help furnish hope to those in need! NW Furniture Bank Volunteers needed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;NWFB helps restore hope, dignity and stability in our community by recycling donated furniture to people in need.â&#x20AC;? TuesdaySaturday Truck Volunteers Needed- 9:00 am-2:00 pm. Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at volunteer@ nwfurniturebank.org or call 253-302-3868. Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs We need a volunteer to host programs Tuesday & Thursday 9:30-12, & 1-2:30 pm at Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs. Volunteer will be calling Bingo and doing some extreme crafting, gardening during spring & summer and into fall. If interested call Bonnie @ 253-278-1475 MondayFriday 8:30-4PM. Ayusa International SeeksTacoma Host Parents for High School Exchange Students Ayusa International, a 30\HDUROG QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W WKDW promotes global learning through the hosting of high school foreign exchange students, is seeking parents/ families in Tacoma to host for the upcoming 2013-2014 school year. Ayusa students are 15-18 years old and come from more than 60 countries around the world including Brazil, Japan, Germany, Ecuador, France, Peru, Morocco, China and 6SDLQWKH\DUHDOOSURĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW in English. For more information, please visit our website: www.ayusa.org

FOR SALE FURNITURE

FURNITURE

New 5 Piece Bedroom Set Full or Queen set includes: Headboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, & mirror. %5$1' 1(: 2QO\ $400 253-539-1600

Adjustable Power Bed Brand New with memory foam mattress. Wall hugger with warranty. Delivery available. $995 253-537-3056

5 Piece Dining Room Set Table & 4 Chairs. New in box. Only $300 253539-1600 Microfiber Sectional Brand New REVERSIBLE sectional with chaise lounge. 1(:2QO\ 539-1600 All New Pillow Top Mattress Queen Size with warranty. Still in original plastic. Can deliver. $120. 253-537-3056 Solid Wood Bunk Beds Available in 2 colors. Brand new in box. Can break down to two separate twin beds. Delivery available. $250 253-539-1600 Low Profile Leather Bed Frame Still in box. Available in Full or Queen. Very nice. Can deliver. $250 253-539-1600 All New King Mattress Set 3 Piece King Mattress set for only $275. Still in original packaging with factory warranty. Can deliver. 253-537-3056

New Mission Style Bedroom Suite Solid wood Mission bedroom set. $699. Includes: headboard, footboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, and mirror. 253-539-1600 New Overstuffed Microfiber sofa & Love Seat Still in plastic with manufactures warranty. Can have for $700. Lifetime warranty on frame. 253-539-1600 BRAND NEW! Queen Memory foam mattress set with 20 year warranty. Can Deliver. $400. 253-537-3056 New Pillow Top Full Mattress Only $99. Never XVHG  &RPHV ZLWK manufactures warranty. Delivery available. 253537-3056

WANTED FURNITURE

Looking for a Futon Bed. Can Pay Cash. Please Call Alex. (253) 564-5743

FIRE ARMS

AUTOS

New in Box Glock 26 G4 with extra clips & holster. $650. (253) 686-5953

1999 Ford Windstar Van. 196K miles. Runs Good. Well Maintained. Fife. 255-2943. $1475

RUMMAGE SALE

RUMMAGE SALE

Holy Cross Rummage Sale N. 43rd & Shirley. Fri. April 4 & Sat. April 5. 10 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4 p.m. $2 Bag Sale Sat 2 PM ESTATE SALE

ESTATE SALE

ESTATE SALE A Guyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bonanza Refrig. Pool Table, Furniture, Tools Fri. April 4 & Sat. April 5 9 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4 p.m. 1506 23rd Ave., Milton

ANTIQUES WANTED

EMPLOYMENT

CNA

Full or Part-Time Day Shifts, Weekends. Live-in Nights. In Lakewood. Fax Resume to (253) 589-0182

DIRECTV is currently recruiting for the following position in Lacey:

Sr. Human Resources Business Partner If you are not able to access our website, DIRECTV.com, mail your resume and salary requirements to: DIRECTV, Attn: Talent Acquisition, 161 Inverness Drive West, Englewood, CO 80112. To apply online, visit: www.directv.com/ careers. EOE.

DISCRIMINATION Experiencing Workplace Discrimination? Retired City of Tacoma Civil Rights Investigator will provide assistance. Call 253-565-6179. Never a fee for my services.

PETS

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy 253-770-8552

Need safe farms or barns for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. 7KH\DUHĂ&#x20AC;[HG vaccinated and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 298-0913

Pet of the Week

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Malcolmâ&#x20AC;? This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Featured Pet is a wonderful and social Gold Rottweiler named Malcolm! This 2 year old handsome boy is sure to bring love and happiness to his new forever family. Malcolm is an affectionate pup who will eagerly await your return home after a long day. After a few hours apart, Malcolm will love taking a stroll with you through the neighborhood. He has minimal interest in chasing toys, so a nice daily walk will be a great stress reliever for him. Malcolm would do best in a single dog householdâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as he has a lot of love to give! Since Malcolm is a large dog & we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know all the details of his past, we suggest he is placed in a family with no children under the age of 5. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss your chance to make Malcolm a part of your family today! Reference #A484169

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www.thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week 1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105

VOLUNTEERS South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www.southsoundoutreach.org.

Project Homeless Connect is an annual event where homeless individuals can receive free services. The next event will be held at Tacoma Dome on Oct 23rd. For more information visit www.pchomelessconnect.com or call 253.593.2111.

Get involved with Metro Parks Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Citizen Advisory Councils! The Business & Responsive Agency Council helps district leadership with busiQHVV SODQQLQJ Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO sustainability decisions, revenue development and quality assurance. Monthly meetings focus on issues that affect the future of our park system. Visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/business-volunteer to learn more or call Brett Freshwaters, &KLHI )LQDQFLDO 2IĂ&#x20AC;FHU DW 253.305.1081. Brettf@tacomaparks.com.

Ivan is as social as they come. He loves toys, attention, and did I say lots of attention? This cuddly fella is in search of a Forever Family that has the time to give him what he needs. He is only 4 years old, has a bobtail, and he wants YOU to come see him today! Wicket is an adorably cute 9 year old Poodle and Rat Terrier mix. He loves company, and enjoys long walks around the neighborhood. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d make an excellent companion for a Forever Family that is looking for an older lap loving dog. Help Wicket find just the family he needs this season.


Friday, April 4, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV OPEN HOUSE Saturday, April 5, 12-2 pm UNIVERSITY PLACE HOME 7032 37th St Ct W University Place 4 Bed, 2.5 Bath 2880 sq foot $309,225

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

StephanieLynch 253.203.8985

MOORAGE

MOORAGE

Boat Moorage at Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dock. $9.50 per foot per month. 5 min. from I-5. Call Laura at (253) 627-3186

STABLES

HOMES FOR SALE

33 N Salmon Beach

STABLES

Dillon Stables. Covered, well-lit riding arena. 12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x12â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Stalls. Full care. Riding Lessons. Horses for Sale. $400 per month. (253) 606-4994 FOR RENT

HOMES FOR SALE

FOR RENT

Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton K\GUDXOLFERDW/LIWEULFNZRRGEXUQLQJĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFH with insert, expansive decking on all sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout the last 9 years, including roof, VLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZVGRRUVGHFNLQJERDW hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more. $450,000

Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 222-8480

CONDOS & HOMES GIG HARBOR

DUPONT

318 POINT FOSDICK PL NW

1835 MCNEIL CIRCLE

$1650

$1350

3 BED 1.75 BATH 1650 SF. RAMBLER HAS NEW FLOORS, NEWER PAINT, FAMILY ROOM, WASHER/DRYER & PETS OK W/APPROVAL

2 BED 1.75 BATH 1344 SF. LARGE CONDO INCLUDES AMAZING KITCHEN, ALL APPLIANCES, HUGE MASTERS AND GARAGE SPACE.

UNIVERSITY PLACE

PUYALLUP

7508 41ST. ST CT W #B3

11225 187TH ST E

$710

$1595

2 BED 1 BATH 800 SF. LARGE 2 BED APT HAS NEWER APPLIANCES, WASHER/DRYER, $24 FEE FOR W/S/G AND MORE.

4 BED 2.5 BATH 2430 SF. HUGE HOME ON GOLF COURSE HAS 5 PIECE MASTERS, FAMILY ROOM,FENCED YARD & SMALL PETS OK

NE TACOMA

DUPONT

2943 38TH AVE NE

2206 TOLMIE AVE

$1295 3 BED, 2 BATH 1140 SF. REMODELED HOME HAS SS APPLIANCES, FORMAL DINING, GARAGE SPACE AND MORE.

$1195 2 BED 1 BATH 1084 SF. PERFECT 2 BED CONDO HAS A FANTASTIC KITCHEN, OPEN LAYOUT, WASHER/ DRYER AND GARAGE SPACE.

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200 View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

805 N Steele St Want bragging rights & the ability to name drop? Hans Grohe, Duravit, Kohler, & Porcher to name a few... Then this is the house for you-high end everything & custom touches galore. Need this spelled out in layman terms? Fabulous, fantastic & close to hip 6th Ave Biz District, this 4 bed, 2.5 bath home has natural, original woodwork, is an entertainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream, and is ready for new owners... Leave your hammer DW\RXUROGKRXVHWKLVRQHLVĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGDQG Ă&#x20AC;QLVKHGZHOO,PLJKWDGG:HOFRPH $368,000

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3578 E F St, Tacoma â&#x20AC;˘ $124,000 This home is completely remodeled and movein ready with a massive, fenced backyard. Updated plumbing & electrical. New carpet, paint, moldings, doors. New kitchen with hickory cabinets, range, dishwasher. 12 by 14 covered deck. Huge Outbuilding for storage, alley access. ( MLS # 582500)

Turn the Key & Move In! This Cozy 2Bd 1Bth has been freshly SDLQWHG  IHDWXUHV UHĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHG ZRRG Ă RRUVLQFKWULPDURXQGZLQGRZVGRRUV & custom tile throughout. Upgraded (OHFWULFDO 3OXPELQJ2IĂ&#x20AC;FH'HQDUHD and large windows to enjoy Country Living and Northwest Wildlife at your doorstep! Privacy & Beauty all around! Situated on 1.12 acres (2 parcels), this property has Boundless Potential for Investor/Builder. Centrally located near highly desired schools, parks, water recreation and minutes to HWY 16 & local stores. This home is ready for your Inspiration!

Michelle Anguiano Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood 253.720.6525

1018 S 61st St, Tacoma â&#x20AC;˘ $149,500

3 Bed, 1 3/4 Bath. 1,356 sq ft. Open Ă RRUSODQ YDXOWHGFHLOLQJVKLJKOLJKW this handsome rambler on a park-like corner lot in Artondale. Kitchen features an island, new smooth-top stove & convection oven, tile countertops & bay ZLQGRZV)DPLO\URRPZLWKĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHLV perfect for entertaining as is the large deck & fenced backyard. The master suite, one of three newly carpeted bedrooms, has French doors to the deck and a remodeled ž bathroom. 30-yr roof installed in 2005. 10 mins to schools, shopping, recreation & SR-16

936 S Sheridan $219,000

Askthehometeam.com

Sergio Hernandez (253) 431-2308

Heather Redal (253) 363-5920

Sergio@betterproperties.com

Heatherredal@gmail.com

3728 N Gove St, Tacoma Cute little bungalow in Proctor! Nice upgrades include a new family room, windows, roof, energy package & carpet 6 years ago. Detached garage was converted to extra living space. It has a separate electric panel, heat & lights - lots of possibilities... music studio, art studio, exercise / yoga room, etc. Parking for 3 cars off the alley next to garage. Charming back yard, too! +DUGZRRGĂ RRUVXQGHUFDUSHWH[FHSWLQ family room. MLS# 518902. $195,000 Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

2711 Henry Road N

Beautiful Victorian 4-plex in good location back on the market after remodel. Walking distance WR KRVSLWDOV GRZQWRZQ SDUNV 0DLQ Ă RRU XQLW has one bedroom plus attached bonus room, dining room, lg kitchen with nook, new carpet throughout, bay windows. Upstairs unit has 2 bedrooms, bath, lg living room, kitchen & balcony. Lower level has 2 studio apts & bath. Sep. utilities for main and upper units. 3,064 sq ft MLS# 523770

Better Properties Heather Redal 253.363.5920 PROPERTY

PROPERTY

MT. RAINIER VIEW $125,000 Beautiful Level Buildable Site! Located off of Ray Nash Drive NW, this 1.25 Acres of natural setting and mature Evergreen trees is perfect to build your dream home and enjoy the Country Lifestyle! Peeka-Boo View of Mt. Rainier. Just minutes away from sought after Schools, Uptown Gig Harbor Amenities, Restaurants, WA-Hwy 16, Hospitals, Boat launch/ water activities, tennis courts & Kopachuck State Park! Electricity is available at corner.

Michelle Anguiano, Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood 253.720.6525

OLD TOWN $499,950 Amazing development potential with this unique 2OG7RZQSURSHUW\&LW\KDVJLYHQĂ&#x20AC;QDOSODW approval for 4 lots on this prime 3 acre piece. Big views possible from all lots in this great neighborhood, tucked back & out of the way. Walk to the historic Old Town district with its coffee shops, wine bar & restaurants.; then stroll down to the waterfront & enjoy the gorgeous Puget Sound setting with walking paths, public docks, shoreline restaurants & more! MLS# 332653

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

COMMERCIAL Absolutely Charming, Mediterranean Style, custom built North Tacoma view home. Enjoy Commencement Bay view from Mstr Br balc. ,QVLGHIHDWLQFO0DUEOHĂ RRUHQWU\6W6WHHO$SSO *UDQFRXQWWRSV&XVWEXLOW+LFNRU\FDE%HDXW %UD]LOLDQ&KHUU\KDUGZRRGĂ RRU%D\ZLQGRZV 0VWUVXLWHZ)3 /UJEDWKVWHDPVKRZHU &DOLFORVHW1HZ(QHUJ\(IĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWKHDWLQJ&HQW YDFXXPQHZSDLQWLQ RXWQHZFDUSHW)LQLVKHG %VPWZNLWFKHQ&ORVHWR6FKRROV3DUNV )UHHZD\+RVSLWDOV :DWHUIURQW$623,000.

Gil Rigell Better Properties N. Proctor (253) 376-7787

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St.

COMMERCIAL

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract LAKEWOOD FLORIST SHOP Same location 30+ years, owners retiring, Asking $60,000 cash. PORT ORCHARD, DOWNTOWN Food & Beverage, annual gross sales, approx. $1,500,000, excellent net. Owner selling real estate & the business for $1,050,000, terms avail., same location over 100 years. ice

RURAL LIVING: pr reduced Restaurant/Lounge in Ashford, WA Price for business, $105,000 with $25,000 down. Price for the real estate, $390,000 with $75,000 down. Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract includes a 3 B/R house, laundromat, restr./lounge bldg. on 3.4 acre, commercial zoned parcel. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;CALLAHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB & GRILL IN KEY CENTER Business is for sale for $300,000 with $100,000 down, High gross sales. Saler will also consider leasing the space

$264,950 Debbie Houtz Better Properties 253-376-2280

MLS# 573155

Advertise Your Real Estate Listing in the Pierce County Community Classifieds CALL 253-922-5317

Super charming home w/ the ease of newer amenities... Box beam ceilings, hardwood Ă RRUVPDUEOHHQWU\SLFWXUHSODWHUDLOV SHULRG VW\OHOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHVDGGWRWKHDPELHQFHZKLOH newer roof, furnace/heat pump, indoor/outdoor speakers, newer wiring/plumbing, & gas Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHDGGWRWKHDKKKKIDFWRU6SDFLRXV living room, large kitchen, HUGE dining room, a bedroom and cute remodeled bathroom JUDFHWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWĂ RRU*LJDQWLFGHFNZVHDWLQJ welcome home. Move in and make it yours. $210,950

Charm and character galore in this 1920â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s &XWLH %HDXWLIXO KDUGZRRG Ă RRUV WKURXJKRXW high coved ceilings, large open kitchen, mud room, master bedroom w/2 closets, upstairs has KLJKFHLOLQJV)LUĂ RRUVDQGEHGURRPVZLWKORWV of closet space plus lots of storage. Backyard is fully fenced and is a gardenerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream with pond, mature landscaping and so much privacy. Garage is like a quaint cottage with a loft, new wiring and shop. House has 60 year roof, new insulation and is adorable! (MLS # 600824)

6711 36th St Ct NW, Gig Harbor

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

Professional Management Services

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

1232 S Adams St.

www.johnlscott.com/80019 â&#x20AC;&#x153;I promise to follow through and follow up. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll discuss with you exactly how I work and what you can expect. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll communicate Â?Â? Top Producing Broker 2008-2014 Â?Â? regularly and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll know the process each www.stephanielynch.com step of the way. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m here to work hard for you and make the transaction as smooth as possible. Call me today for your personal consultation.â&#x20AC;?

CALL 253.922.5317

COLLISION CENTER Same owner 15 yrs. Retiring, 6621 So. Tacoma Way. $130,000 with terms to qualified buyer - some training provided at 0 cost to buyer.

A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with no HOA. High &HLOLQJVJDVÂżUHSODFHVVHSDUDWHO\PHWHUHG &DOOIRUSULYDWHVKRZLQJWRGD\253.606.0689 BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME

$399,000

LAKEWOOD CAFE/LOUNGE on a busy intersection, $81,500 CASH.

CALL RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 4, 2014

Michael McDonald Bachman Turner

Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo

April 5, 8:30pm

April 11, 8:30pm

April 26, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $40, $60, $95, $100

I-5 Showroom $35, $60, $85, $90

I-5 Showroom $35, $50, $75, $80

CageSport MMA XXX

Tesla

Spike & the Impalers

May 3, 7pm

May 16, 8:30pm

May 17, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $35, $55, $100

I-5 Showroom $25, $35, $55, $60

I-5 Showroom $30, $40, $50, $55

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


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