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FREE s Friday, February 14, 2014

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ASIAN NEW YEAR CELEBRATION

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Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

CHURCH FIRE Golgotha Baptist Church stricken again by fire

ready. set.grow. Princess Promenade kicks off 2014 Daffodil Festival season

By Kathleen Merryman

Firefighters tackled, then deputies arrested a man found lurking in the ruins of Golgotha Baptist Church Tuesday. Wednesday, prosecutors charged Bryan Douglas Brock, 34, of Tacoma, with burglary in the second degree. In what appears to be a second arson, fire consumed what remained of Golgotha Baptist Church in Midland on Monday morning. Tony Houser was the first to notice smoke coming from the church at 1611 E. 85th St., at the intersection of Portland Avenue and 85th Street East. He called 9-1-1 at 9:45 a.m. then noticed a man behaving oddly. “There was a guy walking, walking down the road, stopping, and turning around and looking,” he said. “I let the firemen know what I saw.” The fire, he said, was a rotten blow for the congregation, as flames took hold in a room above a portico facing Portland Avenue. That side of the church, which included the

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ven a slick of snow on the ground couldn’t keep a bumper crop of new Daffodil Princesses from making their first appearance as a court for the 2014 festival year, at the Daffodil Festival Princess Promenade on Friday, Feb. 7. Serving as the official kick-off for the upcoming season of public appearances and community events and service, Promenade also marks the official presentation of each princess with the tiara, sash and golden daffodil necklace that they will wear throughout the year. The event found itself in a new venue this year at Puyallup’s Pioneer Park pavilion, which was brightly decorated with glowing golden daffodils and cheerful garden gnomes, in keeping with the 2014 theme, “Ready. Set. Grow,” for the 81st festival year. For one of the Princesses, Ji Larson from Lincoln High School, the fact that the festival already has such a legacy behind it is a great responsibility. “There have been tons of people whose lives have been touched by this festival. Personally it is an honor to be a part of it and carry on the spirit of Daffodil.” Princess Kayla McElligot, from Fife High School, concurs: “Knowing that there have been princesses representing Pierce County for 81 years is humbling…You know that you have been given this title and you have to honor it with grace and dignity, and represent your high school and community just as others have done before you.” Each of the young ladies was escorted by a member of the Daffodil Festival and their Educator of the Year, an educator nominated by each princess from their respective high school as outstanding in his or her field. As a part of the evening’s festivities, Pierce County Council Member Joyce MacDonald read a resolution passed by the council declaring the princesses as Official Ambassadors of Pierce County. The governing body has done so for the past two years of Daffodil royal courts, as well, on behalf of the positive effect the festival has on the promotion and representation of the county at festivals around the Pacific Northwest. A presentation by the Pierce County branches of the YMCA included the gift to each of the princesses of a yearlong membership, in appreciation of the partnership the festival has forged with the organization in recent years. The event itself was a discernible product of the Festival’s inherent connection to its supportive community, with appetizers and dessert provided by the Adriatic

X See FIRE / page A4

WHAT’S RIGHT WITH TACOMA

HEARING, THEN TELLING

Part Two of ‘The Lucky Woman’s Guide to Breast Cancer’ By Kathleen Merryman Cancer is the news no one is quite prepared to get. It demands a reaction for which most of us have no reference point. All of a sudden, we’re sloshing around in information, family stories and preconceptions that may or may not have anything to do with what we’ll be fighting. Most of us do resolve, in that moment, to fight, whether it’s to beat the disease or, as a dear friend in his 90s chose, to dampen the pain. Most of us have no idea of the X See CANCER / page A4

X See PRINCESS PROMENADE / page A4 PHOTOS COURTESY OF DAFFODIL FESTIVAL

NEW ROYALTY. (Top) The 2014 Daffodil

Princesses looked stunning in their yellow satin dresses, sashes and tiaras. (Above, left) Stadium High School’s Daffodil Princess Delaney Fry; (middle) Mt. Tahoma High School’s Daffodil Princess Nina Thatch; (bottom) and Foss High School’s Daffodil Princess Lydia Mangan. HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE

Bailey wins state title A6

CHARTER REVIEW STARTS OUT SLOWLY: Only a handful of people attended the first public hearing of the city’s Charter Review Committee. PAGE A3

Puyallup Nation Kings tryouts A10

Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

You are on a roller coaster ride as Mercury rewinds and some of your plans may fall through or people may not be reliable. Work or business projects may not coordinate and acting on impulse could cause stress. Try to locate and keep track of receipts and paperwork. Enjoy the fresh, crisp air.

An important relationship could reach a critical peak this week. The full moon today lets you see your friends and loved ones for who they really are. You have desired change for some time and now you have the chance to make this dream of stability happen. Take a step in the opposite direction. Don’t give into self-doubt.

Organize your home or office for positive work results. You may experience mechanical malfunctions as a result of Mercury in retrograde. Your patient determination will win over that hard to deal with person. Working as a team can make better progress. Respect and listen to your heart.

You may need to go with the flow to make your daydreams come true. New opportunities help you pull back in order to move forward. With Mercury in retrograde, your patience and stamina may be tested. Choose what is right or what is wrong for you. Take your time and do it right.

There is a possibility that you make a change that could surprise someone. A plan or project may not go as planned as Mercury rewinds. Interviews or meetings may be canceled. Keep track of those important documents, receipts and paperwork. Do your homework first and think carefully before making any moves.

WORD SEARCH M W F Q P O T H O L E S C E Q Q

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SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) Today’s powerful full moon reveals a special valentine. See the happiness in your everyday life. Opposites are at play bringing fun as well as disappointment. When things get too much, retreat to work out your next move. Enjoy your popularity with good intentions and spread joy.

Today’s full moon brings good times with friends and family. As Mercury is in retrograde, you may notice crazy times at work. Challenges with your boss or co-worker will escalate and then subside. Your fondest dreams and fantasies may be on your mind lately. Stay calm and keep smiling.

CAPRICORN (December 22 – January 19) This week could be socially challenging. Today’s full moon helps you recognize your responsibilities to others. You come to a common ground as a result of a disagreement. As Mercury rewinds this week, you may experience electronic problems. Back up your important files to avoid losing crucial information.

A quick, tempting getaway probably won’t resolve your issues. You may find yourself more in touch with repressed feelings as Mercury rewinds this week stirring up old emotions. The full moon today may be a special time for you and your partner. Take time to decompress.

Love is in the air today during this special full moon today. You are stimulated by a cuttingedge wavelength. This lively energy helps you find answers and make meaningful connections. Creative opportunities arise. We are the company we keep so stick with like-minded people.

Wishful thinking may get in the way of progress. Beware of misunderstandings with your partner or relative, as Mercury is in retrograde. Try to sense the needs and feelings of others. Appreciate the little things that make the bigger picture. Make some time for peace and quiet to help you focus.

Watch your budget and avoid spontaneous spending. Questions about money and wild ideas are in the air. Confusion this full moon could distract you from taking good care of yourself. Be loving and giving but don’t sacrifice everything or play the martyr. Your desires may prove reckless.

ANAGRAM

DAFFODIL PARADE

G A C R X O O Q M X T X N M H S

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to be a second arson, fire consumed what remained of Golgotha Baptist Church in Midland on Monday morning. kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

By Savannah Fry

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PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

FLAMES. In what appears

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:*/6633,=0,:7(::05.)@>0+,4(9.05: Two replacement levies to upgrade schools and technology programs around the Tacoma School District are winning by wide margins in early returns from Tuesday’s election. Both packages are four-year levies totaling $96 million a year and were passing with about 64 percent of the vote, according to early election returns. While more ballots will be tallied until the election is finalized Feb. 25, it is unlikely that the

trend will break and change the outcome of the election since the levies only require a simple majority of 50 percent to pass. Proposition No. 1 will fund dayto-day school operations, including classroom teachers, librarians, nurses, textbooks and instructional materials, athletics, arts and music programs, technology support and maintain roofs, heating, electrical and plumbing systems, playgrounds,

City News

7th and Tacoma Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.� And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holeyness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

Gloria Dei Lutheran Church - ELCA Mark E. Woldseth, Pastor 3315 South 19th St. Tacoma, WA 98405 (253) 383-5515 lutheransonline.com/gloriadeilutherantacoma

“Come and see!�

Sunday Worship - 10:45am

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CITIZENS FOR TACOMA, NOT TRASH CONTINUES TNT *3,(5<7 A group of Tacoma residents is continuing its effort to stop The News Tribune from distributing advertisement bundles in orange plastic bags by cleaning them from the streets and yards in their neighborhood and filing complaints with the Better Business Bureau over what the group considers littering. The City of Tacoma has posted information about advertising bundles to aid residents in their efforts by referring them to the TNTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s customer service department and stating that the bundles are not considered litter under city code. Visit http://www.cityoftacoma.org/cms/One. aspx?portalId=169&pageId=48191. CITY COUNCIL GREENLIGHTS MLK ROUTE Tacoma City Council unanimously approved a recommendation to route the light rail expansion from the Theatre District station on Commerce to Stadium Way and up then down Martin Luther King Jr. Way. The recommendation now goes to the Sound Transit Board for final approval and further study. The expansion would add 2.3 miles of track to the Link system that already runs 1.6 miles from the Tacoma Dome station to Commerce Streetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s station near Ninth Street. The recommended route would run from Commerce to Stadium Way then on to North First Street and continue to Division Avenue and turn left to Martin Luther King Jr. Way. Sound Transit maps call it the A1/B1 route. The route received the most community support and is the most straightforward, although it will mean construction on Stadium Way, which just reopened following being redesigned and refinished. City planners are looking at how the trains will impact traffic in the area, while the effort to raise money for the project continues as well. Estimates put the cost at about $165 million, but the budget estimated that the work would cost $150 million, which will be split three ways among federal grants, local funding and Sound Transit dollars. The local dollars will likely come from in-kind services from the city, vehicle licensing fees, contributions from institutions, sales taxes, parking fees and possibly a Local Improvement District tax on property owners. ;(*64(;,(*/,9*/(9.,+>0;/*/03+9(7, On Feb. 7, Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist charged Meredith Powell, 24, with two counts of child rape in the third degree and communication with a minor for immoral purposes. She engaged in sexual conversations and activity with three of her students. The defendant pleaded not guilty and will be released on her personal recognizance. The defendant is a math teacher at Lincoln High School in Tacoma. On Jan. 17, one of the victims went to the defendantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s classroom instead of attending the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Martin Luther King Day assembly. The two kissed and engaged in sexual activity. A few days after the assembly, the defendant again engaged in sexual activity in her classroom with another victim. They kissed and the defendant performed oral sex on the victim. Between the period of Jan. 17, 2014 and Jan. 28, the defendant exchanged explicit text messages with the victims. The messages included compliments about each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attractiveness. The defendant sent one of the victims a photo of her naked in the bathtub. She gave another victim her home address and asked him to come over. The victim declined. The defendant did not have intercourse with any of the three victims. On Feb. 3, the defendant wrote a letter to the girlfriend of one of the victims. She apologized for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;promiscuousâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;unprofessionalâ&#x20AC;? comments and texts she sent to the victim. The girlfriend showed the letter to school administrators. The defendant was placed on administrative leave. Detectives arrested the defendant on Feb. 6. 796*;697961,*;*3,(9:(56;/,9/<9+3, Despite harsh words from a capacity public forum on the project earlier in the month, the planned six-story apartment and retail development is one big step closer to

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playfields, alarm, sprinkler, security and emergency preparedness systems. Proposition No. 2 will fund technical training, support and up-todate tools for teaching and learning, replace outdated classroom computers for teachers and students, and improve the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s online system for parents, students and teachers to monitor academic progress, homework and attendance.

breaking ground. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are a lot of people who are really concerned about it,â&#x20AC;? Proctor resident Tom Egnew said. Neighbors gathered at University of Puget Sound to hear developers make their case for The Proctor, a proposed six-story, 147-unit apartment and retail building slated for the corner of North 28th and Proctor streets. Many residents voiced concern that the proposed building would be too large for the neighborhood and wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have enough parking spaces to provide for its residents and therefore would cause a further car crunch in the community business district. The project plans to provide roughly one car stall per unit, but the development will offer two bedroom units, they pointed out. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is woefully under-parked,â&#x20AC;? Egnew said, adding that the lack of residential parking will cause a spill-over into the surrounding street parking spots meant for local businesses. The mixed-used facility would have spaces for six businesses, but displace four existing businesses. But while the mostly single-family-resident speakers talked about the downside of more people coming to the area, the project is well within the zoning codes of the area. It is the exact sort of live-work project the City Council wanted in business districts, actually, because it adds density while not displacing businesses. The city even made it easier in 2009 for developers to construct mixed-use developments in particular areas by allowing buildings to be six stories instead of the previous four â&#x20AC;&#x201C;story cap. The project is being backed by Proctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Northwest Shop and former city council member Bill Evans and Blue Mouse Theater backer and real estate broker Erling Kuester as well as Gig Harborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rush Co. and a roster of other investors. The project scored its latest win last week when a hearing examiner ruled that an alley bisecting the property could be vacated to allow for a sky bridge to span the alley and join to sections of the facility. The decision, however, now goes to the City Council for final review, but it is expected to approve the decision. It is expected to be on a council agenda later this month.

:7(*,>692:*(33:-694<9(3=63<5;,,9: Spaceworks Tacoma, a joint initiative of the City of Tacoma and the Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber of Commerce designed to activate empty storefronts and vacant space, has issued a call for volunteers to assist with the new round of Spaceworksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; murals. Work on the murals starts now and continues until March 17. Artists Chelsea Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Sullivan and Diana Leigh Surma have been selected to complete two spectacular new murals on the corner of 11th and Market Street. Volunteers are needed to help prepare the spaces, work with the artists on implementation, and to document the projects. This is an opportunity to be involved in the process of creating public murals, work directly with professional artists, join the Spaceworks team and help beautify Tacoma. Volunteers are needed anytime from Feb. 14 to March 17. If you are interested, contact Gabriel Brown, Spaceworks assistant, at the Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber, 950 Pacific Ave., #300, P.O. Box 1933, Tacoma, WA 98401-1933; phone (253) 682-1735; or e-mail gabrielb@ tacomachamber.org. Also visit www.spaceworkstacoma. com and www.tacomachamber.org. REGISTER TODAY FOR UWT DIVERSITY SUMMIT The public is cordially invited to UW Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2014 Diversity Summit being held on Friday, Feb. 28 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. in William Philip Hall. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Diversity Summit will feature the Interactive Theater as Pedagogy Project (ITPP). ITPP uses interactive theater â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with a focus on Theater of the Oppressed methods â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to create collective spaces that promote engagement in difficult dialogues, critical thinking, and taking action for change. Have you ever witnessed or experienced an act of oppression â&#x20AC;&#x201C; sometimes overt, sometimes subtle, and yet always powerful? When these situations take place, many of us do not intervene or respond, or perhaps we do something that, later on, we wished we had done differently or more effectively. If yes, then join us as both a spectator and spect-actor to identify and respond to isms, phobias and more! Space is limited, so register today at: www.tacoma. uw.edu/diversitysummit.

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7630*,(:27<)30*Âť:/,37;6*(;*/(**<:,+2033,9 By David Rose Correspondent

Detectives in Pierce County need your help tracking down an accused killer. Nevada Lee Pettes is wanted for DAVID ROSE his suspected role in the murder of Jacob Glenn on Fox Island last November. Police say heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been on the run and committing more

crimes since then. Detectives believe Pettes was with the suspect who stabbed Glenn to death during a drug rip. The 23-year-oldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s body was found in a ditch outside a grocery store. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been on the run and he knows heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wanted for murder,â&#x20AC;? said Detective Ed Troyer with the Pierce County Sheriff â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also wanted for some armed robberies and kidnappings in other jurisdictions including Tacoma. Det.

Troyer says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;So this is a guy whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dangerous, who knows that police are looking for him. We need to get him caught through a viewer tip before he hurts or kills somebody else.â&#x20AC;? Nevada Lee Pettes is 32 years old, 5 7 and 155 pounds. He was last living in Tacoma before he went on the run. If you can help detectives catch him, call in an anonymous tip at CRIME STOPPERS: 1-800222-TIPS.

NEVADA LEE PETTES

*/(9;,99,=0,>:;(9;:6<;:36>3@ By Steve Dunkelberger

Stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The first opportunity for Tacoma residents to go on the record on how the city should change the way it operates was short, sweet and to the point. The special meeting of the 2014 Charter Review Committee lasted less than a half hour and largely consisted of people either talking off topic or championing the benefits of shifting to a â&#x20AC;&#x153;strong mayorâ&#x20AC;? system of government. The hearing was held on Monday to gather public comment and recommendations from residents for changes to the Tacoma City Charter. It is a process the city is required to undergo every 10 years. Among the half dozen people who support changing Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s form of government was John Ladenburg, former council member, former Pierce County Prosecutor and former Pierce County Executive. He pointed out that the city charter was first crafted in 1954, when the city was a roughand-tumble town and not the complex city it is today, but its city structure hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t kept up with the times. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Frankly, it is time for Tacoma to grow up,â&#x20AC;? he said, noting that most cities of comparable size long ago adopted the strong mayor system to better manage city needs and create better oversight of city resources. He further recommended that the charter review committee look at changing the makeup of the city council from nine members, with four at-large positions of half-time council members, to five district-bound council members who serve full time. The change, he said, would at least avoid the perception that every community is represented equally rather than concentrated in the North End, where many elected officials reside. Attorney and activist Erik Bjornson supported the â&#x20AC;&#x153;strong mayorâ&#x20AC;? call by add-

Consider this Cabbie ConfesTacoma Weekly is interested in sions, Tacoma Edition. what A is pair happening in our community. of travelers from PortPlease send yourthat news and story ideas land learned nothing is free in tolife, news@tacomaweekly.com. especially cab fare. On Feb. 5, after being transported to South 90th Street by taxi from Portland, a man and woman informed the driver that they had no money to pay the $377 cab fare. The driver decided to contact the police to deal with the situation, and when the officer arrived, he questioned the male passenger about paying the fare. The man said that he had more than $400 in cash sometime before he entered the cab, but claimed he was intoxicated before he made the call, and someone must have stolen it from him when he was passed out before entering the cab. The woman was released without charge. The man was booked to Fife Jail for third degree theft. Some criminals arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even smart enough to wait until they reach their destination before letting the cab driver know they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any money. A woman was arrested at a McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on Pacific Avenue on Feb. 5 for not paying cab fare. The woman claimed that she planned to have her mom or friends pay the fare when she arrived, but when she was unable to contact any of her friends to come to the McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and pay her fare, she was transported to Fife Jail for theft. Compiled by Derek Shuck

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

9,=0,> Only a handful of people attended the first public hearing of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Charter Review Committee on Monday.

ing that the current model with a hired manager running the city often supports the status quo, while a strong mayor system allows cities to make decisive actions and bold initiatives. The League of Women Voters of Tacoma-Pierce County has gone on record as supporting the current system. Residents at the hearing also called for changes to the Public Utility Commission and the retention of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Civil Service Board, which reviews labor issues within the city staff. Former council member and current State Representative Steve Kirby advocated for the Civil Service Board as a way to safeguard against wrongful terminations and pointed out that two recent cases reviewed by the board determined the city failed to

follow its own termination processes. This public hearing was just the first of many to come over the next four months as the Charter Review Committee considers its roster of recommendations to the city council for placement on a public ballot. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are going to have a whole series of presentations and information gathering sessions in the weeks ahead,â&#x20AC;? board Chairman and former mayor Bill Baarsma said. Baarsma wrote a dissertation on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;strong mayorâ&#x20AC;? system in 1972 that is available at the charter reviewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s city page at www.cityoftacoma.org. Information about matters pertaining to the 2014 Charter Review is available at cityoftacoma.org/charterreview, by emailing charterreview@cityoftacoma.org or calling (253) 591-2067.

;67:;690,:65 [HJVTH^LLRS`JVT

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FEBRUARY 22, 2014 AT OWEN BEACH Check-In at 9:00am-11:30am, Costume Contest 11:15am, Plunge at 12:00pm

Take a dip in the ice waters across Washington State and be a part of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;coolestâ&#x20AC;? event of the year! Join the fun, help raise funds and win prizes all in support of Special Olympics Washington. Special Olympics Polar Plunge Series is a fundraising effort organized by law enforcement agencies across the state to benefit Special Olympics Washington. This unique opportunity gives individuals, organizations and businesses the chance to support Special Olympics Washington by collecting pledges for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;opportunityâ&#x20AC;? to plunge into frigid water across Washington State.

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WDaffodil

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Grill and beverages by Anthem Coffee. The Educator of the Year program itself, now in its tenth year, is sponsored by Lexus of Tacoma at Fife. Some of the community dignitaries present at the event included Pierce County Council member Dan Roach, Washington State Representative Hans Zeiger, Mayor of Puyallup John Knutsen, and Mayor of Sumner Dave Enslow. The 25 young ladies representing the festival were each individually selected by their own high schools in October and November, and have been preparing rigorously since then for their coming responsibilities as Daffodil Princesses. Princess Nina Thatch, from Mt. Tahoma, is still reveling in the feeling of being officially designated a princess of the Daffodil Festival. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel honored to have a title that means so much to the community as well as the opportunity to represent my school, my county, and all the people that look up to this festival. Everywhere I go, I hear â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Princessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and it just sinks in that it is actually true.â&#x20AC;? The young women chosen by their schools to represent Tacoma this year included Delaney Fry from Stadium, Sarah Schroeder from Wilson, Nina Thatch from Mt. Tahoma, Lydia Mangan from Foss, and Ji Larson from Lincoln. For Princess Delaney, the heritage of the festival, and its ties to the community, serve as the most inspiring element of the Daffodil Festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impact on Pierce County. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They truly care about the community; you can defi-

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allies weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an army of technicians, nurses, social workers, financial counselors, doctors, friends, family and people of faith. Most of us are unaware of the rise of the machines that can do recon anywhere in our bodies, looking for intruders, pinpointing malfunctions. So, yes, when we get the news, we have no idea whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coming at us, or how weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll

nitely see it by how seriously the princesses take their responsibility. I find it very inspiring, how much the festival wants to support the citizens of Pierce County, of all generations.â&#x20AC;? Princess Sarahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fond memories of combing through the newspaper for news of the princesses, and seeing them on Parade Day, have made way for very real friendships, and a legacy she never expected. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I was younger, you were just able to see the surface of the festival and the girls, but now that I am personally involved, I see that there is so much more history and great relationships that I am just getting into.â&#x20AC;? Princess Lydia went from looking up to her cousin Arielle Valenzuela, who was a 2006 Princess from Washington High School, to being inspired by the royal company she has now joined. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are all so sweet and everything they do is for the good of everyone! I can tell that each and every one is eager to serve the communityâ&#x20AC;Ś I can tell Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have quite a few lifelong friends after all is said and done.â&#x20AC;? The princesses already have many events lined up as a part of their official Daffodil duties, including reading at libraries around Pierce County on Saturday, Feb. 15, as well as the Fourth Annual Daffodil Day at the South Hill mall on Saturday, March 1. Princess Stephanie Jackson-Buena, the Daffodil Festival representative from Chief Leschi High School, is enthusiastic about the events of the coming year, and is equally excited about princesses to come, having this advice to offer: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Put your best foot forward, have a plan, and just have fun, because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great experience!â&#x20AC;? On Friday, March 7, a month from the day they were officially declared princesses, one of the 25 young ladies will be chosen as Queen, at the annual Daffodil Festival Coronation event, at Life Center in Tacoma.

meet it, then deal with it. I thought I might be better at it than I am. Ha. I am a lumpy person. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the bony lump on the top of my right foot. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the lipoma lump on my right arm. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so big it scares cats. A bunch of fibroids earned me a hysterectomy. And, for years, benign little fibrous patches have been showing up in mammograms of my left breast. Every time they do, I get a needle biopsy, bruise like a bull rider and move along, maâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;am, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing there to see, just a

bump in the road. So I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fazed last Thanksgiving season when I got the call-back from the Carol Milgard Breast Center after a mammogram. I knew I had the role: Lumpy Woman, a walk-on, walk-off. Once again, the needle biopsy. Once again, thinking up possible lyrics to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blue Boob.â&#x20AC;? Except, no. This was not a drill. I got the news just the way it might be delivered in a sitcom on the verge of cancellation. Our family lives like that, banging against deadlines, rescuing anything from meals to cats at the last minute, kidding each other, making rude noises and busting into inappropriate laughter. At 11:40 a.m., Sunday, Dec. 8, I was about to rise above all that. I was hosting the cookie exchange party my pal Cheryl Tucker founded 25-plus years ago. Six of us meet that second Sunday of the month for a fĂŞte that

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sanctuary, did not burn in the first arson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The poor church people,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This part of the building, they probably had to do some smoke repairs. Now theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got this.â&#x20AC;? In September, Joshua Joseph Toves went on a night-time arson attack on Midland. He torched a car, an abandoned house and the church. That fire gutted classrooms and the entrance and left the sanctuary with smoke and water damage. Since then, the Moldovan congregation, led by Pastor Pavel Sandu, has met at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in Tacoma. They had made plans to salvage and repair the building they had bought for $750,000 in April 2012. Though they had set up a temporary electrical stand, there was no power in the building. Like Houser, Ron Shackleford arrived before the firefighters. He began filming the fire right away, and has given that video to investigators. Sixteen minutes after he started filming, flames were through the roof of that second-floor room, eating at support beams and following a crawl space under the roof. Because the building was vacant, and compromised by the first arson, firefighters opted to fight it from the outside only, with four engines, one ladder truck and 40 people, including a medic crew and two battalion chiefs, said Central Pierce Fire and Rescue Assistant Chief Ed Hrivnak. The fire traveled between the ceiling and the plywood and shingles of the roof, and there was no way to stop it as it ate section after section of the church until it reached the sanctuary. It burned up the central beam, raining embers into the interior until it reached the altar space, and the stained glass window depicting Golgotha, the hill where Jesus was crucified, the place of suffering and sacrifice.

looks, but does not sound, like tea at Downton Abbey until around 4 p.m., when we put on Pink Martiniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s version of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Auld Lang Syneâ&#x20AC;? and bust excellent vintage lady moves. Until then, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a glass of champagne on arrival, our best china, ironed linens, sandwiches without crusts, three kinds of teas and six monologues about how we chose our cookies, and what we learned while making them. Each of us brings a small gift for everyone. All of us strive for perfection, and I pretty regularly fail, but with that soon-to-be-cancelled sitcom flourish. This year was different. I was just 20 minutes from perfect. All I had to do was scrape the sale tags off the gifts â&#x20AC;&#x201C; pink willow teacup sets Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d bought in July. (Yeah, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d had six months to scrape, but why rush?) My husband was out getting ice when the phone rang. It was my doctor, with the

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news. (Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re right about the double-take you just did. My doctor called me at 11:40 a.m. on a Sunday. She is the best.) The lump in my right breast was cancer, she said, and we would likely beat it with a lumpectomy and five weeks of radiation. Cancer would be a walk through a point in time, not my whole future. We chose the surgeon she would go to if this were her diagnosis. We agreed that this would take a good deal of mental energy, and I might not be able to write a clear sentence, much less a column. (Yeah, I hear you. Why start now?) We set a start date for treatment after I got back from spending a Mele Kalikimaka with the kids and grandkids. I took a deep breath, noticed that I should have wiped down the window sill above the sink, and did it. We hung up. My husband got back. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Doc Edwards just called,â&#x20AC;? I told him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have cancer. Can you help me scrape these price tags off the cups?â&#x20AC;? Cheryl knocked, and I told her. We agreed that it was a valid excuse for not being

quite ready. Because this is, after all, a sitcom, my mom called from Wyoming between the pot of lapsang suchong and the refreshing Nepali ginger tea. There will be no dying, I told her. And, because she was on the verge of motherly sobs, no crying until I cry. A week later, the daughters in Hawaii and I made the same deal before we made sand tarts and sugar cookies. We are all tissue-free to date, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve discovered a disturbing crack in my manners. When people say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hi, how are you?â&#x20AC;? I tell them that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m whomping breast cancer. To my regret, I have told several people I barely know. So, for your own sake, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ask. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be forced to endure a hug, and hear a bit more than I should tell you about how the diagnosis has gotten more complicated. Stuff you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to know. Save yourself. Spend your energy on a breast self-exam, and, if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time, get a mammogram. And next time you pass a bake sale raising funds for cancer research, buy a raspberry bar.

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Guest Editorials

Leave mandates would cost businesses over $1 billion annually By Erin Shannon Washington Policy Center for Small Business During this legislative session, lawmakers in the House of Representatives considered two bills that would require employers to offer paid leave to workers. HB 1313 would require employers with five or more employees to pay employees for five, seven or nine days of sick leave per year, depending on the size of the company. This bill passed the House and will now be considered by the Senate. HB 2238 would require employers with more than 24 employees to offer up to three weeks of paid vacation for employees that work an average of 20 hours per week. This bill did not survive the committee cut-off and is considered dead this session. Although one of the bills is dead this session, it is instructive to understand how much these paid leave mandates would cost employers. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average cost to an employer for paid sick leave is 25 cents per hour per employee. The average cost for paid vacation is a steeper $1.02 per hour. Taken in isolation, one might think those numbers seem reasonable. Lawmakers may think theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re being generous by forcing employers to change personnel policies (after all,

it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cost public budgets a dime), and that it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cost businesses too much, but looking at the numbers in aggregate, those seemingly negligible costs add up quickly. There are 2,669,256 employees who work for companies with five or more employees in our state. Nationally, 39 percent of private-sector workers do not receive paid sick leave. So just over 1 million workers would benefit from the paid sick leave bill. Assuming those workers clock the national average of 1,700 hours per year, multiply by $.25 per hour, and the annual cost to employers in our state for paid sick leave would be a staggering $442 million. There are 1,713,831 workers in Washington businesses with 25 or more employees. Nationally, 23 percent of private-sector workers do not receive paid vacation, so that would be approximately 394,181 Washington workers who might benefit from the paid vacation mandate. Assuming the national average of 1,700 hours worked per year, multiply by $1.02 per hour, and the cost to employers in our state for paid sick leave would be a mind-boggling $684 million every year. Taken together, that would be an increase in the cost of doing business in Washington State of more than $1.1 billion per year. Of course, employers cannot simply absorb an extra $1.1 billion every

year. They will be forced to shift costs back on to workers, eliminating non-mandated benefits (such as undesignated leave) and reducing hours, and to consumers, in the form of increased prices. There is a reason only one other state, Connecticut, mandates paid sick leave, and why no state mandates paid vacation. It is because such mandates increase the cost of doing business. And most states are loath to increase costs on their job creators, especially when economies and employment are still lagging from the Great Recession. Washington should be especially wary, as our new business start rate has declined while our failure rate continues to increase. In 2010, Washington ranked 9th in business starts and 11th in closures. In 2011 (the most recent year data is available), Washington slipped to 12th for new business starts and 7th for closures. So entrepreneurs are opening fewer businesses, and more of them are failing, as compared to other states. Other states are doing a better job at fostering a positive business climate than Washington on the heels of the recession, as we are moving the wrong way in both rankings. Adding $1.1 billion per year in labor costs to our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s job creators is not the way to reverse this disturbing trend. Erin Shannon is the director for the Center for Small Business.

The trillion-dollar road to Armageddon By Ira Helfand and Robert Dodge, MD In March of last year, the Norwegian government convened a gathering of 129 nations in Oslo for a two-day â&#x20AC;&#x153;Conference on the Humanitarian Consequences of Nuclear War.â&#x20AC;? This week, there will be a follow up meeting in Mexico to further examine the scientific data now available documenting the devastating global impact of even a very limited use of these weapons. The United States and the other four permanent members of the UN Security Council, who together possess 98 percent of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nuclear weapons, boycotted the Oslo meeting and have not yet indicated if they will attend the meeting in Mexico. In a joint statement issued before the Oslo meeting, the P5, as they are called, said that a conference that examined what will actually happen if nuclear weapons are used would somehow â&#x20AC;&#x153;distractâ&#x20AC;? them from their efforts to reduce the nuclear danger. The administration has expressed particular concern that these conferences will somehow endanger the 1968 Non Proliferation Treaty, which makes it illegal for states that do not possess nuclear weapons to build them. But Article VI of the NPT also requires the existing nuclear powers to engage in good faith negotiations to eliminate their own nuclear arsenals. A recent statement by Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel sheds light on the real threat to the NPT. Speaking after a tour of nuclear weapons facilities in Albuquerque earlier this month, Hagel called for the U.S. to â&#x20AC;&#x153;upgradeâ&#x20AC;? its nuclear warheads and the submarines, bombers and missiles that deliver them. The Congressional Budget Office estimated in late December these

plans would cost $355 billion over the next decade. The Center for Nonproliferation Studies predicts the new weapons will cost $1 trillion over 30 years. Meanwhile, the Russians are in the middle of a similar major upgrade of their nuclear forces. So while asking the non-nuclear weapons states to respect the NPT and refrain from building nuclear weapons, the two main nuclear powers are ignoring their responsibilities under the treaty and expending vast sums of money they cannot afford to make sure they have thousands of nuclear weapons for the foreseeable future. And this is the problem: the system of nuclear apartheid, where some nations possess nuclear weapons and others are forbidden to have them, is increasingly unacceptable to the nonnuclear weapons states. These nations do not want to build nuclear weapons of their own. They want the nuclear powers to stop holding them hostage and putting the safety of the whole world at risk with the weapons they already possess. This concern has indeed been fueled by the growing understanding of the actual effects of nuclear weapons, particularly the recent reports that have shown that even a very limited, regional nuclear war would have catastrophic weather, contamination, crop loss and famine consequences worldwide, likely killing billions of people. The weapons on a single U.S. Trident submarine can produce this global catastrophe; we have 14 of them. The U.S. and Russia claim the world does not have to worry about their nuclear weapons â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they will never be used. Around the world, it is an argument that persuades few. If there is no chance that these weapons will ever be used, why would we spend

hundreds of billions of dollars on them? Even if they are not used deliberately, there exists the very real threat of an accidental war. We know of at least five occasions in the last 35 years when either Moscow or Washington prepared to launch a nuclear war in the mistaken belief that it was itself under attack. And a terrorist cyber attack could lead to the unauthorized launch of these weapons. We are at a fundamental decision point with respect to nuclear weapons. We can begin negotiations with the other nuclear powers to eliminate our nuclear arsenals and prevent the proliferation of these weapons across the planet. Or we can spend a trillion dollars to extend our nuclear arsenal and send a clear message to the rest of the world that they should build nuclear weapons, too. The US should stop insisting that the non-nuclear nations trust us and do as we say and not do as we do. We need to lead by example and seek the security of a world without nuclear weapons. The US should attend the Mexico meeting and give leadership to the growing international movement to negotiate a treaty to eliminate these weapons once and for all. Ira Helfand is co-president of International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War and a past president of the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s U.S. affiliate, Physicians for Social Responsibility (www.psr.org). He is the author of the new report â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nuclear Famine: Two Billion People at Risk?â&#x20AC;? Robert Dodge is a member of Physicians for Social Responsibilities Security Committee, is syndicated by PeaceVoice, and is on the Board of Physicians for Social Responsibility Los Angeles and the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation (www. wagingpeace.org).

The committee to review Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s city charter has been called to order and has held the first of what promises to be a roster of public hearings on ways the city should change the way it operates. The committee is made up of Bill Baarsma, Theresa Baker, Gary Brackett, Mabel Edmonds, Tim Farrell, Eric Hahn, Charles Horne, Justin Leighton, Mark Martinez, James Merritt, John Messina, Kenneth Miller, Patricia Talton, Catherine Ushka and Justin Van Dyk. It is tasked with looking over the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s charter and recommending changes. The effort happens once a decade, and a dozen changes were made during the last go-round in 2004. The first public hearing on rule changes was held on Monday and brought suggestions from minor ordinance tweaks, to how departments are funded, to a change in governance that would shift the councilmanager city from a â&#x20AC;&#x153;weak mayorâ&#x20AC;? form to a mayorcouncil, or â&#x20AC;&#x153;strong mayor,â&#x20AC;? system. This new system would have the day-to-day city business managed by a city administrator and the mayor playing more of an active role in oversight and policy. It is not a new debate and was part of the push during the last review and even was the thrust of an initiative. The matter will be the focus of heavy discussion this go-round as well, especially considering that former Tacoma Mayor Baarsma spearheaded the effort last time and is the chair of the review committee this time. The current mayor-council system has the mayor largely in a ceremonial role as the chair of the council, with no authority to hire or fire officials or veto power over the rest of the council. Under a â&#x20AC;&#x153;strong mayorâ&#x20AC;? system, the mayor can appoint or remove department heads as well as be the driver of crafting a municipal budget. In this structure, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chief executive officer works directly for the mayor. Most cities in Washington have a â&#x20AC;&#x153;strong mayorâ&#x20AC;? system, at 228 to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;weak mayorâ&#x20AC;? tally of 52. But most of those are municipalities have less than 50,000 residents. Today, the 52 Washington cities operating under the council-manager form of government range in population from 1,915 in Carnation to 204,200 in Tacoma. The total population in councilmanager cities in 2010 was slightly over 1.7 million residents, accounting for approximately 42 percent of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s incorporated population. Most major cities have a mayor-council system, however, under the idea that it boosts accountability and oversight as well as allow for faster decision-making about management matters. Now that the general call-for-community input is over, the committee will systematically work through the suggestions and slate more public hearings as the process grinds on into the spring. The committee plans to meet every Monday and Wednesday at 7 p.m. in Room 16 of the Tacoma Municipal Building North, located at 733 Market St. until it submits its recommendations to the City Council on May 6. All of its meetings are open to the public and agendas and minutes for review will be posted. Even at two meetings a week, the review committee has a tight deadline to get its list of recommendations for charter changes to the council, so residents would be wise to keep tabs on the effort by subscribing to the committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s email alerts that are available through the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s web site. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s charter is long and wordy and written in legal jargon the way most government documents are, but certainly there are well-versed residents willing to give it a read-through and suggest changes as the process moves its way through this formal review. Information about the review and its committee meetings is available at cityoftacoma.org/ charterreview. The above opinion represents the view of Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s editorial board.

Letters to the Editor Dear Editor, (Re: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Celebrate Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day and help the homeless,â&#x20AC;? TW 2/7/14) Thank you Matt Nagle for such a great article. You have always supported our â&#x20AC;&#x153;CAUSEâ&#x20AC;? and we thank you for that, Thank You for following us as we grow and expand. We will continue to always provide the best of service to our homeless community Jeannette Twitty CEO, House of Matthews Dear Editor, (Re: Tacomans hold â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;return to senderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rally against Trib advertising bundles, TW, Feb. 7) The area in which Mr. Deetz (David Zeeck) traveled certainly wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ours. Only a few days after the orange bags started arriving, it was an eyesore. I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see any bags that made it to the porch. They were scattered in yards, sidewalks, and gutters. As the Weekly surmised, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a distribution problem. The worker(s) making the â&#x20AC;&#x153;deliveriesâ&#x20AC;? wanted to get rid of the bags as quickly as possible. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think (s)he had increased TNT revenues, consumer savings opportunities or TNTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public image in mind. Regardless, the responsibility still rests with the TNT. I am amazed that the publisher chose to minimalize the extent of the pollution, question the integrity of those objecting and chose instead to defer blame. That is not the way a true leader responds to a problem. Attack the problem, not the people who wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let you forget about it. You could have come out of this looking great in Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes by simply sending the errant delivery people to pick up the mess they made. Too late now. Sad. Ron Pulliam Tacoma

Sports

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014

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BELLARMINE PREP FINISHES STRONG TO CLAIM PLAYOFF SPOT Junior guards lead Tacoma Baptist to blowout win

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 6

TOP UPCOMING MATCHUPS GIRLS BASKETBALL

Feb. 17 – SS#4 vs. Lincoln Clover Park High School – 6:30 p.m. Lady Abes look to advance in loser-out district playoff opener.

BOYS BASKETBALL

Feb. 19 – GSHL#3/SS#3 vs. Lincoln/Wilson Rogers High School – 7:45 p.m. After possible tiebreaker (Feb. 14), Abes or Rams claim top seed and first-round bye.

BOYS SWIMMING

Feb. 21-22 – 2A/3A/4A State Swim Meet King County Aquatic Center – 9:45 a.m. Stadium’s Willers one to watch in 4A 200 and 500 freestyle.

WRESTLING

Feb. 21-22 – Mat Classic State Wrestling Tacoma Dome – 10 a.m. Lincoln aiming for good representation at the Dome.

BAILEY FINISHES STRONG TO WIN STATE BOWLING TITLE

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

CHAMPION. Shannon Bailey put togeth-

er a string of six straight strikes in her final round, and finished with a score of 247 to win the state individual championship. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

B

ellarmine Prep certainly responded after being pushed to the brink of playoff elimination a month ago. A loss to Narrows 4A champion Stadium in mid-January had put the Lions at 1-5 in league play, and postseason chances looked bleak. But Bellarmine rattled off six straight wins, capped by a 70-56 win over Yelm at home in their season finale on Feb. 6, to secure a spot in the district playoffs. “We’ve definitely been taking every game as a playoff game, a must-win,” said junior forward Rex Bodoia, who tallied game highs of 23 points and 19 rebounds in the win over the Tornadoes. “I think we’ve gotten better at finishing games. A lot of the games we lost early in the season were close games, and we were in it for most of it.” Bodoia helped get the Lions out to a quick start offensively, going 5-for-5 in the first quarter for 10 points. His rebound and put-back at the start of the second quarter put the Lions up 24-16, and Malachi Flynn gave the Lions their largest lead of the first half, at 33-21, with a three-pointer midway through the period. Yelm closed to within 35-27 at the break on a layup in the final minute by Christian Davis, who was 6-for-9 in the first half for 15 of his teamhigh 20 points. Elijah Fuller – who finished with 17 points and 11 rebounds for the Tornadoes – nailed a three-pointer with 3:30 to go in the third quarter to pull within 46-42. But Bodoia went back to work, helping the Lions’ break Yelm’s pressure defense by driving for layups at the end of the third quarter and the beginning of the fourth to boost the lead to 56-44. “They press really hard up front,” said Bellarmine Prep head coach Bernie Salazar of Yelm. X See BASKETBALL / page A9

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

BIG FINISH. (Top) Junior forward Rex Bodoia (14) puts

up a shot over Yelm’s Caleb Harris and Christian Davis in Bellarmine Prep’s big win. (Bottom) Lions guard Carson Hollyoak (12) looks to get a layup past the outstretched arm of Rylan Carrier.

Shannon Bailey insists she wasn’t paying attention to the growing excitement around her. It was hard not to peak at other scores, as the Wilson junior bowler headed into the final round of the state championship tied for the individual lead with Everett’s Candice Goldfinch, who had bowled a 256 in her fifth game to pull even. Goldfinch then put up four strikes in her first five frames in the final round to take the lead, while Hudson’s Bay’s Dakota Varela – bowling on the same lane as Bailey – rattled off six straight strikes to move into second place. But Bailey saved her best for last, collecting six straight strikes of her own from the fifth to tenth frames to claim the 1A/2A/3A individual title on Feb. 7 at Narrows Plaza Lanes. “I was a little excited, but I was like ‘I’ll just stay calm and bowl my game,’” said Bailey, an Annie Wright student who joined the Rams this fall. “I just bowled what I normally bowl. I just got in the zone and stayed (there).” Bailey’s final-round score of 247 was by far her best round of the day, as she finished with an overall score of 1,274 to edge Goldfinch by four pins. “It was like she didn’t even know what was on the line, she didn’t even feel the pressure,” said Wilson head coach Ken Richardson of Bailey. “To win it by four pins, that’s insane.” Bailey had stayed consist much of the day, tallying an opening-round score of 218 and adding a 220 in her third and fifth games. After putting up a high score of 211 in her first round, Wilson junior teammate Hunter Freuhling-Thomas stumbled in her third round but recovered to take 17th place overall with 1,021 pins. “That just kind of eases all the sorrow from last week,” said Richardson, referencing the Rams being edged for the final team berth to state at the district tournament. “They did so great. They competed so well. And they’re both coming back (next year).” Curtis, meanwhile, settled for sixth place in the 4A tournament, tallying a total of 6,677 pins after the 14 Baker games on Feb. 8. Alexia Rawls had led the Vikings in the individual competition, tallying a score of 987 over her six rounds to place 26th.

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;(*64()(7;0:;90+,:+,-,5:, :,5069:;6>0505:,(:65-05(3, LADY CRUSADERS SECURE THIRD SEED TO DISTRICT PLAYOFFS

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

)9,(205.-9,,(Left) Tacoma Baptist senior guard Ali Oatridge (left) steals a ball away from Seattle Lutheranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hailey Meyer. (Right) The Lady Crusadersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jennifer Brooks, who finished with eight points, finds space in the defense to put up a layup. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma Baptist needed someone to step up to take the pressure off of star senior forward Sarah Zeitler, and fellow senior guard Ali Oatridge â&#x20AC;&#x201C; also playing in her final home game â&#x20AC;&#x201C; answered the call. Oatridge scored six of her team-high 12 points in the first five minutes of the second half, helping the Crusaders begin to pull away in an eventual 44-31 win over Seattle Lutheran on Feb. 11. With the Crusaders leading 19-11 early in the third quarter,

Oatridge nailed an outside jumper, and converted a steal into a layup moments later to give Tacoma Baptist a 12-point lead. With the focus on Zeitler in the inside, she buried another jumper three minutes later to help the Crusaders maintain control with a 26-14 lead. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coach just told me to slow down and focus on my shots,â&#x20AC;? Oatridge said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I focused I started putting them inâ&#x20AC;ŚI stopped, pulled up and hit the open shots instead of going for layups every time.â&#x20AC;? After Seattle Lutheranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Abbi Sanders â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who tied Hailey Meyer

with a team-high 12 points â&#x20AC;&#x201C; pulled the Saints within 31-23 with a jumper early in the fourth quarter, the Crusaders put the game away with a 13-0 run. Oatridge nailed her second three-pointer during the run, and Zeitler capped the stretch with two free throws. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The outside shooting was much improved,â&#x20AC;? said Tacoma Baptist head coach Josh Narayan, adding it was a big help because â&#x20AC;&#x153;they were double- and tripleteaming Sarah on the inside.â&#x20AC;? The Saints succeeded in slowing Zeitler early, as she started just 1-for-6 from the field. But Ashley Brooks scored

four points in the first quarter, and Oatridge banked in a threepointer to make it 9-5 heading into the second quarter. The defense continued to buckle down in the second period, as the Crusaders extended the lead to 15-5 and held the Saints scoreless until Olivia Wakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s layup with 1:15 until halftime. Seattle Lutheran was just 4-for-22 from the field in the first half, and committed 16 turnovers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was the bench that was pushing us to get all the steals and play so hard on defense,â&#x20AC;? said Oatridge, who finished with four steals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the loudest theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been all year, and you could total-

ly tell. It really helped us out on the court.â&#x20AC;? Zeitler finished with 10 points, seven rebounds, three blocks and three steals, while Ashley Brooks added 10 points and eight rebounds and Jennifer Brooks had eight points and six rebounds for the Crusaders. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now is the time to peak in the season, and we were able to do that tonight,â&#x20AC;? Zeitler said. Tacoma Baptist earned the third seed into the 2B Bi-District tournament with the win, and will travel to face Orcas Island, Darrington or La Conner on Feb. 18 at 7 p.m. in their opener.

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HIGH SCHOOL ROUNDUP LINCOLN WINS LEAGUE TITLE, OTHER WRESTLERS ADVANCE

Led by its six individual champions, Lincoln piled up 362 points to run away with the team title at the Narrows League Wrestling Championships on Feb. 7-8 at Foss High School. Sophomore Solomon Sok was the Abesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first individual champion, claiming the 126-pound title with an 11-4 win over Sheltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gil Ramos. Fellow sophomore Marcus Wiley pinned Sheltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chase Salisbury early in the third round at 138 pounds, junior B.J. Hawthorne outlasted Fossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hien Ly by a score of 7-2 in the 182pound final and senior Murad Vagabov won 9-6 over Sheltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hector Gaspar at 160 pounds. Two finals featured a clash of Abes teammates, as senior Keidrick Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bannon won 14-3 over senior Ike Castro at 170 pounds and senior 195-pounder Aliyas Fletcher took a 16-5 win over junior teammate Jeremy Lukosh. In all, 17 Lincoln wrestlers finished in the top four in their respective brackets and will advance to the district tournament. Foss sophomore Joey Wurtz claimed the title at 132 pounds, outlasting Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Robert Mathews for a 4-3 win in the final. The Falcons advanced six other wrestlers to districts, including Ly and fellow runner-up Nick Burton, who fell 6-2 to Wilson senior Brant Powers in the 152pound final. Powers will be joined by five other Ram teammates at the district tournament. Mount Tahoma senior Nehemiah Barr (285 pounds), junior Daniel Edi-

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

*/(47065: (Left) Lincoln sophomore 126-pounder Solomon Sok (left) was one of six Abes to win titles at the Narrows 3A championships at Foss High School. (Right) Stadium sophomore Noah Willers won the 200- and 500-yard freestyles at the district swim meet at Curtis High School.

son (195) and sophomore Garrett Owen-Bisson (145) fell short of qualifying for districts. Bellarmine Prep qualified five wrestlers for districts in the 4A tournament, which was also held at Foss. Senior Hunter Taylor settled for second place at 170 pounds, falling in the finals to Yelmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bo Campbell. Sophomore Jed Klein was edged 3-2 by the Tornadoesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; James Page in the 106pound final, and junior Elliott Villars (220) and sophomores Luke Yi (285) and Josiah Mayo (120) all claimed third place to advance to regionals. The 4A wrestling regionals take place at Central Kitsap High School on Feb. 15 at 10 a.m.,

while the 3A regionals are at Bonney Lake High School on Feb. 15 at 10 a.m.

WILLERS LEADS STADIUM, CURTIS SWIMS TO DISTRICT TITLE

Stadium sophomore Noah Willers captured two individual titles at the 4A West Central District Swimming Championships on Feb. 7-8 at Curtis High School. Willers started by narrowly beating Kentwoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brian Wright in the 200-yard freestyle, finishing in a time of 1 minute and 47.25 seconds. He later won the 500-yard freestyle in a time of 4 minutes and 54.74 seconds, shaving over five seconds off of his

mark in the preliminary round. Stadium junior Kyle Marr advanced to state in the 100-yard freestyle after taking sixth place in 50.18 seconds, and teamed with Willers, Michael Marr and Sam Hoag to narrowly miss qualifying in the 400-yard freestyle relay with a seventh-place finish. Michael Marr, Nick Mahan, Nick Stauffer and Sean Macapinlac also took seventh in the 200-yard freestyle relay to be edged out of qualification, and Hoag took eighth in the 100-yard breaststroke. Senior Brian Woodbury led Curtis to the district title as a team, winning the 200-yard individual medley in an All-American consideration time of 1 minute and

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52.84 seconds, and later adding an Automatic All-American time of 49.69 seconds in winning the 100-yard backstroke. Woodbury teamed with Ryan St. John, Riley Hess and Eddie Na to lead off the meat with a win in the 200-yard medley relay. St. John added a second-place finish in the 100yard breaststroke, and Na, freshman Sam Abbott and sophomores Troy Friedman and Garrett Friedman took second in the 200-yard freestyle relay. The 4A state swim meet takes place at the Weyerhaeuser King County Aquatic Center in Federal Way, starting with prelims on Feb. 21 at 9:45 a.m. and finals on Feb. 22 at 10 a.m.

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rella and Parmesan cheese served over penne marinara for $11.95. My Greek offers a variety of pizzas, a small 10-inch for $8.95, 12-inch for $10.45 and 14-inch for $11.95, with your choice of traditional red, Alfredo or creamy pesto sauce. My Greek houses a bar full of vintage Italian, American and Greek wines. Due to the success of the restaurant, Morcos is expanding the business to a third store in the coming year, which will be his second location in Puyallup. The My Greek location on Pearl Street is open from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday-Thursday and 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. The restaurant can be reached at (253) 752-2700.

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WBasketball From page A6

â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we could get it past that first wave, we were often in a two-onone or three-on-one.â&#x20AC;? Marâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;kese Jackson scored eight of his 14 points in the fourth quarter to help Bellarmine Prep pull away, while Will Wolf finished with 12 points and six rebounds and Carson Hollyoak added 10 points for the Lions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought Will Wolf and I kind of dominated in the paint,â&#x20AC;? Bodoia said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We would just give them a pump fake, they would (jump) up and we could just go straight up. We got a lot of free throws and we were just aggressive inside, and I thought it worked out well.â&#x20AC;? After moving into a secondplace tie with South Kitsap at 7-5, the Lions fell 70-60 to the Wolves in the tiebreaker on Feb. 8 at Stadium High School to settle for the third seed to district play. They will travel to play at Kentwood on Feb. 13 at 6 p.m. in their district opener. For the Lions, the prospect of a tough road playoff game is way better than the alternative. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really proud of our guys,â&#x20AC;? Salazar said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a great comeback.â&#x20AC;?

;(*64()(7;0:;*9<0:,: 6=,9:,(;;3,3<;/,9(5

Tacoma Baptistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dynamic

junior guards were at it again in their regular season finale. Brandon Stoehr finished with a game-high 23 points, and Dayton Pascua added 22 points as the Crusaders rolled to a 71-46 win over Seattle Lutheran on Feb. 11 to claim the third seed to the 2B Bi-District playoffs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Me and Dayton have played together since second grade,â&#x20AC;? Stoehr said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impossible to play when heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out, and vice versa. We play off each other, feed off each other.â&#x20AC;? The Crusaders were in control from the start, as Pascuaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s steal and dish to Stoehr for a layup made it 10-2 with 3:18 left in the first quarter. The lead kept growing rapidly, as Tacoma Baptistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pressure defense rattled the Saints â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who were playing without injured star forward Abijah Smith â&#x20AC;&#x201C; into mistakes and quick shots. Pascuaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s driving layup with 3:30 until halftime increased the lead to 27-10, and the Crusaders led 34-16 at the break. Seattle Lutheran was just 7-for-24 in the first half, and committed 11 turnovers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We took a pretty bad beating last week against Bear Creek because we lacked intensity and our defensive pressure wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t there for whatever reason,â&#x20AC;? said Tacoma Baptist first-year head coach Jason Townsend. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The main focus coming into tonight was defensive pressure.â&#x20AC;? Stoehr, who finished with a

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

.66+46=,:(Left) Tacoma Baptist junior guard Dayton Pascua lunges for a layup in the

Crusadersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runaway win. (Right) The Crusadersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Brandon Stoehr (4) weaves around Seattle Lutheranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grant Doerr for a layup.

team-high five steals, noted that the defensive approach has helped fuel the offense. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We get a lot of fast-break buckets,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we do that, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very efficient. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hard to beat.â&#x20AC;? Tommie Brazile banked in a three-pointer and Ben Cooksley added a three-point play within the first two minutes in the second half, making it 40-18 and

ending any thoughts of a comeback. Cooksley finished with seven points and 13 rebounds, while Brazile added seven points, eight rebounds and three steals. The Crusaders finished 13-7 overall and 6-4 in league play, and avoided the dreaded play-in game to the Bi-District tournament. They will travel north to take on either Concrete, Orcas Island or La Conner on Feb. 19 at 7 p.m.

in their opener. With their highenergy guards seemingly peaking at the right time, Tacoma Baptist could be poised to make a run to the state tournament. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a huge, huge blessing for me to walk into a situation with two dynamic guards who can just go,â&#x20AC;? Townsend said. He later added, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think they havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really scratched the surface of their potential.â&#x20AC;?

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7<@(33<75(;065205.::,*65+ @,(96--;6(.9,(;:;(9; Tryouts to be held Feb. 15 at Chief Leschi Schools

By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

W

ith just a little over two months to go before their first pre-season game (April 12 against the Bellingham Bulldogs), the Puyallup Nation Kings football team is off to a great start in terms of team players. So far there are 73 on the roster, with more to come. The roster will then be cut down to 55 players before the Kingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first regular season game on May 16. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had the same core of 40 people showing up to every practice compared to last year when we were lucky to get 15 people at a practice,â&#x20AC;? said

PHOTO BY ED CURRAN

@(9++(:/ Archie Cantrell prepares for a timed sprint during his tryouts with the Puyallup Nation Kings football team.

Kings owner/player Ty Satiacum, who founded

the team last year along with Archie Cantrell and Joe McCloud. What made the difference in this second year? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The foundation we set last year,â&#x20AC;? Satiacum replied. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And being a firstyear team and coming up one game short of the Championship.â&#x20AC;? He said word started spreading that the Kings take care of the players and the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s support has been very helpful to the team as well. Made up of adults 18 years and older, the Kings held a tryout/combine on Jan. 18 at the Chief Leschi Schools field, and 48 player hopefuls showed up. This gave coaches the chance to evaluate the players speed, strength, agility and athleticism. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This year we have a lot more volunteers and a full coaching staff. Eight coaches not including the strength and conditioning coach and trainer,â&#x20AC;? Satiacum said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last year we struggled through the sea-

son without a full-time coach.â&#x20AC;? Aaron Rambo is head coach this year, and Satiacum couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be happier. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This year we have a coach thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passionate; he coaches at Foster High School and is a volunteer coach at (University of Puget Sound). His energy level and dedication are great.â&#x20AC;? The team has high aspirations for 2014. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This year we have big goals,â&#x20AC;? Satiacum said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is to win not only this league but we want to travel and play the champions of the PFL (Pacific Football League), which you could say is a step up in competition. We want to win three rings this year.â&#x20AC;? The next tryout/combine will be held on Feb. 15 at Chief Leschi Schools, 10:30 a.m. Pre-registration is $25 and $40 on-site. Players will be evaluated on the following areas: 225 lb. bench press repetitions,

broad jump, 40-yard dash, vertical jump, 3-cone drill, 1-on-1 drills, 7-on-7 competition and various other drills. To pre-register, contact Stephanie Satiacum at Stephanie.satiacum@ gmail.com or call Leesa Wright at (253) 405-8111. Make check/money order out to Puyallup Tribe of Indians. The Kings is an amateur football organization with the Western Washington Football Association (WWFA). Satiacum said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been very impressed with the quality of players heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seen this year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We really have some talent. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking good.â&#x20AC;? He said Marquise Henry in particular is one to watch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Looking at him, you wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think he could hit as hard as he does. But heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very fast. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like an Earl Thomas â&#x20AC;&#x201C; heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll play safety for us and come in like a kamikaze. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a competitor.â&#x20AC;? The Kings offensive line is also looking sharp.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I started the team last year, I called on my old buddies because I played offensive line for Spanaway Lake High School back in 2001. I called on as many of them as I could and I was able to pull four of them including myself, so I have four of our five starting offensive linemen for the team. We all had league honors in high school. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a big part of the team now.â&#x20AC;? Representing for the Puyallup Tribe, the Kings, so far, have Satiacum, SouByAchHe â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bigâ&#x20AC;? Bean, Archie Cantrell, Marquise Henry, James Stafford, Julio Taraya, Joe Mccloud, Justin Turnipseed, Pernelle Turnipseed and Christian Melendez. Satiacum hopes that this core of Puyallup tribal members, along with the rest of the team, will help increase participation of Chief Leschi students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hope to boost the numbers at Chief Leschi, their participation levels, because the word is spreading. The Kings are popular at the high school. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m having students come up saying they want to play for the Kings and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping that translates into bigger turnouts for the school so this year weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have a combine for the students. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be like a football camp/combine where students will have a chance to experience an NFL style of testing,â&#x20AC;? Satiacum said, and it will be held in the spring. Players who are interested in trying out for the Puyallup Nation Kings are asked to contact head coach Aaron Rambo at arambo@live.com.

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City Life

Asia Pacific New Year

B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014

SECTION B, PAGE 1

Think you’re a true Miley Cyrus fan? Take our quiz and find out! By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

B

efore Miley Cyrus, dancing around in teddy bear costumes was strictly for theme park employees and “furries.” Foam fingers were just boring accessories for drunk football fans. And Matt Lauer never, ever got to talk about twerking. Shelloooo, people! It’s Valentine’s Day, and how can you not love this gal? Cut it out with all the “she’s a bad role model” and “what’s up with her tongue?” nonsense, haters. Her stop at the Tacoma Dome on Sunday is cause for celebration; and we thought we’d help you measure how much you appreciate the most inescapable pop star of 2013 with this quiz. XAnswers can be found on our Daily Mashup blog, www.tacomaweekly.com/dailymashup.

1. Miley legally changed her name in 2008. She was actually born … A) Rachel Louise Cyrus B) Mary Elizabeth Cyrus C) Tomoko Luisa Cyrus D) Destiny Hope Cyrus 2. Her famous godmother is ______________. A) … Congressional Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi B) … country legend Dolly Parton C) … British novelist J.K. Rowling D) … popular actress Nicole Kidman 3. Today she’s known for chronic twerking. A few short years ago, most people knew her for this wholesome Disney character. A) Simply Carley B) Dora the Explorer C) Hannah Montana D) Tila Tequila 4. In 1992, the year she was born, her daddy scored a huge hit with _____________. A) “I Like It I Love It” B) “Achy Breaky Heart” C) “Friends In Low Places” D) “Gone Country” 5. On “The View,” the pop star said she sticks out her tongue so much because … A) … she has O.C.D. If she doesn’t do it 20 times a day she’ll die. B) … Gene Simmons once sued her unauthorized KISS tribute band. It’s her way of getting under Gene’s skin now that she’s richer than him. C) … gluten allergies make it swell up. Sticking it out keeps her from suffocating. D) … it’s a defense mechanism. She’s really self-conscious about being photographed all the time. 6. Which of these songs is not from her 2008 debut, “Breakout”? A) “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun” B) “Party in the U.S.A.”

C) “Wake Up, America” D) “Fly on the Wall” 7. _____________ is a series of YouTube clips costarring her homie, Mandy Jiroux. A) “The Miley and Mandy Show” B) “Miley and Mandy’s Twerka-thon” C) “Hannah Montana and Friends” D) “Miley and Mandy Party in the USA” 8. Finish the lyric. “I hopped off the plane at L.A.X./with a dream and my _____” __________________________________ 9. Who does that hilarious impression of the singer on “Saturday Night Live”? A) Nasim Pedrad B) Cheri Oteri C) Vanessa Bayer D) Bobby Moynihan 10. In 2012, she co-starred in the movie __________ with Demi Moore. A) “G.I. Jane” B) “Margin Call” C) “12 Years a Slave” D) “LOL” 11. Miley posed topless for a racy photo shoot that appears in the March 2014 issue of what magazine?

last spring. D) … pay people to keep him out of trouble and party at home. 12. Finish the lyric: “Don’t you ever say _________, I will always want you.” __________________________________ 13. _____________ were among the other artists that performed on last year’s “MTV Video Music Awards,” a show that’s mostly remembered for Miley grinding on that dude in the Beetlejuice suit. A) Hall and Oates B) Macklemore & Ryan Lewis C) Rodrigo y Gabriela D) Huh, other people appeared on that?

A) W B) Vogue C) Vanity Fair D) Playboy 12. During a recent appearance on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno,” Cyrus said Justin Bieber should … A) … quit biting her style. People can’t tell them apart any more. B) … make sure he has enough bribe money next time he goes drunk drag racing. C) … return that bong he stole from her beach house in Kailua

14. Which lyrical cliché does not appear in her hit single “We Can’t Stop”? A) “Do the ladies run this mother lover?” B) “Hands in the air like we don’t care” C) “This is our house” D) “Forget the haters”

15. Who is this Molly person she mentions in the song? A) Miley’s twin sister. B) Miley’s childhood role model, Molly Ringwald. C) That sassy character Melissa McCarthy plays on “Mike & Molly.” D) Dude, I’m not answering that. My mom is watching me take this quiz. 16. __________ elapse before Miley appears to be butt naked in the “Wrecking Ball” video. A) Duh! A minute, 13 seconds. Doesn’t everybody skip right to that part? B) Ha! I see through your trick question. She’s probably naked during the teary close up at the beginning. C) I don’t know. I just hope she sanitized that sledgehammer before she licked it. D) Look again, bozo. She is never naked in that video.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE ‘TUNA DOES VEGAS’ When the lovable and eccentric characters from the “thirdsmallest town in Texas” reunite on the stage of Pierce College Theatre, it is sure to be an experience to remember. “Tuna Does Vegas” takes the audience on a rambling romp through Sin City, as oddballconservative radio host Arles Struvie announces on-air that he and his wife, Bertha Bumiller, plan to renew their wedding vows in Vegas. As everyone in Tuna, Texas insists on going along for the ride, hilarity ensues. Plays Feb. 21, 22, 28 and March 1 at 7 p.m., at Pierce College Fort Steilacoom Theater. Tickets available at the door, at the Student Life Office between 9-11 a.m., or noon-2 p.m., or by calling (253) 964-6710. General admission is $3, or $2 for students.

TWO POETRY CONTEST Citizens for a Healthy Bay is hosting an environmental art and poetry contest, “Mountain to Bay: Words and Images of the Puyallup River Watershed.” The free contest is open to all students ages 4-18 years in the Puyallup Watershed with the simple instructions, “explore your watershed and then create poetry and/or art about what you observed.” Due date for all submissions is May 1, 2014. Prizes include a private pizza party aboard CHB’s Bay Patrol boat and more. Visit the www.healthybay. org for more information.

THREE EARLY SPRING W.W.Seymour Botanical Conservatory in Wright Park is bringing color and life to winter’s gray skies with “Crave: An Early Glimpse of Spring” grand floral exhibits. Showing now through

March 23, featured flowers include azaleas, cyclamen, fairy primroses, tulips, orchids, oxalis and much more. Admission is $3 ages 12 and over.

stripped down to acoustic guitars (steel, classical), ukulele and vocals.

FOUR

ART & ACCESSORIES On Thursday, Feb. 20, 4-8 p.m., Moss + Mineral (305 S. 9th St., Tacoma) will host an opening for Tacoma artists Sean Alexander and Virginia Bunker. Alexander is well-known for his ink drawings of almost maddening precision; this show will introduce his modernist furniture inspired by mid-20th century design, along with new 2D art. Bunker is a style expert and this exhibit will introduce her debut collection of women’s accessories made from luxurious upcycled materials at this special in-store event. Read more at www.mossandmineral.com. Info: (253) 961.5220.

‘THUNDERSTORM’ On Saturday, Feb. 15 at The Wine Studio in Gig Harbor (3123 56th St. NW, #5), Tacoma music men Dave Hannon, Jeff Ross and Moe Abbot will be performing live 7-10 p.m. Ross, singer/songwriter/ guitarist, will release his new album “Thunderstorm” that evening as well. CDs can be purchased at www.cdbaby.com/cd/jeffross2, on iTunes in a couple weeks and at shows around Tacoma/Gig Harbor/Port Orchard. Recorded at Wenlock Studios in Tacoma, “Thunderstorm” features additional vocals by Jessie Abbott, and Seattle singer/songwriter Moe Abbott on ukulele and vocals. To allow the music to speak for itself rather than adding layers, the album is

FIVE

Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 14, 2014

SUPERGROUP WALKING PAPERS LEAVES FANS STARSTRUCK

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ast weekend, Seattle supergroup Walking Papers delivered two big shows at Jazzbones. Friday night’s quickly sold out, and fans braved snow-covered roads to get there on Saturday. Tacoma Weekly freelance music photographer Bill Bungard was there to capture one of his favorite local bands in action. The group consists of singer-guitarist Jefferson Angell (of Post Stardom Depression and the Missionary Position fame); drummer Barrett Martin from Screaming Trees and Mad Season; keyboard player and backup singer Benjamin Anderson, who played in Rorschach Test and Missionary Position; and superstar bassist Duff McKagan, who has headlined arena and festival stages with Guns N’ Roses, Velvet Revolver and, most recently, Jane’s Addiction. With that pedigree and powerhouse, self-titled debut album, Walking Papers is primed for the national circuit. Still, the band supports the local music scene, playing local clubs and transporting fans back to the days when magic was common on such stages. Walking Papers has a great sound backed by great stage presence, and they left fans stoked and starstruck.

BENJAMIN ANDERSON

DUFF MCKAGAN

JEFFERSON ANGELL

DUFF MCKAGAN

BARRETT MARTIN

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, February 14, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 3

PUSHING THE BOUNDARIES OF CERAMIC ART

CULTURE CORNER

A GUIDE TO THE MUSEUMS OF TACOMA Washington State History Museum 1911 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, WA 98402 Wed.- Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: www.washingtonhistory.org/

New Exhibit Opens Feb. 17:

Civil War Pathways in the Pacific Northwest Feb. 17-July 6 PHOTO COURTESY OF KITTREDGE GALLERY

PHILOSOPHERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; STONE. Chad Gundersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Specimen 23â&#x20AC;? is made

of solid-cast glaze. It is one of dozens of such works currently on display at UPSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kittredge Gallery.

Chad Gunderson at Kittredge Gallery By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

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had Gunderson is the newest member of the University of Puget Soundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art faculty. Brought on board to teach ceramics, Gunderson is currently the featured artist in a one-man show at the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kittredge Gallery. Entitled â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Like Rocks!â&#x20AC;? the show consists of a prolific assortment of colorful, abstract objects that are made entirely of ceramic glaze. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect to see pretty clay pots at this show. Gunderson casts just glaze to produce organic forms that are usually colored with acrylic and/ or spray paint. Most of these â&#x20AC;&#x153;Specimensâ&#x20AC;? (as Gunderson calls them) are displayed at the center of white, porcelain disks that hang on the gallery walls. Many of the specimens resemble geological mineral samples like pumice stone marked with deep cavities. Some resemble torn sponges, fragments of sea corals, chunks of liver or hunks of bread. Some erupt with bulbous tumors that are painted in garish hues. Some have deep craters that are edged with paint. The artist cites such dis-

Furnit u

parate elements as igneous rock, Chinese scholarsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; stones, Lego bricks and vintage Tupperware as sources of inspiration. Gunderson joined the UPS faculty last August. He has also taught at Bennington College in Vermont, at Brooklyn College and at Arizona State University (which is where he earned his M.F.A.). In addition to his own show in Kittredgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Large Gallery,â&#x20AC;? Gunderson curated the show in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Small Gallery.â&#x20AC;? For this charming little exhibit, he chose objects from the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ceramics collection that are notable for having pushed the boundaries of ceramic art at the time they were made. Here one may encounter the brilliant Patti Warashina (who recently had a major retrospective at Bellevue Art Museum), the funky Clayton Bailey and the quirky David Gilhooly among others. Comparison of ceramic art to rocks does not sound exciting. This show, however, exceeds expectations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Like Rocks!â&#x20AC;? runs through March 1. For further information visit pugetsound. edu/Kittredge. More information on Gunderson is available on the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at chadgundersonart.com.

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HOT DEALS

The Civil War fostered intense debates in Washington State about race, citizenship, civil liberties, politics, and federal government power, and helped connect the Pacific Northwest more closely with the rest of the nation. Civil War Pathways in the Pacific Northwest examines how the issues of the war influenced the lives of those in our region.

FEB 2014

Feb. 17 Opening Day Activities:

Exclusive WSHS members-only reception and program, 10-10:45 a.m.

Includes presentations by exhibit curator Lorraine McConaghy and retired Seattle Times editor Bruce Ramsey.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Territorial Voices: A Civil War Readerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Theaterâ&#x20AC;? 11 a.m. to noon

Open to the public free with museum admission. Come participate in an interactive, living theater piece where the audience reads the words of ordinary settlers, territorial military, and administrative leadership. Through the presentation, participants will realize the changing significance of words like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Democratâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Republicanâ&#x20AC;? and learn about various opinions on race and slavery in the Washington Territory.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Am Always on the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Side: Vignettes of the Civil Warâ&#x20AC;? 1 p.m

Open to the public, free with museum admission, Though womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voices are often lost amidst the din of the battlefield, their stories are an integral part of our nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history. Karen Haas has researched numerous diaries, letters, and songs written by women to create a program portraying women from differing walks of life and points of view. These vignettes bring a frequently neglected side of the Civil War to life: women striving to survive in a time of violence, turmoil, and societal change. NOT INTENDED FOR YOUNGER AUDIENCES.

Civil War Fashion Show 3 p.m.

Open to the public, free with museum admission Presented by Goodwill of Tacoma, this

fashion show recreates the look and feel of the Civil War era.

Bonus: Authors whose books are part of the Civil War Book Club will be signing copies of their books in the Museum Store. Musicians will be playing Civil War era music in the museum, and re-enactors will be portraying various Civil War characters in the gallery.

Tacoma, WA 98465.

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Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, February 14, 2014

COME ONE, COME ALL TO 16TH ANNUAL ASIAN NEW YEAR CELEBRATION By Ernest A. Jasmin

SCHEDULE OF THIS YEARâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ENTERTAINMENT

ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

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ocals will gather to celebrate the traditions of Asia and the Pacific Islands at the 16th annual Asia Pacific New Year festival this weekend. The event will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Tacoma Dome Exhibition Hall, 2727 E. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; St., featuring food, music, dance, martial arts demonstrations, more than 60 vendors and more. The event is organized by the Asia Pacific Cultural Center, a non-profit group that, since 1996, has united Asian and Pacific Islander groups from around the state. There are organized groups representing 18 countries in Washington, according to APCC executive director Faaluaina Pritchard; and each year one is recognized as host at the Asia Pacific New Year event. This year the spotlight is on Tahiti. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is only one big family of Tahitians here in the state of Washington, and there are maybe two other families,â&#x20AC;? Pritchard said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But the biggest family is the Radfords, and they live in Bellevue. So we got them to come, and they have a dance group called Te Fare O Tamatoa. Literally translated, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;house of the kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; or â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;house of warriors.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? The event is free and open to all ages. Parking will cost $10, and attendants are accepting cash only.

Main Cultural Stage Entertainment: Opening Ceremony, 11 a.m. Host nation Tahiti, noon Japan Kabuki Academy and Okinawa Taiko Drums, 1:30 p.m. Hawaii, Guam, Imahe, 2 p.m. Filipino Youth Activity Drill Team, 2:30 p.m. International Chinese Academy, 3 p.m. India Association of Western Washington, 3:30 p.m. Kinnaly Dance & Laos Association, 4 p.m. Su A Kim Korean Traditional Dance Troupe, 4:30 p.m. Saraswati/Northwest Indonesia Cultural Association, 5 p.m. Polynesian Club of Federal Way High School, 5:30 p.m.

Demonstration Room

Asia Pacific New Year Celebration Saturday, Feb. 15 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tacoma Dome Exhibition Center Free admission (253) 383-3900 or www.asiapacificculturalcenter.org

PHOTO COURTESY OF ASIA PACIFIC CULTURAL CENTER

LET THERE BE LIGHT. Patsy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connell releases a Chinese lantern at last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Asia Pacific New Year Festival. The host country for 2013 was Taiwan.

Vietnamese martial arts, noon Hawaiian hula, 12:30 p.m. Filipino martial arts, 1 p.m. Filipino folk dances, 1:30 p.m. Okinawa martial arts, 2 p.m. Taiwan Aboriginal, 2:30 p.m. Thai boxing, 3 p.m. Japanese Kendo, 3:30 p.m. Karate, 4 p.m. Tae Kwan Do, 4:30 p.m. Hot hula, 5 p.m.

Kieth Urban to play State Fair K

eith Urban will â&#x20AC;&#x153;do the Puyallupâ&#x20AC;? this year. The New Zealand-born country star - known for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Think of Me,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;But for the Grace of Godâ&#x20AC;? and other hits, and for judging on â&#x20AC;&#x153;American Idolâ&#x20AC;? - will bring his â&#x20AC;&#x153;Light the Fuseâ&#x20AC;? tour to the Washington State Fair grandstand on Sept. 15, organizers announced. Tickets went on sale online at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 12, with prices ranging from $40 to $100. They will be available at the Washington State Fair Box office - located at 9th Ave. SW and Meridian Street, in Puyallup - beginning 10 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 15. Pre-show dinner packages will also be available for $55, with food and beverages catered by The Vault. For further details, visit www.thefair.com.

  

 

   

Every Thursday, February 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; April 3, 2014 University of Puget Sound | Tahoma Room,

Commencement Hall

FREE ADMISSION 6pm doors open 7pm film begins

For more information: www.sistercityfilmfest.org Call: 591-5117 or Find us on facebook: Sister City Film Festival

URBAN

PHOTO COURTESY OF ARTIST

- Ernest A. Jasmin, Tacoma Weekly

RICHIE TO PLAY IN SEATTLE

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ionel Richie is headed to Seattle. Live Nation announced that the five-time Grammy-Winning artist â&#x20AC;&#x201C; best known for â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s hits â&#x20AC;&#x153;All Night Long,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dancinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; on the Ceilingâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Helloâ&#x20AC;? and for fronting the Commodores â&#x20AC;&#x201C; will headline KeyArena on May 30. â&#x20AC;&#x153;F--- Youâ&#x20AC;? singer and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Voiceâ&#x20AC;? judge CeeLo Green â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who called off his appearance at the Washington State Fair in September - has been tapped to open. The show will start at 7:30 p.m. A ticket â&#x20AC;&#x153;presaleâ&#x20AC;? event will start at 10 a.m. Friday, Feb. 14, before tickets go on sale to the general public at 10 a.m. on Feb. 24. Prices range from $23 to $121. For further details, visit www. ticketmaster.com

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

Tena DuBerry Jazz Bistro keeps the music playing

Friday, February 14, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 5

Nightlife

TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

POPULAR R&B CROONER BRIAN MCKNIGHT WILL GET FANS IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE ON VALENTINEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY AT THE EMERALD QUEEN CASINO. MUSIC STARTS AT 8:30 P.M., AND ONLY A FEW TICKETS REMAIN WITH PRICES RANGING FROM $40 TO $90; WWW.EMERALDQUEEN.COM. .

FRIDAY, FEB. 14 JAZZBONES: Leroy Bell & His Only Friends (singer-songwriter) 8 p.m., $15

PHOTO COURTESY OF TENA DUBERRY

SIREN SONG. Tena DuBerry has over 30 years of experience as a per-

former. Her next venture, The Tena DuBerry Jazz Bistro, opens on Sunday, Feb. 17. By Derek Shuck Derek@tacomaweekly.com

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ocal musician Tena DuBerry has no problem admitting that Tacoma is full of talented local artists. In her eyes, the Tacoma scene is making a loud bang throughout the Pacific Northwest â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the problem lies in keeping the music playing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to start something. People have started things all over the place all the time,â&#x20AC;? DuBerry said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have all these great artists and more, how do we keep it playing? DuBerry hopes to begin solving this problem by opening the Tena DuBerry Jazz Bistro at Highland Golf Course on Sunday, Feb 16. According to DuBerry, the bistro will be a place for an older, mature crowd to get together, network and enjoy a live jazz venue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a place and a venue to connect,â&#x20AC;? DuBerry said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;where we can grow as a community.â&#x20AC;? The venue will have an emphasis on a live performance over DJs or television entertainment. DuBerry hopes the club will be reminiscent of the 70â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music of Aretha Franklin or Ella Fitzgerald, tickling those feelings of nostalgia and warmth from a time when live performers ruled the entertainment scene. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re] bringing back the live music, the feel-good music, because music heals,â&#x20AC;? DuBerry said. Sunday will mark the grand opening of the bistro, and the occasion will

be celebrated with giveaways and a live performance from DuBerry herself. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you come see me, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always going to be a top performance, period,â&#x20AC;? DuBerry said. DuBerry is a veteran singer who has performed everywhere from Tacoma Little Theater to Carnegie Hall. She has a background in jazz, doing everything from plays to singing telegrams. DuBerry has written two plays that were performed in Tacoma: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Valentines Day and Black History Month Tribute to AfricanAmerican Artist, No Longer Hereâ&#x20AC;? at Clover Park Technical College and â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am EVERYWOMANâ&#x20AC;? at the Tacoma Little Theatre, which honored women in every stage of their lives. She has covered everyone from Michael Jackson to Ray Charles, and will have an opportunity this week to cover Frank Sinatra songs in Seattle. Born in Tacoma, DuBerry moved to the Washington, D.C. area when she was 13, but has returned to try and unite live performers in the Tacoma area, with the bistro being just the first step in keeping the music playing in the city. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to learn to support one another; we have to learn to put our money where our mouth is,â&#x20AC;? DuBerry said. DuBerry wants the bistro to evolve into a venture that supports the community, whether through professional connections or scholarships for younger residents. Specifically, DuBerry wants to use the bistro to provide role mod-

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els for young women. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We really want people to be a part of making this grow,â&#x20AC;? DuBerry said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s do this together, we have the singing, we have the opportunity, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make it happen together.â&#x20AC;? Once the club is open, the plan is to begin doing live performances twice monthly, every other Sunday, slowly increasing the number of shows until they are a daily occurrence. DuBerry hopes these performances will help the Tacoma community by creating lasting relationships between the venue and performers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It really should be a partnership,â&#x20AC;? DuBerry said. With that support from the community, the staff of the bistro truly believes Tacoma can become a goto hotspot for entertainment not just from around the state but from around the whole country. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make Seattle come to Tacoma, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make Olympia come to Tacoma, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make California come to Tacoma, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make Las Vegas come to Tacoma,â&#x20AC;? DuBerry said. The Tena DuBerry Jazz Bistro will have its grand opening Sunday, Feb.16 from 6-8 p.m. and will feature live music performances, certificate giveaways, refreshments and light hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres. Tickets are $35 at http:// tenaduber ryjazzbistro. brownpapertickets.com. MONUMENTS MEN (118 MIN, PG-13)

B SHARP COFFEE: Michelle Beaudry (Great American Songbook) 5 p.m., Ryan Heffner (Americana) 8 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Chapter 5 (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: BJ Johnson (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Michael Anthony Pratt Band (country) 8 p.m., $10 MAXWELLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: The Pecos, Milk (indie-rock) 9 p.m., $5 STONEGATE: Crosswalk (rock) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Mr. Pink (dance) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Jimmy Schubert (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE THURMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Blenis-Ely Band (blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Hot Death, Conjurer (metal) 8 p.m., NC

THE SWISS: Music for Youth (teen jam) 3 p.m., NC, AA TACOMA COMEDY: Tacomedy Contest (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+ TACOMA DOME: Miley Cyrus, Icona Pop (pop) 7 p.m., $41.50 to $91.50, AA

MONDAY, FEB. 17 JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC

NEW FRONTIER: Jazz & Beyond (live jam) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino, Brooke Lizotte (experimental jam) 9 p.m., NC UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Blues jam, 8 p.m.

TUESDAY, FEB. 18 JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5

SATURDAY, FEB. 15 JAZZBONES: Witchburn, Girl On Fire, Amadon (metal, hard rock) 8:30 p.m., $7 B SHARP COFFEE: SB Slim (folk, blues) 8 p.m., NC DOYLEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Down North (rock, pop, soul) 9:30 p.m., NC EMERALD QUEEN: Air Supply (classic rock) 8 p.m., $30 to $65 GRIT CITY COMEDY: BJ Johnson (comedy) 8:30, 10:30 p.m., $15 LAST STAND: Brotha Nature, Crime Wave, Sheldon Black, etc. (hip-hop) 5 p.m., $7 NEW FRONTIER: The Silver Dollars, B.O.D., People Under the Sun (xxx) 9 p.m., $5 THE SPAR: The Still Got It Band (rock) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Crosswalk (rock) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Kry (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Jimmy Schubert (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Liquor Switch (classic rock) 8 p.m.

SUNDAY, FEB. 16

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19 CLIFF HOUSE: Paige Hansen (jazz) 6:30 p.m., NC

DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Dave Nicholsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar)

THURSDAY, FEB. 20

TEMPLE: Dubcityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ball with Teairra Mari (R&B, hip-hop) 9 p.m., $40

CLIFF HOUSE: Kareem Kandi Band (jazz) 6:30 p.m., NC DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m. LAST STAND: Sic Ill, Bishop Dennis, Cole Zamira, etc. (hip-hop) 5 p.m., $7 LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Good For You (rock) 3 p.m., AA NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 4 p.m. THE SPAR: Rafael Tranquilino (blues) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman Allstars (classic rock) 8:30 p.m., NC

LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Sevens Revenge, Pariahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Revolt, KNC Music Factory (rock) 7 p.m., $5, AA

502 MARTINI: Kim Archer (singer-songwriter) 5 p.m., NC DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open jam) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Barleywine Revue (country) 9 p.m., NC, AA TACOMA COMEDY: Josh Wolf (comedy) 8 p.m., $10 TRIPLE PLAY: Comedy open mic, 9 p.m., NC UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

   

2/14: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 2/15-2/17: 11:50am, 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 2/18-2/20: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00

PHILOMENA (98 MIN, PG-13)

2/14: 1:55, 4:20, 6:35, 8:50 2/15-2/17: 11:35am, 1:55, 4:20, 6:35, 8:50 2/18: 4:20, 8:50 2/19-2/20: 1:55, 4:20, 6:35, 8:50

ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATED ANIMATED SHORTS (102 MIN, NR)

2/14: 4:10, 6:25 2/15-2/17: 11:30am, 4:10, 6:25 2/18: 4:10, 6:25 2/19-2/20: 1:45, 8:40

ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATED LIVE ACTION SHORTS (113 MIN, NR)

2/14-2/18: 1:45, 8:40 2/19-2/20: 4:00, 6:25

NEBRASKA (115 MIN, R)

2/14: 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 2/15-2/17: 12:00, 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 2/18-2/20: 2:45, 5:30, 8:15

THE SQUARE (95 MIN, NR)

2/18: 2:00, 6:45

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2/15: 10:00am

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Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 14, 2014

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: SPECIAL OLYMPICS POLAR PLUNGE

Sat., Feb. 22, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Owen Beach, Point Defiance Park Take a dip in the icy waters across Washington State and be a part of the “coolest” event of the year! Join the fun, help raise funds and win prizes, all in support of Special Olympics Washington. Info: www.specialolympicswashington.org WINE & CHOCOLATE Fri., Feb. 14, 5:30-7 p.m. W.W. Seymour Conservatory Stroll through a romantically lit conservatory, sip wine or champagne, nibble decadent truffles and chocolate covered strawberries. Info: www. metroparkstacoma.org/conservatory/

KIDS NIGHT OUT Fri., Feb. 14, 6-10 p.m. Lakewood Community Center, 9112 Lakewood Dr. SW Kids ages 6-12 can share a fun evening with other kids. Info: www.piercecountywa. org/parks

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

VALENTINE’S DAY RED CARPET EVENT Fri., Feb. 14, 8 p.m. Serious Soul Café, 35501 21st Ave. SW, Federal Way House of Matthew Transitional Housing Services holds a fundraiser event to benefit homeless veterans. Info: www. thehouseofmathew.org

RELAX & RENEW Sun., Feb. 15, 5:30 p.m. WW Seymour Conservatory Come to the beautiful tropical Conservatory for a guided hour of meditation and gentle movement. No Experience necessary and accessible to all. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org/conservatory/

DANCING WITH THE TACOMA STARS Sat. Feb. 15, 6:30 p.m. Temple Theatre Ballroom Selected representatives of the Tacoma community go through the rigors of learning ballroom dance and compete for top honors in this exciting and innovative fundraising event for Tacoma Musical Playhouse. Info: (253) 5656867 and www.tmp.org/specialevents.aspx

TENA DUBERRY’S JAZZ BISTRO Sun., Feb. 16, 8 p.m. Highlands Golf Course, 1400 N. Highlands Pkwy., Celebrate the opening of songstress extraordinaire Tena DuBerry’s Jazz Bistro as she performs some of your favorite tunes along with some of her most talented friends. Info: (253) 759-3622 and www.brownpapertickets.com/ event/571548

CHILI CHASE Sat., Feb. 22, 9 a.m. STAR Center Features a chip-timed 5K run along with a 1-mile kid’s dash. Afterward come inside to feast on tasty chili. Registration closes Feb. 20. Info: www.starcentertacoma.org

SOUNDSCAPES Sat., Feb. 15, 7:30 p.m. Rialto Theater Go green with these natureinspired masterpieces including Beethoven’s supreme ode to his beloved countryside. Info: www.broadwaycenter.org

W.I.P. (WORKS IN PROGRESS) Mon., Feb. 17, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Urban Grace Studio, 902 Market St., Tacoma The Barefoot Collective & MLKBallet host W.I.P. (Works in Progress), a studio series for performing arts including dance, music, spoken word, theater, and more. Info: www.facebook.com/ events/744886352189994/

LGBT WEDDING EXPO Sun., Feb. 23, 1:30 p.m. McGavick Conference Center Celebrate equality in Tacoma! The afternoon promises the opportunity to meet with dozens of LGBT-friendly wedding vendors. Enjoy a variety of delicious samples, music, LGBT-specific planning tips and much more! Info: www.samelovesamerights.com

TACOMA DANCE STUDIO Fri., Feb. 21 Tacoma Dance Studio, 5412 South Tacoma Way Tacoma’s newest dance venue has a large dance floor and dancing every Friday and Saturday. On Feb. 21, CASANOVA will play. Info: dancingmanllc@ yahoo.com or 253-2248244.

COMEDY OPEN MIC Every Thursday, 9 p.m. Triple Play Sports Bar, 3829 6th Ave. The Happy Thursday Comedy Open Mic is a weekly standup comedy open mic hosted by comedian Kareem Walters and featuring some of the best rising comics and established headliners. Info: www. tripleplaytacoma.com

ASIA PACIFIC NEW YEAR Sat., Feb. 15, 10:30 a.m. Tacoma Dome Exhibition Hall Featured community is Island of Tahiti along with Japan, Hawaii, Philippines, China, India, Korea, Indonesia/Thailand and Samoa. Info: www. asiapacificculturalcenter.org FREE FAMILY MOVIE Sat., Feb. 15, 9 a.m. to noon Grand Cinema Hurry and don’t miss a special FREE screening of Dreamworks’ “The Croods” at the Grand Cinema. Info: www. grandcinema.com.

TRIBUTE TO JIMI HENDRIX Fri., Feb. 21, 8 p.m. Jazzbones Born Dec. 8, 1954 in Seattle, Randy Hansen is a guitarist best known for his emulation of Jimi Hendrix. He clearly has a bit of physical resemblance to Hendrix and carries that resemblance further by emulating such signatures of Hendrix’s style as playing a guitar with his teeth or behind his back. Info: www. jazzbones.com/events

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE Kerri Bailey is a horticulturist and a certified herbalist. She makes custom blends and consults at Ubiquitous Journey (www.UBJourney.com) on 6th Avenue. Kerri owns two businesses – the online herb store www.HerbalElements.net and a water garden store inside Alpine Nursery in South Hill (www. AlpineGrows.com) called The Pond Pad (www.ThePondPad.com). She writes blogs on gardening, ponds, natural health and herbal remedies and teaches classes through Free University (www.FreeUNW.com).

ARIES (March 21 – April 19) You are on a roller coaster ride as Mercury rewinds and some of your plans may fall through or people may not be reliable. Work or business projects may not coordinate and acting on impulse could cause stress. Try to locate and keep track of receipts and paperwork. Enjoy the fresh, crisp air.

LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) An important relationship could reach a critical peak this week. The full moon today lets you see your friends and loved ones for who they really are. You have desired change for some time and now you have the chance to make this dream of stability happen. Take a step in the opposite direction. Don’t give into self-doubt.

TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) Organize your home or office for positive work results. You may experience mechanical malfunctions as a result of Mercury in retrograde. Your patient determination will win over that hard to deal with person. Working as a team can make better progress. Respect and listen to your heart.

SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) You may need to go with the flow to make your daydreams come true. New opportunities help you pull back in order to move forward. With Mercury in retrograde, your patience and stamina may be tested. Choose what is right or what is wrong for you. Take your time and do it right.

GEMINI (May 21 – June 20) There is a possibility that you make a change that could surprise someone. A plan or project may not go as planned as Mercury rewinds. Interviews or meetings may be canceled. Keep track of those important documents, receipts and paperwork. Do your homework first and think carefully before making any moves.

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SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) Today’s powerful full moon reveals a special valentine. See the happiness in your everyday life. Opposites are at play bringing fun as well as disappointment. When things get too much, retreat to work out your next move. Enjoy your popularity with good intentions and spread joy.

CANCER (June 21 – July 22) Today’s full moon brings good times with friends and family. As Mercury is in retrograde, you may notice crazy times at work. Challenges with your boss or co-worker will escalate and then subside. Your fondest dreams and fantasies may be on your mind lately. Stay calm and keep smiling.

CAPRICORN (December 22 – January 19) This week could be socially challenging. Today’s full moon helps you recognize your responsibilities to others. You come to a common ground as a result of a disagreement. As Mercury rewinds this week, you may experience electronic problems. Back up your important files to avoid losing crucial information.

LEO (July 23 – August 22) A quick, tempting getaway probably won’t resolve your issues. You may find yourself more in touch with repressed feelings as Mercury rewinds this week stirring up old emotions. The full moon today may be a special time for you and your partner. Take time to decompress.

AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) Love is in the air today during this special full moon today. You are stimulated by a cuttingedge wavelength. This lively energy helps you find answers and make meaningful connections. Creative opportunities arise. We are the company we keep so stick with like-minded people.

VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) Wishful thinking may get in the way of progress. Beware of misunderstandings with your partner or relative, as Mercury is in retrograde. Try to sense the needs and feelings of others. Appreciate the little things that make the bigger picture. Make some time for peace and quiet to help you focus.

PISCES (February 19 – March 20) Watch your budget and avoid spontaneous spending. Questions about money and wild ideas are in the air. Confusion this full moon could distract you from taking good care of yourself. Be loving and giving but don’t sacrifice everything or play the martyr. Your desires may prove reckless.

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NOTICES

NOTICES

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR KING COUNTY In re the Estate of: Janice Kay Lammert, Deceased. Case No. 14-4-00623-1 SEA NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent that arose before the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in R.C.W. 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney at their respective addresses stated below a copy of WKHFODLPDQGĂ&#x20AC;OLQJWKHRULJLQDORIWKHFODLP with the Court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under R.C.W. 11.40.020(1)Š, or (2) four months after the date RIĂ&#x20AC;UVWSXEOLFDWLRQRIWKHQRWLFH,IWKHFODLPV into presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in R.C.W. 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probate and non-probate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: February 14,2014 Joyce K. Lammert, P.R. 1509 Fifth Avenue N. Seattle WA 98109 Ross Radley, Attorney for P.R. 146 North Canal St, #350 Seattle WA 98103 (206) 323-3800 rradley@mindspring.com

TO: John Sr., Michael J.

TO: Spapull Gottfriedson In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs GOTTFRIEDSON, Spapull Case Number: PUY-FH-SHELL-2013-0037 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Revocation Hearing on March 11th, 2014 at 9:00am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT.

EMPLOYMENT

If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0058 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Continued Initial Hearing on March 04, 2014 at 10:00am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Name: Puyallup Tribe of Indians vs. Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0065 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

Training will be offered the Ă&#x20AC;UVW ZHHN RI -DQXDU\ DQG classes will start in mid-January. Please contact Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information.

Help a Child Improve Reading One-on-one support makes a huge difference in an elementary studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to overcome reading challenges. As a Read2Me Tutor for Tacoma Community House, you can be that person who makes a difference. We are on the lookout for committed tutors for grades 1-3. There are sessions at Manitou Park, Mann, McCarver, and Roosevelt Elementary Schools. The next orientations will be held in January. Call 253.383.3951 for more information.

Pet of the Week

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Willowâ&#x20AC;? Our Featured Kitty this week is one to talk about. Let us introduce you to one amazing felineâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Willow. This gorgeous girl is a nine year old seal point Siamese, she is guaranteed to steal your heart the moment you see her. Willow is truly everything one could desire in a cat. She is incredibly sweet and friendly, curious and loving & of course, a beauty. Willowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perfect day would be curling up on your lap while you read a book or watching your favorite shows. When sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not relaxing with you, Willow loves WRH[SORUHKHUVXUURXQGLQJVDQGPD\EHĂ&#x20AC;QGDZLQGRZVLOOZLWK a view. Being that Willow is a more experienced cat, she would prefer to spend her days in a quiet and calm household. Willowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new forever family must be sure to give her the love and attention she deserves. This attention does includes dental visits, as she is in need of a teeth cleaning. Willow is one very special kitty who ZLOOĂ&#x20AC;OOWKHVSDFHLQ\RXUKHDUW\RXGLGQ¡WNQRZZDVHPSW\'RQ¡W wait, come meet Willow today. Reference #A482457

You are summoned to appear for a Continued Initial Hearing on March 04, 2014 at 10:00am

In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs Sharp, Floyd J.

Citizenship Volunteers Looking for a rewarding experience? Help immigrants prepare to become citizens. You will help to provide instruction to legal permanent residents who need practice with the written and oral.

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE -PML;V^PUN-PML9LJV]LY`:LY]PJL  5>;V^PUNH[(]L,-PML VU0UJVTWSPHUJL^P[O[OL 9*>H[!WT=PL^PUNVM JHYZMYVT!!WT9LNPZ[LYLK ;V^5\TILYZ *HZO (\J[PVU6US`^^^Ă&#x201E;ML[V^PUNJVT

Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0054 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

TO: Sharp, Floyd J.

PAWS NEEDS WILDLIFE VOLUNTEERS PAWS in Lynnwood is looking for volunteers to help care for wildlife this spring. Every year, PAWS cares for more than 3,000 injured, orphaned or abandoned wildlife. Join the team and you can help feed and care for these remarkable animals. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a remarkable H[SHULHQFH\RXZRQ¡WĂ&#x20AC;QG anywhere else! For any questions please contact Mark Coleman, Communications Manager, at 206.419.6646.

PETS

In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs John Sr., Michael J.

FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT.

VOLUNTEERS

Exp. Breakfast Cook Needed. Part/Full Time. Flexable Schedule. Come in and fill out application. Tower Lanes 6323 6th Ave., Tacoma. 564-8853

Help Wanted Earn Extra Income, Become an Avon representative Only $10 to start Sign up online at: www.start.youravon.com Use reference code FORTIZ Or call (253) 226-6683

VOLUNTEERS These are exciting times and you can make a difference! South Sound Outreach Services invites you to be trained as an In Person Assister Volunteer to help Pierce County residents enroll online for health insurance in the Washington Health Plan Finder. Open Enrollment is October 1 until March 31st. Coverage begins January 1st, 2014 for those enrolled by December 15th. Interested trainees may call Heather at SSOS 253-593-2111. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be glad you did!

Meals on Wheels Office Volunteer Do you want to put your RIĂ&#x20AC;FH VNLOOV WR ZRUN LQ D rewarding volunteer opportunity? We are seeking a volunteer with strong customer service and computer skills to assist in our Meals on Wheels TaFRPD RIĂ&#x20AC;FH RQH PRUQLQJ a week. Must enjoy working with seniors, using the telephone and computer, inputting data and setting XS Ă&#x20AC;OHV  )RRG KDQGOHU¡V card required. For more information call Linda at Lutheran Community Services: 253-272-8433. Become a Senior Companion today! Volunteers help frail or disabled seniors stay in their own home and maintain their independence. Activities include running errands, providing transportation or simply being a friend. Hourly stipend and mileage reimbursement provided. Requirements: must be 55+, serve at least 15 hours a week and be low-income. Drivers are especially needed currently. For more info call Julie Kerrigan, Program Director: 1(800) 335-8433, ext. 5686

FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT. TO: Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Name: Puyallup Tribe of Indians vs. Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0066 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on Tuesday the 1st day of April, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT. TO: Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Name: Puyallup Tribe of Indians vs. Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0074 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on Tuesday the 1st day of April, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT. TO: Denise Elseth Bowen Kristine Siddle vs Denise Elseth Bowen Case Number: PUY-CV-PO-2014-0009 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 25th day of March, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Selena Adrian IN RE: Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mya Adrian

You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on April 22nd, 2014 at 1:30PM If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

Ayusa International SeeksTacoma Host Parents for High School Exchange Students Ayusa International, a \HDUROGQRQSURĂ&#x20AC;WWKDW promotes global learning through the hosting of high school foreign exchange students, is seeking parents/families in Tacoma to host for the upcoming 2013-2014 school year. Ayusa students are 15-18 years old and come from more than 60 countries around the world including Brazil, Japan, Germany, Ecuador, France, Peru, Morocco, China and Spain; WKH\DUHDOOSURĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW in English. For more information, please visit our website: www.ayusa.org

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week 1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Come quick! Fonzy is looking to share his love with a new valentine this year. Companionship is what this boy wants and needs. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d make an excellent partner for a Forever Family that is looking to take him everywhere, as he does not like to be left alone. Stop by today and see if he can be your right hand man!

1999 Toyota Solara SLE Automatic transmission, power windows, leather interior, sun roof, tinted windows, smooth ride, great condition and runs well. Mileage: 134,515 Asking $4,500 If you interested call (253) 474-6556 and leave a message. SPEND YOUR TAX DOLLARS HERE!

DANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S QUALITY CARS 429 ST HELENS AVE â&#x20AC;˘ TACOMA, WA 253.221.2209 OR 253.229.3636

FOR SALE FURNITURE

FURNITURE

New 5 Piece Bedroom Set Full or Queen set includes: Headboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, & mirror. BRAND NEW! Only $400 253-539-1600

All New King Mattress Set 3 Piece King Mattress set for only $275. Still in original packaging with factory warranty. Can deliver. 253-537-3056

5 Piece Dining Room Set Table & 4 Chairs. New in box. Only $300 253-539-1600 Microfiber Sectional Brand New REVERSIBLE sectional with chaise lounge. NEW! Only $500 253-539-1600 All New Pillow Top Mattress Queen Size with warranty. Still in original plastic. Can deliver. $120. 253537-3056 Solid Wood Bunk Beds Available in 2 colors. Brand new in box. Can break down to two separate twin beds. Delivery available. $250 253-539-1600

If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for an energetic ball of fun with an extra digit, then Snowshoe is your boy. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s under a year old, polydactyl, and ready to play. This cuddly cat in interested in any toy you bring his way, and any affection youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ready to give. Help this young man find the Forever Family heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been dreaming of this Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day!

Adjustable Power Bed Brand New with memory foam mattress. Wall hugger with warranty. Delivery available. $995 253-537-3056 New Mission Style Bedroom Suite Solid wood Mission bedroom set. $699. Includes: headboard, footboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, and mirror. 253-539-1600 New Overstuffed Microfiber sofa & Love Seat Still in plastic with manufactures warranty. Can have for $700. Lifetime warranty on frame. 253-539-1600 BRAND NEW! Queen Memory foam mattress set with 20 year warranty. Can Deliver. $400. 253-537-3056

Low Profile Leather Bed Frame Still in box. Available in Full or Queen. Very nice. Can deliver. $250 253-539-1600

New Pillow Top Full Mattress Only $99. Never used! Comes with manufactures warranty. Delivery available. 253537-3056

ANTIQUES WANTED

ANTIQUES WANTED

Case Number: PUY-CV-PC-2013-0249 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs We need a volunteer to host programs Tuesday & Thursday 9:30-12, & 1-2:30 pm at Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs. Volunteer will be calling Bingo and doing some extreme crafting, gardening during spring & summer and into fall. If interested call Bonnie @ 253-278-1475 MondayFriday 8:30-4PM.

AUTOS

You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing onTuesday the 1st day of April, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

Help furnish hope to those in need! NW Furniture Bank Volunteers needed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;NWFB helps restore hope, dignity and stability in our community by recycling donated furniture to people in need.â&#x20AC;? Tuesday-Saturday Truck Volunteers Needed- 9:00 am-2:00 pm. Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at volunteer@ nwfurniturebank.org or call 253-302-3868.

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105

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Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy

253-770-8552

Need safe farms or barns for indoor/ outdoor semiferal cats. 7KH\DUHĂ&#x20AC;[HG vaccinated and dewormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 2980913

BUY HERE PAY HERE DEALER!

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TAX REFUND SERVICES AT MAPLE LEAF MOTORS MAPLE LEAF MOTORS Will MATCH 150 for EVERY $500 Of Your Tax Refund You Put Toward Your Down Payment. Maximum Match Of $600 $

Plus Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Receive $100 Discount On Tax Preparation Done By Us Thru Tax Refund Services! MAPLE LEAF WOULD LIKE YOU TO COMPARE THEIR IMPRESSIVE BENEFITS TO WHAT YOUR LAST DEALERSHIP OFFERED YOU WHEN YOU PURCHASED A USED CAR! t8&0''&33&"40/"#-& %08/1":.&/54646"--: "4-08"4 0' 163$)"4&13*$& t8&3&1035505)&$3&%*5 #63&"6"--08*/(:06503& &45"#-*4):063$3&%*53"5*/(

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Friday, February 14, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV HOMES FOR SALE

Why NOW is the Time to Sell Your Home!

HOMES FOR SALE

CALL 253.922.5317

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

1232 S Adams St.

805 N Steele St

Super charming home w/ the ease of newer amenities... Box beam ceilings, KDUGZRRGĂ RRUVPDUEOHHQWU\SLFWXUHSODWH UDLOV SHULRGVW\OHOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHVDGGWRWKH ambience, while newer roof, furnace/heat pump, indoor/outdoor speakers, newer ZLULQJSOXPELQJ JDVĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHDGGWRWKH ahhhh factor. Spacious living room, large kitchen, HUGE dining room, a bedroom and FXWHUHPRGHOHGEDWKURRPJUDFHWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVW Ă RRU*LJDQWLFGHFNZVHDWLQJZHOFRPH home. Move in and make it yours. $219,950

Want bragging rights & the ability to name drop? Hans Grohe, Duravit, Kohler, & Porcher to name a few... Then this is the house for you-high end everything & custom touches galore. Need this spelled out in layman terms? Fabulous, fantastic & close to hip 6th Ave Biz District, this 4 bed, 2.5 bath home has natural, original woodwork, is an entertainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream, and is ready for new owners... Leave your hammer at your old houseWKLVRQHLVĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGDQGĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGZHOO,PLJKWDGG Welcome! $368,000

â&#x20AC;˘ Interest rates are on the rise. Sell now and buy your next home before prices increase.

â&#x20AC;˘ Buyers are plentiful and listings are few. More buyers means a better environment for you to sell.

â&#x20AC;˘ Your home may no longer meet your needs. It is amazing how when you are in a home 3, 5, or 10 years how much your needs change. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get you into the right home for you while prices are still affordable for your next move.

I have buyers approved wanting to buy homes! Call Me Today! <RXUQH[WVWHSLVWRFDOOPHIRUDPDUNHWDQDO\VLVWRĂ&#x20AC;QGRXW what your home will sell for in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s market!

253-203-8985

www.StephanieLynch.com

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

1388 N Lenore St. Information deemed liable but not guaranteed.

REALTORS

REALTORS

If I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell it to you and if I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live in it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t list it.

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

33 N Salmon Beach

Fantastic mid century modern centrally located near stores, schools, parks and easy commuting to freeways, yet house feels secluded and private due to professionally landscaped, lovely yard with zen paths and sustainable design. Fantastic NLWFKHQKDUGZRRGĂ RRUVPDVWHURQPDLQ great patio for entertaining- this is a wonderful home with lots of space. Move in ready and awaiting new owners. $282,000

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

Shannon

Agent Extraordinaire

7OVUL!  -H_! ,THPS!ZOHUUVUZLSSZ'OV[THPSJVT HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

FOR SALE IN ORTING MOBILE 55+ PARK 2 BED, 2 BATH 836 HARMAN WAY S SPACE 44 360-893-0960

Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton hydraulic boat Lift, brick wood burning Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHZLWKLQVHUWH[SDQVLYHGHFNLQJRQ all sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout the last 9 years, including URRIVLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZVGRRUVGHFNLQJ boat hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more. $450,000

Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 222-8480

936 S Sheridan $229,000

3728 N Gove St, Tacoma Cute little bungalow in Proctor! Nice upgrades include a new family room, windows, roof, energy package & carpet 6 years ago. Detached garage was converted to extra living space. It has a separate electric panel, heat & lights - lots of possibilities... music studio, art studio, exercise / yoga room, etc. Parking for 3 cars off the alley next to garage. Charming back \DUGWRR+DUGZRRGĂ RRUVXQGHUFDUSHWH[FHSWLQ family room. MLS# 518902. $204,950

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

2711 Henry Road N

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St.

Open House

A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with no HOA. High Ceilings, gas ÂżUHSODFHVVHSDUDWHO\PHWHUHG &DOOIRUSULYDWHVKRZLQJWRGD\253.606.0689 BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME

$399,000

2/15 & 2/16 12-3

Beautiful Victorian 4-plex in good location back on the market after remodel. Walking distance to hospitals, downtown, parks. 0DLQ Ă RRU XQLW KDV RQH EHGURRP SOXV attached bonus room, dining room, lg kitchen with nook, new carpet throughout, bay windows. Upstairs unit has 2 bedrooms, bath, lg living room, kitchen & balcony. Lower level has 2 studio apts & bath. Sep. utilities for main and upper units. 3,064 sq ft MLS# 523770

Absolutely Charming, Mediterranean Style, custom built North Tacoma view home. Enjoy Commencement Bay view from Mstr Br balc. ,QVLGHIHDWLQFO0DUEOHĂ RRUHQWU\6W6WHHO$SSO *UDQFRXQWWRSV&XVWEXLOW+LFNRU\FDE%HDXW %UD]LOLDQ&KHUU\KDUGZRRGĂ RRU%D\ZLQGRZV 0VWUVXLWHZ)3 /UJEDWKVWHDPVKRZHU &DOLFORVHW1HZ(QHUJ\(IĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWKHDWLQJ&HQW YDFXXPQHZSDLQWLQ RXWQHZFDUSHW)LQLVKHG %VPWZNLWFKHQ&ORVHWR6FKRROV3DUNV )UHHZD\+RVSLWDOV :DWHUIURQW$623,000.

Better Properties Heather Redal 253.363.5920

Better Properties N. Proctor (253) 376-7787

Gil Rigell

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

PROPERTY

PROPERTY

MT. RAINIER VIEW $125,000

Beautiful Level Buildable Site! Located off of Ray Nash Drive NW, this 1.25 Acres of natural setting and mature Evergreen trees is perfect to build your dream home and enjoy the Country Lifestyle! Peek-a-Boo View of Mt. Rainier. Just minutes away from sought after Schools, Uptown Gig Harbor Amenities, Restaurants, WA-Hwy 16, Hospitals, Boat launch/water activities, tennis courts & Kopachuck State Park! Electricity is available at corner.

Michelle Anguiano Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood 253.720.6525

OLD TOWN $499,950 Amazing development potential with this unique Old Town property! City has given Ă&#x20AC;QDOSODWDSSURYDOIRUORWVRQWKLVSULPH acre piece. Big views possible from all lots in this great neighborhood, tucked back & out of the way. Walk to the historic Old Town district with its coffee shops, wine bar & restaurants.; then stroll down to the waterfront & enjoy the gorgeous Puget Sound setting with walking paths, public docks, shoreline restaurants & more! MLS# 332653 Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract RURAL LIVING: Restaurant/Lounge in Ashford, WA Price for business, $105,000 with $25,000 down. Price for the real estate, $390,000 with $75,000 down. Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract includes a 3 B/R house, laundromat, restr./lounge bldg. on 3.4 acre, commercial zoned parcel.

price reduced

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;CALLAHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB & GRILL IN KEY CENTER Business is for sale for $300,000 with $100,000 down, High gross sales. Saler will also consider leasing the space COLLISION CENTER Same owner 15 yrs. Retiring, 6621 So. Tacoma Way. $130,000 with terms to qualified buyer - some training provided at o cost to buyer. LAKEWOOD CAFE/ LOUNGE on a busy intersection, $81,500 CASH.

CALL RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109

Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 14, 2014

Air Supply

Smokey Robinson Merle Haggard

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KUBE 93 Comedy Jam Battle at the Boat 95 Starring Nick Cannon

Keith Sweat

March 14, 8:30pm

March 22, 7pm

March 29, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $20, $30, $40, $45

I-5 Showroom $25, $40, $100

I-5 Showroom $30, $40, $55, $60

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


Twa 2 14 14 p01