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FREE s Friday, March 14, 2014

LADY RAMS FIFTH AT STATE

A6

THE WISDOM OF LITTLE BILL

ST. PATRICK’S DAY EVENTS! B2

B1

Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

FOOD BANK GIFTED Eloise’s Cooking Pot earns new truck

ready, set,grow! Emerald Ridge High School’s

Marissa Modestowicz

PHOTOS BY AHMBUR BLUE

TRUCKIN’ IT. The community

named 2014 Daffodil Festival Queen

showed up on March 6 to congratulate Ahndrea Blue and the rest of Eloise’s Cooking Pot food bank on their new 2014 Toyota Tundra. The 2014 Toyota Tundra retails for around $26,000, but Eloise Cooking Pot was able to score their model for free due to Toyota’s 100 Cars for Good giveaway.

By Savannah Fry

F

Correspondent

amilies, schools and communities came together Friday, March 7, as the Daffodil Festival’s 2014 Royal Court took the stage at Life Center to see who would be awarded the title of Queen for the current festival year. KING 5 television’s Chris Egan and the current reigning Miss Washington Reina Almon oversaw the proceedings. The princesses gave their 25 speeches all themed around the 2014 Festival theme of “Ready, Set, Grow!” Daffodil Coronation mainstay Kerry Yanasak played piano in between the princess’ speeches, as he has for over 20 years. Nina Thach, from Mt. Tahoma High School, was under a fair amount of pressure as the first princess of the night to give a speech. However, she was confident in her ability to speak well. “When you walk up on stage, your audience doesn’t know what you’re going to say, so you can’t really mess up if the audience doesn’t know!” she said. Stephanie Jackson-Buena, from Chief Leschi High School, presented a speech that was grounded in her culture by integrating a native language that is no longer spoken into a moving story of how she helps preserve her heritage: “Its English name is Salish, and I’ve been learning it since I was 12, but I’m nowhere near fluent, and it was a language spoken throughout the Northwest.” Does she get the opportunity to speak it a lot? “Not as much as I’d like to,” she said. Kayla McElligott, from Fife High School, spoke of celebrating the milestones in her life. That’s what made her speech so easy, she said. “My comfort zone is being in front of people, so I wasn’t worried. I walked out and saw my family and people I loved… I just wanted to share my story.” And, of course, she looked forward to hearing the stories of her peers. “I couldn’t wait to hear what ‘Ready, Set, Grow!’ meant to the other princesses.” Delaney Fry, from Stadium High School, described the growth of a garden, and how this mirrors the abilities of the individual to help a community blossom, just like flowers. Lydia Mangan, from Henry Foss High School, gave a worldly speech, focusing on her time spent abroad, as an exchange student in France, and performing ballet in China, pertinent experiences for the ambitious future travel journalist. X See QUEEN / page A4

By Derek Shuck Derek@tacomaweekly.com

When Eloise’s Cooking Pot food bank’s truck was totaled last year, CEO and founder Ahndrea Blue was at a loss for what to do. Without a means of transportation, the elderly and disabled the food bank delivers to in the Tacoma area would have no way to receive their food. Even a replacement truck was not enough to X See TRUCK / page A4

WHAT’S RIGHT ųWITH TACOMA

IT TAKES A VILLAGE TO CONQUER CANCER And be sure to bring a notebook

By Kathleen Merryman Cancer pros want you to bring two things to every important appointment: A notebook and an advocate. No problem, my husband and I thought. We are reporters. We ask lots of questions. We carry notebooks the way trees carry leaves. The notebook buddy plan worked all through the scary introduction, through the lumpectomy, through the installation of the power port for chemotherapy drugs. We had no idea that all that was the easy part. MultiCare did. The cancer treatment team knew we were about to hit a tornado of info. Cytoxan, adriamycin, neulasta and taxol, X See CANCER / page A3

PHOTOS COURTESY OF DAFFODIL FESTIVAL

NEW QUEEN IS CROWNED. (Above two pho-

tos) Marissa Modestowicz (middle) of Emerald Ridge High School, along with princesses Haley Theriault, Ji Larson and Sydney Brown, hear Modestowicz’s name announced as the 2014 Daffodil Queen. (bottom) After getting congratulatory hugs, Modestowicz received her crown and big bouquet of flowers. HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE

Unidentified woman A3

CITY SEEKS INPUT ON STREET SAFETY: Tacoma hopes to get a little more pedestrian friendly. PAGE A2

Lady Abes compete at the Dome A6

Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) Creative solutions may come with a little social planning.You may encounter resistance from a partner or boss. Discussion in a lighthearted way may help avoid misunderstandings. The Full Moon in Virgo on Sunday may bring out your perfectionist side. Try to see the best in all things. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) This week’s focus is on water, which suggests you go with the flow and avoid wasting time on regrets. Make plans for the future and reorganize to accomplish your agenda. We are the company we keep so stick with positive and enthusiastic people to help keep up your upbeat rhythm. GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) Positive work and job process are the highlight for you this week. Don’t overlook the important details. Be honest and use a down-toearth approach for smooth success. Artistic and musical influences affect your instincts. A friend may have a great idea to consider.

LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Set your boundaries with others to avoid getting roped into too many projects. Be open to potential new opportunities while being selective. The New Moon brings a steamy romantic encounter. Experiment with other approaches. SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) Feeling bored and restless? Don’t let that distract you. You just may need some activities to challenge your physical and intellectual abilities. Plan that adventure you have always wanted. Have some fun this week with friends and loved ones.

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N N E F S I D E W A L K H X B F

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V A K B R U S T O N U Z X Y G Z

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) Practice self-reliance this week as you may not be able to count on anyone but yourself. A partner may be marching to their own beat that is different from yours. You may receive an unexpected invitation that brightens your day. Save extra cash for a rainy day.

CANCER (June 21 – July 22) Use patience this week as things may not go your way. The Full Moon on Sunday may highlight intense conversations this weekend. Willingness to compromise will help you be on the same wavelength with others. A new relationship may blossom.

CAPRICORN (December 22 – January 19) The Full Moon in Virgo highlights your travel and adventure sectors inspiring you to take a break or short vacation. New ideas may come to you from many areas. Figure out which techniques work best to avoid delay of plans. Don’t pussyfoot around.

LEO (July 23 – August 22) There is an old issue that may pop up this week. A friend may help you find a fresh perspective to help you work through this. The Full Moon on Sunday may bring on the urge to splurge. Shop smart and treat yourself. A new friend may come your way.

AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) This week’s atmosphere is favorable for romantic or creative opportunities.The Full Moon brings new challenging opportunities at work or in business. Know where you stand and make priorities to ease anxiety. Handle your money matters carefully.

VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) This is a social week for you with several opportunities to connect with people as part of a team. Pooling resources will get you farther faster. Stubborn opinions may affect you and patience will be needed during this Full Moon on Sunday. Let go and move on.

PISCES (February 19 – March 20) Try not to overdo it this week, as you may feel pressure from others. Overextending oneself can lead to more harm than good. The Full Moon on Sunday brings opportunities for romantic social events or may heighten intimacy with your partner. Relax and take time to pamper yourself.

ANAGRAM

GOLDEN GLOVES

Y I H S I F E H T E C I R U A M

F I K K S U U J W S J U G O X D

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Pothole pigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s *0;@:,,2:057<;65:;9,,;:(-,;@7961,*;:

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK VISIT US ON FACEBOOK MHJLIVVRJVT[HJVTH^LLRS`

21st and Fawcett Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;pothole initiative.â&#x20AC;? And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holeyness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or return â&#x20AC;&#x201C; each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma hopes to get a little more pedestrian friendly by spending $2.5 million on pedestrian improvements throughout the city, with about $300,000 going to each council district and $1 million set for downtown projects. But before any street crossings and yield signs go up, public hearings are set to see what neighborhoods want along their streets. Residents can either fill out a questionnaire on the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, March 17 through April 14, or attend community meetings in their neighborhoods starting later this month. Traditionally, the city has not budgeted general pedestrian improvements outside of the Hazardous Sidewalk Replacement Program and Americans with Disabilities Act Transition Plan. Instead, improvements have been made as construction projects were required to meet modern standards and as schoolchildren safety grant funding allowed. Neighborhood council districts

and business districts have lists of projects already identified around the city, so the meetings will help set priorities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first round of our public process is designed to capture this information, prioritize them based on traffic and safety standards, and provide a pre-design estimated construction cost to each improvement,â&#x20AC;? said Neighborhood and Community Services Specialist Carol Wolfe. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With this information, we can go back out to the public in round two, discuss the results and anticipated costs, and determine what projects will ultimately be completed. We will not have enough money to complete all the improvements; but as a result of this process, we will have districtwide lists that could be implemented should additional funds be made available in the future.â&#x20AC;?

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Monday, March 24 at the Center at Norpoint Cascade Room, 4818 Nassau Ave. N.E. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; District 2, which includes New Tacoma, Northeast and

Bulletin Board *65;9(*;69::6<./;-69;6;,4763, The City of Tacoma is seeking bids for work that would stabilize the 110-year-old historic Tacoma Totem Pole in Firemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Park in downtown Tacoma. The totem was flagged with safety issues after it was discovered last spring that the wood is riddled with rot and bugs. Bids call for contractors to install a support beam behind the 82-foot totem to keep it from falling over until a more permanent solution can be found. Those plans could mean moving the totem indoors to protect it from further weather damage. The totem pole was carved on Vashon Island and first stood at South 10th and A Streets before being moved to Firemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Park in 1953. The pole was designated an historic landmark in 1975. The project budget is $40,000 to $50,000. Bids will be received until March 31. 9(0:05.-<5+:56>2,@(:305296<;,.,;:62(@ The effort to raise the money for the Link rail expansion is well underway now that Sound Transitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s board has approved a route for the light rail expansion that would run tracks up Stadium Way and onto the Hilltop to South 19th Street. The route is now undergoing more detailed engineering and environmental review. It is expected to cost $165 million, which is already $15 million over budget. Sound Transit will pay $50 million with another $50 million expected to come from federal grants, while the remaining amount is expected to come from â&#x20AC;&#x153;local partnershipsâ&#x20AC;? that could mean in-kind services from the city, local tax breaks, a likely Local Improvement District and other yet-to-be-determined sources. All of the money must be determined before construction could begin. Whenever the track opens, the rides will not be free like the current Link route from the Tacoma Dome to the Theater District, since Link will start charging riders starting in the fall. Sound Transit Commissioners voted to begin collecting $1 fares from Tacoma Link rider and increase that fare to $1.50 per ride in the fall of 2016. Discounts will also be available for children and low-income riders. Fares will likely go up again when the expansion line starts running trains to help offset operational costs. ;(*64(6--,9:)0*@*3,-90,5+3@.9(5;: The City of Tacoma is empowering business districts to bring in more two-wheeled customers. To do it, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re offering businesses grants of up to $500 to encourage and promote cycling by customers, employees and business

parts of North Tacoma. Wednesday, March 26 at Blix Elementary Library, 1302 E. 38th St. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; District 4, which includes Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s East Side and parts of the South End Monday, March 31 at Birney Elementary Library, 1202 S. 76th St. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; District 5, which includes parts of the South End and South Tacoma. Wednesday, April 2 at the Tacoma Public Utilities Building Auditorium, 3628 South 35th Street â&#x20AC;&#x201C; District 3, which includes Central and parts of South Tacoma Wednesday, April 9, at the Main Library Branch, 1102 Tacoma Avenue South â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Downtown-zoned areas which include a portion of New Tacoma and a small section of the Central District; generally bounded by Division Avenue to the north, Yakima Avenue to the west, Dock Street to the east, and I-5 to the south (including a small portion of the Dome District) Thursday, April 10 at the Wilson High School Library, 1202 North Orchard â&#x20AC;&#x201C; District 1, which includes the West End and parts of North Tacoma. All meetings will be held from 6-7 p.m. and are open to residents that work or live in any part of Tacoma.

owners within Tacoma business districts while increasing cycling visibility. The grant opportunity falls on the heels of a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bicycles Mean Businessâ&#x20AC;? workshop that shared with Tacoma business districts the strong connection between bicycling and shopping local. Some of the bicycle-friendly business ideas shared at the event included: bicycle date night specials, shared merchant delivery bicycles, personalized safety information coasters/collateral, hotel guest bicycles or banners welcoming cyclists. Any business owner or member of a Tacoma business district is eligible to apply. Up to $500 will be approved per business district, there are 15 in Tacoma, and projects should have business district approval. The application and more information are available from the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, cityoftacoma.org. The deadline to apply is April 4, 2014. Tacoma residents and visitors can look forward to seeing the projects unfold during the April to December 2014 implementation timeframe. Those with questions may contact Active Transportation Coordinator Diane Wiatr at dwiatr@cityoftacoma.org.

4,,;;/,+(--6+037905*,::,:(;;(*64(4(33 Tacoma Mall is welcoming families to experience the magic of reading. On Saturday, March 15, from 2-4 p.m., Simon Kidgits Club at Tacoma Mall is hosting its free annual Book Blast event and inviting parents and children to bring books to life through special read-aloud sessions, story-inspired activities, and refreshments. The Pierce County Daffodil Princesses will be guest reading along with the mouse character from â&#x20AC;&#x153;If You Give a Mouse a Cookie.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacoma Mall is a destination for families and friends to do more than just shop, and through our Simon Kidgits Club, we are giving children the chance to experience all that books have to offer in a social setting,â&#x20AC;? said Sarah Bonds, director of marketing and business development at Tacoma Mall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The combination of education and fun allows kids in our community to have a blast with reading.â&#x20AC;? Simon Kidgits Clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Book Blast will provide families the chance to make reading a fun, social experience with various kid-focused offerings. Book Blast event activities, scheduled from 2-3 p.m., will kick off with a craft session and snacks with the mouse character from the popular childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;If You Give a Mouse a Cookie.â&#x20AC;? Then, from 3-4 p.m., the Daffodil Princesses, on the last stop of their reading tour, will read, craft, and take pictures with guests. Additionally, Simon is teaming up with Better World Books to provide each Kidgit member that attends the event a pre-loved book and bookmark to take home. Simon and Better World Books are also supporting literacy through a Drop Box book collection program. Families can participate in the program by donating books at the Drop Box.

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TEMPLE THEATRE Landmark Catering & Convention Center Saturday, March 29

the Ta k e n o o g a ta Chat Choo to n C h o oo Junctio et Tuxed and g ood M e h t ght In o o n li for a Mr e n a d e ! Se

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2 pm Matinee & 7:30 pm

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Tkts: call 253.383.3245 or visit the theater

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FORENSIC ARTIST RECONSTRUCTS FACE OF UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN

Investigators hope someone will identify woman killed in fiery crash

PHOTO CREDIT

BLESSING. The unidentified woman was buried in an unmarked grave at the Longview Memorial Park and Cemetery in

Cowlitz County. Investigators say some clues at the scene of the accident indicate she may have been Native American. In this photo taken on Jan. 8, Puyallup Tribe Cultural Director Connie McCloud and her sister, Peggy McCloud, give a blessing before the womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s body was exhumed. Connie McCloud said she did this, â&#x20AC;&#x153;To let her know this (exhuming) was being done to help identify her and get notification to the family for closure and healing.â&#x20AC;? By David Rose Correspondent

Washington State Patrol investigators now have new clues that may help identify a woman killed in a fiery truck crash on I-5 in Cowlitz County. Forensic artist Natalie Murry DAVID ROSE created a digital reconstruction of what she thinks the woman may have looked like. She was riding with longhaul trucker Lester Harvel when they were both killed after slamming into the back of another truck in Cowlitz County in 1991 after delivering a load in Tacoma. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a little bit difficult in the sense that there was a fire in the semi and things happen to bone in fire, and so I had to make

WCancer From page A1

ondansetron and dexamethasone were about to bust into our vocabulary, along with their trade names â&#x20AC;&#x201C; because remembering one name per drug would just be too easy. Our treatment team knew weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d need help â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that everybody needs help with this, and assigned us a nurse navigator. Calm, considerate, resourceful, non-judgmental, Robin manages to anticipate my mistakes, and steer me from rash to reasoned actions. What to do about a temperature? Robin knows. Where to

adjustments to that, to the shape of her cranium because it had changed from what it normally would have been,â&#x20AC;? said Murry. Her reconstruction is part science, part art and based on a witness description of the woman. Murry explains, â&#x20AC;&#x153;She was not what they would call pretty, but she was attractive. She had long, straight dark hair and high cheek bones and was wearing an earring with a feather and so they surmise that she might be Native American.â&#x20AC;? WSP detective Greg Wilcoxson and Cowlitz County Coroner Tim Davidson exhumed the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s body In January. Wilcoxson says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The driving force is just that all these years later, 22-plus years, we have a grave without a headstone or even a marker of any type and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sad to know that sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never been identified.â&#x20AC;?

find a good wig? Robin has the list. When to call Robin? Any time. Any time at all. Before I met Robin, before I knew enough to fear the tornado, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d done my prep reading. I got a binder to save every bill, prescription, report, info packet and schedule. Two months into this, the second binder is half full. My PET scan technician, the one who pinpointed the nest of invader cells behind my breastbone, gave me two LIVESTRONG workbooks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lance Armstrong? Really?â&#x20AC;? I thought after I thanked her kindly. The last time Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d run into a reference to the lying, cheating cyclist was in a bike shop on Kauai, where

State anthropologist Kathy Taylor rebuilt her skull then Murry photographed it and uploaded the images into her computer. She can spend up to 20 hours building this digital reconstruction. The Puyallup Tribe and Crime Stoppers of Tacoma-Pierce County funded the womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exhumation in hope that she can be returned to her family. Murry is hoping her reconstruction resembles her enough that a family member or friend might be able to identify her. Murry adds, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The main thing is that it sparks recognition.â&#x20AC;? The unidentified female has bad teeth, according to Murry, that included a gap in her front bottom teeth. If you know anything about the identity of this woman or think you recognize her, please call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222TIPS.

they had his poster at floor level, for convenient kicking. I could not imagine his cancer foundation had anything to say that I needed to read. Wrong, as usual. On a low day after surgery, I pulled the books out and read about the broader experience of cancer. The books told of young people facing infertility, and resources for families facing ruinous bills. They listed support services and gave contact info. They provided work sheets on everything from side effects to expenses. They explained how to make a will, and what to consider in a living will. It was good reading, and a decent invitation to admit that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a dark layer under all the confidence,

Rarely are deli customers as toasted as their sandwiches, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tacoma Weekly is interested in exactly what happened a Broadway what is happening in ourat community. Street location on March 1. After Please send your news and story ideas the sandwich restaurant, a toentering news@tacomaweekly.com. man began acting erratically when speaking to the only employee in the store. Instead of ordering food, he began yelling about his girlfriend and being accused of shooting someone, though to make it clear to the employee, he claimed he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a real gun, just a water gun, and he was most definitely not going to rob her. Thinking the suspect might be high, the employee contacted the police, who were able to apprehend the man exiting the store after he thoroughly scared both the employee and two customers. Despite the fact that all he claimed to do was buy a cookie, the suspect was arrested for trespassing and booked into Fife Jail. Another man tried to outdo the suspect by bringing his own type of party to a Pacific Avenue restaurant on March 1. After being kicked out of the location the previous night by an officer, the man returned to the fast food restaurant with friends and a bottle of whiskey, which they preceded to blatantly drink in the diner. The party was cut short when an officer was called to deal with the group. The suspectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s friends were able to leave without incident, while the suspect himself was arrested for trespassing and booked into Fife Jail. He didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get to take his whiskey with him. Compiled by Derek Shuck

technology and support that are carrying me through this. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s okay, the book said, to falter once in a while. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m lucky enough to have a cancer with research possibilities â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a cancer that can help some other woman down the line. I agreed to be a candidate for a clinical trial then learned that, if that did not work, I might fit into another study. This was great news. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m beating this cancer because others, mostly women, offered their bodies to researchers as living laboratories. It would be a privilege to do the same. Sign me up, I said. I also recognize my weakness in the face of too much information. I weighed it all â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all the notebooks and resource info and insurance

documents and bills â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and it came in at 12 pounds, six ounces. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a terrific, and necessary, reference, but daunting. And that is why, when I go in for chemotherapy, I take advantage of one of the finest advances in medical technology: The nurses. There are big spaces, as that chemical warfare drips through my port that I just want to read. And there are smaller spaces when the nurse sits with me during a shorter drip. â&#x20AC;&#x153;How are you doing?â&#x20AC;? sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ask. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any problems? Any questions?â&#x20AC;? I have my notebook, with those questions. And, in the nurse, and the oncology support team with her, I have my advocate.

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ROBBER

UNIDENTIFIED SERIAL ROBBERY SUSPECT

Tacoma Police detectives and Pierce County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s detectives need your help to identify the suspect responsible for up to eighteen armed robberies of convenience stores from December 26th, 2013 to March 8th, 2014. The robberies have occurred between 7:00 p.m. and 11:45 p.m. at convenience stores and gas stations in the City of Tacoma and in the Midland area of Pierce County.

Fridays at 10:30pm on

The pictured suspect enters the store, displays a handgun, demands cash and threatens to shoot the clerk. The suspect takes the cash and walks out of the store. The suspect is described as a black male in his 30â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, approximately 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; tall with a heavy build. During the robberies he was seen wearing a black hooded sweatshirt, black gloves, black shoes, black pants or dark blue jeans, and a black mask.

1,000

$

Receive up to for information leading to the arrest and charges filed for the person(s) in this case.

Call 253-591-5959 www.TPCrimestoppers.com

All Callers will remain anonymous

1-800-222-TIPS (8477)

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WTruck

From page A1

meet the growing needs of the hungry in the community. Luckily, a Toyota giveaway saw fit to give Eloiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a brand new 2014 Toyota Tundra, free of charge. The gift was a part of Toyotaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual 100 Cars for Good giveaway, in which the company provides non-profit organizations in need with a vehicle. The public votes for their favorite non-profits over a 90-day period, and Eloiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s was one of the lucky winners, and their brand new truck was handed over to them on March 6 at Titus-Will Toyota in Tacoma. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This truck is truly going to make a difference in our organization, and truly make a difference in our community,â&#x20AC;? Blue said. Eloiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, named after Blueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grandmother, is dedicated to serving southeast Tacoma, providing professionally cooked food to those in need. Eloiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cooking Pot was launched four years ago and has grown exponentially since then. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gone from serving 20 people, to about 1,500 people a week. We are just

blessed,â&#x20AC;? Blue said. In 2013, Eloiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cooking Pot served more than 800,000 people with nearly a million pounds of food, and 500 of these customers are currently on the delivery system. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The unique thing about this organization is itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not cans of food. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking about food from the four food groups. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking organic food, were talking about fresh food,â&#x20AC;? Cynthia Johnson, a Toyota representative who was at the presentation, said. With only one truck it has proven to be very difficult to meet the demand for deliveries, with six buildings currently on a waiting list for food. One of the buildings on the list is at 911 N. K Street, a complex full of elderly and disabled patrons. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It makes the difference of going without food. No meal in your tummy, [the truck] is huge,â&#x20AC;? Lynda Rometo, a representative from the building, said. Blue was provided with a six-year, 100,000-mile service agreement courtesy of Toyota. For more information on Eloise Cooking Pot, call (253) 426-1994. Eloiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cooking Pot is located at 3543 E. McKinley Ave.

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WQueen From page A1

Ji Larson, from Lincoln High School, gave an impassioned speech about overcoming challenges. Worried about speaking in front of a crowd, Ji found strength in her regal peers: â&#x20AC;&#x153;All the princesses were so supportiveâ&#x20AC;Ś they all told me that I did well and to relax and have fun because the hard part was over. I was kind of shaking and Lydia even held my hand after I sat down next to her. Everyone is so sweet.â&#x20AC;? Sarah Schroeder, from Wilson High School, spoke of the success of accomplishing your goals, similar to the same feelings she was experiencing that night. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was so readyâ&#x20AC;Ś but of course, once you start walking down that aisle, it hits

you that all these people are looking and waiting to hear from you! Kind of nerveracking, but once I got up there to say my speech, that all went away.â&#x20AC;? After the speeches concluded, Microsoftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mike Egan was there to share the good news â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and trade some quips with his younger brother Chris Egan â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that each princess was to be awarded the use of a Microsoft Surface, for use in juggling schoolwork with princess duties during their busy reign. The Pierce County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department was also there to announce another princess partnership, with the Charlieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dinosaur Foundation, which works to instill security and positivity in the lives of foster children. Mt. Tahomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nina Thach was awarded the title of Miss Congeniality. The

title comes with a scholarship from the Tacoma Yacht Club, which not only hosts the princesses at a special annual dinner but sponsors the Daffodil Marine Parade as well. The most important thing for Thach was that her peers were the ones to pick the title, but it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just her fellow princesses that made the night special: Daffodilian Ernie Ouellette had given her some words of encouragement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He told me, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Be proud to be called this titleâ&#x20AC;Ś Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing better than to be recognized and loved by the ones who have loved you these past four months. It shows your character more than any other title you could have received.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Stadiumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Delaney Fry was awarded the title of second runner-up, and said that she was proud of the strength of her court. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I look at our Royal Court â&#x20AC;&#x201C; at all of us â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I could have named so many people for any of these titles. We just have an amazing group of young women hereâ&#x20AC;Ś I knew we had all worked very hard to get to this point, and we did it together.â&#x20AC;? Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sarah Schroeder was given the title of first runner-up, and concurred, saying that the title could have belonged to anyone. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew I gave it all I had, but I just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think any of us knew what the outcome was going to be. We all deserved it. It was truly an overall exciting night.â&#x20AC;? The evening ended with the presentation of the 2014 Daffodil Festival Queen Marissa Modestowicz, from Emerald Ridge High School. With that, Lydia Mangan, from Foss, felt like the court was finally complete, and the journey could really start. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re more ready than ever to continue our work as leaders and mentors in our community. Marissa is going to make a fantastic queen and will represent this festival and Pierce County perfectlyâ&#x20AC;Ś This year will be one weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never forget and I feel incredibly blessed to be a part of it.â&#x20AC;?

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Guest Editorials

Joe Dear, a man of integrity and humility By Don C. Brunell It is rare that someone with deep roots in Washington State has his obituary published in the New York Times, but when Joe Dear died, the newspaper ran an extensive story. Dear, who was raised on the East Coast and migrated to Olympia to attend Evergreen State College, was the powerful chief investment officer at the California Public Employeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Retirement System (CalPERS) in Sacramento until losing his battle with prostate cancer on February 26. He was 62. Joe Dear was an anomaly. In this age of partisan vitriol, where the motives of politicians and bureaucrats are routinely suspect, Dear acted with integrity and humility. Perhaps best known for his work at CalPERS, most of us remember him for his days in our state. After graduating from Evergreen, he became research director for the Washington State Labor Council, AFL-CIO. Dear quickly earned the respect of Gov. Booth Gardner who appointed him deputy director of the Dept. of Labor and Industries (L&I). The agency was mired in controversy because workers compensation rates were skyrocketing and the system was dysfunctional. Employers and workers were experiencing doubledigit rate increases and prolonged waiting periods for claim closures and rehabilitation. The state legislature was in a tugof-war over privatizing workers comp. Gardner soon realized that it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

matter whether the state or private sector ran workers comp, it was fundamentally flawed. Dear quickly sized up the problems and brought warring parties to the table. Things changed. Part of the solution to L&Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s woes was better investment strategies for workers comp trust funds. Dear, with a BA in political economy, quickly learned about investment strategies, something that would become his trademark. He eventually became executive director at the Washington State Investment Board before moving to CalPERS. Dear had a knack for handling difficult issues with grace, wisdom and determination. In positions ripe for political sniping, he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t personalize differences; he solved problems in an even-keeled manner. He had the ability to develop a deep understanding of all points of views and found ways to respectfully address your concerns â&#x20AC;&#x201C; even if you didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t agree with his conclusion. He was a careful listener and a gifted mediator. Those traits earned him the respect of President Clinton who appointed him to head OSHA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Clinton needed Dear to tackle the highly charged ergonomics issues because of the exploding number of carpel tunnel and lower back injuries. That was one of Dearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s toughest assignments. When Gary Locke was elected governor, he immediately asked Dear to become his chief of staff, a tough job at any time but especially when

an administration is just forming. In that capacity, Dear carefully organized the Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cabinet and took on a number of touchy assignments. For example, when the state was struggling to implement K-12 education reforms â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the Washington Assessment of Student Learning (WASL) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dear was appointed to the lynchpin group recommending the rewards for successful school and the punishments for schools that failed to meet the learning standards. The group was chaired by Boeing CEO Frank Shrontz. Educators, from superintendents of schools to principals and teachers, were on pins and needles awaiting the outcome. Dear was a guiding light in that group, which ultimately produced a set of thoughtful recommendations. Dearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s accomplishment were many, as the New York Times pointed out, but he was one of those rare people who handled success with humility and dignity. Whether you knew Joe Dear as a student or as head of CalPERS, he was the same genuine guy. There is an old saying that people are seldom criticized for being too humble or overly caring. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why people loved Joe Dear and will miss him. Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He recently retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T DICTATE LANGUAGE Legislating on what people speak widens cultural divides By Daniel Ward The Ukrainian conflict has highlighted the instability of nations in which languages and cultures compete for dominance. Despite fundamental differences, parallels have been drawn with the situation in the U.S., where Spanish is now being seen as a challenge to English in some areas. Although there is no danger of a Ukrainian-style conflict in the U.S., more must be done to encourage linguistic integration and equal access to economic opportunities, and thus minimize the potential for tension between communities. In Ukraine, the division has been over-simplified by many commentators as an east (Russian-speaking) and west (Ukrainian-speaking) divide. Past polls indicate that a majority of Russian speakers living in the country have expressed loyalty to Ukraine and not Russia. Also, some people who identify themselves as Ukrainian-speaking may speak Russian in their day-to-day lives. However, the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s politics have been dominated by the linguistic divide since the breakup of the Soviet Union. Back in 2004, governors in eastern Ukraine warned that Russianspeaking regions in the east would secede if Viktor Yushchenko became president. The disputed election of Viktor Yanukovych, a Russia-backed candidate, was overturned and

Yushchenko won in a reelection. The country remained politically divided, but discussion of eastern secession quickly waned. Ten years later, Yanukovych, elected in 2010 after disappointment in the Orange Revolution, has been ousted, and the east-west divide has again come to the fore. Making Ukrainian the sole national language back in 1991 was a divisive move on which politicians have played to gain advantage. Yanukovych is a Russian speaker from the east and, despite his efforts to please nationalists by promoting the language, he still makes mistakes in Ukrainian. Yulia Tymoshenko (just released from jail), who lost the 2010 election, has spent years mastering Ukrainian, yet she called the 2012 law making Russian an official language â&#x20AC;&#x153;a crime against the state.â&#x20AC;? The lesson from Ukraine and other linguistically diverse nations is that the creation of an official language leads to division rather than unity. It is usually a ploy to cater to nationalistic minorities for political gain. Furthermore, the groups that speak unofficial languages become constitutionally excluded, while their languages and cultures are delegitimized. In the U.S., where states and cities have enshrined English as the sole official language, we should learn from this experience and allow languages to develop organically

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without governmental intervention. While Spanish is a very important language in the U.S. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; almost 40 million Americans speak it at home â&#x20AC;&#x201C; English is the de facto language of the nation and it does not need any official recognition as such. No matter how unjust it may be, the reality is that Americans who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t speak and write relatively well in English have less chance of economic success than those who do. Nobody knows that better than non-English speakers themselves, who are clamoring for classes, books, apps, CDs â&#x20AC;&#x201D; anything that will help them to learn the language. Instead of wasting time, effort, and money on amplifying divisions by creating a sole official language, we should be providing more free or lowcost programs to adult English learners and increasing investment in researchproven methodologies to help younger English learners achieve language competency and content knowledge hand in hand. Of course, the more forward-thinking English learners â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and native English speakers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will see it as an advantage rather than a threat to be competent in another language, too. Daniel Ward is editor of Language Magazine, www.languagemagazine. com.

MetroParks of Tacoma is floating a $198 million bond on the April 22 ballot that would improve parks and recreational facilities around the region with specific efforts for upgrades at neighborhoods. Outside the roster projects that would be paid for by the bond, it also shows that Tacoma has survived the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great Recession,â&#x20AC;? and is ready to pay more for quality of life improvements. At least that is what parks boosters are hoping, because the package is more than double the amount approved by voters in 2005 and will cost homeowners about $96 a year in property taxes for the next 10 years. That is not an insignificant amount for homeowners, but it is also an amount that would transform parks around the city. Most notable of the renovations would come at Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium, which is set to see about $64 million in improvements to replace the 50-year-old aquarium, as well as renovate the Polar Bear and Rocky Shores exhibit improvements. Parking, event spaces and landscaping will also get improved. Improvements there would boost the appeal of the tourist attraction and its role as an economic engine in the community. MetroParksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Northwest Trek in Eatonville is also expected to become more of a tourist draw with planned renovations. But most impactful for most Tacomans will be the list of improvements at neighborhood parks with added trails and amenities at Swan Creek Park, upgrades along the waterfront to add boat lifts, gangways, accessibility and safety features, shoreline signs, habitat restoration, and trail and pier improvements at Point Defiance Marina, Ruston Way parks, Dickman Mill Park, Titlow, Dash Point and Thea Foss Waterway parks. Seymour Botanical Conservatory at Wright Park would also get renovations. Still more improvements would be funded at Wapato, Norpoint, Jefferson, Franklin, and Stewart Heights parks. A new sprayground and infrastructure improvements at Eat Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lincoln Park. Improvements to provide expanded access including Alderwood, Alling, Baltimore, Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Point, Charlotteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blueberry Park, Cloverdale, Fern Hill, Ferry, Jane Clark, Lincoln Heights, Manitou, McKinley Playfield, McCarver, Neighborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, North Slope Historic, Northeast Tacoma Playfield, OaklandMadrona, Optimist, Peoples, Puget, Rogers, Sawyer Tot Lot, Sheridan, South, Stanley Playfield, STAR Center and Vassault parks. Bond dollars would also support programs at the Center at Norpoint and Peoples Center/Tacoma Nature Center as well as help the ongoing partnership to build a new community center to provide services to the Eastside, which has few park facilities. In an ideal world, it would have been nice if MetroParks floated two $150 million bonds to split the vote among neighborhood and regional projects given that the economy is still on the mend and people just might not be in as much of a giving mood as they hoped. But the package is what it is and would certainly make a difference. The last parks bond was approved in 2005, when a $84.3 million bond measure passed with 62.38 percent of the votes. That money was leveraged with grants and other money to add an additional $38.5 million in improvements. The proposed bond would fund about half of what parks officials have tallied in renovations and improvements, but it is a significant amount to eat away at that list. The bond deserves the community investment with an approval at the ballot box. The above opinion represents the view of Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s editorial board.

Letter to the Editor Dear Editor, I taught at Lincoln for several wonderful years. I know how great these young adults are, but their celebration of and for Kathleen Merryman deserves a shout out! Way to go, ABES!!! Ms. Merryman not only writes about what is good in Tacoma, she is a one of reasons the city is fabulous. Thank you, Lincoln family, for pointing it out. Willie Dickerson Snohomish, WA

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Sports

FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 2014

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

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LADY RAMS’ SURPRISE SEASON ENDS WITH 3A FIFTH-PLACE TROPHY

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 6

LADY ABES FALL IN FIRST TWO AT THE DOME Lincoln makes first state appearance in eight years

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

MOVING UP. (Top) Junior guard Kiaira

Thomas (1) leans for a layup in Lincoln’s opening loss to Cleveland. (Bottom) Lady Abes sophomore forward Tamia Braggs (33) puts up a one-handed jumper in the face of the Eagles’ defense. By Justin Gimse

By Jeremy Helling

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

W

ilson’s Lady Rams left it all on the floor for their final 3A State Basketball Tournament Game on March 8. They tried to keep up with a taller and better-rested Bellevue team, but fell short, going down 70-61 to earn the 3A Hardwood Classic fifth-place trophy. The young, upstart Wilson squad had left the court at nearly 11 p.m. the night before and was back warming up a mere 14 hours later at the Tacoma Dome. Wilson Coach Michelle Birge played every available player off of the bench to try and match the energy Bellevue brought to the contest, but in the end the Wolverines simply shot the ball better for the third-place trophy. “I told everyone the night before that we were going to need every single player to step up for us and everyone will play,” said Birge. “Because fatigue was really going to be a factor following two 9 p.m. games.” Wilson (20-7) jumped out to a 17-13 advantage to end the first quarter, as junior Amanda Darden hit a short-jumper with 10 seconds remaining to cap an 11-0 run for the Lady Rams. Bellevue bounced back in the second quarter taking a 32-30 lead into the locker room. The Wolverines stretched the lead to 54-39 at the end of the third, buoyed by 10-of-11 shooting from the free-throw line. Bellevue would go on to finish the game shooting 50 percent from the field, with Wilson managing 37.1 percent. Junior forward Violet Morrow led the Lady Rams with 21 points and six rebounds, while sensational freshman Josie Matz delivered 14 points. Bellevue (23-4) was led by Shelby Cansler’s 24 points and eight assists. Matz averaged 20.3 points and 4.7 rebounds for the tournament and was voted to the FirstTeam 3A All-Tournament Team. Morrow averaged 14.7 points and 10.6 rebounds, earning a spot on the All-Tournament Second-Team. “Josie’s an incredible freshman,” said Birge. “She’s been there at the helm all year long and been doing some amazing things for us. Violet does a lot of small things for us. When she embraces the go-to role the sky is the limit for this young lady.”

LADY RAMS’ FURIOUS FOURTH QUARTER NOT ENOUGH FOR TITLE SHOT

Things were quiet on the Wilson side of the Tacoma Dome as the Lady Rams struggled in the semifinals for three quarters, and fell behind 26 points before the start of the fourth quarter. It was a fabulous fourth, but the Lady Rams ran out of time, falling to a hot-shooting Bishop Blanchet squad 65-55 in the 3A State matchup on March 7. Josie Matz scored 12 of her team-high 22 points in the fourth quarter, and Wilson

X See BASKETBALL / page A9

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

ELEVATION. (Top) Wilson junior forward Violet Morrow (12)

finds space for a shot in the paint versus Bellevue. (Middle) Freshman guard Josie Matz (3) twists around Bellevue’s Elisa Park for a jumper. (Bottom) The Lady Rams’ Kiara Knox (10) gets a shot up over the outstretched arms of Blanchet’s Micah Lussier.

Lincoln got a rude introduction in its first state-tournament appearance in eight years. Cleveland raced out to a huge lead and coasted over the Lady Abes in their opener, and Lincoln was unable to catch up with Sunnyside the following day to be eliminated in the 3A girls state basketball tournament on March 6-7 at the Tacoma Dome. Still, it was a welcome experience for a building program that notched 20 wins in its first year under head coach Jamila Jones. “It has been a great year, from a foundation standpoint,” Jones said. “We wanted to leave with some hardware…but I think it’s a learning experience. To play at this level at the Tacoma Dome, you have to have a certain level of experience and basketball savvy to you.” From the start against Cleveland – the eventual state champs – the Lady Abes were flustered by pressure defense and a speedy transition offense. The Eagles charged out to a 12-0 lead midway through the first quarter on a steal and layup by Makala Roper, who finished with a game-high 19 points. With sophomore forward Tamia Braggs stuck on the bench in early foul trouble, Lincoln struggled to find a consistent source of offense, and Roper hit back-to-back threes late in the first quarter to extend the Eagles’ lead to 26-6. Cleveland coasted from there. The Lady Abes brought much more energy and efficiency on March 7 against Sunnyside, but a 10-point first-quarter lead helped the Grizzlies create some space in a 67-54 win to eliminate Lincoln. Breneya Johnson’s rebound and put-back less than three minutes into the game tied it at 9-9, but Sunnyside went on a 13-3 run to end the quarter, as Natalia Bazan’s jumper with five seconds left in the period made it 22-12. The Grizzlies led 38-26 at the break, and Emilee Maldonado – who finished with a team-high 19 points – extended it to 41-28 with a three-pointer two minutes into the third quarter. But Braggs came alive in the second half, pulling the Lady Abes back to within 44-38 with two free throws in the final minute of the third quarter. Braggs scored 16 points in the second half, but it wasn’t enough, as Sunnyside had an answer every time Lincoln made a charge. Braggs finished with 25 points and eight rebounds and Johnson added 13 points and nine rebounds, as the duo finished a combined 14-for-26 from the field. “I think we did well once we got the ball inside,” Jones said. Despite the bitter finish, Jones and the Lady Abes can take solace knowing that Braggs, junior guard Kiaira Thomas and sophomore guard Aamira Turner all return next year.

-YPKH`4HYJOÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNL

WILSON SETTLES FOR FIFTH IN 3A BOYS STATE TOURNEY RAMS TOP Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;DEA, FALL TO EASTSIDE CATHOLIC, BELLEVUE By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

Wilson came to the Tacoma Dome with high hopes, and started with a bang. After edging Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Dea in their opener, the Rams couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sustain the momentum, falling to Eastside Catholic and Bellevue to claim fifth place at the 3A boys state basketball tournament on March 6-8. The Rams showed no ill effects of the 9 a.m. tipoff in their opener against Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Dea, sinking seven of their first 10 shots and taking a 13-8 lead on Alphonso Andersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three-point play midway through the first quarter. The Rams were 12-for20 from the field in the first half, but led just 28-25 at the break. The Irishâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Quin Barnard began to heat up late in the third quarter, giving Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Dea its first lead since the early stages, at 36-35, with a three-pointer with 1:12 left in the period. Barnard nailed back-to-back threes early in the fourth to make it 46-40 with 6:37 to go in the game. The Rams stormed back, as Anderson capped a 10-1 run in just over two minutes with a turnaround jumper to make it 50-47. Anderson secured the win with a beautiful pass under the hoop to David Jenkins for a layup to make it 58-55 with 23 seconds left. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was supposed to be to me going to the basket,â&#x20AC;? Anderson said of the play. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The second half (Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Dea) kind of took it away. I made the best (decision), and we ended up making the bucket.â&#x20AC;? Ivy Smith, Jr. sank two

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

DRIVING HARD. (Left) Wilson point guard Ivy Smith, Jr. (1) drives past Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Deaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jamar Kemp in the Ramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tournament-opening win. (Middle) The Ramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Alphonso Anderson elevates for a layup over Eastside Catholicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ian Christie (33) and Zach Wallin. (Right) Senior guard Jamal Welch (23) rises for a jumper over Bellevueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kyle Foreman in the third-place game.

free throws with a second remaining, and Jamie Ormeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desperation threepointer for the Irish sailed over the backboard. Anderson led Wilson with 21 points and nine rebounds, while Smith, Jr. had 16 points and eight assists and Jenkins and Jamal Welch added eight points apiece. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re growing up, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re poised,â&#x20AC;? said Wilson head coach Dave Alwert of his group. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a big moment for them, per se. These guys play in a lot of different tournaments all year round, so this is just

another game.â&#x20AC;? The Rams came out sluggish in the semifinals against Eastside Catholic, and the Crusaders slowly wore them down in the second half to pull away for a 60-52 win on March 7. Wilson was just 4-for-21 from the floor in the first half, but trailed just 19-16 at the break to the equally lethargic Crusaders. But Eastside Catholic launched a quick 8-0 run at the start of the third quarter to take control, as Mandrell Worthy fed Nathan Christie for a layup to make it 27-16 at the 5:30 mark. Jenkins

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who was scoreless in the first half â&#x20AC;&#x201C; kept Wilson in the game with nine of his team-high 17 points in the third quarter. The Crusaders, meanwhile, keyed on Anderson all game, smothering him with double and triple-teams which left him with few good looks at the basket. Christie â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who scored a game-high 23 points â&#x20AC;&#x201C; delivered the dagger with 2:26 left in the game, nailing a threepointer as the shot clock expired to give the Crusaders a 50-40 lead. Wilson never got within six points the rest of the way.

Anderson finished with 15 points and 13 rebounds, while Jamal Welch added 11 points and seven rebounds for the Rams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We always say weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re young,â&#x20AC;? Alwert said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re experienced now. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been battle-tested. That game came down to execution, and they just outexecuted us at the end.â&#x20AC;? Turnovers cost the Rams dearly in their third-place contest against Bellevue on March 8, as Bellevue scored 23 points off Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 21 turnovers for a 71-61 win. Anderson had another monster effort for the Rams,

finishing with 23 points and 15 rebounds, while Jenkins had 11 points and Welch added 10 points. Bellevueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kyle Foreman led four Wolverines in double figures, finishing with 20 points, and Sharif Khan had 13 points and five steals. Despite falling short of the ultimate goal, the Narrows 3A champion Rams return four of five starters next year, and should be loaded for another postseason run. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll learn from this, and when we come back next year weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be even stronger,â&#x20AC;? Alwert said.

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24 34

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/0./:*/663)6@::6**,979,=0,> By Jeremy Helling

MOUNT TAHOMA

jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

The final buzzer has sounded on the basketball season, and spring sports are upon us. We start previewing the spring season with a look at the six Narrows League boys soccer teams in Tacoma.

STADIUM

The Tigers have much to replace off last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s state-tournament squad, but still have their sights set high under second-year head coach Adam Becker. Gone are dazzling forwards Max Harvey and Andrew Foreman and playmaking midfielder Jacob Beardemphl, but junior forward Gabe Castillo returns and is a breakout candidate after some solid performances last season. Senior defenders Austin Yon and Tyler Swenddal should shore up the back line, but all-league junior defender Bryce Ikeda will not play as he trains with the Sounders Academy. Becker noted that junior Hunter Hwang should make an impact either as a forward or midfielder. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking at a little different of a formation, something that will fit these kids really well,â&#x20AC;? Becker said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m conf ident,â&#x20AC;?

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

/0.//67,:(Left) Stadium junior forward Gabe Castillo will look to help fill the void left by several graduated star players. (Right) First-team all Narrows 3A midfielder Rene Ramos (9) will try to help guide Foss back to the playoffs.

he added of the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; chances. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to win the Narrows League every year.â&#x20AC;?

),33(9405,79,7

The Lions are looking to continue to mature, having just missed out on a playoff spot last year, but still feature a relatively young squad. Senior midf ielder

Drew Barker â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who finished with 11 goals and 10 assists last year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; returns to lead the attack. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a terrific player, a very exciting player,â&#x20AC;? said Bellarmine Prep head coach Joe Waters. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He can change the game in a split second.â&#x20AC;? Senior Eric Musica and junior Brendan Hartley will also contribute up front, and senior Chase Racquer and junior Dacin Titus will fill in in the middle. The Lionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense will be young â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as junior Connor Thompson is training with the Sounders Academy â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but sophomore Ryan Clarke is promising.

FOSS

The Falcons graduated star midfielder Pablo Santos â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the other half of the Narrows 3A co-MVP award â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but the excitement and depth continue to grow as they aim to return to the playoffs.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think this is going to be a better overall team year,â&#x20AC;? said head coach Mark Kramer, noting a much larger turnout at tryouts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be more of a balanced attackâ&#x20AC;Ś their level of commitment is high, and their expectations are even higher.â&#x20AC;? Senior all-league midfielder Rene Ramos returns to guide Fossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; attack, and junior forward Jesus Perez is poised to break out at striker. Sophomore Jordon Ramirez is another strong threat up front, junior defender Oliver Mogollan steps in as a leader on the back line, and junior keeper Sergio Barajas is a solid last line of defense.

>03:65

The Rams will look to build off of their appearance in the state tournament last year, as they return nearly their entire lineup plus a key piece who was absent last year.

Narrows 3A co-MVP Oswald Ramos, who struck for 11 goals last year, will again be a solid threat up front. Junior midfielder Evan Pichette â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who trained with Crossfire Academy last year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; returns to provide more punch in the middle, and speedy junior midfielder Munassar Saleh is a crafty scorer and distributor. Senior forward Stephen Osgood and junior Aarjay Narayan add to the Ramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; firepower, and head coach Jason Gjertsen expects freshman keeper Alec Greenleaf, midfielder Pablo Ramos and defender Nick Rhode to contribute as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last year we were good but we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really have depth off the bench,â&#x20AC;? said Gjertsen, noting the Rams have around 15 players who are capable of starting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our expectations are a little bit higher this year.â&#x20AC;?

The Thunderbirdsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rise to claim a playoff spot last spring has helped elevate the level of competition in the Narrows 3A, and they have high hopes again this year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think our biggest goal is to make sure last year wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a flash in the pan,â&#x20AC;? said head coach Scott Nelson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We might not have the ability to (finish first), but we have the ability to establish ourselves as a strong team in this division.â&#x20AC;? Graduated forward Brian Wambaa will be hard to replace, but the other half of the T-Birdsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; speedy one-two punch up front, senior Ian Karanja, returns to provide pace and touch at forward. Senior center midfielder Cesar Ramirez is a key piece to the attack, and junior Anthony Garibaldi is a playmaker in the middle as well. Senior defender Jorge Trejo and junior defender Tony Nguyen will lead the back line.

LINCOLN

Abes head coach Monte Gibbs is focusing on the finishing touch early this season, as Lincoln hopes to be able to keep pace with the other potent offenses in the league. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been known as a defensive team, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been known as a passing team,â&#x20AC;? Gibbs said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d really like to see us be able to finish this year. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been our Achilles heel.â&#x20AC;? Senior Philip Gyamfi should be a focus of the attack at midfielder or forward, and Gibbs noted that Spanish exchange student David Vazquez-Pinol is a promising midfielder that will contribute. Junior Angel Zuniga should lead the Abesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defenders, and sophomore Simon Capilla should step in at goalkeeper.

Local Restaurant Spotlight MY GREEK COMES TO THE SMALL SCREEN carried away with certain Greek traditions at the restaurant, allowing customers to smash their plates for a price. The extra cash didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go to the restaurant, mind you, but to his personal pockets. With this new information in mind, Morcos rectified the situation by firing the manager. Morcos has previously dealt with a similar situation at his old Puyallup location, when he discovered that several of his cooks were drinking the restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stock after the doors were MY GREEK WAS FEATURED ON THE FEB. 18 EDITION OF THE FOOT NETWORK SHOW â&#x20AC;&#x153;MYSTERY DINERS,â&#x20AC;? WHERE locked. UNDERCOVER ACTORS INVESTIGATE WHY RESTAURANTSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; MONEY GOES MISSING. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That type of thing is very common when you By Derek Shuck give someone the keys,â&#x20AC;? Morcos said. derek@tacomaweekly.com The My Greek episode was filmed last summer, and since then business has picked up considerably for the hen Nader Morcos, owner of the My restaurant. Greek food chain, returned from a threeâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything is fine, we had this scare six months day vacation, something seemed very ago, business is picking up, and the numbers are ahead,â&#x20AC;? wrong at his Tacoma location. The numMorcos said. bers didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite add up in his finance books, and there My Greek serves classic Greek food as well as were a lot of broken plates in the trash. Morcos was Italian and American food, everything from gyros to suspicious of the circumstances, considering he had Chicken Parmesan is available at the restaurant, though recently hired a new manager. the Greek tradition of smashing plates is most definitely Rather than ignore the issue, Morcos called the Food not allowed. Network â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mystery Dinersâ&#x20AC;? program, a reality show that My Greek is located at 2303 N. Pearl St. and can be investigates what happens at restaurants when the boss reached at (253) 752-2700. isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t around, using a combination of hidden cameras and undercover actors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was surprised how quickly they contacted me,â&#x20AC;? Morcos said. After submitting his application, the network got in touch with him a few days later, and a week after that the cavalry arrived. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I expected five or six people, and then a whole Mon ~ Thurs: 11:00am ~ 8:30pm crew and three trucks pulled up,â&#x20AC;? Morcos said, but still $ 99 Fri ~ Sat: 11:00am ~ 9:00pm served his guests samples of his classic Greek food. Sunday Closed Lunch The My Greek episode of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mystery Dinersâ&#x20AC;? aired Specials! on Feb. 18, and revealed some startling results. We have Korean food! It turns out the new manager was getting a little 6WK6W7DFRPDÂ&#x2021;

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WBasketball shot 8-for-12 as a team in the period following three quarters under 30 percent. Meanwhile, the Braves were on fire, converting 60 percent of their shots, including five 3-pointers in the first half. Blanchet would cool off to finish at 51.2 percent for the game, but the damage had already been done. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We never gave in against Bishop Blanchet,â&#x20AC;? said Birge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even though they smacked us pretty hard, we wanted to go out and fight for every inch and for every point to prove that although weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re coming up short on this game, we will be back. These ladies have a lot of heart and desire. We just have to get better at some small things.â&#x20AC;? Violet Morrow finished with 14 points and eight rebounds, while sophomore Kiki Knox added 10 points and nine rebounds for Wilson. Blanchet was led by Jadyn Bushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 22 points and eight rebounds.

LADY RAMS THROTTLE MERCER ISLAND IN 67,5,9

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

GRABBING THE BOARD. Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tyra Foster

(11) hauls in a rebound against Bellevueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Katie Holmes (24).

Josie Matz pulled another clutch performance out of the hat, leading the Wilson Lady Rams to a 58-33 Quarterfinal victory over Mercer Island on March

From page A6

6 at the Tacoma Dome to earn a return trip to the semifinals of the 3A State Hardwood Classic. Matz finished with 25 points, eight rebounds and three steals after a first-half struggle where she could only muster four points. Luckily, Wilson owned a 22-12 halftime advantage in a game where Mercer Island never had the lead. Mercer Island ended the game converting an abysmal 12.7 percent of their shots in the face of stiff Wilson defensive pressure and bad shot selection. Wilson out-rebounded the Islanders 63-40, led by Junior Violet Morrowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s massive 18 rebounds to go along with nine points. Senior Tyra Foster added another 11 rebounds and seven points.

           

      

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Become a Transit Leader in Your Community! Join Pierce Transitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Community Transportation Advisory Group (CTAG) and help shape the future of public transportation in Pierce County. Pierce Transit is accepting applications to fill three current vacancies on its Community Transportation Advisory Group (CTAG). New CTAG appointees will serve a three-year term, beginning with the first CTAG meeting on May 15, 2014 and ending May 14, 2017. The Pierce Transit CTAG consists of nine volunteer representatives who reflect the demographic diversity of the Pierce Transit service area. CTAG members serve an important role as informed stakeholders providing feedback on Pierce Transitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposed plans, policies and services, and acting as communication links between Pierce Transit and their various networks. The Pierce Transit CTAG meets monthly on the third Thursday of each month at 5:30pm at Pierce Transitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Training Center in Lakewood. Meetings generally last about two hours. Interested applicants may print the CTAG charter and applications from Pierce Transitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, or obtain an application packet at Pierce Transit Administrative Offices, 3701 96th Street SW, Lakewood, WA 98499. Office hours are 8:00am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00pm weekdays. Applicants must either reside or be actively employed, or be a full-time student within the Pierce Transit service area. Completed applications must be received in Pierce Transitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offices by 5:00pm, March 28, 2014. Pierce Transit will review all applications received by the deadline and schedule interviews for applicants deemed to be the best qualified. Interviews are planned for the week of April 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10, 2014. All applicants will be notified of their status, and the final three prospective appointees will be invited to preview a CTAG meeting on April 17, 2014. The Pierce Transit Board of Commissioners will approve and appoint the new CTAG members at its regular Board meeting on Monday, May 12, 2014 at 4:00pm.

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PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT SUPPORTING THE ECONOMIC GROWTH OF OUR COMMUNITY

The Puyallup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s donation of $200,000 to Northwest Harvest will help keep food on the table for countless struggling families.

Considered among the most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians has grown to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its own membership but sharing its wealth among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County, with a payroll of more than 3,300 people

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 74 percent of whom are non-Native. Working in the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities, these employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits. In 2012 the Tribe spent over $445 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more. Even during the recession, the Tribe increased employment and funded substantial vendor purchases and construction projects,

keeping many businesses afloat and people employed. As the country continues to recover from past economic woes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians leads the way locally. From sponsoring dozens of local charities, nonprofit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer or cease to exist, to protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and health care, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its well-deserved reputation as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the generous people,â&#x20AC;? a reflection of the meaning of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very name.

Support For Our Native Community To the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;communityâ&#x20AC;? means more than their own membership circle. With over 4,600 Puyallup tribal members locally and across the country, and an Indian population of over 24,000 in the tri-county area, the Puyallup Tribe takes great pride in continuing its ancestral ways by caring for Native American people across the board. HEALTHCARE The Puyallup Tribal Health Authority (PTHA) opened in 1974 and today offers a wide variety of services annually to a patient population of over 12,000 from more than 200 tribes. Services provided include medical, pediatrics, dental, pharmacy, laboratory, radiology, mental health counseling, tobacco cessation programs, problem gambling programs, and alcohol and drug treatment programs. Following the vision of continuous improvement, the Health Authority recently completed a 10,000-square-foot expansion, and is in the process of a renovation project that at completion will provide much needed clinical space by adding 13 exam rooms, six pediatric exam rooms and three dental operatories. PTHA was the first tribal clinic in the country to start an Osteopathic Family Medicine Residency in 2012. It began with two residents, and it was quickly recognized that expanding to four would go a long way toward filling access gaps. Four new residents began training in July. The residency will reach full capacity in FY15 with 12 residents. The vision of this program is to train new doctors to work in Indian Country with full understanding of how health is affected by the cultural, environmental and familial aspects of tribal communities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to train healers not just technicians,â&#x20AC;? said Clinical Director Dr. Alan Shelton, MD. PTHA received national attention from the White House when President Obama addressed PTHAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great success in a speech at the 2013 Tribal Nations Conference (in part): â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś[T]he Puyallup Tribal Health Authority in Washington State created the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first tribal family medicine residency program. Patients are cared for in a culturally sensitive way, often by Native American staff. And weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re seeing results â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a young physician caring for a revered Tribal Elder; a doctor who has delivered babies in the community for years, and now his son is also doing the same. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creating more quality health care, but also sustaining bonds between generations. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s progress that we need to build on.â&#x20AC;? ELDERS Caring for their elders is a top priority for the Tribe, with $4.5 million spent last year on elder care services. The Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beautiful House of Respect Elders Center â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a $13 million facility opened in 2009 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; stands as testament to the Puyallupsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; deeply held reverence for their elder membership. The center, located on a historically significant site above the Puyallup River, offers a variety of health and recreational options for Puyallup elders over 45 years old.

Lieutenant Governor Brad Owenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (back row, left) archery classes at Chief Leschi Schools have been a real hit with children and adults.

YOUTH For the youth, the Tribe works to proactively instill positive values in its young members as early as possible through several important means: Puyallup Tribal Community Center â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This 34,000square-foot facility includes a 15,000-square-foot gymnasium and other areas for youth activities. The facility will also accommodate gatherings for meetings, weddings, funerals and cultural activities. Chief Leschi Schools â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Providing a Native-focused academic environment for children in pre-kindergarten through high school, Chief Leschi Schools serves Native American students from more than 60 different tribes with current enrollment of approximately 890 students. As one of the largest Bureau of Indian Education (BIA) schools constructed in the nation, the 200,000square-foot school is intended to be a model for Native American programs around the country. Grandview Early Learning Center â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Providing quality and culturally appropriate early childhood care for Native children in the community, during 2013 Grandview Early Learning Center served over 120 families and 210 children.

there. For its members seeking higher education after high school, or their general equivalency degree (GED), the Puyallup Tribe ensures that funding is available for tuition assistance, books, tutoring and more. HOUSING Believing that everyone deserves a comfortable home to live in, the Puyallup Tribe and the Puyallup Nation Housing Authority (PNHA) strive to provide safe and sanitary housing for Puyallup tribal members and other Native Americans. During 2012, the Housing Authority spent over $4 million providing housing assistance to approximately 150 households. The recently completed Phase II of the Northeast Longhouse project in Tacoma added another 10 townhomes to the complex for a total of 20 townhomes. These housing units were built in an energy efficient manner and are culturally relevant to the community. Beyond providing safe and affordable housing, the Longhouse project also revitalized a struggling neighborhood. As the project came together, a long-stalled construction project across the street started up once again. Today, new singlefamily homes are now for sale on non-tribal land across the street.

Education opportunities within the Tribe donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.

City Life

Cottonwood Cutups CD Release Show

B5

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 2014

SECTION B, PAGE 1

THE WISDOM OF

LITTLE BILL LEGENDARY BLUES MAN REFLECTS ON WHAT HE’S LEARNED IN 75 YEARS By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

A

fter catching a screening of cult hit “Blackboard Jungle” one fateful day in at the Sunset Theater, Tacoma teens Bill Engelhardt, Buck Ormsby, Lasse Aines and Frank Dutra decided to form their own band, Little Bill & the Bluenotes. They started throwing teen dances and scored a national hit with “I Love an Angel” in 1959, the first of the rock era to come out of Tacoma. And thus began the legendary Northwest garage-rock scene that spawned the Wailers, the Ventures and the Sonics. In 2009, former Tacoma mayor Bill Baarsma declared March 28 “Little Bill Day” in commemoration of Engelhardt’s role as a regional rock pioneer. His actual 75th birthday falls on St. Patrick’s Day, though. Not that you’ll catch him celebrating publicly. “I don’t like working on my birthday,” the Mountlake Terrace resident said recently, “because March 17, for some reason, makes people feel they should get real drunk and boisterous. They all think they’re Irish.” So the party is set for 5 p.m. Sunday, March 16, at Immanuel Presbyterian Church, which is located at 901 N. J St., in Tacoma. Engelhardt will headline a special installment of the church’s monthly Blues Vespers series. He will be joined by Rod Cook on guitar, Russ Kammerer on drums, Ron Handee on trumpet, Brian Kent on tenor sax and guest vocalists Patti Allen, The Randy Oxford Band’s Jada Amy and Junkyard Jane’s Leanne Trevalyan. But, before that, we thought we’d ask him about some of the biggest lessons he’s learned over six decades as a performer. Here’s some of what he had to say: "Whether it's music – or whatever it is – just be honest with what you do and what you say. If you're not, people will see right through it, and that takes away all your credibility. Once you lose your credibility, with any form of what you do, it's hard to ever get that back."

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“I was telling my wife this story last night. When I was 21 years old, I got my first job in a bar. It was in Tacoma, and I was singing with these older guys. They were all in their 40s and 50s – maybe a little older than that, some of ‘em. “The drummer was an old guy, named Vernon

PHOTO BY ERNEST A. JASMIN

BLUES MAN. Little Bill Engelhardt performs at Destination Harley-Davidson in Fife on March 8. He’ll celebrate his 75th birthday during a special Blues Vespers show on March 16 at Immanuel Presbyterian Church.

Brown – a black guy. He’d sit back there on those drums and he’d say, ‘Sing the blues, Bill. Sing the blues.’ “On the breaks, we’d go outside. He drank Thunderbird wine, I remember. He’d tell me these great stories, and I just loved this guy, everything about him. I was so impressed with him, and I wanted him to be impressed with me. “One night, I decided – because I’m getting a little cocky now – that I’d come to work having smoked some marijuana. I’m up there, and I think I’m like Shecky Green or something. I think I’m real funny, and I’m screwin’ up the songs and everything. My set got over, and I was sitting at the bar. I'd say Vernon at that time was in his late '60s; and he walked over to me and he said, 'I thought you were special, but you're not.' Because I wasn't honest. I wasn't being honest. “I did win him back. But even when he said that, I'm sorry to say, it still took me a number of years to get my life together. But I'll never forget that. I'll never forget the look on his face, the look of disappointment, and how embarrassed I was. I was terribly embarrassed, and I should have been."

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“Our heroes in those days were all drunks and dope addicts: Hank Williams, John Coltrane, all guys that died young; and for some reason these were our heroes. (He chuckles.) “Do everything you can to not make the mistakes that I've made, and avoid anything that could take control of your life. Alcohol and drugs will do that to most people. Some people can drink and never (falter.) But you're playing real Russian roulette there. “I can remember going to work and thinking, ‘I just won’t have one drink. Then I’ll be fine.’ Then I’d sit down, and it was like somebody else was talking. ‘Yeah, I’ll have a beer and a shot of whiskey.’ I look back at that now and I think what a waste. What a waste. “After I was completely straightened up it was such a strange thing because I think I started believing in myself a little more. I wasn’t hiding behind anything, a bottle or a pill. I think I gained more confidence, for sure. I started really enjoying my family more, my kids. I’m so glad I straightened myself up by the time my grandkids came along. Yeah, you see things a lot differently.”

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“I think it’s really important to follow your dreams, and don’t let go of ‘em. I knew when I was 10 years

old what I was gonna do. There was no doubt in my mind. My dad had a cousin that played guitar, and I knew. So I followed that dream. “I have a disability, but it never occurred to me that I couldn’t do it. That never occurred to me. “I quit a couple of times and worked at day jobs. Basically, a lot of that had to do with my family. My wife was raising two little kids. Sometimes, you have to look at priorities, too. As it turned out, I got off the road. I stayed home with my family, and I sobered up; and my dreams just kept coming true. “I sit in my office right now. I'm not bragging, but there are awards on my wall, for God's sake. When I started, when I was 17, all I wanted was to be in a band. If you have a passion, stay with it. Follow it."

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“I think it’s really important, when you’re young – or even as you get older – that you ask all the questions you can think of to your aging relatives, about their life and what they went through. What happens, is pretty soon there’s no one left to ask. They’re gone. “I tell my kids that. I tell my grandchildren that. Ask me everything you can think of. I don’t want to die and have you say, ‘I wish I had asked him such and such.’ I think that’s really, really important. All my aunts and uncles are all gone. Even now – I’m 75 – I’ll think, ‘I wonder what happened there’ or, ‘I wonder how that came about.’ And I’ll think I’ve got nobody to ask. That’s really important, to stay in touch and find out as much about your family’s history as you possibly can.”

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“Don’t be afraid to tell someone you love ‘em. They don’t have to be a relative or a wife or a kid. That’s important. My dad never, ever said that word to me; and I learned from him not ever saying that word to me how important that word is. His way of saying I love you was to buy me something or give me money. But he couldn’t say those words, you know. “(Keyboard player) Buck England hasn’t worked with me for a while now, because his health is bad. We were talking a while back. I called him up. When he hung up he told me, ‘You know, Bill, I love you.’ ‘I love you, too, Buck.’ And I do. I think it’s OK to say that to someone. I guess I can thank my dad because he never did say that.”

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE GONGBI PAINTING

Center, 4851 South Tacoma Way. Artist reception March 20, 4-6 p.m.

TWO

WARRIOR HOMECOMING III

Gongbi painting is a detail style of meticulous brush painting done on rice paper with ink and colors using bamboo brushes. It is an ancient form of Chinese painting, developed in the Han Dynasty during the reign of the Chinese Emperors. It was recently brought to the U.S. during a cultural exchange with Chinese artists set up by Asia Pacific Cultural Center founder and artist Patsy Surh O’Connell. Kathy Thurston is the featured artist in this exhibit. Thurston’s exhibit is a westernized contemporary interpretation of this ancient art form, on display now through April 30 at Asia Pacific Cultural

SCINTILLATION The annual Wilson High School Scintillation Show Choir dinner and auction will take place Saturday, March 29, at the Charles Wright Academy Dome, 7723 Chambers Creek Rd. W. Doors open at 5 p.m. The evening includes performances by the Scintillation Show Choir and entrance into the silent auction that will have more than 400 items up for bid and 20 live auction items. Tickets $20 per person and include dinner and the auctions. Must be 21 to attend. For tickets, call Scintillation Booster President Stacy McCracken at (253) 222-0294, or Show Choir Director Wendy Shepherd at (253) 571-6156.

THREE ED TAYLOR Music man Ed Taylor, one of the most talented guitarists around, invites one and all to

help celebrate his new CD “It’s Complicated.” The event, titled “Ed Taylor and Friends,” is on March 22 at Slavonian Hall, 2306 N. 30th St; doors open at 6 p.m. for dinner and the first show starts at 7:30, second show at 9:30. Carol Handley will be MC for the event and special guest will be Eugenie Jones, who also has a brand new album out. The band: Doug Barnett on bass guitar, Mark Arrington on drums and Eugene Bien on keys; special guest will be the SaxMan himself Jeff Kashiwa. Visit www. bsquaredproductions.biz.

FOUR NW INDIAN ART Bill Holm, esteemed authority of Northwest Coast Indian Art, will give a special presentation at Fort Nisqually on March 22, 1 p.m. His topic will be the “The Northwest Gun in NW Coast Indian Art.” Bill is a legend in the field of Native American art. Seating

is limited and available on a first come, first served basis. HIS presentation is included with fort admission ($4-7). Copies of Bill’s book “Northwest Coast Indian Art” will be available for purchase in the museum store.

FIVE STRANGELY ALRIGHT Maurice the Fish Records has a major winner in the band Strangely Alright. With their radioPHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD ready pop highlighted by lyrics that have something good to say, the band appeals to a variety of tastes across the board. There is so much depth and quality to this group; it’s plain that there is real work and care put into the crafting of every song they play. Check out their new video at http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Zz71WY8q4g and experience their live show with Mr. Von (hip hop) and Devil on a Leash (rock) at Louie G’s on March 20, 8 p.m., all ages – part of the Maurice The Fish Records’ Music Mash-Up Series when, once a month, groups from different genres get together and create a show that has “something for everyone.”

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 14, 2014

8IQV\\PM\W_VOZMMV".Q^MXTIKM[ \WKMTMJZI\M;\8I\ZQKS¼[,Ia IZW]VL;W]\P;W]VL By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

T

acoma is gearing up for St. Patrick’s Day, one of the biggest party days of the year, and here are five hot spots for celebrating the big day.

Doyle’s Public House (208 St. Helens Ave., Tacoma): “Since it falls on a Monday, we’re prepared to celebrate Friday, Saturday and Sunday, as well,” bar manager Jesse Turcotte said. Towards that end, a big party tent has been erected in the parking lot between Doyle’s and neighboring King’s Books. Expect the venue to be standing room only for a weekend of music, ale, corned beef, cabbage and soccer. Saturday’s theme is “Working Man’s St. Patrick Day,” a pre-funk for the working stiffs that can’t take Monday off (or Tuesday morning, for that matter.) The Major League Soccer match between the Seattle Sounders and Toronto FC will be shown in the big tent at 1:30 p.m., followed by an appearance by Pierce County Firefighters Pipes & Drums at 7. Later, inside, the musical lineup will feature local bluegrass band, the Rusty Cleavers, playing tunes from its new, self-titled debut album at 8 p.m. and the Ethan Tucker Band at 9:30. Sunday will feature a big English Premier League soccer breakfast, with Manchester United versus Liverpool and Tottenham versus Arsenal being broadcast starting at 6:30 a.m. “Regardless of the day of the week, on St. Patrick’s Day we stay true to form and we fill up,” Turcotte said. The bar will open at 6 a.m. on Monday, and organizers expect 3,000 to 4,000 to circulate through the building throughout the course of the day. The musical lineup will include Tacoma singer-songwriter and “The Voice” contestant Stephanie Anne Johnson at 3 p.m., Science at 4:30 p.m., The Staxx Brothers at 6:15 p.m., Pierce County Firefighters Pipes & Drums at 8 p.m. and the Missionary Position headlining at 9 p.m. It’s free to get in until 3 p.m. after which there will be a $10 cover charge. For further details, call (253) 2727468 or visit www.doylespublichouse.com. Twisted Kilt Irish Pub (109 S. Meridian, Puyallup): TK Pub will host the biggest party in Puyallup, featuring tents, three bars, live music, DJs and giveaways all weekend long. Friday’s musical lineup includes Whiskey Syndicate, Ben Union and DJ Triple Nine. Up Saturday are Groove Colony, Grinder and a Flogging Molly cover band; and, on the big day it’s Johnny Cash tribute

PHOTO BY DENNIS WRIGHT

CHEERS! The big tent at Doyle’s Public House is usually ground zero for St. Paddy’s Day libation in Tacoma. band Folsom Prism and Just Dirt. Cover is $5 each day, but a $20 VIP bracelet gets you in all weekend, plus 10 percent off your tab through year’s end; (253) 604-4791 or visit www.tkirishpub.com. The Great Leprechaun Hunt: Tacoma Mob Riders is a group of local beer and cycling enthusiasts that embarks pedal-powered pub crawls every month that are open to anyone who has a bike and is 21 or older. This month’s St. Patrick’s Day-themed “booze cruise” will launch at 7 p.m. on March 15 at the Acme Tavern, 1310 Tacoma Ave. S., in Tacoma, and then depart for destinations unknown. Sure, founders Kris and Ranell Nystrom keep the evening’s stops under wraps, but we’re betting they’ll include a St. Paddy’s Day hot spot or two from this list. And, along the way, cruisers should keep their eyes peeled since there will be prizes for anyone who spots the leprechauns hidden along the route.

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E-mail private-idaho@comcast.net or look for Tacoma Mob Riders on Facebook for further details. St. Paddy’s Day Run: Tacoma City Marathon Association’s annual event will kick off at 8 a.m. on March 15, will have its annual St. Paddy’s Day Run with 10K, 5K and 1K races going from downtown to the scenic Ruston Way waterfront. View courses online at Registration by March 14, and view route maps at stpaddyruntacoma.com. Caladh Nua at the Rialto Theatre (901 Broadway, Tacoma): This Celtic quintet – pronounced Coll-ah Noo-Ah – will make it’s Tacoma debut on March 16, playing music steeped in the traditions of the southeastern counties of Ireland. The music starts at 7:30 p.m., and tickets are $19 to $49; (253) 591-5894 or www.broadwaycenter.org.

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Friday, March 14, 2014 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

‘AMERICAN QUR’AN’ ILLUMINATES KITTREDGE

CULTURE CORNER

A GUIDE TO THE MUSEUMS OF TACOMA

Muesum of the Week: Buffalo Soldier Museum

1940 S. Wilkeson St. Wed. and Sat., 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Info: http://www.buffalosoldierstacoma.org

IMAGE COURTESY OF ARTIST

SCRIBE. L.A. artist Sandow Birk has set out to hand copy the entirety of the Qur’an. Each sheet is illustrated with a scene from American Life. By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

I

n the minds of many Americans, the Qur’an (the holy book of Islam) is a thing exotic, mysterious and possibly sinister. It is thought to be the guidebook of bombers and beheaders and extremists against whom U.S. armed forces are fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. A prolonged period of war, terrorist threats and hyper surveillance has spawned a paranoid environment in which Muslims are regarded with suspicion. Such an environment is conducive to the spread of dehumanization and the tagging of “otherness” onto the people of the Islamic world. Enter Sandow Birk, a Los Angeles-based artist whose work deals with political matters and cultural critique. In a brilliant move to counter this downgrading of Muslims and Islamic culture, Birk has undertaken the herculean task of manually inscribing and illuminating the entire Qur’an. Birk calls the project “The American Qur’an.” Excerpts of the project are currently on view at University of Puget Sound’s Kittredge Gallery. Birk’s endeavor is to show the Qur’an as what it was meant to be: a universal message to all humankind. Each chapter, or Sura, is carefully written out in English (Birk uses copyright-free English translations). Birk developed a calligraphic script based in the graffiti-style of lettering prevalent in the American Urban environment. Surrounding the Qur’anic text are scenes of American

life. The scene depicted has some connection to the content of the particular chapter at hand. A page that mentions Noah’s ark, for example, is decorated with a scene of a man building a rowboat. The boat-in-progress is held together with pinch clamps with bright red handles. The garage door is open showing cupboards and tool chests. A red tricycle sits on the lawn nearby. The imagery is diverse. There are scenes of ethnic neighborhoods, of preschool playgrounds, of snowy residential streets and of surfers at the beach. There are also scenes of firefighters responding to disasters and an eerie image of the execution room of a prison. These are all hand painted with gouache and acrylic. The actual text of the Qur’an is floated atop the imagery like independent sheets that seem to eclipse the painted imagery. Figures are cut off and much is inferred without being shown. Birk has been working on the project for several years now and the task is still not complete. Birk is drawing upon a long tradition of inscribing and illuminating the Qur’an. He travelled widely in the Islamic world in preparation for the project. Birk is also an artist with some very impressive awards and fellowships in his resume. This month he is serving a residency at UPS, lecturing and teaching workshops. “American Qur’an” runs through April 12. For further information visit www. pugetsound.edu/news-and-events/campusnews/details/1285/. More of Birks work can be viewed at www.sandowbirk.com.

The 9th and 10th Horse Cavalry Buffalo Soldiers Museum’s mission is to educate, preserve and present the history and outstanding contributions made by America’s Buffalo Soldiers from 1866-1944, including WWII (1941-1945). The mission is achieved through educational programs, historic research, youth outreach programs and exhibits. The museum creates and disseminates knowledge about the history of the Buffalo Soldiers and their service and contributions. This is the story of the building of the Western Frontier. This is the forgotten story of American History.

Tacoma Museums: Fort Nisqually Living History Museum Point Defiance Park, 5400 N. Pearl St. Wed.-Sun., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Info:FortNisqually.org LeMay Car Museum 2702 E. D St., Tacoma, WA 98421 Mon.-Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: www.lemaymuseum.org/ Tacoma Art Museum 1701 Pacific Ave. Wed.–Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Closed Mondays and Tuesdays) www.tacomaartmuseum.org Museum of Glass 1801 Dock St. Wed.-Sat., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sun., noon to 5 p.m. Info: museumofglass.org Slater Museum of Natural History (currently under renovation) University of Puget Sound 1500 N. Warner St. #1088 slatermuseum@pugetsound.edu

Collins Memorial Library University of Puget Sound 1500 N. Warner St www.pugetsound.edu/academics/academic-resources/collins-memoriallibrary/ Scandinavian Cultural Center Pacific Lutheran University Hours: Sun. 1-4 p.m., Tue. and Wed. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Info: www.plu.edu/scancenter/ Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum 407 S. G St. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Info: www.rain.org/~karpeles/taqfrm. html Foss Waterway Seaport 705 Dock St. (Closed until Spring 2014) Info: www.fosswaterwayseaport.org/

Visit one today!

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, March 14, 2014

MUH GROG ZOO BRINGS UNIQUE IMPROV TO BROADWAY CENTER By Rachael Rice

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that we are doing something a little different when it comes to improv shows,â&#x20AC;? said Utley. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re pushing the boundaries of improvisational theater and our audiences are able to connect with us on a deeper emotional level.â&#x20AC;? The beauty of improvisational theater is that every show is one of a kind, at once priceless, freely expressive and unique to its audience. A show by Muh Grog Zoo is made even more of a commodity by virtue of its unique content. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rooted in comedy,â&#x20AC;? continued Utley. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our audiences arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t coming to our shows just to laugh.â&#x20AC;? The March 14 show will consist of two 35- to 40-minute one-act plays with a short 20-minute intermission in between. This performance is intended for audiences ages 18 and up. The show will be held in Studio III of the Broadway Center, 901 Broadway. Admission is free, but you have to register first with Tacoma Free For All, which is also free â&#x20AC;&#x201C; www.broadwaycenter.org.

editorial_intern@tacomaweekly.com

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n March 14, as a continuation of the Tacoma Fall Free for All, the Broadway Center will be hosting a free performance by Muh Grog Zoo, an improvisational theater cohort specializing in one-act plays. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We go on stage knowing nothing,â&#x20AC;? said Muh Grog Zoo member Adam Utley. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And by the end, with each other and with the audience, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve created a one-act play.â&#x20AC;? In other words, Muh Grog Zoo performances are entirely unscripted, unplanned, unstudied and showgoers should come expecting the unexpected. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing the audience can assume,â&#x20AC;? agreed Utley. Muh Grog Zoo is not your average improvisational theater troupe in that they do not focus on only the comedic aspects of improv, as many popular improvisational theater shows such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whose Line is it Anyway?â&#x20AC;? seem to. Muh Grog Zoo breaks from the stereotype of improvisational theater and tries to form emotional ties with their audiences.

Muh Grog Zoo Performance Schedule Broadway Center for the Performing Arts â&#x20AC;&#x201C; March 14 and June 6 at 7:30 p.m., free with Tacoma Free For All registration Lakewood Playhouse â&#x20AC;&#x201C; March 28, April 11, April 25, May 9, May 23, June 13, June 27, July 11, July 25, Aug. 8 and Aug. 22. Visit www.lakewoodplayhouse.org for show times (click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Improv Showsâ&#x20AC;?), tickets are $8 for a single, $10 for a pair.

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

Cottonwood Cutups to celebrate debut release at New Frontier Lounge By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

T

heir sound is twangy, but the attitude is pure punk. The Cottonwood Cutups have been rocking local hot spots with their rootsy, bluegrassinfluenced sound for 2 1/2 years; and, on March 22, the local trio will unleash its self-titled, full-length debut album at the New Frontier Lounge, 301 E. 25th St., in Tacoma. We caught up with upright bass player Ryan Ramsdell to get the skinny on his band’s new sounds. Tacoma Weekly: Give me some background on when and how this band got started. Ramsdell: There are some family ties here. My little sister married Joel Hill, the guitar player, so he’s my brother-in-law. And his little brother is Jesse, who is the mandolin and banjo player in the band. We have a family tradition on my side that we’ve been going to the Cottonwood Campgrounds, 20 minutes south of Forks. When Joel married in, he started bringing his brother, and they would come every year. We would start having campfire jams, and that kind of morphed into the beginnings of this band. We, technically, deemed ourselves a band in August of 2011. I actually didn’t start playing the bass until right about then; and Jesse, technically, is a guitar player by trade. But once he joined this band he started focusing on the mandolin and the banjo. TW: How would you describe what you do? Ramsdell: Americanafolk with a punk kind of leaning. The newer material we’re working on, that’s not on the album, tends to be a little harder. I think “Soulless Solstice,” which is the first song on the album, and “Eric’s House” are kind of indicators of where that punk influence comes from. We get frequently compared to the Devil Makes Three, and sometimes Old Crow Medicine Show. TW: I’ve seen you a

Nightlife

TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

DOYLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE WILL HOST THE BIGGEST ST. PATRICK’S DAY BASH IN TOWN WITH A MUSICAL LINEUP THAT INCLUDES STEPHANIE JOHNSON, THE STAXX BROTHERS, THE MISSIONARY POSITION AND MORE. MUSIC STARTS AT 3 P.M.; WWW.DOYLESPUBLICHOUSE.COM.

PHOTO BY KEVIN KNODELL

ROOTSY. Cottonwood Cutups release their new CD March 22.

few times live, but on the CD I’m struck by how you do have a more diverse sound than a lot of Celtic or bluegrass bands. Ramsdell: Yeah, we get tagged in with a lot of bluegrassers, but we’re not really traditional bluegrass. ... You kind of go through the tracks and you find out the three of us have different influences and a different feeling for music. When we put it together, it creates a whole spectrum of different genres, leaning into the Americana as being the bass of it. TW: On the one hand, you’ve got a collection of fun drinking songs. But when you really listen to the lyrics, you cover some dark stuff in there. Are they inspired by real things that happened? Ramsdell: Jesse tends to write his lyrics solo, and he’s the one who wrote the lyrics to songs like “Bitter Reminder of You” and “Charlie” and “Eric’s House” that feel a bit more bluegrass. And then songs like “Soulless” and “River Hoedown” were written by Joel and myself, and they tend to be a little bit more on the story side. In fact, “River Hoedown” (is) based on our origin story with a little bit of embellishment. The lyrics are actually about strangers that showed up at our campground, and we thought they were gonna kill us. But actually, they pulled out guitars and started jamming with us. TW: Well, that’s a better outcome than expected. So what do you have planned

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for the CD released show? Ramsdell: I connected with the Rusty Cleavers, which are good buddies of ours, and we play with them a lot. They’re a Tacoma local band. They call themselves “drunkgrass,” which is fitting. Then our band had played with McDougal down at the Doug Fir Lounge down in Portland earlier in the year. He frequents between Portland and Olympia ... and he’s pretty amazing. He’s a solo banjo player, sometimes guitar player. Typically, he’ll sit in a chair and use both his feet to play hi-hat, tambourine and bass drum; almost a gypsy-punk sort of thing. He is very talented. TW: Where can people find the CD? I think I’ve seen it on Amazon already. Ramsdell: It technically doesn’t hit digitally until (March 21.) ... It’ll go up on iTunes, and it’ll show up on Pandora, eventually - et cetera et cetera. I did drop off a few copies at Hi Voltage Records. They’re the only place that has physical copies in advance. It happens to be Jesse and my favorite haunt for vinyl in town. ... Otherwise, they’ll be able to get a ton of them at the CD release. THE PAST (130 MIN, R)

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EMERALD QUEEN: KUBE 93 Comedy Jam featuring Nick Cannon, Nate Jackson, Ralph Porter and Justin Hayes (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $20-$45

GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: The Hipsters (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Myles Weber (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: Curtis Salgado (blues, soul) 8 p.m., $15 MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rob Rideout Trio (rock) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Grinder (rock) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Tacomedy Contest Finals, 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE THURM’S: Blenis-Ely Band (blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA UNCLE SAM’S: Hambone Blues band featuring Jerry Miller, 8 p.m.

NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 4 p.m. THE SPAR: Mark Dufresne (blues) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman Allstars (classic rock) 8:30 p.m., NC

MONDAY, MARCH 17

JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Jazz & Beyond (live jam) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino, Brooke Lizotte (experimental jam) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: St. Paddy’s Day Bash

TUESDAY, MARCH 18 DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, MARCH 15 NEW FRONTIER: Argonaut, Deadkill, Levels (sludge metal) 9 p.m., $5

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19 B SHARP COFFEE: Eugenie Jones (jazz) 8 p.m., NC DOYLE’S: The Rusty Cleavers (bluegrass, country) 8 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Vàng trang (Vietnamese pop) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Myles Weber (comedy) 8:30, 10:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: Grand Royale (Beastie Boys tribute) 9 p.m., $7 LOUIE G’S: The Darna, Van Eps, Amadon, Stolen Society (rock) 7:30 p.m., AA THE SPAR: The Olsen Brothers (rock) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Kry (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 STONEGATE: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 9 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Tacomedy Contest Finals, 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAM’S: Fueling the Heathen, Skinwalker, Zorakaser (metal) 9 p.m.

JAZZBONES: Vokab Kompany (hip-hop) 8 p.m., $5

DAVE’S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar)

THURSDAY, MARCH 20 LOUIE G’S: Strangely Alright, Raymond Hayden (rock) 8 p.m., $5, AA

SUNDAY, MARCH 16

GLORIA (110 MIN, R)

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ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Leon Christian (classical guitar) 3 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m. IMMANUEL PRESBYTERIAN: Little Bill’s 75th birthday jam (blues, jazz) 5 p.m., NC,AA

502 MARTINI: Kim Archer (singer-songwriter) 5 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Sean Kent (comedy) 8 p.m., $10 STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open jam) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Twang Junkies (country) 9 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Tacoma Comedy Contest finals, 8 p.m., $10 UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

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Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 14, 2014

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: ‘MAN OF LA MANCHA’

Fri., March 14, 7 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse “Man of La Mancha” tells the story of the mad knight Don Quixote, as a play within a play performed by Cervantes and his fellow prisoners as he awaits a hearing with the Spanish Inquisition. Age rating PG-13. Info: (253) 565-6867

MOVIES & MUSIC AT THE LIBRARY Fri., March 14, 1:30 p.m. Tacoma Public Library – Main Branch What’s all the hoopla about Freegal and....Hoopla? You can now stream movies, music, videos and TV shows through your computer or most electronic devices for free from the library website. Info: (253) 292-2011 BUILT FORD TOUGH SERIES Sat., March 15, 8 p.m. Tacoma Dome The Top 35 bull riders in the world compete against the fiercest bucking bulls on the planet, providing two hours of thrills and spills guaranteed to keep you on the edgeof-your-seat and your heart pounding. Tickets $15-$100. Info: www.tacomadome.org PIER PEER Sat., March 15, 8-9 p.m. Foss Waterway Seaport Bring your family for an aquatic nighttime adventure! See and touch creatures brought up from the deep by local divers; observe hun-

dreds of mysterious creatures drawn to underwater lights. Price $8 per person Info: (253) 591-6439 RELAX AND RENEW Sun., March 16, 5:30-6:30 p.m. W.W. Seymour Conservatory Indulge in an hour of guided meditation and gentle movement in the beautiful tropical setting of the Conservatory in Wright Park. No experience is necessary, accessible to all. Price suggested donation $10. Info: (253) 5915330 ALMOST SPRING SWAP MEET Sun., March 16, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Washington State Fair Events Center 34th Annual Swap Meet featuring over 500 vendors, selling antique cars and parts and antiques and collectibles along with a classic/antique car show. Something for everyone. Price Saturday $5, Sunday $3, children under 12 free with adult, free parking. Info: (253) 833-3926

‘FIDDLER ON THE ROOF’ Sun., March 16, 2 p.m. Bellarmine Prep, 2300 S. Washington, Tacoma In the little village of Anatevka, Tevye, a poor dairyman, tries to instill in his five daughters the traditions of his tight-knit Jewish community in the face of changing social mores and the growing anti-Semitism of Czarist Russia. Price $8. Info: (253) 752-7701 ext. 807

WEE ONES WEEKLY FOR EVERYONE Mon., March 17, 9:30 a.m. Children’s Museum of Tacoma, 1501 Pacific Ave., Tacoma Drop in and enjoy thematic and musical programs perfect for toddlers, preschoolers and their grown-ups. Program participation includes 30 minutes of exclusive play in the Museum. Price: $15. Info: (253) 627-6031 ST. PATRICK’S DAY AT TIDES TAVERN Sat., March 15, 11 a.m. Tides Tavern, 2925 Harborview Dr., Gig Harbor Kick off your St. Patrick’s Day weekend with live music by “Pierce County Fire Fighters Pipes & Drums” from 6-6:30pm. Free. Info (253) 858-3982 GENEALOGY CLASS Mon., March 17 Heritage Quest Research Library, 1007 Main St., Sumner Join Dee Haviland Fournier to discover what is available and where to find often overlooked resources to embellish your family history. Price $15. Info: (253) 863-1806

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

PLU STUDENT SPOTLIGHT CONCERT Tues., March 18 Lagerquist Concert Hall, Mary Baker Russell Music Center The PLU Symphony Orchestra Student Spotlight Concert features winners of the 2013-2014 Student Soloists competition Marta Neumann, Vocalist and Kaichi Hirayama, Clarinetest. Jeffrey BellHanson, Conductor. Price: $8 general; $5 seniors, PLU Alumni; free for PLU community, students and 18 and under. Info: (253) 535-7787

lia Earhart’s accomplishments, one of which went by the name of Jacqueline Cochran. Price $10. Info: (253) 241-4166 WHEN RACHMANINOFF PLAYED TACOMA Thurs., March 20, 6:30 p.m. Washington State History Museum Before it was lost to fire in the 1960’s, and before it was a favorite destination of movie audiences as the Music Box in the 1940’s and 50’s, the Tacoma Theater was designed to be a great hall for performance, with the “largest stage on the Pacific Coast.” Free. Info: (253) 272-9747

MS WORD 2010 INTERMEDIATE Tues., March 18 Tacoma Public Library Main Branch This intermediate workshop follows the Word 2007 Basics class, introducing students to the following word processing features: setting margins and tabs, inserting images and creating tables. Price: Free. Info: (253) 591-5666

BALLROOM DANCING Thurs., March 20 Allenmore Events Center, 2125 S. Cedar St., Tacoma Thursday ballroom/variety dancing. Huge dance floor, great location at the all new Allenmore Golf and Events Center/Tacoma Elks. Open to members and guests. Price: $5 members, $10 guests/nonmembers, discounts for couples. Info: (253) 272-1117

CIVIL WAR PATHWAYS IN THE NW Wed., March 19, 7 p.m. Washington State History Museum Join the Washington State History Museum in its groundbreaking exploration of the American Civil War, and the role and impact it had on the Northwest territories. Info: (888) 238-4373

SEE ME NAKED Thurs., March 20, 7 p.m. Studio 3, Broadway Center In a performance which takes a humorous approach to body image, Seattle actress and writer Maria Glanz brings her wildly popular show, See Me Naked, a deeply honest interactive comedy. See Me Naked explores personal boundaries and feelings relating to being naked, both literally and symbolically. Info: broadwaycenter.org

EARLY WOMEN IN FLIGHT: JACKIE COCHRAN Wed., March 19 Garfield Book Company at PLU There were numerous women pilots who far exceeded Ame-

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE Kerri Bailey is a horticulturist and a certified herbalist. She makes custom blends and consults at Ubiquitous Journey (www.UBJourney.com) on 6th Avenue. Kerri owns two businesses – the online herb store www.HerbalElements.net and a water garden store inside Alpine Nursery in South Hill (www. AlpineGrows.com) called The Pond Pad (www.ThePondPad.com). She writes blogs on gardening, ponds, natural health and herbal remedies and teaches classes through Free University (www.FreeUNW.com).

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) Creative solutions may come with a little social planning.You may encounter resistance from a partner or boss. Discussion in a lighthearted way may help avoid misunderstandings. The Full Moon in Virgo on Sunday may bring out your perfectionist side. Try to see the best in all things. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) This week’s focus is on water, which suggests you go with the flow and avoid wasting time on regrets. Make plans for the future and reorganize to accomplish your agenda. We are the company we keep so stick with positive and enthusiastic people to help keep up your upbeat rhythm. GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) Positive work and job process are the highlight for you this week. Don’t overlook the important details. Be honest and use a down-toearth approach for smooth success. Artistic and musical influences affect your instincts. A friend may have a great idea to consider.

LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) Set your boundaries with others to avoid getting roped into too many projects. Be open to potential new opportunities while being selective. The New Moon brings a steamy romantic encounter. Experiment with other approaches. SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) Feeling bored and restless? Don’t let that distract you. You just may need some activities to challenge your physical and intellectual abilities. Plan that adventure you have always wanted. Have some fun this week with friends and loved ones.

WORD SEARCH O Z L X U I R E I E M M A D O G

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SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) Practice self-reliance this week as you may not be able to count on anyone but yourself. A partner may be marching to their own beat that is different from yours. You may receive an unexpected invitation that brightens your day. Save extra cash for a rainy day.

CANCER (June 21 – July 22) Use patience this week as things may not go your way. The Full Moon on Sunday may highlight intense conversations this weekend. Willingness to compromise will help you be on the same wavelength with others. A new relationship may blossom.

CAPRICORN (December 22 – January 19) The Full Moon in Virgo highlights your travel and adventure sectors inspiring you to take a break or short vacation. New ideas may come to you from many areas. Figure out which techniques work best to avoid delay of plans. Don’t pussyfoot around.

LEO (July 23 – August 22) There is an old issue that may pop up this week. A friend may help you find a fresh perspective to help you work through this. The Full Moon on Sunday may bring on the urge to splurge. Shop smart and treat yourself. A new friend may come your way.

AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) This week’s atmosphere is favorable for romantic or creative opportunities.The Full Moon brings new challenging opportunities at work or in business. Know where you stand and make priorities to ease anxiety. Handle your money matters carefully.

VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) This is a social week for you with several opportunities to connect with people as part of a team. Pooling resources will get you farther faster. Stubborn opinions may affect you and patience will be needed during this Full Moon on Sunday. Let go and move on.

PISCES (February 19 – March 20) Try not to overdo it this week, as you may feel pressure from others. Overextending oneself can lead to more harm than good. The Full Moon on Sunday brings opportunities for romantic social events or may heighten intimacy with your partner. Relax and take time to pamper yourself.

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NOTICES

NOTICES

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Public Hearing for Native American Education Program 2014-15 Grant Review to be Held March 27th

TO: Misty Carrillo In the Welfare of: C.B DOB: 01/27/2014 Case Number: PUY-CW-CW-2014-0004 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Review Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Continued Initial Hearing on Initial the 12th day of June, 2014 at 1:30 P.M.

Parents, teachers, administrators, and community members from the following school districts are invited to attend a public hearing on March 27, 2014 at the Puget Sound Educational Service District Tacoma 2IĂ&#x20AC;FH7KHIRUPXODJUDQWIRUWKH1DWLYH American Program will be reviewed for the 2014-15 school year. In addition, attendees will have the opportunity to provide input regarding the program.

WHO: Parents, school staff, students,

WHAT: Public Hearing regarding the 2014-

NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS.

WHEN: March 27, 2014, 5:00-7:00 pm

TO: Rosanna M. Johnson Case Name: Washington State Foster Care vs. Rosanna M. Johnson Case Number: PUY-CS-2007-0907-0425 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Show Cause Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Show Cause Hearing on the 26 day of March, 2014 at 9:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT. In the matter of the Estate for Georgia N. Parizo In the Tribal Court of Puyallup Tribe of Indians for the Puyallup Indian Reservation Probate has been established for the Estate of Georgia N. Parizo Case No. PUY-CV-LOA 2013-0308 7KHDERYHLGHQWLĂ&#x20AC;HG&DVH1XPEHULVQRWLFHRI Probate of the Deceased Georgia N. Parizo. Puyallup Tribal Probate Code 8.04.340, Notice to Creditors against Georgia N. Parizo and to the Tribe for presentation of their claims against the Estate, unless it is determined by the Court that the Estate is exempt from the claims of creditors. Georgia N. Parizo DOD; November 11,2013 2228 East Wright Ave Tacoma, Washington 98404 All persons having claimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s against the Estate are required to present such claims in writing with proper vouchers to the Administrator of the Estate listed EHORZZLWKLQGD\VRIWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWSULQWLQJRIWKLVQRWLFH Puyallup Tribal Probate Code; 8.04.350 Allowance or rejection of Claims. A claim not presented to the Administrator within 90 GD\VDIWHUQRWLFHWRFUHGLWRUVZDVĂ&#x20AC;UVWSRVWHGLVQRW barred, but such claim cannot be paid until the claims SUHVHQWHGZLWKLQWKDWSHULRGKDYHEHHQVDWLVĂ&#x20AC;HG B all claims presented to the Administrator shall be examined dated and endorsed with the words â&#x20AC;&#x153; examined and allowedâ&#x20AC;? if the Administrator is VDWLVĂ&#x20AC;HGWKHFODLPLVMXVWRUHQGRUVHGZLWKWKHZRUGV â&#x20AC;&#x153;examined and rejected if the Administrator is not so VDWLVĂ&#x20AC;HG PTPC; 8.04.360 Hearing on Rejected Claims. Any claimant whose claim has been rejected may request a hearing before the Tribal Court concerning WKHUHMHFWLRQRIWKHFODLPE\Ă&#x20AC;OLQJSHWLWLRQUHTXHVWLQJ such hearing within 30 days following the date the DGPLQLVWUDWRUĂ&#x20AC;OHGQRWLFHRIUHMHFWLRQFRQFHUQLQJVXFK claim with the Tribal Court. Claims against the Estate of Georgia N. Parizo may be sent the Administrator of this Estate may be processed to Lawrence La Pointe, 2228 Wright Ave East, Tacoma, Washington 98404 TO: David A. Mata In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs MATA, David A. Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0067 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing, May 20th, 2014 at 9:00am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT.

TO: Chayni Frazier In The Welfare of: Lincoln-Frazier, Aloya, Lincoln-Frazier, Joseph, Lincoln-Frazier, Aliya, Lincoln-Frazier, Nakia, and Lincoln-Frazier, Robert Case Number: PUY-CV-PC-2013-0180 PUY-CV-PC-2013-0181 PUY-CV-PC-2013-0182 PUY-CV-PC-2013-0183 PUY-CV-PC-2013-0184 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at 9:00am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy 253-770-8552

and community members from the following school districts: Bethel, Franklin Pierce, Peninsula, University Place, and Sumner.

If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

Need safe farms or barns for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. 7KH\DUHĂ&#x20AC;[HG vaccinated and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 298-0913

Pet of the Week

15 Native American Education Program

WHERE: Puget Sound Educational Service 'LVWULFW²7DFRPD2IĂ&#x20AC;FH Cascade Building 2316 S. South State Street, Suite D Tacoma, WA 98405

About the Native American Education Program The Native American Education Program facilitates academic success for Native students and helps all students become more aware of Native American culture, particularly within our region. Coordinated through Puget Sound Educational Service District, the program provides Education Coordinators LQĂ&#x20AC;YHSDUWLFLSDWLQJVFKRROGLVWULFWV%HWKHO Franklin Pierce, Peninsula, Sumner, and University Place (Pierce County).

EMPLOYMENT

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pandaâ&#x20AC;? :HRIWHQĂ&#x20AC;QGRXUVHOYHVLQWKHSUHVHQFHRIVSHFLDODQLPDOV ZKRUHTXLUHVSHFLDODWWHQWLRQ3DQGDFDPHWRXVRQ 9DOHQWLQH¡V'D\DVKLVRZQHUVFRXOGQRORQJHUJLYHKLPWKH SURSHUFDUHKHQHHGHG:KLOHJHWWLQJWRNQRZ3DQGDEHWWHU LWZDVGLVFRYHUHGWKDWKHKDVDQXQUHVROYHGVNLQFRQGLWLRQ FDOOHG(KOHUV'DQORVV\QGURPH+DYLQJWKLVV\QGURPHPHDQV WKDW3DQGD¡VVNLQLVH[WUHPHO\VHQVLWLYHDQGFDQEHGDPDJHG HDVLO\LIQRWKDQGOHGZLWKFDUH$OWKRXJKKLVVNLQPD\EH IUDJLOHWKLV\HDUROGEODFN ZKLWHER\ORYHVWRFXGGOHDQG FKDVHWKHRFFDVLRQDOODVHUWR\,I\RXVHHDSDWFKRIVXQOLJKW DFURVVWKHĂ RRU\RXZLOOPRVWOLNHO\Ă&#x20AC;QG3DQGDEDVNLQJLQLW 7KLVNLWW\ZRXOGGREHVWLQDTXLHWKRPHZLWKRXWFKLOGUHQGXH WRKLVPHGLFDOFRQGLWLRQ%ULQJPRUHORYHLQWR\RXUKRPHDQG PDNH3DQGD\RXUVWRGD\5HIHUHQFH$

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www.thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week 1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

DISCRIMINATION Experiencing Workplace Discrimination? Retired City of Tacoma Civil Rights Investigator will provide assistance. Call 253-565-6179. Never a fee for my services.

FOR SALE FURNITURE

FURNITURE

New 5 Piece Bedroom Set Full or Queen set includes: Headboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, & mirror. BRAND NEW! Only $400 253-539-1600

Adjustable Power Bed Brand New with memory foam mattress. Wall hugger with warranty. Delivery available. $995 253-537-3056

5 Piece Dining Room Set Table & 4 Chairs. New in box. Only $300 253539-1600 Microfiber Sectional Brand New REVERSIBLE sectional with chaise lounge. NEW! Only $500 253539-1600 All New Pillow Top Mattress Queen Size with warranty. Still in original plastic. Can deliver. $120. 253-537-3056 Solid Wood Bunk Beds Available in 2 colors. Brand new in box. Can break down to two separate twin beds. Delivery available. $250 253-539-1600 Low Profile Leather Bed Frame Still in box. Available in Full or Queen. Very nice. Can deliver. $250 253-539-1600 All New King Mattress Set 3 Piece King Mattress set for only $275. Still in original packaging with factory warranty. Can deliver. 253-537-3056

New Mission Style Bedroom Suite Solid wood Mission bedroom set. $699. Includes: headboard, footboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, and mirror. 253-539-1600

George loves it when you say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh George!â&#x20AC;? He is very loving, and usually comes when you call. George lived with a German Shepard that he got along great with, and he so gentle with kids. He has always been an indoor cat, but he loves to sit by the window to bird watch. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget he loves toy mice! Help George find his Forever Family today!

Teddy has come from the bottom, and he is rapidly moving to the top. This big man previously had quite the rough life, but it hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tarnished his easy going personality one bit. He is super sweet, attentive, and easily motivated. Help Teddy find the Forever Family heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been dreaming of.

ANTIQUES WANTED

New Overstuffed Microfiber sofa & Love Seat Still in plastic with manufactures warranty. Can have for $700. Lifetime warranty on frame. 253-539-1600 BRAND NEW! Queen Memory foam mattress set with 20 year warranty. Can Deliver. $400. 253-537-3056 New Pillow Top Full Mattress Only $99. Never used! Comes with manufactures warranty. Delivery available. 253537-3056

FREE TV. Hardwood Captain Chairs $175 each (four chairs). Dishwasher $200. (253) 846-1690. No calls Before 9 AM Please.

MOTORCYCLE 2013 Harley Davidson Sportster 1200 $9750

Low miles. Cash or possible financing 253-389-8410 williamsimons@yahoo.com

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105

AUTOS SPEND YOUR TAX DOLLARS HERE!

DANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S QUALITY CARS 429 ST HELENS AVE â&#x20AC;˘ TACOMA, WA 253.221.2209 OR 253.229.3636

DIVORCE? BANKRUPTCY? FORECLOSURE?

REPOSSESSION? BAD CREDIT? NO CREDIT?

NO PROBLEM! WWW.DANSQUALITYCARS.COM

VOLUNTEERS PAWS NEEDS WILDLIFE VOLUNTEERS PAWS in Lynnwood is looking for volunteers to help care for wildlife this spring. Every year, PAWS cares for more than 3,000 injured, orphaned or abandoned wildlife. Join the team and you can help feed and care for these remarkable animals. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a remarkable experience \RXZRQ¡WĂ&#x20AC;QGDQ\ZKHUH else! For any questions please contact Mark Coleman, Communications Manager, at 206.419.6646.

South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www.southsoundoutreach.org.

Citizenship Volunteers Looking for a rewarding experience? Help immigrants prepare to become citizens. You will help to provide instruction to legal permanent residents who need practice with the written and oral. Training will EHRIIHUHGWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWZHHN of January and classes will start in mid-January. Please contact Karen Thomas at (253) 3833951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse. org for more information.

Get involved with Metro Parks Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Citizen Advisory Councils! The Business & Responsive Agency Council helps district leadership with business planning, Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO VXVWDLQDELOLW\ decisions, revenue development and quality assurance. Monthly meetings focus on issues that affect the future of our park system. Visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/business-volunteer to learn more or call Brett Freshwaters, &KLHI)LQDQFLDO2IĂ&#x20AC;FHUDW 253.305.1081. Brettf@ tacomaparks.com.

Help a Child Improve Reading One-on-one support makes a huge difference in an elementary studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to overcome reading challenges. As a Read2Me Tutor for Tacoma Community House, you can be that person who makes a difference. We are on the lookout for committed tutors for grades 1-3. There are sessions at Manitou Park, Mann, McCarver, and Roosevelt Elementary Schools. The next orientations will be held in January. Call 253.383.3951 for more information. These are exciting times and you can make a difference! South Sound Outreach Services invites you to be trained as an In Person Assister Volunteer to help Pierce County residents enroll online for health insurance in the Washington Health Plan Finder. Open Enrollment is October 1 until March 31st. Coverage begins January 1st, 2014 for those enrolled by December 15th. Interested trainees may call Heather at SSOS 253-593-2111. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be glad you did!

Become a Senior Companion today! Volunteers help frail or disabled seniors stay in their own home and maintain their independence. Activities include running errands, providing transportation or simply being a friend. Hourly stipend and mileage reimbursement provided. Requirements: must be 55+, serve at least 15 hours a week and be lowincome. Drivers are especially needed currently. For more info call Julie Kerrigan, Program Director: 1(800) 335-8433, ext. 5686 Help furnish hope to those in need! NW Furniture Bank Volunteers needed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;NWFB helps restore hope, dignity and stability in our community by recycling donated furniture to people in need.â&#x20AC;? Tuesday-Saturday Truck Volunteers Needed- 9:00 am-2:00 pm. Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at volunteer@nwfurniturebank.org or call 253-3023868. Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs We need a volunteer to host programs Tuesday & Thursday 9:30-12, & 1-2:30 pm at Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs. Volunteer will be calling Bingo and doing some extreme crafting, gardening during spring & summer and into fall. If interested call Bonnie @ 253-278-1475 Monday- Friday 8:304PM. Ayusa International SeeksTacoma Host Parents for High School Exchange Students Ayusa International, a 30\HDUROG QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W WKDW promotes global learning through the hosting of high school foreign exchange students, is seeking parents/families in Tacoma to host for the upcoming 2013-2014 school year. Ayusa students are 15-18 years old and come from more than 60 countries around the world including Brazil, Japan, Germany, Ecuador, France, Peru, Morocco, China and Spain; they are DOO SURĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW LQ (QJOLVK For more information, please visit our website: www.ayusa.org

Project Homeless Connect is an annual event where homeless individuals can receive free services. The next event will be held at Tacoma Dome on Oct 23rd. For more information visit www.pchomelessconnect.com or call 253.593.2111.

Metro Parks Tacoma Special events bring the community together and provide families with affordable fun. Metro Parks Tacoma needs volunteers to help produce memorable events. Visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/volunteer and VLJQXS WR EH QRWLĂ&#x20AC;HG RI special event service opportunities. To learn more, contact Roxanne Miles, Volunteer Manager, at 253.305.1068. Roxannem@tacomaparks.com.

Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@tacomaparks.com or 253.305.1025. Join us in changing lives! Changing Rein Equine Assisted Activities and 7KHUDSLHV D QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W offers equine assisted services to differentlyabled individuals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and adaptive lessons. Other volunteer opportunities include: grounds maintenance and administrative/clerical work. Must be at least 14 years old to participate. Horse experience helpful, but not necessary. Training provided. For more information contact: Volunteer Coordinator at 253-3701429 or volunteer@ changingrein.org. The Tacoma Maritime Institute meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00 CONVERSATION PARTNERS NEEDED Help adults learn to speak English! Mornings, no experience or foreign language skills needed. South Tacoma. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy, 253-571-1887. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION VOLUNTEERS NEEDED If you enjoy helping toddlers learn, you can help us! Seeking retired or experienced volunteers to assist in expanding our capacity and provide quality learning for busy little people. (No diaper changing!) Background check required. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy 253-5711887 Be a Big Brother! Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG difference in the life of a child. There are severDOSURJUDPRSWLRQVWRĂ&#x20AC;W your schedule and interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agencyplanned activity. For more information, visit www.bbbsps.org or call 253.396.9630.

Friday, March 14, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV HOMES FOR SALE

Why NOW is the Time to Sell Your Home!

HOMES FOR SALE

1232 S Adams St.

â&#x20AC;˘ Interest rates are on the rise. Sell now and buy your next home before prices increase.

â&#x20AC;˘ Buyers are plentiful and listings are few. More buyers means a better environment for you to sell.

â&#x20AC;˘ Your home may no longer meet your needs. It is amazing how when you are in a home 3, 5, or 10 years how much your needs change. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get you into the right home for you while prices are still affordable for your next move.

I have buyers approved wanting to buy homes! Call Me Today! <RXUQH[WVWHSLVWRFDOOPHIRUDPDUNHWDQDO\VLVWRĂ&#x20AC;QGRXW what your home will sell for in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s market!

253-203-8985

www.StephanieLynch.com

Super charming home w/ the ease of newer amenities... Box beam ceilings, KDUGZRRGĂ RRUVPDUEOHHQWU\SLFWXUHSODWH UDLOV SHULRGVW\OHOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHVDGGWRWKH ambience, while newer roof, furnace/heat pump, indoor/outdoor speakers, newer ZLULQJSOXPELQJ JDVĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHDGGWRWKH ahhhh factor. Spacious living room, large kitchen, HUGE dining room, a bedroom and FXWHUHPRGHOHGEDWKURRPJUDFHWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVW Ă RRU*LJDQWLFGHFNZVHDWLQJZHOFRPH home. Move in and make it yours. $219,950

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

CALL 253.922.5317

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

Turn the Key & Move In! This Cozy 2Bd 1Bth has been freshly painted  IHDWXUHV UHĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHG ZRRG Ă RRUV  LQFK WULP around windows/doors & custom tile throughout. 8SJUDGHG (OHFWULFDO   3OXPELQJ 2IĂ&#x20AC;FH'HQ area, and large windows to enjoy Country Living and Northwest Wildlife at your doorstep! Privacy & Beauty all around! Situated on 1.12 acres (2 parcels), this property has Boundless Potential for Investor/Builder. Centrally located near highly desired schools, parks, water recreation and minutes to HWY 16 & local stores. This home is ready for your Inspiration!

Michelle Anguiano Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood

253.720.6525 PROPERTY

PROPERTY

65 Acres Sale or Trade. Tonasket Area Okanogan. Hunting Property Bordering U.S. Forest Service land. Frontage of Aeneas Valley Road. Sale or Trade at $1,000 per acre. Turkey and Deer abound. (206) 953-0356 Bill.

1388 N Lenore St. Information deemed liable but not guaranteed.

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

North Lakewood Single Unit Apt. 1 Bed Above Laundry Room Plus RV Spaces. No Pets. No Smoking. Screen $45. $550 Rent. Deposit $500 (253) 627-7830 Duplex, 2 bd, newly renovated, new carpet, paint, garage. Conveniently located. No pets. No smoking. Deposit is $850, Rent $945 Utilities Included, Sec. 8 OK. 5440 South Bell Tacoma WA 98408 (253) 886-4706 MOORAGE

MOORAGE

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

33 N Salmon Beach

Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton hydraulic boat Lift, brick wood burning Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHZLWKLQVHUWH[SDQVLYHGHFNLQJRQ all sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout the last 9 years, including URRIVLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZVGRRUVGHFNLQJ boat hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more. $450,000

936 S Sheridan $219,000 Boat Moorage at Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dock.

$9.50 per foot per month. 5 min. from I-5. Call Laura at (253) 627-3186

Cute little bungalow in Proctor! Nice upgrades include a new family room, windows, roof, energy package & carpet 6 years ago. Detached garage was converted to extra living space. It has a separate electric panel, heat & lights - lots of possibilities... music studio, art studio, exercise / yoga room, etc. Parking for 3 cars off the alley next to garage. Charming back yard, too! +DUGZRRGĂ RRUVXQGHUFDUSHWH[FHSWLQ family room. MLS# 518902. $204,950 Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

2711 Henry Road N

Beautiful Level Buildable Site! Located off of Ray Nash Drive NW, this 1.25 Acres of natural setting and mature Evergreen trees is perfect to build your dream home and enjoy the Country Lifestyle! Peek-a-Boo View of Mt. Rainier. Just minutes away from sought after Schools, Uptown Gig Harbor Amenities, Restaurants, WA-Hwy 16, Hospitals, Boat launch/water activities, tennis courts & Kopachuck State Park! Electricity is available at corner.

Michelle Anguiano Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood 253.720.6525

OLD TOWN $499,950 Amazing development potential with this unique 2OG7RZQSURSHUW\&LW\KDVJLYHQĂ&#x20AC;QDOSODW approval for 4 lots on this prime 3 acre piece. Big views possible from all lots in this great neighborhood, tucked back & out of the way. Walk to the historic Old Town district with its coffee shops, wine bar & restaurants.; then stroll down to the waterfront & enjoy the gorgeous Puget Sound setting with walking paths, public docks, shoreline restaurants & more! MLS# 332653

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

Beautiful Victorian 4-plex in good location back on the market after remodel. Walking distance to hospitals, downtown, parks. 0DLQ Ă RRU XQLW KDV RQH EHGURRP SOXV attached bonus room, dining room, lg kitchen with nook, new carpet throughout, bay windows. Upstairs unit has 2 bedrooms, bath, lg living room, kitchen & balcony. Lower level has 2 studio apts & bath. Sep. utilities for main and upper units. 3,064 sq ft MLS# 523770

HOMES FOR SALE

3728 N Gove St, Tacoma

STABLES

Dillon Stables. Covered, well-lit riding arena. 12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x12â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Stalls. Full care. Riding Lessons. Horses for Sale. $400 per month. (253) 606-4994

MT. RAINIER VIEW $125,000

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 222-8480

STABLES

Fantastic mid century modern centrally located near stores, schools, parks and easy commuting to freeways, yet house feels secluded and private due to professionally landscaped, lovely yard with zen paths and sustainable design. Fantastic NLWFKHQKDUGZRRGĂ RRUVPDVWHURQPDLQ great patio for entertaining- this is a wonderful home with lots of space. Move in ready and awaiting new owners. $282,000

Better Properties Heather Redal 253.363.5920

805 N Steele St

COMMERCIAL

Absolutely Charming, Mediterranean Style, custom built North Tacoma view home. Enjoy Commencement Bay view from Mstr Br balc. ,QVLGHIHDWLQFO0DUEOHĂ RRUHQWU\6W6WHHO$SSO *UDQFRXQWWRSV&XVWEXLOW+LFNRU\FDE%HDXW %UD]LOLDQ&KHUU\KDUGZRRGĂ RRU%D\ZLQGRZV 0VWUVXLWHZ)3 /UJEDWKVWHDPVKRZHU &DOLFORVHW1HZ(QHUJ\(IĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWKHDWLQJ&HQW YDFXXPQHZSDLQWLQ RXWQHZFDUSHW)LQLVKHG %VPWZNLWFKHQ&ORVHWR6FKRROV3DUNV )UHHZD\+RVSLWDOV :DWHUIURQW$623,000.

Gil Rigell Better Properties N. Proctor (253) 376-7787

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St.

HOMES FOR SALE

6711 36th St Ct NW, Gig Harbor

COMMERCIAL

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract LAKEWOOD FLORIST SHOP Same location 30+ years, owners retiring, Asking $60,000 cash. PORT ORCHARD, DOWNTOWN Food & Beverage, annual gross sales, approx. $1,500,000, excellent net. Owner selling real estate & the business for $1,050,000, terms avail., same location over 100 years. ice

RURAL LIVING: pr reduced Restaurant/Lounge in Ashford, WA Price for business, $105,000 with $25,000 down. Price for the real estate, $390,000 with $75,000 down. Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract includes a 3 B/R house, laundromat, restr./lounge bldg. on 3.4 acre, commercial zoned parcel. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;CALLAHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB & GRILL IN KEY CENTER Business is for sale for $300,000 with $100,000 down, High gross sales. Saler will also consider leasing the space

3 Bed, 1 3/4 Bath. 1,356 sq ft. Open Ă RRUSODQ YDXOWHGFHLOLQJVKLJKOLJKWWKLV handsome rambler on a park-like corner lot in Artondale. Kitchen features an island, new smooth-top stove & convection oven, tile countertops & bay windows. Family room ZLWKĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHLVSHUIHFWIRUHQWHUWDLQLQJDV is the large deck & fenced backyard. The master suite, one of three newly carpeted bedrooms, has French doors to the deck and a remodeled ž bathroom. 30-yr roof installed in 2005. 10 mins to schools, shopping, recreation & SR-16

$264,950 Debbie Houtz Better Properties 253-376-2280

MLS# 573155

Want bragging rights & the ability to name drop? Hans Grohe, Duravit, Kohler, & Porcher to name a few... Then this is the house for you-high end everything & custom touches galore. Need this spelled out in layman terms? Fabulous, fantastic & close to hip 6th Ave Biz District, this 4 bed, 2.5 bath home has natural, original woodwork, is an entertainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream, and is ready for new owners... Leave your hammer at your old KRXVHWKLVRQHLVĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGDQG Ă&#x20AC;QLVKHGZHOO,PLJKWDGG:HOFRPH

$368,000

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

COLLISION CENTER Same owner 15 yrs. Retiring, 6621 So. Tacoma Way. $130,000 with terms to qualified buyer - some training provided at 0 cost to buyer.

A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with no HOA. High &HLOLQJVJDVÂżUHSODFHVVHSDUDWHO\PHWHUHG &DOOIRUSULYDWHVKRZLQJWRGD\253.606.0689 BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME

$399,000

LAKEWOOD CAFE/LOUNGE on a busy intersection, $81,500 CASH.

CALL RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109

U

Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 14, 2014

KUBE 93 Comedy Jam Battle at the Boat 95 Starring Nick Cannon

Keith Sweat

March 14, 8:30pm

March 22, 7pm

March 29, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $20, $30, $40, $45

I-5 Showroom $25, $40, $100

I-5 Showroom $30, $40, $55, $60

Michael McDonald Bachman Turner

Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo

April 5, 8:30pm

April 11, 8:30pm

April 26, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $40, $60, $95, $100

I-5 Showroom $35, $60, $85, $90

I-5 Showroom $35, $50, $75, $80

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


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