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FREE s Friday, February 28, 2014

WRESTLERS AT MAT CLASSIC A6

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GROUND BREAKING

GRAND CINEMA AWARDS

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Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

PACIFIC AVE LIGHTS SPRING UP By Steve Dunkelberger

ity for ladder trucks to access the upper floors of the neighborhood’s buildings. The quick answer is that they won’t. City codes don’t require prior approval from the fire department for the installation of new streetlights, and the lights are well within current fire codes, fire spokesman Joe Meinecke said. “We were not in the loop in terms of the process,” he said.

Stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Pacific Avenue got a bit brighter with the installation of new overhead streetlights around the city’s downtown bar district. The web of lights, however, did prompt a question to the PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER Tacoma Fire Department about GOT A LIGHT? New streetlights were installed along the west end how the mesh of power lines of Pacific Avenue, a move that raised a question about fire safety. and cables would affect the abil-

WHAT’S RIGHT WITH TACOMA

“But we don’t see it as a highsafety concern.” If buildings around the meshed streetlights caught fire, firefighters would use the uphill entrances along Commerce Street, instead of on Pacific. That being said, the new lights prompted fire officials to meet with city officials about future installations of lights that could at least raise questions about public safety.

ų UWT forum focuses efforts of branding city By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

TOP PHOTO BY ED CURRAN / BOTTOM PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

ALL FOR ONE. (Top) Six of the Tacoma Weekly staff lined up to get their heads buzzed this week in solidarity with writer Kathleen “Kits” Merryman (middle, in blue), who is being treated for breast cancer. (Above left) Operations Manager Tim Meikle couldn’t wait to get his clippers to Managing Editor Matt Nagle’s hair; (middle) Merryman gets a hug from Meikle before she gives up her thick head of hair too; (right) and turnabout was fair play as Merryman gave Meikle a nice new head shave.

WHAT SOME OF OUR READERS CHOSE

THE LUCKY WOMAN’S GUIDE TO BREAST CANCER:

SURGERY EDITION Noir boob survives, so does rest of body

By Kathleen Merryman My right boob is such a diva. It gets to sleep next to my husband. The left boob gets the bedside lamp. The left boob toughed out needle biopsies of benign fibroids, and all it did was whimper a few times and bruise some. The right boob got one biopsy alerting us to a cancerous tumor the size of a Brazil nut and it turned into Susan Hayward in a 1958 prison flick. “I Want to Live!” it wailed. Then, to match the movie, it bruised noir. If it hadn’t been so tender, I would have given it a 1950s slap. Instead I admonished it to calm down, already. Maybe we could find a way where we both get to live. And that’s how it is turning out. Welcome to “The Lucky Woman’s Guide to Breast Cancer, Surgery Edition.” The diva boob tumor was pretty much self-contained, Dr. Virginia Stowell

LUMPECTOMY VS. MASTECTOMY:

explained to my husband and me. It was moderately differentiated invasive ductile carcinoma, she said, a common cancer, and she intended to cut it all out. How much of the boob went with it would be my choice. I was surprised to learn that the decision on whether to go with a mastectomy or a lumpectomy was mine. With my tumor, survival over time is the same with either of the two. There is, of course, the chance that cancer will come back in the same breast, or the other one. That chance is 10 percent with a lumpectomy and radiation only. We went for the lumpectomy for sound scientific reasons: I don’t like the idea of cutting off a boob. I like even less the idea of reconstructing it with an implant. And, back in December, I ran into a woman in a waiting room at the Carol Milgard Breast Health Center. She had a few years on me, and she was delighted that her lumpectomy had left her with a perky boob. It sounded X See CANCER / page A10

Every breast has its own story. That’s why, through the Magic of Facebook, I asked if the choice between lumpectomy and mastectomy had landed in your lap, and what you decided. Keep in mind as you read the responses that cancers are different, as are their treatments, which can also include radiation and chemotherapy. Carole Turner Parkhurst went with the mastectomy. “I had stage one breast cancer one year ago. I opted for the mastectomy and when I told the doctor, he said that’s what he would do for his wife. I didn’t have chemotherapy or radiation. I take an anti-estrogen pill every day for five years. The side effects are bad joint pain and inability to sleep. I live with the joint pain and have found relief for the sleep. I just had my one-year check-up last week and am fine.” Donna S. Casey wrote, “I received a lumpectomy at the start. However, as time went on I feared the cancer coming back, and I thought, ‘I am getting a double mastectomy.’” Out of the blue, she had a conversation with a woman whose cancer had come back 15 years after a double mastectomy. Casey talked with her treatment team and decided to stay with the lumpectomy and her medication. “I took my pills for 10 years and kept my breast,” she wrote.” I am Cancer Free!”

X See READERS / page A10

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE

Licoln tops Wilson in finals A6

New show at MOG B3

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) You are sensitive to those around you this week. Try not to take offense where there is none. Putting yourself in others’ shoes will give insight to others’ views you may see as stubborn. Give into compromise and allow things to flow. Rushing leads to mistakes. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) Pay attention to completing important tasks or chores this week. Mixed messages or misunderstandings may cause confusion. Someone may use harsh words or try to deceive you. Don’t cut corners – do the job right the first time. Take some special time to relax with your partner. GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) A change of perspective may help you get out of a sticky situation. Now is a great time to shine at work or find new employment or opportunity. There is a silver lining in the dark cloud that is lifting this week. Smile while you show your skills. CANCER (June 21 – July 22) It is a great time to fix that broken sink or tackle that DIY project you have been putting off. Family may join in for the fun. Study new techniques or take a class. Expanding your self-knowledge is fulfilling and comes easy for you. Finish what you start. LEO (July 23 – August 22) Things may seem to be going well yet try not to take on more than you can handle. Delegate to those who can help you manage. It’s okay to take a back seat for a while. Those that need your help may ask you for it. VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) An important transaction or real estate matter may be delayed. There is a chance those delays may work out in your favor. You become more sensitive to others’ feelings or point of view. A mysterious relationship could be revealed.

CHARTER REVIEW: Charter review looks at issues of utility oversight. PAGE A4

Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) You may find yourself reminiscing about the past. An old flame or friend may contact you on social media. Decide what is really important to you for the present and let go of what is not needed from the past. Exercise may help you relax. SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) Your intensity and passion may not be understood by others who do not share your emotional views. Romantic dreams or fantasies may occupy your time. Your partner may have a different agenda from your own or be resistant to your plans.

WORD SEARCH Y M S J A Z Z B O N E S T S A P

O U B B L A C K V I O L I N B F

Y B U R B A N B R A N D I N G W

Q J T R Y E S L P B B K K E R O

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L Y N I T S E D F O Y T I C I N

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O X K U F M E K T C V W U I E U

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) Your rebellious side may urge you to take that risk. Check the pros and cons carefully before making that investment or other moneymaking idea. Money may come easy to you. Plan your goals and execute them with precision. CAPRICORN (December 22 – January 19) Work may be hectic right now as you take on more responsibilities. Make your views heard to those who have the power for positive change. Balance work with home life. Learn to turn off your work mode so you can recharge. Romance your partner. AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) As Mercury rewinds, you are filled with brilliant ideas. Someone may not like your suggestions or not want to listen. This may take time before they turn around so don’t waste your time. Go over the fine print well before signing contracts. PISCES (February 19 – March 20) Allow your artistic and creative juices to flow as many thoughts may come your way. Inspiration comes in many ways. Look for subtle clues in everyday things. An amazing dream may give you insight into solving a problem or issue you are having. Enjoy a romantic moment.

ANAGRAM

SMOKEY ROBINSON

Horoscope, word search and more B6

A gathering of about 300 community activists, marketing professionals and city boosters took over William W. Philip Hall at University of Washington-Tacoma on Feb. 21 to hold an all-day forum on branding efforts. The forum was the fifth annual event hosted by the university’s Urban Studies Department as a way to develop ways for Tacomans to better focus their marketing efforts aimed at promoting the city in the shadow of Seattle. “Beyond Urban Branding: The Promise. The Problem. The Potential” walked attendees through the concept of branding cities with strategic marketing messages and effort through the experiences of writers and marketers in similar cities around the country. Previous urban branding efforts by various marketing folks in Tacoma included the tag lines of “No. 1 Wired City,” “Gritty City” and various versions of the area code “253.” This year’s forum hoped to spark a collective conversation about the ways and taglines to ponder to promote the area in a holistic way that involves all stakeholders, from residents and artists to businesses and educators, to government and nonprofits. “There are all sorts of people who can bring their talents to bear on this,” said forum panelist Jim Throgmorton, professor emeritus at University of Iowa and author of “Story and Sustainability.” The theme of creating an authentic branding message that includes as many aspects of Tacoma was repeated again and again throughout the day, meaning that a marketing message can’t simply be developed in a board room but through a collective process of community forums. Urban branding goes beyond the latest gimmicks in marketing, and should be tackled on many fronts, particularly for Tacoma, which struggles to define its identity outside of being the little sibling of

X See BRANDING / page A10

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Sports ........................A6 Make A Scene ........B5 A&E ....................... ....B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Two Sections | 20 Pages


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Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK VISIT US ON FACEBOOK MHJLIVVRJVT[HJVTH^LLRS`

7th and ‘G’ Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.� And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holeyness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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Bulletin Board *644<50;@.,;:<7+(;,: (;(4;9(2:;(;065>692:/67 Close to 60 community representatives participated in a workshop for the new Freighthouse Square station location on Feb. 19. The Washington Department of Transportation, Amtrak station design team and City of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s architect provided concept drawings for the station location, spanning westside, central and eastside areas of the Freighthouse Square building. The interactive workshop was the third public meeting to gather feedback on the new station. WSDOT updated the community on the public outreach process and summarized what was heard at the two previous station conversations. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s architect described the features, benefits, challenges and guiding principle ratings for each station location. Because the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s architect evaluated potential improvements for the entire building, other drawing elements included live/work spaces, retail and restaurants. WSDOT showed photos of existing Amtrak stations and described each stationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ownership structure. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These drawings are a work in progress,â&#x20AC;? said David Smelser, WSDOTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cascades rail program manager. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Federal funding will pay for the new Amtrak station. For additional building improvements, private or public partners, like the city, will be needed.â&#x20AC;? The community toured the boards displaying the concepts and talked one-on-one with WSDOTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s station design team and cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s architect. The meeting wrapped up with the attendees giving ideas on what they liked or didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like about the station locations. The Feb. 19 workshop comments and other comments provided to WSDOT will be considered during the development of a preferred location. A comment form is available online at http://www.wsdot. wa.gov/Projects/Rail/PNWRC_PtDefiance/feedback.htm. The preferred location concept will be presented to the community at the Amtrak Station Relocation Citizens Advisory Committee meeting on March 12. More information about the meeting will be provided as it becomes available. Another public meeting will follow in July on the preferred building method and materials. The schedule calls for preliminary design to occur July to October, before it goes to the Federal Railroad Administration for approval. Construction is planned for late 2015/early 2016, and will be completed one year later. Âş>/,9,>64,5:<**,,+(4,90*(:<**,,+:Âť U.S. Representative Derek Kilmer and special guest Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland invite you to a special event on strengthening womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic security. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where Women Succeed, America Succeedsâ&#x20AC;? takes place on March 7 at the Tacoma campus of Evergreen State College, 9-11 a.m. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s free and all are welcome, children and aduts. There will be resources and speakers on a variety of topics including financial security, food and nutrition, childcare resources, job training programs, higher education and housing resources and rights. If you plan to attend, please RSVP to Andrea Roper at (253) 272-3515 or e-mail andrea.roper@mail.house.gov. :6<;/:6<5+:<:;(05()030;@,?76 9,(*/,:6<;;6-(4030,: Got a T-shirt at home thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ready for a second life? Bring it to the free South Sound Sustainability Expo on Saturday, March 1. This year, attendees are being invited to screen print their own light-colored T-shirt from home or to buy a second-hand T-shirt at the event. The screen printing is just one of several ways the event intends to broaden its reach with more family-friendly activities this year. Plans also include a fun and educational Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Corner with the Tacoma Nature Center and Slater Museum of Natural History, mini farmers market with a farmer meet-n-greet, the chance to create a reclaimed materials art project with guidance from Tinkertopia and an expo scavenger hunt. The event runs from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Greater Tacoma Convention and Trade Center, where over 80 businesses, organizations and individuals with environmentally, economically and socially sustainable practices can answer attendee questions. Attendees also have the chance to win raffle prizes donated by Expo vendors. A line-up of workshops and short films for children and adults also helps connect attendees to resources: 10:05â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:20 a.m. Inspiring Local Projects (short films) 10:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:25 a.m. Backyard Chickens: Getting Started (workshop) 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:50 a.m. Thought-Provoking Sustainability Films 12:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:55 p.m. Solar Power: How it Works and How to Make it Work for You (workshop) 1:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1:20 p.m. Kid-friendly Films 1:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2:25 p.m. Sustainable Cooking Demo (workshop) 2:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2:55 p.m. Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Biggest Carbon Loser (short film)

Last year, more than 650 people attended the event with 88 percent reporting that their expectations had been met or exceeded. Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office of Environmental Policy & Sustainability, which heads up this effort, develops, promotes and implements sustainable practices through education, community partnerships and performance management. Additional sponsors and partners include Tacoma Public Utilities, Sustainable Works, University of Washington Tacoma, University of Puget Sound and Pacific Lutheran University.

.,;/,37>0;//,(3;/05:<9(5*,,596334,5; Gotten your health insurance? In partnership with its In-Person Assisters, Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department is sponsoring an enrollment event from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, March 1 at 12 locations countywide. Open enrollment continues through March 31. Through Feb. 11, 367,000 Washington residents have already enrolled in health insurance through the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s online exchange, the Washington Healthplanfinder. InPerson Assisters will answer questions and help you enroll at these locations at Super Saturday: South Sound Outreach, 1106 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, (253) 593-2111; Community Health Care, East Tanbara Health Center, 1708 E. 44th St., (253) 722-2154; Lakewood Clinic, 10510 Gravelly Lake Dr. SW, (253) 589-7030; Planned Parenthood (Puyallup), 702 30th Ave. SW, (206) 320-7610; Sea Mar Community Health Care, 2121 S. 19th St., (855) 2894503; Sea Mar Community Health Care (Puyallup), 10217 125th St. Court E., (855) 289-4503; Asia Pacific Cultural Center, 4851 South Tacoma Way, (253) 383-3900; Tillicum Library, 4916 Washington Ave. SW, (253) 548-3314; Pierce County Fire District 16 (Key Pen), 8911 Key Peninsula Hwy. N, Lakebay, WA 98349, (253) 204-9542; Korean Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association, 123 E. 96th St., (253) 535-4202; Brown Tones Productions/HELP, Oasis of Hope, 1937 S. G St., (253) 238-3642; Eatonville Family Agency, 305 W. Center St., (360) 832-6805. Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department organized the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Super Saturdayâ&#x20AC;? event with the support of the participating organizations. The Health Department is one of 10 lead organizations that the Washington Health Benefits Exchange selected to train and certify local in-person assisters. Through various community agencies, Pierce County residents can get one-on-one enrollment support. To date, over 20,000 low-income Pierce County adults are newly covered from Medicaid expansion. Those who are eligible for Medicaid can enroll any time. For more information on getting health insurance, visit www.tpchd.org/healthcarereform. Âş,+: 4,+:Âť;/,4,-69465+(@40?,9 The City of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next quarterly Monday Mixer networking event at the Hilltop Regional Health Center Community Room (1202 Martin Luther King Jr. Way) on March 3, from 5-6:30 p.m., focuses on Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s medical industry and the educational institutions that produce tomorrowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s generation of trained professionals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacoma is home to top-notch health care organizations, as well as fantastic schools, colleges and universities,â&#x20AC;? said Mayor Marilyn Strickland. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This upcoming Monday Mixer is a way to show them our appreciation and reinforce the relationships between these important employers and the institutions that train their highly skilled workforce.â&#x20AC;? Key staff from the City of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Community & Economic Development Department will be at the event along with various community leaders. Monday Mixers are free to attend and open to all. Bookmark and visit tacomameansbusiness.com for updates. 5(996>:)9,>05.3(<5*/,:;(*64(),,9>,,2 Tacoma Beer Week is just around the corner and Narrows Brewing Company is initiating the week-long series of beer-centric activities with the Tacoma Collaboration Kick-Off and Tap Takeover on Monday, March 3, at the Narrows Brewing Taproom, located at the historic Narrows Marina (doors open at 2 p.m.). The event will feature a â&#x20AC;&#x153;tap takeoverâ&#x20AC;? of dark beers, including Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Neo Noir â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a collaboration black Belgian IPA brewed earlier this year by Narrows Brewing Company, Engine House No. 9, Pacific Brewing and Malting Co., Harmon Brewing Company and Wingman Brewers. Other beers featured on tap will include Harmonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cross Pollination Imperial Coconut Honey, Narrows Brewingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Superbowl Tribute XLVlll Oatmeal Stout and more TBA. All pints sold during the Collaboration Kick-Off and Tap Takeover event will be priced at $4, with $1 from each pint sold going to benefit the Emergency Food Network. There will also be bins located at the brewery for patrons to make food donations in. Tacoma Beer Week is a week-long series of events hosted at various libation destinations in honor and celebration of the citiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sip-worthy suds, beer-riffic brewers and the patrons who support them. Narrows Brewing Company invites you to kick off this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s week-long homage to Tacoma beers by joining them on Monday, March 3. (By Margo Greenman)

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*67::,,2)(5296)),9>0;/+0:;05*;0=,/,(+>,(9.3(::,: By David Rose Correspondent

Pierce County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s detectives are asking for the publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s help identifying a serial bank robber with a thing DAVID ROSE for headgear and black rimmed glasses. The first robbery was on Dec. 5 at the Key Bank on Pacific Avenue South. The suspect was wearing a tan coat with a red and black hunting hat with ear flaps, and he used a blue scarf to hide his face. Det. Ed Troyer says the

crook wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t alone. He left in a stolen vehicle with a getaway driver. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So, we have a couple of bank robbers out there now that are pretty prolific and we need the publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s help getting them caught and getting them off the streets so nobody gets hurt and no more tellers are terrified,â&#x20AC;? Troyer said. The suspect hit a second time on New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eve, stealing money from the till at a Dennyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s restaurant. He was wearing a blue sweatshirt with an Oakley insignia on the front and a white bandana wrapped around his

head. The robberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third heist was on Feb. 10 at the Twin Star Credit Union on Pacific Avenue South. This time, he was wearing a yellow jacket with a dark stocking cap and bill with ear flaps. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This bank robber has glasses that are peculiarly unique, and we want to be able to find somebody who might know a guy whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wearing these type of glasses or seeing this disguise,â&#x20AC;? Troyer said. The tipster who calls Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-tips with the suspectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name will get a $1,000 reward from Crime Stoppers.

5,>:8<(9,-66; +,=,3674,5;)9,(2:.96<5+ By Derek Shuck

derek@tacomaweekly.com

Downtown Tacoma busted out the golden shovels to break ground on The Henry, a development complex on the Foss Waterway, on Feb. 20. The Henry, a sevenstory complex, is on schedule to be completed in August of 2015 and the city of Tacoma hopes it is a beacon to let developers know that downtown is open for business. The $32 million, 52,000-square-foot project will not only house a variety of studio, one- and two-bedroom apartment units, but also about 11,000 square feet worth of commercial space. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We think [The Henry] is going to help create more economic activity and building activity, were hoping to bring more developers into Tacoma to do what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing,â&#x20AC;? said Scott Carino, co-developer of The Henry. Scott, his brother

Local officers were able to Tacomaoutâ&#x20AC;? Weekly interestedfrom in â&#x20AC;&#x153;smoke a fewiscriminals what is happening our community. the Pierce CountyinTransit System. PleaseOn send your and decided story ideas Feb. 17,news a man to totry news@tacomaweekly.com. and ride the bus in style when he brought his cigar along. After entering a public bathroom in the transit area, the suspect decided to bust out the cigar and fill the bathroom with smoke, apparently to class up his trip. When another man complained to an officer, the officer investigated the bathroom and questioned the smoker on what he was doing. The suspectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only line of defense was, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sorry man, so sorry. You got me.â&#x20AC;? The man was then banned from all Pierce Transit property for the next year. Another transit patron had a different type of smoke up his sleeve on the same night. An officer was alerted that a man in the designated smoking area was smoking something that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t appear to be a cigarette. When confronted, the suspect admitted to smoking marijuana out of an aluminum can. When the officer ran the suspectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name in a database, he discovered he had previously been banned from Pierce Transit property. The suspect then claimed he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think he was on Pierce Transit property. The officer pointed out that literally one foot away was a giant sign marked â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacoma Dome Stationâ&#x20AC;? that the smoker had somehow failed to notice. The man was later booked into the Fife Jail. Compiled By Derek Shuck

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+0.05 Developers, investors and city officials all got together to celebrate the construction of the 52,000-square-foot Henry development on Thursday, Feb. 20.

Tony and his father Ernie are veterans of developing in the Tacoma area, building Theaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Landing downtown over ten years ago, where it has flourished and become a flagship project for downtown development. The Henry will offer 116 units ranging between 530 and 1200 square feet and within easy walking distance to

not only the Museum of Glass, but whatever commercial businesses end up in the complex. The apartment units will not be exclusively geared towards the younger crowd. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most people think apartments are for younger people, but we have a ton of retired people in [Theaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Landing],â&#x20AC;? Scott said.

Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recent emphasis on development has led to downtown being â&#x20AC;&#x153;open for business,â&#x20AC;? and this push has made Tacoma an attractive city for both businesses and developers, beginning with the arrival of State Farm last year. The Carinos have had a positive experience bringing The Henry to Tacoma.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We got our permits in August, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re building now,â&#x20AC;? Scott said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If this was the city of Seattle, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be building a year and a half from now.â&#x20AC;? The Henry is expected to have its first tenants move in during the summer of 2015, with rent ranging anywhere from between $1,000 and $2,300 per month.

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Orting Police detectives need your help to identify the suspect(s) responsible for the murder of 53-year-old Michael Compton. At 3:15 a.m. on Wednesday, February 19th, 2014, the body of homicide victim Michael Compton was found in the front yard of Comptonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residence, located in the 500 block of Ford Lane SW in the City of Orting. The victim had been shot in the head by an unidentified Fridays at 10:30pm on

suspect(s). Detectives believe Compton may have been shot during a struggle after interrupting a burglary in his garage sometime between 1:00 a.m. and 3:00 a.m. Detectives are looking for information on any suspicious persons and/or vehicles seen in the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neighborhood in the early morning hours of Wednesday February 19th.

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*/(9;,99,=0,>3662:(;0::<,:6-<;030;@6=,9:0./; By Steve Dunkelberger Stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The operations of the City of Tacoma and the services it provides doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get more personal for its residents than who controls the power that flows through their light switches or provides the water used to flush their toilets. People largely donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care about such services, until they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work or come at a higher price. Few things breed discontent more than a toilet that canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t flush. In the City of Destiny, these finer things of life are provided largely by Tacoma Public Utilities, a publicly owned company formed in 1893 that is the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest department. It has 1,350 employees and a budget of more than $1 billion a year, but works partially independently of City Council decisions. It has an all-volunteer Public Utility Board of five Tacoma residents that serve as its board of directors. The board makes policy and project decisions for TPUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s power, water, rail and Internet services, while the City Council appoints the board, approves its budget and

approves rate changes. Some Tacomans think the City Council should have direct oversight of a utility of that size rather than have decisions left in the hands of bureaucrats and volunteer board members. Others fear politicizing power and water rates would bring trouble. The Charter Review Committee is pondering the issue as part of its roster of recommendations to the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s governance. Supporters of shifting utilities under direct council oversight include review committee chair and former mayor Bill Baarsma and former council member and former Pierce County Executive John Ladenburg. A big issue in their argument is the debacle surrounding the utility boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decisions in the 1970s to invest in Washington Public Power Supply Systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nuclear power plants in Hanford and Grays Harbor County. Utilities around the nation were investing in nuclear power plants with projections of higher electricity use in the years to come. TPU and other Puget Sound cities bought into WPPSS, or what would later be known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;whoops.â&#x20AC;? It proved to

be a bad deal. Cost overruns and mismanagement led to the default of $2.25 billion in municipal bonds and years of lawsuits. Tacoma ratepayers were on the hook for $40.3 million in debt that they paid off through a 15 percent electricity surcharge that lasted for years without a single watt of power ever being generated. The City Council at the time approved the investment but eventually pulled the plug after budgets were revised and revised again as costs skyrocketed, said Ladenburg, who was on the council at the time. He noted that the council eventually killed the deal after receiving financial documents from other utilities and members of the media that TPU failed to provide. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were hiding the ball from us about what was going on and about the cost over runs,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We got more information from the Snohomish Public Utility District than we did from our own utility. They just shut the door in our face.â&#x20AC;? The relationship between the City Council and TPU got so bad, Ladenburg said, that the city created a government liaison position to spy on its own utility. The council hired Jake Fey, who would later become a City Council member and is now a state senator.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was basically our spy to get information about our own utility board,â&#x20AC;? Ladenburg said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what he did.â&#x20AC;? TPUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s board was pushing higher energy use to justify the increase in projected energy production, while the city council was looking for ways to promote conservation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want demand to go up. We wanted to find ways for it to use less, not more,â&#x20AC;? he said. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Good Cents Homes program won out and even became an effort the state adopted as its standards, he said. Dissolving the utilities board and having TPUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s director answer to the City Council and city manager like other municipal departments would have avoided those conflicts. Supporters of the current system fear such a move would make long-term utility decisions at the changing winds of politics that could hurt ratepayers. TPU has a strong bond rating, for example, and shifting its governance could lead to a drop in that credit score, which would translate to higher interest rates for its bonds. Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s power utility is seen by those in the industry as being well run and provides electrical rates that are the envy of other cities.

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ing,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m getting.â&#x20AC;? At its simplest form, TPU is a utility that is owned by the residents of Tacoma, although about half of its customers reside outside the city limits. Much of its operational decisions are made by an appointed volunteer committee, a system what was established in 1953. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s typical for public utilities, but the issue is split. Mayor Marilyn Strickland and Councilmember Ryan Mello, who chairs the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Infrastructure, Planning, and Sustainability Committee, contend that a change, or at least a review, is needed as a matter of transparency and accountability for a large organization that affects every resident. Tacoma residents own the utility, while residents outside the city but who are connected to TPU services are customers, much as they would be customers of a private utility. So the question should be raised. Should something so essential to life like power and water be managed by non-elected volunteers or elected officials? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It really is that simple,â&#x20AC;? Mello said. City Councils oversee operations of about 37 percent of large public utilities around the country, while 24 percent have their own elected boards and 39 percent have appointed boards.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;What problem is a change trying to solve?â&#x20AC;? TPU director Bill Gaines asked rhetorically. One argument to keep the utility board is to safeguard its reserves against becoming a savings account to fund General Fund programs. While a direct â&#x20AC;&#x153;raidâ&#x20AC;? of TPU accounts would be illegal under state law, creative accounting by politically minded accountants could find a way, supporters of the status quo fear. TPU pays the city hall some $17 million a year for â&#x20AC;&#x153;administrative servicesâ&#x20AC;? such as information technology, human resources and legal advice. TPU and city officials negotiated an amount after the State Auditor determined the city was overcharging the utility to raise money for general city services. Last year, the City Council also proposed a utility tax that would fund street improvements, while suggesting TPU didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to increase its rates and could absorb the cost of the added taxes through efficiencies and reserve funds. The plan failed at the ballot box. Gaines says that while some of the budget transfer makes sense to pay for administrative duties city hall officials do on behalf of the utility, he questions the amount. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pay-

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Guest Editorials

We can learn from the Skagit River Bridge replacement By Don C. Brunell The news these days is filled with stories about Big Bertha, the stalled Seattle waterfront drilling machine, and the cracks in the pontoons of the new SR 520 floating bridge across Lake Washington. You might wonder if Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department of Transportation (WSDOT) is doing anything right. It is. For example, the replacement of the collapsed I-5 bridge across the Skagit River between Mount Vernon and Burlington is an example of how WSDOT engineers and private contractors can move quickly to design and complete a major transportation project with minimal traffic disruption. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what happened. On May 23, 2013, just after the evening rush hour, a semi-truck carrying an oversized load of oil drilling equipment slammed into the supports of the 58-year-old bridge. About a third of the four-lane bridge plunged into the river. Two vehicles fell into the water, but the three people in those cars were rescued by boaters. Miraculously no one was seriously injured. State transportation officials went to work almost immediately. Traffic engineers worked through the night on detour routes through the streets of Burlington and Mount Vernon for the 71,000 vehicles

that use the bridge daily. Within 24 hours, a contractor was hired under an emergency contract to remove the collapsed span, and began working with WSDOT engineers to install a temporary span to get the interstate back open. The temporary span was up and operating by June 19. On June 18, the state awarded a $6.87 million contract to Max J. Kuney Construction of Spokane, one of our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest and most respected contractors, to design and build a permanent replacement span. The design was completed on July 9 and construction began three days later. The replacement bridge was built alongside the temporary span without interrupting traffic, and moved into place during an overnight closure on September 14 to15, 2013. The Skagit River bridge replacement is an example of how things can get done quickly and effectively. Yes, this was an emergency and, we cannot expect that breakneck pace on a regular basis. But surely there is something we can learn from this extraordinarily successful project â&#x20AC;&#x201C; something lawmakers and elected officials can use to reduce the protracted delays that cost motorists and taxpayers billions. Traditionally, major transportation projects in Washington seem like a bureaucratic blood sport. They spark months or years of criticism, accusations, public hearings and debate from all sides. We call that â&#x20AC;&#x153;input.â&#x20AC;? On occasion, people who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get

their way file lawsuits, causing further delays. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s followed by months or years more of design and permit review. We call that â&#x20AC;&#x153;process.â&#x20AC;? There must be a better way. Of course, public input is important, but there comes a time when we have to stop talking and get moving. Endless â&#x20AC;&#x153;processâ&#x20AC;? needlessly runs up the costs of these projects, and hinders transportation improvements that bring environmental and economic benefits. Lawmakers, state transportation officials and private contractors should come together to analyze what made the replacement of the Skagit Ridge Bridge such a resounding success. Then they should identify ways to translate that success to everyday transportation projects around the state â&#x20AC;&#x201C; whether by streamlining permits, utilizing the faster â&#x20AC;&#x153;design and buildâ&#x20AC;? construction process, or expediting regulatory reviews. The Skagit River Bridge project was a stunning success. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s learn from it. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make it possible to have successes like that every day of the week. Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He recently retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.

A real jobs plan for Obama: Halt your war against the energy industry By Drew Johnson The new national jobs report is brutal. The economy only created 74,000 positions last month. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s well under the rate of population inflation. And about 350,000 unemployed people simply quit their job search. Now, roughly one in 10 Americans is stuck outside the labor market. President Obama claims to care about putting people back to work. His record, however, tells a different story. For example, his administration has taken every available opportunity to suppress the one industry ripest for job growth: the oil and natural gas sector. The energy industry already supports over 9 million jobs throughout the country. And theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re precisely the kind we need: well paying, stable and technically sophisticated, but not requiring extensive formal schooling. The average oil and gas job pays $12,000 above the median wage in the overall economy. Thanks to the recent development of more effective tools for exploration and excavation, America is now undergoing an energy renaissance. The U.S. is on track to be the top energy producer on the planet within just a few years, but only if lawmakers stay out of the way. Private sector growth depends on a non-intrusive policy environment. And, unfortunately, this White House has decided to needlessly hamper the energy industry and choke off new job creation. For starters, the Obama administration is aggressively blocking drilling on public lands. During the last year of the George W. Bush presidency, the federal government handed out 1,874 leases and 6,444 permits for energy

development on government territories. In 2010 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the most recent year of data â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the Obama administration dispensed just 1,053 leases and 3,963 permits â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a 44 percent and 33 percent drop, respectively. A big reason for this decline is bureaucratic foot-dragging. Officials are subjecting energy entrepreneurs to unreasonable delays. The non-partisan Government Accountability Office has calculated that for 91 percent of lease applications this administration has failed to make a ruling within 60 days of submission, as required by law. And when theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not delaying, Obama regulators are arbitrarily revoking access to public lands granted by previous administrations. In 2009, for instance, the federal Bureau of Land Management rescinded 71 drilling leases in Utah. The next year, it cancelled 91,000 acres worth of permitting in Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. If this administration would reverse course and allow expanded energy development on public lands, the benefits to the job market would be immense. A return to Bush administration-rates of leasing and permitting would increase domestic oil production on federal lands from 7 million barrels to 13 million barrels a year. And that production uptick would create up to 30,000 new jobs. Next, the White House struck an anti-job pose on the issue of Keystone XL, the planned pipeline that would transport an estimated 800,000 barrels of oil a day from Canadian shale formations to American refineries in the Gulf Coast. The President still hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t given full approval for its construction, despite the fact that his own State Department officially determined that the pipeline is safe and environmentally friendly. Ending the needless delays and

allowing the Keystone project to move forward would immediately create about 20,000 new manufacturing and construction jobs. Given its astonishing employment potential, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no wonder Keystone has a broad, bipartisan base of supporters, including Bill Clinton, Warren Buffet, President George W. Bush and 62 sitting senators. The most recent public polling shows that 82 percent of Americans favor full approval of Keystone, as well. This administration has also been inexcusably slow in loosening restrictions on energy exports. Our supply of oil, natural gas, coal and gasoline now exceeds domestic demand. Producers are eager to ship surplus product to foreign markets. Unfortunately, antiquated federal laws severely restrict their ability to do that. The 1975 Energy Policy and Conservation Act bans most crude oil exports. Further, the application process for shipping out natural gas is notoriously slow, selective and costly. Overturning these needless restrictions would, according to the Council on Foreign Relations, boost annual American exports by $4 billion. Most of those new revenues would be invested back into domestic energy operations, leading to more jobs and opportunity for a workforce desperate for both. If the President were really committed to getting Americans back to work, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d halt his crusade against the energy industry. The oil and natural gas sector is ripe for future job growth. Policymakers just need to get out of the way. Drew Johnson is a senior fellow at the Taxpayers Protection Alliance, a nonpartisan, nonprofit educational organization dedicated to a smaller, more responsible government.

Pioneers flooding to the area from â&#x20AC;&#x153;back Eastâ&#x20AC;? some 150 years ago would likely find it odd that they were transported to the modern day to find Seattle is the dominant city in the region and not the â&#x20AC;&#x153;City of Destiny.â&#x20AC;? Tacoma was well established as a town on the move while Seattleites were living in tents and logging the woods overlooking Elliott Bay. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the cityâ&#x20AC;? of the region was all but assured with the coming of the transcontinental railroad to Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s waterfront. But fate and politics intervened. Seattle boomed. Tacoma lumbered. Tacoma is now largely overshadowed by its neighbor when it comes to its image around the world. Few local folks can describe their hometown to outsiders without saying â&#x20AC;&#x153;just south of Seattle.â&#x20AC;? This despite having a host of nationally ranked museums and car collections, a bustling shipping industry and landmark parks. Life is what it is. But facts donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to make their way into the local psyche. Just because people around the world might think of us as a little sibling of Seattle, we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to live that nickname. We can define ourselves as we see us, not as others do. But that takes a vision, something Tacoma isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t particularly good at crafting. Decades of trying to define and then redefine the city has created a hodgepodge of messages and half-completed efforts. Remember the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacoma Renaissance,â&#x20AC;? which promoted downtown as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;24-hourâ&#x20AC;? community while downtown residents complained about the nightclub noise? And then there was â&#x20AC;&#x153;Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s No. 1 Wired City,â&#x20AC;? which came at a time when other cities were already wireless. Ask the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s movers and shakers about what their visions of Tacoma are, and those dreams of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future will vary with each person. But that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily bad. Some folks will say Tacoma is â&#x20AC;&#x153;livable.â&#x20AC;? Others will say â&#x20AC;&#x153;cultural.â&#x20AC;? Others will say â&#x20AC;&#x153;diverse.â&#x20AC;? And yet others will say â&#x20AC;&#x153;gritty.â&#x20AC;? Tacoma is all those and yet not exclusively any of those. And it never will be. It is a complex city. The trick now is to massage those complexities into a singular narrative of what Tacoma is to present that â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacomaâ&#x20AC;? to the world. University of Washington-Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Urban Studies Department hosted the fifth annual urban branding forum on Feb. 21 to aid that effort by gathering community members to help define Tacoma through its past, present and future. Without a vision of what Tacoma should be, it will only create a future of lost opportunities and muddled identities that will continue to translate into Tacoma being a sibling of its neighbor to the north. The above opinion represents the view of Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s editorial board.

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Sports

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2014

TH E

SI

DE LIN E

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

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SECTION A, PAGE 6

WRESTLERS CONVERGE AT THE DOME FOR MAT CLASSIC

ABES CLAIM DISTRICT TITLE OVER RAMS Lincoln grows in numbers, nets early victories Lions top Tigers, Vikings earn regional berth

By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

L

incoln’s growing presence on the big stage was evident early on the first day at the Mat Classic. Five Abes wrestled within a 30-minute period of each other – with four pulling out first-round victories – as Lincoln concluded its impressive season at the state wrestling meet on Feb. 21-22 at the Tacoma Dome. “It’s incredible, man,” said senior 170-pounder Keidrick O’Bannon, one of three Lincoln boys to wrestle at state last year. “We came a long way. We set team goals and we just destroyed them. It just feels good…we’re here to push it to the roof.” The Abes brought eight boys wrestlers to the Dome this year, as O’Bannon put up Lincoln’s first victory in pinning Ferndale’s Charnjit Matu with 11 seconds to go in the first round. Junior B.J. Hawthorne was similarly impressive in his 182-pound opener, getting a pin late in the first round over Liberty of Issaquah’s Quinn Magendanz. “I just waited for the opportunity to open up and took my shot,” said Hawthorne, who was an alternate at the Mat Classic last year and did not wrestle. “Being here last year and not being able to participate was horrible.” Hawthorne advanced to the semifinals with a 7-5 overtime victory over Shadle Park’s Kyle Vinson, but fell in his next two matches to eventually settle for fifth place. Senior Aliyas Fletcher gutted out a 6-3 win over Mountlake Terrace’s Brett Potter in his opener, and later earned fifth place with a 2-1 win over Peninsula’s Chance Stolz. Fellow 195-pounder Jeremy Lukosh raced out to a 10-1 lead over Sunnyside’s Isaac Palomino in his opener, securing a pin late in the second round to advance. Lukosh, senior 285-pounder J.J. Saili – another first-round winner – and senior 132-pounder Robert Mathews and 160pounder Murad Vagabov all fell short of placing, but helped establish Lincoln wrestlers as a growing power. And the success didn’t stop with the boys, as Lincoln junior 155-pounder D.J. White placed third in the girls bracket by pinning Nooksack Valley’s Kylee Dekoekkoek in the second round of the consolation final. Stadium’s Celeste Wise placed sixth in the 100-pound girls bracket while the Tigers’ Jazmine Teganvoort took seventh at 235 pounds. Bellarmine Prep senior Hunter Taylor helped get the Lions’ contingent off to a solid start, pulling a late reversal and pin with 11 seconds to go in his 170-pound opener after falling behind 4-2. “I knew I had to leave it all out there,

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

CHARGING HARD. (Top) Lincoln’s Josiah

Barsh (3) drives past Wilson’s Alphonso Anderson for a layup in the Abes’ titlegame victory. (Bottom) The Rams’ David Jenkins leaps for a layup.

T

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

SHOWDOWN. (Top) Lincoln’s Keidrick O’Bannon grabs hold of Ferndale’s

Charnjit Matu in his opener at 170 pounds. (Middle) The Abes’ Aliyas Fletcher (left) looks for an opportunity for a takedown in his opening win against Mountlake Terrace’s Brett Potter. (Bottom) Bellarmine Prep’s Hunter Taylor (right) engages with Union’s Javier Martinez in his opening win.

so I just gave it 110 percent the whole time,” Taylor said. “I realized he was getting kind of sloppy, so I decided it was time to pull the trigger and go for it.” Taylor fell in the quarterfinals and settled for a seventh-place finish, while

Bellarmine sophomore 106-pounder Jed Klein eventually earned fifth place after getting a quick pin over Heritage’s Jordan Zuniga in his opener. The Lions’ Elliott Villars (220 pounds) and Luke Yi (285) both fell in their opening two matches to be eliminated.

he Lincoln Abes boys were chanting “Back to Back!” at center court following their 80-70 West Central District championship victory over cross-town rival Wilson on Feb. 22. The two highly-ranked squads squared-off for the fourth time this season and as expected, the game was intense from tip-off to final buzzer at the near-capacity Pacific Lutheran Gymnasium. There were six lead changes in the first half, with Lincoln entering the locker room with a 39-34 advantage. Wilson came alive in the third quarter and tied the game up 44-44 at the 4:10 mark. But the Rams would not have another run in them as Lincoln pulled away early in the fourth quarter to take a 12-point lead. “We got some quality shots and pushed the ball,” said Lincoln head coach Aubrey Shelton. “Our guys were making good decisions, and if we didn’t have something in the fast break we pulled it out, ran our offense down, used some clock and knocked down some big clutch shots.” Both teams had four players score in double figures, but the Abes’ Ahmaad Rorie was the difference in this game. Rorie finished with a game-high 24 points and sparked Lincoln throughout the game on both ends of the floor.

X See BASKETBALL / page A9


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WILSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TURNOVERS COSTLY IN DISTRICT TITLE DEFEAT

LADY ABES WIN, LIONS FALL IN CONSOLATION GAMES

T

he Wilson Lady Rams fell short on their quest for a repeat West Central District championship, but claimed the second seed to move onto the state regional round of 16. On a night that saw Wilson commit 26 turnovers, the last thing they needed was Prairie shooting 28 free throws, and making 19 of them. The Lady Rams couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t keep a grip on the basketball in the fast and physical matchup, as Prairie pulled away in the fourth quarter to secure its third title in four years with a 63-42 win on Feb. 22 at Pacific Lutheran University. It was a rough-andtumble contest, leading both teams to shoot below 35 percent from the field. Prairie was able to manufacture more opportunities and 14 more free-throw attempts than Wilson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These girls know that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re capable of more. We had quite a few chip shots in the paint that did not go in,â&#x20AC;? said Wilson head coach Michelle Birge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one expected us to be in this game this year and we surprised some folks getting back here. We wanted to defend our title.â&#x20AC;? Prairie (21-3) applied consistent full-court pressure from tip-off to buzzer, taking Wilson (18-4) out of its offensive game plan and keeping them off-balance for most of the game. Wilson had a 7-5 lead midway in the first quarter, but never saw the lead again. With 5:50 remaining in

at the Tacoma Dome.. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Obviously itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winor-go-home and you put everything on the line,â&#x20AC;? said Birge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You break down the film and put your team in the best position to compete, and you hope they are a little more disciplined and a little more equipped to handle the physicality of the game.â&#x20AC;? By Justin Gimse

LADY ABES FALL ;679(090,,(95 THIRD SEED

When Lincoln was able to get into their half-court offense against Prairie, Tamia Braggs dominated in the middle. But the Falconsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; full-court pressure rattled the Abes much of the game, as Prairie pulled away late for a 60-49 win in the 3A bi-district semifinals on Feb. 21 at Clover Park High School. 3 â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get to see that much,â&#x20AC;? said Lincoln head coach Jamila Jones of the full-court pressure. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we handled it well in the first half, we just went away from doing some things that we were doing well.â&#x20AC;? Braggs was 9-for-13 from the field for a gameX See DISTRICTS / page A8

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

TOUGH SHOT. (Left) Wilson freshman guard Josie Matz (3) puts up a one-handed shot as Prairieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nicole Goecke defends. (Right) The Ramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Violet Morrow (12) drives past the Falconsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cherita Daugherty for a layup in the title-game loss.

the third quarter, the Lady Rams pulled into a 29-29 tie, only to be outscored 34-13 the remainder of the game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We knew Prairie was going to put us in a little storm,â&#x20AC;? said Birge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The key to the game was not letting our emotions control us. At times we played very composed and other times the physicality of the game bothered us.â&#x20AC;? Wilson had no answer

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WDistricts high 22 points, and added 17 rebounds and four blocks for Lincoln. She scored 11 points in the first quarter as Lincoln took a 15-14 lead. The Abes hung tough through the third quarter, regaining a 36-34 lead on

From page A7

Braggsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; put-back with 2:25 to go in the period. But they wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lead again, as the Falcons responded with a 16-3 run, capped by Cherita Daughertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s steal and layup two minutes into the fourth quarter. Kiaira

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Thomas finished with 12 points for Lincoln, while Aamira Turner added seven points and three steals. Thomas helped the Lady Abes rebound quickly, scoring a team-high 17 points in a 55-50 win over Kennedy on Feb. 22 to earn the third seed to the state regionals. Lincoln will host Mountlake Terrace at Mount Tahoma High School on Feb. 28 at 6 p.m. By Jeremy Helling

LADY LIONS STRUGGLE AGAINST SKYVIEW

Bellarmine Prep looked to be in for a low-scoring, tight affair against Skyview heading into the second quarter. But the Storm began to hit their shots, and limited the Lionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opportunities as they cruised to

a 50-32 win on Feb. 22 at Auburn High School. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mentally, I just think we werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t here tonight,â&#x20AC;? said Bellarmine Prep head coach Kevin Meines. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not to take anything away from Skyview. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a very good team and they were able to take us out of a lot of things. But I think we beat ourselves tonight.â&#x20AC;? The Storm shot just 2-for-18 from the field in the first quarter, as the Lions took a 6-5 lead on Claire Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rebound and put-back late in the period. But Skyviewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s balanced attack began to assert itself in the second quarter, as Genevieve Lo gave the Storm the lead for good, at 10-8, with a three-pointer midway through the period. Loâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s layup early in the

third quarter made it 27-12, deflating the Lionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; hopes for a comeback. Bellarmine Prep shot just 14-for-49 from the field in the game, as Jayana Ervin and Jasmyne Holmes scored eight points apiece and Claire Martin added seven points and 10 rebounds. Aubrey Ward-El led

Skyview with 11 points, while Lo and Jocelyn Adams added 10 points apiece. Bellarmine Prep settled for the fourth seed to state regionals, as they will travel north to face Lynnwood at Everett Community College on March 1 at 2 p.m. By Jeremy Helling

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

DOMINANT. Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tamia Braggs, who finished

with a game-high 22 points and 17 rebounds, puts up a layup in the semifinal loss to Prairie.

Local Restaurant Spotlight THUNDERBIRD MORE THAN JUST A CONVENIENCE STORE By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

F

or the past 30 years, the Thunderbird Trading Post, located on 7121 Waller Rd. E., has been a mainstay of the Tacoma community. Vicky Gord launched the Post as a small convenience store, but since then it has expanded into a lounge with darts and karaoke, a cigar lounge, a seasonal firework stand and successful restaurant. The Thunderbirdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s restaurant mixes a local, family environment with a famous breakfast menu to craft an atmosphere that delivers on quality of both food and service. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something about being local, that with todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s corporate franchises and everything that we kind of lose out on,â&#x20AC;? said Gordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daughter Bettina Gese. Some regulars have been coming to the Thunderbird for years, and the servers know them on a first name basis. The Thunderbird is also one of the few tribally owned restaurants in the city, and this only further cements the sense of community at the Trading Post. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Usually when customers go in our servers are so amazing that they know most of them by name, and they talk to them, or suggest new items to them or they know exactly what they want,â&#x20AC;? Gese said. But successful service is only half the battle, as the Thunderbirdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s restaurant also comes stocked with a plenty of food in big portions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pancakes, we have huge pancakes,â&#x20AC;? Gese said of popular breakfast items. The Bird Pancake Breakfast, one pancake, one egg and a choice of a slice of bacon, a sausage link or a sausage patty for $4.95 is for seniors, children or just those with a light appetite. For those with a bigger appetite, you can get four of the Thunderbirdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s famous pancakes for $3.95. Other items on the breakfast menu includes the Meat Loverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Scramble; diced ham, sausage, diced bacon, hash browns and three eggs scrambled together, topped with shredded cheddar and swiss cheese, served with toast for $9.50. While the breakfast items are popular, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not all the Thunderbird has to offer. Their famous Thunder Burger is a half-pound patty topped with cheddar cheese, crisp bacon, lettuce, tomato, red onion

and a delicious secret sauce for $8.95. The Thunderbird Restaurant offers daily and weekly menus, and has special events including Taco Tuesdays, and daily deals that can be anything from all you can eat Fish and Chips to Barbeque Ribs. For more information on the Thunderbird restaurant, visit PHOTO COURTESY OF BETTINA GESE www.facebook. VERY FIRST THUNDERBIRD TRADING com/Thunder- THE POST SIGN, RAISED IN 1975 birdRestaurant for information on daily deals and www.thunderbirdtrading.com/web/restaurantolder.htm for the Thunderbirdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menu or call 253-531-9595. The restaurant is open Sunday through Thursday 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday and Saturday 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.

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WBasketball â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ahmaad had his best performance of the season so far,â&#x20AC;? said Shelton. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not just in scoring but his leadership and control of the game. He was focused on winning from beginning to end.â&#x20AC;? Lincoln (22-3) has won two straight District Championships, and three of the last four. The Abes will host fourth-ranked Bellevue (21-4) on Feb. 28 in the state regional round at Mount Tahoma at 8 p.m. Narrows League Champion Wilson (21-3) will host Mountlake Terrace (17-7) at Mount Tahoma on March 1 at 4 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a very tough draw,â&#x20AC;? said Shelton. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bellevueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probably one of the best four teams in the state and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very strong, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re balanced and have great shooters. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have to play our best basketball of the season to beat them. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get focused and prepared and give it our best shot.â&#x20AC;? By Justin Gimse

From page A6

a technical foul to be disqualified. Malachi Flynn hit two of the resulting four free throws, then drilled a three-pointer on the ensuing possession to give the Lions a 41-32 lead with 1:29 remaining. Flynn led the Lions with 17 points, helping fill the void left by Bellarmine Prep leading scorer Marâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;kese Jackson, who injured his ankle just over two minutes into the game and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t return. Senior guard Carson Hollyoak added 11 points for the Lions, including a three-pointer with three minutes until halftime that helped Bellarmine Prep take a 19-12 lead at the break. Drew Griffin came off the bench to score six points and collect a teamhigh 11 rebounds for the Lions. Brown finished with 14 points for Stadium while Bobby Moorehead added nine points. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They deserved it. They

outworked us,â&#x20AC;? said Stadium head coach Doug Cockeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the little areas like loose balls and (rebounding), they beat us.â&#x20AC;? With the win, the Lions were set to host Issaquah in the state regionals at Puyallup High School on Feb. 28 at 8 p.m. Stadium will travel north to face Jackson at Everett Community College on Feb. 28 at 8 p.m. By Jeremy Helling

=0205.:96337(:; EMERALD RIDGE

The defending state champs werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t about to see their season end in the district tournament. Curtis jumped all over Emerald Ridge in the first quarter and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let up, cruising to a 67-40 win over the Jaguars on Feb. 22 at Auburn High School to earn the final berth into the state regionals. The Vikings embraced their trademark defense at the start, as Emerald Ridge committed seven turnovers in the first three minutes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and 12 total in the first quarter. Darrin Gethersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

steal and dish to Jason Williams made it 11-1 at the 5:00 mark, and Marcus Stephens came off the bench to drain a three-pointer to make it 20-3 with a minute to go in the first quarter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We lost Thursday night (to South Kitsap), and we came out in the first quarter and responded again,â&#x20AC;? said Curtis head coach Tim Kelly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think a lot of that starts with our defensive intensity. It leads to getting some easy baskets, and you build the lead.â&#x20AC;? Tory Causey helped the Vikings essentially seal the game before halftime, sinking a three-pointer with three minutes until the break to make it 31-4. Aushanti Potts-Woods led the Vikings with 13 points, Causey and Stephens finished with 12 points apiece and Williams added 10 points. The Vikings face a daunting trip east to play Wenatchee in the state regionals at Big Bend Community College on March 1 at 2 p.m. By Jeremy Helling

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

REVENGE. Bellarmine Prepâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Malachi Flynn puts

up a layup as Stadiumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lucious Brown defends in the Lionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; victory.

LIONS GET REVENGE ON TIGERS

Bellarmine Prep got revenge for two regularseason losses to crosstown rival Stadium, pulling out a 45-38 win over the Tigers on Feb. 22 at Auburn High School to claim the third seed to the state regionals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a good team effort,â&#x20AC;? said Bellarmine Prep head coach Bernie Salazar. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The guys really stepped upâ&#x20AC;Śitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s playoff basketball. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a battle.â&#x20AC;? With Bellarmine Prep leading 36-32 with under two minutes remaining, Stadium star forward Lucious Brown was whistled for his fourth personal foul, and then called for

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WBranding From page A1

Seattle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;second cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; phenomenon is not exclusively a Tacoma issue,â&#x20AC;? wrote Ali Modarres, director of

WReaders Christine Dampier has had second thoughts about her choice. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My wonderful surgeon was able to do the lumpectomy and save the breast, but after a year of being in remission, the cancer returned and metastasized itself in my bones. If it ever

UWTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Urban Studies program, on NewGeography.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Glasgow, Scotland; Melbourne, Australia; Milan, Italy; Montreal, Quebec; St. Paul, Minn.; Long Beach, Calif. and many other cities around the globe face a similar challenge. Either their identity has not been well articulated, or it has not been

From page A1

came down to it, I would have the breast removed to better my chances at life,â&#x20AC;? she wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Christine that is what my surgeon said too,â&#x20AC;? Pat Porter responded. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I went ahead with a mastectomy, and that was just six weeks ago. I think the most pain-

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understood by external observers. This is not a logo problem. It is not about a catchy phrase, and it is not about another cultural event.â&#x20AC;? Cities like Tacoma canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t simply battle marketing-dollar-for-marketing-dollar with their larger siblings. Where dollars miss, communities can create, however.

ful part is over. I had six rounds of some god-awful chemo. Now I have to have a chemo that will insure any cancer that is floating around will be killed, and I will have that until July. My hair is growing back. My fingernails are hardly black anymore, and I am getting my strength back.â&#x20AC;? The women talked about unexpected side effects, from stress to bone pain to just breaking down in tears. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all part of the big trek through this disease, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get to them later in the Lucky Womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide to Breast Cancer. If you would like to read more of the comments from readers, or chime in, they are on Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Kathleen Merrymanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook pages.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is where the notion of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;urban brandingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; comes in,â&#x20AC;? he wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cities need an internally generated and well-articulated narrative of identity before they can be recognized externally.â&#x20AC;? As part of crafting that community message to the rest of the world, about 300 people at the

WCancer

From page A1

good to me. So much of what we expect from cancer, we learn from friends, or folks we bump into. That, Gentle Readers, is why we need to broaden this conversation â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to get more accounts into our ears. We need to know when people run out of resilience, and what, other than time, can trigger that. We need to understand that some of us bounce back to work a day after surgery, and some of us deflate into bed. Most of all, we need to know that it is all okay, or should be. When it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, we need to know how we can muster the resources for the people who need

them. Based on chats with younger, fitter friends, I was expecting the bounceback path. Ha. The surgery was oddly sweet. All prepped up, I waited my turn in pre-op, where jolly conversations drifted through my cubbyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s curtain. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like these people,â&#x20AC;? I thought. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll take good care of me.â&#x20AC;? And so they did. They are good at shots. They made sure not to lose my glasses, or my library book. Because they preferred that I not die from a rogue blood clot, they rigged

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me up with compression stockings and a blissful machine that massaged my legs. Because they did not want me to have cold feet or slip on their nice clean floors, they gave me nonskid socks. The hospital, it turns out, is a great place to score socks. Wheeled into the O.R., I saw Dr. Stowell reading the Tacoma Weekly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dang,â&#x20AC;? I thought. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope she likes what I wrote.â&#x20AC;? She did. She wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t so wild about what she found after she got the tumor out of diva boob. The cancer had gotten to the lymph nodes and was staging an invasion when she caught it, she told me when I woke up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crud,â&#x20AC;? I thought. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That means chemical warfare.â&#x20AC;? And it does, but not before diva boob monopolized the show for a few weeks. That boob must have admired Greta Garbo fainting away her life in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Camille.â&#x20AC;? It left me with the energy level of an expiring French courtesan for a couple of weeks But did it afford me any glamour? Nooooo. It upped the contusion index to the gasping point - and I am talking the nurse when I went in for a post-op check. My torso looked like a lava lamp, but in camo colors. (Yes, that lamp is a million dollar entrepreneurial idea, and, yes, you may have it.) That boobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bruises are fading. It gets no more drama. Not one wail. And it had darn well end up perky. This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s self-care tip: Eat some ice cream. You never do, because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an extravagance, but youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re worth it. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a diva.

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City Life

Smokey Robinson at Emerald Queen

B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2014

SECTION B, PAGE 1

Locals get a chance to walk the red carpet at Theatre on the Square The 86th annual Academy Awards are Sunday. Here are the nominees in the biggest categories: BEST PICTURE: s h!MERICAN (USTLEv s h#APTAIN 0HILLIPSv s h$ALLAS "UYERS #LUBv s h'RAVITYv s h(ERv s h.EBRASKAv s h0HILOMENAv s h 9EARS A 3LAVEv s h4HE 7OLF OF 7ALL 3TREETv BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE: s #HRISTIAN "ALE h!MERICAN (USTLEv s "RUCE $ERN h.EBRASKAv s ,EONARDO $I#APRIO h4HE 7OLF OF 7ALL 3TREETv s #HIWETEL %JIOFOR h 9EARS A 3LAVEv s -ATTHEW -C#ONAUGHEY h$ALLAS "UYERS #LUBv

PHOTOS COURTESY OF GRAND CINEMA

By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE: s !MY !DAMS h!MERICAN (USTLEv s #ATE "LANCHETT h"LUE *ASMINEv s 3ANDRA "ULLOCK h'RAVITYv s *UDI $ENCH h0HILOMENAv s -ERYL 3TREEP h!UGUST /SAGE #OUNTYv

It’s “Nebraska” versus “12 Years a Slave,” and Cate Blanchett taking on Judi Dench. There should be plenty of suspense once the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences starts doling out Oscars on March 2. Ellen DeGeneres has been tapped to host the 86th annual Academy Awards, and ABC-TV will broadcast all the festivities from Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre starting at 4 p.m. Among the hottest places to catch all the action locally will be Broadway Center’s Theatre on the Square, 915 Broadway, in Tacoma. That’s where the non-profit Grand Cinema will host its annual Academy Awards party, which will feature the broadcast, shown on a 24- by 15-foot projection screen, contests, film trivia and more. “The event is all about celebrating the past 12 months of film,” Grand Cinema marketing director Zach Powers said. “This is the night that the biggest talents in film get together and gather and award the year’s best. So we take the occasion to bring together Pierce County’s biggest film buffs and celebrate this year together. “You have your favorites that you’re rooting for. But it’s this whole spectacle, and it’s fun to enjoy it with community. Then we

BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE: s "ARKHAD !BDI h#APTAIN 0HILLIPSv s "RADLEY #OOPER h!MERICAN (USTLEv s -ICHAEL &ASSBENDER h 9EARS A 3LAVEv s *ONAH (ILL h4HE 7OLF OF 7ALL 3TREETv s *ARED ,ETO h$ALLAS "UYERS #LUBv BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE: s 3ALLY (AWKINS h"LUE *ASMINEv s *ENNIFER ,AWRENCE h!MERICAN (USTLEv s ,UPITA .YONGO h 9EARS A 3LAVEv s *ULIA 2OBERTS h!UGUST /SAGE #OUNTYv s *UNE 3QUIBB h.EBRASKAv X &IND A FULL LIST OF NOMINEES at oscar.go.com.

throw in tons of different festivities and visuals and have a good time.” Before the show, patrons will receive ballots with all of this year’s nominees to fill in with their predictions. The most accurate prognosticator will receive a golden ticket, which allows unlimited free movies at the Grand for a year. There will also be a costume contest for revelers that come dressed as actors and characters from their favorite flicks. Prizes include a $250 gift certificate to the Melting Pot, free movies passes and Grand t-shirts. “Some people take the opportunity to get dressed up in red carpet-appropriate formal attire,” Powers said. “Then a lot of people will take advantage of our costume party, so you may have people dressed up as astronauts for ‘Gravity,’ or people in baseball uniforms for ‘42.’ You never know.” General admission to the Academy Awards party is $20, which includes complimentary snacks and a seat in the main theater. VIP tickets are $90 and include a seat in a private viewing area, a full dinner catered by Maxwell’s Speakeasy + Lounge, complimentary drinks and personal table service; but few of those packages remained earlier this week. Tickets are available at the Grand Cinema, located at 606 S. Fawcett Ave., in Tacoma, online at www.grandcinema. com or by calling (253) 593-4474.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE 1001 FACES B2 Fine Art Gallery’s new “1001 Faces Exhibition” explores archival, ceremonial and tribal masks from around the world. It features the works of Peruvian wood carver Enrique Leon, artist John Edward Smith, Yup’ik Eskimo artist Terresa “Michuar” White and Maori carver Takirirangi Smith. Also be sure and check out B2’s fine rug collection. 711 St. Helens Ave. Info: (253) 238-5065 and www.b2finearts.com.

TWO BOOK ART University of Puget Sound is hosting the national traveling exhibition “Horizon,” a high-caliber selection of book arts, organized and juried by the New York-based Guild of Book Workers. Collins Memorial Library on campus is one of only six national venues, and

Chris Spencer guitar, Chuck Kistler bass and Ken French drums. They perform live March 9 at Jazz LIVE at Marine View, 8469 Eastside Dr. NE. Admission is always free to all ages. WORK BY HEATHER BAIN

the only one in the Pacific Northwest, to host the exhibition. The 52 works of contemporary book arts and fine binding feature some of the finest book artists and binders in the country.

THREE THE ROADSTARS Five of the top jazz musicians in the Northwest have banded together to create The Roadstars, featuring a collection of jazz, swing and other music types. Ranging from Ragtime to current jazz including recognizable TV show and movie themes, The Roadstars deliver a memorable evening of upbeat music mixed with narration and humor. The Roadstars are: Lance Buller trumpet and vocals,Teddy Dortch saxophone,

FOUR TACOMA SINGS More than 120 singers will fill the stage when Northwest Repertory Singers and the Tacoma Youth Chorus combine talents for Tacoma Sings: A Generational Collaboration Saturday, March 8.The concert is at 7:30 p.m. at Mason United Methodist Church, 2710 N. Madison St. The concert will include a diverse repertoire of songs, including spirituals, a love song based on a text by Sara Teasdale, an ethereal song about sleep, and a humorous piece about commonly used Italian terminology found in music. A half-hour preconcert lecture takes place at 6:30 p.m. Bring food donations for the Proctor-area FISH Food Bank. Get tickets from Brown Paper Tickets with no service fee at 1-800-

838-3006 or online. Tickets are $18 general admission, and $15 for senior/student/military. Children under 12 are free. Tickets are also available by calling 253-265-3042.

FIVE FLORIDA GEORGIA LINE Florida Georgia Line is headed to the Washington State Fair. The country duo – comprised of Tyler Hubbard and Brian Kelley and known for hits “Cruise,” “Get Your Shine On” and “Stay” – will headline the grandstand at 7:30 p.m. on Sept. 15, organizers announced Monday. Tickets will go on sale at 10 a.m. Friday, March 1, with prices ranging from $40 to $90. They can be found on the Washington State Fair web site, www.thefair.com, by calling (888) 559-3247 or by visiting the Washington State Fair box office, located at Ninth Ave. SW and Meridian Street in Puyallup. A full schedule of fair concerts, which include Keith Urban, Jeff Dunham and more, can be found at www.thefair.com/tickets.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 28, 2014

LAKEWOOD PLAYHOUSE’S ‘12 ANGRY Dance Theatre Northwest brings MEN’ WILL KEEP YOU RIVETED dance and glass art together

PHOTO BY KATE PATERNO-LICK

12 ANGRY MEN. (clockwise from left): Bob Reed as Juror No. 1, Bruce-Story Camp as Juror No.

8, Joseph Grant as Juror No. 4, Curtis Beech as Juror No. 9, James Clark as Juror No. 5, Michael Dresdner as Juror No. 11, Dennis Worrell as Juror No. 12, James Wrede as the Jury Foreman, Christian Carvajal as Juror No. 3, Jacob Tice as Juror No. 2 and Jed Slaughter as Juror No. 6. By Derek Shuck Derek@tacomaweekly.com

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rials look to be the theme of the month for Tacoma productions. After the Tacoma Little Theater staged “To Kill a Mocking Bird,” last month, Lakewood Playhouse has responded with its own courtroom drama in the form of “12 Angry Men,” directed by Victoria Webb. The play tells the story of a jury deliberating on a first-degree murder trial, where a guilty verdict means a death sentence. The case is clear-cut to 11 of the jurors, who are ready to send the defendant to the chair. Only one man champions innocence, or at least wants to talk it out, before sentencing a 17-year-old boy to death. The play, much like the follow-up film of the same name, is simple. There are no scene changes in the play; everything takes place in a small jury deliberation room. Furthermore, no characters are given names; they are only referred to by juror number or simply “you.” While some may equate simple with “boring,” the 12 actors are so engaging that it’s easy to forget how long you’ve been watching the play. The actors are more than up to the challenge of keeping the audience’s interest without breaks in dialogue. As 12 different personalities clash in the room, the actors’ skills begin to shine. Bruce Story-Camp’s Juror No. 8, the one man who believes the defendant is innocent, begins quiet and reserved, but gains confidence and voice as the play progresses. Christian Carvajal’s Juror No. 3 brings a sense of intimidation and physical presence, while still nailing small emotional moments later in the play. With 12 characters without names always on the scene at the same time, it can be difficult to differentiate the different jurors at the beginning of the play. When they mingle for a few minutes near the beginning, you may get whiplash moving from conversation to conversation so quickly. However, when the jury sits down, the story quickly becomes focused and clear as several personalities come to the forefront of the deliberations. You get a

decent picture of not just the case but who these men are and where they come from and how their individual views seep into the case. Even the less vocal jurors give their characters small ticks that inform the audience. Dennis Worrell’s Juror No. 12 gives quick, jerky movements as a fast talking ad director that clearly has very little idea of how to handle the increasingly intense situation. Ronnie Hill’s Juror No. 10 constantly blows his nose, and it’s these ticks that give each juror a unique personality, even if they are silent during a particular conversation. An air of (fake and completely safe vapor) smoke repeatedly fills the stage, as the men constantly smoke in their confined setting. There is always something going on with any of the 12 men at any particular time. The Playhouse is the perfect venue to host such a claustrophobic setting. The tight, cramped jury room only gets smaller as heads collide and tensions rise, and the audience becomes acutely aware of just how small the stage is, giving an almost meta view into how close and personal the discourse is becoming. You really do feel as though you are a part of the proceedings. It would be easy for the play to fall apart if one actor were to be off, the whole play can come apart, it’s not as though a weak actor is only in a few scenes, the jurors are a constant presence. Luckily, the Lakewood Production actors fire on all cylinders and deliver an engaging, emotional experience. With a plot largely revolving around a murder case and little action, “12 Angry Men” is not recommended for children. But for anyone looking for a dialogue heavy play that takes a look at how personal views and bias affect the justice system, there is no better place to look. The performers do an excellent job of capturing the spirit of the original, and their mannerisms and dress bring the spirit of the 1950’s to life without even having to step outside the courtroom. The play runs through March 16 with tickets priced at $25 for adults and $21 for seniors. Visit www.lakewoodplayhouse.org.

PHOTO COURTESY OF DANCE THEATRE NORTHWEST BY MAKS ZAKHAROV

‘FIRE TO RAIN.’ Dance Theatre Northwest’s

Lauren Trodahl will perform a piece entitled “Fire to Rain” at “Art Inspires Art – TRIBUTE: Tradition in Translation.”

T

ranslating glass artistry into dance – this will be the focus of “Art Inspires Art – TRIBUTE: Tradition in Translation.” Presented by Dance Theatre Northwest (DTN) Artistic Director Melanie Kirk-Stauffer and DTN dancers, the event takes place on March 8 at Museum of Glass, 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Dance, music, slides and an accompanying lecture will highlight Kirk-Stauffer’s presentation with performances featuring classical and contemporary ballet and jazz that highlight the work of artists showing at Museum of Glass: Róisín de Buitléar and Fred Curtis from “Caution! Fragile. Irish Glass: Tradition In Transition,” an inspirational exhibition exploring the past, present, and future of Irish glass; Dale Chihuly’s “Irish Cylinders;” and glass artists Dante Marioni, Anna Skibska, Ben Edols, Kathy Elliott and Kelly Knickerbocker. Featured DTN performers include Chhay Mam, Allison Zakharov, Lauren Trodahl, Amelia Arial, Oceana Thunder, Solana Sartain, and Gregory Peloquin. “Art Inspires Art – TRIBUTE: Tradition in Translation” is free with museum admission and all ages are welcome. For more information visit our website: www.DTNW. org or call (253) 778-6534.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, February 28, 2014 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

Clashing collaborations: two new shows at MOG

CULTURE CORNER

A GUIDE TO THE MUSEUMS OF TACOMA Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum

407 S. G St. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Info: http://www.rain.org/~karpeles/taqfrm.html Six large Greco-Roman columns and portico form a stately entrance to the Karpeles Manuscript Museum. Facing lovely Wright Park, an arboretum of hundreds of mature trees, and just across the street from the Victorian-styled Seymour Botanical Conservatory, it offers an ideal environment for the exhibit of original papers of historic importance. Both children and adults can view the historic documents in some 50 oak and glass cases. The primary sources of history displayed in the museum provide the means for increasing the cultural literacy of Tacoma viewers. Exhibits are always admission free.

Current Exhibit: The Evita Perón Exhibit (through April 22) PHOTO COURTESY OF MUSEUM OF GLASS

PIZAZZ. “Signal” is a collaborative work by glass artist Jen Elek and neon specialist Jeremy Bert. It is from the “Look! See?” exhibit at Museum of Glass. By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

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his month saw the opening of two new exhibits at the Museum of Glass. Anna Skibska’s understated show, “Coastal Alchemy” is juxtaposed against the over-the-top extravaganza “Look! See?” by Jen Elek and Jeremy Bert. “Coastal Alchemy” is a collection of visual vignettes by Polish-born artist Skibska. Painter Meg Holgate augments the show with her softly blurred landscapes and poet T.s. [sic] Flock was brought on board to give the affair a feathery, literary touch. The works are meant to refer to atmospheric and environmental phenomena. The exhibit is gauzy and ephemeral. Skibska’s delicate constructions, made with hundreds of spindly segments of glass, come across as ungainly things made of chicken wire. After breezing through “Coastal Alchemy,” one comes into a realm of brash color, flashing lights and a circuslike atmosphere. This is “Look! See?” by Elek and Bert. Elek contributed her blown glass orbs stuck together in clusters and her oblong forms arranged in a tight grid (she calls this a “blanket” formation). There are sculptures comprised of corn dog shapes all stuck together and there are dozens of colorful orbs mounted on the walls. Bert is a neon specialist, bending glass

tubes and filling them with glowing gas. He has also provided compositions of colorful marquee lights and repurposed, giant letters from old signage. As an interactive element, there is one portion of the gallery in which museum visitors can move these letters around and even wear them to become a lit-up, walking, talking alphabet. “Look! See?” is pop art; happily sappy in its dual purpose of wallowing in popular imagery at the same time that said imagery is criticized. Every item in “Look! See?” is sweet, sweet candy for the eye. There is a collection of “Human Heads” that consist of glass domes by Elek. Bert has outfitted them with light bulb eyes and neon mouths that constantly shift from a smile to a frown. “Signal” is a brilliant collage – the perfect merger of the talents of both artists. A blue glass form – not unlike a car muffleris set next to a set of neon tubes that form plaid stripes. There is also a dense grid of colorful carnival lights that are constantly blinking in random patterns. These are reflected in chrome-plated spheres. Much of Elek’s contribution to the show was actually made in the museum’s hot shop. “The work feels like it’s at home here,” Elek asserted at the Feb. 22 opening of the show. “Coastal Alchemy” runs through Sept. 28 and “Look! See?” runs through January of next year. For further information visit museumofglass.org.

View documents hand written by Evita Perón, the celebrity wife of Argentine President Juan Perón. Evita played a central role in Perón’s first term in office (19461952). Documents on display include: 1. Juan Perón’s request for permission to marry Evita 2. A love letter of Evita to Juan Perón prior to their marriage where she practices writing ‘Eva Perón’ 3. Background check on Evita given to the Minister of War while she was Juan Perón’s mistress 4. Evita’s actions in taking charge when Perón is arrested 5. Evita’s Civil Personnel Registration in the Nat. Administration 6. Juan Perón’s pension registration naming Evita as his wife

15. Evita’s letter to Juan Perón’s mother Juana Perón

7. Evita’s registration of her fingerprints

16. Evita’s draft notebook recording responses to questions requested by her associates in preparation for writing her book “La Razon de Mi Vida” (“My Mission in Life”)

8. Evita signs her dental records 9. Evita’s draft manuscript of the objectives of the Eva Perón Foundation 10. Evita’s project proposals for the Eva Perón Foundation 11. Evita’s draft to the women of Argentina on women’s civil rights

17. Original draft of Evita’s autobiography “La Razon de mi Vida” (“My Mission in Life”)

12. Evita’s strong political attack for housewife’s civil rights

18. Letter of Evita’s mother, Juana Ibarguren de Duarte, wishing Evita happiness on her trip to Europe

13. Evita’s draft address to the First National Assembly of Women

19. Letter of Evita to Juan Perón before her operation

14. Evita’s address to the First Assembly of the Perónista Feminist Party

20. Letter of Evita to Juan Perón while on her death bed


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, February 28, 2014

FORECAST: QUIET STORM Smokey Robinson dazzles as he delivers Motown hits at Emerald Queen

PHOTOS BY BILL BUNGARD

By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

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mokey Robinson may be the sexiest senior citizen on the planet. The Motown legend and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer made a case for that distinction on Feb. 21, at least, as he headlined the Emerald Queen Casino two days after his 74th birthday. The Poet Laureate of Soul made his entrance sporting a spiffy, gold suit and his falsetto honey sweet as he eased into his set with his 1981 hit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being With You.â&#x20AC;? Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d ditched his jacket and tie by the time he tackled tunes he wrote for the Temptations, and his neckline gradually dove to Tom Jones depths. Backed by his 9-piece band, Robinson strutted, shimmied and gyrated through his biggest hits, albeit, a bit slower than he used to. He pointed dramatically into the crowd, hypnotizing unsuspecting female fans with his sparkly, green-eyed gaze; and by the end of the night he was rubbing his bare chest, in the throes of ecstasy. No, your grandpa canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pull this off, not even with a makeover and a satchel full of Viagra. But weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking Smokey Robinson here, a guy whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been getting lovers in the mood since the Kennedy Administration â&#x20AC;&#x201C; like a boss.

The Motown legend drops by Tacoma about once a year, if not at the E.Q., at the Puyallup Fair; and elements of his set seemed strangely familiar, right down to his jokes, which included a swaying impression of Stevie Wonder, a guy he recalled as his partner in crime for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tears of a Clown.â&#x20AC;? But familiarity was not a problem for a crowd being treated to some of the most iconic cuts in American pop history. He drenched fans with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quiet Storm.â&#x20AC;? He lifted their spirits with â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Girl.â&#x20AC;? And he invited them to a â&#x20AC;&#x153;feel good competitionâ&#x20AC;? with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cruisinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;.â&#x20AC;? He milked that, the nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final selection, for more than 10 sweltering minutes, inviting a pair of women onstage to lead competing halves of the crowd in belting out its iconic refrain. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I loooooooove it when weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re cruisinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; together.â&#x20AC;? I challenge anyone to not be in a good mood following a Smokey Robinson show. Visit BillBungard.com for more images from Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show. Set list: Being With You; I Second That Emotion; Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve Really Got a Hold On Me; Quiet Storm; Ooo Baby Baby; The Way You Do the Things You Do (Temptations); Get Ready (Temptations); My Girl (Temptations); The Tears of a Clown; In Other Words (a.k.a. Fly Me to the Moon, Bart Howard); Love Bath; That Place; Just to See Her; The Tracks of My Tears; Cruisinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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ZOOK CD RELEASE AT NEW FRONTIER LOUNGE FEB. 28

Friday, February 28, 2014 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Nightlife

TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

CATCH THE FUNKY STYLINGS OF RIPPIN’ CHICKEN AT 9:30 P.M. SATURDAY, MARCH 1, AT DOYLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE IN TACOMA. THE SHOW IS FREE, BUT YOU HAVE TO BE 21 OR OLDER TO GET IN; WWW.DOYLESPUBLICHOUSE.COM.

FRIDAY, FEB. 28 B SHARP COFFEE: Ryan Heffner (acoustic) 7 p.m. NC

NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 4 p.m. RIALTO: Tacoma Youth Symphony presents “Dreams and Fantasies” (classical) 3 p.m., $7-$18 STONEGATE: Rich Wetzel’s Groovin’ Higher Orchestra (jazz big band) 5 p.m., NC

MONDAY, MARCH 3

PHOTO COURTESY OF CARL ZOOK.

WANTED. Zook is singer-guitarist Carl Zook and drummer Kaitlyn

Fernandez. The duo will make its public debut on Friday, Feb. 28, at the New Frontier Lounge. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

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acoma, prepare to meet your favorite new party band. Punk duo, Zook, will unleash its infectious, frenetic new sounds on the New Frontier Lounge on Friday, Feb. 28, opening for Port Orchard’s Mos Generator. And while the band is brand spankin’ new, the name will already be familiar to avid followers of the local hard rock scene. The band’s eponym is singer-guitarist Carl Zook, a veteran of Dirty Thieves, Buckwildz, Looking for Lizards and South 11th, among other area bands. The other half of the equation is Kaitlyn Fernandez, who is best known as the drummer for Tacoma skate-punk crew, Overboard. On Monday, the two described the easy rapport they’ve enjoyed since they were united last year in the lineup of Tacoma punk act I Defy. “I started jamming with them, and it just kind of clicked,” Fernandez recalled between sips of

beer at Hilltop’s Broken Spoke. “We started jamming, playing more music and writing more songs; and then Carl and I started writing our own stuff. “I just like the way that Carl and I jam together,” she said. “I can lay down a beat, something I just made up; and he starts playing a riff, and it turns into a song.” “We don’t really have to talk about a lot of stuff,” Zook added. “It’s not like we’re spending a lot of time figuring (stuff) out. We just jam it out, and it goes really fast.” Their chemistry comes through on, “Kick It!,” the eight-song debut they recorded at Tacoma’s Autopsy Room. Zook’s sound is brash, hooky and hedonistic. Chunky power chords and manic fills infuse party hearty lyrics about chugging beers, rockin’ clubs and hookin’ up. There’s no hipster pretense; it’s mosh fuel, boozy escapism at its best. “She plays drums really well, in the pocket, so it’s really driving,” Zook said of his bandmate. “It’s heavy, but catchy. It’ll

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make you drive your car a hundred miles an hour,” he added, laughing. “I like this the best out of anything I’ve been a part of. This is way better than anything else.” “Kick It!” will be available this weekend at Rocket Records, 3823 Sixth Ave., followed by a digital release, online at zook.bandcamp.com, among other sites. Music will start after 9 p.m. Friday at the New Frontier, located at 301 E. 25th St., in Tacoma. The cover charge is $5; (253) 572-4020 or www.thenewfrontierlounge.com for further details. GLORIA (110 MIN, R) Fri 2/28-Mon 3/3: 1:30, 3:55, 6:25, 8:50 Tue 3/4: 3:55, 8:50 Wed 3/5-Thu 3/6: 1:30, 3:55, 6:25, 8:50 THE GREAT BEAUTY (142 MIN, NR) Fri 2/28-Thu 3/6: 1:35, 4:35, 7:35 MONUMENTS MEN (118 MIN, PG-13) Fri 2/28: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 Sat 3/1-Sun 3/2: 11:50am, 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 Mon 3/3-Thu 3/6: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 PHILOMENA (98 MIN, PG-13) Fri 2/28: 5:30 Sat 3/1-Sun 3/2: 11:30am, 5:30 Mon 3/3-Thu 3/6: 5:30 NEBRASKA (115 MIN, R) Fri 2/28: 2:45, 7:50 Sat 3/1-Sun 3/2: 12:00, 2:45, 7:50 Mon 3/3-Thu 3/6: 2:45, 7:50 SWEET DREAMS (89 MIN, NR) Tue 3/4: 1:45, 6:40

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THE SWISS: Blues County Sheriff (blues) 8 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Jazz & Beyond (live jam) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino, Brooke Lizotte (experimental jam) 9 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, MARCH 4 JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5

SATURDAY, MARCH 1 LOUIE G’S: American Wrecking Company, Syztem7, Agnozia, Inside the Gates (metal, hardcore) 7:30 p.m., $10, AA

B SHARP COFFEE: Ty Elwin (singer-songwriter) 8 p.m., NC BOB’S JAVA JIVE: Death By Stars, Elbow Coulee, TBASA (indie-rock) 8 p.m., $6 EMERALD QUEEN: Merle Haggard (country) 8 p.m., $35-$70 GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Rex Navarrete (comedy) 8:30, 10:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: The Spazmatics (‘80s covers) 9 p.m., $7 NEW FRONTIER: Big Wheel Stunt Show’s final show, The Hardcount, Gold Records (hard rock) 9 p.m., NC PANTAGES: Tacoma Concert Band (classical) 7:30 p.m., $16-$34 THE SPAR: Twang Junkies (country) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Comedy 253 reunion (comedy) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Kry (covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Andy Haynes (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15, 18+ THEATRE ON THE SQUARE: Project Trio (classical, jazz, hiphop) 7:30 p.m., $22-$36

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5 TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar)

DAVE’S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC

THURSDAY, MARCH 6 502 MARTINI: Kim Archer (singer-songwriter) 5 p.m., NC

SUNDAY, MARCH 2 TACOMA COMEDY: Louie Foxx (comedy magician) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m. 606 Fawcett, Tacoma, WA

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GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Rex Navarrete (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: Disco Disco, Afrodisiacs, Mr. Pink, DJ Freshwell (dance covers) 8 p.m., $7 MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Zook CD release, Mos Generator (hard rock) 9 p.m., $5 THE SWISS: Grinder (rock) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Andy Haynes (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15, 18+ UNCLE SAM’S: The Foreskins featuring Howard Comfort (rock) 9 p.m. UNCLE THURM’S: Kareem Kandi Band (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA

DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open jam) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Tom Segura (comedy) 8 p.m., $10 TRIPLE PLAY: Comedy open mic, 9 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older


Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 28, 2014

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: TOM SEGURA

at the new Allenmore Golf and Events Center/Tacoma Elks on Saturday March 1st at 8pm. Tickets: $15:00 Info: (253) 272-1117

Thurs. March 6 Tacoma Comedy Club, 933 Market St. Tom Segura is a comedian originally from Cincinnati, Ohio, though he was raised in too many places to list. His television credits include “Conan,” “Comedy Central Presents” (half-hour special), Showtimes’ “Russell Peters Presents,” and “Live at Gotham!” When he’s not on tour Tom continues to perform at the top comedy festivals in the world, including Montreal’s Just For Laughs Comedy Festival. Price: $10. Info: (253) 282-7203 MASTERPIECE SERIES II Fri., Feb. 28, 7:30 p.m. The Great Hall of Annie Wright School, 827 N. Tacoma Ave. The Corigliano String Quartet captured the imagination of audiences worldwide when it won the Grand Prize of the Fischoff Chamber Music Competition in 1999. Tickets: $27. Info: (253) 272- 2215 COMEDY WITH REX NAVARRETE Fri., Feb. 28, 8:30 p.m. Grit City Comedy, 100 S. 9th St., at 502 Martini Bar & Lounge Many claim that college is the turning point in one’s life, when one finds his or her future. This was the case for San Francisco Bay Area comedian Rex Navarrete,

when Navarrete’s college professor told him he was wasting his talents. Tickets: $13.70. Info: (253) 2722489 PIER PEER AROUND TACOMA Sat., March 1, 7:30-9 p.m. Point Defiance Marina Bring your family and join us for an aquatic night-time adventure as you explore hundreds of mysterious life forms below the docks with experienced naturalists! Ages 8 and up only! $8 per person. Info: (253) 5916439 THE GREAT PRETENDERS Sat., March 1, 8 p.m. Allenmore Events Center, 2013 S. Cedar St. The Great Pretenders will be

A DR. SEUSS BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION Sun., March 2, 2:00 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 Sixth Ave.s From the moment his tall, red-and-white-striped hat appears around the door, Sally and her brother know that The Cat in the Hat is the funniest, most mischievous cat they have ever met. Tickets: $15 adults, $13 seniors and military, $12 children, groups of 10 or more $10 each. Info: (253) 565-6867 RELAX AND RENEW Sun., March 2 W.W. Seymore Conservatory, 316 S. G. St. Join us for an hour of guided meditation and gentle movement in the beautiful tropical setting of the Conservatory in Wright Park. No experience is necessary, accessible to all. Suggested donation $10.00 Info: (253) 591-5330 MONDAY MIXER: EDS & MEDS Mon., March 3, 5-6:30 p.m. Hilltop Regional Health Center, 1202 Martin Luther King Jr. Way A networking event brought to you by Mayor Marilyn Strickland and the City of Tacoma’s Community & Economic Development Department, focusing this quarter on Tacoma’s medical industry and the educational institutions that produce tomorrow’s generation of trained professionals. Free. Info: (253) 573-2523

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

GOOD DEED DOGS DRIVE Mon., March 3 Matress Discounters, 6001 Tacoma Mall Blvd. Sooner or later, everyone needs a helping hand — or a helping paw. So, Mattress Discounters is raising money to help train assistance dogs for those in need. Now through March 9, make a donation at your local Mattress Discounters store. Info: mattressdiscountersdogs.com.

TACOMA AUTHOR KARLA STOVER Wed., March 5, Noon Round Table Pizza, 7901 S. Hosmer St. Karla Stover will introduce her new Tacoma-based murder mystery, A Line to Murder. When protagonist Mercedes MacKaill thinks the police aren’t doing enough to find out who murdered her friend, she sets out to solve the crime herself. Free. Info: (253) 537-5010

SPECIAL FAMILIES OF PIERCE COUNTY Mon., March 3, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Pierce County Library Processing and Administration Center, 3005 112th St. E. SPECIAL Families of Pierce County is a support group for families that have children with special needs. Each month we provide an expert speaker that discusses a topic relevant to special needs. Free. Info: (253) 548-3300

AARP FREE TAX ASSISTANCE Wed., March 5, Noon to 5 p.m. Tacoma Public Library – Moore Branch 215 S. 56th St. AARP volunteers will be available at the Moore Branch Library to provide free tax assistance and preparation. Age suitablility 18 and up. Free. Info: (253) 314-4848 STUDENT PREVIEW OF IN THE GARDEN OF LIVE FLOWERS Thurs. March 6, 7:30 p.m. PLU-Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts., 12180 Park Ave. S. Price: Free with student ID or $8 General Admission, $5 Senior Citizens and Alumni, $3 for PLU community. Info: (253) 535-7411

TOTALLY TWEEN: MAGIC TREE HOUSE PARTY Tues., March 4, 3:30-5 p.m. Parkland Spanaway Pierce County Library, 13718 Pacific Ave. South Do you read the Magic Tree House books? Test your knowledge, play games, eat snacks, and enjoy all things Magic Tree House. No registration required. Ages 6-11. Free. Info: (253) 548-3304

BALLROOM DANCING Thurs. March 6, 7 p.m. Allenmore Events Center, 2013 S. Cedar St. Thursday Ballroom/variety dancing. Huge dance floor. Great location at the all new Allenmore Golf and Events Center/Tacoma Elks Open to Members and guests. Price: $5 member, $10 guest/nonmembers, discounts for couples. Info: (253) 272-1117

MARDI GRAS 2014 AT TIDES TAVERN Tues., March 4, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tides Tavern, 2925 Harborview Dr. Gig Harbor Join us on Fat Tuesday, March 4 to celebrate Mardi Gras! This is an all day event and we will be featuring live music in the evening. Free. Info: (253) 858-3982

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE Kerri Bailey is a horticulturist and a certified herbalist. She makes custom blends and consults at Ubiquitous Journey (www.UBJourney.com) on 6th Avenue. Kerri owns two businesses – the online herb store www.HerbalElements.net and a water garden store inside Alpine Nursery in South Hill (www. AlpineGrows.com) called The Pond Pad (www.ThePondPad.com). She writes blogs on gardening, ponds, natural health and herbal remedies and teaches classes through Free University (www.FreeUNW.com).

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) You are sensitive to those around you this week. Try not to take offense where there is none. Putting yourself in others’ shoes will give insight to others’ views you may see as stubborn. Give into compromise and allow things to flow. Rushing leads to mistakes. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) Pay attention to completing important tasks or chores this week. Mixed messages or misunderstandings may cause confusion. Someone may use harsh words or try to deceive you. Don’t cut corners – do the job right the first time. Take some special time to relax with your partner. GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) A change of perspective may help you get out of a sticky situation. Now is a great time to shine at work or find new employment or opportunity. There is a silver lining in the dark cloud that is lifting this week. Smile while you show your skills. CANCER (June 21 – July 22) It is a great time to fix that broken sink or tackle that DIY project you have been putting off. Family may join in for the fun. Study new techniques or take a class. Expanding your self-knowledge is fulfilling and comes easy for you. Finish what you start. LEO (July 23 – August 22) Things may seem to be going well yet try not to take on more than you can handle. Delegate to those who can help you manage. It’s okay to take a back seat for a while. Those that need your help may ask you for it. VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) An important transaction or real estate matter may be delayed. There is a chance those delays may work out in your favor. You become more sensitive to others’ feelings or point of view. A mysterious relationship could be revealed.

LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) You may find yourself reminiscing about the past. An old flame or friend may contact you on social media. Decide what is really important to you for the present and let go of what is not needed from the past. Exercise may help you relax. SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) Your intensity and passion may not be understood by others who do not share your emotional views. Romantic dreams or fantasies may occupy your time. Your partner may have a different agenda from your own or be resistant to your plans.

WORD SEARCH Y M S J A Z Z B O N E S T S A P

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SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) Your rebellious side may urge you to take that risk. Check the pros and cons carefully before making that investment or other moneymaking idea. Money may come easy to you. Plan your goals and execute them with precision. CAPRICORN (December 22 – January 19) Work may be hectic right now as you take on more responsibilities. Make your views heard to those who have the power for positive change. Balance work with home life. Learn to turn off your work mode so you can recharge. Romance your partner. AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) As Mercury rewinds, you are filled with brilliant ideas. Someone may not like your suggestions or not want to listen. This may take time before they turn around so don’t waste your time. Go over the fine print well before signing contracts. PISCES (February 19 – March 20) Allow your artistic and creative juices to flow as many thoughts may come your way. Inspiration comes in many ways. Look for subtle clues in everyday things. An amazing dream may give you insight into solving a problem or issue you are having. Enjoy a romantic moment.

ANAGRAM

SMOKEY ROBINSON

How many words can you make out of this phrase?


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Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 8 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, February 28, 2014

NOTICES

NOTICES

EMPLOYMENT

OBITUARY RANDALL GREGORY WILLIAMS

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR KING COUNTY In re the Estate of: Janice Kay Lammert, Deceased. Case No. 14-4-00623-1 SEA NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent that arose before the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in R.C.W. 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney at their respective addresses stated below a copy of WKHFODLPDQGĂ&#x20AC;OLQJWKHRULJLQDORIWKHFODLP with the Court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under R.C.W. 11.40.020(1)Š, or (2) four months after the date RIĂ&#x20AC;UVWSXEOLFDWLRQRIWKHQRWLFH,IWKHFODLPV into presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in R.C.W. 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probate and non-probate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: February 14,2014 Joyce K. Lammert, P.R. 1509 Fifth Avenue N. Seattle WA 98109 Ross Radley, Attorney for P.R. 146 North Canal St, #350 Seattle WA 98103 (206) 323-3800 rradley@mindspring.com

TO: Selena Adrian

TO: Timothy Reed BRYAN, Annette and Jennifer vs Timothy Reed Case Number: PUY-CV-PO-2013-0268DV YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 29th day of April, 2014 at 1:30 p.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Misty Carrillo In the Welfare of: C.B DOB: 01/27/2014 Case Number: PUY-CW-CW-2014-0004 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Review Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Continued Initial Hearing on Initial the 12th day of June, 2014 at 1:30 P.M. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS.

DISCRIMINATION Experiencing Workplace Discrimination? Retired City of Tacoma Civil Rights Investigator will provide assistance. Call 253-565-6179. Never a fee for my services. Help Wanted Earn Extra Income, Become an Avon representative Only $10 to start Sign up online at: www.start.youravon.com Use reference code FORTIZ Or call (253) 226-6683

PETS

IN RE: Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mya Adrian Case Number: PUY-CV-PC-2013-0249 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on April 22nd, 2014 at 1:30PM If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. TO: Spapull Gottfriedson In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs GOTTFRIEDSON, Spapull Case Number: PUY-FH-SHELL-2013-0037 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Revocation Hearing on March 11th, 2014 at 9:00am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Velma Satiacum & Lawrence W. Hatch Sr. In the Welfare of: H Jr., L. DOB: 04/11/2013 Case Number: PUY-CW-CW-2013-0015 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Disposition Hearing Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Guardianship Hearing on Monday the 2nd day of June, 2014 at 1:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. TO: SILVA, Naomi Louise In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs SILVA, Naomi Louise Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0059 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on March 18, 2014 at 9:00am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Jessica Rivas In the Matter of: Nicholas E. Earl Sr., vs Jessica Rivas Case Number: PUY-CV-07/08-090 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Show Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Show Hearing on the 15th day of April, 2014 at 9:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT.

The City of Milton has received an application for Master Plan amendment. The proposal is to extend the expiration condition to extend to September 23rd 2019 instead of expiring on September 23rd 2014. The project is SEPA exempt. A full copy of the plans and application are available upon request at the Planning and Community Development Department located at 1000 Laurel St Milton, WA 98354. Comments on the above application must be submitted in writing to Chris Larson, Contract Planner, Planning and Community Development Department, 1000 Laurel Street, Milton, WA 98354, by 5:00 PM on March 28th, 2014. If you have questions about this proposal, or wish to be made a party of record and receive additional information by mail, please contact Chris Larson, at 253-517-2715 or clarson@ cityofmilton.net. Anyone who submits written comments will automatically become a party of UHFRUG DQG ZLOO EH QRWLĂ&#x20AC;HG RI DQ\ GHFLVLRQ RQ this project.

FOR SALE FURNITURE

FURNITURE

New 5 Piece Bedroom Set Full or Queen set includes: Headboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, & mirror. BRAND NEW! Only $400 253-539-1600

All New King Mattress Set 3 Piece King Mattress set for only $275. Still in original packaging with factory warranty. Can deliver. 253-537-3056

5 Piece Dining Room Set Table & 4 Chairs. New in box. Only $300 253-539-1600 Microfiber Sectional Brand New REVERSIBLE sectional with chaise lounge. NEW! Only $500 253-539-1600 All New Pillow Top Mattress Queen Size with warranty. Still in original plastic. Can deliver. $120. 253537-3056 Solid Wood Bunk Beds Available in 2 colors. Brand new in box. Can break down to two separate twin beds. Delivery available. $250 253-539-1600 Low Profile Leather Bed Frame Still in box. Available in Full or Queen. Very nice. Can deliver. $250 253-539-1600

Adjustable Power Bed Brand New with memory foam mattress. Wall hugger with warranty. Delivery available. $995 253-537-3056

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy 253-770-8552

Cat Wanted My little shi-tsu dog and cat were extremely close. Each day he keeps looking for her. Must be dog friendly. 472-8518.

Pet of the Week

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mooâ&#x20AC;? This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Featured Kitty it a very special one. Moo is a friendly and fun black and white boy who will capture your heart & attention. Mr. Moo is the epitome of a stellar cat who loves to be loved. He enjoys being petted and shows you his appreciation by giving you gentle head-butts. If you were to pick him up to cuddle, he would relax completely in your arms and enjoy the attention. This lovable 8 year old does have a cute little quirkâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a drooler. Due to the fact that Moo is missing a few teeth, he tends to drool, especially when heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comfortable. Other than missing some teeth, Moo does have a heart murmur. His forever family must make sure he receives the continued care that he requires. Although Moo has a few health conditions, you would never know it! This lovable guy is not only playful, he is extremely patient and tolerant. He would do well with young children and other equally calm pets. We guarantee youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never meet another cat like Moo. Make him yours today. Reference #A362819

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www.thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week 1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

New Mission Style Bedroom Suite Solid wood Mission bedroom set. $699. Includes: headboard, footboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, and mirror. 253-539-1600 New Overstuffed Microfiber sofa & Love Seat Still in plastic with manufactures warranty. Can have for $700. Lifetime warranty on frame. 253-539-1600 BRAND NEW! Queen Memory foam mattress set with 20 year warranty. Can Deliver. $400. 253-537-3056 New Pillow Top Full Mattress Only $99. Never used! Comes with manufactures warranty. Delivery available. 253537-3056

ANTIQUES WANTED Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105

R

andall Gregory Williams was born on March 31, 1943 in Tacoma to Helen and Frank Williams. Along with his sister, Diane, the family lived on Five Mile Lake in Edgewood. He decided in his early years WKDW WKH QDPH 5DQG\ ZDVQ¡W Ă&#x20AC;WWLQJ VR KH DQQRXQFHG to the family he had changed his name to Butch Eisenhower. The name stuck for some time. Eventually the Eisenhower was dropped and it was shortened to Butch. By kindergarten, the Butch was dropped as well and he returned to being Randy. When he was two, the family moved to Homer, Alaska where they ran a restaurant and bar called The Husky and homesteaded. It was only a couple of years before they moved back to Edgewood where Randy would grow up and attend Edgemont for his elementary and middle school. His mother Helen remembers him as a very loving boy that would quickly win over the hearts of his teachers. He attended Sumner High School where he graduated in 1961. He played on the golf team and introduced his dad to the game, which became a passion of his father Frankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in his retirement. His undergraduate years were spent at Central Washington University in Ellensburg. He graduated in 1965 with a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in Social Sciences. A strong work ethic was something his father instilled in him. As a boy, if there were no other chores to do, Frank would have him move a wood pile from one side of the yard to the other, and then back again. So it was no surprise that he worked his way through college. At Nalley Valley Potato Chip Company he began by shoveling salt but was promoted to supervisory positions in which he streamlined and innovated the way the processing was handled. After graduation, he joined the Peace Corps and lived in a village in India near the border of Bangladesh. The objective was to teach farming practices to ORFDOVÂŤZKLFKPHDQWKHKDGWRĂ&#x20AC;UVWOHDUQDERXWIDUPLQJ practices. He fell very ill while in India with an intestinal disorder that the doctors were unable to diagnose. He ZDVĂ RZQEDFNWR:DVKLQJWRQ'&DQGWKHQHYHQWXDOO\ home. Hope was fading for an explanation or a cure. It was then that he came across a chiropractor named Dr. Don Robinson. As Randy told him of his condition and the outlook the doctors had given him, Dr. Don replied â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s their opinion. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s see about getting you healthyâ&#x20AC;?, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what he did. A lifelong friendship was born between him and Dr. Don and a seed of passion for chiropractic was planted. As his strength improved and his health came back, he decided to return to school. He moved to Seattle DQG OLYHG IRU D WLPH ZLWK IULHQGV RQ D Ă RDWLQJ KRPH while attending the University of Washington studying geography. The university encouraged him to join their doctoral program and to take a position in the department. He declined as his interest in chiropractic care had grown to a calling. He chose to attend Palmer College of Chiropractic in Davenport, Iowa. He graduated top of his class in 1973, the same year he met the love of his life, Angela Rose Raiti. They married in 1974 and settled back in Edgewood. Dr. Williams was an associate under his mentor Dr. Don for some time before opening his own practice in Fife in the business building near the Poodle Dog. He would continue practicing for nearly 40 years in various locations in Fife. In 2012, he received an award from the city of Fife for his devotion to improving the city. In 1976, Nicole Rene was born and the Williams grew to a family of three. Two years later in 1978, Matthew Randall was born; Christine Helene arrived in 1980. Chrissy would later follow in his footsteps and become Dr. Chrissy and take over his chiropractic practice. Family instantly became the highest priority for Randy. He loved his wife and children and held his responsibilities as a husband, father, and a provider with the highest regard. In 1986, their fourth child, Jean Marie, was born and the Williams family was complete. Randy and Angieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Catholic faith was a central part of the family. They were longtime parishioners of St. Martin of Tours in Fife. Randy and Angie moved to Port Orchard in 2008. They enjoyed sitting on the front porch, watching the sunset over the water (sometimes with an evening cocktail in hand), either in peaceful thought or listening to a Mariners game. Faith, family and career were by far the three most prevalent loves of his life. Other hobbies included gardening and travel. During the past eight years, Randy and Angie enjoyed long weekend get-a-ways to their beach house in Seaview. Family vacations were always an adventure. Popular destinations included Sun River, Oregon; houseboats on Lake Shuswap in Canada; Lake Chelan; and Kauai. Aside from watching his grandchildren grow, he was most looking forward to seeing the world and traveling with his wife and friends in his retirement years. We, his family, knew for just a couple weeks that his time would end sooner than seemed right for a man that gave so much. We had precious time with him to laugh and cry, to dream and reminisce... and we sang. It was beautiful. His passing on February 13th in San Diego, California was peaceful, surrounded by family and love. For many years his business card had on it the simple phrase â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keep Smilingâ&#x20AC;?. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what he always did and you can bet he is doing now. We ask you to join us and him and Keep Smiling.

Jellybean is such a cutie pie! She is 7 months old, super cuddly, and ready for a Forever Family to call her own. This young girl wants to be the queen bee, as she doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like other cats. Give her the keys to the kingdom, and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sure to rule your world. Stop by today!

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He was preceded in death by his father Frank Williams. He is survived by his wife of 40 years, Angela Rose; his mother Helen Williams; and sister Diane Peters and her husband Hal. He also is survived by his children, their spouses and families: Nicole and Fabio Bolognesi and sons Luca and Marco; Matthew and Adrianne Williams and sons Mason and Charlie; Chrissy and Justin Blair and daughter Rylin; Jeannie Williams and KHUVLJQLĂ&#x20AC;FDQWRWKHU7UHYRU:LOFR[ A funeral Mass will be held at 11 am on Tuesday, March 4, 2014 at St. Martin of Tours in Fife. Please wear bright colors that represent Randyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vibrant smile and warm heart. Donations may be made to St. Jude Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Research Hospital.

AUTOS WANTED

429 ST HELENS AVE â&#x20AC;˘ TACOMA, WA 253.221.2209 OR 253.229.3636

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Retired Grandpa needs to purchase affordable, reliable, used vehicle to crisscross and explore America. I planned this trip in 1966 while serving in Vietnam. Any leads or ideas? (360) 628-8839


Friday, February 28, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV HOMES FOR SALE

Why NOW is the Time to Sell Your Home!

HOMES FOR SALE

CALL 253.922.5317

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

1232 S Adams St.

805 N Steele St

Super charming home w/ the ease of newer amenities... Box beam ceilings, KDUGZRRGĂ RRUVPDUEOHHQWU\SLFWXUHSODWH UDLOV SHULRGVW\OHOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHVDGGWRWKH ambience, while newer roof, furnace/heat pump, indoor/outdoor speakers, newer ZLULQJSOXPELQJ JDVĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHDGGWRWKH ahhhh factor. Spacious living room, large kitchen, HUGE dining room, a bedroom and FXWHUHPRGHOHGEDWKURRPJUDFHWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVW Ă RRU*LJDQWLFGHFNZVHDWLQJZHOFRPH home. Move in and make it yours. $219,950

Want bragging rights & the ability to name drop? Hans Grohe, Duravit, Kohler, & Porcher to name a few... Then this is the house for you-high end everything & custom touches galore. Need this spelled out in layman terms? Fabulous, fantastic & close to hip 6th Ave Biz District, this 4 bed, 2.5 bath home has natural, original woodwork, is an entertainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream, and is ready for new owners... Leave your hammer at your old houseWKLVRQHLVĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGDQGĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGZHOO,PLJKWDGG Welcome! $368,000

â&#x20AC;˘ Interest rates are on the rise. Sell now and buy your next home before prices increase.

â&#x20AC;˘ Buyers are plentiful and listings are few. More buyers means a better environment for you to sell.

â&#x20AC;˘ Your home may no longer meet your needs. It is amazing how when you are in a home 3, 5, or 10 years how much your needs change. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get you into the right home for you while prices are still affordable for your next move.

I have buyers approved wanting to buy homes! Call Me Today! <RXUQH[WVWHSLVWRFDOOPHIRUDPDUNHWDQDO\VLVWRĂ&#x20AC;QGRXW what your home will sell for in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s market!

253-203-8985

www.StephanieLynch.com

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

1388 N Lenore St. Information deemed liable but not guaranteed.

STABLES

STABLES

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

33 N Salmon Beach

Fantastic mid century modern centrally located near stores, schools, parks and easy commuting to freeways, yet house feels secluded and private due to professionally landscaped, lovely yard with zen paths and sustainable design. Fantastic NLWFKHQKDUGZRRGĂ RRUVPDVWHURQPDLQ great patio for entertaining- this is a wonderful home with lots of space. Move in ready and awaiting new owners. $282,000

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

Dillon Stables. Covered, well-lit riding arena. 12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x12â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Stalls. Full care. Riding Lessons. Horses for Sale. $400 per month. (253) 606-4994 HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St.

Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton hydraulic boat Lift, brick wood burning Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHZLWKLQVHUWH[SDQVLYHGHFNLQJRQ all sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout the last 9 years, including URRIVLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZVGRRUVGHFNLQJ boat hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more. $450,000

3728 N Gove St, Tacoma

Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 222-8480

Cute little bungalow in Proctor! Nice upgrades include a new family room, windows, roof, energy package & carpet 6 years ago. Detached garage was converted to extra living space. It has a separate electric panel, heat & lights - lots of possibilities... music studio, art studio, exercise / yoga room, etc. Parking for 3 cars off the alley next to garage. Charming back \DUGWRR+DUGZRRGĂ RRUVXQGHUFDUSHWH[FHSWLQ family room. MLS# 518902. $204,950

936 S Sheridan $219,000

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

2711 Henry Road N

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800 Turn the Key & Move In! This Cozy 2Bd 1Bth has been freshly painted  IHDWXUHV UHĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHG ZRRG Ă RRUV  LQFK WULP around windows/doors & custom tile throughout. 8SJUDGHG (OHFWULFDO   3OXPELQJ 2IĂ&#x20AC;FH'HQ area, and large windows to enjoy Country Living and Northwest Wildlife at your doorstep! Privacy & Beauty all around! Situated on 1.12 acres (2 parcels), this property has Boundless Potential for Investor/Builder. Centrally located near highly desired schools, parks, water recreation and minutes to HWY 16 & local stores. This home is ready for your Inspiration!

Michelle Anguiano Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood

253.720.6525 PROPERTY

PROPERTY

MT. RAINIER VIEW $125,000 Beautiful Level Buildable Site! Located off of Ray Nash Drive NW, this 1.25 Acres of natural setting and mature Evergreen trees is perfect to build your dream home and enjoy the Country Lifestyle! Peek-a-Boo View of Mt. Rainier. Just minutes away from sought after Schools, Uptown Gig Harbor Amenities, Restaurants, WA-Hwy 16, Hospitals, Boat launch/water activities, tennis courts & Kopachuck State Park! Electricity is available at corner.

Michelle Anguiano Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood 253.720.6525

OLD TOWN $499,950 Amazing development potential with this unique 2OG7RZQSURSHUW\&LW\KDVJLYHQĂ&#x20AC;QDOSODW approval for 4 lots on this prime 3 acre piece. Big views possible from all lots in this great neighborhood, tucked back & out of the way. Walk to the historic Old Town district with its coffee shops, wine bar & restaurants.; then stroll down to the waterfront & enjoy the gorgeous Puget Sound setting with walking paths, public docks, shoreline restaurants & more! MLS# 332653

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with no HOA. High &HLOLQJVJDVÂżUHSODFHVVHSDUDWHO\PHWHUHG &DOOIRUSULYDWHVKRZLQJWRGD\253.606.0689 BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME

$399,000

Beautiful Victorian 4-plex in good location back on the market after remodel. Walking distance to hospitals, downtown, parks. 0DLQ Ă RRU XQLW KDV RQH EHGURRP SOXV attached bonus room, dining room, lg kitchen with nook, new carpet throughout, bay windows. Upstairs unit has 2 bedrooms, bath, lg living room, kitchen & balcony. Lower level has 2 studio apts & bath. Sep. utilities for main and upper units. 3,064 sq ft MLS# 523770

Absolutely Charming, Mediterranean Style, custom built North Tacoma view home. Enjoy Commencement Bay view from Mstr Br balc. ,QVLGHIHDWLQFO0DUEOHĂ RRUHQWU\6W6WHHO$SSO *UDQFRXQWWRSV&XVWEXLOW+LFNRU\FDE%HDXW %UD]LOLDQ&KHUU\KDUGZRRGĂ RRU%D\ZLQGRZV 0VWUVXLWHZ)3 /UJEDWKVWHDPVKRZHU &DOLFORVHW1HZ(QHUJ\(IĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWKHDWLQJ&HQW YDFXXPQHZSDLQWLQ RXWQHZFDUSHW)LQLVKHG %VPWZNLWFKHQ&ORVHWR6FKRROV3DUNV )UHHZD\+RVSLWDOV :DWHUIURQW$623,000.

Better Properties Heather Redal 253.363.5920

Better Properties N. Proctor (253) 376-7787

Gil Rigell

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract RURAL LIVING: Restaurant/Lounge in Ashford, WA Price for business, $105,000 with $25,000 down. Price for the real estate, $390,000 with $75,000 down. Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract includes a 3 B/R house, laundromat, restr./lounge bldg. on 3.4 acre, commercial zoned parcel.

price reduced

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;CALLAHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB & GRILL IN KEY CENTER Business is for sale for $300,000 with $100,000 down, High gross sales. Saler will also consider leasing the space COLLISION CENTER Same owner 15 yrs. Retiring, 6621 So. Tacoma Way. $130,000 with terms to qualified buyer - some training provided at o cost to buyer. LAKEWOOD CAFE/ LOUNGE on a busy intersection, $81,500 CASH.

CALL RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 28, 2014

Merle Haggard

KUBE 93 Comedy Jam Battle at the Boat 95 Starring Nick Cannon

March 1, 8pm

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March 22, 7pm

I-5 Showroom $35, $50, $65, $70

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I-5 Showroom $25, $40, $100

Keith Sweat

Michael McDonald Bachman Turner

March 29, 8:30pm

April 5, 8:30pm

April 11, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $30, $40, $55, $60

I-5 Showroom $40, $60, $95, $100

I-5 Showroom $35, $60, $85, $90

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


Twa 2 28 14 p01