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CHARTER REVIEW MOVES FORWARD WITH CHANGE OF MAYORAL DUTIES By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The committee tasked with reviewing Tacoma’s City Charter is moving forward with a planned recommendation to the city council that would change the way the city operates. The change would strengthen the role of the mayor from a largely ceremonial role to one that directly appoints the city’s department heads. The Charter Review’s subcommittee concerning the form of government approved

a plan to recommend to the full Charter Review effort a change that would largely mirror the City of Spokane’s charter. The subcommittee will now draft a model for discussion by the full committee, which will then forward recommendations to the city council. The city council would then decide if this, or any, recommendations are placed on a public ballot. Subcommittee chairman Ken Miller and members Bill Baarsma, Justin Leighton, Gary Brackett, Justin Van Dyk and Jim Merritt voted to support the change. Member

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Mabel Edmonds opposed the draft. The subcommittee hopes to have a working draft of the proposed changes to present at its first public hearing April 9. “This is historic,” Baarsma said. “This is a big change.” Cities with more than 100,000 residents generally have a municipal structure that has the mayor playing a strong leadership and oversight role of city activities by proposing budgets and overseeing department chiefs, for example. In Tacoma, those duties are X See CHARTER / page A11

PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

TOXINS. A University of Washington Tacoma study raises concerns about the levels of arsenic and lead found in South Sound lakes. Tacoma’s Snake Lake is among the 26 bodies of water researchers tested.

SAFETY OF LAKE FISH IN QUESTION UWT RESEARCHERS TESTED 26 LAKES By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

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study by University of Washington Tacoma researchers tested the waters of 26 lakes around the South Sound and concluded that the bodies of water contain high levels of arsenic and lead. Those toxins could raise questions about the safety of the fish consumed from those waters, although future research is needed. The toxins are linked to the metal smelting operations at American Smelting and Refining Co., or Asarco, in Ruston, which has also been linked to soil contamination in a 1,000-squaremile area reaching as far north as Seattle and south to Olympia. Asarco operated for almost 100 years before it ceased operations in 1989. Testing and clean up of soil has been underway ever since. But that effort hasn’t reached the area’s lakes, which are popular with sports fishing. “With 83 percent of the lakes in the deposition zone having surface sediments exceeding published ‘probable effects concentrations’ for arsenic and lead, this study provides evidence for possible ongoing environmental health concerns,” the study reported. Lakes in urbanized areas are particularly of concern since the lakes are stocked with sports fish by Department of Fish and Wildlife as well as used for recreational activities that put people in contact with contaminated water. These lakes are also considered more concerning since they are largely shallow, so the heavy

“The research is still ongoing and it is certainly on our radar.”

– Hannah Aoyagi, Ph.D

Tacoma Smelter Plume Project Planner

metal toxins are found pretty evenly through the water column rather than simply settling to the lake-bed sediment. While the most contaminated lakes are found in North Pierce County and South King County because that pattern follows the common wind direction inland from Commencement Bay, Tacoma’s Snake Lake and Wapato Lake tested about standard toxin levels. Wapatop, for example, contained 19.8 milligrams of arsenic per kilogram of sediment. “Basically, when the wind blew toward Seattle, they would let it fly,” said Associate Professor of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering at UWT’s Environmental Science and Studies James E. Gawel, Ph.D., noting that Asarco had a policy in the 1970s that shut down smelter operations only when the wind blew from the north and directed the toxins toward Tacoma. Even with that policy, much of Tacoma and the surrounding cities were contaminated by arsenic and lead, which were used in the smelting process. The Department of Ecology has an on-going program to monitor or remove the toxic soil in residential yards, schoolyards, camps and parks where there might be direct

contact with contaminated dirt. The program started in 2009, when the State of Washington received a settlement from Asarco for $94 million to pay for cleanup of the Tacoma Smelter Plume. That settlement however, does not include the testing and cleanup of lake sediment at this point. “The research is still ongoing and it is certainly on our radar,” Tacoma Smelter Plume Project Planner Hannah Aoyagi, Ph.D. The arsenic standard for freshwater sediments is 14 milligrams per kilogram of sediment, but that standard was set in 2013 and doesn’t take into account fish or human health risk. Those risks are calculated on a site-bysite basis and have yet to be determined for the lakes. What is also unknown at this point is the level of heavy metal contamination the fish in the lakes contain and what levels could be passed to people eating the fish caught from the lakes. “That is kind of the really big picture,” Gawel said. More information about the study can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ pubmed/24317160.

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE

Tacoma 2.0 A3

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ARIES (March 21 – April 19) Your priorities may be in question as you feel pulled in several directions. Problems could surface at work and in your home life. Take time to get feedback to figure your solutions or they may elude you. Sunday’s New Moon may help you find answers. Time to make a fresh start. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) Distractions may keep you from sticking to your to-do list. Prioritize to maximize your accomplishments. Conversations with trusted friends may open new connections. New career possibilities may come from social meetings. Sunday’s New Moon may bring clarity. GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) All kinds of connections may happen while networking this week. Sharing your ideas in casual conversation could bring visionary ideas and spontaneous opportunities. Research your options to make the best decisions. The New Moon on Sunday gives you a boost. CANCER (June 21 – July 22) If you feel like you’re going in too many directions, take a break to get your focus. Avoid distractions that may hold up progress. Pursuing a teaching or learning opportunity may help give you satisfaction. Learn to balance your efforts. LEO (July 23 – August 22) You may be inspired to take a step in a new direction. Your options may pave the way for exciting new experiences or encounters. Your selfconfidence is high this week after the New Moon on Sunday. Step outside your comfort zone. VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Are you on the verge of taking a financial risk with shared assets? Use your practical common sense to think things through. Sunday’s New Moon may bring clarity to recent money matters. Get things off on the right foot.

WASHINGTON’S MOST WANTED: Serial robber may be hiding in Tacoma. PAGE A3

Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Romance is in the air this week. Many opportunities are coming for you this week as well. Be easygoing and light hearted. Sunday’s New Moon in Aries may bring a turnaround in an important relationship. Remember to keep up your wellness routine. SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) You may feel like you want to be alone or limit your choice of the company you keep this week. There is someone who may charm you into letting your guard down. Trust your instincts and go with the flow. Try to focus on a regular routine for greater progress.

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L O P P J L D G Y W S U P N C O R

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) Family communications may not go well this week. Choose your words carefully so others fully understand what you are trying to convey. Distractions may cause interruptions so keep plans flexible. A romantic adventure may be on the agenda.

Set boundaries with yourself and others. Business or personal relationships may get complicated this week. Make important decisions that you have been avoiding. Keep communication lines open. Sunday’s New Moon brings an upbeat energy. AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) This week’s gift to you is the opportunity to catch up and feel more grounded. Listen to what others suggest and draw your conclusions privately. Confrontations may get you needed answers. Study the terms and conditions in detail before making risky decisions. PISCES (February 19 – March 20) Implementing radical solutions may balance an unsettled situation. Romantic relationships are favored this week. Have fun and give into the experience. The New Moon in Aries gives you a chance to arrange steps for greater security. Finances may reach a critical phase of discontent.

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T A C O M A D O M E L L M A S P E

Horoscope, word search and more B6

The Lucky Woman’s Guide to Breast Cancer: Sea Turtle and Mountain Edition By Kathleen Merryman The turtles are my buddies. I admired the green sea turtles, the honu, who graze around the edges of Kauai, long before I got cancer. Ancient and new, they don’t much mind sharing a wave with us at Brennecke Beach. Grazing on seaweed in the rocks at Spouting Horn, they have no clue that we come to watch them – that every time we spot them, we yip with pleasure and point. None of that matters to them. They just keep on surviving the bumps in the ocean. That’s why I was so happy to run into them the day I began chemotherapy. The honu co-star in one of the assortment of waiting room videos in the Milgard Cancer Center in Multicare Medical Center’s Philip Pavilion. Digitized, those turtles and schools of reef fish work most days to pull an assortment of mainlanders into the kind of happy place where we’re willing to launch repeated assaults on our own bodies. Welcome to The Lucky Woman’s Guide to Breast Cancer, Sea Turtle and Mountain Edition. The sea turtles don’t do it alone. They can’t because, cool as they are, they don’t appeal to every spirit. They’re just one element in the wallpaper of memory and optimism built around the hospital’s cancer war. Some days, instead of turtles we get gardens, and some days we get the desert. We never know precisely where they are. Both ways, we get lessons in resilience and endurance. Fresh from short, dark days, azaleas, trillium and dogwood bounce back, dewy and new somewhere in the Northwest. Steadfast after millennia of carving winds, rock formations stand like families, together, enduring, changing, redefining. They reach into the spot that resonates with their image, and we grab hold. And that’s just the video wallpaper in the place. Every photograph on the walls is of a spot we might have been smart and active enough to visit in our Northwest. Every image invites us to come back again, as soon as we are well and ready. “Get through this,” the stones in a stream say. “Get back here, so we can be beautiful together,” calls a patch of rain forest. From the check-in desk to the chemo suites, everyone who works in the joint joins the chorus. They are the better angels into which oldfashioned medicine has evolved. True, they’re big fans of the advances science has made with drugs, radiation and operations. All that magical technology can keep us from barfing, these days. It’s so much better, Merrilee and Maiken, Chris and Lisa say, than it was even nine years ago, even four years ago. These days, at lunchtime, Roland

X See CANCER / page A5

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Bulletin Board

Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK

MAN KILLED IN SIXTH AVENUE SHOOTING Parts of Tacoma’s Sixth Avenue District were blocked by police tape while investigators were collecting evidence in the death of 19-year-old Charles Williams of University Place, who was fatally shot in the early morning hours of Sunday, March 23. The shooting occurred around 1:30 a.m. Sunday along the 2600 block of Sixth Avenue. A witness recorded the shooting, which involved someone firing several bullets at a crowd. KING 5 News posted the video on its website Sunday afternoon, prompting people to view it in hopes of gathering more evidence about the shooting. No one else was injured in the incident. The eight-second video shows a crowd on the sidewalk followed by people running and the sound of seven gunshots. Investigators are also gathering security camera footage from surrounding businesses in hopes that they recorded the incident as well.

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*/(9;,99,=0,>7<)30*/,(905.65(7903 A special meeting of the 2014 Charter Review Committee will be held on Wednesday, April 9, at 5:30 p.m. in the Tacoma Municipal Building Council Chambers (747 Market St., 1st Floor) to gather public comment and recommendations from residents for proposed changes to the City Charter. The City Charter is the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s constitution, and it is reviewed every 10 years by the Charter Review Committee. At this meeting, members of the public will have three minutes to address the Charter Review Committee. The Charter Review Committee will also discuss preliminary recommendations from its subcommittees on form of government, Article 2 legislative, Article 3 administrative, Article 4 public utilities, and human resources. Information about matters pertaining to the 2014 Charter Review is available at cityoftacoma.org/charterreview or by calling (253) 591-2067.

19th Street and Steele Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;pothole initiative.â&#x20AC;? And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holeyness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or return â&#x20AC;&#x201C; each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

*36:<9,9,4(05:65:*/<:;,97(92>(@ Inclement weather and a material delay will postpone the complete reopening of Schuster Parkway until April 30. The southbound lane of Schuster Parkway accessing I-705 re-opened March 23 but the southbound access to Pacific Avenue will remain closed between South 4th and South 7th streets until Wednesday, April 30. This work completes extensive stormwater system improvements designed to prevent flooding and improve storm drainage on Commerce Street in the vicinity of the Spanish Steps. After I-705 access opened, detour signs continue to direct downtown traffic from southbound Schuster Parkway to South 4th Street, to Dock Street and into downtown; or from North 30th Street, to McCarver Street, to Tacoma Avenue, to Stadium Way and into downtown. View a map of the detour routes online at cms.cityoftacoma.org/CRO/ Phase%201A.pdf. Northbound lanes will remain open and continue to experience limited impact. The Schuster Parkway sidewalk will remain closed to pedestrians and users through April 30. The pedestrian detour will continue to follow the vehicle detour. For more information about this closure, visit cityoftacoma.org/stadiumway, or contact Erik Ward with the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Environmental Services Department at (253) 502-2171.

CORRECTION

In our March 21 edition, the Tacoma Weekly reported that Metro Parks leveraged its current bond with $54 million in additional dollars and that the bond proposal would cost about $8 per month for the average homeowner for the next 10 years. Metro Parks was actually able to leverage an additional $57 million in grants and other money from the last bond. The $198 million proposed parks bond set for voters on April 22 will cost an average of $8 a month during the life of the bond and that timeline is determined by the issuance schedule of the bonds themselves. We apologize for this error.

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2588 Pacific Highway, Fife, WA 98424  Â&#x2039;-(?!  7\ISPZOLY!John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com 6WLYH[PVUZ4HUHNLY!Tim Meikle / tim@tacomaweekly.com 5L^Z+LZR!news@tacomaweekly.com 4HUHNPUN,KP[VY!Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com :[HMM>YP[LYZ! Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Kathleen Merryman / kathleen@tacomaweekly.com Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com Derek Shuck / derek@tacomaweekly.com :WVY[Z,KP[VY! Justin Gimse/ jgimse@tacomaweekly.com 7HNPUH[PVU!Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar >LI+L]LSVWLYZ! Cedric Leggin, Ed Curran, Mike Vendetti, Jacob Thiel 7OV[VNYHWOLY! Rocky Ross *VU[YPI\[PUN>YP[LYZ! Karen Westeen, Steve Mullen, Dave Davison, Sean Contris (K]LY[PZPUN!Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Colleen McDonald / cmcdonald@tacomaweekly.com, Marlene Carrillo / marlene@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. Tacoma Weekly welcomes letters to the editor, your opinions and viewpoints. Anonymous letters will not be published. Tacoma Weekly reserves the right to edit letters for length, content and potentially libelous material. Please send them to above address or e-mail us at letters@tacomaweekly.com.

AFRICAN-AMERICAN GIRLS NEEDED TO AUDITION Dee Productions, along with DuBerry Enterprises, will be having auditions for African-American and black-colored girls between the ages of 8-17 years old. Auditions will be held in two groups, on Sunday, March 30, 3-5 p.m. for ages 8-12 years and 5-7 p.m. for ages 13-17 years. No musical background is required, but reservations are requested. Rehearsals will be once a week, for two hours a week, on Sundays from April 6 to June 29 with possible cameo appearances on Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day and more. E-mail tenaduberryenterprises@gmail.com for additional information. ;>64<9(3:;(2,:/(7,+6>5;6>5 Spaceworks Tacoma announces a new round of murals currently taking shape at the corner of South 11th and Market Street. Artists Chelsea Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Sullivan and Diana Leigh Surma have been commissioned to create murals that will bring life to this longstanding vacant building, activate the intersection, prevent vandalism, and foster creativity in our community. Artist Chelsea Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Sullivan is creating a long mural on a series of 10 large panels running down South 11th Street. The piece is titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Turn on Springâ&#x20AC;? to which she states: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Early spring in Tacoma can be a little gray. It rains, a lot. It is chilly. Driving into town is always beautiful but where the city skyline meets with the clouds, they share the same hue and fade into one another. My goal is to capture the beauty that lives in this gray world and explode some color into it.â&#x20AC;? On Market Street, artist Diana Leigh Surma is painting â&#x20AC;&#x153;Show Your Stripes,â&#x20AC;? an intricately laid out design of abstract geometric shapes. Diana comments that this project â&#x20AC;&#x153;celebrates the revitalization of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bustling downtown corridor and encourages youth participation in the arts. The design incorporates bold colors and overlapping planes that

stretch across the muralâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surface to create a unified composition. Like the networks of shapes that shift before the viewerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes Tacoma is a city constantly transforming and reinventing itself. However, the roots of its history and traditions, its stripes, stand to remind us of what came before.â&#x20AC;? These new murals are part of the 11th round of Artscapes exhibitions brought to you by Spaceworks Tacoma. Over the course of the program, 84 large-scale art installations, murals, and videos, along with performances and events have taken place in vacant storefronts throughout downtown Tacoma. This round of Artscapes applications were reviewed in October by a talented and devoted selection panel of: Kyle Dillehay, Art Instructor at Tacoma Community College; Dane Meyer, Dane Gregory Meyer Photography and Tacoma Arts Commissioner; Naomi Strom-Avila, Cultural Arts Specialist for the Tacoma Arts Program; and Frank Terrill, Artifact Restorer and Senior Engineer at the Tacoma Planning & Development Services Division. Over the course of the program Spaceworks has partnered with University of Washington Tacoma, AT & T, Power Property Consultants, A Street Associates LLC, Paul Okner, The Marie T. Wilson Trust, Bristol Equities, Steve Shaub, Pioneer Health Services, LinMar Managerment, Lee Noble,Tim Johnson, The Chambers Family, George and Al Howe, Neil Walter Company, Eric Cedarstrand, Simon & Johnson LLC, Seven Seventeen Investors LLC., and has received funding from the Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber, the City of Tacoma, the Greater Tacoma Community Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, Americans for the Arts and Ovation TV. Full descriptions and images can be found at http:// spaceworkstacoma.wordpress.com/projects/installations.

(<+0;69Âť:6--0*,/6:;:*(5+0+(;,Âť:>692:/67 Calling all candidates! The Pierce County Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office annual candidateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s workshop is scheduled for Wednesday, April 2 from 6-8 p.m. The workshop will be held at the Pierce County Election Center, 2501 S. 35th St., Suite C, Tacoma, WA 98409. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal in the Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office is to ensure that every candidate is prepared to comply with the law and is armed with accurate information. I urge candidates, campaign managers and key volunteers to attend. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s free and informative,â&#x20AC;? said Pierce County Auditor Julie Anderson. Critical information will be provided on topics including: s &ILING FOR OFFICE s 0UBLIC $ISCLOSURE #OMMISSION REQUIREMENTS A 0$# staff member will be present to answer questions). s $ETAILS NEEDED FOR SUBMITTING YOUR VOTERS PAMPHLET statement. s 7EBSITE TOOLS s 6OTER REGISTRATION INFORMATION s /BTAINING DATA AND MAPS FROM THE !UDITORS /FFICE Vendors offering campaign services will be present to answer questions in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;vendor fairâ&#x20AC;? format. Individuals interested in attending are asked to RSVP at www.piercecountyelections.org or by phone (253) 7982634. ,4736@,9:5,,+,+;6/6:; :<44,916):-69@6<;/ The City of Tacoma, the REACH Center, Tacoma Public Schools and WorkForce Central are partnering to accept applications from local businesses interested in providing employment to Tacoma high school juniors and seniors this summer. Employers interested in participating in Summer Jobs 253 can download the application at SummerJobs253.com or contact summerjobs253@reachtacoma.org. Employer applications must be received by May 1 and can be mailed to the REACH Center, c/o Tacoma Community House, PO Box 5107, Tacoma, WA 98415. The $50,000 in funding support by both the City of Tacoma and WorkForce Central, and a $500 employer contribution per student, allows the program to provide case management, classroom support and wages for the student participants. Given that the $500 investment by employers entitles organizations to nearly 100 work hours, we feel this is an opportunity for employers to expand organizational capacity and invest in community workforce development at a very low cost, said REACH Center Director Kurt Miller. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last year, the pilot program was a great success,â&#x20AC;? Neighborhood and Community Services Director Tansy Hayward said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have modified the program this year to make Summer Jobs 253 more sustainable and to provide more opportunities for students and employers to participate.â&#x20AC;? Summer Jobs 253 is a summer youth program that provides an opportunity for Tacoma high school students to gain work experience and increase self-confidence and personal growth. The program was recognized by the U.S. Conference of Mayors as one of five exceptional city summer youth programs that incorporates robust financial literacy components. For students interested in participating applications are available online or from their school counselor. For more information, visit SummerJobs253.com.

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SERIAL ROBBER MAY BE HIDING IN TACOMA By David Rose Correspondent

A Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wanted fugitive accused of being a serial robber is believed to be hiding in Tacoma. Pierce County detectives say they got dozens of Crime Stoppers tips from Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wanted viewers DAVID ROSE identifying Joseph Smith after surveillance photos aired in February. Now, investigators need help finding him. Smith has four felony warrants for robbery and theft. Detectives say he robbed the Key Bank in Spanaway, the Twin Star Credit Union in Parkland and stole money from

the till at a Dennyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Restaurant. During the last theft he was wearing a white headband. Detectives say he frequently wears bandanas and prescription glasses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a guy whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s robbed multiple banks and we believe he`s going to continue to do it and usually theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re supplying a drug habit or something like that,â&#x20AC;? said Pierce County sheriff â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s detective Ed Troyer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So not only are they addicted to medicine, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re fueling that funding by robbing banks which terrifies bank tellers sometimes, so we definitely want to get this guy off the streets.â&#x20AC;? Joseph Smith is 49-years-old and detectives say he is most likely couch surfing in Tacoma. If you can tell them where to find him, call an anonymous tip in to: CRIME STOPPERS: 1-800-222-TIPS.

JOSEPH SMITH

STRICKLAND LAUDS WORK TOWARD

CREATION OF â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;TACOMA 2.0â&#x20AC;&#x2122; By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

M

ayor Marilyn Strickland noted the decades of successes found around Tacoma as a way to prepare the city for the next round of changes in the works that will launch the City of Destiny into the upper echelon of municipal areas around the country. The verbal back-slapping and goal-setting fest came during her 45-minute State of the City address during a sold out event of about 250 people last week at Hotel Murano, sponsored by the Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber of Commerce. Dubbed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacoma 2.0,â&#x20AC;? Stricklandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s address touched on economic development, Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s regional and national presence, education, and her youth summer employment program SummerJobs253. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The dictionary definition of 2.0 is â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;to denote a superior or more advanced version of an original concept.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; In short, 2.0 is a better version,â&#x20AC;? Strickland said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacoma 2.0 challenges all of us to do heavy lifting to advance this great city.â&#x20AC;? Many efforts have already

lifted the city to what it is today. For example, visionaries at the Port of Tacoma made the city an international hub, while Tacoma Schools has increased its graduation rate from 55 percent to 75 percent in just the last four years. Higher education leaders have made Tacoma home to a collection of four-year and community and technical colleges that are the envy of other cities for preparing students for needs of local industries. The work of arts boosters and philanthropists gave rise to world-class museums, arts events and performance venues. All of these efforts required community visions and partnerships. That collaborative spirit will have to continue to move the city forward, according to Strickland. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We do not have the luxury to be divided about anything,â&#x20AC;? she said. Strickland then laid out four pillars that everyone could support: job growth, infrastructure, education and profile. Successes on those fronts can be found at State Farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision to land its regional headquarters downtown; the rising graduation rate in Tacoma schools and the launch of SummerJobs253, a job X See TACOMA / page A6

Romance and crime donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necTacomamix. Weekly is interested essarily On March 18, a manin what is happening in our decided to celebrate hiscommunity. two-year Please send your news story ideas anniversary with hisand girlfriend by toshoplifting news@tacomaweekly.com. from a Target on 23rd Street. After being caught with a number of items under his jacket, the man admitted to trying to steal the items to give as gifts to his significant other, though a pack of NASCAR trading cards was specifically for him. Empty packages and half-eaten food were discovered in the manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cart, and the total amount of items he attempted to steal was valued at $749.19. The suspect was then booked into the Fife Jail for third-degree theft. Stores normally have signs indicating whether or not they accept EBT cards, but a general rule of thumb is that bars arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;okayâ&#x20AC;? list. A woman learned this the hard way after tallying a $71 bill on March 19 at Harmon Brewery. When she discovered her EBT card couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cover her bill, she decided to make a run for it before being caught by the brewery owner. When police arrived, her only defense was that she had recently been making some poor life decisions. The woman was booked into Pierce County Jail for theft. Compiled by Derek Shuck

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The Puyallup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s donation of $200,000 to Northwest Harvest will help keep food on the table for countless struggling families.

Considered among the most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians has grown to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its own membership but sharing its wealth among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County, with a payroll of more than 3,300 people

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 74 percent of whom are non-Native. Working in the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities, these employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits. In 2012, the Tribe spent over $445 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more. Even during the recession, the Tribe increased employment and funded substantial vendor purchases and construction projects,

keeping many businesses afloat and people employed. As the country continues to recover from past economic woes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians leads the way locally. From sponsoring dozens of local charities, nonprofit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer or cease to exist, to protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and health care, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its well-deserved reputation as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the generous people,â&#x20AC;? a reflection of the meaning of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very name.

)0(%/)%0.%/!1)-,0 +./-3),'&7#)%,#61-/-1%#1!*+-, is checked for fish twice a day at dawn and dusk. During hatchery releases and high flow events, personnel remain onsite through the night to clear the trap of debris and to keep fish from overcrowding. Salmonids collected in the trap are identified by species, measured for length and checked for hatchery or wild origin. After this short sampling period, they are released back into the river to continue their migration. Data collected from the project is used to estimate juvenile abundance, which provides baseline information to allow managers to meet escapement objectives in the watershed, forecast future returns of hatchery and naturally produced adults and provide critical biological and life history patterns of each species. Data collected in the past 14 years by the Tribe has been, and will continue to be, critical in determining the trends in productivity and evaluating the health of the watershed. The Tribe also plays an active role in improving fish passage and survivability to ensure bountiful returns for tribal and sport fisherman. In 2013, the tribal fisheries staff worked endlessly to monitor and improve fish passage above Mud Mountain dam and through the fish trap A juvenile Chinook salmon with parr marks (characteristic operated by the Army Corps of Engineers in Buckley, vertical bands) captured in the screw trap. Puyallup Tribe operates two of the five hatcheries on the Puyallup River, playing a vital role in salmon restoration and commercial fishing alongside non-tribal facilities. The Tribe conducts the Puyallup River Juvenile Salmonid Production Assessment Project, which began in 2000. The Puyallup Tribal Fisheries Department started the project to estimate juvenile production of native salmonids, with an emphasis on natural Fall Chinook salmon production and survival of hatchery and acclimation pond Chinook. In 2011, a newly constructed trapping platform was put into place on the lower Puyallup at RM 10.6, just upstream of the confluence with the White River. Trap operation begins in early spring (early-February) and continues, when feasible, 24 hours a day, seven days a week until late summer (mid-August). The trap

A screw trap near the Main Street Bridge churns away on the Puyallup River.

Washington. The Tribe continues to play an active role in urging the Army Corps of Engineers to meet its obligations to move fish above the dam for spawning and improve passage to lessen an unacceptable mortality rate at the fish trap due to the trapâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outdated design and capacity. In addition to the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s innovative hatchery operations and work to improve fish passage, in 2013 the Tribe constructed an acclimation pond on private land in Clearwater to provide for spring Chinook runs and should see its first fish in the spring.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;This project fills a production hole weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had since the road washed away in 2009,â&#x20AC;? said Russ Ladley, resource protection manager for the Tribe. The Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hatchery is key in providing spring Chinook runs for tribal and non-tribal fishermen on the Puyallup River. In 2014, the Tribe plans to construct an additional acclimation pond that will hold steelhead. With successful completion of the acclimation pond, the Tribe will be the only entity producing and rearing 50,000 steelhead in the watershed.

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 )**)-,), Indian people pay taxes. They pay most of the same taxes non-Indians pay, and in some cases additional Tribal taxes as well. Indians have a few tax exemptions, just as non-Indians do. The Puyallup Tribe and its members are dramatic examples of these realities. Indian tribes collect taxes that are then sent to the appropriate taxing bodies. The Tribe withholds federal income tax from its employees (who include Puyallup Tribal members, other Indians and non-Indians), and from the per capita payments it makes to its members. As

federal law provides, the Tribe sends that money to the I.R.S., a total of over $43 million in FY 2013. As an employer, the Tribe pays its share of payroll taxes and withholds payroll taxes from its employees, which is then sent to the Social Security Administration and other government agencies. Those taxes added up to over $18 million in FY 2013. Under the terms of agreements with the State of Washington and local governments, the Tribe collects and pays tax funds to those governments, including about $11

million to the State of Washington, and over $300,000 to the City of Fife. Unlike all other governments, non-trust land owned by the Puyallup Tribal government is often subject to state and local property taxes. In 2013, the Puyallup Tribe paid nearly $1 million in property taxes to state and local governments. The total amount in taxes collected, withheld, or paid to the various governments by the Tribe in FY 2013 was over $75 million.

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Derek@tacomaweekly.com

Schwarzenegger, Stallone, Statham. When thinking of masculinity itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to envision over-the-top action heroes as the pinnacle of â&#x20AC;&#x153;manhood.â&#x20AC;? But what happens when these examples of no-emotion heroes become the picture of masculinity in the real world? How do you refocus masculinity to have a positive impact on the world around you? These are the questions menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s groups across the nation have been asking, and soon itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a question weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be asking here in Tacoma. Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Project Coordinator Jonathan Grove and his team at Pacific Lutheran University hope to refocus what it means to be a man in the Tacoma community when they host a town hall meeting about the subject of positive masculinity on April 4, at Lincoln High School. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a list of traits that we see in media; it paints a picture thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty restrictive for guys, particularly for guys trying to figure out who they are in the world,â&#x20AC;? Grove said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being maybe the aggressive, tough guy that never has any feelings â&#x20AC;&#x201C; human beings donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do that very well.â&#x20AC;? The conversation will discuss topics such why â&#x20AC;&#x153;bad boyâ&#x20AC;? behavior is celebrated while positive masculinity often times is not, as well as what Grove and others believe to be a declining state of menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s involvement in the world. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Men are struggling to find or feel that there is a positive role for them in the community,â&#x20AC;? Grove said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Increasingly, men are not taking on a leadership role.â&#x20AC;? The talk is part of the Healthy Masculinity Action Project, a movement to inform communities about how men can be positive role models in the community. Other town

PHOTO BY KATIE GROVE

76:0;0=,4(:*<3050;@ Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Project Coordinator Jonathan Grove has served with the program since 2005.

hall meetings have taken place all over the country. The conversation will be introduced by guest speaker Tony Porter, co-founder of a Call to Men: The Next Generation of Manhood, a group based on New York that works with the image of masculinity in regard to violence against women. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Porter] will provide the framework for things we may consider; ways for approaching the topic,â&#x20AC;? Grove said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As simple as it sounds, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not to re-imagine what we mean by good, positive, healthy masculinity.â&#x20AC;? After the presentation, the community discussion will begin, and Grove hopes people will touch upon everything from what masculinity looks like to who in the community exemplifies positive masculinity. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The purpose of this event is to have a conversation. What does the language look like for what we expect to be good, positive

and preventive [masculinity] for our community and for individuals?â&#x20AC;? Grove asked. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What does it look like in practice, what does it look like to pass it along, what does it look like to do it? Where are those examples?â&#x20AC;? The talk is open to anyone who wants to listen and participate; the group is working on getting sign language interpreters and bilingual citizens to interpret the conversation. The talk has been designed from the ground up to serve everyone from 12 to 80. Anyone who has a frame of reference for masculinity is the target demographic, from teenagers to city council members. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those of us who are working on planning it have approached this as truly a community conversation,â&#x20AC;? Grove said. The end game of the conversation is to make it a constant discussion point in the community going forward, and to position positive masculinity as a recurring theme in Tacoma. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want it to sort of become a launch pad rather than a one shot,â&#x20AC;? Grove said. The meeting will last from 4-8 p.m. Attending the event is free, and food will be served. To get a sense of the resources that will be needed, Grove is asking interested parties to RSVP at mensproj@plu.com.

WCancer From page A1

can roll a cart through the suites, offering juice, sandwiches and pudding â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and patients want to eat. Maybe it was a movie that put the image of a chemo treatment suite in my mind. Maybe it was a sketchy description, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d imagined a more utilitarian space filled with rows of people, some reading, some watching television on a chairside monitor, all dripping to the rhythm of infusion pumps. The reality is a merrier hallway lined with rooms in which cancer fighters settle into oversized recliners. Any one of us can bring a friend, and all of us can choose the privacy of cubicle curtains or the possibility of a view. We can see Wright Park, if we stand up, and we can count the spires and turrets on schools and churches. On a fine day, Mount Rainier jumps right into the sightline from The Mountain Suite. The Zen Suite would be where weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d likely find the Dalai Lama and his friend, Richard Gere, should they happen to be in town together. Be kind, those two would tell us. Be nice. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where your strength lies. That, too, is where Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been finding strength, shared by this team of cancer fighters, from the honu on the walls to the mountain in our view, to the medical team by our side.

TACOMA SCHOOLS EARN AWARD FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION The Washington State Board of Education awarded three Tacoma elementary schools â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Northeast Tacoma, Point Defiance and Sheridan â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first-ever English Language Acquisition Award. The TPS schools, three of 42 statewide, were recognized for their English Language Learners (ELLs) making the greatest progress toward the goal of becoming proficient in English, which is a stepping stone to academic achievement and careerand college-readiness.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We work hard to understand the needs of our nonEnglish-speaking students, and we offer them lessons that match their English abilities while maintaining respect for their native language and heritage,â&#x20AC;? said Minh-Anh Hodge, ELL department director. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This award reinforces the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to rigorous ELL staff training and the strides they have made in engaging and supporting students on their path to learning the English language.â&#x20AC;? ELL students are the fastest growing subgroup

in Washington classrooms. TPS is no different. As of March 2014, the district teaches 2,564 ELL students, an increase of 138 from last year. Among this group of ELLs, 766 are newly enrolled. During the 2012-13 school year, 594 ELLs met state-established English proficiency criteria and exited the program. Of TPSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; nearly 29,000 students, 8.8 percent of them are in ELL programs, which are taught at 22 elementary schools, four middle schools and all five comprehensive high

schools. Sheridan Elementary enrolls 196 ELL students, which represents 38 percent of the total school population, the largest in the district. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a breakdown of the native languages spoken by TPS ELL students in 2014: Arabic: (75), Cambodian (210), Korean (21), Laotian (12), Moldavian (27), Russian (150), Samoan (133), Spanish (1,353), Tagalog (36), Ukrainian (58), Vietnamese (335), other (154). ELL students were assessed on the Washington English Language

Proficiency Assessment (WELPA) in nearly 1,700 schools across the state. The award recognizes approximately the top five percent of elementary, middle and high schools (who have assessed 20 or more students) based on the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s median point gain on the 2012-13 WELPA. Award-winning schools

must also have met 201213 Annual Measurable Achievement Objective (AMAO) 1 and AMAO 2 federal accountability targets. There are two award categories based on the number of students who took the WELPA, small programs (20 to 99 students) and large programs (100 plus students).

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WTacoma From page A3

placement program for highschoolers; the community effort to renovate the Murray Morgan Bridge; and news that Tacoma Art Museum will be a nationally recognized center of Western American art once the Haub Wing opens next year. That said, failures to provide proper mass transit and street repairs remain stumbling blocks between the Tacoma of today and the Tacoma everyone wants it to be in the future. She called them the elephants in the room, pointing out potholes specifically and the failure, because of strong opposition from business groups, of Proposition 1 that would

raise utility taxes to fund road repairs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to find a way to get to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;yes,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? she said, noting that business, labor and government leaders championed the completion of State Route 167 to link the tideflats to the warehouse hubs found in the Puyallup Valley and could do the same in Olympia to champion street repairs. Through collaborations like this, Tacoma could better leverage its strategic position equidistant between Seattle and Portland, which puts it at the heart of one of the most dynamic regions of the country. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to raise our profile but more importantly, it is time to raise our standards,â&#x20AC;? she said.

Creating Beautiful

2014 STATE OF THE CITY ADDRESS TO AIR ON TV TACOMA THE RECORDED EVENT WILL AIR ON TV TACOMA ON THESE DATES AND TIMES: MARCH 27 74(5+ 74 MARCH 28 74(5+74 4(9*/  (4(5+74

MARCH 30 (474 (5+74 MARCH 31 (474(5+ 74

TV Tacoma is available on both the Click! and Comcast cable systems. On Click!, TV Tacoma can be seen on Channel 12 within Tacoma city limits and in Pierce County, with the exception of University Place, where it can be found on Channel 21. On Comcast, TV Tacoma can be seen on Channel 12 within Tacoma city limits and on Channel 21 in Pierce County. The address is also viewable on the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s YouTube channel, Facebook page and Twitter feed. Event attendees and members of the public Tweeted their thoughts with #SOTC253 hashtag as well.

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Sports

FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 2014

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

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TACOMAWEEKLY 2014 ALL-CITY GIRLS BASKETBALL TEAM

ACCOLADES AND VICTORIES ARE THE CALLING CARD OF THIS YEAR’S ROSTER

SECTION A, PAGE 7

2013 HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS SOFTBALL PREVIEW

SOME TEAMS SEEK IMPROVEMENT, SOME EYEING POST-SEASON

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

HOME RUN. (Top) Former All-Narrows

MVP and future Washington Husky Courtney Schwan hopes to return Bellarmine to the State Tourney (Bottom) 3-Time All-Narrows Shortstop Darian Grimm returns to make another run at the post-season with Wilson. By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

BELLARMINE LADY LIONS JASMYNE HOLMES - BELLARMINE

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

With the 2013 4A State Tournament still a fresh memory, look for the Lady Lions to make a serious run at a return trip this year. Coach Craig Coovert saw five players graduate last year, but still returns probably the most experienced and talented squad in Tacoma this season. Bellarmine is led by alleverything senior Courtney Schwan, a firstteam all-Narrows selection and former league MVP. Junior Becca Sorensen was a first-team selection and plays possibly the best second base in the Narrows. Sophomore first-teamer Alyssa McKiernan looks to improve upon her surprising breakout freshman season. Look for a big season from Celine Woo after a hot streak at the plate to end last season. Newcomers Charlotte James and McKenzie Schwan will be counted on to play like veterans if the Lady Lions are to repeat their dominance again.

WILSON LADY RAMS

JOSIE MATZ – WILSON

CLAIRE MARTIN – BELLARMINE

Coach Ron Balmer and the Lady Rams have their work cut out for them this season. After making a run into the District Playoffs last season, several top players have graduated. To make matters more difficult, this season’s turnout was lower than hoped for at Wilson. Still, Balmer’s squad returns 3-time All-Narrows senior shortstop Darian Grimm to the diamond along with talented junior second base Adriana Lanz. The team could see a significant boost if senior pitcher Stephanie Granger is cleared to play by the WIAA soon. Look for freshmen Kately Kass and Kayla Washington to step-up this season.

LINCOLN LADY ABES

VIOLET “CAPRI” MORROW – WILSON

TAMIA BRAGGS – LINCOLN

New coach Gabrielle Knittel brings a brand new coaching staff and a fresh attitude to the Lincoln squad this year. The Lady Abes suffered through a rough 2013 season with just two wins and are looking to reverse the losing trend. Lincoln returns several talented players including seniors Victoria Nuon, Heidi Leeper, Maryelle Montez, Yoselin Maldonado and juniors Viane Tran and Kayla “Salt” Aronhalt. Keep an eye out for junior Deona Owens and some surprising freshmen. “We are a strong-minded team that is focused on improving with every game,” said Knittel. “We pride ourselves on discipline, integrity and by having a winning team attitude.”

MOUNT TAHOMA LADY THUNDERBIRDS By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

game shy of the Final 8 for a trip to the 4A Hardwood Classic.

JASMYNE HOLMES – BELLARMINE LADY LIONS 5-6 – SR – GUARD – 13.5 PPG – 2.9 RPG The two-time 4A Narrows First-Teamer capped her senior year with 4A League MVP honors. A constant sure and steady leader, the captain of the Lady Lions led Bellarmine to the 4A Narrows Crown and a 19-6 record, falling just one

VIOLET MORROW – WILSON LADY RAMS 5-10 – JR – FORWARD – 13.4 PPG – 9.9 RPG – 3.0 SPG The junior captain of the Lady Rams was a constant force and game changer for the 3A Narrows League Champions. With a roster full of college-bound hoopsters graduating in 2013, Wilson was in need of some instant leadership this season and Morrow delivered. The Lady Rams (21-7) made it X See BASKETBALL / page A10

FIRST TEAM

Coach Dottie Harris has dropped the “Interim” from her title last year and has assembled a new coaching staff to go along with a very young team. Following a difficult 2-win 2013, Harris hopes her core returning players will be able to help get the new players up to speed and ready to start winning ballgames. Expect strong seasons from juniors Zanna Holt, Nancy LaPointe-McCloud and Karen Davila. Seniors Jea’Ohnna Lee and

X See SOFTBALL / page A10

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SPORTSWATCH 9690,*(7:305*635*(9,,9 >0;/(33:;(;,/,960*:

Lincoln High School standout guard Ahmaad Rorie had one more show to put on Saturday, March 22 at the WIBCA allstate boys basketball game. The future California Bear scored a team-high 32 points and dished-out eight assists, leading the 3A team to a comeback 134-127 win over the 4A squad at Eastside Catholic High School. This year Rorie helped lead the Lincoln Abes to a 22-4 season and a back-to-back district championship victory over cross-town rival Wilson.

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A sold out Emerald Queen Casino showroom witnessed a coronation March 22 when Stivens â&#x20AC;&#x153;Supermanâ&#x20AC;? Bujaj (12-0, 9 KOs) stopped Victor Barragan in the seventh round to capture the WBC United States Cruiserweight Title. The undefeated 23-year-old sent a bloodied Barragan (12-8, 3 KOs) to the canvas with a right to the chin. Barragan was on his feet before the referee counted him out, but was not fit to continue and the referee called the fight. The next EQC night of boxing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Battle at the Boat 96 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is scheduled for June 7.

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Two Washington Huskies and a Seattle Redhawk have signed on with the Sounders U-23 for the 2014 Premier Development League season. Goalkeeper Ryan Herman started 17 games for Washington this season, while forward Darwin Jones rang up seven goals and four assists in 22 games for the Huskies. Chase Hanson, a midfielder/defender appeared in 24 games for Seattle University. All three players were with the Sounders U-23 in 2013. More than 20 Sounders U-23 players have signed professional contracts since the clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inception in 2006 when it was originally known as the Tacoma Tide. Their season begins May 5 at Sumnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sunset Chevrolet Stadium in a friendly match against Western Washington University.

PHOTOS BY JUSTIN GIMSE

A65,+05 (Top) Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Scott Diaz (right) waits his turn on the ninth green as Gig Harborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tom Laughlin attempts a long putt. (Bottom) Jake Patzer battles the blustery winds to close out the day for Wilson.

>03:65.63-,9:)9(=, 05:(5,>,(;/,90536:: By Justin Gimse

30-,*/90:;0(5;():1,::5,3:65 (:5,>/,(+-66;)(33*6(*/

Former Stadium High School football head coach Jess Nelson has taken his clipboard across town to Life Christian Academy. Nelson ran the Tigers program since 2007 and will replace departing coach Tim Kuykendall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe my coaching philosophy will be an incredible fit with the academyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s core values,â&#x20AC;? said Nelson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a transformational coach, my goal is building champions on the field, in the classroom and in life.â&#x20AC;? Life Christian competes in the 1A Nisqually league.

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University of Puget Sound pitcher Steve Wagar was awarded Northwest Conference Pitcher of the Week honors after hurling 10.1 scoreless innings between two games against St. Martins and Pacific Lutheran. The junior right-hander struck out a total of 10 batters bringing his season total to 33 strikeouts in 33 innings and a 2.73 earned run average. UPS edged PLU two out of three games in their March 22/23 cross-town tripleheader.

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

Wilson team captain Scott Diaz looked comfortable and at ease strolling down the ninth fairway toward the final green. With his sleeves rolled up, it seemed to make the wild weather at Allenmore Golf Course Tuesday, March 26 even more wet and blustery. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was crazy weather out today,â&#x20AC;? Diaz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But that just happens up here sometimes. You have to just put up with it and play through it.â&#x20AC;? Sideways rain, falling tree branches, huge wind gusts and even occasional hail could not deter the Wilson and Gig Harbor golf teams from finishing what was, at times, a sloppy afternoon of golf. There were even a few sun breaks during the round, followed quickly by torrential rain squalls of course. The teams competed using the Stableford scoring system which, at the high school level, awards one point for a bogey, two for a par and three for a birdie. The teams of six add their points up at the end of the

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round and the highest point total wins. Gig Harborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Christian Youtser scored 13 points and shot a round of 42 leading the Tides to a 43-24 victory over the Rams. Youtser was the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Medal Winnerâ&#x20AC;? for the contest, edging out Diaz who scored 11 points and finished with a round of 43. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Overall Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pretty happy with how I did,â&#x20AC;? Diaz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wish a few of my chips had gone a little bit better. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to just keep doing what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m doing and make improvements every day.â&#x20AC;? Gig Harborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rachel Geringer was the Medal Winner in the girls competition scoring 19 points with a round of 54. Five Tides scored in double-digits. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gig Harborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty tough,â&#x20AC;? said Wilson coach Mike Fabiani. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always got some good solid players.â&#x20AC;? Wilson is without a full team and has just two girls playing this season. The Lady Rams are eligible for individual honors and the post-season but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t count toward a team score. Freshmen Grace Prendergast scored 6 points and Korean exchange student Sung Min Yun scored five points.

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LOGGERS TAKE TWO FROM LUTES IN WILD TRIPLEHEADER

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

SHOWDOWN. (Left) Trevor Lubking pitched another gem for the Lutes striking out 13 batters. (Middle) PLU closer AJ Konopaski picked up a save and threw 5.2 scoreless innings in two games. (Right) Loggers ace Steve Wagar pitched 8.1 shutout innings in the UPS 2-0 win. By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

The new spring sun was popping out from time-to-time and a semblance of warmth greeted a nice crowd for a weekend of baseball March 22, at Pacific Lutheran University. On tap was a Saturday doubleheader against University of Puget Sound, followed by a Sunday tilt to close the series against the Loggers. The long-time cross-town and conference rivals spent the better part of eleven hours working out their differences on the diamond over three games and each contest had its own flavor. In the first game, UPS capitalized on a wild-pitch to break a 0-0 tie in the fifteenth inning claiming the victory 2-0. The second game saw PLU take an early 2-0 lead only to surrender 12 runs in innings 4 thru 6 and suffer a 15-6 blowout loss. The Lutes bounced back in the final game behind a solid pitching performance, holding off the Loggers at the end for a 5-4 win. UPS (5-4 NWC, 7-10 overall) found itself closer to the bottom than to the top of the Northwest Conference baseball standings

prior to the weekend. PLU (8-3 NWC, 13-7) sat comfortably in second-place behind NCAA Div III #1 ranked Linfield. The Lutes remained in second after going 1-2 against the Loggers; however UPS was able to move up one spot to fifth in the NWC Standings and had just one more loss than the Lutes. In the marathon first game PLU rolled out ace pitcher Trevor Lubking to the mound. The junior hurler entered the game leading the NCAA D-III in strikeouts; and he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t disappoint ringing up his third-straight double-digit strikeout performance with 13 in 8.1 innings of shutout work. UPS countered with their big gun; 6-4 junior Steve Wagar who pitched an equally impressive 8.1 scoreless innings and five strikeouts. Wagarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance, coupled with an appearance earlier in the week against St. Martins would earn him NWC Pitcher of the Week honors. The game lasted four hours and three minutes and the squads left a combined 29 players on base. Three runners were taggedout at home plate, and it took a Cory Nelson wild pitch past Lute catcher Curtis Wildung to

bring in the Loggersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; JB Early from third-base for the deciding run. Next up, senior first baseman Curtis Carter smoked a deep double adding an insurance run scoring junior centerfielder Connor Savage. UPS wins game one 2-0. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybody in the dugout did a real good job staying focused and in the game,â&#x20AC;? said Puget Soundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Carter about the extended contest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a great team so whenever you can take one from the Lutes it always feels goodâ&#x20AC;Ś Especially with Lubking on the mound. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great pitcher. He really knows how to spot up and throw all of his pitches for strikes. That was a big deal.â&#x20AC;? It was a tough loss for any team to take after such a long battle, and PLU didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look like they were ready to bounce back from it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a little deflating,â&#x20AC;? said Lutes head coach Geoff Loomis. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Puget Sound has a good squad and they definitely had a lot of momentum going into game two after that big win in game one. If that first game goes our way it could have been our momentum.â&#x20AC;? In game two, the Lutes used

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some clutch-hitting and took advantage of UPS throwing errors for a run in the first and third innings. UPS worked the base paths in the fourth, turning four hits and two walks into a fourrun inning and a 4-2 lead. PLU answered in their fourth with a home run over the right field wall by Wildung to close within one run at 4-3. UPS scored a run in the fifth and erupted for seven runs in the sixth and the rout was on at 12-3 UPS. The game was postponed in the eighth inning due to darkness and was continued the following day prior to game three. UPS added a homer from Jeff Walton in the eighth and two more runs in the ninth for the 15-6 victory. PLU was able to put the drawn-out, two-day loss quickly behind them in game three. Junior pitcher Chris Bishop took a no-hitter into the sixth inning and the Lutes had a 3-0 lead. The Loggers scored one in the sixth on an RBI single by Lucas Stone scoring Connor Savage. PLU responded with two more runs in the bottom of the sixth to move further ahead 5-1. The Loggers scored three runs on clutch two-out hitting in the

eighth inning and the memories of the extra-innings the day prior began to stir with PLU clinging to a 5-4 advantage. Lutes closer AJ Konopaski made short-work of the Loggers in the ninth inning earning his ninth save of the season recording three straight outs on just eight pitches. Lutes avoid the sweet with the 5-4 win. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We bounced back really strong,â&#x20AC;? said Loomis. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to keep ourselves in this league race and we really needed to win game three to keep that going.â&#x20AC;? Loggers head coach Brian Billings was pleased with his teams weekend run but was already looking forward. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really happy with the way we pitched this weekend and some of our hitters really broke out,â&#x20AC;? Billings said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any time you can throw a 15 inning shutout, you have to be happy with that. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We played pretty well against a good baseball team. Of course weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re happy taking the series on the road against our cross-town rival but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to turn the page and get ready for Linfield now.â&#x20AC;?

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*/(4),9:)(@76:;:9,*69+9,=,5<,: Chambers Bay Golf Course broke records in several financial categories in 2013 as excitement increased in advance of next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s U.S. Open. The 4th quarter financial report, released this week by County Executive Pat McCarthy, showed operating revenues increased more than $1 million over the prior year, a gain of 23 percent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Golfers are coming from other states and other countries to play

one of the few municipal courses in the nation that was selected to challenge the best players in the world,â&#x20AC;? Executive McCarthy said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is an extraordinary opportunity for our region, and the best is yet to come. We have heard from other U.S. Open sites that we can expect incredible amounts of attention in the coming years. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be ready.â&#x20AC;? Here are other highlights from the 2013 report as compared to the previous year:

WSoftball

er Michaela Phillips returns, as well as key senior leaders Kylie Thornton and Naomi King.

WBasketball

;(*64()(7;0:;3(+@ CRUSADERS

all the way to the 3A State Semifinals and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Capriâ&#x20AC;? was voted Second-Team All-Tournament.

From page A7

Makayla Matson have turned out for the team for their first time. Harris is looking for strong seasons from sophomores Elizabeth Box and Brandy Bullplume.

STADIUM LADY TIGERS

Another new coach dropping the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Interimâ&#x20AC;? from last year is Stadiumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bridgette Walker who took over the squad near the end of the season in 2013. Stadium had a great turnout this spring and has a talented group of players returning looking to improve on the Lady Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; two victories of last year. Walker will lean on veteran infielders Patricia Hultman and Isabel Chapman to shore up the defense and experienced pitchers Kylie Lensegrav and Sydney Rogers to keep opposition batters off the bases. Sophomores Allyssa Young and Brianna Lamb are solid starters and look for freshmen Emery Norwood and Rika Linman to make an immediate impact.

FOSS LADY FALCONS

Coach Carlena Stroud looks to make some moves in the 3A Narrows standings this year. With seven returning players from last year the Lady Falcons have their sights set on topping the squadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s five victories of 2013. First-team all-Narrows sophomore infield-

Coach Amy Hunter fields a team packed with sophomores and freshman and even two 8th graders. The sole returning senior is veteran catcher Becca Cerka and her .447 batting average from 2013. Sophomore pitcher Jen Brooks is a force from upon the mound and behind the plate (.646 BA). Keep an eye out for Isabella Thomas at third base. The 8th grader has some talent.

FIFE LADY TROJANS

Fife returns eight seniors from the 2013 SPSL 2A champion squad that went 21-5 and made it to the quarterfinals of the State 2A Tournament. Coach Michelle Nixon is expecting an even better outcome this year. Senior shortstop Angela Leingang returns following her SPSL MVP season along with six other teammates who were selected either first or second-team all-league. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is my third season with Fife fastpitch and these seniors started this journey with me,â&#x20AC;? said Nixon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So I have a bit of an emotional tie with them. They are all wonderful girls and great leaders on and off the field.â&#x20AC;? One key position Nixon must fill is the departure of Mackenzie Bourbanis who is now playing at Portland State.

s 'OLFERS PLAYED   rounds, a 12 percent increase over 2012 and the highest recorded since the course opened in 2007. s 2OUNDS BY OUT OF STATE RESIdents increased 10 percent. s 2OUNDS BY RESIDENTS FROM other Washington counties increased 14 percent. s !VERAGE GREEN FEES PER ROUND â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a key performance measure â&#x20AC;&#x201C; increased 11 percent. s -ERCHANDISE SALES JUMPED A whopping 40 percent as custom-

ers snapped up gear featuring the 2015 U.S. Open logo. s &OOD AND BEVERAGE REVENUES were up 11 percent. The golf course recorded all of those increases despite being closed for more than a week in December due to freezing weather. Chambers Bay, designed by renowned architect Robert Trent Jones II, offers Scottish linksstyle golf amid windswept dunes on the shores of Puget Sound. The

United States Golf Association will conduct its national championship, the U.S. Open, at Chambers Bay in June 2015. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thanks to the golf course, thousands of people enjoy the trail, meadows, beach, playground and dog park,â&#x20AC;? the Executive said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chambers Bay truly is a community gem, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re taking good care of it.â&#x20AC;? More information about the golf course is available at www. chambersbaygolf.com.

From page A7

CLAIRE MARTIN â&#x20AC;&#x201C; BELLARMINE LADY LIONS 6-4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FORWARD â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 13.4 PPG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12.9 RPG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4.5 BPG Martin was an honorable mention for the 4A All-Narrows team as a freshman. She has followed it up with two First-Team nods as well as being voted 4A Narrows Defensive MVP. Light on her feet and a nose for the ball, Martin made it a danger to enter the key while she was on defense and she was dangerous around the basket on the offensive end. TAMIA BRAGGS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; LINCOLN LADY ABES 6-1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SO â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FORWARD â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 16.5 PPG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 13.5RPG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3 BPG Tamia Braggs is just a sophomore and already a back-to-back 3A First-Team Narrows selection. This season Braggs kicked her game into a new gear adding League-MVP to her youthful credentials. Braggs led the Lady Abes (19-7) to a surprise season and run into the Final 8 at the 3A Hardwood Classic. Her next-level talent is beginning to show. JOSIE MATZ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; WILSON LADY RAMS 5-8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; GUARD â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 15.9 PPG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4.4 APG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3.5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SPG Matz took the 3A Narrows League by storm and made a name for herself instantly this year. She took the reins of the Lady Rams as point guard following the departure of one of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best teams ever and she delivered. Deadly from the left or right hand, Matz slashed her way to the hoop for assists and buckets and was equally proficient from the three-point line. Voted First-Team 3A State Tournament.

2ND TEAM SARAH ZEITLER TACOMA BAPTIST LADY CRUSADERS 6-0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; CENTER â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 16 PPG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11 RPG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9 BPG First-Team All-Sea-Tac League Selection KIAIRA â&#x20AC;&#x153;KIKIâ&#x20AC;? THOMAS - LINCOLN LADY ABES 5-3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; GUARD â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11.7 PPG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5 APG Second-Team 3A All-Narrows Selection JAYANA ERVIN - BELLARMINE LADY LIONS 5-9 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; GUARD â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11.7 PPG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6.4 RPG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2.6 SPG Second-Team 4A All-Narrows Selection KIARA KNOX â&#x20AC;&#x201C; WILSON LADY RAMS 5-10 - SO â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FORWARD â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12.7 PPG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9.3 RPG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3.7 SPG First-Team 3A All-Narrows Selection VANESSA HIGGINS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; STADIUM LADY TIGERS 5-8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FORWARD â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11.2 PPG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10.1 RPG Honorable Mention 4A Narrows Selection

HONORABLE MENTION

SHELBY GAVIGAN â&#x20AC;&#x201C; BELLARMINE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6-0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FORWARD, TYRA FOSTER â&#x20AC;&#x201C; WILSON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6-1 - SR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FORWARD, BRENEYA JOHNSONCOX â&#x20AC;&#x201C; LINCOLN - 6-0 - SR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FORWARD, TAYLOR BOLES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; LIFE CHRISTIAN â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5-7 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; GUARD.

Tacoma Sports Online [HJVTH^LLRS`JVTZWVY[Z

Local Restaurants ASIAN TERIYAKI OFFERS EASTERN FUSION DELICIOUSNESS By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

R

esidents on 64th Street may have noticed a recent change in the neighborhood, with brand new Asian fusion restaurant Asian Teriyaki replacing Hong Kong Luiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. While Asian Teriyaki may sound limited in scope, the restaurant actually offers a wide array of all things eastern. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re much more than just Asian teriyaki,â&#x20AC;? said Ken Baker, who owns the restaurant with his wife Hyong Baker. The restaurant combines a blast of Asian fusion from all over the east, including Korean, Vietnamese, Japanese and Chinese foods. Everything from southeastern cuisine like fresh spring rolls to egg rolls to, yes, traditional teriyaki can be found at the new restaurant, and all of it is made with care. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Hyong] insures itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s done right,â&#x20AC;? Ken said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She pushes the [employees] to make sure everything is just right.â&#x20AC;? Asian Teriyaki opened last January, replacing Hong Kong Luiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s location at 759 S. 64th St. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were very fortunate this facility was available,â&#x20AC;?

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Ken said of the location, which has been the location for several teriyaki restaurants over the past several years, which made all the amenities of a restaurant already present. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to start from scratch; we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to build something from the ground up,â&#x20AC;? Ken said. The building is the perfect location for a walk-in, family owned diner with a great atmosphere, in an area where sit down restaurants are difficult to find. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My wife takes pride in the product she puts out,â&#x20AC;? Ken said. Asian Teriyakiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;secret weaponâ&#x20AC;? resides in the form of Hyongâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sweet and sour sauce, which she learned in Korea and refined with experience of years working in teriyaki restaurants all around the country. Although the Bakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pride themselves on creating a unique Asian fusion menu, they have made sure to retain some of the more popular items from Hong Kong Luiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Asian Teriyaki is open Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. and Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m, offering both take out and sit down dining.

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TOP CHEF. Hyong Baker (right) has operated Asian Teriyaki since January with some help from her daughter Jessica.

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WCharter From page A1

now being done by the city manager with approval from the city council, which has the mayor voting as one of the nine members as well as chairing the council meetings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most people believe the mayor controls the city, but it really is the city manager because the mayor has no authority,â&#x20AC;? said Adrian S. Kwiatkowski, president of The Strong Mayor-Council Institute, which advises cities about matters of local governance. Kwiatkowski reviewed Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s charter and council make-up and offered his opinions on a few items that he found unusual. While people often believe that having more council members representing a city makes the council more accountable, he said that the opposite is often true because individual council members have only one vote against the remaining eight members. Toss in the fact that coun-

cil members are limited to two terms, and Tacoma has a constant turnover of elected representatives that stymies progress while newer council members catch up on important issues, or defer to other members, which negates the political need for the council position. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one has the bully pulpit,â&#x20AC;? Kwiatkowski said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then you have government by committee, which is the worst option.â&#x20AC;? The Charter Review Committee is pondering two options for changes to the role of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mayor that will be used to craft Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s charter change recommendations. One mimics the City of Spokaneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s charter, which has the mayor appointing a Chief Administrative Officer directly, without council approval. The National Civil League offers a second option, which has the mayor nominating a CAO and department heads who must then be confirmed by the City Council. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CAO would then assist the mayor in drafting a budget, policy changes and capital improvement

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plans. Both options would empower a mayor to veto council ordinances, to offer a â&#x20AC;&#x153;state of the cityâ&#x20AC;? address, to be directly elected to be the Chief Executive Officer of the city, to draft budgets and to directly remove department heads. The issue has been bubbling for years, including an initiative effort following the last charter review in 2004 that failed to gain enough signatures to be put on a ballot.

THOUGHTS OF CHARTER CHANGES

Tacoma Weekly emailed a simple question to every member of the Tacoma City Council to determine their thoughts on how they will view the Charter Review Committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roster of recommendations that they will have to decide which will face voters. The question was: â&#x20AC;&#x153;What is your litmus test for approving the recommendations for a public vote? Is it, for example, a known fix to a known problem or can it be more of an endorsement to a public vote to let the citizens decide after the committee created its list of recommendations or could it even be more populist than that by just allowing the voters to decide on any recommendation.â&#x20AC;? /,9,(9,;/,9,:765:,: WE RECEIVED:

â&#x20AC;&#x153;For items that are â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;housekeepingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in nature (e.g. spelling, or making gender neutral, or updating language to current usage), I would like to see straightup rationale for making a change or tweak. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For items that might want to change the procedure aspects of the Charter, then I would like to see examples of how the current wording or process has not fulfilled the vision or intent of the Charter (e.g. the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;delayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in time from a City Council Meeting Resolution to the time it becomes statute - the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;WalMartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; delay from the Tuesday night until the Thursday publication in the Daily Record).

â&#x20AC;&#x153;For items that are looking to actually change the structure of the government - to me - there needs to be documentation of the failings of the current form since the last Charter Review AND that there is considerable savings of revenue in going to a different process as it is far more efficient than the current system (I have seen the current system work well and not work as well - and it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to the be the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; as much as the accountability of those who are elected within the system).â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; David Boe â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would hope that recommendations sent to the council would come with a strong recommendation from the charter review committee. Then we would need to review the recommendations and carefully consider before sending them to voters. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think known fixes that voters really just should pass could be forwarded with a recommendation. (housekeeping items to keep up with model ordinances, language changes that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have substantive changes) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Other items may be sent with a recommendation from council, without any recommendation and I could see a possibility where we could send an item with a council recommendation of a no vote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will depend on how it is forwarded to us, the support it has from the charter committee and the procedure decided upon.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Marty Campbell â&#x20AC;&#x153;Personally, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my place to set a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;threshold.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not any smarter than the voters of Tacoma. We appointed these citizen volunteers for a reason. If they come up with a recommendation that they believe the people have a right to decide on, who am I to stand in their way? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just how democracy is supposed to work.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Anders Ibsen â&#x20AC;&#x153;When it comes to the

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recommendations of the Charter Review Committee, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a litmus test per se. Together with my colleagues, I will review the recommendations and the process including the public input and make a determination on forwarding them on to the ballot. I am certain there will be several items that are housekeeping in nature. These will be necessary to allow the charter to keep with the changing times. Because of the balances in place, these will have to be forwarded to the voters and approved to be changed. Other items that may come forward will likely garner a little more scrutiny from the council and debate about the merits of forwarding them or not. I look forward to the process and I am eager to see the results of the Charter Review Committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Joe Lonergan â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am open to any and all recommendations that come from the Charter Review Commission and will seek to understand the rationale behind all of their recommendations when they are presented to the full Council. As I have expressed to the Committee when I provided comments at their meeting in February, I am particularly interested in their recommendations around increasing the level of transparency and accountability to the public of the operations of all facets of the City of Tacoma. When spending public dollars and making policy decisions on anything from police and fire service to streets and transportation systems to the six utilities the City runs that make our lives more convenient and healthy, and every other service, the public deserves full transparency, accountability and a great return on their public investment. In our democratic form of government, citizens rightly hold publicly elected officials accountable for public spending and policy decisions. I believe, and have expressed to the Charter Review Committee, that

the City Charter must have adequate provisions to ensure two fundamental things 1) transparency in all of the business of the city so that there is trust and confidence in the dealings of the city and 2) that the public is able to hold elected representatives accountable for spending and policy decisions that are made across all areas of the City of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s government.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ryan N. Mello â&#x20AC;&#x153;The City Council has the authority to put forward potential charter changes to the vote of the people at any time before, during or after charter review cycles. A formal review of the entire charter by an appointed or elected charter review committee must take place at least every 10 years. I expect the committee to provide a thorough analysis of both pros and cons of issues forwarded to the council for consideration. I have no litmus test when it comes to deciding which recommendations should be put before the voters, although I will ask some questions including: 1. Does the current practice allow us to meet or exceed our long-term strategic goals and objectives? 2. Does the current practice hinder the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s progress? 3. Does the current practice restrict us from leveraging our assets? 4. Is the current practice detrimental to the residents of Tacoma? 5. Is making a change to the charter the only sustainable way to solve the problem? I look forward to the recommendations from the committee and hearing from the residents of Tacoma as we carefully deliberate the issues. We all want Tacoma to be its best.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Mayor Marilyn Strickland Council members Lauren Walker, Victoria Woodards and Robert Thoms did not respond to several attempts for comment.

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City Life

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B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 2014

SECTION B, PAGE 1

Tacoma Hangouts host Gray Sky Blues Music Festival

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

CLASSIC. Blues Fans dance and party at the Gray Sky Blues Music festival in 2013. Events

coordinator Gary Grape has kept the original format of the festival in order to replicate previous years successes. By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

T

he changing season means more than just a shift in sports and sunshine. For thousands of people, spring means it’s time for festivals, and Tacoma is getting a jump on the competition with the annual Gray Sky Blues Music Festival happening April 5 at The Swiss Restaurant and Pub, The Harmon Brewery and Stonegate Pizza and Bar. The festival starts at 1 p.m. that Saturday immediately after the Daffodil Parade and continues all the way through 1 a.m. Sunday morning. “I can always get great musicians because the Pacific Northwest is loaded with them,” Gary Grape, director of events for the Tacoma Events Commission, said. Cee Cee James will headline the festival at the Swiss Restaurant and Pub at 6 p.m. James made waves in 2013 when she won “Song of the Year” from Blues Blast Magazine for “I Gotta Right To Sing the Blues.” Born in the Pacific Northwest, James moved to Nashville where she took the scene by storm. This year’s Gray Sky Blues Music Festival marks her homecoming to the Pacific Northwest. Along with best song, James was recognized as the “Best Foreign Singer” in Poland and was awarded a “Top Ten Song” award from the John Lennon Songwriting Contest. With the nickname “The Vocal Volcano,” James delivers roots rock, blues and soul with a vocal kick. Opening for James is the Arthur Migliazza Trio. Migliazza is a long time piano player who takes cues from classic pianists such as Otis Spann, Champion Jack Dupree, Jimmy Yancey, Professor Longhair, James Booker, Jay McShann and Katie Webster. Throughout his career, Migliazza has earned several awards including being inducted into the Arizona Blues Hall of Fame in 2010, and being a finalist at the International Blues Challenge in Memphis this year. The Arthur Migliazza trio will take the stage at The Swiss at 4 p.m. The Cody Rentas Band kicks The Swiss into gear at 1 p.m. Rentas is a 21-year-old artist who

has been a staple of the Tacoma music scene since 2008. Taking cues from performers like Santana and Stevie Ray, Rentas excited crowds with his electric personality and mix of new and old school jams. “He’s pretty much a seasoned pro now, I’m not thinking of him as a kid,” Grape said. One of the youngest stars at the festival is 16-year-old Nolan Garrett, a guitarist, singer and songwriter who has been playing in the Tacoma scene for the last four years. With influences ranging from Jimi Hendrix and John Mayer, to Alice In Chains and The Black Keys, Garrett has become a rising star and will be playing at the Harmon Brewery at 4:30 p.m. “When you see Nolan Garrett, he’s not just playing to you, he’s putting on a show,” Grape said. “One of these days, I won’t be able to touch that kid; he’s destined to be a star.” Opening for Garrett is Colorado resident Jack Gaffney, another young singer-songwriter who was chosen by the South Sound Blues Association to perform at the festival, after winning a youth showcase in Nashville. Gaffney has been involved in the music scene since he was a child, releasing his first album when he was 12 years old, produced by influence and mentor Carter Pann, a Grammy award winning classical composer. Gaffney will take that stage at Harmon Brewery at 3:45 p.m. But the Gray Sky Blues Music Festival isn’t just a young person’s game. Seasoned vet Mark Riley will take the stage with The Mark Riley Trio at The Harmon Brewery at 1. Described as roots rock and blues to heal the soul, Riley brings a nice counterpoint to the younger performers with his wealth of experience. The festival will close at Stonegate Pizza with a 21-and-over after-hours party at 8:30 p.m. starting with live blues upstairs in the loft with Steve Cooley and the Dangerfields. Starting at 10 p.m. downstairs, listen to great blues with Junction 61-49. The party will be in full swing until 1 a.m. with a special appearance by Cee Cee James and other festival performers. “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” Grape said, referring to the format of the successful festival.

PHOTO COURTESY OF GARY GRAPE

VOCAL VOLCANO. Cee Cee James will headline the

Gray Sky Blues Music Festival on April 5. James is riding high on her 2013 Blues Blast Magazine award for song of the year.

April 5th SCHEDULE THE SWISS RESTAURANT AND PUB (1904 S. Jefferson Ave.) 1-2 p.m. The Cody Rentas Band 2:30-3:30 p.m. Brian Lee and the Orbiters ($10 cover charge starts at 3:30 p.m./$8 for Blues Association/ Society members and active military) 4-5:30 p.m. Arthur Migliazza Trio 6-7:30 p.m. Cee Cee James, Festival Headliner THE HARMON BREWERY (1938 Pacific Ave.) Noon–12:45 p.m. Fistful of Dollars (Puget Sound Music for Youth Association) 1-2 p.m. The Mark Riley Trio 2:30-3:30 p.m. Maia Santell and House Blend 3:45-4:15 p.m. Jack Gaffney (Boulder, Colorado) 4:30-5:30 p.m. Nolan Garrett STONEGATE PIZZA AND BAR (5421 S. Tacoma Way) 8:30 p.m.–Midnight Steve Cooley and the Dangerfields (upstairs) 10 p.m.–1 a.m. Junction 61-49 (downstairs)

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE ‘ROWING INTO THE SON’ A book reading event will be held at University of Puget Sound on April 2 as part of the Pierce County Reads program. Author Jordan Hanssen, author, adventurer and University of Puget Sound class of 2004, will talk about his passion for rowing and his incredible 72-day journey across the Atlantic Ocean in 2006. As described in his book Rowing into the Son, Hanssen and his fourperson team faced hurricane-level winds, giant eddies, passing freighters, flying fish, sharks and more on their journey, the only American team in the first-ever race from New York to England. Meet Hanssen in the Tahoma Room, Commencement Hall and enjoy refreshments from 6:30-7 p.m., followed by his a presentation and book sign-

ing from 7-8 p.m. Copies of Rowing into the Son will be on sale at the event.

TWO FAMILY BINGO NIGHT On Friday, April 4, Pierce County Parks and Recreation will host a Family Bingo Night at Chambers Creek Regional Park, 9850 64th St. W. in University Place, 6:30-9 p.m. Fee $5 per person, includes SIX game sheets. Prizes awarded to the winner of each game. Register you and your family members by April 1 – space is limited. For more information call (253) 798-4104 or www.piercecountywa.org/parks.

decade of the new century and now a resident of Tacoma, Offin-Amaniampong’s new book ‘Beneath the Façade’ is an inspiring autobiography that documents the life of an immigrant determined to pursue his dreams and overcome the challenges that foreigners face in the United States of America, capturing the truism that readers both in America and abroad will find exceptionally enlightening.

FOUR JENNIFER NETTLES

THREE ‘BENEATH THE FAÇADE’ Author Gordon OffinAmaniampong will hold a book signing event on April 4, 1-3 p.m. at Europa Bistro, 2515 N. Proctor St. A Ghanaian journalist who immigrated to America in the first

Sugarland singer Jennifer Nettles will bring her solo act to the Washington State Fair. Nettles will headline the 11,000-seat grandstand with songs from her January

release, “That Girl,” on Sept. 8, fair organizers announced today. Tickets will go on sale at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 29, with prices ranging from $30 to $75.

FIVE ‘TEA FOR RUBY’ Evergreen City Ballet presents “Tea for Ruby” with special guest – illustrator Robin Preiss Glasser! Theatre on the Square,Saturday, April 5 at 10 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m.; Sunday, April 6, at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Audiences of all ages will enjoy this performance, as Ruby gets a princessworthy lesson on manners in this charming world-premiere ballet adapted from the picture book from #1 New York Times best-selling “Fancy Nancy” illustrator Robin Preiss Glasser and author Sarah Ferguson, The Duchess of York. Tickets: $27 regular, $16 children and students. Info: www.broadwaycenter.org.

Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 28, 2014

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

TACOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY FINDS PERMANENT HOME

PHOTOS BY ERNEST A. JASMIN

TREASURE TROVE. Tacoma Historical Society president and former Tacoma Mayor Bill Baarsma holds a Stadium High School pennant that could be

as much as a century old, based on its depiction of the original design of Stadium Bowl. (top right) An architectural model was used during the designing of the Tacoma Dome. “We got a phone call from some ladies who were told to throw it out,” Tacoma Historical Society’s Deb Freedman said. (lower right) An ornate, brass cash register that was used at the Zelinsky Family Grocery Store in Old Town, circa 1909. “It still works,” Baarsma said. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

A

mong the biggest fundraisers for the nonprofit Tacoma Historical Society is its annual Historic Homes Tour, which visits many of the city’s most storied structures each May. This year, treasurer Deb Freedman is ecstatic about one stop in particular: 919 Pacific Ave., a space located inside the 111-year-old Provident Building. Without a sustainable headquarters for much of its 25 years, the Historical Society recently claimed two adjacent suites in that building as its permanent home. The new space opened to the public on Thursday, March 27. “So it’s appropriate to have it on the Homes Tour, I think,” Freedman said. “I’m excited about that.” It’s the Historical Society’s second stop downtown after a setback five years ago. In 2006, the group opened an exhibit space on Tacoma’s Antique Row, at 747 Broadway. But that venue closed in 2009, a casualty of a

Local Improvement District (L.I.D.) construction project. Tacoma Historical Society president Bill Baarsma, who was still the city’s mayor back then, coyly accepts part of the blame. “Everything was kind of going well until the L.I.D. was put into affect, and Broadway was shut down,” Baarsma recalled. “People couldn’t get to the exhibit center. We couldn’t host tours because people couldn’t find us. Our retail sales plummeted and, as a result, we had to close the exhibit center and lay off our one staff person.” Since then, the group has operated out of a shoddy office space located at 3712 Cedar St., across the parking lot from Tacoma Goodwill. Much of its collection has been stored in an old warehouse near the Murray Morgan Bridge. All the while, organizers looked to upgrade to a better space they hoped would improve their visibility and accommodate their growing collection of artifacts. Among the locations the group contemplated were Engine House No. 4, near the LeMay Museum, and a space inside the

old Federal Building, currently being renovated at Ninth and A streets. But most options were impractical or out of the Historical Society’s price range. The space in the Provident Building was brought to the group’s attention in January. The price, location and – perhaps most of all – its 3,100 square feet of retail and storage space are perfect for the society’s needs. “We’ve searched and searched, and it’s a dream come true,” Baarsma said. “It’s everything we’ve been looking for.” The first exhibit on display in the new retail space is “Out of the Attic: Curiosities from the Collection of Tacoma Historical Society,” featuring various items the group has rescued from oblivion. “We are between Tacoma’s treasures and archives and the landfill, to a large degree,” Baarsma said. “We’re the stopping-off point. I just can’t imagine the Tacoma Historical Society not being in existence, frankly.” Learn more by calling (253) 472-3732 or visiting TacomaHistory.org.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, March 28, 2014 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

Handforth observes centenary of WWI CULTURE CORNER AG M with show of propaganda posters UIDE TO THE

Muesum of the Week:

By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

Museum of Glass

T

his year marks the centenary of the beginning of the conflagration of World War I. In observation of this fact, Handforth Gallery – housed inside the main branch of the Tacoma Public Library – is currently exhibiting the library’s collection of WWI propaganda posters. Entitled “Defending America’s Freedom: It’s Everybody’s Job!” the exhibit consists of posters collected by John B. Kaiser who served as library director from 1914 through 1924. There are recruitment posters, exhortations to purchase war bonds, instructional messages and a nice collection of posters encouraging support of and participation in the Red Cross. Soldiers, sailors, nurses and Lady Liberty herself are the heroes of the story told in these images. The villains are the “Huns,” German soldiers portrayed as hunkering brutes with spiked helmets, walrus mustaches and blood on their hands. They drag away Belgian maidens from ruined cities. From the coning towers of their submarines they fire upon poor nurses who were passengers aboard ships that their U-boats have sunk. One poster simply depicts a bloody handprint: “The Hun. His Mark,” the poster says, “Blot it out with Liberty Bonds.” A variety of art media was used in the production of the originals that were commissioned from some of the best artists of the day. Howard Chandler Christy, known for his sensual nudes, has depicted a cute, young woman clad in a sailor’s outfit.

USEUMS OF TACOMA

1801 Dock St. Wed.-Sat.,10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sun., noon to 5 p.m. Info: museumofglass.org MARCH

2014

This week’s events:

March 29, 6:30 p.m. 3rd Annual Slider Cook-Off

The evening will feature a slider cooking competition and tastings showcasing seven South Sound restaurants as they battle it out on the grill to prepare the tastiest slider. Guests along with “mystery” judges, who will circulate the event throughout the evening, will vote for their favorite offering. Along with the food, the event will also include 1950s rock and roll music performed by Daryl and the Diptones and live glassblowing by John Miller. Miller is known for creating glass sculptures of iconic American food, such as cheeseburgers and donuts. The full line-up of participating restaurants includes BITE, Dirty Oscar’s Annex, Lobster Shop South, Maxwell’s, Paesan, Social and X Group Catering. Beer will be provided by Narrows Brewing Company. PHOTO COURTESY OF TACOMA PUBLIC LIBRARY

HUN. World War I propaganda posters are on

display at Tacoma Public Library through April 26.

The quick, broad-brush strokes are reminiscent of the style of painters of the ash can school. “Gee I wish I were a man,” reads the poster, “I’d join the Navy…” Gordon Grant’s Red Cross poster, “What are you doing to help?” looks like it was originally done in charcoal. A nurse standing beside a wounded soldier is reaching out to the viewer. The Red Cross was branded as the “Great Mother,” who cares for the wounded with its legion of nurses. One rather surreal poster, by Alonzo Earl Foringer, depicts a colossal nurse holding a wounded soldier on his stretcher like the Madonna holding a baby. Joseph Pennell’s war bond poster gives us an apocalyptic vision of New

Furnit u

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York City in flames. German aircraft fly in a burning sky and U-boats are in the harbor. The Statue of Liberty is in ruins; its head has fallen to the ground. The message here is fight the enemy abroad so that we don’t have to fight him at home. This sentiment was echoed by some of the rhetoric that was heard leading up to the invasion of Iraq in the wake of the 911 attacks. This is a show that will appeal to history buffs, art lovers and those interested in advertising and graphic design. Exhibition curator Robert Schuler will give a gallery talk April 5 at 1 p.m. “Defending America’s Freedom” runs through April 26. For further information visit http:// www.tpl.lib.wa.us/page. aspx?hid=437.

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March 30, Noon-5 p.m. Kids Design Glass

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April 2, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visiting Artist Erich Woll

Erich Woll works in the hot shop Wednesday, April 2 through Sunday, April 6.

Current exhibits: Coastal Alchemy, Through Sept. 28

Skibska treats glass sculptures as just one of many collage elements that combine paper, photography and even shadows on the wall, to create an immersive, abstract environment.

Look! See? The Colors and Letters of Jen Elek and Jeremy Bert, Through Jan. 18, 2015

Seattle-based artists Jen Elek and Jeremy Bert have collaborated to present a multimedia exhibition that challenges assumptions about how art can be experienced in a museum setting. By actively encouraging visitors to not only touch but wear some of the artworks in the gallery, the artists are implicitly suggesting that art should be actively encountered rather than passively observed.

Bohemian Boudoir, Through May 1

Highlighting more than 40 glass crystal perfume bottles and bedroom accessories.

CAUTION! Fragile. Irish Glass: Tradition in Transition, Through Sept. 1

A deep look at the Irish glass industry and the impact of recent factory closures on artists, tradition and personal identity.

Irish Cylinders by Dale Chihuly, Through Sept. 1

These legendary Irish Cylinders, created in 1975 at the Rhode Island School of Design. Begun on St. Patrick’s Day and completed over Thanksgiving weekend, the 44 vessels, are loosely categorized as St. Patrick’s Day Cylinders, Irish Cylinders and the Ulysses Cylinders (which were inspired by James Joyce’s masterpiece, Ulysses.)

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Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, March 28, 2014

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Second weekend of Sasquatch festival cancelled

Tommy Castro brings new band the Painkillers to Tacoma, Seattle

S

PHOTOS BY LEWIS MACDONALD

BLUES CREW. Tommy Castroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new band, the Painkillers, includes Randy McDonald, David Tucker and James Price. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

B

ay Area bluesman Tommy Castro has had a pretty solid run these last two decades, having released a string of critically acclaimed albums, taken home the prestigious Blues Music Award in 2008 and jammed with some of the biggest names in the genre. But the 58-year-old singer, guitarist and songwriter feels heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just now hitting his stride with his new backing band, the Painkillers, and his latest collection from Alligator Records, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Devil You Know.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel like I get better at making records the more I do it,â&#x20AC;? said Castro, who will headline Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jazzbones on April 4. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really set out to make a certain kind of an album. I had a certain kind of attitude and a certain kind of a sound I was trying to create, and really worked hard at it.â&#x20AC;? After years of playing guitar-driven blues, soul and R&B, backed by a tight horn section, Castro decided to strip his supporting cast down to a lean trio in 2012. The Painkillers are drummer David Tucker, keyboard player James Price and bassist Randy McDonald, an original member of the Tommy Castro Band.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the closest thing to just jamming with my friends, just for the sheer joy of playing when we were kids,â&#x20AC;? Castro said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s back to playing with a little more focus on guitar than in recent years. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a little bit more of a rock edge to things. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s slightly more contemporary. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more interesting drum things happening, rhythms. That was all part of the plan. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all kind of working out.â&#x20AC;? When it came time to record â&#x20AC;&#x153;Devil You Know,â&#x20AC;? Castro could also call on an all-star cast of friends to make cameos. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being sort of a regular on the Legendary Rhythm & Blues Cruise, I get a chance to network and hang out and jam with a lot of musicians,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twice a year, I do this cruise. You get a chance to really spend a little time with some of the other players on the scene rather than just hearing them on the occasional set on a festival.â&#x20AC;? On the new album, guitarist Joe Bonamassa shreds on an updated version of Savoy Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outsider anthem, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Tired.â&#x20AC;? J. Geils Bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Magic Dick blows harp on the gritty, rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Two Steps Forward,â&#x20AC;? and Tab Benoit adds a bit of Bayou soul to â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I Cross the Mississippi.â&#x20AC;? Also making appearances are vocalists Samantha Fish and Tasha Taylor and Alligator label mates Marcia Ball and The Holmes

Brothers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybody had a place on this album that made sense,â&#x20AC;? Castro said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Like Bonamassa playing on â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Tired.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; His style on guitar really reminds you of one of those great British, blues-rock players. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in that bag, and we were gonna do this song anyway. To put him together with that track, it was the perfect fit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had some really talented people involved with me: producer Bonnie Hayes and some of the songwriting partners of mine. Everybody collaborated and helped me to pull together the kind of album I was trying to make; and I think it might be the best thing that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done.â&#x20AC;? Tommy Castro and the Painkillers will make two stops locally. On April 2, they will headline the Triple Door, 216 Union St., in Seattle. That show will kick off at 7:30 p.m. and is open to all ages. Tickets are $18 in advance, $20 the day of the show; (206) 838-4333 or www.thetripledoor.net for further details. On April 4, Castro and company will headline Jazzbones, 2803 Sixth Ave., in Tacoma. That show will start at 8 p.m., and you have to be 21 or older to enter. Tickets are $15 general admission, $17.50 for reserved balcony seating. For more info, call (253) 396-9169 or visit www.jazzbones.com.

low ticket sales have led to the cancellation of the Fourth of July weekend installment of Sasquatch! Festival The three-day event would have brought Soundgarden, Frank Ocean, New Order and more to Grant Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gorge Amphitheatre on July 4, 5 and 6. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sasquatch! community has spoken,â&#x20AC;? read a statement from Live Nation Seattle president Jeff Trisler. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They continue to support the traditional Memorial Day Weekend event with great enthusiasm. Unfortunately, the second weekend was not embraced. We felt it was better to cancel the new event now and give everyone time to make alternative plans for the Fourth of July weekend. Going forward, Sasquatch! Music Festival will be at the Gorge Amphitheatre on the weekend the fans want: Memorial Day Weekend only.â&#x20AC;? Ticketmaster will refund credit cards used to purchase passes for Fourth of July Weekend, according to Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s announcement. Further details are available by calling 1-800-745-3000. The traditional Memorial Day Weekend installment of Sasquatch will go on as planned, from May 23 to 25. The main stage lineup for that one includes reunited hip-hop duo Outkast, The National, Queens of the Stone Age and M.I.A. A full lineup and other details can be found online at SasquatchFestival.com. -Ernest A. Jasmin, Tacoma Weekly

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

The Purrs promise new tunes this weekend at New Frontier

Friday, March 28, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 5

Nightlife

TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE HAPPY NEUROTICâ&#x20AC;? AUTHOR DAVID GRANIRERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S STAND UP FOR MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMS HELPS PARTICIPANTS WORK THROUGH MENTAL CHALLENGES THROUGH COMEDY. TACOMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GRADUATING CLASS OF 2014 WILL BE ON DISPLAY AT 7 P.M. ON MARCH 28 AT TACOMA COMMUNITY COLLEGEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BUILDING 2 AUDITORIUM. TICKETS ARE $12$15 WITH PROCEEDS BENEFITING TACOMA AREA COALITION FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES; WWW.EVENTBRITE.COM.

PHOTO BY JIM BIGGS

MEOW. The Purrs are guitarist Liz Herrin, drummer Craig Keller, guitarist Jason Milne and singer-bassist Jim Antonio. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

S

eattle psychpop outfit the Purrs are headed to Tacoma to share a bill with local favorites Trees and Timber and People Under the Sun on Saturday night at the New Frontier Lounge. Last summer, Fin Records delivered the quartetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Boy with Astronaut Eyes,â&#x20AC;? among the best regional recordings of 2013. This weekend, the band will showcase a few things theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been working on since. Lead guitarist Jason Milne and singer-bassist Jim Antonio, the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary songwriter, checked in to give us the skinny. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s some of what they had to say. Tacoma Weekly: Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been together for a minute, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a relative newcomer to the band. Antonio: Most people are. TW: How did you guys hook up? Antonio: We formed in the year 2000 via a couple of well-placed ads in The Stranger, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been playing ever since. Three of the four are original members. Every band has a rotating position, and ours has historically been rhythm guitar. TW: The Spinal Tap thing. Antonio: Yeah, exactly. But lately, we scored a person. (To Milne) Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s her name again? Milne: (Cracks up.) Her name is Liz (guitarist Herrin.) Antonio: Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been with us for a while. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually from â&#x20AC;&#x201C; not Tacoma â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but Auburn, so sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got family and stuff down there. TW: At what point did you realize you had something special? You had to have something that really clicked to stick together for 14 years. Antonio: Well, you would think that. But I know lots of older couples who have been together forever who just hate each other but canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a divorce. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not exactly sure thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good barometer of how special we might be. TW: The Purrs actually hate each other. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my lead. Antonio: I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say it was special, but I just thought we sounded good. The thing that really kept us together was our shared interests, and we got along with each other. TW: Maybe speak to some of the reference points that went into your sound. Antonio: I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a super unique

set of influences or style choices. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just basically been two guitars, bass, drums â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as many vocals as possible. We love psychedelic music. A lot of bands use that phrase, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sure itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exactly well applied to us, but we often get stuck with that one. Milne: Jim was just writing a ton of songs, too. The styles varied, and what worked with the band at a high rate ended up being developed and recorded. There wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t any conscious decision on the sound. TW: Your latest is â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Boy with the Astronaut Eyes.â&#x20AC;? Take me back to the moment that set the tone for that one or established what direction you went in. Milne: It was somewhat random. I think we had about 15 songs we were looking at. At some point, we drew the line and said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gonna be these 10. â&#x20AC;Ś Once we had those, I think we put a lot of care in the sequencing and what effect that has on listening to the whole album.â&#x20AC;? Antonio: I thought we did a pretty good job with this one. Personally, I really like the last song (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over and Outâ&#x20AC;?) even though we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really play it out so much. (It) kind of ends on an up note. TW: Why donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you play it? Milne: When â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Boy with Astronaut Eyesâ&#x20AC;? record came out and we were touring, supporting it, we were playing tons of songs off of that. But now weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to get a couple songs here, a couple songs there off of each record. Antonio: And weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re working on new songs. A little less than half the set has been new stuff these days. Jason: We recorded four more new songs with (Seattle producer) Erik Blood. Then we have another batch weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re starting to work on in demo. TW: Tell me about the new songs. Antonio: The last eight or nine songs have been a bit more (upbeat) and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of guitar solos, which I just love, actually. ... Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got songs with a bit more â&#x20AC;&#x153;poundinessâ&#x20AC;? to them, and some tension in the guitars. TW: Tell me about the new songs that are getting the most response. Antonio: I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know about response â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;cause usually weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing in front of a bunch of drunk people, and they just clap to whatever. (Milne laughs.) I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say we judge our songs based on audience response. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not like we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care or whatever, but we are going in a direction; and people can either jump on for the ride or not.

WORD SEARCH WORD LIST CHARTER REVIEW

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STATE OF THE CITY

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MURANO

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BEST OF TACOMA

TW: For the people who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t drunk, what can they listen up for? Milne: I think the three ... that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be playing in Tacoma, are â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;American as Apple Pie.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Another song is called â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Late Night Disturbance.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jim: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Really Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Need This Nowâ&#x20AC;? is another one. All three of them were, basically, inspired by specific events - kind of. I would say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Late Night Disturbanceâ&#x20AC;? was definitely spun off that whole Cafe Racer massacre that happened (in 2012.) TW: Were you guys regulars there? Jim: No, I had only been there once or twice. It just kind of colored my writing of that song. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about the closest thing I can say. Somebody does something, blows up and does a bunch of stupid, horrible, violent (stuff) because they werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t thinking properly, for whatever reason. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Really Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Need This Nowâ&#x20AC;? was pretty much a song driven by the collapse of my last relationship. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to deal with some emotional pain and then nitpicky crap that happens every day is piling up on top of it. ... The (freaking) bathtub starts leaking or your phone bill comes. Some miniscule thing hits you at the wrong time. TW: It sounds like there might be a darker thread running through the next collection of songs. Antonio: There might be, but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wanna say that. One of the things I like about our band â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and this is what I like about a lot of bands â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is you take either horrible noise and say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hey hey hey,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; beautiful stuff over the top of it; or you take a really beautiful sound and you say terrible things over the top of it. People always cite Jesus and Mary Chain for doing that type of thing. I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a brilliant move: You take something sonically one way and lyrical imagery thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s completely the other way â&#x20AC;Ś I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pretty honest view of what life is. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got really great things right next to really bad things, always at the same time. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just the way it goes. THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (99 MIN, R) Fri 3/28: 11:30am, 12:00, 1:45, 4:05, 6:40, 9:00, 9:10 Sat 3/29-Sun 3/30: 11:30am, 12:00, 1:45, 4:05, 4:20, 6:40, 8:05, 9:00, 9:10 Mon 3/31-Thurs 4/3: 1:45, 4:05, 6:40, 9:00 WALKING THE CAMINO (84 MIN, NR) Fri 3/28-Sun 3/30: 2:15, 4:40, 7:00 Mon 3/31: 2:15, 4:40, 7:00, 9:10 Tue 4/1: 4:40, 9:10 Wed 4/2-Thurs 4/3: 2:15, 4:40, 7:00, 9:10 THE WIND RISES (126 MIN, PG-13) Fri 3/28: 11:45am, 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 Sat 3/29-Sun 3/30: 11:45am, 2:30, 5:15 Mon 3/31-Thurs 4/3: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 TIMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S VERMEER (80 MIN, PG-13) Fri 3/28: 11:55am, 2:00, 4:20, 6:30, 8:30 Sat 3/29-Sun 3/30: 11:55am, 2:00, 6:30, 8:30 Mon 3/31-Wed 4/2: 2:00, 4:20, 6:30, 8:30 Thurs 4/3: 2:00, 4:20, 6:30 THE ROCKET (96 MIN, NR) Tue 4/1: 2:15, 7:00 OUR VINYL WEIGHS A TON: THIS IS STONES THROW RECORDS (94 MIN, NR) Thu 4/3: 8:30

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FRIDAY, MARCH 28

SUNDAY, MARCH 30

LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Amanda Hardy CD release, Klover Jane, Jamie Nova (rock) 7 p.m., $5, AA

GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Zoltan Kaszas (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: The Afrodisiacs, Mr. Pink (dance) 8 p.m., $8 LAST STAND: Deviance (hardcore) 7 p.m., AA MAXWELLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Loser Dog, The Skins, Terrapin (rock) 9 p.m., $5 STONEGATE: Rumble Underground (rock) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: The 5 (dance) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Brian Moote CD recording (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Enemy Combatants, Ten Pole Drunk, Taco Ninjas (metal, hardcore) 8 p.m. UNCLE THURMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Kareem Kandi (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA UPS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; KILWORTH CHAPEL: Adelphian Concert Choir, 8 p.m., AA

SATURDAY, MARCH 29

TACOMA COMEDY: Brian Moote CD recording (comedy) 8 p.m., $10

DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 4 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman Allstars (classic rock) 8:30 p.m., NC THE SPAR: Chris Stevens (blues) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Benefit for cancer, 4 p.m. TEMPLE THEATRE: Bump Kitchen, Merrilee Rush, Gabriel, Champagne Sunday (Mitch Reems cancer benefit) 3 p.m., $20

MONDAY, MARCH 31 STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino, Brooke Lizotte (experimental jam) 9 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Jazz & Beyond (open jam) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Blue Night, 8 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, APRIL 1

EMERALD QUEEN: Keith Sweat (R&B) 8:30 p.m., $30-$60

B SHARP COFFEE: Stillwater Hill (bluegrass) 8 p.m., NC BOBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAVA JIVE: Czar, Breag Naofa, A God or Another, The Vatican (grindcore) 9 p.m., $5 GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Zoltan Kaszas (comedy) 8:30, 10:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: The Reallionaire Beat Battle hosted by Bruce Leroy (hip-hop) 6 p.m., $10-$15 LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Ted Brown Music Outreach benefit with Nolan Garrett, SweetKiss Momma, Stolen Society, Fistful of Dollars (rock, blues) 5 p.m., $10, AA NEW FRONTIER: The Purrs, Trees and Timber, Blanco Bronco (indie-rock) 9 p.m., $5 THE SPAR: Tatoosh (blues) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rumble Underground (rock) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Kry (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Brian Moote CD recording (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 TEMPLE THEATRE: In the Mood (jazz, big band) 2, 7:30 p.m. $29-$49 UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Hambone Blues Band (blue) 8 p.m.

DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock)

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2

DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ STONEGATE: Dave Nicholsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, APRIL 3 TACOMA COMEDY: April Macie (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Billy Shew band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

                               

Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 28, 2014

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: REACH GOALS, OVERCOME BARRIERS Sat., March 29, 3-5 p.m. Ubiquitous Journey (2607 6th Ave., Tacoma) Meet Eric J. Scroggins, Ph.D. for a “Meet the Author” event. Dr. Scroggins, a speaker and executive business coach, will share selections from his book, “Vision Blockers” (www.visionblockers. com). The interactive style of the event will offer a question and answer period for those who would like to learn more about overcoming barriers and reaching goals. Join us for a great opportunity to meet this Pacific Northwest author and business leader. Ubiquitous Journey is a tea and spice merchant and also features a tea and coffee bar as well as a café. This event is open to the public and free to attend. Due to limited seating, please call ahead to reserve your space (253) 572-2550. GIRL RISING Fri., March 28, 6-8 p.m. University of Washington - Tacoma You are invited to attend a free screening of “Girl Rising” at the University of Washington Tacoma in honor of Women’s History Month. Event will take place in Carwein Auditorium and a post-film discussion will include UWT faculty and community experts. Price: Free. Info: (253) 692-4000 THE AFRODISIACS AND MR.PINK Fri., March 28, 8 p.m. Jazzbones, 2803 6th Ave. Haven’t pulled those bellbottoms and platform shoes out of the closet in a year or two? Or 30?! Well, it’s time to get digging. This is your official invite from The Afrodisiacs to put on your Boogie Shoes, catch the Love Rollercoaster over to Funkytown, and Shake Your Booty. Price: $8. Info: (253) 396-9169

COMEDY SHOW: STAND UP FOR MENTAL HEALTH Fri., March 28, 7 p.m. Tacoma Community College Auditorium – Bldg. 2, 6501 S. 19th St., Tacoma Stand Up for Mental Health is a program that teaches people recovering from mental health challenges how to talk about their experiences in stand-up comedy. Awardwinning author, comic and therapist David Granirer, from Vancouver, taught a recent class in Tacoma and will open the show, joining the nine comics of the 2014 graduating class plus comics from the 2012 class. Price: $12. Info: (253) 565-9000 Ex. 12 ‘CHAPTER TWO’ Sat., March 29 7:30 p.m. Tacoma Little Theatre, 210 N. I St., Tacoma Writer George Schneider, a

recent widower, is encouraged by his younger brother Leo to start dating again. But this sends George into even more of a depression after a series of bad matches. Price: $22$15. Info: (253) 272-2281

COMEDY WITH JIMMY DELLA VALLE Sat., March 29, 8:30 p.m. Comedy Underground, 100 S. 9th St., Tacoma Jimmy Della Valle, born and raised in New York and now living in Los Angeles, confesses: “Once a New Yorker, always a New Yorker.” His streetwise, edgy flare, macho vulnerability and blue-collar twists are what allow Jimmy to keep audiences on the brink of laughter. Price: $13.70. Info: (253) 961-4262 INTERNET BASICS Sat., March 29 Tacoma Public Library Main Branch, 1102 Tacoma Ave. S. Want to be grounded in the basics of Internet navigating and searching before striking out on your own? Students will learn key vocabulary, and how to navigate from website to website. Evaluation of Internet sources will also be included.Price: Free. Info: (253) 292-2001 FINGERTIPS AT THE CABALLEROS CLUB Sun., March 30 5:30-8:30 p.m. Caballeros Club, 1516 28th St. Fingertips will be playing funky rhythm & blues. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. and no cover charge for this first event. Open to the public. Price: Free. Info: (253) 5729681

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

‘JAVA TACOMA: EPISODE 4’ Sun., March 30 2 p.m. Dukesbay Theater, 508 S. 6th Ave., Tacoma Best friends and fellow coffee lovers Jeri, Kate and Linda join forces once again to commit manic mayhem over at Tacoma’s Perky’s Coffee House. This time, a suave but untrustworthy stranger enters their lives. Could this mean romance for one of our ladies, or a reason for comic revenge? Price: $10. Info: (253) 267-9869

ture of the steel drum with musician Ian Dobson. Register online at www.piercecountylibrary.org/calendar. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3304 LINE DANCING FOR FUN AND FITNESS Tues., April 1 6-8 p.m. Asia Pacific Cultural Center, 4851 S. Tacoma Way Learn to line dance every Tuesday to all styles of music. Great exercise for both mind and body. Price: $45 for 7week session. Info: Instructor Maryanne Ellis, (253) 7520205

SPRING BREAK SUPERSTARS Mon., March 31, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium Salute the Zoo’s conservation animal superstars: sharks, wild cats, red wolves, elephants and polar bears. Discover each animal’s superstar qualities by completing our Animal Scavenger Hunt! Each day of the week will focus on one superstar species. Price: adults $12.50$15; youth $10.50-$13; tots $6.25-$8.75; kids 2 and under free. Info: (253) 5915337

PLAY TO LEARN Tues., April 1, 10-11:30 a.m. Charles Wright Academy, 7723 Chambers Creek Rd. W., Tacoma Offered in partnership with the Children’s Museum of Tacoma, Play to Learn is for parents, grandparents, neighbors, family and friends who nurture children ages 6 and under. Price: Free. Info: (253) 620-8373 WOMEN AND MONEY Wed., April 2, 6 p.m. LaQuinta Inn & Suites, 1425 E. 27th St., Tacoma South Puget Sound Business and Professional Women presents A Panel of Experts on Women and Money at our April Monthly Meeting. Join us for networking beginning at 6 p.m. followed by a buffet dinner and a short general meeting before the Panel convenes. Price: $23-$30. Info: (253) 335-7584

RECALYPSO - STEEL DRUM PARTY Mon., March 31, 1 p.m. Parkland Spanaway Pierce County Library, 13718 Pacific Ave. S., Tacoma Concert and workshop combine into one excellent musical experience. Explore creative ways to turn items you think of as garbage into musical instruments. Learn about the amazing history and cul-

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE Kerri Bailey is a horticulturist and a certified herbalist. She makes custom blends and consults at Ubiquitous Journey (www.UBJourney.com) on 6th Avenue. Kerri owns two businesses – the online herb store www.HerbalElements.net and a water garden store inside Alpine Nursery in South Hill (www. AlpineGrows.com) called The Pond Pad (www.ThePondPad.com). She writes blogs on gardening, ponds, natural health and herbal remedies and teaches classes through Free University (www.FreeUNW.com).

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) Your priorities may be in question as you feel pulled in several directions. Problems could surface at work and in your home life. Take time to get feedback to figure your solutions or they may elude you. Sunday’s New Moon may help you find answers. Time to make a fresh start. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) Distractions may keep you from sticking to your to-do list. Prioritize to maximize your accomplishments. Conversations with trusted friends may open new connections. New career possibilities may come from social meetings. Sunday’s New Moon may bring clarity. GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) All kinds of connections may happen while networking this week. Sharing your ideas in casual conversation could bring visionary ideas and spontaneous opportunities. Research your options to make the best decisions. The New Moon on Sunday gives you a boost. CANCER (June 21 – July 22) If you feel like you’re going in too many directions, take a break to get your focus. Avoid distractions that may hold up progress. Pursuing a teaching or learning opportunity may help give you satisfaction. Learn to balance your efforts. LEO (July 23 – August 22) You may be inspired to take a step in a new direction. Your options may pave the way for exciting new experiences or encounters. Your selfconfidence is high this week after the New Moon on Sunday. Step outside your comfort zone. VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Are you on the verge of taking a financial risk with shared assets? Use your practical common sense to think things through. Sunday’s New Moon may bring clarity to recent money matters. Get things off on the right foot.

LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Romance is in the air this week. Many opportunities are coming for you this week as well. Be easygoing and light hearted. Sunday’s New Moon in Aries may bring a turnaround in an important relationship. Remember to keep up your wellness routine. SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) You may feel like you want to be alone or limit your choice of the company you keep this week. There is someone who may charm you into letting your guard down. Trust your instincts and go with the flow. Try to focus on a regular routine for greater progress.

WORD SEARCH N S K T J A Z Z B O N E S Z D E C

G T V A I Z E U N E V A H T X I S

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SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) Family communications may not go well this week. Choose your words carefully so others fully understand what you are trying to convey. Distractions may cause interruptions so keep plans flexible. A romantic adventure may be on the agenda. CAPRICORN (December 22 – January 19) Set boundaries with yourself and others. Business or personal relationships may get complicated this week. Make important decisions that you have been avoiding. Keep communication lines open. Sunday’s New Moon brings an upbeat energy. AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) This week’s gift to you is the opportunity to catch up and feel more grounded. Listen to what others suggest and draw your conclusions privately. Confrontations may get you needed answers. Study the terms and conditions in detail before making risky decisions. PISCES (February 19 – March 20) Implementing radical solutions may balance an unsettled situation. Romantic relationships are favored this week. Have fun and give into the experience. The New Moon in Aries gives you a chance to arrange steps for greater security. Finances may reach a critical phase of discontent.

ANAGRAM

HISTORICAL

SOCIETY

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T A C O M A D O M E L L M A S P E

Friday, March 28, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Emmaâ&#x20AC;? This amazing 6 year old black kitty is proof that a second chance is the most wonderful gift one can give a shelter pet. Emma arrived to us frightened and very timid. She would hide inside her box and rarely make an appearance outside of it. As time went on and her trust began to grow, it was clear that this kitty was not what she seemed. Emma started showing us that she ZDVDEXQGOHRIFRQĂ&#x20AC;GHQFH ORYHVKXPDQLQWHUDFWLRQ Since she is still adjusting, this sweet girl would do best in a quieter environment with older children. Please donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait, give Emma the second chance she deserves so much. Reference #A483463

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Aflac is here at Metro! This domestic duck is looking for a loving home to call her own. She is oh so friendly, and has made so much progress since being brought to the shelter with an injured leg. Help her find tranquility in a new home today!

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Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 8 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, March 28, 2014

NOTICES

NOTICES

Notice of Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 RCW Grantor: John Lora and Melinda Oliver Successor Trustee: Philip S. Brooke III %HQHĂ&#x20AC;FLDU\$PHULFDQ:HVW%DQNDV6XFFHVVRULQLQWHUHVWWR9LNLQJ&RPPXQLW\%DQN Abbreviated Legal: Ptn Lot 2, Blk 2, Town of Sumner, Vol 1, P. 68 (Parcel A) and Ptn Lot 3, Blk 2, Spauldings Add., V. 2, P. 11 (Parcel B). Full Legal on: Pages 2 & 3 Assessorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parcel No.: 798500-047-0 (Parcel A) & 782000-013-0 (Parcel B) Prior Document Reference No.: 200708211361

John Lora 320 E. Pioneer Ave. Puyallup, WA 98372

6711 Regents Blvd Tacoma, WA 98466

Melinda Oliver 320 E. Pioneer Ave. Puyallup, WA 98372

Melinda Oliver c/o Mark D. Waldron 6711 Regents Blvd Tacoma, WA 98466

John Lora 316 E. Pioneer Ave. Puyallup, WA 98372

Noel P. Shillito 1919 N. Pearl St. Ste C2 Tacoma, WA 98406

Melinda Oliver 316 E. Pioneer Ave. Puyallup, WA 98372

Viking Bank 5821 Sprague Court, Suite 101 Tacoma, WA 98409

John Lora PO Box 633 Milton, WA 98354 John Lora PO Box 633 Milton, WA 98354 Valley Construction Supply, Inc. c/o Henry L. Skidmore 777 108th Ave. NE Ste 2240 Bellevue, WA 98004 Mark D. Waldron 6711 Regents Blvd. Tacoma, WA 98466 John Lora c/o Mark D. Waldron

John Lora c/o Noel P. Shillito 1919 N. Pearl St. Ste C2 Tacoma, WA 98406 Melinda Oliver c/o Noel P. Shillito 1919 N. Pearl St. Ste C2 Tacoma, WA 98406 John Lora 1718 East 92nd Avenue Milton, WA 98354 Melinda Oliver 1718 East 92nd Avenue Milton, WA 98354 John Lora PO Box 1870

Milton, WA 98354 Melinda Oliver PO Box 1870 Milton, WA 98354 John Lora 1012 Main Street Sumner, WA 98390 Melinda Oliver 1012 Main Street Sumner, WA 98390

NOTICES

NOTICES

Notice of Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 RCW Grantor: John Lora and Mindy Oliver aka Melinda Oliver Successor Trustee: Philip S. Brooke III %HQHĂ&#x20AC;FLDU\$PHULFDQ:HVW%DQNDV6XFFHVVRULQLQWHUHVWWR9LNLQJ&RPPXQLW\%DQN Abbreviated Legal: Ptn. Lot 20, Blk A, Sumner, WA Vol. 1, Pg. 68 Full Legal on: Pages 2 & 3 Assessorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parcel No.: 798500-020-0 & 798500-021-0 Prior Document Reference No.: 200609250744

Names and addresses identical to list on Prior Document Reference No.: 200708211361 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will, on the 25th day of April 2014, at the hour of 10:00 A.M., inside the front entrance of the Pierce County Courthouse 930 Tacoma Avenue South in the City of Tacoma, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following-described real property, situated in the County of Pierce, State of Washington, to-wit: PARCEL A: Lot 20, Block A, Sumner, according to the plat thereof recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, page 68, in Pierce County, Washington; Except the east 72 feet thereof; And except any portion in Main Street; And except any portion, if any, lying in Railroad Avenue.

TO: Sylvia Carrillo & Damontay Whitaker In the Welfare of: K.R. C-W. DOB: 05/21/08 & A. C-W. DOB: 07/23/13 Case Numbers: PUY- CW-CW-2014-0010 & PUY-CWCW-2014-0009 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Review Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Continued Initial Hearing on Monday the 30th day of JUNE at 1:30PM If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

Commonly known as 905 Main Street, Sumner, Washington 98390.

NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS.

John Lora 720 Main Street Buckley, WA 98321

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TO: Farrah Bradley and Harold Chad Tom

Including title to all improvements thereon, and appurtenances thereto.

In the Welfare of: T., R.L. DOB: 09/24/2013 Case Number: PUY-CW-CW-2013-0042

Melinda Oliver 720 Main Street Buckley, WA 98321

which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated September 19, 2006, and recorded on 6HSWHPEHUXQGHU$XGLWRU¡V)LOH1RDQGE\WKDWFHUWDLQ0RGLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQ of Deed of Trust dated January 19, 2007 and recorded on January 29, 2007 under recording QXPEHUDQGE\WKDWFHUWDLQ0RGLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQRI'HHGRI7UXVWGDWHG-DQXDU\ 15, 2010 and recorded on April 5, 2010 under recording number 201004050524, records RI3LHUFH&RXQW\:DVKLQJWRQIURP-RKQ/RUDDQG0HOLQGD2OLYHUDV*UDQWRUVWR3DFLĂ&#x20AC;F Northwest Title Company of Washington, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of $PHULFDQ:HVW%DQNDV%HQHĂ&#x20AC;FLDU\DQGDVVXFFHVVRULQLQWHUHVWWR9LNLQJ%DQN

John Lora 905 Main Street Sumner, WA 98390 Melinda Oliver 905 Main Street Sumner, WA 98390

John Lora 1012-1014 Main Street Sumner, WA 98390 Melinda Oliver 1012-1014 Main Street Sumner, WA 98390

I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will, on the 25th day of April 2014, at the hour of 10:00 A.M., inside the front entrance of the Pierce County Courthouse 930 Tacoma Avenue South in the City of Tacoma, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following-described real property, situated in the County of Pierce, State of Washington, to-wit: PARCEL A: The East 25 feet of Lot 2, Block 2 of Town of Sumner, according to plat recorded in Book 1 of Plats, at Page 68, in Pierce County, Washington.

PARCEL B; West 26.43 feet of the east 72 feet of Lot 20, Block A, Sumner, according to the plat thereof recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 68, in Pierce County, Washington; Except the northwesterly 10 feet thereof; And except any portion thereof lying within Main Street.

,,1RDFWLRQFRPPHQFHGE\WKH%HQHĂ&#x20AC;FLDU\RIWKH'HHGRI7UXVWLVQRZSHQGLQJWRVHHN satisfaction of the obligations in any Court by reason of the Borrowerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or Grantorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s default on the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts, which are now in arrears: MATURITY: $170,170.64 Failure to pay at maturity December 19, 2013 the entire principal balance in the amount of $144,153.49 plus late charges in the amount of $744.10, interest in the amount of $7,147.61, fees and insurance costs in the amount of $18,125.44.

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Adjudication Hearing Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Guardianship Hearing on Monday the 7th Day of July, 2014 at 9:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. TO: Juarez, Anthony J.

PARCEL B; The East 25 feet of Lot 3, Block 2 of Spauldingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s First Addition to the Town of Buckley, according to plat recorded in Volume 2 of Plats at page 11, in Pierce County, Washington.

REAL PROPERTY TAXES:

In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs Juarez, Anthony J.

Tax ID.: 798500-020-0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Delinquent in the amount of $1,482.21 for 2011; delinquent in the amount of $1,370.07 for 2012 and delinquent in the amount of $1,254.89 for 2013: $4,107.17

Case Number: PUY-FH-SHELL-2014-0017

Commonly known as 1012 Main Street, Sumner, WA 98390 (Parcel A) and 720 Main Street, Buckley, WA 98321 (Parcel B).

Tax ID.: 798500-021-0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Delinquent in the amount of $1,218.21 for 2011; delinquent in the amount of $1,122.82 for 2012 and delinquent in the amount of $1,028.06 for 2013: $3,369.09

7D[,GHQWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQ1XPEHU 3DUFHO$ DQG & 120005-468-0 (Parcel B).

TOTAL: $177,646.90

Including title to all improvements thereon, and appurtenances thereto. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated August 16, 2007, and recorded on $XJXVWXQGHU$XGLWRU¡V)LOH1RDQGE\WKDWFHUWDLQ0RGLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQ of Deed of Trust dated August 28, 2007 and recorded on September 6, 2007 under UHFRUGLQJQXPEHUDQGE\WKDWFHUWDLQ0RGLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQRI'HHGRI7UXVWGDWHG December 14, 2007 and recorded on December 18, 2007 under recording number DQGE\WKDWFHUWDLQ0RGLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQRI'HHGRI7UXVWGDWHG1RYHPEHU 2008 and recorded on November 21, 2008 under recording number 200811210660, DQGE\WKDWFHUWDLQ0RGLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQRI'HHGRIWUXVWGDWHG-DQXDU\DQGUHFRUGHG $SULOXQGHUUHFRUGLQJQXPEHUDQGE\WKDWFHUWDLQ0RGLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQ of Deed of Trust dated January 15, 2010 recorded April 5, 2010 under recording number DQGE\WKDWFHUWDLQ0RGLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQRI'HHGRI7UXVWGDWHG-DQXDU\ 2010 and recorded April 5, 2010 under recording number 201004050523 records of 3LHUFH&RXQW\:DVKLQJWRQIURP-RKQ/RUDDQG0HOLQGD2OLYHUDV*UDQWRUVWR3DFLĂ&#x20AC;F Northwest Title Company of Washington, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation in IDYRURI$PHULFDQ:HVW%DQNDV%HQHĂ&#x20AC;FLDU\DQGDVVXFFHVVRULQLQWHUHVWWR9LNLQJ%DQN ,,1RDFWLRQFRPPHQFHGE\WKH%HQHĂ&#x20AC;FLDU\RIWKH'HHGVRI7UXVWLVQRZSHQGLQJWR seek satisfaction of the obligations in any Court by reason of the Borrowerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or Grantorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s default on the obligations secured by the Deeds of Trust. III. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts, which are now in arrears: MATURITY: $749,429.80 Principal balance due April 15, 2013 in the amount of $684,514.71 together with accrued interest of $32,515.20 through January 1, 2014 plus fees, insurance and late charges in the amount of $32,399.89. REAL PROPERTY TAXES: Tax ID.: 798500-047-0 (Parcel A) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Delinquent in the amount of $2,925.47 for the second half of 2010; delinquent in the amount of $5,766.67 for 2011; delinquent in the amount of $5,280.06 for 2012 and delinquent in the amount of $4,964.83 for 2013: $18,937.03 Tax ID.: 782000-013-0 (Parcel B) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Delinquent in the amount of $3,778.17 for the second half of 2010; delinquent in the amount of $8,177.29 for 2011; delinquent in the amount of $7,462.17 for 2012 and delinquent in the amount of $6,950.02 for 2013: $26,367.65 TOTAL: $794,734.48 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal of $ÂŹ684,514.71 together with interest as provided in the Note from the 6th day of February 2013, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on the 25th day of April 2014. The defaults referenced in Paragraph III must be cured by the 14th day of April 2014 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before the 14th day of April 2014 (11 days before the sale date), the defaults, as set forth in Paragraph III, are cured and the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 14th day of April 2014 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. 9,$ZULWWHQ1RWLFHRI'HIDXOWZDVWUDQVPLWWHGE\WKH%HQHĂ&#x20AC;FLDU\RU7UXVWHHWRWKH Borrower, Grantor and Guarantors at the following addresses:

IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal of $144,153.49, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 6th day of March 2013, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute.

Items V through IX identical to those on Prior Document Reference No.: 200708211361 Dated this 10th day of January 2014. Philip S. Brooke III, Successor Trustee 717 West Sprague Avenue, Suite 1200 Spokane, WA 99201-3505

Notice of Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 RCW Grantor: John Lora and Melinda Oliver Successor Trustee: Philip S. Brooke III %HQHĂ&#x20AC;FLDU\$PHULFDQ:HVW%DQNDV6XFFHVVRULQLQWHUHVWWR9LNLQJ&RPPXQLW\%DQN Abbreviated Legal: Ptn. Lots 1-5, Blk 7, Meekerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Second Add. vol. 2, pg. 93 Full Legal on: Pages 2 & 3 Assessorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parcel No.: 574500-046-0 & 574500-045-0 Prior Document Reference No.: 200612060386

Names and addresses identical to list on Prior Document Reference No.: 200708211361 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will, on the 25th day of April 2014, at the hour of 10:00 A.M., inside the front entrance of the Pierce County Courthouse 930 Tacoma Avenue South in the City of Tacoma, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following-described real property, situated in the County of Pierce, State of Washington, to-wit: PARCEL A: The West 50 feet West of Lots 1 to 5, inclusive, Block 7, Meekerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Second Addition to the Town of Puyallup, W.T., according to the plat thereof recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, page 93, in Pierce County, Washington. PARCEL B; Beginning 75 feet West of the Northeast corner of Lot 1, Block 7, Meekerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Second Addition to the Town of Puyallup, W.T. according to the plat thereof recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, page 93, in Pierce County, Washington; Thence South 110 feet; Thence West 40 feet to the East line of the premises conveyed to the Swedish Baptist Church of Puyallup by deed recorded under Recording Number 626569; Thence North along the said East line of the premises of the Swedish Baptist Church, 110 feet, more or less, to the North line of said Lot 1; Thence East 40 feet to the point of beginning. Commonly known as 316 & 320 East Pioneer, Puyallup, Washington 98372. 7D[,GHQWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQ1XPEHU  Including title to all improvements thereon, and appurtenances thereto. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated November 29, 2006, and recorded on December 6, 2006 under Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s File No. 200612060386 and by that certain Deed of Trust dated November 13, 2008 and recorded on November 24, 2008 under recording QXPEHUDQGE\WKDWFHUWDLQ0RGLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQRI'HHGRI7UXVWGDWHG-DQXDU\ 15, 2010 and recorded April 5, 2010 under recording number 201004050523, records of 3LHUFH&RXQW\:DVKLQJWRQIURP-RKQ/RUDDQG0HOLQGD2OLYHUDV*UDQWRUVWR3DFLĂ&#x20AC;F Northwest Title Company of Washington, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation in IDYRURI$PHULFDQ:HVW%DQNDV%HQHĂ&#x20AC;FLDU\DQGDVVXFFHVVRULQLQWHUHVWWR9LNLQJ%DQN ,,1RDFWLRQFRPPHQFHGE\WKH%HQHĂ&#x20AC;FLDU\RIWKH'HHGVRI7UXVWLVQRZSHQGLQJWR seek satisfaction of the obligations in any Court by reason of the Borrowerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or Grantorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s default on the obligations secured by the Deeds of Trust.

John Lora 316 E. Pioneer Puyallup, WA 98372

Melinda Oliver 1718 East 92nd Avenue Milton, WA 98354

John Lora 1012 Main Street Sumner, WA 98390

Melinda Oliver 316 E. Pioneer Puyallup, WA 98372

John Lora PO Box 633 Milton, WA 98354

Melinda Oliver 1012 Main Street Sumner, WA 98390

Failure to pay when due the following amounts, which are now in arrears:

John Lora 324 E. Pioneer Puyallup, WA 98372

Melinda Oliver PO Box 633 Milton, WA 98354

John Lora 905 Main Street Sumner, WA 98390

Monthly payments due for April 5, 2013 through January 5, 2014, each in the amount of $1,868.00 each. $18,680.00

Melinda Oliver 324 E. Pioneer Puyallup, WA 98372

John Lora PO Box 1870 Milton, WA 98354

Melinda Oliver 905 Main Street Sumner, WA 98390

LATE CHARGES:

John Lora 1718 East 92nd Avenue Milton, WA 98354

Melinda Oliver PO Box 1870 Milton, WA 98354

III. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are as follows:

DELINQUENT PAYMENTS:

Accrued Late Charges / Fees $1,150.20 REAL PROPERTY TAXES: Tax ID.: 574500-046-0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Delinquent in the amount of $4,180.84 for the second half of 2010; delinquent in the amount of $8,035.91 for 2011; delinquent in the amount of $7,348.02 for 2012 and delinquent in the amount of $7,230.61 for 2013: $26,795.38

E\ERWKĂ&#x20AC;UVWFODVVDQGFHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HGPDLORQWKHWKGD\RI0D\SURRIRIZKLFKLVLQWKH possession of the Trustee; and the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above on May 8, 2013 and the Trustee has possession of proof of such posting.

Tax ID.: 574500-045-0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Delinquent in the amount of $1,198.59 for the second half of 2010; delinquent in the amount of $2,278.20 for 2011; delinquent in the amount of $2,045.69 for 2012 and delinquent in the amount of $1,873.02 for 2013: $7,395.50

VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale.

TOTAL: $54,021.08

VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor, and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor, of all their interest in the above-described property.

IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal of $194,660.75 together with interest as provided in the Note from the 6th day of March 2013, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute.

IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale. Dated this 10th day of January 2014. Philip S. Brooke III, Successor Trustee 717 West Sprague Avenue, Suite 1200 Spokane, WA 99201-3505

Items V through IX identical to those on Prior Document Reference No.: 200708211361 Dated this 10th day of January 2014. Philip S. Brooke III, Successor Trustee 717 West Sprague Avenue, Suite 1200 Spokane, WA 99201-3505

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on Tuesday June 10, 2014 at 10:30am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: David A. Mata In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs MATA, David A. Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0067 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing, May 20th, 2014 at 9:00am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Chayni Frazier In The Welfare of: Lincoln-Frazier, Aloya, LincolnFrazier, Joseph, Lincoln-Frazier, Aliya, Lincoln-Frazier, Nakia, and Lincoln-Frazier, Robert Case Number: PUY-CV-PC-2013-0180 PUY-CV-PC-2013-0181 PUY-CV-PC-2013-0182 PUY-CV-PC-2013-0183 PUY-CV-PC-2013-0184 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at 9:00am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

VOLUNTEERS PAWS NEEDS WILDLIFE VOLUNTEERS PAWS in Lynnwood is looking for volunteers to help care for wildlife this spring. Every year, PAWS cares for more than 3,000 injured, orphaned or abandoned wildlife. Join the team and you can help feed and care for these remarkable animals. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a remarkable experience you ZRQ¡W Ă&#x20AC;QG DQ\ZKHUH HOVH For any questions please contact Mark Coleman, Communications Manager, at 206.419.6646. Citizenship Volunteers Looking for a rewarding experience? Help immigrants prepare to become citizens. You will help to provide instruction to legal permanent residents who need practice with the written and oral. Training will be offered the Ă&#x20AC;UVW ZHHN RI -DQXDU\ DQG classes will start in midJanuary. Please contact Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or kthomas@ tacomacommunityhouse. org for more information. Help a Child Improve Reading One-on-one support makes a huge difference in an elementary studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to overcome reading challenges. As a Read2Me Tutor for Tacoma Community House, you can be that person who makes a difference. We are on the lookout for commit-

ted tutors for grades 1-3. There are sessions at Manitou Park, Mann, McCarver, and Roosevelt Elementary Schools. The next orientations will be held in January. Call 253.383.3951 for more information. These are exciting times and you can make a difference! South Sound Outreach Services invites you to be trained as an In Person Assister Volunteer to help Pierce County residents enroll online for health insurance in the Washington Health Plan Finder. Open Enrollment is October 1 until March 31st. Coverage begins January 1st, 2014 for those enrolled by December 15th. Interested trainees may call Heather at SSOS 253-593-2111. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll EHJODG\RXGLG

Become a Senior Companion today! Volunteers help frail or disabled seniors stay in their own home and maintain their independence. Activities include running errands, providing transportation or simply being a friend. Hourly stipend and mileage reimbursement provided. Requirements: must be 55+, serve at least 15 hours a week and be low-income. Drivers are especially needed currently. For more info call Julie Kerrigan, Program Director: 1(800) 335-8433, ext. 5686

Friday, March 28, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV YEAR-OVER-YEAR PRICE CHANGE BY REGION

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

CALL 253.922.5317

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

1232 S Adams St.

3578 E F St, Tacoma â&#x20AC;˘ $124,000 This home is completely remodeled and movein ready with a massive, fenced backyard. Updated plumbing & electrical. New carpet, paint, moldings, doors. New kitchen with hickory cabinets, range, dishwasher. 12 by 14 covered deck. Huge Outbuilding for storage, alley access. ( MLS # 582500)

Super charming home w/ the ease of newer amenities... Box beam ceilings, hardwood Ă RRUVPDUEOHHQWU\SLFWXUHSODWHUDLOV SHULRG VW\OHOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHVDGGWRWKHDPELHQFHZKLOH newer roof, furnace/heat pump, indoor/outdoor speakers, newer wiring/plumbing, & gas Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHDGGWRWKHDKKKKIDFWRU6SDFLRXV living room, large kitchen, HUGE dining room, a bedroom and cute remodeled bathroom JUDFHWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWĂ RRU*LJDQWLFGHFNZVHDWLQJ welcome home. Move in and make it yours. $210,950

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800 Our region has seen some of the largest gains in value. If you have been thinking about selling but not sure what your home is worth, please call me today for a personalized market analysis. I will share with you what marketing strategies I will use to get your home sold and for the most amount of money. Call me to get a personalized market analysis and find out how I can get your home sold!

253-203-8985

www.StephanieLynch.com MOORAGE

MOORAGE

Boat Moorage at Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dock. $9.50 per foot per month. 5 min. from I-5. Call Laura at (253) 627-3186

STABLES

HOMES FOR SALE

33 N Salmon Beach

STABLES

Dillon Stables. Covered, well-lit riding arena. 12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x12â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Stalls. Full care. Riding Lessons. Horses for Sale. $400 per month. (253) 606-4994 HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

6711 36th St Ct NW, Gig Harbor

Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton K\GUDXOLFERDW/LIWEULFNZRRGEXUQLQJĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFH with insert, expansive decking on all sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout the last 9 years, including roof, VLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZVGRRUVGHFNLQJERDW hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more. $450,000

Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 222-8480

805 N Steele St

%HG%DWKVTIW2SHQĂ RRUSODQ & vaulted ceilings highlight this handsome rambler on a park-like corner lot in Artondale. Kitchen features an island, new smooth-top stove & convection oven, tile countertops & bay ZLQGRZV)DPLO\URRPZLWKĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHLVSHUIHFW for entertaining as is the large deck & fenced backyard. The master suite, one of three newly carpeted bedrooms, has French doors to the deck and a remodeled ž bathroom. 30-yr roof installed in 2005. 10 mins to schools, shopping, recreation & SR-16 MLS# 573155 $264,950

Debbie Houtz Better Properties 253-376-2280

NOTICES

Want bragging rights & the ability to name drop? Hans Grohe, Duravit, Kohler, & Porcher to name a few... Then this is the house for you-high end everything & custom touches galore. Need this spelled out in layman terms? Fabulous, fantastic & close to hip 6th Ave Biz District, this 4 bed, 2.5 bath home has natural, original woodwork, is an entertainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream, and is ready for new owners... Leave your hammer DW\RXUROGKRXVHWKLVRQHLVĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGDQG Ă&#x20AC;QLVKHGZHOO,PLJKWDGG:HOFRPH $368,000

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n i d

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NOTICES PIERCE COUNTY DISTRICT COURT 930 Tacoma Avenue south, Room 601, Tacoma, WA

HOWARD, GLORIA ANN: Petitioner

HOWARD, ANGELA M., Petitioner

HOWELL, JERRY L: Respondent

HOWELL, JERRY L, Respondent

NO: 4Z619667A

NO: 4Z619666A

REISSUANCE OF TEMPORARY ANTIHARASSMENT PROTECTION ORDER AND

REISSUANCE OF TEMPORARY ANTIHARASSMENT PROTECTION ORDER AND

The Temporary Order for Protection issued on 01/30/14 Is herby extended through the new court hearing date: APRIL 14, 2014 @ 1:15 PM. At 930 Tacoma Avenue South, Courtroom 936

The Temporary Order for Protection issued on 01/30/14 Is herby extended through the new court hearing date: APRIL 14, 2014 @ 1:15 PM. At 930 Tacoma Avenue South, Courtroom 936

RESPONDENT. Violation of the provisions of this order with notice of its terms is a criminal offense under RCW 10.14 and RCW 10.31.100 and you may be subject to arrest. Willful disobedience of this order may also be contempt of court and subject you to penalties under RCW 7.21. A copy of this order has been filed with the court. ͳǤÂ&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2020;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x203A;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;ÇŁ Based upon the petition, testimony, and case record, the court finds the respondent committed unlawful harassment as defined in RCW 10.14.080, and

RESPONDENT. Violation of the provisions of this order with notice of its terms is a criminal offense under RCW 10.14 and RCW 10.31.100 and you may be subject to arrest. Willful disobedience of this order may also be contempt of court and subject you to penalties under RCW 7.21. A copy of this order has been filed with the court. 1.Minors addressed in this Temporary Order: NONE Based upon the petition, testimony, and case record, the court finds the respondent committed unlawful harassment as defined in RCW 10.14.080, and

IT IS ORDERED that the Respondent is restrained from: ǤÂ&#x2013;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x203A;Â?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022; Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2030;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2019;Â&#x160;ͳǤÂ&#x201E;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x203A;Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Ǥ ǤÂ&#x192;Â?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x203A;Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x203A; Â?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2030;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2019;Â&#x160;ÍłÂ&#x192;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2014;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D; Â&#x2022;Â&#x2014;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2026;Â&#x2021;Ǥ Ǥ Â&#x2018;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2039;Â?ͳͲͲͲ Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Č&#x2039;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2026;Â&#x2021;Č&#x152;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;ÇŻÂ&#x2022;     ǤÂ&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;ÇŁÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2039;Â?ʹͲÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013; Â&#x2018;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;ǤÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x160;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x201E;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x203A;Ǥ IT IS ORDERED THAT: The clerk hall forward a copy of this order on or before the next judicial day to: South sound 911 (or the law enforcement agency where Petitioner lives) for entry into the computer based criminal intelligence system available in this State used by law enforcement to list outstanding warrants.

IT IS ORDERED that the Respondent is restrained from: A. Attempting to contact the petitioner and any minors named in paragraph 1. Above in any manner. B. Making any attempts to follow the petitioner and any minors named in paragraph 1 above or keep them under surveillance. C. Going within 1000 Feet (distance) of the petitionerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s RESIDENCE CONFIDENTIAL D. Other: Respondent is restrained from being within 20 feet of Petitioner. Petitioner has a reasonable fear for her safety. IT IS ORDERED THAT: The clerk hall forward a copy of this order on or before the next judicial day to: South sound 911 (or the law enforcement agency where Petitioner lives) for entry into the computer based criminal intelligence system available in this State used by law enforcement to list outstanding warrants. The petitioner shall forward a copy of this on or before the next judicial day to: (Law Enforcement Agency where Respondent lives) and said agency shall personally serve the respondent with a copy of this order and shall promptly complete and return to this court proof of service.

936 S Sheridan $219,000

Charm and character galore in this 1920â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s &XWLH %HDXWLIXO KDUGZRRG Ă RRUV WKURXJKRXW high coved ceilings, large open kitchen, mud room, master bedroom w/2 closets, upstairs has KLJKFHLOLQJV)LUĂ RRUVDQGEHGURRPVZLWKORWV of closet space plus lots of storage. Backyard is fully fenced and is a gardenerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream with pond, mature landscaping and so much privacy. Garage is like a quaint cottage with a loft, new wiring and shop. House has 60 year roof, new insulation and is adorable! (MLS # 600824)

Askthehometeam.com

Sergio Hernandez (253) 431-2308

Heather Redal (253) 363-5920

Sergio@betterproperties.com

Heatherredal@gmail.com

3728 N Gove St, Tacoma Cute little bungalow in Proctor! Nice upgrades include a new family room, windows, roof, energy package & carpet 6 years ago. Detached garage was converted to extra living space. It has a separate electric panel, heat & lights - lots of possibilities... music studio, art studio, exercise / yoga room, etc. Parking for 3 cars off the alley next to garage. Charming back yard, too! +DUGZRRGĂ RRUVXQGHUFDUSHWH[FHSWLQ family room. MLS# 518902. $195,000 Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

2711 Henry Road N

Beautiful Victorian 4-plex in good location back on the market after remodel. Walking distance WR KRVSLWDOV GRZQWRZQ SDUNV 0DLQ Ă RRU XQLW has one bedroom plus attached bonus room, dining room, lg kitchen with nook, new carpet throughout, bay windows. Upstairs unit has 2 bedrooms, bath, lg living room, kitchen & balcony. Lower level has 2 studio apts & bath. Sep. utilities for main and upper units. 3,064 sq ft MLS# 523770

Better Properties Heather Redal 253.363.5920 PROPERTY

PROPERTY

MT. RAINIER VIEW $125,000 Beautiful Level Buildable Site! Located off of Ray Nash Drive NW, this 1.25 Acres of natural setting and mature Evergreen trees is perfect to build your dream home and enjoy the Country Lifestyle! Peeka-Boo View of Mt. Rainier. Just minutes away from sought after Schools, Uptown Gig Harbor Amenities, Restaurants, WA-Hwy 16, Hospitals, Boat launch/ water activities, tennis courts & Kopachuck State Park! Electricity is available at corner.

Michelle Anguiano, Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood 253.720.6525

OLD TOWN $499,950 Amazing development potential with this unique 2OG7RZQSURSHUW\&LW\KDVJLYHQĂ&#x20AC;QDOSODW approval for 4 lots on this prime 3 acre piece. Big views possible from all lots in this great neighborhood, tucked back & out of the way. Walk to the historic Old Town district with its coffee shops, wine bar & restaurants.; then stroll down to the waterfront & enjoy the gorgeous Puget Sound setting with walking paths, public docks, shoreline restaurants & more! MLS# 332653

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

PIERCE COUNTY DISTRICT COURT 930 Tacoma Avenue south, Room 601, Tacoma, WA

The petitioner shall forward a copy of this on or before the next judicial day to: (Law Enforcement Agency where Respondent lives) and said agency shall personally serve the respondent with a copy of this order and shall promptly complete and return to this court proof of service.

1018 S 61st St, Tacoma â&#x20AC;˘ $149,500

COMMERCIAL Absolutely Charming, Mediterranean Style, custom built North Tacoma view home. Enjoy Commencement Bay view from Mstr Br balc. ,QVLGHIHDWLQFO0DUEOHĂ RRUHQWU\6W6WHHO$SSO *UDQFRXQWWRSV&XVWEXLOW+LFNRU\FDE%HDXW %UD]LOLDQ&KHUU\KDUGZRRGĂ RRU%D\ZLQGRZV 0VWUVXLWHZ)3 /UJEDWKVWHDPVKRZHU &DOLFORVHW1HZ(QHUJ\(IĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWKHDWLQJ&HQW YDFXXPQHZSDLQWLQ RXWQHZFDUSHW)LQLVKHG %VPWZNLWFKHQ&ORVHWR6FKRROV3DUNV )UHHZD\+RVSLWDOV :DWHUIURQW$623,000.

Gil Rigell Better Properties N. Proctor (253) 376-7787

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St.

COMMERCIAL

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract LAKEWOOD FLORIST SHOP Same location 30+ years, owners retiring, Asking $60,000 cash. PORT ORCHARD, DOWNTOWN Food & Beverage, annual gross sales, approx. $1,500,000, excellent net. Owner selling real estate & the business for $1,050,000, terms avail., same location over 100 years. ice

RURAL LIVING: pr reduced Restaurant/Lounge in Ashford, WA Price for business, $105,000 with $25,000 down. Price for the real estate, $390,000 with $75,000 down. Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract includes a 3 B/R house, laundromat, restr./lounge bldg. on 3.4 acre, commercial zoned parcel. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;CALLAHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB & GRILL IN KEY CENTER Business is for sale for $300,000 with $100,000 down, High gross sales. Saler will also consider leasing the space COLLISION CENTER Same owner 15 yrs. Retiring, 6621 So. Tacoma Way. $130,000 with terms to qualified buyer - some training provided at 0 cost to buyer.

A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with no HOA. High &HLOLQJVJDVÂżUHSODFHVVHSDUDWHO\PHWHUHG &DOOIRUSULYDWHVKRZLQJWRGD\253.606.0689 BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME

$399,000

LAKEWOOD CAFE/LOUNGE on a busy intersection, $81,500 CASH.

CALL RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109

Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 28, 2014

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