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FREE s Friday, April 3, 2015

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ART FROM LOCAL STUDENTS

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Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

DAFFODIL CORONATION, 2015

A LOOK AT THE FUTURE

CITY TO HOST COMP PLAN FORUMS TO FORMULATE FUTURE GROWTH

COURTESY OF CITY OF TACOMA

GROWTH. Downtown Tacoma

won’t be the only neighborhood to grow in the next 20 years. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma is set to take another look at its comprehensive plan, an umbrella document that is required by the state to address future growth and development. The city’s comprehensive plan provided the framework for more than a dozen neighborhood-specific transportation and cultural plans for the city and six regional plans. It was last updated in 2004.

u See TACOMA / page A2

DAFFODIL FESTIVAL CORONATION FINDS A NEW QUEEN AND A NEW VENUE

SAGA CONTINUES

ANOTHER ROUND OF HEARINGS FOR PIERCE COUNTY SERVICES BUILDING

By Savannah Fry

T

Correspondent

he Daffodil Festival’s annual Queen’s Coronation event took place the evening of Saturday, March 28, celebrating the Festivals’ 82nd year and crowning the 79th monarch to hold the title of queen for the communitywide leadership program. This year marks a notable difference in venue, as Coronation moved from its past home at Life Center in Tacoma to the more grandiose Pantages Theater in the downtown area. With a history to fit the Daffodil Festival’s illustrious career as a community mainstay for 82 years, the Pantages was the perfect venue to host one of the Festival’s grandest events. That venue also allowed for more seating room, something necessary for the Festival’s growing attendance rates at this event in recent years, and definitely appreciated by the princesses and their cheering sections, as well. Princess Kaitlin Ringus, representing Fife High School, had her own section of the audience to her name: the entire first row of the balcony seating – about 30 tickets, by her estimations – had been claimed by her family. “My parents, brothers, sister in law, aunt and uncle, cousin, boyfriend’s parents, my grandma, my father’s best friends, some of the faculty from my school, and the wonderful family that I nanny for… and some more of my friends.”

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

VOTE. Petition backers John

Berry and Grant Pelsky gather signatures outside of the Pierce County Annex. “We aren’t here to cause problems for our government,” Berry said. “We just want the people to have a vote. We have a right to protect our Constitution.”

u See QUEEN / page A10

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS COURTESY OF DAFFODIL FESTIVAL

ELEGANT. (Top) This year marked a notable dif-

ference in venue, as Coronation moved from its past home at Life Center in Tacoma to the more grandiose Pantages Theater in the downtown area. With a history to fit the Daffodil Festival’s illustrious career as a community mainstay for 82 years, the Pantages was the perfect venue to host one of the Festival’s grandest events. (Middle) Bonney Lake High School’s Princess Ashley Becker was visibly shocked, and delighted, when her name was announced as the chosen Daffodil Queen. (Bottom) Bonney Lake High School’s Queen Ashley Becker marks the 79th holder of the title, as well as Bonney Lake’s firstever queen for the Festival.

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Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

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Sports ......................A10 Hot Tickets ..............A11

Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

The yet-to-be-built, and already controversial, Pierce County General Services Building slated for the former Puget Sound Hospital site on the Pacific Avenue hillside is headed for another round of hearings. Two local residents, Leslie Young and Arthur Miller, have filed a lawsuit against Jerry Gibbs who has organized a group of people to gather signatures in an effort to put the whole plan up for a public vote in November. They filed the lawsuit on the grounds that the call for a

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Two Sections | 24 Pages


Section A • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 3, 2015

CONVICTED CHILD PORNOGRAPHER

A woman previously banned from a Tacoma Avenue market decided to revisit the venue on March 26, and made a poor distraction for a quick getaway. Management approached the woman as she exited the bathroom and reminded her that she was banned from the facility. The woman simply ignored the manager and filled a cup of free water, which she then threw on a customer outside as she made her getaway. Police caught up to the woman down the street and issued her a citation. A man on Pacific Avenue would go to any lengths to speak to the police on March 25, which probably had a lot to do with his blood alcohol content. Police were called to the scene when the man began harassing citizens at a bus stop. The officer observed the scene from across the street, and the man decided to pay him a visit with half a bottle of vodka in his hand while traveling across several lanes of traffic to do so. The officer responded by issuing him a citation for drinking liquor in public. The officer also discovered the man was banned from Pierce Transit, and he was then transported to Fife Jail and booked for trespassing and unlawful bus conduct. Compiled by Derek Shuck

TOP STORIES ON tacomaweekly.com

#1 SMALL BUSINESSES FEAR $15-PER-HOUR PACKAGE #2 FOOTBALL RETURNS AND THE KINGS GET BACK TO BUSINESS #3 2015 HIGH SCHOOL BOYS SOCCER PREVIEW #4 “SPIRITUAL COWGIRL� JESSICA LYNNE PLAYS FOR A GOOD CAUSE #5 $15 MINIMUM WAGE ON TRACK FOR NOVEMBER BALLOT #6 WINTHROP GETS RENOVATION FUNDING #7 CITIZEN ACTIVIST SUED FOR SECOND TIME FOR FILING PIERCE COUNTY REFERENDUM

WANTED FOR ROBBERY By David Rose

Washington’s Most Wanted - Q13 Fox

Tacoma Police say convicted sex offender Walter Mason Clark is now wanted for stealing a man’s new cell phone. Officers responded to calls of someone yelling in the 400 block of Faw- DAVID ROSE cett Avenue to call 911. “He followed a victim into an apartment building. While the victim was going into their apartment he robbed them of his cell phone so he’s also wanted for robbery as well as burglary 2nd,� said Officer Shelbie Boyd with Tacoma Police. Clark, who goes by “Lil Wayne� or “Mason,� was convicted in 2003 of child pornography.

He has a Pierce County Sheriff ’s Department warrant for failure to register as a sex offender and escape from community custody. “He’s out, he’s a registered sex offender and we need to be sure he gets put back where he belongs, also he has no care or concern about the other people he’s out victimizing today,� said Officer Boyd. Clark is 5’11�, 210 lbs. with black hair and brown eyes. Crime Stoppers of Tacoma-Pierce County is offering a cash reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to Clark’s arrest. All calls are anonymous. If you know where officers can find him, call the hotline at 1 (800) 222-TIPS. Clark will be featured on Washington’s Most Wanted Friday night at 11 p.m. on Q13 FOX and Saturday night at 9:30 p.m. on JOEtv and 10:30 on Q13 FOX.

t Tacoma

TrAnSPorTATion MASTer PlAn/ CoMPrehenSive PlAn MeeTingS:

From page A1

The first step at refreshing the plan involves a series of community workshops that will run through April and address growth and development projects for the next 25 years. The focus of the current update will be to extend the planning horizon to 2040, comply with regional and state requirements that have changed since it was last updated a decade ago and to address recommendations on how to best accommodate the growth expected to come to Tacoma as adopted in Vision 2040. The process will also address the community comments that were gathered from the Citywide Strategic Plan and Vision process last year. While the comprehensive plan addresses many aspects of growth, from residential and commercial zoning and general design standards to recognizing areas as retail or industrial centers, transportation around the city will likely drive much of the debate since an area’s walkablity or drivability to services often define neighborhoods.

Thursday, April 2, 6-8 p.m., Truman Middle School, 5801 N. 35th St. COURTESY OF CITY OF TACOMA

WORD CLOUD. Participants at earlier forums were asked to define Tacoma’s future. Those words were then gathering into a word cloud to show patterns by increasing the size of the word every time it is used by a participant.

“The transportation element is going to be a big part of it,� City Councilmember Marty Campbell said. His Eastside district is anchored by Pacific Avenue, which is slated to be the site of a 330,000-squarefoot office building to house 1,300 county staffers. That facility, and the amount of large parcels of commercially developable land, make it a district on the rise. How much of a rise is where neighbors differ. “People want growth, but they want it measured,� Campbell said. “People want growth

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that comes with the community not faster than the community.� A draft of the city’s Transportation Master Plan is under review as well. The plan is meant to evaluate the various methods people use to get from one area to another, be it by car, bike, foot or mass transit and how those travel patterns would be affected by transportation changes. One concept behind the plan to the creation of 20-Minute Neighborhoods, meaning having all regular services and shops within a 20-minute drive from homes.

Thursday, April 9, 6-8 p.m., Gray Middle School, 6229 S. Tyler St. Thursday, April 16, 6-8 p.m., Jason Lee Middle School, 602 N. Sprague Ave. Thursday, April 23, 6-8 p.m., Tacoma Nature Center, 1919 S. Tyler St. To view the plans, visit cityoftacoma. org/tmp or tacoma2040.com.

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Friday, April 3, 2015 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 5

Our View

TACOMA’S FUTURE WILL COME IF WE PlAn it or not

EDITORIAL CARTOON BY CHRIS BRITT s CBRITTOON@GMAIL.COM s7774!#/-!7%%+,9#/-%$)4/2)!,#!24//.3 FIND CARTOONS, THE ART OF FREE SPEECH: CHRIS BRITT AT TEDXTACOMA ON YOUTUBE.COM

Guest Editorials

By Laura Finley

on ‘reAl women’

I am an unreal woman, evidently. A fake, a fraud, an alien-woman of sorts. At least that’s what I keep hearing and reading. Because evidently, real women have “curves,� “back fat,� “bass,� and “booty.� Real women struggle to lose weight after childbirth. They have droopy bits and wrinkles, so I am told. I am 42 years old. I am 5’10 and weigh 110 pounds. I do not have an eating disorder, I am just naturally tall and thin, I eat generally healthy foods, and I am a lifelong runner who paid for most of my college by competing in Division 1 track and cross country. I lost all the weight I gained with my healthy (7.1 pounds, 20 inch) baby within one week of delivery. According to popular culture, this makes me not “real� at best, and, if you listen to popular music, it might make me a “silicone Barbie doll� or a “skinny bitch.� This focus on so-called “real women� may sound nice, but in actuality is as divisive as the excessive emphasis on being model thin. When former super model Cindy Crawford released an untouched photograph showing her beauty but also her flaws, people went crazy, claiming that this made them love

her even more because she is now more “real.� Dove has led the “real� women movement with its “Campaign for Real Beauty,� featuring several supposedly “real� women in their bras and panties. While these women definitely don’t have typical celebrity or model bodies, it was revealed in 2008 that these photos were also Photoshopped, hence not actually real at all. “People� magazine recently featured the photography of Jade Beall, who captured “real� women after pregnancy. The focus, of course, is on those who struggled to lose their baby weight. Because that’s what “real� women do. When pregnant model Sarah Stage released pictures of her small and still muscular stomach, she suffered from skinny-shaming, with many asserting that somehow she was delinquent because she didn’t gain enough weight. Yet Stage’s baby is by all measures so far completely healthy. Maria Kang, now known as “fit mom,� ignited an online war when she photographed her very fit body asking women, “What’s your excuse?� Kang is the mother of three children under the age of three, and has argued that many women use children, work or other obligations as an excuse not to take care of their personal fitness

and health. Women accused her of fatshaming, of bullying, and demanded that she apologize. Don’t get me wrong – I appreciate any chance to open up a conversation about women’s many body types and the strange and oppressive pressures placed on us (and that we place on ourselves) to meet these socially constructed standards. I fail to see, however, how skinny-shaming is any better than fat-shaming. It is unclear to me how poking fun of women who are thin and fit serves to challenge the excessive focus on women’s bodies. Film star Maggie Gyllenhaal offered a more nuanced understanding of the complexities of women in her commentary about the roles for which females were being considered for Oscars. She noted that “these women who are sometimes powerful and sometimes not. Sometimes sexy, sometimes not. Sometimes honorable, sometimes not.� In sum, not “real� or “unreal� by some visual criteria but instead different from one another in many ways, physical and otherwise. Laura Finley, Ph.D., teaches in the Barry University Department of Sociology & Criminology and is syndicate by PeaceVoice.

How KeYStone AnSwerS tHe cHAllenge of rAil trAnSPort

By Michael James Barton

In February, trains carrying oil derailed in West Virginia and Canada. The devastating accidents sparked renewed concerns over the safety of transporting oil by rail. Efforts to prevent similar incidents in the future are essential. But statistically speaking, rail transport is among the safest ways to move oil long distances. The most pressing challenge facing our railroad infrastructure is congestion – especially now that the shale-energy revolution has boosted domestic oil and gas production to historic highs. Congress has tried to relieve some of that congestion – and in the process, dramatically reduce the greenhouse-gas emissions generated transporting oil – by approving the long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline. The measure would’ve allowed the addition of 1,179 miles of pipeline to the 2.6 million miles already in use in America today. Yet, President Obama vetoed the bipartisan agreement. His veto was motivated by petty politics – and will do nothing to help this country build the rail and pipeline infrastructure it so desperately needs. In 99.99 percent of cases, our railroads transport hazardous materials without incident. Overall rail safety has improved markedly over the last few years. Between

2011 and 2014, the number of derailments fell by more than 15 percent, according to the Federal Railroad Administration. Of course, industry and governments alike should work to bring the number of rail accidents to zero as soon as possible. For years, the energy industry has worked with federal regulators to develop and refine safety standards that would help achieve this goal. For such efforts to be successful, however, our leaders will need to address the growing problem of rail congestion. Thanks to a surge in domestic oil production, the amount of oil transported by rail has spiked. In 2008, America’s railroads carried 9,500 carloads of crude oil, according to the Department of Energy. By 2013, they transported 407,761 carloads – a more than 42-fold increase. The latest forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration projects that domestic crude production will continue to grow. Meanwhile, according to Gary Doer, Canada’s Ambassador to the United States, “[S]ince the KXL application was first delayed in November, 2011, crude oil by rail exports from Canada to the U.S. have jumped ten-fold, and continue to expand.� Our already-stretched rail infrastructure isn’t capable of moving even more crude.

The only feasible alternative is a pipeline like Keystone XL. Moving oil by pipeline emits fewer greenhouse gases than rail transport. In fact, the State Department found that transporting Canadian oil sands through the Keystone pipeline could generate 41 percent fewer emissions than moving them by rail. By vetoing Keystone, the president hasn’t just needlessly strained America’s rail infrastructure. He’s also increasing air pollution. All this despite the fact that Keystone passed with bipartisan support in both the House and Senate. America needs to ramp up its investments in both pipelines and railroads. By rejecting KXL, the president is denying our country the basic infrastructure improvements that our domestic-energy revolution demands. The president says he wants to reduce pollution, create jobs, and expand our nation’s infrastructure. Building the Keystone XL pipeline would accomplish all three. Yet he’s vetoed the project. Maybe the president just doesn’t mean what he says. Michael James Barton is the Energy Advisor at ARTIS Research, and speaks around the country on energy and energy security matters. He previously served as the deputy director of Middle East policy at the Pentagon.

Letter to the Editor Dear Editor, (Re: Steve Dunkelberger’s March 27 article “Small Businesses Fear $15 Per Hour Package.�) It is ironic that Kris Blondin, the owner of Stinkrestaurant, expresses so much concern about Proposition 1 lately. A year ago, I met Kris Blondin outside of Stadium Thriftway. I was collecting signatures on an informal petition for a $15/hr minimum wage in Tacoma. Ms. Blondin stopped and spoke to me for several minutes about her concerns. She said there should be some type of exemption for tipped workers. She also told me that she doesn’t pay herself. I politely listened and asked questions because I really wanted to know her perspective. I requested her contact information and she provided it. I explained that 15 Now Tacoma was seeking input from local small businesses to help us write an initiative. I emailed her, called her and visited Stink.

Ms. Blondin sent her wait staff to tell me she was too busy to talk at that time. While I was there, I ordered some rare Norwegian cheese. The wait staff person told me they would contact me later about the cheese, as they didn’t currently have any. Well, I never heard back from Ms. Blondin or Stink about the $15/hr minimum wage, or the cheese! I did see her criticizing 15 Now Tacoma and paid sick leave in comments in various online news sites. 15 Now Tacoma has been holding weekly public meetings at First United Methodist Church for 14 months. And we wrote an initiative that exempts small businesses. I saw another article recently where Blondin claimed that Stink grosses less than $300,000 annually. If that is true, Blondin’s restaurant would be exempt. 3ARAH-ORKENs.OW4ACOMA6OLUNTEER

The year 2040 seems like a lifetime away, far too distant into the future to worry about. That is a mistake. The future starts now. The actions made, the policies adopted, the plans approved and the paths selected today will create the city of tomorrow. Be a part of that process. Tacoma is in the early stages of updating its comprehensive plan, the umbrella document of the city to address quality of life, growth and development for the coming decades. The plan was last updated in 2004, when the city was on the cusp of the city it is today. Tacoma was ranked among the top 30 in America’s Most Livable Communities that year in a survey conducted by the Partners for Livable Communities, which noted Tacoma’s bright future as “America’s #1 Most Wired City.â€? Remember that slogan? Tacoma Art Museum’s landmark building had just opened. The Museum of Glass was new, and light rail had just started running through downtown. The Greater Tacoma Convention and Trade Center opened the same year. No one complained about potholes around the city ‌ because they largely didn’t exist. The city has changed since 2004, so the document used to chart its future should take those changes into account as more changes are coming. The “Medical Mileâ€? will continue to fill in with healthcare clinics and offices between the two anchor hospitals. The Eastside will add commercial and residential developments that could make it the envy of the rest of the city. The Tacoma Dome could have a massive flower on its roof. Streets might even get repaired or made obsolete with the use of flying cars or driverless drones. Updating the city’s comprehensive plan based on an episode of “The Jetsonsâ€? isn’t the best idea, but spending time projecting the future is always time well spent. Consider the fact that the city will see new neighbors and new businesses along its streets. Everyone wants to live in a walkable community that is safe and well landscaped, complete with a cute all-hours cafĂŠ on one corner and a full-service grocery store on the other and maybe a park just across the street. The trick to that is now to get Tacoma to be a city of neighborhoods straight out of Mayberry without driving up property costs so current residents can no longer afford to live on the streets they helped create. Tacoma’s future could follow the current struggles found in Seattle, as a rising number of residents of the Emerald City are being priced out of their neighborhoods and finding more affordable housing in Pierce County. Tacoma could either solidify its standing as a bedroom community for Seattle workers or emerge as a vibrant city in its own right. Both paths have merits. Both have drawbacks. And yes, both futures require planning, frank discussions and then decisions on key issues. Be part of that discussion before the future is decided. Visit tacoma2040.com for a look at our shared future and for ways to voice your thoughts on how the future should be crafted.

TACOMAWEEKLY

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2588 Pacific Highway E., Fife, WA 98424 (253) 759-5773 • FAX: (253) 759-5780 Publisher: John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com Operations Manager: Tim Meikle / tim@tacomaweekly.com News Desk: news@tacomaweekly.com Managing Editor: Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com Staff Writers: Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Kathleen Merryman / kathleen@tacomaweekly.com Derek Shuck / derek@tacomaweekly.com Entertainment Editor: Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com Sports Editor: Justin Gimse/ jgimse@tacomaweekly.com Pagination: Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar Web Developers: Cedric Leggin, Ed Curran, Mike Vendetti Photographer: Rocky Ross, Bill Bungard Contributing Writers: Karen Westeen, Dave Davison, Glen Casebeer Advertising: Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Marlene Carrillo / marlene@tacomaweekly.com Shelby Johnson / shelby@tacomaweekly.com Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. Tacoma Weekly welcomes letters to the editor, your opinions and viewpoints. Anonymous letters will not be published. Tacoma Weekly reserves the right to edit letters for length, content and potentially libelous material. Please send them to above address or e-mail us at letters@tacomaweekly.com.

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Section A • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 3, 2015

Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK

Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.” in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of roads riddled with holes, and continued those efforts in 2012. While that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

KING’S BOOKS CELEBRATES 15 YEARS On April 1, King’s Books will be 15 years old and the community is invited to come and celebrate on April 4 during the day and during the night. All items in store will be 15 percent off to celebrate. For the Day Carnival, events happen all day for kids

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TACOMA ELKS HOLDS EASTER EGG HUNT Tacoma Elks # 174 will hold its annual Easter egg hunt on Sunday, April 5 from 1-3 p.m. for all the Tacoma community. The egg hunt will be located on the driving range by the new Tacoma Elks lodge at 2013 S. Cedar St. at 2 p.m. Forty-five volunteers from the Tacoma Elks, Wilson Jr. ROTC and the Iron Horse girls fast pitch soft ball team prepared about 2,000 eggs for the egg hunt. There will be three categories for the children, ages 0-2 years, 3-5 years and 6-10 years old. Prizes in the eggs will be candy, $140 in quarters, $100 in dollars, and rewards for 15 bicycles in the 3-5-year-old age category. Starting at 1 p.m. there will be free hot dogs and drinks. There will also be face painting and photos with the Easter Bunny. Donations are requested for the face painters and the Easter Bunny photos. Participants are reminded to be at the egg hunt promptly at 2 p.m. or before. As in the past, all the eggs were gathered by the children in the time of 45 seconds to one and one half minutes. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT PARKING IMPROVEMENTS SCHEDULED The City of Tacoma’s Public Works Department is starting ADA parking and sidewalk improvements at four City-owned facilities. The work will start in March and extend through May as part of the City’s ADA SelfEvaluation and Transition Plan. Locations include: s Pantages Theater (901 Broadway.) s Rialto Theater (310 S. 9th St.) s People’s Community Center (1602 S. Martin Luther King Jr. Way) s Swasey Library (7001 6th Ave.) “I’m happy to see that the City is moving towards being more accessible to all residents,” said Council Member Lauren Walker. The internal areas of these facilities have already been upgraded to current ADA standards. External upgrades represent the next phase of improvements. Each location, with the exception of the Rialto Theater, requires significant concrete and asphalt removal and replacement to meet ADA required grades. To date, there have been 25 internal building upgrades and seven external building upgrades as part of the ADA Self-Evaluation and Transition Plan. Contact City of Tacoma Project Manager Mark D’Andrea with questions or concerns at mdandrea@cityoftacoma.org or (253) 591-5518.

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referendum on the issue is not a legal use of the county’s referendum process because the decision to build the multimillion dollar office building falls under the sole duties of the County Council, which approved the deal in a 4-to-3 vote earlier this year. The lawsuit comes after Pierce County Executive Pat McCarthy filed a similar suit earlier this year that was later dropped by a vote of the council. The new lawsuit could end in a summary judgment as early as later this month or in May if both sides agree on an expedited hearing date. “This is not Pierce County suing the voters, the so called ‘David v. Goliath’ argument, but a ‘David v. David’ dispute over what is just, right and legal,” Young and Miller stated in a release announcing the lawsuit. “We, the plaintiffs, are registered voters too, and are also taxpayers who reside in Pierce County. We believe this referendum is not a proper, legal referendum – as the actions of our government, Pierce County, were administrative in this case, not legislative. We do not want the citizens to waste time, and as taxpayers, we believe the referendum calls for an unnecessary and inappropriate election.” As with most construction projects, delays mean prices go up. The coun-

TAX SERVICE HELPS FIGHT HUNGER Liberty Tax Service is working to fight hunger in Washington with an innovative “Donate & Save” program that rewards individuals with a discount on tax preparation when they donate non-perishable items to support local food banks. From April 1 to April 8, participating Liberty Tax offices in King, Pierce, Thurston, Lewis and Grays Harbor Counties will take $50 off tax preparation services for new customers who bring at least five non-perishable food items to Liberty Tax when they come in to have their taxes prepared. Although the $50 savings will end on April 8, many area Liberty Tax offices will continue to accept food donations until April 15. The need is great. In Washington, one in seven people struggles with hunger, according Feeding America, a network of 200 food banks across the country. With customer support, Liberty Tax hopes to deliver 5,000 pounds of food in the Month of April to help area food banks feed local residents. “It’s a win, win, win situation,” said Brian Patrick, franchise owner of three Liberty Tax Service locations in Pierce County. “Customers win because their generosity will help others; those in need win because the donations will help the Food Bank put food on their tables, and the community wins because we’ve done our part to help our neighbors.” To find a local Liberty Tax office, call (866) 8711040 or visit www.libertytax.com. Liberty Tax does take appointments, but they are not necessary. see more bulletin boArd items At tAcomAweekly.com

ty has said delaying the project has already meant the construction contract has had to be modified and that further delays of the private-public construction partnership could make the deal no longer financially viable. The project is being funded through what is called a 63-20 partnership that allows the Seattle construction firm Wright Runstad to use tax-exempt bonds with the county agreeing to a lease-to-own package to pay off the debt over 30 years. The project is estimated to total $235 million in rental payments and interest. Construction costs for the nine-story building at 3580 Pacific Ave. are set at $127 million, but that is being renegotiated because of the delay of a missed groundbreaking originally set for March 17. Gibbs vows to keep gathering signatures, calling the latest lawsuit another attempt to bully him from calling for a public vote on the project. Signature gatherers would have to get 24,427 valid signatures by late June to qualify for the November ballot. “This is now the second attempt to suppress the vote on the people in Pierce County and prevent the referendum from appearing on the November General Election ballot…,” he stated. Word of the latest lawsuit prompted Pierce County Council Chair Dan Roach to propose an ordinance to call for a public, advisory vote before the plan moves forward. “This process has been muddied every step of the way, but through it all

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of all ages. Crafts and wares with Tacoma Is For Lovers; Scott Haydon will be taking pictures in the photo booth; the Cartoonist’s League of Absurd Washingtonians (C.L.A.W.) will be on hand doing caricatures; Write@253 will be doing Type@253, so come typewrite a story; make a book with the Tacoma Book Artists; Remann Hall Book Club will have a table with books for sale; face painting; and crafts and wares with Erika Rier. Also on the schedule: 12:30 p.m. musical sing-along with Philosopher Queen; 1:30 p.m. storytime with Erica Leith; 2-4 p.m. craft activity and book signing with author and kitten wrangler Laurie Cinotto; 2:30 p.m. listen and draw with Chris Britt, author of “Blabbering Bethann.” The night party (7-11 p.m.) will faeture fun with authors, poets, book clubs, and a DJ. Celebrate King’s Book’s history and try your hand at trivia (winners revealed at end of night); learn about King’s Books’ various book clubs and what they’re reading; hear poetry celebrating the bookstore from Connie Walle and Kevin Miller; get a date with a book in speed dating format; learn about authors Mark Lindquist and others’ favorite books and reveal yours; and hang out at the Book Social. Afterward, join in on the dance party with Post Defiance featuring DJ Lil Bito and DJ Spud. Join store cat Atticus as he breaks out his moves! King’s Books is located at 218 St. Helens Ave.

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one thing has remained crystal clear… the people want their voices heard,” said Roach. “The ordinance I’m proposing will hopefully settle this matter for the time being and restore for citizens their right to participate in county government without fear of being sued to keep silent.” The driver behind the new building is to house many county services in one place to end leases at about a dozen facilities around the county and avoid costly repairs at the Pierce County Annex. The converted department store dates back to the 1950s. Renovations there would cost about $12 million. The county spends about $3.2 million in lease payments at eight buildings in Tacoma. Lease payments at the new facility would be about $8 million a year. Ending lease payments through consolidation into the new facility, the sale of the annex building, and the $4 million in projected annual savings through the laying off 38 staff positions would combine to fund the lease-toown payments at the General Services Building without the need to raise taxes, county documents state. The combined projected savings totals $300 million over the coming decades. The facility would house 19 county departments and 1,300 workers, including about 250 staffers at the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department, a separate agency that has agreed to be a tenant in the 330,000-square-foot building for $1 million a year in lease payments

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Friday, April 3, 2015 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 7

iS now oPen for buSineSS PHOTOS BY MATT NAGLE

freSh. The family owned Sterino’s thrives under the direction of three generations – pictured here are (middle, from left) Jake Sterino, his son Gavin Sterino and patriarch Jack Sterino. On the far left is Sterino’s staff member Tim Curtis and on the right is store manager Rob Rider. By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

O

ne of the most wonderful signs of springtime is the bounty of fresh fruits and vegetables that begin appearing on store shelves. Those looking for the freshest locally grown selection must check out Sterino Farms Produce Market and plant nursery at 6006 52nd St. E. in Puyallup. Having just re-opened for their third season on April 1, Sterino’s is all decked out with the colors, tastes, scents and visual delights of these warming days. The harvest continues throughout the summer and fall. For 28 years, the Sterino family operated their produce stand in Fife, offering the highest quality fruits and vegetables on the Fife farm and selling it to wholesalers across the Pacific Northwest. The original stand served its loyal customers until 2006, when Sterino Farms centralized their operations at the Puyallup site. In May 2013, the family celebrated another new chapter in their 90-year farming history by opening their produce

market in Puyallup fashioned after the original Fife produce stand. “There was a large demand from the customers,” said Tim Curtis, who is part of Sterino’s staff. “We constantly heard, ‘When are you guys going to get a produce market open again?’ That was one of the driving forces for us to open our market in Puyallup and we have a lot of customers from Fife that have come back and new ones coming in. It’s been amazing.” It’s clear that great care goes into everything Sterino’s offers its customers, and just one visit will prove to the most discriminating shopper that Sterino’s is the real deal when it comes to caring about what their customers feed their families. Jake Sterino is the fourth generation of the Sterino family to operate this father/son business, right next to his dad Jack Sterino. “We bring in anything from this local area – from radishes to spinach to kale, green onions, bok choy… whatever is growing in this local area we bring it in,” Jake Sterino said. This is in addition to the produce Sterino’s itself grows as the

largest farming outfit in Pierce County. Planting more than 700 acres throughout the Puyallup Valley, Sterino’s has a solid reputation among produce wholesalers across the country that supply Kroger, Safeway and other big chain supermarkets. All of the Farm’s produce is cut in the morning then cooled, delivered and on store shelves that afternoon, making it truly the freshest produce available. “Right now we’re harvesting rhubarb and we’re shipping that all the way back to Detroit, Chicago, Texas… it’s really a special item,” Curtis said. “We bring in produce from other farms and some of that is sold here, and some of it goes out to the different markets.” Sterino Farms is also currently harvesting leeks, among its other early spring produce choices. And this summer Sterino’s will have leaf and head lettuce, celery, raspberries, blackberries, gooseberries, currants, cabbage and the Farm’s popular corn ripens perfectly in August. “Corn is a biggie here. We sell tons of that,” Curtis said. In addition to produce, Sterino’s stocks a nice selection of conve-

nience items too, like Smith Bros. milk and dairy products, jams from Puyallup Valley Jams, Timmons Honey from Graham, Sterino Farms frozen berries in five gallon buckets, Schwartz Brothers bakery items (new this season), shortcakes from Sakuma Brothers Farms in Mt. Vernon, pie mixes for banana cream pies and apple crisps…even bacon and eggs. Those who like their snacks on the spicy side will want to try Hampton Farm’s Hot Nuts from Georgia, in the shell and ready to enjoy. “You can’t buy them anywhere else in the Northwest,” Jake Sterino said. Things are looking just as ship shape over at the plant nursery, managed by Jake Sterino’s son Gavin. He strives to bring in unique items that customers won’t find just anywhere, and it’s obvious that it has all been hand selected, much of it in larger sizes so that you can plant it at home and not have to wait for years for it to get a nice size. Sterino’s currently has more than 150 Japanese maple trees in 45-gallon pots ready for planting or display as is. Gavin Sterino said he goes to

great lengths to make the Sterino plant nursery reflect the excellence of the produce market. “One of the main things is we want to have that ‘wow factor’ when you come down,” he said. “Honestly, if you can’t find it here I don’t know where you’re going to be able to find it.” Among the nursery stock are palm trees from California, raspberry plants, maple trees, Meyer lemon trees, spiral evergreens and evergreens sculpted into a variety of eye-catching shapes. With Mother’s Day just around the corner, Sterino’s will have plenty of big, beautiful flower baskets that any mom would love to receive. With the summer months approaching, something will always be happening at Sterino Farms, like barbecues and chile roasts – and in the fall look for Sterino’s bounty of pumpkins at a steal of a price. “Last year we sold $1 pumpkins and that was really well received,” Jake Sterino said. “We had people coming in from all over.” “Like” Sterino Farms on Facebook to learn more and visit www. SterinoFarms.com.

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Section A • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 3, 2015

          

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Friday, April 3, 2015 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 9

PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT Supporting the Economic Growth of Our Community

State, local and Puyallup tribal officials held a groundbreaking ceremony on Feb. 18, 2015 for the next Interstate 5 project in Tacoma that will create a new bridge over the Puyallup River and reconstruct the I-5/State Route-167 interchange, commuter lanes and increase access to tribal properties. Pictured here are (left to right): Puyallup tribal member David Duenas; State Representative Hans Zeiger (R-25); Tacoma Deputy Mayor David Boe; Puyallup Tribal Chairman Bill Sterud; State Secretary of Transportation Lynn Peterson; Hamilton Construction President Scott Williams; WSDOT Olympic Region Administrator Kevin Dayton; and Kierra Phifer with U.S. Senator Patty Murray’s office.

Considered among the most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians has grown to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce County’s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its own membership but

sharing its wealth among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County. With a payroll of more than 3,200 people that work in the Tribe’s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities — approximately 70 percent of whom are non-Native — employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits.

In 2013, the Tribe spent over $461 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more. From sponsoring countless local charities, non-profit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer or cease to exist, to

protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and healthcare, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its welldeserved reputation as “the generous people,” a reflection of the meaning of the Tribe’s very name “Puyallup.” In the following pages, you’ll read more about what a valuable community partner the Puyallup Tribe of Indians is to the region and the state.

TRIBE WORKS TO RESTORE PUGET SOUND URBAN STREAMS Clarks Creek may provide clues to Puget Sound restoration The Puyallup Tribe of Indians is working to decrease sediment in Clarks Creek, an important salmon tributary to the Puyallup River. “Clarks Creek is important because it supports several different species of salmon, some listed under the federal Endangered Species Act,” said Char Naylor, water quality program manager for the Tribe. Clarks Creek also supports the highest salmon spawning densities in the Puyallup watershed as well as the most significant number and variety of spawning salmon within a city limits in the watershed. “It’s also important because it can be an example of how we can restore hundreds of small urban streams in Puget Sound,” Naylor said. The problems facing the Clarks Creek watershed are endemic to most Puget Sound lowland streams. The principal non-point pollutants causing degradation are excessive sediment, nuisance weed growth, nutrient enrichment and excessive bacteria loading. “If we can tackle these issues in Clarks Creek, we can show other Puget Sound communities how to heal their streams,” Naylor said. The Tribe is leading a regional effort to clean up the creek by reducing the amount of sediment flowing into it. Too much sediment in a stream drives down salmon productivity because it impacts the fish’s ability to find clean spawning gravel in which to spawn or rear. The goal of the project is to reduce sediment loads by half and nutrient and bacteria by a third by lowering flows and stabilizing banks to reduce channel erosion. The Tribe recently finished a two-year study of sediment sources throughout Clarks Creek. The study found that if 23 major sources of sediment were repaired, over 50 percent of the creek’s sediment problem would go away. Yet by doing just the top eight bank stabilization projects, a huge amount of sediment can be removed from the stream very cost-effectively. The tribe is putting together plans to restore two of those major sources of sediment in the creek. The tribal projects This photograph reveals deep incision and erosion shown in the upper portion of the Clarks Creek watershed (where nearby homes are located). would stabilize the banks of two Clarks Creek tributaries. “We would literally be changing the shapes of their banks and channels, adding gravel and planting vegetation along their banks,” hoods of the city of Puyallup before joining the Puyallup River. Because it Naylor said. is largely spring-fed, the creek has a consistent level of water throughout Other sorts of projects suggested by the study include stormwater retthe year, making it great rearing habitat for juvenile salmon. The Puyallup rofits, low impact development, and stormwater detention ponds. Tribe also operates a chinook hatchery on the creek. Most of the creek’s sediment actually starts with the river it flows into. “We have already begun working on implementing several of the iden“The Puyallup River is diked through most of its lower reach,” Naylor said. tified sediment projects to restore the watershed almost before the ink “This caused the river bed itself to drop, which means the creeks flowing was dry on the report,” Naylor said. “It is satisfying to have changed the into it also drop.” This down-cutting action puts more sediment into the status quo, the way things have been done in this watershed over the last creek than would be there otherwise. several decades.” Clarks Creek is just 4 miles long and flows through suburban neighbor(Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission)

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.


Section A • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 3, 2015

t Queen It’s that kind of support that’s made this entire princess business possible for her. Ringus said, “My parents and friends just miss seeing me as much, because my life is so filled with yellow now.â€? Lincoln High School’s Princess, Athena Sok, drew her strength from the audience, especially her own private cheering section made up of parents, friends, nieces and nephews. “It felt really great to know my entire family was out there in the crowd,â€? she said. And how do they feel about all of the yellow? “They love bragging about it, even though I tell them not to‌ my nieces and nephews are ecstatic,â€? Sok said. Wilson High School’s Princess Madison Gordon was blown away by the attendance of the evening, as well. “The best part of the night was seeing all the sup-

From page A1

port we had from the community, and seeing people there both for us and thanking us. We serve because we love it and we are passionate about it, not because we expect anything in return, so it was a nice experience.â€? For her, the continued support and interest the community holds in the annual Festival experience, even after 82 years, is what really sets it apart. “People have this preconceived idea that the Daffodil Festival is a beauty contest, with a parade once a year. All the people there, showing their support for us, is the exact opposite‌ I didn’t even realize how many people were there until after the whole show was over.â€? Some of the Festival’s strongest supporters came out in full force, taking their seats right next to the waiting princesses after they finished their speeches: the Royalty Alumnae.

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From Chief Leschi High School, Princess Emily Inskeep was impressed and grateful for the appearance of some of the Festival’s past monarchs. “It was incredible knowing that being a princess and being a part of this family doesn’t just last for one year; it’s a bond that stays forever, and an experience that lasts a lifetime.� Beyond venue, an additional alteration to the evening’s usual lineup? Instead of high school friends and peers of the princesses, each young lady was escorted in by local servicemen: Master Sergeant Daniel Hagemeier from Olympia, Sergeant First Class Robert Chinneth from Lakewood, Sergeant Gerald Thibodeaux from Puyallup and Specialist Matthew Shaw from Seattle. The hosts for this year’s event were, as always, the affable Chris Egan, Emmywinning sports commentator for KING 5 News, and he welcomed the addition of his older brother, Microsoft executive and Washington State Fair Foundation Board member Mike Egan. The dynamic brother duo had the crowd laughing and groaning at turns, especially during a bit discussing how the hosts were just “a

yard away� from the audience, producing a football from behind their podium in reference to Chris Egan’s Super Bowl coverage earlier this year. The evening was kicked off by some words from Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland, who took to the stage to express her admiration for the young women involved in the Daffodil Festival Royal Court each year, as well as for the communities around Pierce County they represent. Then it was time for the evening’s main event. The 24 Daffodil Princesses had faced their judges earlier this week, with both informal and formal interviews, but their official speeches – oriented around this year’s Festival’s theme, “Shine Your Light With Service� – and impromptu questions, served as the trickiest portion of deciding who would be crowned queen. For Stadium High School’s Princess Pelumi Ajibade, the ability to give those speeches wasn’t just something to be judged on, but an opportunity to spread a message of servant leadership and community outreach. “It was amazing, because our friends and family got to

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hear what we had to say‌ tell our story, and create more of a relationship within our community. Now the audience knows each of us just a little more,â€? Ajibade said. She drew specific emphasis to how most of the Court’s appearances are structured around the principle of being a team. “As a team, we are making sure not to bring too much attention to a single person, and that’s good because we are here to serve the community and exemplify the Festival, not ourselves. But yesterday, we each got to be in the spotlight for a minute and shine our light, show what this Festival has done for us and how we have made that theme our life motto,â€? Ajibade said. After each young woman had completed her speech and impromptu question, the full Court took the stage to perform this year’s official song and dance to Sara Bareilles’ “Brave.â€? Outgoing Queen Marissa Modestowicz from Emerald Ridge High School graciously gave her thank you speech, which held the waiting princesses in suspense for eight minutes while she acknowledged the many men and women who make the Festival’s success possible. Victoria Ann Tirado, from Clover Park High School, received the honor of Miss Congeniality, as

elected by her peers. The title of second Runner Up went to Madison Lindahl from Puyallup High School, while 1st Runner Up was dubbed to be Rachel Price from Eatonville High School. The title of queen was awarded to Bonney Lake High School’s Princess Ashley Becker. Queen Ashley marks the 79th holder of the title, as well as Bonney Lake’s first-ever queen for the Festival. Princess Nicole Ripley, from Foss High School, recounted a lot of emotions experienced over the course of the evening. “It was so fun and so nerve-wracking all at the same time. Honestly, I felt so much closer to the rest of the girls, as we sang and danced to get our nerves out. Overall, it was a fun night, full of adrenaline.â€? Ripley said. For Princess Shannon Woods, from Mt. Tahoma High School, the best part came at the end. “The best part to me was the crowning ceremony‌ this was a special moment to me, because both [Victoria and Ashley] are a perfect fit for their titles.â€? Woods said. Now, she’s got her sights set on the rest of the princesses’ year as a Court. “I’m looking forward to the parade season just for that reason, for being around such a positive group of girls.â€? Woods said.

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Friday, April 3, 2015 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 11

TPU fAceS ToUgh Sell wiTh coUncil over ProPoSed leASing of click

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acoma Public Utilities floated a plan to the City Council that would have the public utility leasing out its Click Network to Wave Broadband for 40 years starting this fall as a way to cure its lingering money troubles. The pitch came during a joint meeting between the council and TPU during Tuesday’s council study session. Click has been hemorrhaging customers and dollars for five years as the number of people “cutting their cords” from cable television for Internet-only options continues to rise. That drop and rising program costs have lead to the city-owned utility posting $9 million a year in losses that have thus far been subsidized by

Tacoma Power customers. TPU has been studying ways to stem that mounting loss for two years, a process that included entertaining options with Wave that would have the Kirkland-based company lease the Click assets for $2 million a year and spend another $1.5 million in improvements during the span of the lease. The deal would enable Click to avoid about $6 million a year in debt, totalling $9.5 million year in “revenue” or $380 million over the four-decade lease. The deal, TPU officials say, would shift a public fiber optic network into a tax-generating business, increase competition and lead to faster Internet service and lower prices. Current mostly unionized

Click workers would either be hired by the non-union Wave or receive severance packages. Details of those deals are under discussion. City Council members are either skeptical or downright hostile against the idea of leasing off its 18-year-old fiber infrastructure, making a required council nod unlikely as the 60-day review period starts. If approved, however, leasing could start in the fall. TPU has already signed a letter of intent, which includes a non-compete clause. Town Hall meetings are scheduled for 6 p.m. on April 9 at Stadium High School and April 15 at Tacoma Public Utilities, 3628 S. 35th St. to gauge public interest in the idea.

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Sports

TH E

SI DE

LIN E

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015

BATTLE AT

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 12

THE BOAT 100

DAZZLES FIGHT FANS

PHOTOS BY ERNIE SAPIRO

UPSET! (top) Local favorite Jeremy McCleary

(left) was in for a rude awakening as underdog Marcello Gallardo knocked him from the ranks of the unbeaten. (right) Tacoma’s Mike “Imagine Me” Gavronski didn’t have to imagine knocking out Maurice Louishomme’s mouthpiece. He did it twice... and then knocked him out for good in the seventh round. By Justin Gimse

I

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

t was nearly 20 years in the making and well worth the wait. Battle at the Boat turned in its 100th night of fights on Saturday, March 28 and it was easily the most exciting event I’ve ever witnessed at the Emerald Queen Casino. Brian Halquist Productions rolled out a sixfight card for the night and nearly every fight offered up the goods to make the packed house scream, yell and cheer. Of course the night began with good old Danny Bonaduce chatting up the crowd from the center of the ring. I always enjoy the former child star and radio host at Seattle’s KZOK. He gets cheers, boos and laughs and he always has a smile on his face up there. The first fight of the night would pit a veteran against a newcomer, and the new blood proved to be much more potent. Portland’s Sean Gee was making his professional boxing debut and he made the most of it. His opponent, Omar Avelar, really didn’t seem up to snuff to deal with the physical nature of Gee’s attack and by the third and fourth rounds of this 140pound four-rounder, Avelar was throwing punches that flowed like molasses. As much as he tried however, Gee (1-0) couldn’t find the right button and knock Avelar (3-13) out, even though he had him dazed several times throughout the bout. Gee would leave the ring with a unanimous decision victory. I’d be missing the mark if I didn’t mention Gee’s walk-up to the ring. He was led out by a couple of dancing girls and the sound system was pumping out the most explicit music I’ve ever heard at a sporting event. It was cringe-worthy, and looking around when the lights came up, there were more than a few screwed-up faces throughout the crowd wondering what the heck they just heard. I couldn’t help but think, with the dancing and the music, what the immortal boxing writer Bert Sugar would be thinking ringside, as this fighter walked down the aisle for his first professional boxing match ever. Next up on the menu was Jason Davis versus Daryl Gardner in a 153-pound match. It would prove to be a bloody affair for both fighters as they received cuts above their eyes. I’m also pretty sure both fighters woke up Sunday morning with some ringing in the ears to go along with the bruises and welts. It was a brutal four rounds of boxing that got the crowd involved from the get-go. Gardner came out swinging with some wild haymakers and some found their way past Davis’ defense. However, the veteran from Vancouver, Wash stuck to his game plan and weathered

u See BOXING / page A15

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

GAMER. (top) Senior Efren Monzon came up big for Fife, moving from defensive sweeper to forward for the game and scoring a hat trick. (middle) Senior forward Jorge Castaneda scored the first goal of the night for Fife. (bottom) Sophomore Bryan Flores made a difference on both ends of the field and also added a goal.

SHORTHANDED TROJANS DROP A FIVER ON ORTING By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

The secret is starting to get out that one of the premier soccer teams in the area is the Fife Trojans. Tuesday night, March 31, they showed that they’re even a formidable squad minus their three top players. The Trojans hosted a quality Orting club and turned a solid 1-0 halftime advantage into a 5-0 shutout to push their undefeated season record to 5-0 and first place in the 2A South Puget Sound League standings. Fife accomplished this without the services of senior Mack Smith who is recovering from a foot injury suffered against Franklin Pierce the week prior. Smith was the leading goal-scorer in the entire state last season with 28 goals and was named the 2014 2A State Player of the Year. It would be difficult for any team to stay competitive and on the attack without that type of player. Add in the fact that all-star midfielder Lorenzo Ramos and goalkeeper Julian Tafolla were also out of action and that seems like a recipe for disaster. Apparently they do things differently in Fife. “These kids don’t worry about anything,” said Fife head coach Tony Crudo. “They’ve played so much soccer and been in so many big games, some even at the national level where they’ve won championships, that these kinds of games are just a game to them. They really handle pressure well.” The Trojans maintained the attack against Orting (3-3) from the opening whistle and dominated much of the action in the first half. Senior sweeper Efren Monzon was moved up to forward for the game to make up for the missing players and he kept the pressure on the Cardinals throughout the entire game. Monzon had four shots on goal in the first half, just missing on each attempt. Fife broke the scoreless tie 19

u See SOCCER / page A15


Friday, April 3, 2015 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 13

SPORTSWATCH SOUNDERS U23 CONTINUES THE MISSION OF MOVING PLAYERS UP

On Sunday afternoon, March 29 Clement Simonin started for Toronto FC in their regular season MLS match versus Real Salt Lake. Simonin started and played 90 minutes in the loss but relishes the opportunity after working hard at NC State and with the Sounders U23 in 2014. “The chance I had to get drafted in the first round of the draft comes mostly from my experience with the Sounders U23,” explained Simonin. “I got the opportunity to play in a very special and competitive environment every day in training and games.” On Sunday evening, Darwin Jones suited up for S2, the Sounders FC USL team. Jones, the former Sounders U23 and Sounders FC home grown player, scored a hat trick to down the Vancouver Whitecaps USL side. Jones started as a youth premier player at Highline Premier FC, a club run previously by current Sounders U23 GM/Head Coach Darren Sawatzky, before moving to Washington Premier FC and eventually into the Sounders FC Academy. Simonin and Jones are part of a long list of Sounders U23 players that have made the jump from the Premier Development League (PDL) team to the professional ranks. The Sounders U23 is an independently owned club team operated by owners Lane Smith, Cliff McElroy, and Mike Jennings. The team is managed and coached by Sawatzky who also ran the Sounders FC Academy from 2008 through 2014. “Helping players move from our PDL program to the professional leagues in this country and abroad is something we take great pride in,” explained Lane Smith, co-owner. “We want to win games, but we know our place in the developmental pyramid and we love seeing DeAndre (Yedlin) at the World Cup and more recently, Clement start for Toronto.” The Sounders U23 started in 2012, after taking over for the Tacoma Tide in the PDL. Since the 2012 season where the Sounders U23 won the Northwest Division title, the Western Conference Championship, and eventually lost in the national semifinals to FC London, 28 players have been drafted into MLS or signed professional contracts in the US or abroad. Currently, Jeff Caldwell and Jordan Morris were called into the US Men’s National U20 and U23 teams respectively. Both players played roles last summer for Sounders U23 and are slated to return in 2015. Morris was invited this week to the full national team after his goal and assist for the U23’s last week versus Bosnia. “Players need the opportunity to be challenged in order to grow and develop. The northwest division in the PDL has a pro team, two MLS affiliate teams, and very organized independent clubs that make it very competitive,” added Sawatzk. “With the training and game competition, this is a great place to help the players add the final pieces before they jump to the professional ranks.” DeAndre Yedlin, Sean Okoli, Aaron Kovar, and Darwin Jones have all signed home grown contracts with Sounders FC and all played significant roles in the Sounders U23 team. Yedlin has since sky rocketed to the US National Team and a transfer to Tottenham in the English Premier League. Yedlin played every minute of the 2012 PDL Season for Sounders U23. Okoli was traded this year to New England and played against Sounders FC in the MLS mach earlier this month. Kovar and Jones continue to shine for both the Sounders FC first team and the S2 USL side. Kovar impressed with his recent performance against Club Tijuana Xolos then played against FC Dallas in the MLS fixture a few days later. Many other Sounders U23 players have made the leap through the MLS draft. Fernando Monge (Montreal) led the early charge in 2012, with Sean Morris (Seattle/Auckland FC-Australia), Aodhan Quinn (Philadelphia/Orlando CityUSL), Eric Stevenson (NYRB), Taylor Peay (Portland), Anthony Arena (Houston/Pittsburgh-USL), Earl Edwards (Orlando City), Simonin (Toronto), Lucas Baldin (Real Salt Lake), Miguel Aguilar (DC United), and Doug Herrick (MLS League GK/Charlotte Eagles-USL/Guam National team) finding homes in the professional game. Not every player makes the complete transition to MLS, but they have used the Sounders U23 team as a catalyst to the next level in the other professional leagues offered in the US. Jamael Cox (Tampa-NASL), Josh Phillips (Colorado Switchbacks-USL), Adam West (Louisville City-USL), Zac Lubin (Tulsa-USL), David Geno (Charlotte Eagles-USL), Oscar Jimenez (Tulsa-USL), Miguel Gonzalez (Colorado Switchbacks-USL), Zev Taublieb (Sacramento-USL), and Jake Feener (Tulsa-USL) have all played for the Sounders U23 and Sawatzky, before leaving for the next level. Finally, the road less traveled is also represented well for Sounders U23. Yedlin headlines the players and is currently playing in England, while Derek Johnson and Miles Byass both accepted contracts and played in Sweden. Chris Brundage played for two professional seasons in Finland and Abdul Aman is currently in Fiji playing for Fiji Suva. “Our goal with the Sounders U23 team is players’ first,” explains Cliff McElroy co-owner. “We do everything we can to help them grow and move on to the highest levels of the game. We hope they all make it out in front of 45,000 fans at Century Link, but if they do not, we want them to chase their careers.” The 2015 Sounders U23 PDL season starts on May 24 when they host the newest member of the Northwest Division: Calgary Foothills. Come watch the future of professional soccer in the United States and Canada as the young guns bring their fight for another PDL summer.

RAINIERS WELCOME AWARD WINNING RED HOT TO CHENEY STADIUM

The Tacoma Rainiers have officially welcomed The Red Hot as the newest addition to the club’s 2015 food and beverage lineup. The popular Tacoma-based hot dog eatery will make its Cheney Stadium debut when the Rainiers begin their season-opening homestand at 7 p.m. on Friday, April 17. The Red Hot’s stadium location will reside along the home plate side of Cheney’s main concourse area and will be open during each of the team’s 72 scheduled home games, as well as select concerts, festivals and other specialty events hosted at the ballpark throughout the year.

“Once we sat down, tasted hot dogs, and met Chris and Stu, this decision became a no brainer,” said Team President Aaron Artman. “We are thrilled to have The Red Hot at Cheney Stadium.” The Red Hot plans to emphasize the experience of enjoying a hot dog at the ballpark with a menu slightly different than the one made famous at their 6th Avenue location. The offerings available at Cheney will include a hot dog topped with peanut butter, bacon, and Cracker Jack. Another dog is capped with cream cheese, grilled onions, tomatoes and celery salt. These will be served along with a selection of sausages, in addition to both vegetarian and vegan options. “We’ve never really been interested in opening another TRH,” said Chris Miller, owner and general manager of The Red Hot. “But we love our city, and we love our community, so when the Rainiers approached us with this opportunity, we couldn’t pass up the chance to be part of this iconic stadium and incredible Tacoma destination.” “We were humbled to be a part of long-standing Tacoma history. We’re excited about offering a different experience there, as well as offering something we feel is pivotal in the baseball world: the best hot dog available.” As the official specialty hot dog provider of Cheney Stadium, The Red Hot will also take over as the culinary caretaker of the Rainiers most coveted concession item, “The Best Hot Dog in Baseball.” The classic version of the quarter-pound favorite served with grilled onions, sweet relish and beer mustard can now be upgraded “Grand Slam Style,” with cream cheese, bacon, sauerkraut and dill. Each of the hot dog options crafted by The Red Hot and served at Cheney Stadium will be available beginning on Opening Night, Friday, April 17. All single-game tickets, as well as season tickets, group outings and suites packages, are available for purchase in-person at the Cheney Stadium Box Office, online at tacomarainiers.com, or over the phone at (253) 752-7707. The most up-to-date news and notes about the Rainiers leading into the season can be found by following the Rainiers on Twitter (@RainiersLand) or liking the team on Facebook.

WIAA APPEARS READY TO TAKE ANOTHER LOOK AT STATE BASKETBALL FORMAT

It appears that the noise and concerns from administrators, coaches, players, family and fans have finally got the WIAA’s attention concerning the unpopular eight-team state basketball format. In the WIAA press release below, make note of the final bit of news to come out of the March Executive Board meeting. From the WIAA: The Washington Interscholastic Activities Association (WIAA) Executive Board concluded its March meeting. During the meeting, the Board took action on a number of items. The first approved motion was the spring allocations and draws. The draws for tennis and softball will not be released until Sunday, May 24, after all of the teams have qualified. The draws for soccer and baseball will be posted along with the brackets by April 15. The Board also approved on an experiment for the 2016 1B/2B State Wrestling Tournament to allow a 12-person entry instead of eight. In addition, the Board approved allocations for a 30-entry event for the 1B/2B Girls State Golf Tournament due to the fact that there were not enough schools that met the team definition for an eight-team entry and a 40-golfer event. Regional baseball sites were approved for the spring. The 2015 Curt and Chee Chee Bruskland Award Recipient will be Jim Caughlin. Caughlin has staffed the pass gate at many WIAA State Championships including football, basketball, StarTrack and gymnastics for over 30 years. A former football player at Portland State University in the 1950’s, Caughlin spent time as a counselor in Oregon before becoming the Director of the Lincoln Bowl. Caughlin will be recognized at the WIAA Coaches School for his services and efforts in supporting high school activities. Finally, the Board expressed willingness to work with the superintendents group that is researching the possibility of returning to a 16-team basketball tournament format. The Board will provide data, committee membership and any other service the group requests. In return, the Executive Board has requested that the group includes a representative(s) from the Superintendents Advisory Committee.

LOGGER MEN WIN PEYTON SCORING MEET, WOMEN TAKE SECOND

The Puget Sound men’s track & field team won the Peyton Scoring Meet with 186 points on Saturday, while the women’s team placed second with 159 points. The Logger men finished 50 points ahead of the secondplace team, Pacific Lutheran. The women came up 23 points shy of first place, which was had by the Lutes. Alison Wise (5:00.14) and Tori Klein (5:05.44) claimed first and second place, respectively, for Puget Sound in the women’s 1,500-meter run. Wise also won the 800-meter run by timing in at 2:23.26. Klein also placed second in the 5,000-meter run (18:48.96), as her teammate, Sierra Grunwald, won the event by crossing the finish line in 18:41.88. In the field, two-sport student-athlete Emily Sheldon (women’s basketball) placed second in the high jump at 1.45 meters. Elizabeth King (3.35-m) and Sunny Lewis (2.90-m) finished first and second, respectively, in the pole vault. Shelby Kantner won the triple jump at 10.76-m. On the men’s side, Sam Carilli won the 1,500-meter run with a time of 4:05.91, while David Santillan finished in a close second by timing in at 4:06.03. The Loggers claimed the top five finishes in the 500-meter run, starting with Tyler Shipley’s victory (15:04.25), and followed by Carilli (15:23.80), Josh Seekatz (15:26.20), Santillan (15:26.28), and Justin Higa (15:40.80). Puget Sound also took the top two spots on the 4x400meter relay. Cameron Braithwaite, Graham Ashby, Jonathan Rosenberg, and Ross MacAusland won with a time of 3:29.18. Graham Cobb, Todd Detweiler, Michael Westbrooks, and Zal Robles followed with a time of 3:36.56. In the field, Braithwaite won both the pole vault (4.33-m) and the long jump (6.54-m). Puget Sound next hosts the 30th Shotwell Invitational on Saturday, April 4, starting at 10 a.m.

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SATURDAY, APRIL 4 – TRACK 30th Shotwell Invitational UPS Baker Stadium – 10 a.m.

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MONDAY, APRIL 6 – BASEBALL Mt. Tahoma vs. Foss Foss HS – 4 p.m.

MONDAY, APRIL 6 – SOCCER Wilson vs. Lincoln Lincoln Bowl – 7 p.m.

TUESDAY, APRIL 7 – BASEBALL Willamette vs. Puget Sound UPS – Doubleheader – 12 p.m.

TUESDAY, APRIL 7 – BASEBALL North Thurston vs. Lincoln Heidelberg – 4 p.m.

TUESDAY, APRIL 7 – SOCCER North Thurston vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma Stadium – 6:30 p.m.

TUESDAY, APRIL 7 – SOCCER Lincoln vs. Foss Lincoln Bowl – 7 p.m.

TUESDAY, APRIL 7 – SOCCER Shelton vs. Wilson Stadium Bowl – 7:15 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8 – FASTPITCH Linfield vs. Puget Sound UPS – Doubleheader – 2 p.m.

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FRIDAY, APRIL 10 – FASTPITCH Foss vs. Lincoln Sera Fields – 4 p.m.

FRIDAY, APRIL 10 – BASEBALL Clover Park vs. Foss Heidelberg – 4 p.m.

SATURDAY, APRIL 11 – HS TRACK Tacoma Invitational Lincoln Bowl – 10 a.m.

SATURDAY, APRIL 11 – BASEBALL Pacific Lutheran vs. Puget Sound UPS – Doubleheader – 12 p.m.

SATURDAY, APRIL 11 – FASTPITCH George Fox vs. Puget Sound UPS – Doubleheader – 12 p.m.

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Section A • Page 14 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 3, 2015

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Local Restaurants RESTAURANT SPOTLIGHT: THE MELON SEED DELI By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

W

ith the weather warming up, and the end of the school year approaching, more and more heads are turning to the thought of frozen yogurt. But your mother would probably be pretty disappointed if your dinner or lunch amounted to a sweet treat covered in Oreos and gummy worms. Luckily, The Melon Seed Deli, located at 3807 S. Center St., offers the wildly popular dessert along with some of the best handmade sandwiches your money can buy thanks to owner Mac Charles. “I noticed that every time I would go out to get frozen yogurt I’d be hungry afterward but just for something light,� Charles said in an earlier interview, explaining why he feels the combination is ideal for business. “We just thought it would be the perfect idea, gourmet style sandwiches and frozen yogurt.� The Melon Seed is quickly becoming an established classic in the community, getting ready to celebrate its two-year anniversary on April 11 with an outdoor day, which includes a jumper for kids. “There’s still a big group people not aware of us, so this is something to do other than just eat. Come and experience the whole atmosphere here at The Melon Seed – have some fun, bring your family and have a day out,� Charles said. The frozen yogurt is not weighed to calculate the price; instead, you pick your size, ranging from 4 oz. to 24 oz., cups for $1.25 to $7.25, adding $1 for toppings. Froyo is not the only dessert The Melon Seed offers, with fresh cheesecake being served for $2.55. The Melon Seed has also been recognized for their

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Friday, April 3, 2015 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section A â&#x20AC;˘ Page 15

t Boxing

From page A10

the storm, while Gardner began to slow down. Davis (12-10-2) had to withstand one more barrage from Gardner (2-5-1) at the beginning of the third round and from that point on dominated the fight. After the final bell, one judge came back with a 39-37 result for Davis, but the other two judges ruled it a 38-38 contest. The fight was ruled a majority draw and the crowd was not happy at all. To show how close it was, the gentleman sitting next to me thought Gardner had edged Davis, while I had Davis over Gardner. Overall, a draw was probably the correct call. The third bout of the evening would match Ricardo Maldonado against Andres Reyes in the 135-pound division. It would be Reyesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; third professional fight and the Yakima native would have his hands full with Maldonado. Both fighters looked sharp and put on an excellent boxing performance with some good exchanges without seeming to inflict serious damage upon each other. While the judges ruled the fight a unanimous decision for Reyes, I felt it was a much closer fight and the early action from the baby face fighter probably was the difference maker. Maldonado was a serious threat throughout the fight but just couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t turn a flurry of punches into a momentum changer. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see him again. Next up for the fourth fight was an odd match-up in the 135-pound division. Returning to the ring after his first defeat at Battle at the Boat 99 was Marcelino Pineda, still considered one of the rising stars around these parts. His foe would be a veteran boxer from Tanzania. No, not Tarzana, Califor-

nia; Tanzania, Africa. Paul Mpendo would be marking his 25th professional fight against Pineda and from the looks of him, it could have been his 50th. Mpendo is listed as 40-years of age, but looked closer to George Foreman, minus the huge belly. Mpendo tried to play a cat and mouse game with Pineda and the kid from Toppenish just kept on driving forward looking for his spots. Pineda (5-1) finally caught Mpendo (8-13-4) in the third round and it only took one punch as a short left hook up against the ropes slammed into the side of Mpendoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head and the wily veteran dropped like a sack of potatoes. It would take several minutes before the medical crew was satisfied that Mpendo could stand up and walk to his corner. The fifth fight of the night was also billed as the semi-main event. It would also prove to be a controversial and surprising finish. In one corner it was the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pride of Buckleyâ&#x20AC;? Jeremy McCleary with his spotless six-win record versus the diminutive Marcello Gallardo from Auburn with the 4-1-2 record. Before the fight began, I told the guy sitting next to me that Gallardo looks like trouble for McCleary. Had we been in Las Vegas, I would have put my money where my mouth was and made off like a bandit because Gallardo didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come to fight. He came to win. As he usually does, McCleary immediately started strong and on the attack. Gallardo wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t throwing many punches early on, but looked to be sizing-up the younger fighter while holding his ground. By the end of the first round Gallardo came on strong and dealt

some stinging blows to McCleary. This would be where the fight turned. Gallardo was constantly moving forward in the second round and it began throwing off McClearyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game. Without really taking it to him yet, it looked as if Gallardo actually won the second round. The third round is where the fight took a huge tilt toward Gallardo. After suffering a lowblow, just inside of his hip, McCleary began taking more and more punishment from the smaller fighter. With his nose bleeding, McCleary was on the wrong end of a quick combo, followed by a left hook that sent the 20-year old local favorite to the canvas. McCleary would get up before the referee counted him out and hung on until the bell ended the round. The fourth round would be more trouble for McCleary as Gallardo went after him like a shark. McCleary was in trouble again early and then suffered another low-blow. This time the punch landed squarely in McClearyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s privates and the referee didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see it. Instead of defending himself, McCleary clutched his groin and bent over sideways, all the while, Gallardo continued to rain punches down upon him. The referee stopped the fight after a flurry of shots on the ropes and the crowd was out of their mind. After the fight was over, the replay kept rolling on the big screens in the EQC Ballroom. There it was, over and over again; Gallardo connecting dead-center with McClearyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crotch. The crowd groaned, gasped and hollered every time it replayed on the screens. I saw the referee looking at the playback as well. It really wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t his fault. From where he was standing during the fight, the shot looked pretty covered up by Gallardoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s body.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;There it was, over and over again; Gallardo connecting deadcenter with McClearyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crotch. The crowd groaned, gasped and hollered every time it replayed on the screens.â&#x20AC;? Either way, McCleary was in serious trouble and it was questionable if he was going to make it through the round, in my opinion. It was just tough seeing the fight end with a shot that basically drained the feeling out of the fingers and toes of most of the men in the room. I want to see a rematch of this fight. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pretty sure everyone who was in attendance would want to see a part two to this contest. The big main event of the night proved to be worth the price of admission. Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mike â&#x20AC;&#x153;Imagine Meâ&#x20AC;? Gavronski (16-1-1) would face Maurice â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Naturalâ&#x20AC;? Louishomme (8-1-1) in what turned out to be an action-packed slugfest that had the crowd going nuts throughout. At times, it was rock concert loud in the EQC Ballroom; especially at the very end. In the first round, Gavronski looked like a predator and Louishomme had a look of a fighter that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to be in there. That would prove to be a bluff in the second round. Following a crushing combo that sent him to the canvas, Louishomme got back up and weathered a barrage from Gavronski as he tried to end the fight. It was as if Louishomme suddenly woke up as he caught Gavronski with a left hook that sent the Tacoma kid to the canvas. It would be the last time Gavronski hit the deck in the fight, but Louishomme would connect on some massive shots

throughout the rest of the fight. Gavronski knocked Louishommeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mouthpiece out in the fourth round and had the fighter dazed and staggered. The challenger from Colorado Springs would not go down though and continued with his game plan of counterpunching and finding an opening on the left side of Gavronskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s face. The action was hot and heavy again in the fifth round as Gavronski maintained the attack while Louishomme found his spots and made him pay. The sixth round saw both fighters slow down a bit. The seventh round would prove to be too much for Louishomme as Gavronski again knocked out Louishommeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mouthpiece and then sent him to the canvas twice. The second time was enough for the referee who stopped the fight 2:55 into the seventh round. After the fight, Gavronski made his way around the ring thanking all of the fans for coming out and showing his appreciation to his hometown. The fans pressed in on the ring offering up their congratulations and handshakes. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice to see Tacoma fans truly rallying around a fighter. I look forward to the next Battle at the Boat and I hope to see Gavronski and maybe a rematch or two. It will be hard to top the 100th. Brian Halquist Productions next event is Super Fight League 4 at the EQC, Saturday, April 25 at 7 p.m.

t Soccer From page A12

minutes into the match when senior Jorge Castaneda took a pass from sophomore Axel Mejia and connected with the ball as he slid and looped it just past the goalkeeper. Fife hung onto their 1-0 lead well into the second half and pushed back against a renewed offensive attack from Orting. It seemed that everything Orting would bring into the Fife end would be stopped well before a scoring chance appeared for the Cardinal. Twenty minutes into the second half it was time for Monzon to find the back of the net. On his sixth shot on goal, Monzon took a long pass into the box, stopped and shifted left, shedding his defender. A left-footer just inside the right post put Fife up 2-0. He nearly scored his second 30 seconds later with a miss, but that would not be the end of his night. Thirty-four minutes into the second half sophomore forward Bryan Flores found the ball at his feet in front of the goal after the ball ping-ponged around the box between players and punched it into the back of the net. Fife now led 3-0. With less than two minutes in the game Monzon got loose twice and made Orting pay. With their defenders pressing further up into Fife territory, Monzon took a pass before midfield and found himself alone against the goalkeeper, who rushed out to meet him 18 yards out at the corner of the box. Monzon slotted a leftfooter inside the far post and Fifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lead was stretched to 4-0 with seconds to spare. Monzon made the most of those waning moments and broke free again, juked the final defender twice and sent a long shot past the goalkeeper just inside the far-post for the hat trick and a 5-0 Fife victory. Fife returns to action on April 7 against Clover Park (2-2) at Harry Lang Stadium. First kick is at 7 p.m.

         And this season the Tacoma Rainiers look forward to having you at our place a lot more often.

Great Strides is a fun, family-friendly event that raises awareness and support for people with cystic ďŹ brosis and their families. Join me to walk to ďŹ nd a cure!

DATE: May 2nd CHECK-IN: 10:00 am WALK: 11:00 am DISTANCE: 3.5 miles 36 gam es for just

presented by

$250

Reserved Tickets for your entire family to every Monday - Thursday game $10 Friday and Saturday Tickets As We Family members, your entire family receives Reserved Seat tickets to every 2015 weekday Tacoma Rainiers game for only $250. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s half of our home schedule, all available for one flat fee. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best value offered in franchise history. Tickets to each eligible game are based upon availability. Membership cards may be redeemed for Reserved Seat tickets only.

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2/16/15 5:34 PM

Scan with any mobile device to visit my fundraising campaign!

LOCATION: Rush Companies, Inc / Cushman Trail, Gig Harbor

There are approximately 30,000 Americans living with cystic ďŹ brosis. I walk for them and hope you will support me in my efforts. Help me reach my fundraising goal by donating to my Great Strides fundraising campaign at http://goo.gl/scftMj or visit http://www.cff. org/greatstrides for more information. Your gift will help add tomorrows to the lives of people with cystic ďŹ brosis by supporting life-saving research and medical progress. Your gift is 100-percent tax deductible. Thank you, Bob and Mindy Corcoran


City Life

Weekly Rewind

B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015

SECTION B, PAGE 1

Teddy Lee Hooker begins new chapter with

return to Gray Sky Blues Fest

ORIGINAL PHOTO COURTESY OF TEDDY LEE HOOKER

BLUES MAN. Ted Grimes – aka Teddy Lee Hooker – returns to Gray Sky Blues Festival next week. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

O

n April 11, Ted Grimes will return to Tacoma’s Gray Sky Blues Music Festival for the first time since he headlined the inaugural event in 2008. The singer-guitarist – who performs as Teddy Lee Hooker – counts his previous Gray Sky performance as a pivotal moment in his career; and, similarly, he sees his return as the start of a new chapter. “I’m the comeback kid,” he joked, recalling tragic events and medical emergencies that have nearly derailed his career over the years. The first took place in the ‘70s, when he was 23. A drunk driver struck the car he was driving, killing his 5-year-old daughter and leaving him in a coma for a month. “I came out of the coma, and I’m dealing with the fact I couldn’t even go to my daughter’s funeral,” he recalled. “I’m just kind of reeling from this. … It took me 10 years to recover from that, get back into playing and get back out there.” Once fully recovered, he enjoyed several years as a successful touring musician before devoting more and more of his time to producing other artists. Then, at 46, came another eye-opening experience, a massive heart attack that required open-heart surgery. The near death experience made him reassess what he was doing with his life. “After I laid in the hospital I thought I wanna play. I really wanna play,” he said. “I came back and just walked away from the studio. I was making pretty decent money, but I told ‘em I’m gonna go do my thing.” Grimes renewed his focus on playing the blues and took the stage name Teddy Lee Hooker. His alias paid homage to blues legend John Lee Hooker, a family friend who, he said, taught him his first guitar licks at age five. In 2008, he was a finalist in the prestigious International Blues Challenge in Memphis where he caught the attention of Tacoma Events Commission’s Gary Grape, founder of the Gray Sky Blues Music Festival. “He just blew everyone away on Beale Street. He was just lights out,” he recalled. The resulting Gray Sky show was among Grimes’ first high-profile gigs as Teddy Lee Hooker. “I think I was really in my element at the time, and I really enjoyed the

energy I was getting from the crowd, from the city,” he said. “Everything was aligned at that point.” But just as his career was picking up steam, Grimes faced yet another setback in 2009, a fall that shattered his right arm, leading to his humerus being replaced with a titanium rod. “I started to have to basically teach myself how to replay,” he said. “I had to finger pick ‘cause I couldn’t hold a pick, and I started to develop my own little claw action. I deal with pain, and I’ll never be able to lift my arm over my head again, so no more behind the head with guitar tricks, you know.” But laughing he added, “On the other end of it, though, I think I came out a stronger, better player, and more focused even. The one thing that has always been there and has never gone away since that heart thing, especially, is that the blues is in me.” Hooker’s headlining performance will take place at 6 p.m. on April 11 at the Swiss Tavern, 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. Joining him on the roster are several regional blues favorites, the likes of Dean Reichert, Blues County Sherriff and the CD Woodbury Band. “I’m kind of excited about it because we have a couple of local legends this year,” Grape said, first alluding to the godfather of Northwest blues and rock, “Little” Bill Engelhart. The original version of Engelhart’s Bluenotes formed in the ‘50s, inspired by a screening of “Blackboard Jungle” at Tacoma’s Sunset Theater, a flick best best known for popularizing Bill Haley & His Comets’ smash hit “Rock Around the Clock.” The original quartet – which also included Buck Ormsby, Lasse Aines and Frank Dutra – laid the foundation for the rock scene as we know it, as they played and promoted their own shows at venues like Tacoma Armory and the Little J.E.M. Cafe in Puyallup. The band is also the first Tacoma band to score a hit during the rock era, with ballad “I Love and Angel” in 1959. “He’s been performing in the Northwest for over 60 years, and he’s just a crowd favorite wherever he plays,” Grape said. Engelhart will appear with his trio – with Rod Cook on guitar and Russ Kammerer on drums – at 1:30 p.m. at the Harmon Brewery. The other local legend Grape tapped to play the Gray Sky festival is Jerry Miller. The Tacoma native became a national sensation in the 1960s as the lead guitarist for

Moby Grape, and Rolling Stone magazine placed him at No. 68 on its 2003 ranking of the greatest guitarists of all time. In recent years, Miller has been a regular performer at Dave’s of Milton, Uncle Sam’s Bar & Grill, and Doyle’s Annex, among other local venues. His most faithful fans know not to expect “Hey Grandma” or “Rounder” to show up during the encore. “You never hear him play any of the old Moby Grape hits,” Grape said. “He just does straight-ahead blues and things he’s written throughout the years. But he’s a consummate player. He can play anything. He can get a call from Santana when they come to down, and he can go sit in with them and never miss a beat.”

Here is a schedule of this year’s performers: The Swiss Pub, 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. A $10 cover will be charged after 3:30 p.m., $8 for Blues Society members and active military. sThe Emily Gardner Band (1 p.m.) sMaia Santell and House Blend, with special guests Julie Powers and Jumpin’ Josh Violette (2:30 p.m.) sCD Woodbury Band (4 p.m.) sTeddy Lee Hooker (6 p.m.) The Harmon Brewery, 1938 Pacific Ave. sKing Kom Beaux (noon) sLittle Bill & The Bluenotes (1:30 p.m.) sBlues County Sheriff (3 p.m.) sJerry Miller Band (4:30 p.m.) B Sharp Coffee House, 706 Court C sThe Dean Reichert Band (8 p.m.) Visit www.tacomaevents.com or call event director Gary Grape at (253) 507-9357 for further details.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE AMERICAN STATION WAGONS America’s Car Museum is kicking off the summer vacation season with a new display sure to bring back road trip memories from your childhood. And there are few vehicles that conjure up the delight of the family vacation like the great American Station Wagon. Whether you’re reliving a memorable road trip, or planning to embark on a new adventure, there’s no better way to experience the great American road trip but in a vintage wagon on the Mother Road. The American Station Wagons display will be featured in the popular Route 66 Gallery, which opened last May to great acclaim. Info: www.lemaymuseum.org.

TWO ‘ROMEO ET JULIETTE’ Charles Gounod’s “Roméo et Juliette” is the classic Shakespearean tragedy of two

star-crossed lovers, torn apart by feuding families. Gounod’s beautiful music along with Shakespeare’s timeless story has never sounded so sweet. Sung in French with English supertitles. Pantages Theater, April 10 at 7:30 p.m. (pre-show lecture at 6:30) and April 12 at 2 p.m. (pre-show lecture 1 p.m.). Info/tickets: www.broadwaycenter.org.

THREE THE FOX ON THE FAIRWAY Tacoma Little Theatre gets you ready for the PGA tour with its hilarious presentation of “The Fox on the Fairway” by Ken Ludwig. A tribute to the great English farces of

the 1930s and 1940s, “The Fox on the Fairway” is filled with mistaken identities, slamming doors and over-the-top romantic shenanigans. It’s a furiously paced comedy that recalls the Marx Brothers’ classics and a charmingly madcap adventure about love, life and man’s eternal love affair with... golf. Plays April 17 to May 3. Friday and Saturday showings are at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. This show is recommended for ages 13 and up. Tickets/info: www.tacomalittletheatre.com and (253) 272-2281.

FOUR ‘39 STEPS’ A RECIPE FOR ZANY COMEDY:Take one part Monty Python and one part “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare Abridged” and mix liberally with Alfred Hitchock’s classic film mystery “The 39 Steps” One actor plays the Hero, Richard Hannay. One actress plays the three women that he encounters and two clowns play the

other 150 roles. A comedic treat like no other with just the right dash of mystery. Plays April 17 to May 10, with special showings at 8 p.m. April 23 (Pay What You Can Night) and 8 p.m. April 30 (Pay What You Can Actor’s Benefit). Ticket/ info: www.LakewoodPlayhouse.org.

FIVE 50 YEARS OF ART A special exhibit celebrating 50 years of art education at Tacoma Community College will be held in The Gallery April 1-30. Works by TCC art faculty and alumni will be displayed. The Gallery is open noon–5 p.m., Monday through Friday (on days the college is open). Located in Building 4 at the north end of campus, it can be accessed from TCC’s main 12th and Mildred entrance. Visitor parking is available in Lot G.


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, April 3, 2015 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 3

Jennifer Chin and James De Foe at Handforth Gallery

CULTURE CORNER

A GUIDE TO THE MUSEUMS OF TACOMA

Museum of the Week: Tacoma History Museum

919 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, WA 98402 Wed.â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Otherwise by appointment. Info: www.tacomahistory.org The museum is located in the historic Provident Building. Tacoma Historical Society works to forge connections between past and present generations, fostering an appreciation of the past and a sense of place within our communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history. The museum allows Tacoma Historical Society to better serve the public and better care for its growing permanent collection of historic Tacoma artifacts, documents and photos. The 3,100 square ft. facility provides a safe, stable environment for collection items, as well as increased community access to the activities and services offered by Tacoma Historical Society.

MARCH

2015

Current Exhibits:

Tacoma Tee-Time: Golf in the City of Destiny Through July PHOTOS COURTESY OF HANDFORTH GALLERY

FUZZ-BUZZ. Jennifer Chinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tangerine and Tealâ&#x20AC;? is acrylic paint on paper mounted on a wood panel. By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

Handforth Gallery (housed inside the main branch of Tacoma Public Library) is currently hosting a two-person show of works by local artists Jennifer Chin and James De Foe. Both artists work with bright color making for a dazzling display that immediately draws the attention of gallery visitors. Chin calls her part of the show â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meditations.â&#x20AC;? Her compositions are abstract, mostly repeated patterns of several select colors. Chin works with a wet-on-wet method: pouring acrylic paint onto thick, wet paper so that the pigments blur and merge into one another. Chin embraces the element of chance as a feature of her work. Out of chaos, a composition emerges. The paintings on paper are mounted on wood panels for their final presentation. Some of Chinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pieces can seem too amorphous, but others are very alluring. The painting â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tangerine and Tealâ&#x20AC;? has a wonderfully fuzzy effect where the titular tones merge with black. It is like a closeup look at the fur on the flank of some giant psychedelic cat. Chin is a graduate of the University of Washington art school and now resides in Tacoma. De Foe calls his half of the show â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eye of the Beholder.â&#x20AC;? He is a professional musician and it is music that inspires his visual art. Like the works of Chin, those of De Foe are also mounted on wooden panels. De Foe does mostly figurative work â&#x20AC;&#x201C; mostly faces. The faces gaze back at the viewer â&#x20AC;&#x201C; silent and haunting. The artist likes to employ a device of grids across the surface so that the subjects appear to exist behind windows or fences. With titles like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wistful,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatever,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why?â&#x20AC;? De Foe seems to be trying to use the subtleties of facial expressions to con-

Join us to celebrate golf history in Tacoma as well as our one-year anniversary in the Provident Building. The exhibit is sponsored by Dr. Jerry V. Ramsey and Richard Sims.

Museum Features: Resource Center:

Tacoma Historical Society operates a Resource Center to provide members and other researchers access to the historic newspapers and other materials the society has collected. More than 400 bound volumes of Tacoma newspapers, dating as far back as 1883, have been cataloged, organized and placed on sturdy shelving. A grant from a friend of the society made this improvement possible. Tacoma city directories, spanning nearly a century, are available. The center provides space for small meetings and houses the societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offices and collection of historical artifacts. The centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gift shop features books on Tacoma history and Tacoma souvenirs. (Society members receive a 10 percent discount.)

Virtual Exhibits Online: MYSTERIOUS. James De Foeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whateverâ&#x20AC;? is characteristic of his moody faces under encaustic wax.

vey fleeting emotional states. He succeeds in conveying a sense of mute alienation. The works are multimedia: pencil, color pencil, oil pastel. They appear to be derived from digital images that are colored in and then embedded beneath a layer of encaustic. The wax overlay gives them texture and depth. Both artists come across as gauzy and dreamy. The works of the two thus tend to exist in harmony despite that one is abstract and the other is mostly figurative. Jennifer Chin and James De Foe runs through April 25. For further information visit www.tpl.lib.wa.us (â&#x20AC;&#x153;programs and events:â&#x20AC;? tab). More on Chin can be found at moxiecolor.com while those interested in De Foe can go to jamesdefoe.com.

The Tacoma Hotel, 1884-1935: Images of the Tacoma Hotel, lost to fire in 1935. Schools of Old Tacoma: The Cristell Collection of postcards, housed at the

Tacoma Historical Society, is rich in antique postcards of Tacoma city schools, many of which no longer exist. Take a walk through history as you view this unusual collection.

People...Virtually: A collection of photos of Tacomans early and more recent, some identified, some not.

Parks of Tacoma: Historic views of the parks of Tacoma. Some images are from the Cristell collection of photos.

Commerce in Tacoma: An exhibit of business and commerce from the early days until the 1970s.

        

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 3, 2015

A round up of events & happenings during the week.

Check it out online for many more photos and video clips! www.tacomaweekly.com

a thousand horses

Jessica Lynne PHOTO BY ERNEST A. JASMIN

Ted Brown Music held a fundraiser for the store’s Musical Outreach program over the weekend, raising funds for instruments and lessons for local kids who can’t otherwise afford them. The event featured performances by Tacoma country act Jessica Lynne & The Cousins and sax player Paul Sawtelle performing songs from his new album, “Virtual Insanity.” Watch a couple of performance clips on our Daily Mashup blog, www. tacomaweekly.com/dailymashup. – Ernest A. Jasmin, Tacoma Weekly

PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD

What to do on a Tuesday night in T-Town? Well, I went and checked out the upand-coming country-rock band A Thousand Horses at Steel Creek American Whiskey. Last year, the band signed with the Republic Nashville label and released its first single “Smoke,” which set a record for the highest debut by a new act when it debuted at No. 28 on Country Aircheck radio. A hint of the Black Crowes and a dash of Tom Petty with a little country soul and you get A Thousand Horses who rocked it for an hour, playing an 11 song set and all originals, except Petty’s “Won’t Back Down.” – Bill Bungard, Tacoma Weekly

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: COLT FORD AND DAN + SHAY

FORD

PHOTO COURTESY OF WASHINGTON STATE FAIR

Musical headliners have been unveiled for the Justin Boots Playoff Rodeo, which will kick off grandstand festivities at the Washington State Fair. “Hick-hop” sensation Colt Ford – known for hits “Drivin’ Around Song” and “Back” - will headline on opening night, Sept. 11; and hunky country-pop duo Dan + Shay (“19 You + Me,” “Show You Off”) will drop by on Sept. 12. Both shows will follow the rodeo’s evening sessions those days, which will kick off at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 to $35 and may be purchased through the Fair’s web site, www.thefair.com. Here are a dozen more hot tickets to jot down, with more info available at www.ticketmaster.com except where otherwise indicated. • Vicci Martinez: 7:30 p.m. April 18, Rialto Theater, $19 to $69; www.broadwaycenter.org. • Go Hard Festival featuring A$AP Ferg, Flosstradamus, Anna Lunde and more: 4 p.m. April 25, Tacoma Dome. • New Kids on the Block with Nelly and TLC: 7 p.m. May 6, Tacoma Dome, $51.50 to $91.50 • Life in Color: Big Bang featuring Diplo, Laidback

and more: 8 p.m. May 8, Tacoma Dome, $51 • Luke Bryan with Randy Houser and Dustin Lynch: 7:30 p.m. May 16, Tacoma Dome, $39.75 to $69.75. • Dana Carvey, Kevin Nealon and Dennis Miller: 7:30 p.m. June 16, Tacoma Dome, $35.50 to $99.50. • Van Halen with Kenny Wayne Shepherd: 7:30 p.m. July 5, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn, • Imagine Dragons with Metric: 7 p.m. July 31, Tacoma Dome, $26.50 to $56.50. • Christopher Titus: 7:30 and 10:30 p.m. Aug. 21 and 22, 8 p.m. Aug. 23, Tacoma Comedy Club, $25 to $35; www.tacomacomedyclub.com. • KISW’s Pain in the Grass with Slipknot, Lamb of God and Three Days Grace and more: 2 p.m. Aug. 23, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn, $32 to $72 or four for $99. • Tim McGraw with Billy Currington and Chase Bryant: 7 p.m. Sept. 4, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn, $51.75 to $67.75. • Jake Owen: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 24, Washington State Fair, Puyallup, $45 to $70; www.thefair.com.

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Make a Scene

Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

THE PROPHETS OF ADDICTION PARTY DOWN FOR CD RELEASE

Friday, April 3, 2015 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 5

Nightlife

TW PICK OF THE WEEK: LOCAL HIP-HOP FAVORITES THE BREAKLITES RETURN TO JAZZBONES ON APRIL 4 WITH SUPPORT FROM DARK TIME SUNSHINE AND RA SCION. MUSIC STARTS AT 9 P.M., AND TICKETS ARE $10; WWW.JAZZBONES.COM.

PHOTO: AGAINSTTHEGRAINPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

HABIT FORMING. The Prophets of Addiction are set to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reunite the Sinnersâ&#x20AC;? at Louie Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Fife April 11. By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

Prophets of Addiction fans, your wait is over. On April 11, band mates Lesli Sanders (lead vocals and bass), Jimmy Mess (drums), McKenna â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sweepâ&#x20AC;? Gates (guitar) and Lee Taylor (guitar) will be onstage live for the official release of the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reunite the Sinnersâ&#x20AC;? CD. The night kicks off at 7 p.m. at Louie Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Fife with opening bands Surgical Chaos USA, DedElectric and Thirion X. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all ages, and anyone 21 and older can get beer and wine with ID. The Prophets leave soon after on their American and European tour and already have more than 50 gigs lined up for the first leg. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been three years since The Prophets of Addiction were in the recording studio to create their smashing debut CD â&#x20AC;&#x153;Babylon Boulevard,â&#x20AC;? and it received rave reviews across the board. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reunite the Sinnersâ&#x20AC;? (on Incorruption/Cargo UK Records) promises to be a benchmark for the band. Sanders is excited about this CD, and for good reason. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These new songs are guaranteed to blow anyone away that listens to them, and that I promise,â&#x20AC;? he said in an interview from SeaTac Airport as he waited for his flight to Hollywood for finishing touches on the album. He shared some major news as well that had been kept under wraps until now: C.C. DeVille of Poison fame will be contributing some solos to the album. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have been friends with him for many years, hanging with him while I lived in Hollywood as well as touring with Poison while I was in a previous band,â&#x20AC;? Sanders said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He really is a great guy.â&#x20AC;? Years ago, DeVille made a promise to Sanders. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These days we have both been sober for quite some time and I remember him telling me, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Lesli, if you stay sober you and I will do some things musically.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Well that was like four years ago and hopefully this is just the beginning of more to come. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mr. DeVille is a man of his word, and that in itself means the world to me.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reunite the Sinnersâ&#x20AC;? was recorded in Tacoma with Ty Mcdonald at the Whine

Cellar Studios, with the drum tracks recorded at Uberbeatz Studios in Lynwood, a place frequented by Queensryche, among others. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I suggest anyone in the Northwest looking to get some good, quality recording done in a professional creative environment hit these places up,â&#x20AC;? Sanders advised. The mixing and mastering duties were handled by Phil Soussan in Hollywood, who has worked with the greats like Ozzy Osbourne, Billy Idol, Vince Neil, Jani Lane and many more. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would of never thought as a teenager that the guy from Ozzy would be mixing and the guitar player of Poison would be working on a song I wrote,â&#x20AC;? Sanders posted on Facebook. Sanders explained the concept behind the CDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s title. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The name â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Reunite the Sinnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; at first may sway some to think this is about something bad, something not cool in some circles. Quite the contrary, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more about reuniting the every day person in the name of rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll. Remember, rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll used to be referred to as â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;the devilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s musicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and in all reality every normal human being has committed sins throughout their lives no matter how small they may be. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about reuniting everyone and bringing back rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll, bringing back a scene, bringing back something real.â&#x20AC;? This will be made wonderfully real at the Prophetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; live shows, and these guys tour their butts off. The Prophets played 72 shows while on their double-leg U.S. tour in 2014, and so far the band has more than 50 gigs lined up for the first leg of their 2015 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reunite the Sinnersâ&#x20AC;? tour, with more dates to come. Sanders also completed his first ever solo project in 2014, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Haunting Truth of My Self Portrait (as told by Lesli Sanders)â&#x20AC;? (see sidebar). Find this CD and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Babylon Boulevard,â&#x20AC;? plus more band merchandise, at www.poarocks.com. Copies of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reunite the Sinnersâ&#x20AC;? will be available at the April 11 CD release party. Also, be sure and â&#x20AC;&#x153;likeâ&#x20AC;? The Prophets of Addiction on Facebook to stay up on everything this most excellent band is up to.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Haunting Truth of My Self Portrait (as told by Lesli Sanders)â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Culminating over 30 years as a musician, singer, songwriter and punk metal soldier, in 2014 Lesli Sanders completed his first solo project with â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Haunting Truth of My Self Portrait (as told by Lesli Sanders).â&#x20AC;? Alone in the studio, he crafted his music and lyrics into a work of depth and meaning in both its musicianship and in its ability to tell an inspiring, sometimes touching, story of his own defeat and redemption the likes of which people all over the world can relate to. Playing every instrument in this multi-instrumental work (with guitar on three tracks played by Ty Mcdonald), the more you listen to â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Haunting Truth of My Self Portraitâ&#x20AC;? the more the layers peel back to reveal its heart laid bare. Beneath the surface of Sanders the rock star, Sanders the man and poet emerges, the lyrics he sings taking hold of the ears and mind as he shares with the listener deeply held truths like an intimate friend. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Self Portraitâ&#x20AC;? starts the CD off with Sanders taking a good, hard look in the mirror and â&#x20AC;&#x153;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a pretty picture,â&#x20AC;? he sings. He doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t love himself and that has to

change. He reflects on what it is that makes him tick â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that makes him want to live â&#x20AC;&#x201C; on the next track, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Return the Smile,â&#x20AC;? and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s his music that he offers up in sacrifice. He sings of this moment of epiphany like a love song to his fans past, present and future. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m gonna put a smile back on your face/Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m gonna make you proud just to say that you know me and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll stand beside me/ Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll always be behind me/ And you will be that strength that drives me when I know youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re behind me.â&#x20AC;? If music is going to save his life, though, he has to get sober first (which he did years ago). â&#x20AC;&#x153;I need to cash it all in so I can be truly free,â&#x20AC;? he sings on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nothings Freeâ&#x20AC;? then he says goodbye with a prayer on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Take Me Away.â&#x20AC;? The brilliant backing chorus of Sandersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; layered voice sounds like the ghosts

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of all those bleary-eyed years giving him a musical sendoff like a bunch of drunken bar buddies would sing â&#x20AC;&#x153;Auld Lang Syneâ&#x20AC;? on the New Years Eve that their best friend is going off to fight in the war. Rebirth and new beginnings dawn a fresh day in the CD closer â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Religion.â&#x20AC;? Stepping out in faith into the valley of the shadow of death, he emerges not only alive but full of life, full of light where darkness used to be. There is so much hope in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Haunting Truth of My Self Portrait.â&#x20AC;? For anyone who has struggled with tragedy, addictions, self-doubt or self hate and has overcome it to live again fully, this oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for you.

FRIDAY, APRIL 3

MONDAY, APRIL 6 B SHARP COFFEE: Palmer Junction (experimental blues) 8 p.m., $5, AA

CULTURA EVENT CENTER: Latin Edition (Latin music) 9:30 p.m. GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Dan NguyĂŠn, Lam Truong, Thu Thao and more (Vietnamese pop) 8:30 p.m., NC HALF PINT: Fang Chi (prog-rock, experimental) 9 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Jar of Flies, Bleed Together (grunge tribute) 8 p.m., $10 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Chrysalis, Amadon, Fire Away (rock) 8 p.m., AA NEW FRONTIER: Smart People Dance Party (DJs) 9 p.m., NC before 10 p.m., $5 STONEGATE: The New All Stars Band (rock) 9 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Brad Upton (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15, 18+ early show UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Strange Pleasure (rock) 8 p.m

SATURDAY, APRIL 4 THE SPAR: The Olson Brothers (country, rock) 8 p.m., NC

STONEGATE: Too Many Cooks with Steve Stefanowicz (rock) 8 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, APRIL 7 DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA JAZZBONES: Ha Ha Tuesday with Lukas Seely, Sean McBride and host Ralph Porter (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8 TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m.

BOBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAVA JIVE: Peach Kelli Pop, Flying Fish Cove (garagerock, pop) 9 p.m. DOYLEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: The Cold 102s (blues) 9:30 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Vibe Central (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: The Breaklites, Dark Time Sunshine, Ra Scion (hip-hop) 9 p.m., $10 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Blacklist Union, Mechanism, Boneshaker, Sons of the Sound, Unders Sin (metal, hard rock) 5 p.m., AA NEW FRONTIER: Leatherdaddy (rock) 9 p.m., $5 STONEGATE: The New All Stars Band (rock) 9 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Brad Upton (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15, 18+ early show UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Justice Creek (southern rock) 8 p.m.

SUNDAY, APRIL 5

B SHARP COFFEE: Robbers Roost (ragtime, gypsy jazz, folk) 8 p.m., NC, AA DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Linda Myers Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC HARMON TAPROOM: Open mic with Steve Stefanowicz, 7 p.m., NC NORTHERN PACIFIC: Open mic, 7:30 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: Dave Nicholsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC

THURSDAY, APRIL 9 STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open mic) 8 p.m., NC

DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

CULTURA EVENT CENTER: Hempfest tryouts (rock) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 3 p.m., NC Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;MALLEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman and the Soul Spiderz (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

CHARLEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Blues jam with Richard Molina, 8 p.m., NC CULTURA EVENT CENTER: Thirsty Thursday (hip-hop DJ) 9:30 p.m. DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: Open jam, 8 p.m., NC DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Peter Lee (comedy) 8 p.m., $10

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

LEVIATHAN (140 MIN, R) Fri 4/3-Thu 4/9: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 IT FOLLOWS (100 MIN, R) Fri 4/3: 4:05, 6:30, 8:50 Sat 4/4-Sun 4/5: 11:30am, 4:05, 6:30, 8:50 Mon 4/6-Tue 4/7: 4:05, 8:50 Wed 4/8-Thu 4/9: 4:05, 6:30, 8:50 â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;71 (99 MIN, R) Fri 4/3: 1:45, 4:20 Sat 4/4-Sun 4/5: 11:35am, 1:45, 4:20 Mon 4/6-Thu 4/9: 1:45, 4:20

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WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS (86 MIN, NR) Fri 4/3-Mon 4/6: 2:05, 6:45, 9:00 Tue 4/7: 6:45, 9:00 Wed 4/8-Thu 4/9: 2:05, 6:45, 9:00 THE SECOND BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (122 MIN, PG) Fri 4/3: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 Sat 4/4-Sun 4/5: 11:45am, 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 Mon 4/6-Thu 4/9: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 OCCUPY THE FARM (90 MIN, NR) Tue 4/7: 2:05, 6:30

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Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 3, 2015

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: BRICK BY BRICK Fri., April 3, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Freighthouse Square, 430 E. 25th St.

“Brick by Brick” is a 16-day Lego artist expo presented by Dan M. Parker. Offering a high-demand creative experience – seeing and creating – people are always excited by what they see, and they want to create themselves. Attendees get up close and personal with the art and get to build if they’re so inspired – playing with imagination, imagination into play. There is no other Expo like this, especially when you include the unique venue that is the Historic Freighthouse Square with the best international food court in Tacoma. Price: $10; $6 children 2-12. Info: www.goo. gl/S3xDq5 HABITAT RESTORATION WORK Fri., April 3, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Tacoma Nature Center at Snake Lake, 1919 S. Tyler St. Join the Tacoma Nature Center for regular stewardship activities as they care for parks by removing invasive plant species, re-planting areas with native plants and helping those plants thrive. No experience necessary. Come dressed for the weather and prepared to get dirty. Work parties occur rain or shine. Children must be accompanied by adults. Price: Free. Info: (253) 591-6439 SPRING BREAK SUPERSTARS Fri., April 3, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, 5400 N. Pearl St. Salute the zoo’s conservation animal superstars as they enjoy

special treats. Price: $6.7517; free for children 2 and under. Info: (253) 591-5337 BEER GUY GARAGE SALE Sat., April 4, 12-5 p.m. The Swiss Pub, 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. Come in and purchase beverage items and apparel. All proceeds go toward Citizens for a Healthy Bay. Price: Free. Info: (253) 572-2821 FOOD ADDICTS IN RECOVERY ANONYMOUS Sat., April 4, 8-9:30 a.m. Trinity Lutheran Church, 12115 Park Ave. S. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous is an international fellowship of men and women who have experienced difficulties in life as a result of the way we used to eat.

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

Through shared experience and mutual support, we help each other to recover from the disease of food addiction. Our program of recovery is based on the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous. Price: Free. Info: (206) 9790866

THE JESSE OWENS STORY Tues., April 7, 5:30 p.m. Parkland/Spanaway Library, 13718 Pacific Ave. S. Watch and discuss a movie about Jesse Owens, the African-American athlete who won four gold medals in the 1936 Berlin Olympics. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3304

MIXXEDFIT CLASS Sat., April 4, 9-10 a.m. STAR Center, 3873 S. 66th St Created and founded by Lori Chung, MixxedFit is a people-inspired dance fitness program that is a mix of explosive dancing and boot camp toning. Price: $5; free for members. Info: (253) 404-3939

U.S. SERVICE ACADEMY NIGHT WITH REP. DENNY HECK Tues., April 7, 6 p.m. William Factory Small Business Incubator, 1423 E. 29th St. Rep. Denny Heck invites South Sound students interested in pursuing an education at a United States Service Academy to attend an information session with Service Academy representatives. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn more about obtaining a Congressional nomination to one of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, and U.S. Coast Guard Academy. These informational events are recommended for high school and middle school students who reside in Washington’s 10th Congressional District. Price: Free. Info: www.dennyheck.house.gov/ ServiceAcademies

SWORD AND LASER BOOK DISCUSSION Sun., April 5, 1 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave. This new Tacoma group is a locally-organized, real-life offshoot of the online Sword & Laser community. Each month, Sword & Laser picks either a fantasy or a science fiction book to read and discuss. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-8801 VISIBILITY AND EMPATHY Mon., April 6, 6-7 p.m. Pacific Lutheran University – Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, 12180 Park Ave. S. This panel explores the nature of conflict, communication and the arts. This panel will also bring together conflict, community and peace practitioners who use a variety of expressive forms to connect participants working to manage conflict, build community and even create peace. Price: Free. Info: (253) 535-7150

ful mind has on your day. Price: $5. Info: (360) 754-7787 CLASSICS BOOK CLUB Wed., April 8, 7 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave. The Classics Book Club has been meeting in Tacoma since 1994. They read a variety of classic works from the ancient to modern. Books available at King’s Books. The group meets the second Wednesday of every month at King’s Books. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-8801 COUNCIL DISTRICT 5: COMPREHENSIVE PLAN WORKSHOP Thurs., April 9, 6-8 p.m. Gray Middle School, 6229 S Tyler St. The City of Tacoma’s Planning and Development Services Department is holding a series of community workshops for the Tacoma Comprehensive Plan update, Tacoma 2040. The Comprehensive Plan establishes City policy on numerous topics including land use, neighborhoods, housing, transportation, arts and cultural resources, historic preservation, recreation and open space, downtown and the environment. Price: Free. Info: (253) 571-5200 ID THEFT PROTECTION SEMINAR Fri., April 24 6:30 p.m. Milton/Edgewood Pierce County Library, 900 Meridian E Ste 29, Milton A seminar to teach business owners and the public how to better protect themselves from identity theft will be held in Milton. The seminar will provide information on the different types of identity theft and key principles to safeguarding personal information. For more information, e-mail Stephen White at steverino7@ gmail.com.

LUNCHTIME MEDITATION: DOWNTOWN TACOMA Wed., April 8 12-12:35 p.m. Tushita Kadampa Buddhist Center, 1501 Pacific Ave. S. With Buddhist Teacher David Eskelin. Change your mind, change your day. Through meditation we learn to reduce stress and improve our mindfulness and concentration. This in turn makes us more relaxed, flexible and effective. In these classes we will emphasize creating happiness for ourselves by developing a peaceful mind. Experience for yourself the effect a peace-

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

WITCHY WOMAN HOROSCOPES Christina Wheeler has been studying astrology for the past 22 years and runs The Nearsighted Narwhal on Sixth Avenue in Tacoma with her partner, Ossain. She loves combining her writing and craftiness to make zines and has one out now called Gypsy Grimoire Magickal Herbs & Spells available at her shop. She also heads the committee for the Sixth Avenue’s Dia de los Muertos parade. Contact her at thenearsightednarwhal@gmail.com for any questions or just to chew the fat about the stars.

ARIES (Mar. 21 – Apr. 19) The eclipse on Monday is going to put a lot of pressure on your serious personal and professional relationships. There will be an emphasis on what you should give in order to sustain harmony. Divorce and relationships strained to the breaking point is the downside. The upside is new relationships and signing favorable contracts. Self vs. others is the theme of the week. TAURUS (Apr. 20 - May 20) Be on guard for accidents this week. Your daily routines could suddenly change but try to put emphasis on finding a routine that you’re better suited to. A health issue may abruptly be brought to your attention. Try your best to maintain harmony with your body and home. GEMINI (May 21 – Jun. 20) Romance has a way of coming and going in your life quite unexpectedly. This week either of these situations is highly probable, with the added bonus of pregnancies and babies. Try to keep your wits about you during this emotionally intense time and don’t forget that it’s better to be constructive than destructive. CANCER (Jun. 21 – Jul. 22) Issues of home and family life are brought to the forefront. You might take the time to decide what family really means to you, who you consider to be family and reexamining familial controversies to reach new solutions and perspectives. Where you live and whom you consider family is in the spotlight, for better or worse. LEO (Jul. 23 – Aug. 22) Communication breakdowns with a loved one is probable, as lines get crossed and intentions misinterpreted. Be fully aware of what you are saying and try not to make promises or be too forthcoming with things that just don’t sit right with your gut. Don’t sacrifice harmony for balance. Be true to yourself and your relations simultaneously. VIRGO (Aug. 23 – Sep. 22) Money makes the world go ‘round, but it’s also starting to make your head spin. Spending, saving, and accumulating it is of the utmost importance right now. Spouses may be involved with the likelihood of overspending or arguments about budgets. Separate money from your relationships to value what they’re really worth. LIBRA (Sep. 23 – Oct. 22) Relationships and partnerships are kind of

your thing but this week it may become clear to you that who you are in your involvements with others is not who you are on the inside. Soul search without giving a thought about others. It’s time for great self-awareness and independence. Shed your co-dependency once and for all. You’re all a whole person, by yourself. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 – Nov. 21) A great spiritual insight may occur through a loved one or soul mate. Seeking relief in selfimposed isolation is a strong need for you, as always, but others may be questioning your motives and feelings. Alternatively, you can combat your loneliness by tapping into that creative spark of yours. All work and no play makes Scorpios even more Scorpio-y. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 – Dec. 21) Your reputation is being heavily scrutinized by others, whether you know about it or not, for better or for worse. Your friendships and associations go under the microscope and it might be high time to separate the wheat from the chaff. It’s not only what other people think that gets you; it’s what the ones you love think that carries the most weight. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 – Jan. 19) The status and reputation you’ve been working so hard for will either be granted or denied, almost fully depending on your personal relationships. You may have spent a great amount of time on something to find that it didn’t really matter after all. Pick up the pieces and make something pretty out of them. Power plays are at an all-time high. You’re strong enough to pull through this. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 – Feb. 18) You may be questioning the meaning of life a lot this week or trying to find where a relationship fits in the grand scheme of things. Someone may inspire you to get you to consider going back to school or jumping out of your comfort zone, or just plain starting in a new direction altogether. Decide what works best for you and either move forward or stay on the path you’re already on. PISCES (Feb. 19 – Mar. 20) Birth and death may be all around you at this time. That, in and of itself, is a pretty heavy concept to chew on but it’s an integral part of life. Nothing ominous, as these are just the natural cycles of life, but rest assured that no one will ever get as much time as they’d like here. That should be a good enough reason to start making your days add up to a happy and fulfilled life.

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Friday, April 3, 2015 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

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CEMETERY PLOT

CEMETERY PLOT

Double Interment at New Tacoma Cemetery. Includes lot, 2 liners, 2 settings fee and 2 openings. Valued at $6,000, asking $4,000. 253-459-3497

EMPLOYMENT

FOR SALE RV

RV

SERVICES CASH FOR CARS

SERVICES

CASH FOR CARS

CASH FOR CARS

We Buy ANY Car of Truck That Drives In $500 to $10,000 For Most Vehicles. Call 253-363-3977

CASH 4 YOUR UNWANTED/JUNK RV FOR SALE: 1994 5TH WHEEL, HITCHIKER II NU WA. LOW MILES, 29 FEET. 1 SLIDE, 2 TVS, QUEEN BED, MICROWAVE OVEN, COOKTOP, FRIDGE. VERY GOOD CONDITION. CLEAN THROUGHOUT. $7,200. CALL 253-537-0923 OR 253-651-5056

WANTED

VEHICLES

4/7).'!.$42!.30/24s,/#!,/2,/.'$)34!.#%

253.414.2221 ,)#%.3%$s"/.$%$s).352%$

DLR

APPLIANCES

WANTED:

(253) 752-8105

REQUIRED Nursing Assistant (With Personal & Nursing Care Experience) Absolute Care Adult Family Home 2 Lakewood, Washington Email: absolutecarefh22015@yahoo.com

DISCRIMINATION Experiencing Workplace Discrimination? Retired City of Tacoma Civil Rights Investigator will provide assistance. Call 253-565-6179. Never a fee for my services.

  

Reconditioned Appliances Quality Guaranteed 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Closed Sundays

    

     

(253) 267-1673



LAWN CARE

LAWN CARE

CLEANING

Big Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawn Care

FREE Hauling for Metal

LIMO

LIMO

CASH FOR CARS The Happy Hooker

Life is too short to spend it cleaning... So let us do it for you.

Âş Storm Clean-up Âş Handyman

(253) 397-7013

Cash for Unwanted & Junk Cars & Trucks Free Removal 253-335-1232

  

CASH FOR TRADE-IN 5042 Yakima Ave. Tacoma, WA 98408

EMPLOYMENT Fife Towing is looking for experienced tow operators who are hardworking and self motivated. Employment is full time. Pay is DOE. To apply email service@fifetowing.com or visit 1313 34th Ave. E. Fife WA 98424 (253) 922-8784



APPLIANCES

WANTED

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

CASH FOR CARS

PAYS YOU! FOR YOUR Junk Cars

253-606-1647

Squeaky Clean 253.473.7621 Licensed & Insured

LIMO

ELECTRICAL

PATRIOT LIMOUSINE SERVICE

Allied Electric Service

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

24 Hour Service 7EDDINGSs!NNIVERSARIESs"IRTHDAYSs0ROMSs'RADUATIONS &UNERALSs2OUND4RIP!IRPORT3ERVICEs#ORPORATE (OLIDAY0ARTIESs!LL/THER3PECIAL/CCASIONS

Toll Free 1-877-272-6092 www.alliedmarinecorp.com

253-848-7378

ALLIEE1963CQ

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ROOFING

PAINTING

ROOFING

PAINTING

Looking For A Great Price?

Your Local Roof Experts â&#x20AC;&#x153;Repairs or Replacementâ&#x20AC;?

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TriState Roofing, Inc. TRISTI*931QH

YARD HELP

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CONTRACTOR

682-9170 509-7977

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CONTRACTOR

JT GENERAL CONTRACTOR ROOFING

FENCING

New â&#x20AC;˘ Repairs Tear-Off & Re-Roof

Wood, Chain Link & Repairs Too!

253-222-1136 License & Bonded â&#x20AC;˘ JTLANLF94INA

HAULING

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Advertising Representatives: â&#x20AC;˘ Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Marlene Carrillo, marlene@tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Shelby Johnson, shelby@tacomaweekly.com


Section B • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 3, 2015

NOTICES

NOTICES

NOTICES

TO: TIFFANY BOWEN

TO: JASON ISBELL, MONICA ISBELL

In the Welfare of: B.B DOB: 10/11/2014 Case Number: PUY-CW-CW-2014-0053

FOR THE MATTER OF: LORELEI EVANS VS. JASON ISBELL, MONICA ISBELL

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an CONTINUED ADJUDICATION Hearing in the Children’s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

CASE NUMBER: PUY-CV-CV-2015-0005

You are summoned to appear for a CONTINUED ADJUDICATION Hearing on the 18TH day of MAY, 2015 at 11:00AM If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.750, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. Notice, pursuant to §7.04.740, If the parent(s), guardian or custodian fails to respond or appear for the formal adjudicatory hearing, the Court may find the parent(s), guardian or custodian in default, and enter a default order of child/family protection and order necessary intervention and appropriate steps the parent(s), guardian or custodian must follow to correct the underlying problem(s). Notice, pursuant to § 4.08.250, when a party against whom a judgment is sought fails to appear, plead, or otherwise defend within the time allowed, and that is shown to the Court by a motion and affidavit or testimony, the Court may enter an order of default and, without further notice to the party in default, enter a judgment granting the relief sought in the complaint.

TO: Joshua Omelas In re the Application for a Representative Payee: O., A. Case Number(s) PUY-CV-PC-2014-0187 YOU are hereby summoned to appear in the Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for Initial Hearing on May 5th, 2015 at 10:30 am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Rowena George AND Kevin George In Re the Application for a Representative Payee: Case Number(s) PUY-CV-PC-2014-0180-RE: L., G. PUY-CV-PC-2014-0181-RE: K., G. PUY-CV-PC-2014-0182-RE: K., G. Jr. PUY-CV-PC-2014-0183-RE: T. G. YOU are hereby summoned to appear in the Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 5th day of May, 2015 at 9:00 am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT.

TO: CORA McNUTT & MARCUS AZURE In the Welfare of: A.A DOB: 09/25/2012 Case Number: PUY-CW-CW-2014-0062 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an CONTINUED ADJUDICATION Hearing in the Children’s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a CONTINUED ADJUDICATION Hearing on the 11TH day of JUNE, 2015 at 11:00AM If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.750, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. Notice, pursuant to §7.04.740, If the parent(s), guardian or custodian fails to respond or appear for the formal adjudicatory hearing, the Court may find the parent(s), guardian or custodian in default, and enter a default order of child/family protection and order necessary intervention and appropriate steps the parent(s), guardian or custodian must follow to correct the underlying problem(s). Notice, pursuant to § 4.08.250, when a party against whom a judgment is sought fails to appear, plead, or otherwise defend within the time allowed, and that is shown to the Court by a motion and affidavit or testimony, the Court may enter an order of default and, without further notice to the party in default, enter a judgment granting the relief sought in the complaint. TO: Claudia Cota-Ancheta & Donald George IV In the Welfare of: T. C-G DOB: 04/30/2009 Case Number: PUY-G-JV-2014-0039

HOLY CROSS RUMMAGE SALE

The Petitioner has filed a Civil Petition against the Respondent in this Court. Both the Petitioner and Respondent have the right to legal representation in this case. This Court has a list of attorneys and spokespersons who are admitted to practice in this Court. The Respondent must respond to this Civil Petition within twenty (20) days after being served. The Respondent must respond by serving a copy of a written answer on the Petitioner and by filing this written answer with this Court along with an affidavit of service. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear in the Puyallup Tribal Court on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, in the matter of which is located at 1638 East 29th Street, Tacoma, Washington, and you are to stay until this Court may hear this matter. YOU ARE SUMMONED to appear on Thursday the 28th day of May, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. for a continued Pre-Trial Hearing.

N. 43rd & Shirley St. Fri. April 10 & Sat. April 11 10 AM–4 PM $2 Bag Sale Sat. 2 PM

2ND ANNUAL Antiques and more. One Day Sale. April 11th 9-5. China hutches, sewing machine, farm style kitchen table and chairs, rocking chairs, 1950s metal patio chairs, old trunks, German desk, oak table, maple table, 1940s mahogany double bed, bird cages lamps, cut glass, pewter dishes, watering cans, planters, quilts, linens, tea cups. 1004 11th Ave. Milton, across from City Hall.

FAILURE TO APPEAR AFTER RECEIVING NOTICE MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT. DATE: this 1 day of April, 2015.

PIERCE COUNTY DISTRICT COURT STATE OF WASHINGTON

NO: 5Z8028300 Regarding the Name Change of Lillian Prudence Kountrouba Minor NOTICE OF HEARING FOR NAME CHANGE By Amber Michelle Midgett Parent/Guardian THE STATE OF WASHINGTON-DIRECTED TO Michael Angelo Koutrouba YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that pursuant to RCW 4.24.130, the mother/father/legal guardian of the above named minor child(ren), has filed a Petition to change the Name of Lillian Prudence Koutrouba TO Lillian Prudence Midgett. The hearing on this matter shall be on Thursday April 23rd , 2015, at 9:00 AM 930 Tacoma Avenue S., Courtroom 127, Tacoma, Washington. FAILURE TO APPEAR AT THIS HEARING MAY RESULT IN THE NAME CHANGE IF THE ABOVE LISTED MINOR(S). DATED 03/16/15 FILE YOUR RESPONSE WITH Pierce County District Court, 930 Tacoma Ave. S., Room 239, Tacoma WA 98402 (253) 798-6311

Auction Notice

Abandoned Vehicle 2nd Thursday Monthly Lakewood Towing Inc. #5002 9393 Lakeview Ave SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 Ph. 253-582-5080 Auction 04092015 Date 04/9/2015 View @ 11 am Auction Starts @ 2 pm In accordance with RCW 46.55.130 Lakewood Towing Inc. will sell to the highest bidder. See complete listing @ lakewoodtowing.com or posting at our office

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Northwest Towing, at 2025 S 341st Pl, Federal Way on 4/6/2015. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130. at 2:00pm. Viewing of cars from 1:00-2:00pm. Registered Tow Number 5695. www.fifetowing.com

VOLUNTEERS A Student Needs You. The process of grooming kids for success can act as a powerful deterrent to dropping out of high school. Communities In Schools is looking for dedicated volunteers with an interest in tutoring 912 grade at Foss High School. Students need assistance in Algebra, English, Geometry and Trigonometry on Monday and/or Wednesdays. Volunteers must be consistent, reliable and willing to share their knowledge in one of the above areas weekly. Please contact Tiffynee Terry-Thomas @ 571-7380 or xx for details. Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care Needs Volunteers

Looking to have a positive impact on your community this year? Invest a few hours per week to support our patients and families. Read a book, listen to life stories, give caregivers a few hours to rest and renew. Apply your listening skills and compassion in a meaningful role as a Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care volunteer. Comprehensive training and on-going support are provided. Join our caring and professional team

to change lives-especially your own. Training starts soon. Call 1—855—534—7050 to learn more or log onto www. chifranciscan.org and click on Hospice and Palliative Care under “Our Services”

Food Bank We are a local food bank on the east side of Tacoma, WA and are powered strictly by volunteers. We provide much needed food and other basic household items to people in need on a weekly basis. Being a volunteer driven organization we are always looking for good people who are interested in donating a few hours of their lives helping make the lives of someone else a little better. Donate as much or as little of your time you want for a wide variety of tasks, there is always plenty to do. If you are looking for a way to be part of something bigger and give a little much needed help to the local community then contact us and we’ll get you started. Please join us in helping to spread a little holiday cheer. Contact Enzi 253-212-2778.

PETS Need safe farms or barns for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. They are fixed, vaccinated and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 203-4608

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy 253-770-8552

Pet of the Week

VOLUNTEERS

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF PIERCE In re the Estate of: ROBERT ORVAL OVERLAND (a/k/a CARSON) Deceased

Smile

NO: 15-4-00387-1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The Personal Representative named below has been appointed and has qualified as personal representative of the above estate. Persons having claims against the deceased must, prior to the time such claims would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, serve their claims on the personal representative or the attorney of record in the address stated below and file an executed copy of the claim with the Clerk of this Court within four (4) months after the date of the filing of the copy of this Notice with the clerk of the Court, whichever is later or, except under those provisions included in RCW 11.40.011 or 11.40.013, the claim will be forever barred. This bar is effective as to claims against both the probate assets and the non-probate assets of the deceased. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with the Clerk of Court: March 18, 2015 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: Friday March 27, 2015. Subsequent weekly publications will run April 3, 2015 and March 10, 2015. Donald N Powell, WSBA #42055, Attorney for Clara Norton, Personal Representative

Looking for volunteers who want to share the passion of reading with a struggling reader! All-Star Readers is held Monday and Wednesdays 3:45-5:00 at Arlington Elementary School now through mid-June. Contact Lori Ann Reeder, Program Manager at lreeder@tacoma.k12.wa.us or 253-571-1139 for specifics and to get started.

Build Success

Many middle school students need your help with math homework and preparing for tests and quizzes in our after school program on Tuesdays at Baker Middle School. Be a part of their successful transition to high school by helping them with math now. Please contact Jenna Aynes at jaynes@tacoma.k12. wa.us or 253-571-5053 or Lori Ann Reeder lreeder@tacoma. k12.wa.us or 253-571-1139 for specifics.

Math or Reading Help Wanted!

Communities In Schools is looking for dedicated volunteers with an interest in tutoring 2nd grade readers at Sherman Elementary School on Wednesdays from 3:45-4:45 PM. Tutors are also needed at Mt. Tahoma High School with Algebra in the Math Boot Camp on Monday or Thursdays afterschool. This program is designed to help students improve their math skills/grades before the semester ends on 1/23. Please contact Trisha Tracy @ 571-3843 or ttracy@tacoma.k12.wa.us for specific information.

Build a Brighter Future. Help a Student Read Dedication and tireless efforts are making a difference in our community. Communities In Schools is looking for dedicated volunteers with an interest in tutoring 2nd grade readers or to assist in the Homework Club at Fern Hill Elementary School on Wednesdays from 4-5 PM. Please contact Judy Merritt @ 571-3873 or jmerrit@tacoma.k12. wa.us for specific information.

Help Students Graduate. The process of grooming kids for success can act as a powerful deterrent to dropping out of high school. Communities In Schools is looking for dedicated volunteers with an interest in tutoring 912 grade at Oakland High School. Students need assistance in Algebra, Basic Math and English Monday - Friday. Volunteers must be consistent, reliable and willing to share their knowledge in one of the above areas weekly. Please contact Leigh Butler @ 571-5136 or lbutler@tacoma.k12. wa.us for more information.

Big Daddy Big Daddy is a big ol’ tomboy who’s dashing in black and white. When the 3-year-old first came to the shelter, he plopped himself down and spread himself out, preparing to be pampered. Ten days in and he’s still mister cool. Always relaxed and friendly, Big Daddy would do best as a lone ranger (as in, no other cats please) and could benefit from an indoor/outdoor setup — he’s got an air of adventure about him. Come meet this leading man today! A496033

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www.thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week 1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Hi, my name is Eva. I’m a black and white Lionhead bunny. I’m pretty social, and I love carrots and playing with toys. Stop by the shelter and see if I can complete your Forever Family.

Call us today to place your classified ad! 253-922-5317 or fill out this form and mail with payment to: Tacoma Weekly

2588 Pacific Hwy Fife WA 98424

Ad Copy Here:

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Continued Initial Hearing in the Children’s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Continued Initial Hearing on the 1st day of JUNE, 2015 at 2:00PM If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.750, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. Notice, pursuant to §7.04.740, If the parent(s), guardian or custodian fails to respond or appear for the formal adjudicatory hearing, the Court may find the parent(s), guardian or custodian in default, and enter a default order of child/family protection and order necessary intervention and appropriate steps the parent(s), guardian or custodian must follow to correct the underlying problem(s). Notice, pursuant to § 4.08.250, when a party against whom a judgment is sought fails to appear, plead, or otherwise defend within the time allowed, and that is shown to the Court by a motion and affidavit or testimony, the Court may enter an order of default and, without further notice to the party in default, enter a judgment granting the relief sought in the complaint.

Name: Address: Phone: Cash

$15.00 30 Words and Under: ______________ Extra words @ .05:_________________ Check

Visa/Mastercard Card #

Money Order Exp.

Sub Total:_________________________ x Number of Weeks = ______________

Total Amount:________________

Cost: $15 for 30 words for one week. 5¢ per each additional word. Deadline: Tuesday, 12 noon for Thursday publications. Payment: Required on all classified ads at time of placement. We accept cash, check, money order or Visa/ Mastercard. Mail or bring payment to Tacoma Weekly at 2588 Pacific Hwy, Fife. Email: advertising@tacomaweekly.com

w w w. t a c o m a w e e k l y. c o m


Friday, April 3, 2015 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 9

Classifieds HOMES

HOMES

2711 Henry Road N

Absolutely Charming, Mediterranean Style, custom built North Tacoma view home. Enjoy Commencement Bay view from Mstr Br balc. Inside feat. incl. Marble floor entry, St. Steel Appl, Gran. count-tops, Cust. built Hickory cab. + Beaut. Brazilian Cherry hardwood floor, Bay windows. Mstr suite w/ FP & Lrg bath+steam shower, Cali closet. New Energy Efficient heating. Cent. vacuum, new paint in & out, new carpet, Finished Bsmt w/ kitchen. Close to Schools, Parks, Freeway, Hospitals & Waterfront. $623,000.

FOR SALE BY OWNER: $158,500 4322 South G St, Tacoma 98418

NEW CARPET

NEW PAINT

4 bed, 2 bath, well cared for 1476 sq ft single family home s Breakfast nook made from real tree knot wood s Detached garage s Newly finished hardwood floors s New carpet throughout s Fresh paint s Fireplace pellet insert s Master bedroom w/ fully remodeled bathroom s Mother-in-law addition attached to back of house w/ full size bathroom equipped w/ full handicap safety bars. Separate entrance. s Quiet neighborhood close to schools, bus stops and zones, I-5 freeway

NEW FLOORS

253-678-0045 FOR RENT

FOR RENT

3 Bdrm Apt for Rent. 3 Bed, 11/2 Bath. Gas heat, dishwasher, sewer/water included. In front parking. Garbage Included. Washer Dryer hookup. Gas paid by owner. Section welcome. Call Kenneth 206-941-6595 $1100.

CONDOS & HOMES NORTH TACOMA

DUPONT

509 N YAKIMA AVE #106

2367 MCDONALD AVE

$825

$1175

2 BED 1 BATH 950 SF. PERFECT UNIT INCLUDES ALL APPLIANCES, FAMILY ROOM, DINING AREA & $25 FEE FOR W/S/G.

3 BED 1 BATH 1040 SF. PERFECT 3 BED RAMBLER HAS A HUGE KITCHEN, HARDWOODS, NEW CARPET AND CLOSE TO JBLM

TACOMA

SPANAWAY

4706 S WARNER ST #C

1302 192ND ST CT E

$795

$1675

2 BED, 1.5 BATH 900 SF. PERFECT UNIT HAS NEW PAINT, NEW KITCHEN, WASHER/DRYER, STORAGE CLOSET AND W/S/G INCLUDED.

5 BED 2.5 BATH 2466 SF. MASSIVE HOME HAS AMAZING KITCHEN, FAMILY ROOM, FENCED BACKYARD AND PETS WELCOME.

LAKEWOOD

TACOMA

8416 PHILLIPS RD SW #44

760 COMMERCE ST #401

$975 2 BED 1.5 BATH 975 SF. 2 BED CONDO HAS NEW HARDWOODS, SS APPLIANCES, PETS WELCOME AND MUCH MORE.

NO RENT TO OWN, LEASE OR OWNER CONTRACT! HOMES

HOMES

6027 S. Lawrence 3 Beds, 1¾ Bath, 1855 g SqFt. Beautiful in turn of the d n century Dutch Pe Colonial home completely updated with character galore. Hardwood floors, foyer, banister staircase, large living & dining rooms, high ceilings, large remodeled kitchen, separate utility rm, 3 bedrooms up w/loft for possible 4th bedroom. Updated electrical & plumbing, new windows, tank less water heater, heat pump, insulated floors, oversized bathtub, security system. Fully fenced back yard w/large deck, sprinkler system, 2 car garage w/ upgraded electrical. MLS # 730787 $179,000

Heather Redal (253) 363-5920 Heatherredal@gmail.com

11425 Madera Cir SW, Lakewood

$995

Park52.com · 253-473-5200 Professional Management Services

HOMES

3720 S Alaska St. 3 beds 1 bath 1,391 sqft. Adorable vintage craftsman w/original woodwork, finishes & attention to detail throughout! Picture perfect with hardwood flrs, fireplace, coved ceilings, large din rm & spacious, bright kitchen w/upgrades & stainless steel appliances. Remodeled bath w/high ceilings, dressing room & closet, 2 bedrooms upstairs, one on main. Dry basement large enough for bed/bath & family room. Fenced bkyd is like a private oasis with mature landscaping & room for entertaining & gardening & garage. MLS # 750464 $189,000

Sergio Hernandez (253)431-2308 Sergio@betterproperties.com

HOMES

6711 36th St Ct NW, Gig Harbor

3 Bed, 1 3/4 Bath. 1,356 sq ft. Open floor plan & vaulted ceilings highlight this handsome rambler on a park-like corner lot in Artondale. Kitchen features an island, new smooth-top stove & convection oven, tile countertops & bay windows. Family room with fireplace is perfect for entertaining as is the large deck & fenced backyard. The master suite, one of three newly carpeted bedrooms, has French doors to the deck and a remodeled ¾ bathroom. 30-yr roof installed in 2005. 10 mins to schools, shopping, recreation & SR-16 MLS# 573155 $257,500 Debbie Houtz Better Properties 253-376-2280

4820 N Shirley St. Tacoma $439,000

16 N SALMON BEACH $349,000

Currently used as non conforming triplex. Over 1/2 acre! This classic home has views of the Sound & Olympic Mountains. Many upgrades yet original woodwork and charm. Main level has large kitchen with vaulted ceiling, skylights, 2 bedrooms & full bath. Upstairs & downstairs have been converted to separate units and could be easily converted back to a fabulous 4 bedroom home. OR subdivide (3 lots? -buyer to verify) Fully fenced yard with fruit trees, RV parking, detached garage/shop.

Welcome to this uniquely Northwest home in the waterfront community of Salmon Beach! Featuring main living area on the 2nd floor, the home boasts an amazing panorama stretching from the Narrows Bridge(s) to Pt Defiance. Open concept great room with living/dining/kitchen laid out with views like crazy! 1500 sq ft of deck space gives you lots of room for gardening, entertaining or just relaxing in the SW exposure, with spectacular sunsets, the Olympic Mtns, marine activity & wildlife galore... MLS# 690309

Mark Hulen 253.761.8888 Better Properties North Proctor mark@betterproperties.com

www.betterpropertiesnorthproctor.com

10519/10521 Mt. Tacoma DR SW Lakewood

$439,000 Incredible opportunity to own a well maintained duplex plus an 1800+ sf shop/ office! Just a few blocks from Pierce College and near shopping. 3 bedroom, 2 bath units with over 1200 sf each. Ideal for an owner/user, hobbyist, mechanic or a great place to store your cars, boats, equipment or? in the detached shop. Plenty of room to park your RV also. GSI does not include the full shop potential income, only the office portion. Only a short distance from historical Steilacoom and the waterfront!

Mark Hulen 253.761.8888 Better Properties North Proctor mark@betterproperties.com

www.betterpropertiesnorthproctor.com

1116 N. Jackson $190,000

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker Better Properties N Proctor 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS Excellent business opportunity! The owners of “Sure to Rise Bakery,” located in Cashmere WA, are looking to retire. This business has been operating for 65 years and has supported our family since we bought it in 1985. We do both wholesale and retail out of our Front Street location. We own the building and all equipment. Please call 509-548-4788 for more information. COMMERCIAL BUILDING 4008 S. Pine Completely remodeled w/over 200k in high end upgrades. 10 offices, private exits, shared executive conference room, kitchen w/dining area, lots of storage, and 15 parking stalls. One office could be used as apartment for out of state clients. ADA Accessible. Mall & 38th Street Exit.

MLS# 663155

$599,000

Sergio Hernandez (253) 431-2308 Sergio@betterproperties.com

PROPERTY

PROPERTY

OLD TOWN $499,950 2 parcels : Build your dream home with a gorgeous view of Narrows Bridge and Puget Sound. The property is being sold as one to maximize the building envelope and open space but see what works best for you. Build on one lot, sell the other or build on the whole lot, there is so much opportunity here! (MLS # 612161) Sergio Hernandez (253) 431-2308

Amazing development potential with this unique Old Town property! City has given final plat approval for 4 lots on this prime 3 acre piece. Big views possible from all lots in this great neighborhood, tucked back & out of the way. Walk to the historic Old Town district with its coffee shops, wine bar & restaurants.; then stroll down to the waterfront & enjoy the gorgeous Puget Sound setting with walking paths, public docks, shoreline restaurants & more! MLS# 332653

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@ betterproperties.com

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract

View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

HOMES

HOMES

Gil Rigell Better Properties N. Proctor (253) 376-7787

Sergio@betterproperties.com

1 BED 1 BATH 770 SF. AMAZING DOWNTOWN CONDO HAS HARDWOOD FLOORS, ALL APPLIANCES AND $35 FOR W/S/G

CALL 253.922.5317

Black Tie Finished yet, Comfortable & Casually Elegant. Named Most Beautiful home in its class. Controlled access, gated & walled community of Madera. The ultimate in seclusion yet near world class amenities. Stylish interiors, warm colors, kitchen that rivals Elle Décor magazine w/ marble, new custom cabinetry, professional appliances, woods & neutral colors, open concept living, flexible floor plan, bed/office on main floor, manicured grounds, unique spaces. Quality. Location. Style. Timeless. MLS# 726788 $699,500 Shannon• Better Properties (253) 691-1800

LONGTIME ESTABLISHED POPULAR RESTR./LOUNGE Business for sale. $189,000 & size, 4,100 sq. ft.

SAME OWNER: BARTENDING ACADEMY OF TACOMA, Since 1959, Very profitable, Training provided.

GIG HARBOR CHINESE RESTR., same owner 26 yrs., $50,000

TAVERN, w/cocktails, Pulltabs, Mineral Lake, Mineral, Wa., EZ terms, Seller Financing

Huge reduction

PORT ORCHARD, DOWNTOWN Food & Beverage, annual gross sales, approx. $1,300,000, excellent net. Owner selling real estate & the business for $850,000, terms avail., same location over 100 years.

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VERY PROFITABLE GROCERY STORE/DELI/BAKERY/ MEAT MARKET. Business For Sale, $275,000, Annual Gross Sales, $1,400,000, Seller Financing.

RICHARD PICTON or ED PUNCHAK

253-581-6463 253-224-7109


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 3, 2015

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