Issuu on Google+

All-City All-City Boys Boys Basketball Basketball Team Team A7

FREE s Friday, March 21, 2014

MITCH REEMS BENEFIT SHOW MITCH REEMS 2, CANCER 0

A2 Pothole pig’s

B1

POTHOLE

Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

WHAT’S RIGHT LOCAL LAW SCHOOL DISCUSSIONS ųWITH TACOMA FACE TOUGH BATTLE FOR FUNDING ATTITUDE, By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

A line item on current versions of the next state budget contain the allocation of $400,000 of taxpayer dollars to provide seed money for the development of a law school at the University of Washington Tacoma campus. The idea of a law school in the 253 area code has been talked about ever since University of Puget Sound sold its

downtown Tacoma law school to Seattle University in 1999, prompting a move to the Emerald City. A steering committee to aid the effort formed last spring, however. The state budget item is the first concrete move to changing that, but it might not survive budget discussions and would also require millions of dollars of other funding to get the law school plans moving forward. Cost of starting a law school X See UWT / page A12

EVERYONE SAYS, COUNTS MORE THAN YOU THINK

DAMMEIER

O’BAN

VOTERS SET TO DECIDE PARKS BOND NEXT MONTH VOTE SET FOR APRIL 22

HUNDREDS OF PROJECTS FUNDED

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

W

ith promises of park improvements around the city on a $198 million bond set to face voters on April 22, the effort to convince voters to tax themselves is underway. Expect mailers, signs and advertisements as well as a roster of meetings at community groups in the coming weeks. “We have many groups we are doing direct outreach with,” MetroParks of Tacoma spokeswoman Nancy Johnson said. “But we are quite open to talk with any group that wants us to come out.” The bond would fund hundreds of projects around the some 3,000 acres of parks land within Tacoma as well as toward renovations at MetroParks’ Northwest Trek in Eatonville. The work is roughly split among three areas, with about $60 million for each project. The total amount is less than half of what parks officials listed, about $500 million in needed improvements. The bond would cost for the average homeowner, with an assessed property value of $171,000, about $8 per month for 10 years, or about $96 a year added to their property tax collections. Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium will see about $64 million in improvements to replace the 50-year-old aquarium, as well as renovate the Polar Bear and Rocky Shores exhibit improvements. Parking, event spaces and landscaping will also get improved. Another three-way slice of the total bond pack-

X See PARKS / page A12

PHOTOS COURTESY OF METRO PARKS

PARKS. A $198 million bond would cost residents about $1,000

spread over 10 years if it passes on April 22 and fund improvements to parks facilities around the city as well as at Northwest Trek. HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE

Vennie Murphy 5k A6

TED BROWN MUSIC OUTREACH: Louie G.’s Pizza to host benefit to help put musical instruments into students’ hands. PAGE B2

Baseball Preview A7

Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) Take some time this week to tune into your heart’s desire. You will be more in touch with your intuition as Mercury moves into Pisces. Guidance will come to you when you most need it. Your energy will be high if you avoid draining distractions. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) You are socially well connected. Your free-spirited friends will help you learn to relax and go more with the flow. Take some time to reflect on past wins and losses to help you progress in achieving your current goals. This weekend may lead to an exciting romantic encounter. Be ready for anything. GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) Your goal this week is to maintain clarity and focus. Make lists to keep your plans at full attention and get feedback from trusted sources. Networking with others will be a benefit. Social activities will keep you busy and may lead to romance.

LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Consider making some healthy life changes this week. Research the latest health news, diets and exercise techniques. Make your own wellness routine that you can realistically stick to. Treat yourself to a massage or spa day with a friend. SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) Our words influence those around us so be convincing. Share your ideas with others. Do your research before starting a new diet or health routine. Start slowly so you don’t burn yourself out.

WORD SEARCH I N Z I W S F R R E W V R V R F H

B I G W H E E L S T U N T S H O W

Z N E V E N I N G M A G A Z I N E

W B X H I H J F F R E K B R J M O

L I N C O L N D R H W V E T O B K

W I J L G M J N W Q Y D X R I K T

B T P O T H O L E F R Z W D Z V T

F P I G B G Q N R W Z C L N Y S M

B S A M O C A T D L C W N O X D E

W Z F S N A M Y R R E M V B K J D

S S K R A P K L K X C G Z F U X Z

M U E S U M T R A A M O C A T G Y

R E G R E B L E K N U D L T J K V

I Z V L D R L L L I X U N I S F Y

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) Practical results come from innovative thinking. Answers to questions you have been worrying about may come to you that affect your romantic or professional possibilities. Spice up your romantic life with a fun adventure.

CANCER (June 21 – July 22) Plan your summer vacation now while you are in the mood for travel and exploring new experiences. You may be tempted to learn about topics that inspire your personal awareness or expand your spiritual views. Take a one step at a time approach.

CAPRICORN (December 22 – January 19) Acts of kindness could go a long way. Remember to also be kind to yourself and to those close to you. You have been busy working hard, so take some time to relax to help you put things into perspective. Unwind with friends.

LEO (July 23 – August 22) As the Sun moves into Aries you may feel the urge to take an adventure or visit a remote tropical island. Your mood may be sensitive so don’t be so serious. Allow your playful nature to emerge and reward yourself for all your hard work. Relax and have fun!

AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) Face your responsibilities head-on and set realistic goals. You can still have fun and spend time with loved ones. Focus on written communication to explore your potential. Funds flow well for you now but avoid overspending.

VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Find something to celebrate this week, as it may be a memorable time. Being a team player will get you more results than working alone. A romantic bond may deepen or a new partner may come into the picture. Take a look at your finances.

PISCES (February 19 – March 20) You may need feedback from a trusted friend to help you fix something that has gone wrong. Self-doubt may play tricks on you. Stay in tune with your intuition to keep yourself on the right track. A heart-to-heart talk will ignite romance.

ANAGRAM

MITCH REEMS

C C S T R I C K L A N D C J N B J

D A L J Z E U L C C K X O P Q K B

A C J Y W W Q B U S G W D J I I K

Horoscope, word search and more B6

The Lucky Woman’s Guide to Breast Cancer, Chemo Prep Edition

By Kathleen Merryman Attitude, everyone says, is the homemade asset that can haul you through your cancer fight. With the right attitude, you can bad-ass your way into chemotherapy, then ride the momentum through the worst of it. Welcome to The Lucky Woman’s Guide to Breast Cancer, Chemo Prep Edition. It took a while to get to the chemical warfare portion of killing my snotty, aggressive invader cells. First, the people behind the machines tracked them down then the lab techs analyzed them. The surgeon went in after the mothership that had been dispatching the enemy to assorted lymph nodes. Now it’s nothing but a nut-sized mass preserved in a research facility somewhere. Nice work, Commander. Next up, the strategists: The oncologist, pharmacist and radiologist who drew up the eight-month battle plan – and gave me about a pound of reading on what that will do to my body. Chemo, the material read, makes most people tired. So does vacuuming, I thought. How tired? Tired to the middle of your bone marrow, where it’s attacking fast-multiplying white blood cells, it turns out. The drugs kill every fast-multiplying cell they find. They want to kill the cancers, but there’s collateral damage. They get the fastregenerating cells in your mouth, your gut, your nose, too. That tactic can change your sense of taste and make your hair fall out. It can make your nail beds turn brown. Unchecked by countermeasure drugs, it can make you barf. Oh, there’s more. And there is the caveat that every patient responds differently. Patients have different doses, different drug combos, treatment lengths and, possibly, different experimental therapies. Looking through the summer and into the fall, I saw a fight, but no clear picture of it. So I mustered my Attitude. I’ve got lots of it, probably too much, probably too intemperate. But this was no time to get all moderate. I imagined a mama grizzly attacking, then me grabbing two big branches and yelling until she decided against messing with me. I imagined an outmatched Scottish army sending bagpipers out in a first wave of terrifying, skirling noise. That, I figured, was the intensity I needed. But, lacking bears and vandals, I decided that Attitude would bring me to every appointment with a grin on my face and a swing in my gait. Attitude would put a lightness to my voice in every family phone call. Attitude would remind me to thank everyone who poked me – there are a lot of needles in all of this, and

X See CANCER / page A11

Facebook: facebook.com/tacomaweekly Twitter: @Tacomaweekly Tumblr: tacomaweekly.tumblr.com Pinterest: pinterest.com/tacomaweekly Flickr:ÁLFNUFRPWDFRPDZHHNO\

Sports ........................A7 Make A Scene ........B5 A&E ....................... ....B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Two Sections | 22 Pages

:LJ[PVU(‹7HNL‹ tacomaweekly.com‹-YPKH`4HYJO

Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK VISIT US ON FACEBOOK MHJLIVVRJVT[HJVTH^LLRS`

PHOTO BY TOM BISHOP

SAY OINK! Tacoma Weekly staffer Steve Dunkelberger snaps a shot of Perceval, the Pothole Pig.

21st and Fawcett Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.� And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holeyness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

Full Service Locksmiths Since 1978

&KLS.H\VĆ5HPRWHV 7UDQVSRQGHU.H\V

253-474-5855

M-T: 8:30-5:30 / W: 8:30-7:30 Th-F: 8:30-5:30 / Sat-Sun: Closed 5424 S Tacoma Way www.SecurityRus.com

2303 N Pearl St, Tacoma, WA 253-752-2700 4VO5IVSBNQNĹ”'SJ4BUBNQN

$BUFSJOH"WBJMBCMFGPS %FMJWFSZPS1JDL6Q

LAMB BURGER $8.95

Hand-made seasoned ground lamb patty grilled to liking with swiss and feta cheese. Served with salad and fries

SMALL 2-TOPPING PIZZA & DRAFT BEER OR SODA $8.50 TO GO SPECIAL $9.50 Gyro, fries, & soda

KIDS EAT FREE EVERY SUNDAY

Beverage & dessert not included. Limit 2 per paying adult.

7,9*,=(33(5+:,=,505.4(.(A05,:,.4,5; By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

K

ING 5 television’s “Evening Magazine� producer Anne Erickson and videographer Tom Bishop paid a visit to Tacoma Weekly to profile the City of Destiny’s most famous swine for a segment about the little pig’s crusade against

potholes. Perceval, the pig named in honor of the first knight of King Arthur’s fabled Round Table to quest for the Holy Grail, powdered his snout and headed out on yet another search for the “perfect pothole.� The latest media attention comes on the heels of Perceval sightings in Seattle Weekly, KOMO News, The

Bulletin Board *65;9(*;69::6<./;-69;6;,4763, Aside from the promotional benefits, sponsors will be positioning themselves with one of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most prominent service organizations, proving to clients that their business is helping to positively impact the state of this community and those who live in it. Sponsorship levels range from $500 to $5,000, as well as numerous in-kind opportunities. Being a 501(c)3 non-profit organization, all sponsorships and donations to the Rescue Mission are tax deductible. Sponsorship benefits include promotion to: ¡ 350+ race participants and volunteers ¡ 15,000 Rescue Mission mail recipients ¡ 4,500 Rescue Mission social media accounts ¡ Countless passersby of 150 Rescue Race posters ¡ Readers of the Volcano, News Tribune and other local media outlets ¡ Viewers of King 5 and KCPQ 13 Fox Download Sponsorship Forms at www.RescueRace. org/Sponsor. Simply send in your completed form to The Rescue Mission. If you are unable to register or sponsor the race, please consider sending a donation to continue food services at the Mission, including hot meals, safe beds, educational programming and addiction recovery. Thank you for being a blessing to The Rescue Mission and to Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homeless men, women and children. :0?-094:05;,9=0,>,+-69*0;@:;9(;,.0*73(5 In the City of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s search for a firm to facilitate its citywide strategic planning and visioning process, these six firms moved on to interviews on March 17: Athena Group, LLC of Olympia; Beckwith Consulting Group of LaConner; BDS Planning and Urban Design of Seattle; Community Attributes Inc. of Seattle; Fern Tiger Associates of Oakland, Calif.; and Strategies 360 of Seattle. The public is welcome to witness these interviews as they are taking place. A brief description of each firm is available at cms.cityoftacoma.org/CRO/StrategicVisioningFirms.pdf. The firm that is ultimately selected will guide the development of a Strategic Visioning Plan, which will provide an action plan for the next five years and set the course for Tacoma over the next decade. The plan would also help the city direct its resources toward a defined vision for a future that is reflective of community priorities, considers current and future trends, and bolsters the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unique position within the region. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacoma is part of what has been recently dubbed in the national media as one of a dozen â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;megaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; regions in the United States,â&#x20AC;? said Mayor Marilyn Strickland. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is home to nearly 10 million people and generates an annual economic output of about $600 billion. The Puget Sound Region alone is forecasted to reach a population of nearly 5 million people with more than 3 million new jobs by 2040. The Strategic Visioning Plan that evolves

w ;CB1>E0-E">5/1?;: 1C'?10 A>:5@A>11/;>

News Tribune, Exit133.com, Business Week and asphalt patch producer U.S. Cold Patch, as well as a flood of community blogs and shout outs on social media. He is one tired swine. Watch the segment at: http:// www.king5.com/on-tv/eveningmagazine/Tacomas-Pot-Hole-Pig250409751.html

from this process will not sit on a shelf and collect dust. It will be a plan of action to help ensure that Tacoma is well positioned to fully utilize its assets and identify opportunities to improve the quality of life for residents of our city.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Civic engagement will be core to the development of the Strategic Visioning Plan,â&#x20AC;? said City Manager T.C. Broadnax. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This will be a process that is accessible and transparent to all, as the City works with residents and other stakeholders to ensure that this plan is a solid, ambitious and viable living document.â&#x20AC;? The strategic planning and visioning process will address these seven key focus areas: public health and safety; quality of life and livability; economic vibrancy and employment; culture, arts and recreation; educational opportunity and attainment; effective, efficient and economical government performance; and infrastructure, mobility and environmental sustainability. Additionally, City Council and staff will use public feedback received throughout the civic engagement component of the strategic planning and visioning process to inform the way the City develops its 2015-2016 Biennial Budget and future budgets. The Strategic Visioning Plan will also serve as the overarching document by which all other City plans, policies, programs, and department or individual evaluations are established.

:,5(;,:,5+:.6=,9569)033;6 ERASE FISHING WAR CONVICTIONS In what one member called a righting of past wrongs, on March 5 the Washington State Senate gave final legislative approval to a bill that allows tribal members to clear their state criminal records if they were convicted of fishing violations before a federal court ruled that what they were doing actually was legal under federal treaties. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is incumbent on us as a society to admit that we were wrong previously â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and that we are righting those wrongs,â&#x20AC;? Sen. Bob Hasegawa (D-Seattle) told the Senate in urging approval of House Bill 2080. The tribal members were arrested during the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fishing Warsâ&#x20AC;? of the 1960s and 1970s, when they staged â&#x20AC;&#x153;fish-insâ&#x20AC;? to assert their treaty rights to salmon. But the demonstrations ran afoul of state regulations, and led to clashes with police and wildlife agents and to criminal convictions. The tribal members were vindicated by a 1974 federal court decision that affirmed their rights to the fish. But the convictions have remained on the record, with negative consequences for the defendants. Under HB 2080, sponsored by Rep. David Sawyer (D-Lakewood) the tribal members could apply to the courts to have their convictions expunged â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and, subject to certain conditions, the measure directs the courts to grant the request if the convictions resulted from the exercise of treaty rights. For those who have died since their convictions, their family members could seek the remedy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never a wrong time to do the right thing,â&#x20AC;? Sen. Jan Angel (R-Port Orchard) said before joining in the unanimous vote for the bill, sending it to governor for signature into law.

America's Greatest Big Band Show

w >;9;01>:@;8-??5/ %11A88 :B1:@;>E-@!$ !$ &

Ĺ&#x160;;>0-.81 185B1>E B-58-.81

w A031@>51:08E1?53:-:0">;<1>@E %@-35:3%1>B5/1? lgi nosta ping earâ&#x20AC;? p a -t e y â&#x20AC;&#x153;A to to yester a ll ride Down â&#x20AC;&#x201D;B r a

"-/7-31 585@->E 5?/;A:@?

>11 1?53: 0B5/1

(5?5@ !2@1: ':5=A1 ??;>@91:@ 4-:31? )1178E

ZUUZ"-/5Ĺ&#x2039;/CE VV 521w;: >5VV-9 W<9%-@VU-9 [<9

%(VUĹ&#x;&!+571A?-@2-/1.;;7 /;9NE;>11/;>

c

d

TEMPLE THEATRE Landmark Catering & Convention Center Saturday, March 29

the Ta k e n o o g a ta Chat Choo to n C h o oo Junctio et Tuxed and g ood M e h t ght In o o n li for a Mr e n a d e ! Se

Presented by:

2 pm Matinee & 7:30 pm

Tkts: call 253.383.3245 or visit the theater

Tacoma Dome Box Office ~ Ticketmaster.com ~ 800.745.3000 Also Playing: Olympia 3/27, Seattle 3/28 Info: inthemoodlive.com

-YPKH`4HYJOÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNL

BODY OF 1989 MURDER VICTIM EXHUMED By David Rose Correspondent

Pierce County sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s detectives and members of the medical examinerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office spent a foggy and eerie DAVID ROSE morning last week at Sumner Cemetery exhuming the body of a man murdered in 1989. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We found him on the banks of the Carbon River,â&#x20AC;? Pierce County sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s detective Ed Troyer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He died from what appeared to be an obvious stab wound. We never found out who he was.â&#x20AC;? The victim was buried in the cemetery off Valley Avenue East when the case turned cold. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The last thing we want to do is unearth somebody, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to find out who he is. That way his family can find closure and we can find out who killed him and without that, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not going to be able to get those answers,â&#x20AC;?

PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID ROSE

COLD CASE Pierce County sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s detectives and mem-

bers of the medical examinerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office exhume the body of an unknown murder victim in hopes of identifying him.

Troyer said. Detectives are getting help from Tacoma Police Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cold Case Unit and King Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forensic anthropologist, Dr. Kathy Taylor, who is nationally known as one of the top scientists in her field.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hope to just bring the case alive again and get it in the minds of people and, in the case of a homicide, how can you solve a homicide if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know who your victim is?â&#x20AC;? Taylor said. The victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s remains were protectively wrapped in two lay-

ers of plastic and tucked into a coffin encased in a concrete container. Taylor is hopeful they can get the DNA they need to enter into a national missing personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s database. She said it falls to families to make sure they check with police on any loved one who has gone missing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People need to realize that if they reported somebody missing in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s, even â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s, call law enforcement and make sure that report still exists and then say, Hey, can I give my DNA?â&#x20AC;? she said. Exhuming the body of a murder victim is a rare step but one Pierce County detectives feel is needed as they try to identify the victim and catch his killer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Always hold out hope for us to solve the case or find your loved one because we have people that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quit, as you can see by today,â&#x20AC;? Troyer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This was years ago and there are a lot of people out here who care and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still working on it.â&#x20AC;?

LOCAL STUDENT WINS MUSIC MARATHON CONTEST After over 28 hours locked in a music store, one local teen will soon become the envy of her school band classmates. Kathryne Hurd, a junior at Stadium High School, took home a brand new Yamaha saxophone after besting her opponents in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hands-On Instrument Contest, hosted by Ted Brown Music in Tacoma. The 8th annual contest lasted from March 7-8 (a total of 28 hours and one minute). The Hands-On Contest pits kids ages 12 to 18 against each other in the ultimate endurance test for young musicians. Contestants keep both hands on a provided instrument case longer than their peers. Aside from a 10-minute break every six hours, contestants must stay awake and alert, and keep all ten digits attached to the case at all times. Family and friends were on hand to keep Hurd and the other 26 contestants fed and hydrated, plus offered the necessary moral support. The final six runners up were awarded Ted Brown Music gift certifi-

their SATs. For more information on upcoming events at Ted Brown Music, visit tedbrownmusic. com.

;67:;690,:65 [HJVTH^LLRS`JVT

PHOTO COURTESY OF TED BROWN MUSIC

WINNER. First place winner Kathryne Hurd (right) was all

smiles when she posed for this photo with Ted Brown Music store manager Ellie Stevens (center) Heidi Larson (left).

cates and T-shirts. Many of the contestants have competed in the contest in prior years. Hurd and second place winner Heidi Larson from Spanaway Lake High School participate each year with the purpose of beating last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s times. Ted Brown Music president Whitney Grisaffi says this echoes the philosophy behind the Hands-On Contest: promote the love of music in the lives of young people. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to share the joy of

music with everyone,â&#x20AC;? Grisaffi said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The kids are competing because they love music, and they want to make music.â&#x20AC;? The Hands-On Contest is just one of several activities hosted by Ted Brown Music with the purpose of promoting music in kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lives. According to the National Association for Music Education, young people involved in music programs are more likely to build abstract reasoning skills, do better at math and science, and score higher on

Tacoma criminals get pantsed

Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to news@tacomaweekly.com.

#1 2014 HIGH SCHOOL BOYS SOCCER PREVIEW #2 READY, SET, GROW

Emerald Ridge High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Marissa Modestowicz named 2014 Daffodil Festival Queen

#3 COTTONWOOD CUTUPS TO CELEBRATE DEBUT RELEASE AT NEW FRONTIER LOUNGE #4 THE WISDOM OF LITTLE BILL

Legendary blues man reflects on what heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s learned in 75 years

#5 IT TAKES A VILLAGE TO CONQUER CANCER And be sure to bring a notebook

On March 11, an officer was dispatched to a Walmart on Union Ave regarding a shoplifting case. The Walmart loss prevention officers had spotted a man removing several items from the shelves and then proceeding to store them in the waistband of his pants. For safekeeping of course. The loss prevention officers followed his shopping spree via store surveillance until the criminal proceeded to check out, where he paid for one of his lifted items. When the shoplifter attempted to leave the store he was asked to stop by several loss prevention officers. The criminal tried to manuever around one of the officers but alas the extra inches on his waist made him ungaily, and he tripped, giving the officers the perfect opportunity to detain him. The stolen merchandise was retreived from his pants and appraised at $55.69, though some of the items had fallen out during the criminalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s swan dive into the carpet. He was transported to the PC Jail and booked. Two days later, at the same Walmart, another shoplifter was detained by loss prevention officers. At 12:20 p.m. the shoplifter entered the store with a plastic bag of unidentified items and proceeded to the clothing area. He was also monitered via the store surveillence for suspicious behavior. Upon entering the clothing area the criminal discarded his bag and instead scouped up five pairs of boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Wrangler jeans. He then carried the pants, completely unconcealed toward the exit, confident in his ability to hide in plain sight. Unfortunately he over-estimated his invisibility and was detained at the front doors by the loss prevention officers. While being held he admitted to commiting the same act yesterday with four pairs of girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jordache jeans. The suspect was arrested for Theft 3rd and trespassed from all Walmart properties. Compiled by Rachael Ria

  Tacoma Police detectives need your help to identify the suspect responsible for an armed robbery of a restaurant. At 10:50 p.m. on Saturday January 18th, 2014, the pictured suspect robbed a Little Caesars Pizza located in the 100 block of S. 38th St. in the City of Tacoma. The suspect walked into the store smoking a cigarette and displayed a handgun, then Fridays at 10:30pm on

threatened the employees and demanded cash. The suspect took the money and fled the restaurant. The suspect is described as a white male in his 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or 50â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, approximately 5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;10â&#x20AC;? tall, with a medium build and a full brown beard. During the robbery he was seen wearing blue jeans and an orange hooded sweatshirt or coat with a design on the left chest area.

1,000

$

Receive up to for information leading to the arrest and charges filed for the person(s) in this case.

Call 253-591-5959 www.TPCrimestoppers.com

All Callers will remain anonymous

1-800-222-TIPS (8477)

 TH 3TREET 7  s 5NIVERSITY 0LACE 7! 

:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNLÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;-YPKH`4HYJO

PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT SUPPORTING THE ECONOMIC GROWTH OF OUR COMMUNITY

The Puyallup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s donation of $200,000 to Northwest Harvest will help keep food on the table for countless struggling families.

Considered among the most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians has grown to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its own membership but sharing its wealth among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County, with a payroll of more than 3,300 people

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 74 percent of whom are non-Native. Working in the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities, these employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits. In 2012, the Tribe spent over $445 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more. Even during the recession, the Tribe increased employment and funded substantial vendor purchases and construction projects,

keeping many businesses afloat and people employed. As the country continues to recover from past economic woes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians leads the way locally. From sponsoring dozens of local charities, nonprofit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer or cease to exist, to protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and health care, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its well-deserved reputation as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the generous people,â&#x20AC;? a reflection of the meaning of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very name.

Millions in funding for local governments

Washington State Patrol was approved to receive $75,000 to help mitigate [YHMĂ&#x201E;JZHML[`PTWHJ[LKI`JHZPUVWH[YVUZ

Each year the Puyallup Tribe distributes 2 percent of its gaming revenue from its two Emerald Queen Casino locations to local governments. Over the years the Tribe has provided millions of dollars to fund vital projects and services, from police and fire to road and traffic improvements. Decisions on how to distribute this money are made by the Community Contribution Committee, which consists of representatives of the Puyallup Tribe; the cities of Tacoma, Puyallup and Fife; Pierce County; and the Washington State Gambling Commission. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approved distribution was for $1.9 million and was awarded as follows: The City of Fife was approved to receive $850,000, an amount determined by an interlocal agreement between the City and the Tribe. This money will help fund a broad array of city-

provided services and infrastructure improvements. The City of Puyallup was approved to receive $30,000 for River Road safety and capacity improvements. The City of Tacoma was approved to receive $851,549 to help cover police, fire department and city attorneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s costs concerning casino-related calls. Pierce County was approved to receive $148,051 for emergency management services. This covers the cost of assigning county employees to assist the Tribe in preparing to deal with natural disasters. Washington State Patrol was approved to receive $75,000 for costs associated with mitigating traffic safety issues on state highways impacted by casino patrons.

Partnering to improve local transportation Partnering with local jurisdictions to improve local transportation, in the past six years the Tribe has spent more than $35 million on transportation projects and traffic safety services in neighboring areas. These are largely done in collaboration with state and local governments to benefit the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growing traffic infrastructure, which helps everyone. Projects range from lighting and safety improvements, to bridges and reconstruction projects, providing hundreds of jobs to local engineers, tradesmen, environmental and cultural resource consultants, construction contractors, and the like. Examples of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expenditures over the past six years to completed and ongoing projects include: 30th Street Safety Project, Tacoma Paving, lighting, ADA access, replacement of sidewalks on both sides of 30th Avenue from Portland Avenue to R Street, and one side of 31st Avenue, including relocation of public utilities. Permitted through the City of Tacoma. The project was completed spring of 2013. 31st Street Rehabilitation Project, Tacoma Funds will go towards repavement, establish curb and stormwater facilities, street trees, and relocation of public utilities. Permitted through the City of Tacoma, the project is in the design and engineering

phase and is slated to begin in summer 2014. Wilkeson Hatchery Access Roads Project Rehabilitation and stabilization of an unpaved road critical for fisheries access. Amenities include paving the road, building retaining walls, fencing and lighting. Project was completed fall 2013. Grandview Avenue/East R Street Construction Project, Tacoma This project involved construction of an access road off of Grandview Avenue for the Grandview Learning Center due to safety concerns related to increased traffic projections, and includes installation of a storm water conveyance system from Grandview Avenue to 32nd Street. In 2009, activities related to this project Workers construct an access road off of Grandview Avenue for the Grandview Learning Center. included preliminary engineering, of federal, state and local government Tribal staff has worked with WSDOT design, NEPA, right of way and completion agencies to plan and administer transregarding HOV improvements on I-5. of plans for the access road. The stormwater portation projects in the region. conveyance has been installed, and the project Â&#x2021; East Side Community Projects: Tribal Â&#x2021; Inspection Services: The Puyallup staff is working with the City of was completed in September 2012. Tribe pays for City of Tacoma Tacoma with respect to long-range inspectors for both the R Street and transportation planning involving sevTransportation Planning and Grandview projects, fees to exceed eral city streets. Collaboration with State and Local $100,000. Â&#x2021; Additional Transportation Planning Governments and Administration: Tribal staff Â&#x2021; I-5 HOV Project, Tacoma and Fife: works in collaboration with a number

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.

-YPKH`4HYJOÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNL

Our View

Dreaming of a future for Tacoma is great, butâ&#x20AC;Ś

EDITORIAL CARTOON BY CHRIS BRITT s CBRITTOON@GMAIL.COM s 7774!#/-!7%%+,9#/-%$)4/2)!,#!24//.3 FIND CARTOONS, THE ART OF FREE SPEECH: CHRIS BRITT AT TEDXTACOMA ON YOUTUBE.COM

Guest Editorial

Hawaii and the electric cow By Don C. Brunell Normally, you wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think the cost of electricity would clobber ranchers, but in Hawaii high power rates are the central competitiveness issue. In fact, the owners of the mammoth Parker Ranch on Hawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s big island have calculated their â&#x20AC;&#x153;per cowâ&#x20AC;? electricity costs. Much of the famed ranchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 130,000 acres is rich grazing land on a high plateau between Hawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s twin 13,000 ft. volcanos. Parker Ranch is one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest beef producers, with much of its product sent to the mainland. The ranch has an extensive water system with large reservoirs, water tanks and troughs, but much of the water must be pumped. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where the electricity costs come in. Parkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s electricity cost per calf is $40 per year and rising, compared to $12 for its competitors. Parker runs about 17,000 head of cattle on its ranch, meaning their annual electric bill is about $680,000. In Waimea, the small town where the Parker Ranch is headquartered, the electric bill for the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 33-bed community hospital was $1.2 million last year, compared to an average $350,000 on the mainland. The Hawaiian Electric Company (HEC) predicts that Hawaiians, who currently pay $160 per month, will pay $300 a month by 2020 and $1,200 per month by 2040 unless things change. In 2009, more than 90 percent of

Hawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s electricity was generated by imported oil that is then distributed to refineries and power plants on the island chain by boat, barge and truck because, unlike other U.S. states, Hawaii has no pipelines or railroads. Not surprisingly, electricity costs in Hawaii are the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highest, while we enjoy some of the lowest. Today, Hawaii is making a concerted effort to install solar panels and wind turbines, and tap into the volcanoesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; geothermal potential. Even with this emphasis on renewables, HEC reports that, over the next decade, more than half of Hawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s electricity will come from oil or perhaps liquefied natural gas, if that is allowed as a replacement fuel. Writing in a local newspaper last fall, Parker Ranch CEO Neil â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dutchâ&#x20AC;? Kuyper noted, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve analyzed the local food and local beef situation and it is clear that success depends on an energy decision. For the ranch, energy is our single most volatile cost and it hinders our ability to be competitive. Energy costs squeeze our margins. We also discovered that increases in energy costs for residents in our region outstrip their incomes and force them to make cutbacks and tradeoffs.â&#x20AC;? In other words, the price of electricity is getting so high in Hawaii that residents are forced to cut household spending in order to pay their electric bills. What the Parker Ranch is experiencing illustrates the importance

of the low cost, abundant, reliable electricity that we are blessed with in Washington because of our extensive hydroelectric system. Our electricity costs are well below the national average, which keeps our industries and businesses competitive and provides affordable energy to homes, schools and hospitals â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and many of our farmers and ranchers pump water to irrigate their land and maintain their livestock. Abundant water and low cost power is our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gold nugget. As our elected officials look to the future and work to expand our economy, grow our tax base and create jobs, they need to be mindful that energy costs are a major expense. Unfortunately, we really donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know the impact of those costs, because in 2008, our government stopped including the cost of food and electricity in the Consumer Price Index. But if you consider what is happening in Hawaii, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take a rocket scientist to see that the cost of electricity is a key cost driver for all of us. Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He recently retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.

Letter to the Editor Dear Editor, I had been following Kathleen Merriman for years while she was at the Tribune. I was so sorry when she decided to retire. A while back, I found that she was writing for the Weekly and was thrilled to see her back in print. However, yesterday I saw the article regarding the students at Lincoln who were doing such kind things to encourage her in her battle with cancer. I was so sorry to read that. We have a short brief history.. one day while she was standing at a corner of Meridian in Puyallup at the fair main gate, I made a right turn. I did not see her and I do not think she saw me until just in time. I tried to apologize as best I could and then sent a brief email to her at the paper. She responded kindly. I still remember it so well because it scared me so much. Please offer to her that I am thinking of her and praying for healing. I pray each day as I drive 512 to work for those who I know are hurting and need healing of whatever kind. She is most definitely on my list. Jill Trobaugh Tacoma Chairman Bill: As the Tacoma Charter Review Commission deliberates, the issue of the form of government always comes up. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to comment. The Council-Manager form began in the early 20th Century as a response to entrenched one-party political machines that dominated cities across America. Today the trend continues toward the Council-Manager from across the world. It can be found in Canada, Australia, Netherlands New Zealand, the United Kingdom, Honduras, Chile and Brazil. In the United States not one Council-Manager city government is found among the cities on the top 10 Crime list. Detroit, St. Louis, Memphis, Birmingham and Baltimore find themselves leading the crime list with strong mayor governments. When Tacoma originally adopted the Council-Mayor form it was also in response to a crime-ridden city. Tacoma had been placed â&#x20AC;&#x153;off limitsâ&#x20AC;? by the United States Army at Fort Lewis. Since the adoption of the Council-Manager form of local government soldiers and their families have become treasured customers in Tacoma stores, living in Tacoma houses and otherwise valued neighbors. California and Texas, the two most populous states, have the most Council-Manager cities and growing populations.

Tacoma needs to avoid the mistakes of strong mayor, commissioner politics, and one-party political machines, which are often unable to adequately deal with crime and corruption. Sadly, even after over sixty years our fine city still carries a stigma of crime and corruption left around after the commission form of government was tossed on the trash heap of history. Some outsiders still slur Tacoma with nicknames like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Comptomaâ&#x20AC;? in reference to crimeridden communities. The Charter Review Commission needs to be wary and careful of wolves in sheep clothing. Power corrupts even the strongest mayor. Dr. Jerry V. Ramsey University Place Dear Editor, The cost of living in Pierce County is going up automatically at the request of county government officials, and without any reporting to the public on the risks and costs of their decision-making. Solid waste ratepayers will be penalized for not making as much garbage as we used to. In 2014, that will amount to an additional $356,334 to $718,726 for the waste service â&#x20AC;&#x153;partnerâ&#x20AC;? NOT hauling or disposing of our garbage. Shifting the risks and costs to the public, while ensuring that profits go to private commercial firms, is not new. The $ 1.7 billion Waste Handling Agreement enforced by Pierce County assumes that ratepayers will reduce their production of this profitable â&#x20AC;&#x153;article of commerceâ&#x20AC;? garbage yet the ratepayerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disposal costs are continually inflated to enhance profits for county officialsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; private commercial â&#x20AC;&#x153;partners.â&#x20AC;? The public agreement puts no onus upon the private partner to control costs and seek revenue in an open regional marketplace. There are always risks and costs to action. But they are far less than the long range risks of comfortable inaction. The hands-off my â&#x20AC;&#x153;partnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s profitsâ&#x20AC;? attitude exhibited by county politicians and administrative staff is not new. The public servantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; failure to correct erroneous assumptions, along with the complicit inaction by the elected council and executive, will produce a profitable â&#x20AC;&#x153;article of commerceâ&#x20AC;? for their collaborator, but it sure wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be you, the public taxpayer. Makes you wonder what other public risks and costs are being hidden from public sight while the politiciansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; collaborators profit. David M. Friscia Graham

Tacomans arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t short on dreams of what the city should or could be when it â&#x20AC;&#x153;grows upâ&#x20AC;? from the long shadow of its larger neighbor to the north. It might just have too many dreams for its own good, because the clash of different visions just might spread the civic energy too thin to bring any of those dreams to reality. One might argue that such is the case with the Tacoma City Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most recent effort in daydreaming late last month. Councilmembers held an all-day study session to focus on their daydreaming and to discuss the paths the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efforts could support to make those dreams transfer from their heads to the streets of the City of Destiny. But those discussions illustrate the problems that have stagnated the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growth in population and in economic activity while its surrounding suburban neighbors have benefited. Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s city leaders want to direct city efforts toward finding ways for the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget to live within its means and finally end the long-standing practice of â&#x20AC;&#x153;structural deficitâ&#x20AC;? budgeting that had one-time revenues from new developments paying for on-going expenses. That coupled with a series of shell games with departmental transfers between accounts created the budget shortfall the city faced last year and the forecasted deficits in the coming budget. The city also wants to boost support for public safety, human services and educational programs from early learning to higher educational options. While doing this, Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget and governmental efforts will also strive to improve the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business and residential neighborhoods. Oh yeah, and the city seeks to solve the growing troubles with Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s streets and infrastructure with repair costs already almost $1 billion. All of these are lofty goals that should be part of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goals, but there are just too many things on the list to get any of them actually solved. Everyone also dreams about cute puppies, rainbows and unicorns in their yards. Dreaming about them doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make them come true. The city is in a tough spot, and that requires tough decisions. Tacoma canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get everything done. Diluting efforts through a thin and broad roster of â&#x20AC;&#x153;wish listsâ&#x20AC;? will only waste money and frustrate citizens because little will actually get done. While the â&#x20AC;&#x153;strategic prioritiesâ&#x20AC;? of the city are well worth some effort, the next few years will be spent on drafting plans to actually get the results years from now. Great. The city will conduct more studies, spend more on consultants and hold more public meetings on efforts that have been known for years only to create plans to bring the desired change just in time for the city council to change either through direct elections or term limits and start the process again. So the new council members can daydream a bit and draft more strategic plans to show they are working for Tacomans. All elected officials want a â&#x20AC;&#x153;legacy projectâ&#x20AC;? they can add their names to before they leave office. Pondering the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future is a popular one because it really doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t require a lot of actual work. Dreaming is easy. Deciding which dreams to fully support is quite another. Consider how many consultants in the last decade have looked at how many ways Tacoma could boost its downtown and its general economic vitality â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and the look at the results. Ask the nine council members about their vision of Tacoma and you will get nine dreams of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future. What the city needs is one vision, one direction, one measurable goal. The above opinion represents the view of Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s editorial board.

TACOMAWEEKLY Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC

2588 Pacific Highway, Fife, WA 98424  Â&#x2039;-(?!  7\ISPZOLY!John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com 6WLYH[PVUZ4HUHNLY!Tim Meikle / tim@tacomaweekly.com 5L^Z+LZR!news@tacomaweekly.com 4HUHNPUN,KP[VY!Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com :[HMM>YP[LYZ! Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Kathleen Merryman / kathleen@tacomaweekly.com Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com Derek Shuck / derek@tacomaweekly.com :WVY[Z,KP[VY! Justin Gimse/ jgimse@tacomaweekly.com 7HNPUH[PVU!Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar >LI+L]LSVWLYZ! Cedric Leggin, Ed Curran, Adam Ellsworth 7OV[VNYHWOLY! Rocky Ross *VU[YPI\[PUN>YP[LYZ! Karen Westeen, Steve Mullen, Dave Davison, Sean Contris (K]LY[PZPUN!Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Colleen McDonald / cmcdonald@tacomaweekly.com, Marlene Carrillo / marlene@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. Tacoma Weekly welcomes letters to the editor, your opinions and viewpoints. Anonymous letters will not be published. Tacoma Weekly reserves the right to edit letters for length, content and potentially libelous material. Please send them to above address or e-mail us at letters@tacomaweekly.com.

Subscriptions are available for $52 per year.

VISIT US ON FACEBOOK FACEBOOK.COM/TACOMAWEEKLY

:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNLÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;-YPKH`4HYJO

=,550,4<97/@2;6),5,-0;9,:*<,40::065 O

n Saturday mornings before the sun comes up and while most of us are still asleep, Vennie Murphy is already hard at work in Tacoma Rescue Missionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Good Neighbour CafĂŠ kitchen preparing breakfast for homeless men and women in downtown Tacoma. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the big guy with the smile behind the cafeteria counter offering a pat on the back that revives you when your world is falling apart. To honour Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to our communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most vulnerable, the Mission and Vennieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brothers and sisters at IAM District 751 are co-hosting the Rescue Race: Vennie

Murphy 5k to Support The Rescue Mission on Saturday, April 12 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Dacca Park in Fife. All proceeds from the Rescue Race will be used for food services. Following the trails of Dacca Park and into neighbourhoods of the City of Fife, this family-friendly 5K (3.1 miles) accommodates the fitness goals and levels of runners of all ages. A particularly safe course, there are no street crossings or major inclines/ declines. Cost: adult $25, youth (under 18) $20, Boeing employee $10, Boeing employee family $15. The Kids Dash is just for the little ones 12 years

The Best of

of age and under. The Kids Dash is one lap around a 400-meter track. Rumour has it there will be someone very special leading the pack. Stay tuned for more information. Cost: $10 (12 and under only). And if this isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough, there will be face painting, balloon animals, live music and more. Come and join the celebration. Register at www.RescueRace.org. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE RESCUE MISSION

BIG GUY, BIG SMILE.

Tacoma Rescue Missionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Good Neighbour CafĂŠ kitchen is blessed to have Vennie Murphy (at right) working there and his friends have organized the Rescue Race: Vennie Murphy 5k to Support The Rescue Mission in his honor.

Lighthouse Laundry SPRING CLEANING in Our Big Washers!

Sixth Avenue is Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier district for shopping, nightlife and award-winning restaurants. From morning to night, seven days a week - The Ave is alive with activities for every personality!

2SHQ P DPS

WK 13HDUOÂ&#x2021;:HVWJDWH66KRSSLQJ&HQWHU Free Wi-Fi www.LightHouseLaundry.com

GRAND OPENING!

3%7s&/2s9/5 #534/-3%7).'s!,4%2!4)/.3s2%0!)23

(With this AD you get $75 Off: Expires 04/30/14)

#,/4(%3s"!'3s3(/%3s#524!).3s!.$-5#(-/2%Ă?

TH3TREET7 5NIVERSITY0LACE 7! (253) 212-3335 !SK F/2 KIMMIE (/523-ONDAYTOFRIDAY!- 0-

3ATURDAY!- 0- #LOSED3UNDAY

Voted Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Everything Homemade.

BEST BARBER SHOP OF 2012

6th Ave. Barber Shop 4318 6th Ave., Tacoma, WA 98406 Tel. (253) 225-8213

MENTION THIS AD AND GET A FREE SOAP!

Like us on Facebook!

Rob the Barber

Family DENTISTRY

Providing high-tech family dentistry with old-fashioned care

741 St Helens Ave, Tacoma, WA 98402    s WWWPIPANDLOLACOM

85 Years In Business

Family-owned & operated  3 ' 3T 4ACOMA s ,OCATED IN THE ,INCOLN $ISTRICT -ONDAY 3ATURDAY AM PM

EVERYTHING FOR THE DO-IT-YOURSELF s 0LUMBING s %LECTRICAL s 0AINT SUNDRIES

s #AST IRON WARE s 4OOLS s (OUSEWARES

s ,AWN  'ARDEN s 0ESTICIDES s 2UG $OCTOR 2ENTALS

(253) 472-1425

MICROSCOPE ENHANCED DENTISTRY G R E G O RY J .

PLANCICH D. D. S .

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re invited to join us at a GILENYAÂŽ Go Programâ&#x201E;˘ Event An opportunity to meet Lily Henson, MD, learn about prescription GILENYA, and connect with people in your community.

4/3/14 at 6:30PM The Ram Restaurant 103 35th Avenue Southeast Puyallup, WA 98374 Tell or bring a friend! Accessible to people with disabilities. Light meal served. Parking will be validated. Space is limited.

Located in the Heart of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Old Town 2312 North 30th Street, Suite 201 Tacoma, Washington 98403 Tel. 253.272.7400 s &AX 

Come follow us on Facebook

Please RSVP by calling 1-866-682-7491 You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088. GILENYA is a registered trademark of Novartis AG. GO PROGRAM is a trademark of Novartis AG. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation East Hanover, New Jersey 07936

Š2013 Novartis 1/13 T-GYA-1234305

Sports

FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 2014

TH

E

SI DE

LIN

E

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

.

TACOMAWEEKLY 2014 ALL-CITY BOYS BASKETBALL TEAM

SAVVY VETERANS AND FRESH FACES COMBINE FOR IMPRESSIVE ROSTER

SECTION A, PAGE 7

2013 High School Baseball Preview

TACOMA SQUADS LOOK TO CASH IN ON THE DIAMOND

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

FULL SWING. Stadium’s Matt Gunn

takes third as the ball sails over Bellarmine’s John Bjork. By Justin Gimse

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

STADIUM

Stadium looks to field another Tacoma team on the rise. The Tigers finished in sixthplace in the highly-competitive 4A Narrows league in 2013 and coach Barry Fretwell sees a group of returning players that has put in the work to climb higher in the standings this season. Leading the team are senior pitcher Jake Vieth and senior catcher Matt Gunn, who both hit over .400 last year. Fretwell says they look even stronger this spring. Senior pitcher/ outfielder Michael Van Orden returns after batting .382 and look for breakout seasons from sophomores Tyler “Smurf ” Mick and Jacob Hinkle. With a strong offensive lineup, solid defense and pitching, look for the Tigers to move up in 2014.

WILSON

IVY SMITH JR. - WILSON

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

Wilson was the top Tacoma team in the 3A Narrows in 2013 finishing in fourth place and advanced to the playoffs. Coach Doug Rupe believes he has the makings of an all-around competitor this year and expects every game to be a good matchup for the Rams. Senior pitcher Brady O’Keefe, a second-team Narrows selection last year, has the ability to keep Wilson in the game whenever he’s on the mound. Senior leadoff hitter Thomas Norisahn was a second-team Narrows pick and is one of the team’s best gloves and fast on the base-path. Junior infielder and first team Narrows selection Matt Stortini may be the “best defensive baseball player I have ever seen in high school,” said Rupe. Curtis High School transfer John Halseth takes over at first base and brings a power bat to the middle of the Rams lineup. With a trio of senior pitchers – O’Keefe, Jared Horner and Evan Stout, along with talented sophomore Mack Larson – Wilson plans on going after opposition batters with a steady diet of strikes backed-up by a solid defense. Sophomore Noah Hill takes over behind the plate and is expected to excel calling games for the Rams.

FOSS

DAVID JENKINS - WILSON

LUCIOUS BROWN - STADIUM

Foss finished in the middle of the 3A Narrows pack last season and coach Roy Young sees potential for a step up the ladder. With five solid seniors returning - catcher Ryan Phillips (two-time all-league), pitcher Marcus Ransom, pitcher Omar Morris, first baseman Brady Todhunter and outfielder Erik DeRusha, coach Young will field a veteran group ready to battle for a league or even a district playoff spot. Keep an eye out for sophomore utility player Austin Eisenmenger.

LINCOLN

The Lincoln Abes are going to have to grow up real quick this season. Coach Ron Gee starts just one senior, Zach Bennett, who will at times be counted on to play nearly every position on the field. Junior shortstop and sophomore pitcher Mark Jones were both second-team Narrows selections last year. The Abes only won two games in 2013 and will rely upon new blood and enthusiasm to improve upon that mark. Look for sophomore Devan Brady and freshmen Austin Music, Zavier Huebner and Caleb Ford to step up for Lincoln.

MOUNT TAHOMA AR’MOND DAVIS - FOSS By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

FIRST TEAM Lucious Brown – Stadium – Sr. - 6-6 - Point Guard/Forward Brown was voted MVP of the 4A Narrows League. The big guard overpowered defenders on the outside and inside and his quickness and passing ability surprised and overwhelmed opponents. He averaged a triple-double 18 points, 10 rebounds and 10 assists, leading a surprise Tigers team to a 4A Narrows league title and the Regional Finals.

ALPHONSO ANDERSON - WILSON Ar’Mond Davis – Foss – Sr. – 6-5 – Shooting Guard Davis led both 4A and 3A Narrows in scoring with 26 points a game. He was a deep threat from the outside and amazing in transition. Spectacular dunks and the consummate Go-To Threat. Davis led the Falcons deep into the playoffs, falling one game short of the 3A State Tournament. Alphonso Anderson – Wilson – Soph. – 6-7 – Forward The young Anderson averaged a double-double with 15 points and 12 rebounds per game. After dominating the glass and working well from the high and low posts, Anderson was X See BASKETBALL / page A10

New coach Todd Roos has high expectations for the Mount Tahoma Thunderbirds this season. The squad returns five solid seniors: shortstop Kasey Baily, pitcher Garret Granvold, third baseman Kyle Couture, catcher Kyle Bailey and outfielder Lawrence Cade-Batek. New faces expected to step up are junior Kasey Hanipale and freshman Garret Rohrs. Coach Roos is counting on his experienced players to improve upon the teams three victories from 2013 and has set a team goal to make the Narrows 3A playoffs this year. Fun fact – Roos has fewer names to remember with two Kyles, two Kaseys, two

X See BASEBALL / page A10

:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNLÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;-YPKH`4HYJO

SPORTSWATCH

*3<;*/:/66;05.(5+,?*0;05.*64,)(*2 /0./30./;5(996>:(33:;(9.(4,

SOCCER CONCUSSION RISK AS HIGH AS IN FOOTBALL?

A new report from Muir Orthopaedic Specialists in Walnut Creek, Calif. paints a grim picture for soccer enthusiasts. The specialists claim the risk of soccer-related concussions is as high as that of a football player. The report cites instances of playerto-player collisions, head-to-knee impacts, heading the soccer ball and even sudden acceleration or deceleration as possible causes of brain trauma. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m seeing here on the West Coast is that kids are having much more exposure to potential concussion situations,â&#x20AC;? says Matthew Pecci, MD, a former director of sports medicine at Boston University. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The season is year round here and soccer participation is much more prevalent. People donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize it, but we see just as many concussions in soccer as in football.â&#x20AC;?

73<:(@:.66+)@,;6 BASKETBALL GREAT

Tom Whalen, one of the greatest scorers in Pacific Lutheran University history, has passed away following a serious illness and surgery. A mainstay for nearly 50 years around the basketball program, the Lute Hall of Famer averaged 21.6 points a game and racked up 1,193 career points in just two years from 1962-64. Whalen remains the only Lute ever to clear 1,000 points in 2 years. The 6-5 center garnered several accolades while playing in Parkland including NAIA District I Player of the Year, NAIA second-team All-America and honorable mention AP All-America. A memorial service for Whalen will be held Sunday, March 23, at South Life Church in Tacoma.

By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

T

he red, white and blue ABA basketball should have been a dead-giveaway that the fans were in for a show Friday, March 14 at the 7th annual Cloud 9 South Sound Classic at Auburn High School. It was the best of the boys 4A Narrows matched-up against the best of the 3A Narrows and the game would come down to the wire with two Lucious Brown free throws capturing the 113-111 victory for the 4A team with 11 seconds remaining in the game. Brown, Stadiumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MVP of the 4A Narrows League season, also took home MVP honors for the night finishing with a game-high 19 points, sealing the win and stopping the 3Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mad comeback with a last-second steal off of Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Londrell Hamilton. With 4:30 remaining in the game, the 4As held a 107-91 lead and looked to have the contest under wraps. The 3A team would end the game on a 20-6 run, erasing an 8-point lead in the final 1:11. After two made free throws by Fossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Olashawan Miller, the 3As full-court pressure led to an errant pass by Brown and it was Miller stealing the ball and finding an open Ivy Smith Jr. who coolly knocked-in a 3-pointer from the far elbow with 46 seconds to play closing the deficit to 111-108. For the first time in the game, the 4A squad looked rushed and unsure of what to do next as they turned the ball

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just played together like a team, passed it around and when somebody got open we took the shot. It worked out for us.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lucious Brown

Stadiumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MVP of the 4A Narrows League season

over again on their end of the floor. Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Smith walked the ball back up the court, worked off a screen and stroked a 3-pointer from the near elbow and the game was tied at 111-111 with 13 seconds left. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wanted to slow it down because everybody just wanted to shoot the ball,â&#x20AC;? said Smith. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s slow it down and then I got a little pick going on and saw my defender go under the screen and thought I might as well take the shot and go for the dagger.â&#x20AC;? Bodies collided on the following 4A inbound pass and Brown found himself at the free throw line where he closed out the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scoring. As Londrell Hamilton approached his 3-point line with time running out, Brown snatched the ball from behind and the game was over. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the beginning of the game we decided we were going to pass the ball

around and not get too selfish and ballhog,â&#x20AC;? said Brown. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just played together like a team, passed it around and when somebody got open we took the shot. It worked out for us.â&#x20AC;? It was an exciting game that saw the teams connect on a total of 26 threepointers, throw down seven slam dunks, including two fast break alley-oops and 13 players finished scoring in double figures. It very well could have been called the Tacoma All-Star Game as 15 hoopsters from the City of Destiny filled out the 23 roster spots between the two teams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a great game and the 4As came out and worked hard,â&#x20AC;? said Wilson and 4A game coach Dave Alwert. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were tired and worked their tails off out there. Our two bigger kids ran the floor really well and really brought a charge. X See NARROWS / page A10

Local Restaurants SPRING INTO HEALTH WITH THESE TASTY SNACK RECIPES

H

ealthy food that also tastes calories) per day helps curb the rise in make their own sport bars. The Pistagood is always in vogue blood glucose after a meal and lowers chio Sport Bars recipe below combines and now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s getting a spring blood pressure, blood triglycerides and the protein power of pistachios with makeover. LDL-cholesterol, all of which, in turn, energizing carbohydrates and allows The theme of the Academy of lower the risk for metabolic syndrome you to control the ingredients in your Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) Nation- and heart disease. Researchers at Loma own kitchen. al Nutrition Month (R) this March is Linda University found that high tree 3. Get creative with the ultimate â&#x20AC;&#x153;Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right.â&#x20AC;? As nut consumption was associated with a snack duo: protein and fiber. Rathspring approaches and fitness routines lower occurrence of obesity and meta- er than buying a traditional trail mix, move outdoors, AND reminds you that bolic syndrome, increasing a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make your own mix of pistachios and healthy snacks can fuel a workout, get risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes your favorite dried fruit. Mix pistachios you through the day and taste delicious. and stroke. with air popped popcorn for a satisfying â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to get stuck in a rut with As a snack ingredient, pistachios and filling post-workout snack. snacks,â&#x20AC;? notes Becci Twombley, direc- can be baked into homemade energy For more information about the tor of sports nutrition at the University bars, sprinkled on yogurt or combined health benefits of pistachios and reciof Southern California and ambassador with dried fruit in a make-your-own pes developed by renowned chefs, visit for the American Pistachio Growers. trail mix. www.AmericanPistachios.org. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spring is a time for renewal â&#x20AC;&#x201C; clean2. Work backwards. Think about (ARA Content) ing out closets, setting new goals and your favorite making a fresh commitment to health snacks, and and nutrition. Just as itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to then experiment switch up your exercise routine every with different ;k^Zd_Zlm few weeks, you want to experiment ways to add with different snack combinations and new proteins Eng\a have fun with your food. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be more to that snack. =bgg^k likely to stick with a healthy routine if For instance, you keep it interesting.â&#x20AC;? Twombley loves Twombleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;snacks from scratchâ&#x20AC;? the portability involves some creativity. Try one of of sport bars, her snacking experiments below if you but not the need a snack makeover this spring. lengthy ingre1. Pick one protein-based ingredi- dient list that ent and think about different ways to can accompany Restaurant Restaurant eat it as a snack. Twombley often rec- some storeand Lounge Lounge and ommends pistachios as a performance bought brands. snack for exercise because, calorie-for- Instead, Twom.+**+)maLmk^^m>Zlm%?b_^+.,&2++&//1/ calorie, pistachios pack more protein bley encourages A Tradition Since 1968 Happy Hour 7 Days a Week. Karaoke Friday & Saturday nights. than most common snacks. Additional- her athletes to Banquet Room - Up to 60 People ly, a serving size of pistachios is 49 nuts (more than any other tree nut), THUNDERBIRD LOUNGE which provides 6 grams TRADING POST INC. of filling protein and 3 6725(Â&#x2021;/281*(Â&#x2021;&,*$5%$5 grams of fiber for only :DOOHU5RDG(7DFRPD:$Â&#x2021;   160 calories. Research at the HAPPY HOUR 4-7PM WEDNESDAYS FRIDAY & SATURDAY University of Toronto Food & Drink Specials! DART TOURNAMENTS DART TOURNAMENTS and Pennsylvania State 6:30PM Sign Up 8PM Sign Up University suggests that eating about 1.5-2 7:30PM Start 9PM Start KARAOKE 9PM ounces of pistachios Power Draw Power Draw Sunday thru Saturday (about 20 percent of

COME IN FOR

Voted BEST

DINER

2013

Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at Fife

HAPPY HOUR: 3-7PM & 9-11:30PM

1128 Broadway Tacoma, WA 98402 253-722-5196

Sunday All Day Happy Hour!

7 Days a Week! MARCH MADNESS JOIN US!

M - TH 11am - 10pm F & SAT 11am - 11pm

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS11am - 3pm

7 50 & $8 50

$

5 Pool Tables, 2 Dart Boards, and 8 Big Screens!

GREAT BAR FOOD SPIRITS & ROTATING MICRO HANDLES

ASIAN TERIYAKI

HAPPY HOUR3pm - 7pm Wells

3 50

$

Domestic

3 00

$

Margaritas

5 00

$

Ajo Prawns $7 00

Street Tacos $3 00

Tocino Prawns $7 00

Queso Dip $3 00

Asada Fries $6 00

Wings $3 00

Super Nachos $5 00

Extended Happy Hour Drinks & Appetizers

4

$ 99 Lunch Specials & MORE!

Mon ~ Thurs: 11:00am ~ 8:30pm Fri ~ Sat: 11:00am ~ 9:00pm Sunday Closed

YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;VE TRIED ALL THE REST, NOW COME HAVE THE BEST!

Edison City Diner

Now Open Sundays!            

                5640 So. Tacoma Way 253-473-1517 www.edisoncitydiner.com

TUES - FRI: 7:30 - 3PM SAT: 8 - 2PM SUN: 10 - 2PM Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

Join

â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;Šus

â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;Šfor

â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;Šour

MARCH

 â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;ŠSPECIALS Monday

â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;Š-

â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;ŠFriday

â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;ŠSpecials 7 am - 11 am

11 am - 9 pm

BREAKFAST SPECIAL WESTERN SCRAMBLE $6.95

RUBEN SANDWICH $8.50

Diced ham, onions & green peppers in scrambled eggs. Served with hash browns and choice of toast.

Corned beef, sauerkraut and swiss cheese on grilled rye bread. Served with choice of fries or potato salad.

11 am - 9 pm COUNTRY FRIED STEAK $9.95

Lightly seasoned, hand breaded grilled steak. Served with soup or salad and choice of potato or seasoned rice and vegetables.

15803 Pacific Ave, Spanaway 253-539-0127 Open 7 am to 9 pm 7 days a week Like us on Facebook!

ADD CHOCOLATE CHIP MINT ICE CREAM TO YOUR MEAL FOR $1.95

Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dock ,:K<AK= *(, 1"'$1! -# ,:K<AMA 1.-2 -#$12

EE#:R6>=G>L=:RL

'.42$, 13(-(22/$"( ++BFBM EE#:R3ANKL=:RL

3./2'$+%, 13(-(2+BFBM

We have Korean food!

6WK6W7DFRPDÂ&#x2021;

Best Breakfa st in Tacoma!

  

-YPKH`4HYJOÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNL

STADIUM EDGES WILSON 1-0 IN BATTLE OF TACOMA SOCCER ELITE By Justin Gimse

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

A cold, windy evening ushered in the spring soccer season at Stadium bowl Monday March 17 and the action on the field already looked like it was playoff time. In a crosstown battle of state powerhouses, 4A Stadium capitalized on an early second-half ricochet to edge 3A Wilson 1-0 in the nonleague contest. Seven minutes into the second half Stadium team captain senior Tyler Swenddal got a toe on the ball from 12 yards out. The shot looked to be wide but careened off of freshman defender Nick Rhodeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leg. Freshman goalkeeper Alek Greenleaf made a diving attempt at the ball but was unable to recover from the surprise bounce. Wilson had several opportunities at the Tigers goal but each shot or header seemed to go just wide. The Rams had eight corner-kicks to Stadiums three and spent the majority of the game on the offensive. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t good enough for an

equalizer goal though. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a very competitive game. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think we played as good as we should, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re [Stadium] thinking the same way,â&#x20AC;? said Wilson coach Adam Becker. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think this will get us ready for our league play, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing Stadium and Bellarmine early in the preseason to play a couple of good 4A teams to get us ready for our season.â&#x20AC;? Wilson played several freshmen as a handful of players left the pitch after getting bangedup in the hard-hitting game. Junior Pedro Ramos left the game early in the first half with a left leg injury and freshman Pablo Ramos stepped up for the Rams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pablo Ramos, my centermid freshman played really well for his first game at this level,â&#x20AC;? said coach Becker. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He controlled the midfield. I thought he was really relaxed around the ball and did pretty much everything we needed him to do. Our keeper Alek [Greenleaf] played very well for a freshman as well.â&#x20AC;?

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

DRIVING HARD. (Left) Impressive freshman Pablo Ramos made his debut for the Wilson Rams. (Right) Stadiumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gabriel Casilloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aggressive play helped put the Tigers over the top.

   9512 Canyon Rd E Puyallup, WA 98371 253-535-6110

OUR OWN HOME MADE





BLOWOUT Warehouse Sale BRING AD IN TO GET THESE DEALS! t#VZ0OF(FU0OF)BMG0GG5BCMF-BNQT t#VZ0OF(FU0OF'SFF8BMM4DPODF t0GG"MM)BOHJOH-BNQT t#VZ0OF(FU0OF'SFF0VUEPPS5BCMF t#VZ0OF(FU0OF'SFF0VUEPPS0UUPNBO t#VZ0OF(FU0OF'SFF1BUJP'VSOJUVSF  4FBU$VTIJPOT t-"3(&454&-&$5*0/0'5*''"/:-*()5*/( */5"$0."

Saturdays 10AM-2PM thru April 5th

PRE-ORDER ONLY

Monday-Saturday 9am-7pm Sunday 8am-4pm

   www.facebook.com/BlueMaxMeats

)((*=Ykl>Klj]]lLY[geYOYk`af_lgf10,*)

*-+&-/*&*),,BmklY[jgkkl`]EmjjYqEgj_Yf))l`klj]]l:ja\_]LYc]L`]>ajklD]^l www.tacomatiffany.com

TACOMA RAINIERS

       Black vs. Green will be a chance for fans to come out, have some food and enjoy some good oďŹ&#x20AC;ense vs. defense games before the team heads oďŹ&#x20AC; to Bellingham on April 12th for their ďŹ rst pre-season game against the Bellingham Bulldogs. For more information, contact head coach : arambo@puyallupnationkings.com or   : (253) 226-8169 Keep up with the team on our new website:

     

APRIL 3 - 6 CHENEY STADIUM FOR TICKETS call 1-800-745-3000 or visit tacomarainiers.com

:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNLÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;-YPKH`4HYJO

WNarrows From page A8

I think they were the difference in the ballgame. The 3Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s were the more talented team but the 4As simply out-worked them in an all-star game.â&#x20AC;? Miller and Smith combined for 13 points apiece, all in the second half as the 3As

WBaseball Garrets and two Baileys on the team.

CHARLES WRIGHT/LIFE CHRISTIAN

The Charles Wright Terriers and Life Christian Eagles will again field a joint squad this season as the CWA/LCA â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;? and compete in the 1A Nisqually league. The Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s boast two 2013 Tacoma

climbed back into the game. Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Keun Thompson scored 12 points in the second quarter and finished with a team-high 18 points. Fossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Arâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mond Davis, the 3A Narrows scoring champion, electrified the crowd with three deep 3-pointers and two vicious dunks, the last on an alley-oop feed from Wilson forward Alphonso Anderson. Stadiumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bobby Moorehead had a solid performance with 11 points, while Bel-

From page A7

Weekly All-City selections in senior pitcher Taylor Roeloffs and junior second baseman Drex Davis. Junior shortstop Sam Absten was a second-team Nisqually pick along with sophomore catcher Henry Cheney. Coaches Tyler Francis and Gregg Leach expect the Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to challenge for the league title as well as a run in the 1A state playoffs.

The Proctor District is 5 minutes from Downtown, Waterfront, Point Defiance, Narrows Bridge and University of Puget Sound.

;(*64()(7;0:;

Crusaders coach Kraig Gillman must refill some slots on the 2014 squad, as six starters graduated last year from the SeaTac League champs. Last season TBS fell one game short of making the state tournament and Gillman doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see his team dropping off. Cool and calm senior shortstop/pitcher Tommie Brazile, a first team all-league pick, returns along with number one pitcher BJ Peterson, a junior. Look for breakout seasons from senior center fielder Kavon Yazdi and all-league basketball player junior Dayton Pascua, who returns to baseball after a two-year hiatus. Freshmen Seth Talen and Ryan Ratliff are both expected to make an immediate impact. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a young, energetic, hard-working group of guys who believe they can compete with anybody,â&#x20AC;? Gillman said.

larmine sophomore Malachi Flynn seemed unfazed by the big game, directing the 4A offense and adding 8 points as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was just coming out to play as hard as I can and help us win this game,â&#x20AC;? said Flynn. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve played with and against all those guys before so I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really nervous. It felt good to be here as a sophomore.â&#x20AC;?

Fuller 12, Malachi Flynn 8, Khaul Matheney 12, Austin Murray 14, Bobby Moorehead 11, Caulin Bakalarski 16, Christian Davis 2, Nick Edens 9, Lucious Brown 19. 3A NARROWS: Trevion Brown 16, Londrell Hamilton 5, Ivy Smith Jr. 13, Montre Brown 2, David Jenkins 12, Jamal Welch 8, Olashawan Miller 13, Justus Martion 1, Arâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mond Davis 15, Keun Thompson 18, Alphonso Anderson 8, Josiah Barsh.

SCORING TOTALS

4A NARROWS: Mitch Fettig 10, Elijah

WBasketball

From page A7

able to step out and drop the mid-range jumper and was also a threat from the 3-point line. Alphonso helped lead Wilson to the 3A Narrows League Title and the 3A State Tournament where he was voted first-team All-Tournament. David Jenkins â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Wilson â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Soph. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6-0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Shooting Guard Jenkins displayed veteran defensive skills and a cool hand under pressure all season. He averaged 14 points and 5 rebounds as a steady and clutch performer for the Rams. David was voted first-team 3A Narrows. Ivy Smith Jr. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Wilson â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jr. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5-10 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Point Guard The toughest selection from a city rich in excellent point guards. Smithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 12 points and 5 assists a game, coupled with a 3A Narrows League Title and a postseason driving the Rams to just one victory from the State 3A Championship Game gives the talented, flashy guard the nod for first-team.

SECOND TEAM

Londrell Hamilton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lincoln â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Fr. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5-11 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; PG Jamal Welch â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Wilson â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sr. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6-1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SG/F Bobby Moorehead â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Stadium â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jr. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6-6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; F Marâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Kese Jackson â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bellarmine â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sr. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6-3 - SG Justice Martion â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lincoln â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sr. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6-6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; F

THIRD TEAM

Ahmaad Rorie â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lincoln â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sr. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6-0 - PG Olashawan Miller â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Foss â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sr. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6-4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; F Brandon Stoehr â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tacoma Baptist â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jr. - 6-0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; PG/SG Josiah Barsh â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lincoln â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jr. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6-1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SG/F Trevion Brown â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lincoln â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Soph. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5-11 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SG

HONORABLE MENTION

Dayton Pascua â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tacoma Baptist â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jr., Keun Thompson â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Wilson â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jr., Montre Brown â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Wilson Soph., Malachi Flynn â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bellarmine â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Soph., Malik Mayeax â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Stadium â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sr., Dionte Simon â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lincoln â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Soph.

VISIT US ON FACEBOOK MHJLIVVRJVT[HJVTH^LLRS` Corcoranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lock & Safe LLC            

253-756-5000

Bookkeeping Services for Small Businesses

Emergency Service

Bob Corcoran, C.R.L. Fax: 253-756-0694

Laura Winkelman H: 253.858.3779 C: 253.514.0309 lw7707@comcast.net

2726 North Proctor Tacoma, WA 98407

BE WELL

inside & out

ADVERTISE WITH US!

253.922.5317

63+=(3<,:5,>/64,

-0-,+,5;(3*,5;,946=,:5,?;+669

A

t Fife Dental Center, Dr. Lisa L. Buttaro and her highly trained staff are committed to providing exceptional care with compassion. Come experience the new dental home for her longterm practice. Dr. Buttaro was honored to cut the ceremonial ribbon welcoming the new facility to Fife while hosting the Fife Chamber of Commerce Christmas party last December. The newly remodeled and enhanced space uses the latest dental materials and technology while allowing Dr. Buttaro to accommodate the growing family of patients, the emphasis on compassion and communication remains the same. Dr. Buttaro loves the sense of community and the small-town feel of Fife. She completed her active duty service with the Army Dental Corps at Ft. Lewis. After graduating Magna Cum Laude from the University of Maryland Dental School, she served our armed forces for 13 years. She has now been in private practice in Pierce County since 2000. Dr. Buttaro has continued her lifelong pursuit of education and learning, completing more than 1600 hours of additional continuing dental education and in 2012 was awarded the Mastership Award from the Academy of General Dentistry. This award is a remarkable accomplishment achieved by less than two percent of general dentists. Whether your dental needs are a complete exam and cleaning, a full-mouth restoration, or anything in between, Fife Dental Center offers these services and more, all with a gentle touch and stunning results. Fife Dental Center accepts most dental insurance plans and are preferred providers with many sedation options also available to ensure maximum comfort to patients with all anxiety levels. The standard of excellence and personalized care offered at Fife Dental Center has continued to set them apart and the staff were honored to be recent recipients of the Crown in Town Award. Fife Dental Center believes that its highly trained and loyal team is a great asset in upholding our core values as a comprehensive care family practice. There has been a push in both the medical and dental communities toward corporate clinics with a revolving door of doctors and staff. We are not a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Doc in

a boxâ&#x20AC;? and are committed to the long term personalized care of our patients. The team members at Fife Dental Center all have EHWZHHQ  WR  \HDUV RI H[SHULHQFH LQ WKH GHQWDO Ă&#x20AC;HOG 7KH team works together to create healthy and beautiful smiles for a lifetime while also working within the individual budgets of our patients. Dr. Buttaro reaches beyond the walls of Fife Dental Center and out into the broader community by being involved in numerous HYHQWVIURPVWDIĂ&#x20AC;QJDQRUDOKHDOWKLQIRUPDWLRQWDEOHDWWKHDQQXal Harvest Festival to providing volunteer dentistry at numerous community events including Homeless Connect, Medical Teams International, Union Gospel Mission, Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dental Health Day and more. In addition, Dr. Buttaro serves on the Board of Trustees for the Pierce County Dental Society and is a delegate for the state dental association. She is an active member of numerous study clubs and professional organizations. To learn more about Fife Dental Center, visit ZZZĂ&#x20AC;IHGHQWDOFHQWHUFRP RU FDOO    3803 to make an appointment with Dr. Buttaro, who is currently welcoming new patients to the dental family. Fife Dental Center is located at 6106 20th St. E.

Fife Dental Center  TH 3T %AST s &IFE 7!  (253)926-3803

NEW PATIENT SPECIAL $100 Target gift card

with NEW patient x-rays, exam and cleaning

Lisa L. Buttaro, DDS MAGD â&#x20AC;&#x153;Exceptional Care with Compassionâ&#x20AC;?

+'-<Xjk)-k_Jk%KXZfdX#N80/+)(Â&#x203A;),*%.0)%0.*, FG<E;8@CP-X%d%kfD`[e`^_kÂ&#x203A;]XZ\Yffb%Zfd&;\jk`ep=cfXkj

PHOTO BY DEREK SHUCK

SMILE. The experienced staff of

Fife Dental Center all have between 10 and 35 years of experience in the field.

-YPKH`4HYJOÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNL

WCancer

It was my husband who noticed the big problem. When the first wave of fatigue hit, right after the lumpectomy, I got flat. Sitting up was a stretch, so I stayed in bed and read and napped and drifted downstream from reality. No watching birds in the bushes. No identifying blackberry stalks to be rooted out on the first good day. No keeping an eye out for the shady people who occasionally mistake our neighborhood for a home electronics and jewelry store. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You need a recliner,â&#x20AC;? Mike said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You need to be engaged. You need to sit up.â&#x20AC;? The pro who prepared our taxes agreed. Recliners, she said, can be a legitimate medical expense, right up there with mileage to doctorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; appointments. And wigs, or, technically, cranial prostheses. Back when I was used to having hair â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that would be in February, Gentle Reader â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I could not imagine going out in public the way most of the dear men in my family do, with nothing between the rain and their bald pates. So I blew $35 ($50 with shampoos, rinses and accessories) on a Diva Soul wig. Do you watch â&#x20AC;&#x153;House of Cards?â&#x20AC;? This wig looks like Cashew, the serial hackerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oft-imperiled guinea pig,

From page A1

every one of them has a role in saving my life. This level of Attitude would require some bolstering, some prepping. This biggest, longest unknown in my adult life, made me want to overpack, literally. I thought about the tubes you slide into for a scan, and imagined cold feet. So I bought socks, warm, soft boot socks with extra insulation. Once I got my Power Port, I bought low-cut tops. The port is that bump in my skin over my left clavicle. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where the chemo drugs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and IV fluids, and antibiotics and who knows what else â&#x20AC;&#x201C; go in. (You can feel it if you want. If we run into each other, just ask. As any kid righting cancer will tell you, ports are cool.) Forget T-shirts and turtlenecks and anything else with a high neck. This baby demands scoops, even cleavage, for proper access. What about the fatigue? Were 7-year-old, $5 Christmas pajamas the happiest garb for healing? I thought not, especially with fresh sets at 85 percent off on the sale racks. Cute, or the illusion of cuteness, bolsters Attitude.

only in auburn. Now, given the heels and crunch-holds delivered to Cashew, I am reluctant to put it on my head. What if a corrupt political operative should see me at the Safeway? Instead, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m wearing hats. Hats are more fun, especially with a pirate-style scarf underneath. Hats, also, are almost always on sale. And rogue politicos pay them no mind at Safeway. The worst thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happened was an incident with two pushy women who simply could not wait for an extra grocery divider, even though I had not yet begun to check out. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sir, sir,â&#x20AC;? they kept saying. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sir, give us a grocery divider.â&#x20AC;? It was Attitude that saved them. Attitude does not bop senior ladies with plastic sticks. Attitude does, however, get tested when the drugs kick in. Next week, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll write about how Attitude survives chemical warfare on its own turf. Until then, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s talk. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to hear how you, or someone you care for, prepped for chemotherapy. How did you deal with the unknowns? How did you work with your family and friends? What worked? What was a waste? How did you manage your workload? Was your employer helpful? And

what about the money? You can comment on this story, right here. You can comment on it on the Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook

page, or you can e-mail me at kathleen@tacomaweekly. com. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking forward to sharing your experiences with our readers.

Furnit ure

costs l

ess at

;6+(@Âť::,3-*(9,;07!

Hit the library and get the books you need for a good binge-read of your favorite authors.

HOT DEALS

Your Fife-Milton-Edgewood Community Connector Route is Changing to Serve You Better Starting March 31st, trip times will be improved on the Route 503 Fife - Puyallup Station. To improve connections with Sounder trains, Pierce Transit has adjusted several Route 503 trips arriving at or departing from the Puyallup Sounder Station. Also, for 5 morning trips, the bus will stop on the same side of the tracks as the train for easier boarding. With these changes, 3 early afternoon trips to the station will be eliminated. Adjusted trips are shown in yellow:

SOUTHCENTER: 206.575.0999 TACOMA LYNNWOOD: 425.977.4900 1181 Andover Park W. 27th Street W 4601 200th St SW #G Tukwila, WA 98188 University Place, WA 98466 Lynnwood, WA 98036 10am-7pm 10am-7pm 10am-7pm

www.costlesswarehouse.com

ROUTE 503 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Weekdays Puyallup Sounder Station to Fife

Fife to Puyallup Sounder Station

6:26 8:13 9:18 10:23 11:28

12:05pm 1:10 2:15 3:20 3:55 4:25 4:57 5:35 6:35

12:18 1:23 2:28 3:33 4:08 4:38 5:10 5:48 6:48

12:34 1:45 2:50 3:55 4:30 4:54 5:32 6:04 7:04

12:36pm

12:47

1:04

Three trips eliminated 5:23 6:33 7:35

Emerald Queen Casino Pacific Hwy 1

59th

   

ton Mil

400

Stew

409

ar t

Pioneer

402

e

Puyallup Fred Meyer

Puyallup Sounder

T Station

Red Lot Park & Ride Washington State Fairgrounds

E Main

167

409

402

5TH  AVE  NE

  AVE NW 5TH

WART  

AVE

4TH  AVE  NE

 ST  NW

4TH  AVE  NW

 

E STEWART AVE    

5TH  ST  NW

 NW

S  MERIDIAN

2ND  ST  SW

3RD  ST  SW

4TH  ST  SW

Fife Milton Edgewood

2ND  ST  SE

E  MAIN  AVE    

W  MAIN  AVE 5TH  ST  SW

2ND  AVE  NW

Av

70th

54th

66th

43rd

 

W  STE 3RD  AVE

Puyallup Youth Tribal Center

ley

6TH  AVE  NW

  

Va l

2

 

 

Rd

Tahoma Market

Rad ian

2ND

5TH ST NW

 

 

4TH ST NW  

 

Legend   RT 503 - 5 Morning Trips RT 503 - Regular Trips

Safe, gentle and effective Chiropractic care Friendly and courteous staff Professional yet comfortable atmosphere Large private treatment rooms Convenient location / Parking Secondary evaluations/opinions M.D. and attorney referrals Most insurance accepted; we do most of the paperwork s Licensed Massage Therapy onsite

501

 

 

Wy

N  MERIDIAN

 

    3RD ST NW

 

Lev ee

72nd St

7TH  AVE  NW

 

20th St

2ND  ST  NW

7TH AVE NW

 

s s s s s s s s

504

Milton

5

ce

Sounder Station will be stopping first on the south side, then the north, so passengers do not need to walk across the tracks to reach their train. All other trips serve the north side only.  

Why choose us to be your Chiropractors?

500

*This map shows how the first 5 trips to the

RT 503 AM & PM Puyallup Station Routing For detailed train information, visit Sound Transitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, soundtransit.org

www.swendsenchiro.com

N Meridian

5:37 6:27 7:08 7:32 8:07 8:43 9:48 10:52 11:57

5:06 6:16 7:18

1

6:11 7:58 9:03 10:08 11:13

1011 E. Main Ave., Ste 201 Puyallup, WA 98372 (253) 845-2013

Meridian

8:15 9:20 10:24 11:29

5:10 6:00 6:41 7:05 7:40 8:26 9:31 10:35 11:40

4:55 6:05 7:07

2

5:58am 7:45 8:50 9:55 11:00

T

T

5th

2

5:01am* 5:51 * 6:32 * 6:56 * 7:31 *

Pacific Hwy E & 59th St

70th Ave E & Radiance Blvd E

Puyallup Sounder Station Bay 2

Meridian

1

Puyallup Sounder Station

9th St

70th Ave E & Radiance Blvd E

2ND  ST  NE  

Pacific Hwy E & 59th St

Dr. Frederick Swendsen Dr. Justin A. Bergstrom

Copyright:Š  2013  Esri

253.581.8000 piercetransit.org

Why suffer when we can help? SOME OF THE CONDITIONS WE TREAT: s Car Crash Injuries s On-the-job Injuries s Sports Injuries s Shoulder Pain, Hip Pain, Knee Pain, Ankle Pain, Arm and Leg Pain s Migraines / Headaches s Carpal Tunnel Syndrome s Fibromyalgia or Chronic Pain s Acute Neck and Back Pain s Muscle Spasms / Stiffness s Tingling or Numbness

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where Pain Ends and Health Begins!â&#x20AC;?

:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNLÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;-YPKH`4HYJO

WUWT From page A1

branch at the University of Washington in Tacoma have been estimated at $2.25 million. The seed money is being backed by Tacoma Republican Sen. Steve Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ban and Puyallup Republican Sen. Bruce Dammeier, who have worked on the idea for years, although UWT officials didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t formally ask for the money. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ban has been an attorney for 25 years, focused on small business owners, nonprofits and individuals on civil rights, employment and business issues. Dammeier is a small business owner and former Navy officer as well as being the vice chair of the Health Care and Early Learning and K-12 Education committees; a member of the Ways & Means and and Rules committees, as well as serving on the state Sen-

ate Education Accountability System Oversight Committee and the Quality Education Council. If the state money survives to budget process, the community effort would be tasked with raising the remaining money that would pay for faculty salaries, a law library and support services for the first three years, after which the program would be expected to support itself through tuition. While UWT plans donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t call for the addition of a law school, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role as an urban campus means it also strives to be responsive to local educational needs, university spokesman Mike Wark said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are very responsive to what our community has in mind,â&#x20AC;? he said. Any law school branch in Tacoma would have to go through a review by the law department and the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s administration once the seed money is collected.

796:,*<;69-05+:+,7<;@Âť: +,(+3@-69*,3(>-<3 Independent and concurrent investigations by the Pierce County Medical Examinerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office, Pierce County Prosecutorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office, and Pierce County Sheriff â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department regarding the shooting death of Justin Michael Linn, 28, have been completed. Linn died from a gunshot wound inflicted by Pierce County Sheriff â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Deputy John Delgado. Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist concluded the death was justifiable homicide under state law. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This defendant had a violent history and posed a serious danger,â&#x20AC;? said Prosecutor Mark Lindquist.

WParks From page A1

age would go toward work to add trails and attractions at Swan Creek Park, upgrades along the waterfront to add boat lifts, gangways, accessibility and safety features,

BUSINESS FURNITURE INC â&#x20AC;&#x153;Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Largest Selection of New & Used Office Furnitureâ&#x20AC;? TACOMA SOUTHCENTER

253.627.8633 206.575.1919

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The deputy did what was necessary to protect himself and our community.â&#x20AC;? On July 27, 2013, Linn committed a residential armed robbery and shot the homeowner. Deputies attempted to arrest him on two occasions in August, but he was able to elude them. During the first attempt, Linn tossed a handgun as he ran from deputies. Sheriff â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s detectives received information that Linn was staying at a motel in Buckley and was armed with a gun. Deputies arrived at the motel on Aug. 22 and conducted surveillance to confirm Linnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s location.

shoreline signs, habitat restoration, and trail and pier improvements at Point Defiance Marina, Ruston Way parks, Dickman Mill Park, Titlow, Dash Point, and Thea Foss Waterway parks. Seymour Botanical Conservatory at Wright Park would also get renovations. The final third of the money would go toward neighborhood parks and recreation facilities around the city, with much of the work coming straight from the master plans that have been developed in recent years for Wapato, Norpoint, Jefferson, Franklin and Stew-

When Linn spotted the deputies, he ran. They ordered him to remove his hands from his waistband, but he ignored their commands. As deputies caught up to Linn, he turned, faced them and started to pull his hands up from his waistband. Deputy Delgado believed Linn was pulling out a weapon and he feared for his life, so he fired four shots at Linn. One bullet struck him in the chest. Linn was not armed when he was shot, but deputies found a loaded handgun in his motel room. Twelve days later, Linn died in the hospital from pneumonia related to his gunshot wound.

art Heights parks. A new sprayground and infrastructure improvements would come to East Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lincoln Park. Improvements would provide expanded access including Alderwood, Alling, Baltimore, Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Point, Charlotteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blueberry Park, Cloverdale, Fern Hill, Ferry, Jane Clark, Lincoln Heights, Manitou, McKinley Playfield, McCarver, Neighborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, North Slope Historic, Northeast Tacoma Playfield, OaklandMadrona, Optimist, Peoples, Puget, Rogers, Sawyer Tot Lot, Sheridan, South, Stanley Playfield, STAR Center and Vassault parks. Bond

dollars would also support programs at the Center at Norpoint and Peoples Center/Tacoma Nature Center as well as help the ongoing partnership to build a new community center to provide services to the Eastside. The last parks bond was approved in 2005, when a $84.3 million bond measure passed with 62.38 percent of the vote. That money was leveraged with grants and other money to add an additional $38.5 million in improvements. Get more information at MetroParksTacoma. org/2014ParksZooBond.

100,000 Sq. Ft. of NEW & USED Office Furniture 3ALES s $ESIGN s )NSTALLATION We Buy Used /FlCE &URNITURE MAIN STORE: 3802 S. Cedar Tacoma Near The Mall SOUTHCENTER: 770 Andover Park East

www.actionbusfurniture.com Now 2 Locations To Better Serve You!

5 YEARS ZERO INTEREST SALE   MINIMUM PURCHASE 3EE IN STORE FOR DETAILS

REG $599

Bring in this ad & receive

$50 OFF* (with minimum purchase of $499)

MILITARY DISCOUNT

REG $999

NOW $399

NOW $699

Available in 6 colors

Available in 2 colors

2402 S 84th 3T ,AKEWOOD  s    (OURS - 3AT AM PM 3UN AM PM *O.A.C. Minimum purchase required, see in store for details. 2 promotions may not be combined. Error may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct such error.

City Life

Scintillation

B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 2014

SECTION B, PAGE 1

Mitch Reems 2, Cancer 0 Friends celebrate local musician’s latest triumph over terminal disease with benefit show

just went over to Hanford and took some of the water over there and poured it into my body,” Reems joked this week. “These were some pretty intense chemicals they were putting in me. The average visit for a chemo patient is three hours, somewhere around there. Every time I was there it was a minimum of eight hours, sitting there with that stuff PHOTO BY JENNY KINDER going into me.” NEW BLUES BROTHERS. Last year’s New Blues Brothers The treatments lineup included Gary Ruhl, Greg Davison, Michael Kinder, Dean seem to have worked, Reichert, Andy Omdahl,Ted Dortch, Ken Elhard, and Mitch Reems though. Subsequent (second from right, dressed as Elwood Blues). tests have shown the tumors shrinking. Reems said he By Ernest A. Jasmin expects to receive a clean bill of health after his ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com next scan, early next month. “At this point, I’m about two months out from my last treatment, and itch Reems will join his popular I’m starting to feel stronger each time,” he said. tribute band, the New Blues Brothers, The March 30 show is a celebration of his for the first time since August on ability to bounce back and a benefit to help deal March 30 at the Landmark Convention Center’s with the hefty price tag that comes with being Temple Ballroom. He anticipates feeling a lot diagnosed with cancer. Bump Kitchen, Chamfresher than he did for most of last year, when pagne Sunday, and Gabriel with Merrilee Rush he’d struggle to make it through a single gig. For nearly three decades, Reems has been known for his lively interpretation of Elwood Blues, Dan Akroyd’s character from “Saturday Night Live” and John Landis’ classic 1980 comedy, “The Blues Brothers.” But, last summer, he felt beat up and listless. He’d endured weeks of intensifying back pain; and running through “Shake a Tailfeather” was enough to suck the wind right out of him, let alone finishing an entire set. will join the New Blues Brothers onstage, with “It was tough,” he said, recalling the New Blues music starting at 3 p.m. Brothers’ appearance on the main stage at Freedom “He’s a great jazz drummer and a fabulous Fair last Fourth of July on Thea Foss Waterway. “I’d singer,” said New Blues Brothers drummer sing my part, then I’d turn around from the crowd, Michael Kinder, who booked the bands for go some place and try and catch my breath.” next weekend’s show. “We tried doing the band At 64, Reems initially chalked it up to the without Mitch a few times, and it’s never been ravages of time. But a biopsy soon revealed the same energy. He brings this dynamic to the it to be something far worse: stage four nonstage that no one can really replace. ... He’s like Hodgkins Lymphoma. a force of nature.” It was the start of his second bout with the Jessi Fredeen – half of folk-pop duo Champotentially terminal disease. He’d already beaten pagne Sunday – also counts Reems among her prostate cancer, a battle that forced him to step favorite local performers and greatest influaway from the New Blues Brothers in 2010, pavences. Granted, she has reason to be biased. ing the way for new “Elwood,” Gary Ruhl. But “There just is nothing like seeing my daddy this time, the disease was widespread and attackonstage,” Fredeen said. ing his body aggressively, prompting an intense “Both my parents are musicians. My mom regimen of chemotherapy. and dad had a show the night they had me, “I like to say whenever I had a treatment they

M

so I’ve never been away from it. I’ve always been surrounded by music. I remember being 7 years old and having to sit outside of the beer garden at the Taste of Tacoma or whatever, seeing him onstage. Now – being a grown woman, watching him with these same guys PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD – it’s just amazing to me.” Bump Kitchen Fredeen and her husband, Jared, will perform songs off of their most recent CD, “Heaven Knows,” followed by a joint set by “Angel of the Morning” singer Merrilee Rush and Gabriel, among Seattle’s most popular rock outfits in the ‘70s. Headlining the show is popular funk and soul band Bump Kitchen, a group has been putting the finishing touches on its first album since 2009’s “Who Ordered the Waffle?” Drummer Everett James hinted at a new direction that he compares Merrilee Rush to Blue Magic and other ‘70s soul acts. “Then there’s maybe two tracks on there that are instrumentals that have more of a funk-jazz kind of thing happening,” he said. “But a majority of the album is soul.” James expected the as yet untitled disc to hit iTunes, CD Baby and other outlets by late April or early May. Reems, for his part, admitted to feeling PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER ov e r w h e l m e d Jessi Fredeen of that so many of his Champagne Sunday friends and family would come to his aid. “I’ve done a million (benefits) over the years for people - friends and family. But when it happens to you, it’s a bit overwhelming,” he said, chuckling. “It’s been pretty heartwarming. (Bands have) come out of the woodwork and are supporting Featuring Bump Kitchen, Merrilee me pretty well. HopeRush and Gabriel, Champagne Sunday fully, it’s just gonna be a and the New Blues Brothers nice celebration because 3 p.m., March 30 I’m not on death’s door, thank God. I’ve gotten Temple Theatre through this, and it will 47 St. Helens Ave., Tacoma be nice to enjoy this event $20 with friends and family Ticketmaster.com and all the great music that’s going to be there.”

“He’s a great jazz drummer and a fabulous singer. ... We tried doing the band without Mitch a few times, and it’s never been the same energy. He brings this dynamic to the stage that no one can really replace. ... He’s like a force of nature.”

Drummer Michael Kinder

MITCH REEMS BENEFIT SHOW

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE ‘TREASURE ISLAND’ For the first time ever, the Lakewood Playhouse LIT program and Metro Parks Theatre program will combine resources for Treasure Island Spring Break Camp for all students between the ages of 9 and 18 interested in theatre. No experience is necessary, for beginning and veteran actors alike. Students will take part in the entire production process to stage “Treasure Island,” including auditions, tech rehearsal, dress rehearsal, and finally a performance at the end of the week-long camp. Camp runs from March 31 to April 4 and takes place every day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Lakewood Playhouse. Fee is $199, scholarship opportunities available. Register at Metro Parks customer service at (253) 305-1022, or visit metroparkstacoma.org (the course barcode is 69248). Contact Mason Quinn for further details: masonq@tacomaparks. com or (307) 214-7308.

TWO THE FAT TONES Experience The Fat Tones at Jazzbones, March 21, 8 p.m. $7 gets you in the door. Their own unique brand of smokin’ rhythm and blues paired with clever and often-funny lyrics will get you feeling good from head to toe. After a more than three year hiatus from the studio, the band of three sharp-dressed men – Zach T. Cooper, Bobby Patterson and Bob Ehrgott – is crafting a new album set for release this summer and in the process of hiring an international publicist to help the boys take their music to new audiences and new heights, in addition to hooking up with Fame Walk Productions and top audio/video engineer/producer Dan Humann. For a full roster of their upcoming shows, and how to get their live CD and DVD, visit www.thefattones.com.

THREE DOYLE’S GETS CRABBIE On Thursday, March 27, guests at Doyle’s

Public House (208 St. Helens) will enjoy drink and food specials with Crabbie’s Alcoholic Ginger Beer, a 4.8 percent ABV refreshing ginger beer. From 6-8 p.m. Doyle’s will offer Crabbie’s Original and Spiced Orange, which recently became available throughout Washington, served chilled over ice with a slice of citrus, for $4 and in a special cocktail the Ginger and Jamey – Crabbie’s Ginger Beer and Jameson Irish whiskey – for $7. Be sure and check out Doyle’s fine menu, including their Shepherd’s Pie of the Month and soup/salad/sandwich of the week. Visit www.doylespublichouse.com.

FOUR STREISAND! Tony-nominated Ann Hampton Calloway expertly paints a musical portrait of the most celebrated singer of our time in “The Streisand Songbook,” March 22 at the Pantages Theater, 7:30 p.m. Celebrating the music of one of America’s most powerful and enduring artists, Calloway sings timeless classics from five decades of Streisand’s multi-faceted

career – a loving tribute to the icon who once described herself as being “simple, complex, generous, selfish, unattractive, beautiful, lazy and driven.” Ticket info at www.broadwaycenter.org.

FIVE KISS HITS THE ROAD WITH DEF LEPPARD Recent Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee KISS is turning 40. To celebrate, the world’s most celebrated costumed rockers will hit the road for 40 dates this summer with fellow hit makers Def Leppard. The tour will kick off on June 23 in West Valley City, Utah before the bands make their way to Auburn’s White River Amphitheatre a few days later, on June 29. Tickets for the Auburn show will go on sale to the general public at 10 a.m. on Friday, March 21, with prices ranging from $32.50 to $149.50. Find further details at LiveNation.com.

Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 21, 2014

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

HELP PUT MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS INTO THE HANDS OF STUDENTS

PHOTO BY TED S. WARREN

PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD

GIVING BACK. Nolan Garrett (left) the band “Stolen Society” are two of the acts that will appear at the benefit fundraiser for Ted Brown’s Outreach program on March 29.

Louie G.’s Pizza to host benefit for Ted Brown Music Outreach By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

T

ed Brown Music is a business that walks the talk when it comes to being all about music. Rather than being driven by pure profit, Ted Brown reaches out to help students explore the world of music, which in turn helps improve the lives of young learners academically and personally. Case in point: Ted Brown’s non-profit Outreach Program. The Outreach Program provides instruments to kids who wouldn’t otherwise be able to afford them, and supports programs such as Teddie Bear Music for children 0-6, Instrument Exploration Camps for kids who want to be in their school band but aren’t sure which instrument to play, and the very popular Live It OutLoud Rock Music Camp for 12-18 year olds to experience what it’s like to be in a real band one day. The Outreach Program mission statement is this: “We believe music enhances the quality of life by improving learning abilities, relieving stress and providing a chance to change lives. Our purpose is to put instruments in the hands of young musicians while supporting their musical activities and programs.” On Saturday, March 29, a benefit fundraiser for Ted

Brown’s Outreach Program will be held at Louie G.’s Pizza in Fife, 5-11 p.m. A $10 admission fee gets you an all-you-caneat spaghetti dinner (and Louie G. definitely knows his Italian cuisine) and the chance to experience four hot and local bands play live: Stolen Society (2013 Live It OutLoud winner), Fistful of Dollars (2012 Live It OutLoud winner), Nolan Garrett Band and SweetKiss Momma. Music starts at 7 p.m. There will be raffles and a silent auction for prizes like gift cards, a set of Shure headphones, a yearlong membership to the Children’s Museum, a package with four tickets to a Hard Rock show with gift certificates for dinner and baskets, such as an Aveda spa package, movie night and products from The Pampered Chef. A live auction will include an original painting by Stacia Weber, who is well known for her skill at live painting. She’ll be at the benefit with easel and brushes in hand, ready to let the atmosphere guide her to paint as she visits with people. New and used instrument donations will also be accepted throughout the evening. For those wishing to attend as a family or group, VIP tables are available. The $500 VIP table offers six tickets, the spaghetti feed, a wine selection, SWAG, company/organization logo on printed materials and a waitperson from 5-8 p.m. At

the $1,000 level your table can order off the menu of Louie G.s five-star cuisine. Susan Renville is an Outreach Program board member and organizer of the benefit. She said the proceeds will help the program continue to flourish and, most importantly, help young people get introduced to playing music which, in turn, has been found to increase children’s proficiency in mathematics, listening, teamwork and many other valuable skills. “We have people that come in (to Ted Brown Music) and want to rent an instrument but they don’t qualify and can’t afford it so we immediately give them an application to get an instrument,” she said, adding that the look of relief and joy on parents’ faces is something she never tires of. “Some of the people just want their kid to be in (the school band) so much and they’re so devastated that they don’t qualify for renting an instrument, but we have the Outreach Program for them. It’s nice to see the parents and kids faces when they realize that – it’s fantastic.” To learn more about the Ted Brown Music Outreach Program, visit www.tbmoutreach.com and go to wp.tedbrownmusic. com/eventsgigs/tbmoutreachbenefit-2/ for more on the March 29 benefit at Louie G.’s.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, March 21, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 3

LIFE AFTER IVAN Local photographer documents todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s B & I

CULTURE CORNER

A GUIDE TO THE MUSEUMS OF TACOMA

Muesum of the Week: LeMay â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Car Museum 2702 E. D St., Tacoma, WA 98421 Mon.-Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: http://www.lemaymuseum.org/

This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s events: MARCH

2014

March 22, 2014, 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Family Workshop â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Balloon Racer Build, tinker and learn together as you explore the world of cars. Every fourth Saturday, you and your child, grandchild or family will spend quality time together designing, creating or exploring cool car concepts.

PHOTO COURTESY OF FULCRUM GALLERY

LOADED. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big Haulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Payloadâ&#x20AC;? is a photo of one of the vintage coin

machines in the arcade of B & I. Gary Lappierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s photos of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s B & I store are on display at Fulcrum Gallery through April 5. By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

A

s a blue-collar town, Tacoma has had its share of kitschy icons. Some have fared better than others. The Java Jive, though it has its issues, has been granted the status of Historic Landmark. The Tacoma totem pole, though plagued with rot, is due to be repaired so that it will have a new lease on life. The once fabulously funky B & I Circus Store â&#x20AC;&#x201C; located on the 8000 block of South Tacoma Way â&#x20AC;&#x201C; has by degrees become less and less fabulous (but possibly more and more funky) as the years have passed. Tacomans with a memory of the 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s no doubt have many a memory of the B & I, which first opened as a surplus store in 1946. Its level of fabulousness and funkiness was amped up by the presence of Ivan the gorilla. It can be argued that Ivan was the source of the B &Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vitality. In 1994 Ivan was carted off to live out his remaining years in the Atlanta zoo. Yet, there is still some semblance of life after Ivan. In 2010 Tacoma photographer Gary Lappier spent several months shooting

photos in B & I. He used 35mm film that was developed in black and white using old school, darkroom techniques. The fruits of his labor are currently on display in the Hilltopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fulcrum Gallery. The show is called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sent from Somewhere Else.â&#x20AC;? Lappierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s B & I has a tired, worn-out feel. Things are gritty and grubby. There are hand-made signs with dog-eared corners. The old merry-go-round is still there, as is the arcade â&#x20AC;&#x201C; equipped with vintage games and old coin machines. The photos capture interiors devoid of people, giving the inside environs an air of loneliness akin to the paintings of Edward Hopper. The ubiquitous presence of florescent lights on the low ceilings and the use of wire mesh as dividers give the place a surreal, claustrophobic atmosphere. Viewing the show is a fascinating exercise. Oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memories are juxtaposed upon the photos just as oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reflection is on the glass of the frame. One has a keen awareness of the passage of time and the winding down of things. Lappier reveals that the B & I, once inhabited by wild creatures, is still untamed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sent from Somewhere Elseâ&#x20AC;? runs through April 5. For further information visit www.fulcrumtacoma.com.

Current exhibits: VeeDub â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bohemian Beauties

Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Car Museum celebrates the impact of an unlikely German car brand â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Volkswagen â&#x20AC;&#x201C; on a restless postwar America ripe for change. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s carâ&#x20AC;? captured the imagination with its simple and elegant designs, while the innovative technology provided a platform for personal expression. The result was a culture of customization that had a lasting impact on America and embodied the free spirit of an entire era.

Legends of Motorsports: The NASCAR Story

From farmers and moonshiners racing â&#x20AC;&#x153;strictly stockâ&#x20AC;? family sedans on treacherous dirt tracks, to a high-tech, high-stakes sport with 70 million fans, the story of NASCAR is a uniquely American tale of ambition, vision, and fast, fast cars.

Master Collector

The Grand Gallery features 45 cars originally from Harold and Nancy LeMayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vast car collection. The exhibit helps to show the diversity of the 3,000+ cars that Harold collected during his lifetime.

Meet the Master Collectors: those dedicated enthusiasts whose passion for cars knows no bounds. Thanks to them, important milestones of automotive ingenuity, engineering, and beauty survive to be viewed and enjoyed today. See how they will go to any length to find, restore, and share the cars of their dreams â&#x20AC;&#x201C; only at Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Car Museum.

Ferrari In America

Classics and Custom Coachwork

Harold E. LeMay

This exhibit highlights the 60 plus years of the Ferrari brand in America, and the influence Luigi Chinetti had during the formative years. The exhibit features Ferrari automobiles from each decade â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from the earliest cars, all the way to modern road and race cars.

British Invasion

The British Invasion exhibit covers both the cars and the culture that invaded America after WWII and through the 1960s.

Opulence and luxury abound in this exhibit highlighting amazing cars from the 1930s. During an era when high end cars were built as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;rolling chassisâ&#x20AC;?, and then sent out to a custom coachbuilder for the body and interior, this exhibit highlights some of the best in the world. The exhibit features custom coachwork by Darrin, Erdman & Rossi, Dietrich, and Derham on various Duesenberg, Packard, Lincoln and Mercedes-Benz automobiles.

Visit us online at www.stbda.com

J^WdaOek\eh oekhikffehj e\j^[Iekj^ JWYecW 8ki_d[ii :_ijh_Yj

Serving pierce county since 2010

Ask about our group ad rates and South Tacoma Business District Member Discount:

ARE YOU PROPERLY INSURED? GIVE YOURSELF PEACE OF MIND AND CALL TODAY FOR A FARMERS FRIENDLY REVIEW!

253.752.0234

(253) 922-5317

5 Haircuts $10 Off Foils

$

Services are performed by supervised students. Open to the Public for Client Services

Price Menu starts at:

s (AIRCUT....................... $5-$10 s 0ERMS$30 s &ACIAL 7AX $5 s &OILS  $29.99 s "RAIDS$30 s 2ELAXERS 

START YOUR NEW CAREER TODAY IN: s #OSMOTOLOGY s "ARBERING

s %STHETICS s 4EACHER 4RAINING

Financial Aid Available for those who qualify. Visit www.bjsbeautyandbarbercollege.com/ for more information.

s #HI 2EFORMATION$150 s 3O #AP %XTENSION $500

1406 54th Ave E Fife, WA 98424 10626 Bridgeport Way SW Lakewood, WA 98499

253 973 vape (8273)

Bring in this ad and receive a free 10ml bottle of e-juice when you make a purchase of $10.00 or more. The Vaporium Vape Geeks are waiting to serve you.

s -ANICURE0EDICURE $19.99 s 3CALP 4REATMENTS$15 s 3PECIAL /CCASION 5PDOS$20

www.bjsbeautyandbarbercollege.com Tacoma

Puyallup

253-473-4320 â&#x20AC;˘ 5239 S Tacoma Way

253-848-1595 â&#x20AC;˘ 12020 Meridian E, Suite G

The areas largest selection of E-Juice & Electronic Cigarettes.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, March 21, 2014

SCINTILLATION GOES TO DISNEYLAND

PHOTO COURTESY OF WILSON HIGH SCHOOL

SING. Scintillation Show Choir performs at their annual winter concert.

Show choir preps for annual fundraiser March 29 By Rachael Rice editorial_intern@tacomaweekly.com

S

how choir has become an increasingly popular American art form and it is continually evolving. With the rise of Foxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hit show â&#x20AC;&#x153;Glee,â&#x20AC;? more and more people have developed an interest in show choirs and more high-schoolers have become interested in performing in choral and theatrical ensembles. One such ensemble exists at Wilson High School, going by the name of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scintillation.â&#x20AC;? Wendy Shepherd took over the Scintillation Show Choir in 1999. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I inherited a wonderful program,â&#x20AC;? said Shepherd. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I thought the kids could be doing more. I raised the bar for my expectations.â&#x20AC;? Scintillation 2014 has a strict regimen and requires a high level of dedication from its team members. The season starts with a summer boot camp to prepare both old members and new for the coming year. During school they rehearse at least five hours a week, not counting time spent practicing outside of class or the hours they dedicate to organizing their yearly fundraiser. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a class,â&#x20AC;? continued Shepherd. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a gift. When I see these students dance and sing together every day, I am inspired. They continually exceed my

expectations.â&#x20AC;? In order for Scintillation 2014 to be able to perform in Disneyland the group needs to raise a minimum of $40,000 at their annual Italian dinner and auction fundraiser on March 29. The dinner will be held at the Charles Wright Academy Dome, 7723 Chambers Creek Rd. W., Tacoma, with doors opening at 5 p.m. Tickets are $20 and all attendees must be 21 or older. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The auction is a lot of fun,â&#x20AC;? said Scintillation dance captain Giovanna Peitz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very rewarding.â&#x20AC;? In Disneyland the students will have the opportunity to attend a choreography workshop taught by the experts, as well as perform in a show of their own. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every student puts in so much work to get to Disneyland,â&#x20AC;? continued Kelsi Creighton, president of the team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It gets stressful but in the end itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth it.â&#x20AC;? When asked if the Scintillation Show Choir did any additional fundraising, the group answer was an empathic â&#x20AC;&#x153;no.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The auction is it,â&#x20AC;? said Shepherd. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make it or break it.â&#x20AC;? This statement is proven to be especially true in that not only does the dinner and auction fundraiser provide money for Scintillationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performing tours, it also finances the entire class. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They get no money from the school,â&#x20AC;?

said Beth Dawson, treasurer of the Scintillation Booster Club. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The auction is supporting the class to buy musical equipment, repairs, costumes, arrangements, props, everything.â&#x20AC;? The dinner and auction also pays for Scintillationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trip to the Fullerton College in Anaheim, Calif. to compete in the Heritage Show Choir Competition at which they have taken the gold medal nearly every year. With all this riding on one day, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to see why the dinner and auction fundraiser is so vital to Scintillationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success. The auction portion of the evening will consist of both silent and live auctions, with over 400 items up for bid, ranging from theme baskets to a barbeque and smoker to a stay at the Tolovana Inn in Cannon Beach, Ore. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a really good auction where you can get great deals,â&#x20AC;? said Shepherd. Auction-goers will also get a preview of the Scintillation Show Choirâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance set, including the audience interactive number â&#x20AC;&#x153;Be Our Guest,â&#x20AC;? a number in which those sitting at the head table will be cast in a starring role. For ticket and donation information, call Scintillation Show Choir Booster Club President Stacy McCracken at (253) 223-0294.

Need a business loan? We can help you. Consult with us.

www.unibankusa.com Main: 425-275-9700 |Tacoma Branch: 253-581-9700 9104 S. Tacoma Way, Suite 101, Lakewood, WA 98499

Creating Beautiful

Smiles

$350 OFF    !  " !   

Complimentary Consultation 8hWY[i?dl_iWb_]dÂ&#x161;?dikhWdY[7YY[fj[Z No Down Payment Option

GESSEL

ORTHODONTICS

DR. THOMAS GESSEL

GESSELBRACES 1628 South Mildred Suite 201 | Tacoma, WA 98465 | (253) 503-1023

Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

CREATIVE COLLOQUY LAUNCHES MARCH 24

PHOTO BY JACKIE FENDER

WORD. Attention admirers of the written word and lovers of the literary:

Creative Colloquy’s kickoff event takes place 7 p.m. on March 24 at B Sharp Coffee House. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

L

ocal authors are being invited to share their work through Creative Colloquy, a new literary web site and monthly reading series being launched on March 24 at Tacoma’s B Sharp Coffee House. The event will be held there the last Monday of each month; and we called on founding writer Jackie Fender – a veteran of the Weekly Volcano and defunct local literary mag, “Wrist” – to give us the skinny on what to expect. Tacoma Weekly: So, what exactly is Creative Colloquy? Fender: Last year, I worked for a literary publication (“Wrist”), and we just shared local authors’ work, and I loved working for them. But the founder, decided the events just weren’t his thing, and he was kind of done with it. I just made so many good relationships, meeting other authors and writers in the area, I thought we need to get reading events going again. And it only makes sense to have a way of sharing their work so that people can make reference to it again and read it. Unfortunately, I’m not independently wealthy, so an actual publication is out of the question for now. I figured a literary site (www. creativecolloquy.com) is the way to go. We’re gonna start that up and start doing monthly readings. TW: How do you get published through your site? Who is this open to? Fender: All scribes are welcome. I’m strongly encouraging short stories, memoirs, novel excerpts things like that. The poetry

community is pretty closeknit and has avenues of sharing, whereas people who write short stories have less of an opportunity right now. That’s kind of my focus, but it’s open to everyone. I don’t discriminate. TW: How would characterize the writing scene in Tacoma. Fender: It’s really just an amazing group. We meet up, and we might not have a lot in common as far as life paths or things like that. But we connect over a love and admiration of the written word. We get together for coffee and we talk books, and writing and what projects we’re working on. I think that really kind of inspires and motivates everybody. That’s the purpose of the reading events, for writers to have the opportunity to connect and bond and strengthen that community. TW: Will the live events be more like a poetry slam, or like a writer’s circle where people give feedback? Fender: What we’re gonna do is feature a handful of writers that are featured on the site every month. … Then, once the featured authors read their work, we’ll have an open mic where people can sign up and read their poetry or short stories to the group. TW: What can you tell me about this first batch of writers? Are these regulars from your days at “Wrist?” Fender: I met all of them through my days at “Wrist,” actually. They’re all really established authors. Joshua Swainston has “Tacoma Pill Junkies,” so he already has his novel published. Melissa Thayer has just announced she has a novel being published shortly. The handful that I have for this event are phenom-

WORD SEARCH WORD LIST TACOMA

DUNKELBERGER

BOND

BIG WHEEL STUNT SHOW

LINCOLN

TACOMA ART MUSEUM

MERRYMAN

LINK

POTHOLE

STRICKLAND

EVENING MAGAZINE

PARKS

enal readers. I approached each of them because at past events they were kind of my favorite to listen to and see. TW: What is your long game on this? Just listening to you, it sounds like you might eventually turn this into a magazine or something like that. Fender: Maybe, yeah, if I can find some way to kind of publish it. It might be more of a quarterly thing rather than a monthly thing, as far as publishing goes. Way down the road, I hope to kind of turn the brand into a non-profit. I want to establish it as an avenue for people to share their work and things. But I have all these crazy ideas about people encouraging literacy in schools by doing dramatic readings, from elementary to high school. ... Maybe even having a book mobile. That’s the big picture, but that’s a ways off. Having the web site, having the monthly readings are key. … We kind of hole ourselves up in our offices and do the things that we do. But I think it’s really important to connect with other people who have that same vision, even if we’re diverse in our genre and life. That’s the focus of the events right now. THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (99 MIN, R) Fri 3.21-Sun 3.23: 11:30am, 1:45, 4:05, 4:40, 6:40, 8:00, 9:00 Mon 3.24-Thu 3.27: 1:45, 4:05, 4:40, 6:40, 8:00, 9:00 WALKING THE CAMINO (84 MIN, NR) Fri 3.21-Thu 3.27: 2:15, 7:00, 9:05 THE MONUMENTS MEN (118 MIN, PG-13) Fri 3.21-Sun 3.23: 11:50, 2:30, 5:10 Mon 3.24-Thu 3.27: 2:30, 5:10 IS THE MAN WHO IS TALL HAPPY? Fri 3.21: 2:00, Sat 3.22: 8:45, Mon 3.24: 6:30, Tue 3.25: 8:45, Thu 3.27: 4:15 THE GHOSTS IN OUR MACHINE Fri 3.21: 4:15, Sun 3.23: 6:30, Mon 3.24: 8:45, Wed 3.26: 6:30 MAIDENTRIP Sat 3.22: 11:45am, Sun 3.23: 4:15, Tue 3.25: 2:00, Thu 3.27: 8:45 ELAINE STRITCH: SHOOT ME Fri 3.21: 8:45, Sat 3.22: 2:00, Mon 3.24: 4:15, Wed 3.26: 2:00, Thu 3.27: 6:30 CHARLIE VICTOR ROMEO Sat 3.22: 4:15, Sun 3.23: 2:00, Tue 3.25: 6:30, Thu 3.27: 2:00 FIRE IN THE BLOOD Fri 3.21: 6:30, Sun 3.23: 11:45am, Mon 3.24: 2:00, Wed 3.26: 4:15 I AM DIVINE Sat 3.22: 6:30, Sun 3.23: 8:45, Tue 3.25: 4:15, Wed 3.26: 8:45

Nightlife

TW PICK OF THE WEEK: TACOMA SMOOTH JAZZ FAVORITE ED TAYLOR WILL PLAY SONGS FROM HIS LATEST CD “IT’S COMPLICATED” ON MARCH 22 AT SLAVONIAN HALL, 2306 N. 30TH ST., IN TACOMA. JOINING HIM ONSTAGE FOR TWO SETS, AT 7:30 AND 9:30 P.M., ARE JEFF KASHIWA AND EUGENIE JONES. TICKETS ARE $17.50 TO $35 IN ADVANCE; (253) 238-5065 OR WWW. BSQUAREDPRODUCTIONS. BIZ FOR FURTHER DETAILS.

FRIDAY, MARCH 21 LOUIE G’S: Metal Church, Mom’s Rocket, Harder You Fall, Sin Circus (metal, hard rock) 7 p.m., AA

GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Notorious 253 (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Ed Hill, David Tobey (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: The Fat Tones (blues) 8 p.m., $7 MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Ghost 211 (rock) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Kry (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Sean Kent (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 TREOS: Ben Potter (country) 7 p.m., NC, AA UNCLE SAM’S: Hambone Blues Band, 8 p.m. UNCLE THURM’S: Urban Rhapsody (funk, jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AAs

THE SWISS: Jason Lee Takeover, 4 p.m., NC, AA TACOMA COMEDY: Bundt Cake featuring Derek Sheen, Adam Norwest and more (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

MONDAY, MARCH 24 STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino, Brooke Lizotte (experimental jam) 9 p.m., NC

B SHARP COFFEE: Creative Colloquy (spoken word) 7 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Jazz & Beyond (open jam) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Velocity (jazz) 8 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, MARCH 25 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, MARCH 22 B SHARP COFFEE: Palmer Junction (experimental blues) 8 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Notorious 253 (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Ed Hill, David Tobey (comedy) 8:30, 10:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: Grayskul, Ra Scion, XP, Rockwell Powers (hiphop) 9 p.m., $7 LAST STAND: Last Stand Awards Show, 5 p.m., NC, AA LOUIE G’S: Eclectic Approach, Amadon, Clear the Chaos, Static (rock) 5 p.m., NC, AA PANTAGES: Ann Hampton Callaway (Barbara Streisand songbook) 7:30 p.m., $35-$79, AA THE SPAR: North Country Bluegrass (bluegrass) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Real Time (dance) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: The Hipsters (dance) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Sean Kent (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAM’S: Fun Police (rock, punk, country) 8 p.m.

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26 TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m.

DAVE’S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC

THURSDAY, MARCH 27

SUNDAY, MARCH 23

THE SWISS: Barleywine Revue (country, bluegrass) 9 p.m., NC

IMMANUEL PRESBYTERIAN: Bill Sims Jr., & Chaney Sims (blues) 5 p.m., NC, AA

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC JOHNNY’S DOCK: Kim Archer Trio (singer-songwriter) 5 p.m. NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 4 p.m., NC THE SPAR: Gin Creek (blues) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman Allstars (classic rock) 8:30 p.m., NC

DAWSON’S: Billy Shew band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Kermet Apio (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+ UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

606 Fawcett, Tacoma, WA

253.593.4474 • grandcinema.com

Custom Hair for Custom People

Shannon Streich Karen Zadow Trisha Dawkins Ashley McMahan 253.224.1331 253.640.5847 253.797.6497 253.970.1972

WE SPECIALIZE IN CUTTING AND STYLING NATURALLY CURLY HAIR

Friday, March 21, 2014 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

With 20 years of experience in the industry, your next salon experince at Hair Muse will be one set apart from the rest. Our focus at Hair Muse is LISTENING to YOUR wants and needs. Any stylist can give you what “looks best” for your features but if you can’t duplicate the look it is a failure. We take the time to teach you how to blowdry and style your hair to achieve consistent results at home. Now that’s a Win Win!

Visit us online: www.hairmuse.com Schedule your appointment today: 253.572.4885

19 Tacoma Ave N • Tacoma, WA 98403

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 21, 2014

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: COMEDY WITH ED HILL AND DAVID TOBEY Fri., March 21, 8:30 p.m. Comedy Underground, 100 S. 9th St., Tacoma Originally from Taiwan, Ed Hill is an emerging young comic who moved to Vancouver, BC 18 years ago, thinking he was on vacation at his father’s discretion. Since then, he has performed all over the world. Price: $13.70. Info: (253) 961-4262

ASK A PSYCHIC Fri., March 21, 7 p.m. Medicine River Center, 12202 Pacific Ave. S. Join Medium Kass Horner and a guest Psychic for a fun, entertaining and uplifting evening. Price: $20. Info: (253) 212-9956 CLASSIC FILM FESTIVAL Fri., March 21, 3 p.m. Tacoma Public Library, Moore Branch, 215 S. 56th Ave. Munch on popcorn and enjoy a screening of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1940 classic “Rebecca.” Suitable for teens and up. Price: Free. Info: (253) 341-4848 UPS WOMEN’S LEAGUE FLEA MARKET Sat., March 22, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. University of Puget Sound Fieldhouse Visit the popular flea market run by the Women’s League of University of Puget Sound and peruse more than 60 booths of antiques and collectibles, artwork, handcrafts, artisan and vintage jewelry, home and garden items.

Price: $5. Info: (253) 8793100 TRIKE-A-THON! Sat., March 22, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Mission Woods Church parking lot, 2003 Taylor St., Milton Children 8 and younger are invited to bring their bikes, trikes, scooters and helmets to ride the course as well as participate in some FUN PIT STOPS! In addition, there will be raffles for bikes and scooters, a bake sale and refreshments available for suggested donation. Info: (253) 922-4535 VIEWING OF ‘FROZEN’ Sat., March 22, 1 p.m. Tacoma Public Library Main Branch, Olympic Room After the kingdom of Arendelle is cast into eternal winter by the powerful Snow Queen Elsa (voice of Idina Menzel), her sprightly sister Anna (Kristen Bell) teams up with a rough-hewn mountaineer named Kristoff (Jonathan Groff) and his trusty rein-

deer Sven to break the icy spell. Rated PG, 102 mins. For families only. Adults not accompanied by a minor will not be admitted. Price: Free. Info: (253) 292-2001

TITLOW MUD RUN Sun., March 23, 12 p.m. Titlow Park, 8425 6th Ave. This 2-mile fun run takes participants off the sidewalks and city streets and onto the trails near Titlow Park. The course is muddy, and full of obstacles to crawl under, jump over or get your attention. Price: $25/$35. Info: (253) 305-1022 SCOOTER 101 CLASS Sun., March 23, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. N.W. Motor Scooters Summer is right around the corner, and you may have thought about getting a scooter, but you don’t know where to start. This is your opportunity to learn how to ride. You’ll learn various techniques and then have the chance to test ride various 50cc scooters. Your ticket includes helmet rental. Price: $20 per person in advance. (253) 565-1117 CREATIVE COLLOQUY Mon., March 24, 7 p.m. B Sharp Coffee House, 706 Court C., Tacoma Admirers of the written word are invited to the first ever Creative Colloquy. Come imbibe in libations or sip on roasted bean concoctions and watch storytellers do the thing they do best, narrate their tales. Featuring a line-up of confirmed local authors who will be reading from selected pieces of work

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

immediately followed by an open mic. Price: Free. Info: (253) 292-9969

school will send their winning team to the District-wide battle! The Public is invited to come and watch the “Final Showdown.” Price: Free. Info: (253) 292 -2001

CLASSICAL CHOIR AUDITION Mon., March 24, 7 p.m. Aylen Jr. High School, 101 15th St. SW, Puyallup The South Sound Classical Choir is seeking new members. Meets Monday nights from 7-9 pm at Aylen Junior High, Puyallup. Two concerts a year, singing classical music from all eras. If you have a love of singing, please consider joining for the choir’s spring season. Info: (253) 507-4183

HOME BREWING Wed., March 26, 6-8 p.m. Summit Pierce County Library, 5107 112th St. E. You can be a home brewer and make your own beer. Learn about different beer styles, beer-making equipment and step-by-step (almost) handson directions for making your first batch! Price: Free. Info: (253) 548 3321 BALLROOM DANCING Thurs., March 27, 7 p.m. Allenmore Events Center, 2125 S. Cedar St., Tacoma Thursday ballroom/variety dancing. Huge dance floor, great location at the all new Allenmore Golf and Events Center/Tacoma Elks. Open to members and guests. Price $5 member, $10 guest/ non-members, discounts for couples. Info: (253) 2721117

QUIZ NIGHT! Tues., March 25, 7 p.m. The Swiss Restaurant & Pub, 1904 Jefferson Ave., Tacoma There are five categories of questions. Entry fee is $2 per person with teams of up to seven people. The winning team takes home the cash! All ages! Info: (253) 5722821 JAZZ COMBO CLASS Tues., March 25, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Ted Brown Music, 6228 Tacoma Mall Blvd., Tacoma Jazz combo class with Kareem Kandi. Learn jazz theory, improv and performance technique. Price: $80 per month. Info: (253) 2723211

FERN HILL CRAFT GUILD CLASSES Thurs., March 27, 9:30 a.m. to noon All Saints’ Episcopal Church, 205 E. 96th St. Come join the fun. Meets Thursdays at 9:30 a.m. to share hobbies and crafts. Each week there is a different craft class to sign up for or just come work on your own project with friends. Business meeting held once a month. Price: First visit free; yearly membership dues $25. Info: (253) 531-0568

BATTLE OF THE BOOKS Wed., March 26, 5 p.m. Tacoma Public Library Main Branch, Olympic Room Middle school teams compete to see who has the most comprehensive knowledge of a select list of books. Each

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE Kerri Bailey is a horticulturist and a certified herbalist. She makes custom blends and consults at Ubiquitous Journey (www.UBJourney.com) on 6th Avenue. Kerri owns two businesses – the online herb store www.HerbalElements.net and a water garden store inside Alpine Nursery in South Hill (www. AlpineGrows.com) called The Pond Pad (www.ThePondPad.com). She writes blogs on gardening, ponds, natural health and herbal remedies and teaches classes through Free University (www.FreeUNW.com).

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) Take some time this week to tune into your heart’s desire. You will be more in touch with your intuition as Mercury moves into Pisces. Guidance will come to you when you most need it. Your energy will be high if you avoid draining distractions. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) You are socially well connected. Your free-spirited friends will help you learn to relax and go more with the flow. Take some time to reflect on past wins and losses to help you progress in achieving your current goals. This weekend may lead to an exciting romantic encounter. Be ready for anything.

LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Consider making some healthy life changes this week. Research the latest health news, diets and exercise techniques. Make your own wellness routine that you can realistically stick to. Treat yourself to a massage or spa day with a friend. SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) Our words influence those around us so be convincing. Share your ideas with others. Do your research before starting a new diet or health routine. Start slowly so you don’t burn yourself out.

GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) Your goal this week is to maintain clarity and focus. Make lists to keep your plans at full attention and get feedback from trusted sources. Networking with others will be a benefit. Social activities will keep you busy and may lead to romance.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) Practical results come from innovative thinking. Answers to questions you have been worrying about may come to you that affect your romantic or professional possibilities. Spice up your romantic life with a fun adventure.

CANCER (June 21 – July 22) Plan your summer vacation now while you are in the mood for travel and exploring new experiences. You may be tempted to learn about topics that inspire your personal awareness or expand your spiritual views. Take a one step at a time approach.

CAPRICORN (December 22 – January 19) Acts of kindness could go a long way. Remember to also be kind to yourself and to those close to you. You have been busy working hard, so take some time to relax to help you put things into perspective. Unwind with friends.

LEO (July 23 – August 22) As the Sun moves into Aries you may feel the urge to take an adventure or visit a remote tropical island. Your mood may be sensitive so don’t be so serious. Allow your playful nature to emerge and reward yourself for all your hard work. Relax and have fun!

AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) Face your responsibilities head-on and set realistic goals. You can still have fun and spend time with loved ones. Focus on written communication to explore your potential. Funds flow well for you now but avoid overspending.

VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Find something to celebrate this week, as it may be a memorable time. Being a team player will get you more results than working alone. A romantic bond may deepen or a new partner may come into the picture. Take a look at your finances.

PISCES (February 19 – March 20) You may need feedback from a trusted friend to help you fix something that has gone wrong. Self-doubt may play tricks on you. Stay in tune with your intuition to keep yourself on the right track. A heart-to-heart talk will ignite romance.

WORD SEARCH I N Z I W S F R R E W V R V R F H

B I G W H E E L S T U N T S H O W

Z N E V E N I N G M A G A Z I N E

W B X H I H J F F R E K B R J M O

L I N C O L N D R H W V E T O B K

W I J L G M J N W Q Y D X R I K T

B T P O T H O L E F R Z W D Z V T

F P I G B G Q N R W Z C L N Y S M

B S A M O C A T D L C W N O X D E

W Z F S N A M Y R R E M V B K J D

S S K R A P K L K X C G Z F U X Z

M U E S U M T R A A M O C A T G Y

R E G R E B L E K N U D L T J K V

I Z V L D R L L L I X U N I S F Y

C C S T R I C K L A N D C J N B J

D A L J Z E U L C C K X O P Q K B

:H·YHKLGGHQORFDOO\WKHPHGZRUGVLQWKLVZRUGVHDUFK+RZPDQ\FDQ\RXӾQG" 1RWVXUHNQRZZKDW\RX·UHORRNLQJIRU"+HDGRYHUWRB5 IRUWKHFRPSOHWHZRUGOLVW

ANAGRAM

MITCH REEMS

How many words can you make out of this phrase?

A C J Y W W Q B U S G W D J I I K

Friday, March 21, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV

CALL 253.922.5317

253.922.5317 www.tacomaweekly.com

SERVICES PRESCHOOL

NOW ENROLLING! Mt. View Co-Operative Preschool Serving children ages 2-5yrs/Pre-K 2003 Taylor Street, Milton (253) 869-3661 www.mtviewcoop.com CASH FOR CARS

ELECTRICAL

Cash for Unwanted & Junk Cars & Trucks Free Removal 253-335-1232

Allied Electric Service

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

Toll Free 1-877-272-6092

PAYS YOU! FOR YOUR Junk Cars

253-606-1647

Contact Alex 253-564-5743 Free Estimates

CONSTRUCTION

D&N CONSTRUCTION LLC .%7 s 2%-/$%,3 !$$)4)/.3 s 2%0!)23 &ULL 3ERVICE #ONTRACTOR ,IC $.#/..#$

253-223-6968

30 RS A YE

TREE & STUMP

CASH FOR CARS

CASH FOR CARS

$

J.L.C.

TRANSPORT & RECOVERY

253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma WA, 98417

LAWN CARE

Big Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawn Care Âş Storm Clean-up Âş Handyman

1901 Center St. Tacoma, WA 98409 253-363-8280 www.tristate.pro

(253) 397-7013

ROOFING

APPLIANCE

ROOFING

Reconditioned Appliances Quality Guaranteed 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Closed Sundays

    

 SERVICES

FREE Hauling for Metal APPLIANCE

Floydâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roofing & Repair

-*$'-0:%33,/Ĺż#0/%&%Ĺż*/463&%

LICENSED â&#x20AC;˘ BONDED â&#x20AC;˘ INSURED

CASH FOR TRADE-IN 5042 Yakima Ave. Tacoma, WA 98408

(253) 267-1673

PAINTING

PAINTING

HAULING

HAULING

SERVICES

SEWING

GRAND OPENING!

SEW â&#x20AC;˘ FOR â&#x20AC;˘ YOU CUSTOM SEWING â&#x20AC;˘ ALTERATIONS â&#x20AC;˘ REPAIRS

CONTRACTOR

CONTRACTOR

JT GENERAL License & Bonded JTLANLF94INA CONTRACTOR ROOFING FENCING

LANDSCAPING

Retaining Walls t Sod Clean-Up t.aintenance

253-222-1 136 Â? Â? TREE & STUMP

Complete Drywall & Painting Service

We Deliver Brian Hall 206-463-9624

ACEDR**933BR

Licensed - Bonded - Insured

BOAT & RV SHRINK WRAPPING â&#x20AC;˘ Weather Proof â&#x20AC;˘ UV Resistant â&#x20AC;˘ We Wrap Anything â&#x20AC;˘ We Come To You! Shrink Wrapping is Economical and Reliable for Storing and Protecting Boats & Recreational Vehicles Outdoors.

We Wrap Anything on Land, Water or Marinas HAULING

Wood t Chain Link t Repairs

LOW PRICES

ACE DRYWALL

206-931-6384 â&#x20AC;˘ 206-463-9624

New t Repairs t Tear-Off t3e-Roof

FREE ESTIMATES

TREE & STUMP

    '&&&"#$"$" "

Phone: Mail:

LAWN CARE

ROOFING

Call to get Mid Winter Special

UNWANTED/JUNK VEHICLES

SEWING

SERVICES

10% Senior Discount

$ $ WE PAY CA$H FOR $

SERVING GREATER PUGET SOUND 10 YEARS

Tree & Stump REMOVAL  

CONTACT US

Your Local Roof Experts â&#x20AC;&#x153;Repairs or Replacementâ&#x20AC;?

TRISTI*931QH

6724 19th Street W, University Place, WA 98466 (253) 212-3335 ASK FOR KIMMIE HOURS: Monday to Friday 9:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Saturday 10:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Closed Sunday



ROOFING

TriState Roofing, Inc.

CLOTHES â&#x20AC;˘ BAGS â&#x20AC;˘ SHOES â&#x20AC;˘ CURTAINS â&#x20AC;˘ AND MUCH MORE!

  

TREE & STUMP

Gutter Cleaning, Pruning, Trees, Pressure Washing, Rototiller.

253.414.2221

The Happy Hooker

CONSTRUCTION

GET READY FOR SUMMER.

ALLIEE1963CQ



     

ALEXâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Landscaping

TOWING AND TRANSPORT â&#x20AC;˘ LOCAL OR LONG DISTANCE

CASH FOR CARS

    

LANDSCAPING

www.alliedmarinecorp.com

CASH FOR CARS

  

LANDSCAPING

SERVICES

HAULING

Father AND Son Hauling Serving all your hauling needs. We will haul anything at any time. NOW Free Junk Car Removal!

899047

PRESCHOOL

SERVICES

VISIT OUR WEBSITE

www.tacomaweekly.com

CELL

OFFICE

253-222-9181

253-671-9951

fatherandsonhauling@hotmail.com

Advertising Representatives: â&#x20AC;˘ Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Colleen McDonald, cmcdonald@tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Marlene Carrillo, marlene@tacomaweekly.com

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 8 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, March 21, 2014

NOTICES

NOTICES

AUTOS

TO: Russell Charles Johns

TO: Juarez, Anthony J.

In the Matter of: Vernon James Louie Petitioners: Eugena Buena-Douglas and Betsey Terrones

In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs Juarez, Anthony J.

Case Number: PUY-CV-PR-2013-0200

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 29th day of March, 2014 at 9:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Sylvia Carrillo & Damontay Whitaker In the Welfare of: K.R. C-W. DOB: 05/21/08 & A. C-W. DOB: 07/23/13 Case Numbers: PUY- CW-CW-2014-0010 & PUY-CWCW-2014-0009 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Review Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Continued Initial Hearing on Monday the 30th day of JUNE at 1:30PM If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. TO: Farrah Bradley and Harold Chad Tom In the Welfare of: T., R.L. DOB: 09/24/2013 Case Number: PUY-CW-CW-2013-0042 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Adjudication Hearing Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Guardianship Hearing on Monday the 7th Day of July, 2014 at 9:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

Case Number: PUY-FH-SHELL-2014-0017

You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on Tuesday June 10, 2014 at 10:30am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Show Cause Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Show Cause Hearing on the 26 day of March, 2014 at 9:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT. In the matter of the Estate for Georgia N. Parizo In the Tribal Court of Puyallup Tribe of Indians for the Puyallup Indian Reservation Probate has been established for the Estate of Georgia N. Parizo Case No. PUY-CV-LOA 2013-0308 7KHDERYHLGHQWLĂ&#x20AC;HG&DVH1XPEHULVQRWLFHRI Probate of the Deceased Georgia N. Parizo. Puyallup Tribal Probate Code 8.04.340, Notice to Creditors against Georgia N. Parizo and to the Tribe for presentation of their claims against the Estate, unless it is determined by the Court that the Estate is exempt from the claims of creditors. Georgia N. Parizo DOD; November 11,2013 2228 East Wright Ave Tacoma, Washington 98404 All persons having claimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s against the Estate are required to present such claims in writing with proper vouchers to the Administrator of the Estate listed EHORZZLWKLQGD\VRIWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWSULQWLQJRIWKLVQRWLFH Puyallup Tribal Probate Code; 8.04.350 Allowance or rejection of Claims. A claim not presented to the Administrator within 90 GD\VDIWHUQRWLFHWRFUHGLWRUVZDVĂ&#x20AC;UVWSRVWHGLVQRW barred, but such claim cannot be paid until the claims SUHVHQWHGZLWKLQWKDWSHULRGKDYHEHHQVDWLVĂ&#x20AC;HG B all claims presented to the Administrator shall be examined dated and endorsed with the words â&#x20AC;&#x153; examined and allowedâ&#x20AC;? if the Administrator is VDWLVĂ&#x20AC;HGWKHFODLPLVMXVWRUHQGRUVHGZLWKWKHZRUGV â&#x20AC;&#x153;examined and rejected if the Administrator is not so VDWLVĂ&#x20AC;HG PTPC; 8.04.360 Hearing on Rejected Claims. Any claimant whose claim has been rejected may request a hearing before the Tribal Court concerning WKHUHMHFWLRQRIWKHFODLPE\Ă&#x20AC;OLQJSHWLWLRQUHTXHVWLQJ such hearing within 30 days following the date the DGPLQLVWUDWRUĂ&#x20AC;OHGQRWLFHRIUHMHFWLRQFRQFHUQLQJVXFK claim with the Tribal Court. Claims against the Estate of Georgia N. Parizo may be sent the Administrator of this Estate may be processed to Lawrence La Pointe, 2228 Wright Ave East, Tacoma, Washington 98404 TO: David A. Mata In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs MATA, David A. Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0067 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing, May 20th, 2014 at 9:00am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Chayni Frazier In The Welfare of: Lincoln-Frazier, Aloya, LincolnFrazier, Joseph, Lincoln-Frazier, Aliya, Lincoln-Frazier, Nakia, and Lincoln-Frazier, Robert Case Number: PUY-CV-PC-2013-0180 PUY-CV-PC-2013-0181 PUY-CV-PC-2013-0182 PUY-CV-PC-2013-0183 PUY-CV-PC-2013-0184 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at 9:00am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

1999 Ford Windstar Van. 196K miles. Runs Good. Well Maintained. Fife. 255-2943. $1475 MOTORCYCLE

MOTORCYCLE

2013 Harley Davidson Sportster 1200 $9750

Public Hearing for Native American Education Program 2014-15 Grant Review to be Held March 27th Parents, teachers, administrators, and community members from the following school districts are invited to attend a public hearing on March 27, 2014 at the Puget Sound Educational 6HUYLFH'LVWULFW7DFRPD2IĂ&#x20AC;FH7KHIRUPXOD grant for the Native American Program will be reviewed for the 2014-15 school year. In addition, attendees will have the opportunity to provide input regarding the program. WHO: Parents, school staff, students, and community members from the following school districts: Bethel, Franklin Pierce, Peninsula, University Place, and Sumner.

Low miles. Cash or possible financing 253-389-8410 williamsimons@yahoo.com ANTIQUES WANTED

ANTIQUES WANTED

WHAT: Public Hearing regarding the 2014-15 Native American Education Program WHEN: March 27, 2014, 5:00-7:00 pm WHERE: Puget Sound Educational Service 'LVWULFW²7DFRPD2IĂ&#x20AC;FH Cascade Building 2316 S. South State Street, Suite D Tacoma, WA 98405 About the Native American Education Program The Native American Education Program facilitates academic success for Native students and helps all students become more aware of Native American culture, particularly within our region. Coordinated through Puget Sound Educational Service District, the program SURYLGHV(GXFDWLRQ&RRUGLQDWRUVLQĂ&#x20AC;YH participating school districts: Bethel, Franklin Pierce, Peninsula, Sumner, and University Place (Pierce County).

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105

PETS Need safe farms or barns for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. 7KH\DUHĂ&#x20AC;[HG vaccinated and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 298-0913

Notice of Application and Neighborhood Meeting The City of Milton has received a Variance application to allow development of a single family residence on a substandard lot located at 1100 15th Ave. The lot is 6,750 and the minimum lot size in this applicable zone is 8,000 sq. ft. The project is SEPA exempt. Notice is hereby given that the City will hold a neighborhood meeting regarding this application on April 2nd 2014, at 5:30 pm in the City of Milton Council Chambers located at 1000 Laurel St. Milton, WA 98354 A full copy of the plans and application are available upon request at the Planning and Community Development Department located at 1000 Laurel St Milton, WA 98354. Comments on the above application must be submitted in writing to Chris Larson, Contract Planner, Planning and Community Development Department, 1000 Laurel Street, Milton, WA 98354, by 5:00 PM on April 3rd, 2014. If you have questions about this proposal, or wish to be made a party of record and receive additional information by mail, please contact Chris Larson, at 253-517-2715 or clarson@ cityofmilton.net. Anyone who submits written comments will automatically become a party of record and will be QRWLĂ&#x20AC;HGRIDQ\GHFLVLRQRQWKLVSURMHFW

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy 253-770-8552

Pet of the Week

FOR SALE RUMMAGE SALE

RUMMAGE SALE

Holy Cross Rummage Sale N. 43rd & Shirley. Fri. April 4 & Sat. April 5. 10 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4 p.m. $2 Bag Sale Sat 2 PM FURNITURE

FURNITURE

New 5 Piece Bedroom Set Full or Queen set includes: Headboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, & mirror. BRAND NEW! Only $400 253-539-1600

Adjustable Power Bed Brand New with memory foam mattress. Wall hugger with warranty. Delivery available. $995 253-537-3056

5 Piece Dining Room Set Table & 4 Chairs. New in box. Only $300 253539-1600 Microfiber Sectional Brand New REVERSIBLE sectional with chaise lounge. NEW! Only $500 253539-1600 All New Pillow Top Mattress Queen Size with warranty. Still in original plastic. Can deliver. $120. 253-537-3056 Solid Wood Bunk Beds Available in 2 colors. Brand new in box. Can break down to two separate twin beds. Delivery available. $250 253-539-1600 Low Profile Leather Bed Frame Still in box. Available in Full or Queen. Very nice. Can deliver. $250 253-539-1600 All New King Mattress Set 3 Piece King Mattress set for only $275. Still in original packaging with factory warranty. Can deliver. 253-537-3056

New Mission Style Bedroom Suite Solid wood Mission bedroom set. $699. Includes: headboard, footboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, and mirror. 253-539-1600 New Overstuffed Microfiber sofa & Love Seat Still in plastic with manufactures warranty. Can have for $700. Lifetime warranty on frame. 253-539-1600 BRAND NEW! Queen Memory foam mattress set with 20 year warranty. Can Deliver. $400. 253-537-3056

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Malcolmâ&#x20AC;? This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Featured Pet is a wonderful and social Gold Rottweiler named Malcolm! This 2 year old handsome boy is sure to bring love and happiness to his new forever family. Malcolm is an affectionate pup who will eagerly await your return home after a long day. After a few hours apart, Malcolm will love taking a stroll with you through the neighborhood. He has minimal interest in chasing toys, so a nice daily walk will be a great stress reliever for him. Malcolm would do best in a single dog householdâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as he has a lot of love to give! Since Malcolm is a large dog & we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know all the details of his past, we suggest he is placed in a family with no children under the age of 5. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss your chance to make Malcolm a part of your family today! Reference #A484169

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www.thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week 1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Nitro is looking a whole lot more handsome these days with his new hairdo. This young man is a great listener, eager to please, and he is oh so playful! Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait! He wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t last long!

New Pillow Top Full Mattress Only $99. Never used! Comes with manufactures warranty. Delivery available. 253537-3056

FREE TV. Hardwood Captain Chairs $175 each (four chairs). Dishwasher $200. (253) 846-1690. No calls Before 9 AM Please.

EMPLOYMENT

AUTOS

FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT.

NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. TO: Rosanna M. Johnson Case Name: Washington State Foster Care vs. Rosanna M. Johnson Case Number: PUY-CS-2007-0907-0425

FOR SALE

Jules is a mellow yet incredibly affectionate cat. His coat is super silky, and he will occasionally show off his adorable bob tail. Jules has been patiently waiting for a loving Forever Family to take him home. Scoop him up today!

DISCRIMINATION Experiencing Workplace Discrimination? Retired City of Tacoma Civil Rights Investigator will provide assistance. Call 253-565-6179. Never a fee for my services.

VOLUNTEERS PAWS NEEDS WILDLIFE VOLUNTEERS PAWS in Lynnwood is looking for volunteers to help care for wildlife this spring. Every year, PAWS cares for more than 3,000 injured, orphaned or abandoned wildlife. Join the team and you can help feed and care for these remarkable animals. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a remarkable experience \RXZRQ¡WĂ&#x20AC;QGDQ\ZKHUH else! For any questions please contact Mark Coleman, Communications Manager, at 206.419.6646. Citizenship Volunteers Looking for a rewarding experience? Help immigrants prepare to become citizens. You will help to provide instruction to legal permanent residents who need practice with the written and oral. Training will EHRIIHUHGWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWZHHN of January and classes will start in mid-January. Please contact Karen Thomas at (253) 3833951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information. Help a Child Improve Reading One-on-one support makes a huge difference in an elementary studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to overcome reading challenges. As a Read2Me Tutor for Tacoma Community House, you can be that person who makes a difference. We are on the lookout for committed tutors for grades 1-3. There are sessions at Manitou Park, Mann, McCarver, and Roosevelt Elementary Schools. The next orientations will be held in January. Call 253.383.3951 for more information. These are exciting times and you can make a difference! South Sound Outreach Services invites you to be trained as an In Person Assister Volunteer to help Pierce County residents enroll online for health insurance in the Washington Health Plan Finder. Open Enrollment is October 1 until March 31st. Coverage begins January 1st, 2014 for those enrolled by December 15th. Interested trainees may call Heather at SSOS 253-593-2111. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be glad you did!

Become a Senior Companion today! Volunteers help frail or disabled seniors stay in their own home and maintain their independence. Activities include running errands, providing transportation or simply being a friend. Hourly stipend and mileage reimbursement provided. Requirements: must be 55+, serve at least 15 hours a week and be low-income. Drivers are especially needed currently. For more info call Julie Kerrigan, Program Director: 1(800) 335-8433, ext. 5686 Help furnish hope to those in need! NW Furniture Bank Volunteers needed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;NWFB helps restore hope, dignity and stability in our community by recycling donated furniture to people in need.â&#x20AC;? Tuesday-Saturday Truck Volunteers Needed- 9:00 am-2:00 pm. Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at volunteer@ nwfurniturebank.org or call 253-302-3868. Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs We need a volunteer to host programs Tuesday & Thursday 9:30-12, & 12:30 pm at Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs. Volunteer will be calling Bingo and doing

some extreme crafting, gardening during spring & summer and into fall. If interested call Bonnie @ 253-278-1475 MondayFriday 8:30-4PM.

Ayusa International SeeksTacoma Host Parents for High School Exchange Students Ayusa International, a 30\HDUROG QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W WKDW promotes global learning through the hosting of high school foreign exchange students, is seeking parents/ families in Tacoma to host for the upcoming 2013-2014 school year. Ayusa students are 15-18 years old and come from more than 60 countries around the world including Brazil, Japan, Germany, Ecuador, France, Peru, Morocco, China and 6SDLQWKH\DUHDOOSURĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW in English. For more information, please visit our website: www.ayusa.org South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www.southsoundoutreach.org.

Project Homeless Connect is an annual event where homeless individuals can receive free services. The next event will be held at Tacoma Dome on Oct 23rd. For more information visit www.pchomelessconnect. com or call 253.593.2111. Get involved with Metro Parks Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Citizen Advisory Councils! The Business & Responsive Agency Council helps district leadership with busiQHVV SODQQLQJ Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO sustainability decisions, revenue development and quality assurance. Monthly meetings focus on issues that affect the future of our park system. Visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/business-volunteer to learn more or call Brett Freshwaters, &KLHI )LQDQFLDO 2IĂ&#x20AC;FHU DW 253.305.1081. Brettf@tacomaparks.com. Metro Parks Tacoma Special events bring the community together and provide families with affordable fun. Metro Parks Tacoma needs volunteers to help produce memorable events. Visit www. metroparkstacoma.org/ volunteer and signup to EHQRWLĂ&#x20AC;HGRIVSHFLDOHYHQW service opportunities. To learn more, contact Roxanne Miles, Volunteer Manager, at 253.305.1068. Roxannem@tacomaparks. com.

Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@tacomaparks.com or 253.305.1025. Join us in changing lives! Changing Rein Equine Assisted Activities and TherDSLHV D QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W RIIHUV equine assisted services to differently-abled individuals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and adaptive lessons. Other volunteer opportunities include: grounds maintenance and administrative/clerical work. Must be at least 14 years old to participate. Horse experience helpful, but not necessary. Training provided. For more information contact: Volunteer Coordinator at 253-370-1429 or volunteer@changingrein.org.

Friday, March 21, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV YEAR-OVER-YEAR PRICE CHANGE BY REGION

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

3578 E F St, Tacoma â&#x20AC;˘ $124,000

Askthehometeam.com

Call me to get a personalized market analysis and find out how I can get your home sold!

253-203-8985

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

North Lakewood Single Unit Apt. 1 Bed Above Laundry Room Plus RV Spaces. No Pets. No Smoking. Screen $45. $550 Rent. Deposit $500 (253) 627-7830

CONDOS & HOMES SPANAWAY

TACOMA

17902 14TH AVE CT E

14406 PACIFIC AVE S # 8

$1595

$650

5 BED 2.5 BATH 2642 SF. BEAUTIFUL HOME HAS BONUS ROOM, LOFT, HUGE/OPEN KITCHEN, WASHER/DRYER & FENCED YARD.

1 BED 1 BATH 710 SF. PERFECT 1 BED APT INCLUDES W/S/G, EAT IN KITCHEN, 6 MONTH LEASE AND ONSITE LAUNDRY.

TACOMA

LAKEWOOD

4534 S 79TH ST

8416 PHILLIPS RD SW #52

$1350

$775

3 BED, 2 BATH 1547 SF. AMAZING RAMBLER HAS ALL APPLIANCES, FAMILY ROOM, FORMAL DINING, FENCED YARD AND MORE.

1 BED 1 BATH 800 SF. 1 BED CONDO HAS HARDWOODS, SS APPLIANCES, GREAT AMENITIES AND PETS WELCOME.

TACOMA

TACOMA

1515 DOCK ST #422

6450 S MASON AVE #8

$2200 2 BED, 1.75 BATH 1368 SF. LAVISH CONDO HAS ALL APPLIANCES, 6 MONTH LEASE AVAIL , W/S/G INCLUDED & GREAT AMENITIES.

HOMES FOR SALE

Sergio Hernandez (253) 431-2308

Heather Redal (253) 363-5920

Sergio@betterproperties.com

Heatherredal@gmail.com

1388 N Lenore St.

www.StephanieLynch.com HOMES FOR SALE

33 N Salmon Beach

Fantastic mid century modern centrally located near stores, schools, parks and easy commuting to freeways, yet house feels secluded and private due to professionally landscaped, lovely yard with zen paths and sustainable design. Fantastic NLWFKHQKDUGZRRGĂ RRUVPDVWHURQPDLQ great patio for entertaining- this is a wonderful home with lots of space. Move in ready and awaiting new owners. $282,000

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800 Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton hydraulic boat Lift, brick wood burning Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHZLWKLQVHUWH[SDQVLYHGHFNLQJRQ all sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout the last 9 years, including URRIVLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZVGRRUVGHFNLQJ boat hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more. $450,000

Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 222-8480

936 S Sheridan $219,000

$735 1 BED 1 BATH 800 SF. 1 BED APT HAS ALL APPLIANCES,, NEWER WINDOWS, ONSITE LAUNDRY AND W/S/G INCLUDED.

3728 N Gove St, Tacoma Cute little bungalow in Proctor! Nice upgrades include a new family room, windows, roof, energy package & carpet 6 years ago. Detached garage was converted to extra living space. It has a separate electric panel, heat & lights - lots of possibilities... music studio, art studio, exercise / yoga room, etc. Parking for 3 cars off the alley next to garage. Charming back yard, too! +DUGZRRGĂ RRUVXQGHUFDUSHWH[FHSWLQ family room. MLS# 518902. $204,950 Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

2711 Henry Road N

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200 View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

MOORAGE

Boat Moorage at Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dock.

$9.50 per foot per month. 5 min. from I-5. Call Laura at (253) 627-3186 STABLES

STABLES

Dillon Stables. Covered, well-lit riding arena. 12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x12â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Stalls. Full care. Riding Lessons. Horses for Sale. $400 per month. (253) 606-4994 HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

This Cozy 2Bd 1Bth has been freshly painted & IHDWXUHV UHĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHG ZRRG Ă RRUV  LQFK WULP DURXQG windows/doors & custom tile throughout. Upgraded (OHFWULFDO   3OXPELQJ 2IĂ&#x20AC;FH'HQ DUHD DQG ODUJH windows to enjoy Country Living and Northwest Wildlife at your doorstep! Privacy & Beauty all around! Situated on 1.12 acres (2 parcels), this property has Boundless Potential for Investor/Builder. Centrally located near highly desired schools, parks, water recreation and minutes to HWY 16 & local stores. This home is ready for your Inspiration!

Michelle Anguiano Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood 253.720.6525

1232 S Adams St. Super charming home w/ the ease of newer amenities... Box beam ceilings, hardwood Ă RRUVPDUEOHHQWU\SLFWXUHSODWHUDLOV SHULRG VW\OHOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHVDGGWRWKHDPELHQFHZKLOH newer roof, furnace/heat pump, indoor/outdoor speakers, newer wiring/plumbing, & gas Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHDGGWRWKHDKKKKIDFWRU6SDFLRXV living room, large kitchen, HUGE dining room, a bedroom and cute remodeled bathroom JUDFHWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWĂ RRU*LJDQWLFGHFNZVHDWLQJ welcome home. Move in and make it yours. $219,950

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

PROPERTY

PROPERTY

65 Acres Sale or Trade. Tonasket Area Okanogan. Hunting Property Bordering U.S. Forest Service land. Frontage of Aeneas Valley Road. Sale or Trade at $1,000 per acre. Turkey and Deer abound. (206) 953-0356 Bill.

MT. RAINIER VIEW $125,000 Beautiful Level Buildable Site! Located off of Ray Nash Drive NW, this 1.25 Acres of natural setting and mature Evergreen trees is perfect to build your dream home and enjoy the Country Lifestyle! Peek-a-Boo View of Mt. Rainier. Just minutes away from sought after Schools, Uptown Gig Harbor Amenities, Restaurants, WA-Hwy 16, Hospitals, Boat launch/water activities, tennis courts & Kopachuck State Park! Electricity is available at corner.

Michelle Anguiano Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood 253.720.6525

OLD TOWN $499,950 Amazing development potential with this unique 2OG7RZQSURSHUW\&LW\KDVJLYHQĂ&#x20AC;QDOSODW approval for 4 lots on this prime 3 acre piece. Big views possible from all lots in this great neighborhood, tucked back & out of the way. Walk to the historic Old Town district with its coffee shops, wine bar & restaurants.; then stroll down to the waterfront & enjoy the gorgeous Puget Sound setting with walking paths, public docks, shoreline restaurants & more! MLS# 332653

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

Professional Management Services

MOORAGE

HOMES FOR SALE

Turn the Key & Move In!

This home is completely remodeled and move-in ready with a massive, fenced backyard. Updated plumbing & electrical. New carpet, paint, moldings, doors. New kitchen with hickory cabinets, range, dishwasher. 12 by 14 covered deck. Huge Outbuilding for storage, alley access. MLS # 582500

Our region has seen some of the largest gains in value. If you have been thinking about selling but not sure what your home is worth, please call me today for a personalized market analysis. I will share with you what marketing strategies I will use to get your home sold and for the most amount of money.

CALL 253.922.5317

Beautiful Victorian 4-plex in good location back on the market after remodel. Walking distance to hospitals, downtown, parks. 0DLQ Ă RRU XQLW KDV RQH EHGURRP SOXV attached bonus room, dining room, lg kitchen with nook, new carpet throughout, bay windows. Upstairs unit has 2 bedrooms, bath, lg living room, kitchen & balcony. Lower level has 2 studio apts & bath. Sep. utilities for main and upper units. 3,064 sq ft MLS# 523770

Better Properties Heather Redal 253.363.5920

805 N Steele St

COMMERCIAL

Absolutely Charming, Mediterranean Style, custom built North Tacoma view home. Enjoy Commencement Bay view from Mstr Br balc. ,QVLGHIHDWLQFO0DUEOHĂ RRUHQWU\6W6WHHO$SSO *UDQFRXQWWRSV&XVWEXLOW+LFNRU\FDE%HDXW %UD]LOLDQ&KHUU\KDUGZRRGĂ RRU%D\ZLQGRZV 0VWUVXLWHZ)3 /UJEDWKVWHDPVKRZHU &DOLFORVHW1HZ(QHUJ\(IĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWKHDWLQJ&HQW YDFXXPQHZSDLQWLQ RXWQHZFDUSHW)LQLVKHG %VPWZNLWFKHQ&ORVHWR6FKRROV3DUNV )UHHZD\+RVSLWDOV :DWHUIURQW$623,000.

Gil Rigell Better Properties N. Proctor (253) 376-7787

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St.

HOMES FOR SALE

6711 36th St Ct NW, Gig Harbor

COMMERCIAL

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract LAKEWOOD FLORIST SHOP Same location 30+ years, owners retiring, Asking $60,000 cash. PORT ORCHARD, DOWNTOWN Food & Beverage, annual gross sales, approx. $1,500,000, excellent net. Owner selling real estate & the business for $1,050,000, terms avail., same location over 100 years. ice

RURAL LIVING: pr reduced Restaurant/Lounge in Ashford, WA Price for business, $105,000 with $25,000 down. Price for the real estate, $390,000 with $75,000 down. Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract includes a 3 B/R house, laundromat, restr./lounge bldg. on 3.4 acre, commercial zoned parcel. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;CALLAHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB & GRILL IN KEY CENTER Business is for sale for $300,000 with $100,000 down, High gross sales. Saler will also consider leasing the space

3 Bed, 1 3/4 Bath. 1,356 sq ft. Open Ă RRUSODQ YDXOWHGFHLOLQJVKLJKOLJKWWKLV handsome rambler on a park-like corner lot in Artondale. Kitchen features an island, new smooth-top stove & convection oven, tile countertops & bay windows. Family room ZLWKĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHLVSHUIHFWIRUHQWHUWDLQLQJDV is the large deck & fenced backyard. The master suite, one of three newly carpeted bedrooms, has French doors to the deck and a remodeled ž bathroom. 30-yr roof installed in 2005. 10 mins to schools, shopping, recreation & SR-16

$264,950 Debbie Houtz Better Properties 253-376-2280

MLS# 573155

Want bragging rights & the ability to name drop? Hans Grohe, Duravit, Kohler, & Porcher to name a few... Then this is the house for you-high end everything & custom touches galore. Need this spelled out in layman terms? Fabulous, fantastic & close to hip 6th Ave Biz District, this 4 bed, 2.5 bath home has natural, original woodwork, is an entertainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream, and is ready for new owners... Leave your hammer at your old KRXVHWKLVRQHLVĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGDQG Ă&#x20AC;QLVKHGZHOO,PLJKWDGG:HOFRPH

$368,000

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

COLLISION CENTER Same owner 15 yrs. Retiring, 6621 So. Tacoma Way. $130,000 with terms to qualified buyer - some training provided at 0 cost to buyer.

A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with no HOA. High &HLOLQJVJDVÂżUHSODFHVVHSDUDWHO\PHWHUHG &DOOIRUSULYDWHVKRZLQJWRGD\253.606.0689 BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME

$399,000

LAKEWOOD CAFE/LOUNGE on a busy intersection, $81,500 CASH.

CALL RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109

Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 21, 2014

Battle at the Boat 95

Keith Sweat

Michael McDonald

March 22, 7pm

March 29, 8:30pm

April 5, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $25, $40, $100

I-5 Showroom $30, $40, $55, $60

I-5 Showroom $40, $60, $95, $100

Bachman Turner

Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo

CageSport MMA XXX

April 11, 8:30pm

April 26, 8:30pm

May 3, 7pm

I-5 Showroom $35, $60, $85, $90

I-5 Showroom $35, $50, $75, $80

I-5 Showroom $35, $55, $100

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


Twa 3 21 14 p01