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FREE s Friday, February 7, 2014

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ARTWORK FROM TACOMA STUDENTS

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Tacomans held a “return to sender” rally Saturday in the TNT lobby. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Modern newspapers generally relish when readers interact with them through letters to the editor, calls and, increasingly, shares on social media. A recent flare-up on Facebook against The News Tribune’s distribuX See TNT / page A4

*LSLIYH[L =HSLU[PUL»Z +H`HUKOLSW [OLOVTLSLZZ By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

Looking for a way to make Valentine’s Day extraspecial this year? A Valentine’s Day Red Carpet Event will be taking place X See HOMELESS page A4

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eahwak fever was in full effect when the clock struck 12:12 p.m. – the “Moment of Loudness” officially proclaimed by Gov. Jay Inslee to celebrate the Seahawks’ first Super Bowl victory in the history of the franchise. Attracting an estimated 700,000 people – more than the city’s population – to downtown Seattle, the mood was electric along the entire 2-mile length of the parade, as fans poured out their appreciation and love for the team on this history making day. See more photos at www.TacomaWeekly.com.

PHOTO COURTESY OF TACOMA SCHOOLS

-69;/,20+: Prop. 1 and 2 would continue funding for school operations and technology.

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma residents face two school levy votes on Feb. 11. Both would replace levies that voters approved in 2010, but that will expire later this year.

X See SCHOOLS

PHOTOS BY STEVE JAMES

page A2

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE

-PYLMPNO[LYZ NP]L^PU[LY JVH[Z A3 WINE ECONOMIST TELLS ALL: Author Mike Veseth will discuss his new book, “Extreme Wine,” at 7 p.m., Feb. 13, at King’s Books. PAGE B3

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Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

ARIES March 21 – April 19 Do you feel like you are sinking into self-absorption? Excessive self-examination may be causing you to be introspective. Your attention will soon drift to those you care about. Don’t be blind or burdened by their troubles that could cause many distractions.

LIBRA September 23 – October 22 Your home or family life may be going through drastic transformative changes. The choices may be difficult with a possible move or split as a result. You have the power to control your life. Don’t let others bully you.

TAURUS April 20 - May 20 Lost in your thoughts? You may feel the need to be in your own space to think things through. This process will lead to intense desire for determined action. Try to stay focused to avoid schedule conflicts with others.

SCORPIO October 23 – November 21 You will find out whatever you needed to know. Your psychic antenna is in tune with those around you. There may be a chance to repair a broken relationship with a sibling. Forget grudges and let go.

GEMINI May 21 – June 20 Your hard work pays off and is producing results. Are you due for a raise or bonus? Try not to be too direct when asking. Don’t let outsiders deviate you from your goals. Remember that true friends will understand.

SAGITTARIUS November 22 – December 21 There are some people in your life you will soon appreciate and see them in a more positive light. Try to relax and receive the changes life brings you. You have a lot of projects going on, don’t spread yourself too thin.

CANCER June 21 – July 22 Write down your dreams, desires and goals. Focus your attention to attain them. Let friends help you sort out your ideas. Make your own vision boards. This mental stimulation energizes you. Avoid overeating.

CAPRICORN December 22 – January 19 Team building will be a main focus for you as you may be asked to develop and stick to a plan. You have a chance for transformation so take those extra steps to make it happen. Achieving harmony and happiness can take practice.

LEO July 23 – August 22 Interesting and harmonious interactions are likely this week. Your inner strength and stamina may be tested by co-workers or a partner. You handle things smoothly and feel like a superhero.

AQUARIUS January 20 – February 18 A cosmic detox is happening in your life. Make your thoughts clear so others can fully understand. If you don’t like what you see, then change it. Work smart and your efforts will pay off favorably. Explore your interests.

VIRGO August 23 – September 22 Imagine the consequences of your actions before speaking your mind. Make decisions in terms of how others may be affected. Keep communications clear and set boundaries. Don’t feed into insecurities.

PISCES February 19 – March 20 Dream opportunities may arise. A sentimental connection may surprise you to tears. Social media may connect you with a long awaiting answer. Swimming in circles gets you nowhere.

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Sports ........................A6 Make A Scene ........B5 A&E ....................... ....B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Two Sections | 20 Pages


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Pothole pigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK VISIT US ON FACEBOOK MHJLIVVRJVT[HJVTH^LLRS`

38th and Fife Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;pothole initiative.â&#x20AC;? And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or return â&#x20AC;&#x201C; each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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City News CITY CHARTER REVIEW BEGINS The committee to review Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s city charter has been called to order. The Charter Review Committee held its first meeting on Monday, Feb. 3. The committee is made up of Bill Baarsma, Theresa Baker, Gary Brackett, Mabel Edmonds, Tim Farrell, Eric Hahn, Charles Horne, Justin Leighton, Mark Martinez, James Merritt, John Messina, Kenneth Miller, Patricia Talton, Catherine Ushka, and Justin Van Dyk. It is tasked with looking over the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s charter and recommending changes. The effort happens once a decade and a dozen changes were made during the last go-round in 2004. The committee plans to meet every Monday and Wednesday at 7 p.m. in Room 16 of the Tacoma Municipal Building North, located at 733 Market St. until it submits its recommendations to the City Council on May 6. The Feb. 10 meeting will be public comment about what residents believe should be changed about the charter. Information about the review and its committee meetings is available at cityoftacoma.org/charterreview. 7905*,::7964,5(+,20*2:6--+(--6+03:,(:65 Princess Promenade is the official kickoff of the 81st annual Daffodil Festival season in Pierce County. One of Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fondest traditions is the ceremonial recognition and appointment of each yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Daffodil Princesses. The event is the start of 10 months of serving the county, cities, and citizens in many capacities. Education, mentoring children and community service are the platforms that will have seen the Royalty appearing at over 220 events throughout Pierce County. The event will feature each young woman being tapped and proclaimed an official Daffodil Princess. Here, they will each receive their tiara, sash and traditional Golden Daffodil. This is the first time the Royal Court will be presented to the public. Pierce County Councilmember Joyce McDonald will address the Princesses and read Resolution R2014-7 that names the Daffodil Festival Royalty as Official Ambassadors of Pierce County. Princess Promenade is held at Pioneer Park Pavilion, 330 S. Meridian, Puyallup, WA 98371. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the program begins at 7. Seating is reserved. High Schools represented: Bonney Lake, Bethel, Cascade Christian, Chief Leschi, Clover Park, Curtis, Eatonville, Emerald Ridge, Fife, Franklin Pierce, Graham Kapowsin, Henry Foss, Lakes, Lincoln, Mt. Tahoma, Orting, Puyallup, Rogers, Spanaway Lake, Stadium, Sumner, Washington, White River, Wilson. For further information, contact the Daffodil Festival at (253) 840-4194 or Steve James at (253) 297-6093. -694,95:(:,5069,?,*<;0=, ;6:7,(205;(*64( Former National Security Agency senior executive Thomas Drake is coming to Tacoma on Saturday evening, Feb. 8, to talk about the big questions raised by people like Edward Snowden who give information to the American people that the government would rather keep secret. Can our democracy survive massive domestic surveillance? Does privacy really

WSchools From page A1

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Saturday, February 15, 2015 Tacoma Dome Exhibition Hall 11 am - 6 pm Doors open 10:30 am Opening ceremony 11 am Tahiti program 12 noon FREE ADMISSION: Cultural Activities Entertainment Food Vendors

The levy dollars from the propositions represent about a quarter of the Tacoma School Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s operational budget and would keep the tax rate at the same rate property owners currently pay. Proposition 1 would pay for teaching materials and fund hiring more teachers so students have smaller class sizes. The money would go toward everything from sports and arts programs to special educational efforts and basic school materials. It will also fund options for higherachieving students and support programs for children who are falling behind educational standards.

matter in a post-9/11 world? What does the 4th amendmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s protection from unreasonable search and seizure mean, especially in the digital age? Drake is a decorated veteran of both the U.S. Navy and Air Force whose first day on a new job as a senior executive at NSA was Sept. 11, 2001. He is proud that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taken â&#x20AC;&#x153;the oath four times in my government career to support and defend the Constitution of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic.â&#x20AC;? And he was charged with espionage when he released information to the public about warrantless wiretapping in 2006. Jesselyn Radack, Drakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advisor in getting his case before the American people, will be speaking as well. As an attorney, she is a former ethics advisor with the U.S. Justice Department and is currently director of national security and human rights at the Government Accountability Project. She has just returned from Russia where she was acting as legal advisor to Snowden. Both Drake and Radack are featured in the film â&#x20AC;&#x153;War On Whistleblowers,â&#x20AC;? available now in its entirety for free on Youtube. Drake begins his momentous saga with, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I joined NSA as a senior executive primarily responsible for electronic foreign intelligence. 9/11 was my first day on the job. After my in-processingâ&#x20AC;Ś,we were in a meeting, and it was a rather dramatic moment, particularly when the second airplane hit, and I remember standing up and saying, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;America is under attack.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The call went out to all the intelligence agencies and departments: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Whatever you have, we need to put into the fight.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I was literally charged to be the leader at NSA to go out and find all of these programs for filtering the vast reams of data being generated by the digital age, the Internet age, and to provide the intelligence as itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s being generated, while protecting the rights of Americans. It was the prime directive of NSA: You do not spy on Americans without a warrant. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And then, as I discovered to my horror, the government was conducting blanket electronic surveillance with no controls, no accountability, no oversight. I was so concerned, because I remember telling my immediate supervision, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What are we doing?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;Ś[And the answer was], â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all been approved. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry. And donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ask any more questions.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? But he couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let it go. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew that, if I remained silent, I would be an accessory to a crime: the subversion of our own Constitution. And warrantless spying and surveillance.â&#x20AC;? So he went to the Office of the General Counsel. Then to House Sub-committee on Intelligence. Then the Senate Subcommittee on Intelligence. And finally to the Department of Defense Inspector General. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And I was being told [at each place], â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all legal!â&#x20AC;? So he ultimately made what he calls â&#x20AC;&#x153;a fateful decisionâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; he contacted the Baltimore Sun anonymously and shared unclassified information about the governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s warrantless wiretapping. The story was released in May of 2006. His story is quite a saga, ranging from being indicted for espionage and facing 35 years in prison to being featured on â&#x20AC;&#x153;60 Minutesâ&#x20AC;? and the charges finally being dropped. Drake and Radack will be speaking 7:30 p.m. at the Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave. The event is sponsored by People for Peace Justice & Healing, the ACLU of Washington, United for Peace of Pierce County, and local chapters of both Veterans for Peace and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. For more information, call (253) 535-7219.

Proposition 1 would raise about $86 million during the four years covered by the tax measure. The average homeowner would pay about $21.25 a year during the span of the Proposition 1 levy. That breaks down to about $1.77 a month. That tax bill is actually higher than what property owners pay now for the levy that is set to expire. However, the smaller package in Proposition 2 would even out the total to the current overall levy taxes landowners pay for schools. Combined, the propositions would cost $5.29 per $1,000 in property value through 2018, the same rate land owners pay now. Proposition 2 would replace the technology levy that is set to expire. The $40 million collected during the four-year levy would replace outdated computers at a time when almost

half of the school district computers are about to fall below the state standards. Proposition 2 would also pay for training, software, upgrades and expanded computer and technology access for students, particularly through mobile devices. The technology upgrades would come at a cost of $3.35 per month, or $40.15 per year, for the average Tacoma homeowner. Both levies have received endorsements from the Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber, the League of Women Voters, Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parent-Teacher Board and the Education Association. Continual gadfly and current Pierce County Jail inmate Robert Hill is the official opposition of the propositions and has only a handful of followers on his campaignâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s official Facebook page.

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;(*64(7630*,5()4(5>/6),(;30;;3,)6@ By David Rose Correspondent

Right after he was featured on â&#x20AC;&#x153; Wa s h i n g t o n â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wantedâ&#x20AC;? last Friday night, Tacoma Police arrested DAVID ROSE a man accused of abusing his girlfriendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 5-year-old son. Officer Loretta Cool with Tacoma Police says Christopher Landrie was caught thanks to tips to their department from viewers. The University Place man allegedly beat the young boy so badly that his brain was bleeding. On

Jan. 19, doctors at Allenmore Hospital performed emergency surgery to relieve the pressure. Detectives say the little boy is the son of Landrieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s girlfriend who at first made up a story that he was injured when she was attacked by three men and raped on the side of the road. She eventually came clean and said Landrie told her what to say. Pierce County Detective Ed Troyer says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;This case is even more complicated because we had to go through lies and stories that mom told about a fake attack at 3:00 in the morning on her and her kids, when it

turns out to be her boyfriend. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve now gotten through it, identified him and he has been charged.â&#x20AC;? In court documents, the boyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mom says Landrie abused her son because he wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t listen after he told him to clean his room. Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist charged Landrie with Assault of a Child in the First Degree. Lindquist says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nothing is more maddening and more incomprehensible than an adult assaulting a defenseless child.â&#x20AC;? Landrie pleaded not guilty in court Monday and is being held on $500,000 bail.

Tacoma Weekly is interested in arrested inat our the N Proctor St. whatAisman happening community. Safeway on your Feb. 2news learned intimidaPlease send andthat story ideas will only get you so far. After the totion news@tacomaweekly.com.

CHRISTOPHER LANDRIE

Firefighters give brand new winter coats to children By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

Just in time for the cold snap that invaded Western Washington this week, Tacoma Firefighters made sure kids in the most need have a nice, new, warm coat to fend off the winter chill. Twice this week, on Feb. 4 and 6, fire trucks and off-duty firefighters visited four Tacoma Public Schools with coats in hand, ready to put them right on the happy children at Downing Elementary School, Madison Elementary School, McCarver Elementary School and Stanley Elementary School. By consulting with Tacoma Public Schoolsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Head Start program, the firefighters were able to determine which students were in most need of new winter coat. In the end, 200 coats were distributed, purchased with the $6,000 the firefighters raised for the cause. All the coats are American-made to ensure domestic production and by a work force that includes disabled veterans. Called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Operation Warm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Firefighters Coats for Kids,â&#x20AC;? the Tacoma firefightersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; giving is part of the national Operation Warm program with which the International Association of Firefighters (IAFF) union partners. Firefighter Ryan Mudie is president of Tacoma Firefighters Local 31. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We thought it was a worthwhile charity, and giving back to the community is what we do so we took the opportunity and went after it,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Making a difference for kids, and our future, is a big piece for us.â&#x20AC;? This is the first year that Tacoma firefighters have participated in the program, and they plan to make it an annual event. Mudie said the best part of going out to deliver the coats was the â&#x20AC;&#x153;big smiles and really excited kids. We put the coats right on their backs.â&#x20AC;?

subject fled the store with several stolen bottles of alcohol, a concerned customer continued to follow him down the street in his vehicle. When the subject noticed, he continually yelled at the customer and motioned to his waist, indicating he was armed. When the subject began to approach the vehicle, the customer told him to stop, or he would have to â&#x20AC;&#x153;take him down.â&#x20AC;? When the subject did not stop, the customer calmly exited his vehicle and promptly pinned the thief to the ground. When the police arrived, the customer had the man pinned with one hand, while the other held his cell phone. The subject was then transferred to Pierce County Jail, for strong arm robbery. Another criminal arrested on Feb. 1 at S. 23rd St. was apparently looking to avoid that same embarrassment by arming up. Officers were called when the man approached a strangerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house and began pounding on the front door with a rusty pipe, asking for drugs. When approached the man answered all questions with â&#x20AC;&#x153;pimpin ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t easyâ&#x20AC;? and had trouble standing up straight. Upon closer inspection, the rusty pipe turned out to be a samurai sword in a wooden sheath, the man also was concealing a large meat cleaver in one of his pockets. The wannabe-samurai was quickly taken to Fife Jail for possession of a dangerous weapon. Compiled by Derek Shuck

;67:;690,:65 PHOTO COURTESY OF RYAN MUDIE

-6920+:. These little students at Downing Elementary School are all smiles in

their new winter coats thanks to Tacoma Firefighters Local 31. Pictured here in back row, left to right, are Tacoma Firefighters Dave McRoberts, Matt Frank, Ryan Mudie and Matt Graham.

Funds to purchase the coats were raised through various means, including community giving, generous businesses like the Milgard Foundation, grants and an auction at the annual firefighters ball. Coming up in late August at Cheney Stadium, a public safety softball charity game will be held between Tacoma Police and Tacoma Firefighters. This will make the perfect opportunity for people out in the community to contribute to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Operation Warm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Firefighters Coats for Kids.â&#x20AC;? Donations, which are tax-deductible, are accepted throughout the year as well. Mail checks or money orders to Tacoma Firefighters Charity Fund, Attn. Coats for Kids, 1109 S. 50th St., Tacoma, WA, 98408.

Without community partners, the firefighters would be hard put to do such successful charity work, according to Mudie. For example, at the Tacoma Firefighters Ball held last month at the Emerald Queen Casino, $34,225 was raised for Camp Goodtimes, a fun and healing place on Vashon Island for children with cancer, on or off treatment, and their siblings 7-17 years old. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We reached out to our partners in the community, the Emerald Queen Casino and the Puyallup Tribal Council, and they helped us with the facility for a night out for firefighters and their families. We couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have done it without those partnerships,â&#x20AC;? Mudie said.

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Take a dip in the ice waters across Washington State and be a part of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;coolestâ&#x20AC;? event of the year! Join the fun, help raise funds and win prizes all in support of Special Olympics Washington. Special Olympics Polar Plunge Series is a fundraising effort organized by law enforcement agencies across the state to benefit Special Olympics Washington. This unique opportunity gives individuals, organizations and businesses the chance to support Special Olympics Washington by collecting pledges for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;opportunityâ&#x20AC;? to plunge into frigid water across Washington State.

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WHomeless From page A1 Feb. 14 at Serious Soul CafĂŠ, and the proceeds will benefit House of Matthews (HOM) homeless prevention and life skills center in Tacoma. Located at 35501 21st Ave. SW in Federal Way, Serious Soul CafĂŠ will be full of fun, food, funk and jazz Ă  la the live music of the smooth and sultry Seatown Rhythm & Blues Players. M.C. Centell Jackson will be your host for the evening, and comedian Frank Brown will share his hilarious comedy suitable for all audiences. For the $30 ticket price you get the choice of a chicken dinner or seafood gumbo. Even if you accidentally forget to buy your Valentine a gift, Cookie Lee Jewelry will be there with a beautiful selection at afford-

WTNT From page A1

tion of advertising bundles that seem to land in gutters and on sidewalks more often than not, however, irked Tacoma residents into action. A group of several dozen people held a â&#x20AC;&#x153;return to senderâ&#x20AC;? rally on Saturday by dumping collections of several hundred advertising circulars to the daily newspaperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s front door as a way to protest what they call littering. The newspaper advertising bundles, they say, are being stuffed into orange plastic bags and tossed onto sidewalks, along streets and into clogged gutters. The protest made it onto King 5 News during Superbowl weekend. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are basically everywhere,â&#x20AC;? Claudia Riedener said. She started seeing the discarded bags along her neighborhood street just

able prices with proceeds going to HOM. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can take your sweetheart out for a delicious dinner, see some entertainment and even buy a gift all in one place and all for a great cause,â&#x20AC;? said House of Matthews CEO Jeannette Twitty. Tickets are available at Serious Soul CafĂŠ, brownpapertickets.com or e-mail jeannettetwitty@thehouseofmatthew.org. Purchase tickets online and get a $5 gift certificate to Serious Soul CafĂŠ to use at a later date. Donate a pair of new socks at the door and get a free raffle ticket for the eveningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drawings. HOM holds fundraisers every quarter, as this is a large part of how the organization supports its programs for the chronically homeless, for homeless veterans and for individuals released from incarceration who are referred to House of Matthews. A lot of these

south of 6th Avenue a few weeks ago and called to complain. She was advised to contact the newspaperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s customer service department and opt out of the free delivery. But that process could take up to two weeks, and the advertising circulars were dotting her street several times a week. She then started collecting them and posted her frustration about the litter on Facebook. Others then did the same. More followed. And then more. And more. A fullon group rant developed. Several people, including subscribers to the newspaper, have since had their Facebook posts about the orange bags found in Tacoma gutters and under bushes removed from the TNTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main page. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just picked up where we could, but it was too much,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are everywhere.â&#x20AC;? She and her husband, John, then collected a few hundred and dumped them in the lobby of the TNT

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individuals come to the House with little, or nothing, but Twitty and her staff are there to help through HOMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clothing bank, food bank or with furniture thanks to a partnership with NW Furniture Bank, and you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be in HOMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s housing program to access these services. House of Matthews offers case management, temporary and permanent housing, supportive services, transportation to medical appointments, legal assistance referrals, and much more, including the most basic necessities â&#x20AC;&#x201C; socks and underwear, bedding and linens, toothpaste and toothbrush... the things most of us take for granted. Through HOMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sponsor-aBedâ&#x20AC;? program, for just $10 a day anyone out in the community â&#x20AC;&#x201C; individuals, families, businesses or corporations â&#x20AC;&#x201C; can help ensure that House of Matthews clients, which

offices. They were told to leave under threat of arrest two weeks ago. They did, but posted photos of the protest on Facebook, further fueling the discontent about what they say was a lack of responsive action. They also received TNT emails stating their frustrations were unfounded. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have been out driving around town today, and have seen 0 products in the street, so I am confused as to where you picked up 100 of these,â&#x20AC;? TNTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vice President of Audience Development Phil Schroder wrote to Riedener in response to her email complaint. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you let me know the area where you picked these up, I can assure you we will be out there next week to check on the delivery. I would encourage you not to pick these up and drop them in our lobby anymore. We have quality control teams out every week checking, but if you pick them up, how would I know I have a delivery quality problem?â&#x20AC;? Ironically, Schroder had written an article in December for the marketing trade publication International News Media Association that highlighted the need for strong customer service. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Again, these are probably obvious conclusions to many of us, but the problem is: We arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t listening,â&#x20AC;? he wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If the publisher walks into our audience

include a good number of military veterans, have a place to lay their head at night as they work hard to improve their lives. Along with offering housing, life skills classes held every Monday, which are open to the public, are an essential component of House of Matthewsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; programs. Coming up on Feb. 24 at 11 a.m., the class will be all about helping people get their child support payments in order. Representatives from the Department of Social and Health Services Division of Child Support will be there to help those who need it get into a better position to pay their child support or to find out if theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re possibly overpaying. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatever situation they have going on with their child support, [Division of Child Support] is trying to reach out to them and help them with those issues,â&#x20AC;? Twitty

department, he can ask any of our employees about the No. 1 goal of our department. And they always answer: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Satisfying the customer.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? That seems like a practice what you preach moment as far as Whitman Area Neighborhood activist Leslie Young is concerned. She spotted the Facebook comments and voiced her thoughts after seeing the signature orange bags in her neighborhood. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think I started tripping over those bags a few weeks ago, and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even know what they were,â&#x20AC;? she said, noting that she was seeing more and more comments and photos of wet and muddy bags in gutters around the city last week. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then they were everywhere.â&#x20AC;? She wrote an e-mail to TNT Publisher David Zeeck to alert him of her concerns. He responded that discarding the advertisements along the roadway was not littering, because newspapers are exempt from littering laws. He further explained that the newspaperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s distribution auditors werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t reporting discarded papers in the volumes residents were describing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was not impressed,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatever happened to the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;customer is always right?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I mean, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know him personally, but his letter back to me was

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said. She said the Division of Child Support is re-branding itself to be a helper. How can the broader community help House of Matthews help others? Donations of new socks are always most welcome, as are backpacks â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an essential need for people who have no place else to keep their stuff. Another way is for organizations and businesses in the community to sponsor HOM fundraisers. Through community partnerships, such as HOMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neighbor First United Methodist Church of Tacoma, the Lucky Silver Tavern in Tacoma and Serious Soul CafĂŠ in Federal Way, HOM enhances its services in new ways. To learn more, contact House of Matthews at the First Tower Building, 621 Tacoma Ave., Ste. 503, or call (253) 301-0508. Also â&#x20AC;&#x153;likeâ&#x20AC;? them on Facebook and visit www. thehouseofmatthew.org.

defensive and rude. There was no apology or anything. I just find it frustrating from a customer-service standpoint. Obviously, they have a problem with their contractors. Now they have a zillion people pissed off at them for not handling it. It is funny and sad at the same time.â&#x20AC;? The advertising bundles are delivered by contractors who are paid by the number of pieces they deliver. A distribution manager monitors their deliveries. That disconnect seems to be at the heart of the issue for Tacoma cartoonist and Tinkertopia owner RR Anderson, who lives in Central Tacoma. He helped organize the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Return to Senderâ&#x20AC;? event after seeing discarded advertising bags around his street. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one likes wet, muddy newspaper bags,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nasty. I understand that they have to do what they have to do to survive, but people just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like litter in their yards.â&#x20AC;? Anderson has no immediate plans to repeat the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Returnâ&#x20AC;? protest, but wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be surprised if other protests take hold, especially with TNT plans to not only continue the practice but expand the distribution to University Place, a city not known for being silent on community concerns. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are going to go insane,â&#x20AC;? Anderson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to bring Phase Two.â&#x20AC;? City Councilmember Marty Campbell looked into the issue and noted he alerted Zeeck about a cluster of a dozen or so bags on a street island at Division and Morton. Zeeck collected the bags personally. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Their early response to this had been in the area of denial, and I think they have changed that,â&#x20AC;? Campbell said. For his part, Zeeck has personally driven around the city looking for the dis-

carded bundles and hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen the troubles the group has described. He noted that the people complaining appear to represent a small minority. Only about a dozen or so people have complained about discarded advertising bundles, while more than 50,000 people are receiving them, he said, and while some call to opt out, others have called to say their houses were missed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I cruised around a several block area and found one,â&#x20AC;? Zeeck said of the bundles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just not seeing them in the streets. â&#x20AC;&#x153; He further defended the free delivery of midweek advertising bundles as a way to pay for the expenses associated with running a newspaper, versus direct mail pieces that draw money to companies outside the area. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that is really important,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am not going to apologize for something that supports local journalism. I just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see the issue the same as they do, but I respect their perspective.â&#x20AC;? Future plans the practice could include adding news content to the bundles and expanding into other areas, but no specifics have been decided, Zeeck said. For people who see bundles in the streets, he suggests that they should simply call customer service to report the sightings rather than pick them up. If delivery cars are seen routinely missing households, people should report license plate numbers and call the TNT offices so the practice can be corrected, because a bundle of advertising left in a gutter or under a tree doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do anyone any good. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is no business model out there where that makes sense,â&#x20AC;? he said. Anyone with complaints or comments can contact customerservice@ thenewstribune.com or call (800) 289-8711

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Guest Editorials

Tell the county council to let pot law stand By William F. (Bill) Johnston I am not a pot smoker. Never have been. Not much of a drinker either. Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stand hard liquor â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a beer now and then and that is about it. But I voted to legalize marijuana because, over the years, I have had many friends and family who indulge and have been at many gatherings where the unmistakable smell of â&#x20AC;&#x153;the weedâ&#x20AC;? hovers over the crowd. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care for the aroma â&#x20AC;&#x201C; kind of like burning rope â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but I certainly have never been alarmed by its presence or of anyone using it. Through personal experience I have concluded that not only is marijuana basically as harmless as a good stiff drink but probably less so. Given the choice of being driven home by a drunk or someone who has smoked a little grass, give me the guy who is high. It might take me two days to get home but I would get there alive! And I would have a driver who was in pretty good humor all the way. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know about you, but I have seen way too many mean drunks in my day. I am sure that most voters assumed the same thing I did when we voted to legalize pot. The new law would go into effect. The State Liquor Board would incorporate the new law into the rules they have ably administered for nearly a century and all would be well. When pigs fly!! The new law went to the lawyers and bureaucrats in Olympia. Clown Town got hold of it. I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even attempt to explain what they have done because the complicated mess makes the roll-out of Obamacare look smooth as silk. And as they say in the TV ads, â&#x20AC;&#x153;But wait! Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more!â&#x20AC;? Yes, there is more, thanks to the Republicans on the Pierce County Council. The church ladies of county government decided that you â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the majority of state voters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; are not smart enough to have made the right

decision when you did away with one of the most stupid laws ever enacted. They felt they had to save us from the sinful activity we were about to embark on. So they canceled the new state law in Pierce County. Democratic County Executive Pat McCarthy saw the absurdity of the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ridiculous decision and vetoed it. The church ladies voted to override McCarthyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s veto. So there you have it. What happened to the Republican mantra of individual liberty, small government, wasted tax dollars and local control? They claim they had to follow the federal law. As usual when it comes to dictating your morals and forcing others to live their personal lives the way you want them to, Republican hypocrisy prevails. Apparently, God speaks to the Republicans but not to the great unwashed like you and me. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s put the hypocrisy of the situation aside and just look at the cold, hard cash involved â&#x20AC;&#x201C; your tax money. What will it cost Pierce County taxpayers to enforce a law the state no longer considers a law? We already know it will cost us $150,000 up front to defend the county council against a legal challenge already filed against their stupid action. But let us look into the future. John Q. Public is driving home in Eastern Pierce County from his job in Tacoma. Before leaving Tacoma he buys legally from a state licensed shop a little weed for the weekend while he is watching â&#x20AC;&#x153;them Hawks!â&#x20AC;? Unfortunately for John Q. he has a taillight out and is pulled over by a Pierce County sheriff who notices on the seat next to Mr. Public a clearly marked little shopping bag from a legal and licensed pot shop â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in Tacoma. What happens next? What does the sheriff do? The Republican church ladies say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arrest the druggie! Toss him in the cooler for 10 years!â&#x20AC;? The

sheriff has got to be thinking does he want to waste his time arresting some guy who is not breaking the state law, in a county the prosecuting attorney has shown little interest in enforcing what the county council has done, spend his time filling out the paperwork, etc. when he could be dealing with real crime? And, finally, does he want to tempt someone to file a false imprisonment charge against him and the county? I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think so! So what are we to do? The Pierce County Council is made up of seven council members from seven districts. The two Democrats are from Tacoma (of course) and the Republicans who are responsible for the stupidity that has already flushed $150,000 down the sewer pipe are from the county. Rural county voters tend to be more conservative than Tacoma voters, and you would think this kind of government interference, waste of tax dollars and attempt to shove their dogmatic morality down our throats would violate every basic political value they have! So, Pierce County voters, do something about it! Google the Pierce County Council â&#x20AC;&#x201C; tell them what a dumb decision they made and there are better things for Pierce County to spend money on. Also note the time each one of them comes up for election and you might take a look at some of the other things they are doing. You might not like that either! William F. (Bill) Johnston is a Vietnam-era veteran of the U.S. Air Force and a graduate of Western Washington University with a Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in journalism and history and a Masters in political science. He is a first-place award recipient for Excellence in Journalism from the Society of Professional Journalists and is a current member of the National Writers Union â&#x20AC;&#x201C; UAW 1981 (AFL-CIO).

New Year, new common sense approach to climate change By Lu Nelson Center for Rural Affairs Our nation spent nearly $7 billion responding to extreme weather in 2013 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; events that endanger livelihoods nationally, and especially in rural and small town America. These destructive storms, devastating droughts, dangerous flooding and paralyzing winter weather highlight the need for action. We must confront threats that climate shifts pose to rural communities and the nation. The New Year provides an opportunity to take commonsense steps to address carbon pollution, a major contributing factor to these threats. Currently, there is no limit

on the amount of carbon pollution that American power plants can emit, but new rules from the Environmental Protection Agency would help limit these emissions. Closing loopholes for high-polluting power plants is crucial to protect community health and our natural resources. Several other power plant by-products are limited, but carbon emissions have been overlooked, leaving the door open for some of the biggest polluters in the nation to get off scot-free. We have an opportunity to retire older power plants â&#x20AC;&#x201C; some of the heaviest polluters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and further our position as a renewable energy leader.

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve begun developing renewable, homegrown energy that helps power our country. And these energy sources provide new rural economic opportunities, bringing along jobs, tax revenues and related industry. This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t something we should ignore. We have commonsense solutions to implement that will benefit us in the long run. 2014 can be a year where we invest in decreasing pollution while improving our health, our environment, and economic development in small-town America. Center for Rural Affairs is an advocate for small farmers around the nation.

Letter to the Editor Dear Editor, Patty Murray did a great job with her follow-up to the Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s State of the Union Address (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Senator Patty Murray responds to Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s State of the Union Address,â&#x20AC;? Tacoma Weekly, Jan. 31, 2014). She spoke of both early childhood education and the safety net that she knows from personal experience. A former preschool teacher, she has seen the â&#x20AC;&#x153;value of early childhood education.â&#x20AC;? Once, when she was growing up, her family needed the safety net government provides and even used food stamps.

No wonder she fights so hard for these programs. And as the only woman to ever get a budget passed in the Senate and get the compromise negotiated with Rep. Paul Ryan, there is no question of her effectiveness. Now is the time to say thank you and keep up the good work, Senator Murray. We need the universal early childhood education program and an effective safety net to help families as they still recover from Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Great Recession. Willie Dickerson Snohomish, WA

No one would be shocked to learn that journalism, particularly in its print form, faces challenges as smart phones, tablets and digital devices continue their march toward being commonplace. Newspapers, especially general news dailies, have largely seen their business models evaporate with more advertising dollars following the eyeballs of readers from print products to online options. The trouble is that for every $7 lost in print advertising, only $1 is seen in online revenues, cutting into the basic business model of most newspapers. The meat-and-potato financial streams from car advertisements and classified sections of many newspapers have largely shifted to online outlets the likes of Craigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s List and Cars.com. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;great Recessionâ&#x20AC;? cutbacks didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help traditional news outlets either, whether in print or over airwaves. But this is nothing new to the world of media. Every new technology brings change to how news is reported and distributed and how money is made during that exercise. Ink-stained hands of scribes were replaced by cheaper and faster lead-type presses. Radio marked the â&#x20AC;&#x153;death of newspapersâ&#x20AC;? only to be replaced by television, which caused calls for the decline of both. The Internet provided challenges that further prompted times of change. Add to that the rise of tablets and smart phones that provide access to the totality of human understanding with a few key strokes, and you get the idea that time are changing. But they have always been changing. Radio survived the invention of television. Newspapers have survived both, and will survive the iPad. It is a matter of being â&#x20AC;&#x153;platform agnostic.â&#x20AC;? Media outlets, from printed newspapers to radio stations to television stations, are finding ways to survive by providing wider ranges of products. Newspapers provide streaming videos or audio sound bites that were the almost exclusively the realm of broadcast outlets, for example. In each case, providing qualityfocused content remains key to drawing viewers, readers, click counts and advertising dollars. No one media platform simply replaces another. Web pages, from those created by established news outlets to community bloggers to simple aggregators of news content created by others, will replace printed newspapers. The business is much more complex than that. Take the case of vinyl recordings, for example. Many a pixel has shined on computer screens announcing news that CD then mp3 files and iPhones would end the days of records. Reality is that digital downloads actually declined last year, thanks to streamline radio product. Only vinyl records posted solid gains, tallying the highest year of record production in more than two decades. While still only a fraction of all sales of recorded music, growth is still growth for a format that was long considered DOA for being outdated technology. The death of ink on paper might be in the future of newspapers, certainly, just the same as printed books may go the way of the buggy whip with the rise of gas-powered vehicles. But that obituary wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be written anytime soon if history foreshadows the future. Also ponder the opportunities such a world provides. Publishers would no longer be burdened with the time lag or extreme expense of squirting ink on paper and entrusting contractors to deliver their product to readers. News distribution could be immediate and less expensive in a paperless world. But that would would still require revenue to fund reporters and editors, so advertising will always be play a role in that business. The role of reporters as watchdogs of government and chroniclers of community activities is too ingrained in the fabric of communities to be simply unraveled by technology. The methods and distribution modes will change, but the role will survive. And revenue streams will be right along side it. The above opinion represents the view of Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s editorial board.

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Sports

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

TH E

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DE LIN E

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

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LINCOLN USES BIG SECOND-HALF RUN TO TOPPLE WILSON

Stadium gets league title for first time since 1991

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 6

TOP UPCOMING MATCHUPS GIRLS BASKETBALL

Feb. 12 – Timberline @ Lincoln – 7 p.m. Abes look to move up in playoff positioning against Blazers.

BOYS BASKETBALL

Feb. 13 – SPSL #9 @ Stadium – 7 p.m. Tigers open district playoffs with home game after winning Narrows 4A.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Feb. 13 – SPSL #9 @ Bellarmine Prep – 7 p.m. Lions also open district playoffs at home after cruising through league play.

BOYS WRESTLING

Feb. 15 – West Central District 3A Regionals 9 a.m. – Bonney Lake High School Local wrestlers look to earn bid to the Mat Classic the following weekend.

WILSON DUO ADVANCES TO STATE BOWLING TOURNAMENT Wilson duo advances to state bowling tournament By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

Wilson became the unlucky victim of the smaller number of team bids to the state bowling tournament. Two bowlers earned bids to state as individuals, but the Rams fell just short of qualifying as a team, set- SHANNON BAILEY tling for fourth place at the West Central District bowling tournament on Feb. 1 at Pacific Lanes. “We left a lot of easy spares out there,” said Wilson head coach Ken Richardson. “But it’s tough. There’s a bunch KYLIE THORNTON of good teams here, and they’re only taking three (to state) this year. It makes it really challenging.” The Rams trailed Timberline – who they had beaten twice this year in league play – by 115 pins heading into the Baker games, and couldn’t make up the deficit as they settled for fourth place with a total of 3,025 pins. But juniors Shannon Bailey and Hunter Freuhling-Thomas each placed in the top eight overall individual finishers, earning the duo a bid to the state meet this weekend. Bailey, who attends Annie Wright, joined the Wilson team in the fall after noticing a banner during her bowling league at Tower Lanes – the Rams’ home venue. Bailey finished fifth overall on the day, averaging a score of 178 through the three individual rounds, including a 186 in her final game. “I felt pretty good actually,” Bailey said. “I was really relaxed…really I just go to my happy place, is what I call it. I just stay relaxed and don’t let the other people bring me down or anything.” Freuhling-Thomas, who finished fifth at the state tournament last year, took eighth overall with an average of 174, including a high round of 190 in her second game. Wilson senior Brianna Osborn just missed the cut of advancing to state, but qualified as an alternate after putting up a score of 181 in her first game and finishing with an average of 164. The Rams’ Austynn Knoll bowled a 160 in her first game and finished with a 156 average to place 22nd individually. Lincoln’s Miriam Cabrera finished just behind Knoll, tallying a score of 161 in her final game to lead the Abes. Teammate Kassie Seifert bowled a 154 in her opener and placed 26th individually, while Triana Williams finished 42nd. Foss’ Kylie Thornton was steady in averaging a score of 133 in her three rounds, while teammate Kiersten Luedtke overcame a rough start to finish with a 167 in her third round. Mount Tahoma’s Emily Eriksen averaged a 139 on the day – including a high of 157 in game two – to place 30th, while teammate Aubruann Hale placed to spots behind and had a 157 in her first game. Curtis, meanwhile, will advance to state as a team, having put up a total of 3,023 pins at the 4A tournament to place second behind South Kitsap. Alexia Rawls led the Vikings with rounds of 185, 185 and 189 to place sixth in individual play, and Sheri Hill placed eighth while averaging a 175. Stadium’s Ali Fouch put up a total score of 389 to place 44th. The 2A/3A and 4A tournaments take place at Narrows Plaza Bowl, as individual play begins on Feb. 7 at 10 a.m. and the Baker games take place on Feb. 8 at 8 a.m. PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

STATEMENT GAME. (Top) Lincolns’ Ahmaad Rorie lofts a shot toward the hoop, as he finished with 13 points

in his fourth game back with the Abes. (Left) Wilson’s Jamal Welch (23) and Lincoln’s Cameron Collins battle for a rebound. (Right) Wilson’s Ivy Smith, Jr. (1) tries to get up a layup as the Abes’ Josiah Barsh (3) extends an arm to defend. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

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incoln’s depth and defensive intensity continue to pay off in big moments. Overcoming a sluggish first half, the Abes used a huge run to take a commanding lead and held on for a 67-59 win at Wilson on Jan. 31 to move within a half-game of the Rams atop

the Narrows 3A standings. “It’s a team effort,” said Lincoln junior forward Cameron Collins, who finished with 10 points and a teamhigh 13 rebounds. “Everybody was chipping in, so it brought up our intensity. Everybody from the bench (and) our crowd just brought our effort up.” The Abes trailed 35-26 just over a minute into the second half, but launched a 30-10 in a little over 10 minutes to take control. Josiah Barsh

pulled the Abes even, at 39-39, with a driving layup with 2:45 to play in the third quarter, and Ahmaad Rorie gave them the lead moments later with a layup after Shon Peterson’s steal. Rorie, in just his fourth game back with the Abes after recently re-enrolling at Lincoln, finished with 13 points and was an offensive catalyst. “He made guys better, and that’s what we’re counting on him to do,” said X See BASKETBALL / page A9


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),33(9405,79,7*9<0:,:7(:; 63@470(05-05(3/64,.(4, WITH LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP LOCKED UP, LIONS LOOK TO POSTSEASON

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

.<(9+73(@(Left) Bellarmine Prep senior guard Jasmyne Holmes (3) drives past Olympiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nicole Fesenbek on her way to the hoop in the blowout win. (Right) Sophomore guard Jayana Ervin puts up a layup over a couple of Bears defenders. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

On senior night, it was sophomore Jayana Ervin that stole the show. The Bellarmine Prep sophomore guard put up a gamehigh 18 points, 15 rebounds and four steals to help the Narrows 4A champ Lions cruise to a 60-39 win over Olympia on Feb. 4. With the Lions holding a 32-25 lead midway through the third quarter, Ervin took over, scoring eight points during a twominute stretch â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including two rebounds and putbacks â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to help Bellarmine take control. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like to refer to it

as my flow, and I like to make flow my goal,â&#x20AC;? Ervin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you get into the flow zone, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry about the play. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry about college coaches watching you or anybody else watching you, all youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re thinking about is the present moment.â&#x20AC;? Olympia never got closer than within nine points the rest of the way, as senior guard Jasmyne Holmes scored nine points in the fourth quarter to help create more cushion. Holmes finished with 17 points and three steals, senior guard Kelsy McElroy had eight points and four steals and forward Claire Martin added 11

points, 10 rebounds and three blocks for the Lions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a group of girls that work well together,â&#x20AC;? said Bellarmine Prep head coach Kevin Meines. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think our starting five matches up with anybody. But we also have some players that can come in off that bench, and they know their role and understand it. So itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a true team effort.â&#x20AC;? Martin scored six points in the first three minutes of the game, and the Lions charged out to a 12-2 lead when Shelby Gavigan fed Holmes for a layup with 3:30 left in the first quarter. Olympia, meanwhile, was just 2-for-

13 from the field and committed seven turnovers in the first quarter. Holmesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; three-pointer extended the lead to 19-6 two minutes into the second quarter after McElroyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s steal, and the Lions led 27-14 at the break. Nicole Fesenbekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jumper completed a 9-0 run for the Bears in just over a minute at the start of the third quarter to pull Olympia within 29-23, but Ervin responded two minutes later with her dominant stretch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a high motor, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a lot of talent and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just happy that sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on our team,â&#x20AC;? Meines said of Ervin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want

to play against her.â&#x20AC;? Laura Snodgrass led Olympia with 13 points, and Fesenbek added nine points for the Bears. The Lions moved to 11-0 in league play, with nine of the wins coming by double-digit margins. Bellarmine Prep was set to

try to complete a perfect league campaign with a game at Yelm on Feb. 6 at 7 p.m. With the top seed from the Narrows League in hand, the Lions will host the ninth seed from the SPSL on Feb. 13 in their district playoff opener.

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SPORTSWATCH WILSON SWIMS TO LEAGUE TITLE

Piling up 344 points as a team, Wilson won the 3A title at the Narrows League Championships on Jan. 31 at Mount Tahoma High School. Senior Cody Dodge helped the Rams get off to a good start, winning the 200yard freestyle in a time of 1:52.77, and later added a second-place finish in the 100-yard breaststroke. Junior Connor Schell added a win in the 500-yard freestyle and a secondplace finish in the 100-yard backstroke, and Austin Lawrence took second in the 50-yard freestyle and third in the 100-yard freestyle. Jesse Gayvoronski added second-place finPHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS ishes in both the 100- and 200-yard freestyles, Alex Gayvoronski took second in the SMOOTH WATERS. Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Conner Schell helped the Rams to a league title, 100-yard butterfly and the Rams won both winning the 500-yard freestyle and finishing second in the 100-yard backstroke. the 200- and 400-yard freestyle relays. Fossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ryan Waller earned a district-quali- lims take place on Feb. 7 at 4:30 p.m., with rebounds, eight assists and 6.4 blocks per fying time in finishing fourth in the 100-yard the finals on Feb. 8 at 4:30 p.m. The 3A game in leading the Abes to the state tournabreaststroke, and the Falcons earned district district meet begins at Hazen High School ment for the first time in 18 years. times in both the 200- and 400-yard freestyle on Feb. 14 at 4:30 p.m., with finals on Feb. She moved on to Georgia Tech, where she relays. Lincoln took sixth with a district time 15 at 5 p.m. averaged 10.8 points per game as a freshman in the 200-yard freestyle relay. but suffered a torn ACL in her sophomore Gig Harbor cruised to the 4A title, but LINCOLN RETIRES year. But Montgomery rebounded, averagStadium settled for second place, as Noah MONTGOMERYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JERSEY ing 13.9 points and 8.6 rebounds per game Willers highlighted the effort by winning Lincoln honored former girls basketball in her senior season. That helped her stock the 200-yard freestyle in a state-qualifying star Alex Montgomery before its home game skyrocket, as she was selected as the tenth time of 1:49.70. Willers narrowly missed against Wilson on Jan. 31, retiring Mont- overall pick in the WNBA draft by the Libanother state time in taking second in the gomeryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s No. 21 jersey. Since playing for the erty in April 2011. Montgomery recently 500-yard freestyle, and Kyle Marr took third Abes, the 2006 graduate played four years finished her most productive season as a pro, in both the 50- and 100-yard freestyles for for Georgia Tech University and completed appearing in all 34 games and averaging 6.1 the Tigers. her third season with the WNBAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New York points and 5.2 rebounds per contest. Sophomore Sam Hoag took second in the Liberty in the fall. 100-yard breaststroke, and classmate Seamus In her senior season at Lincoln, Mont- LADY LOGGERS MOVE TO FOURTH Grant added a third-place finish in the 100- gomery led the Lady Abes to a 25-3 record, A couple of big road wins last weekend yard backstroke. including a 14-0 record in the Narrows helped the University of Puget Sound womThe 4A West Central District meet begins League Bay Division, as it was referred to enâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team move up to fourth place at Curtis High School on Feb. 6 at 4 p.m. then. Montgomery put up eye-popping num- in the Northwest Conference Standings. with the diving competition. The swim pre- bers that season, averaging 22.3 points, 18.8 The Loggers cruised to a 71-54 win at

Linfield on Jan. 31, as they never trailed in the contest. Emily Sheldon led the way for UPS with a game-high 20 points, going 7-for-11 from the field, and Katy Ainslie had 12 points and eight rebounds. Allie Wyszynski came off the bench to add 15 points for the Loggers, who out-rebounded the Wildcats 46-34. They followed that with a 75-71 win at Lewis & Clark on Feb. 1, coming back from a 12-point deficit early in the second half. Amanda Forshay led the way with a gamehigh 22 points, while Erin Stumbaugh came off the bench to score 16 points and Ainslie and Taylor Jones had 10 points apiece. The win helped the Loggers jump Lewis & Clark in the conference standings, as they moved to 6-4 and sat in fourth place.

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Pacific Lutheran got an early start to the baseball season, splitting a doubleheader at home against Concordia on Feb. 3. The Lutes fell 5-3 in the opener, as they managed to go just 6-for-31 collectively at the plate. Third baseman Drew Oord helped pull the Lutes within 3-2 with a single to score Jacob Clements in the bottom of the sixth, and Kyle Pegram scored Curtis Wildung with a sacrifice fly to pull even in the seventh. But reliever Chris Bishop surrendered a run-scoring double to Ben Talbot in the eighth that would end up being the game-clincher. Lutes starter Trevor Lubking pitched 5.2 innings and allowed three runs on eight hits, with one walk and six strikeouts. Wildungâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fifth-inning solo homerun was the Lutesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; only hit in game two, but it was all the offense they needed in a 1-0 win over Concordia. Starting pitcher Derrick Mahlum collected the win in surrendering just four hits in 6.2 innings, with no walks and seven strikeouts.

Local Restaurant Spotlight

SERVING BREAKFAST

LA IGUANA PROVIDES AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FOOD TO FIFE By Derek Shuck Derek@tacomaweekly.com

T

he hot trend these days is to take pictures of your food at restaurants, and then post them on your Instagram and Facebook accounts. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s odd is taking a picture of another personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s food. But ordering a Supreme Burrito at Fifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s La Iguana may elicit snaps from strangers at another table, due to the sheer size of the product. La Iguana, located on 4420 Pacific Highway E., is not only a source of some of the freshest authentic Mexican food in the area, but also the largest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I see peoples face when I give them that burrito itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s priceless,â&#x20AC;? La Iguana Supervisor Salvador Zamora said. La Iguana prides itself on also making food thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s made to order. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a restaurant, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more of a kitchen,â&#x20AC;? Zamora said. As soon as a customer orders a plate, the employees of La Iguana will make the dish from scratch, creating authentic, warm food right in front of the customer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The food takes longer, but at the same time itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth it,â&#x20AC;? Zamora said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and my customers tell me the same thing.â&#x20AC;? Opening in December of 2012, La Iguana is an establishment dedicated to serving the blue collar workers of Fife. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those are really the hardest working people in Fife,â&#x20AC;? Zamora said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All the things we provide help them.â&#x20AC;? These provisions include affordable meals for a good price, with an example being five tacos and a soda for $7.99. La Iguana is also offering a limited

time deal of four enchiladas with rice and beans for $6.99. The aforementioned Supreme Burrito is sold for $8.99, and is stuffed with your choice of meat, rice, beans, tomatoes, onions, lettuce and cheese. La Iguana is also introducing a new program for Fife familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, allowing kids to eat free on Saturdays. La Iguana is open six days a week from 11 a.m.-8 p.m.

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WBasketball

the first half, as the Abes were called for goaltending on Smithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s layup to make it 29-16. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t playing like we do, we werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t playing hard,â&#x20AC;? Shelton said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had to attack the rim more offensively, stop settling for jumpers. Defensively we had to rebound and play harder.â&#x20AC;? But Wilson was called for two technical fouls early in the third quarter â&#x20AC;&#x201C; one on Alwert and another on Jamal Welch for hanging on the rim â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that seemed to throw the Rams off rhythm. Wilson also struggled from the free-throw line, converting just 17 of 34 attempts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help you win a game,â&#x20AC;? Alwert stated. Welch and Alphonso Anderson led Wilson with 15 points apiece, while Smith finished with 14 points for the Rams. Dionte Simon and Trevion Brown tallied 10 points apiece for Lincoln. With the loss, Wilson dropped to 9-1 in league play, while Lincoln improved to 8-1 in the Narrows 3A.

From page A6

Lincoln head coach Aubrey Shelton. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was attacking, dishing and finding people. The Abes kept the momentum going through the fourth quarter, taking a 55-45 lead on a layup by senior forward Justice Martion. Martion scored 12 of his game-high 16 points in the final period to help Lincoln stay in charge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Their big guy hurt us,â&#x20AC;? said Wilson head coach Dave Alwert. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And hats off (to him). That kid played really well. It comes down to toughness. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very good, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still very young. Every loss, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll learn more from.â&#x20AC;? Wilson wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go quietly, as Alphonso Anderson converted a threepoint play to cut it to 60-54 with two minutes to play, and Ivy Smith cut it to 62-57 with a three-pointer with 1:20 remaining. But Martion helped shut the door with an emphatic dunk with 40 seconds remaining to make it 65-57. David Jenkins scored seven points in the first quarter to help Wilson gain a 19-8 lead, and it looked as if the Rams might pull away. Wilson got its largest lead with 2:40 remaining in

STADIUM CLINCHES NARROWS 4A

For the first time since 1991, the Stadium boys basketball team cut down the nets. With a 64-63 win at home over Yelm on Jan. 31, the Tigers clinched the outright title in the Nar-

rows 4A, moving to 9-2 in league play with one game remaining in the season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For (the school), itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a long wait,â&#x20AC;? said Stadium head coach Doug Cockeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, noting that many in the packed house â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including former players â&#x20AC;&#x201C; stayed to cheer on the Tigers as they cut down the nets. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was pretty big.â&#x20AC;? Senior forward Lucious Brown led the way for Stadium once again, getting the game-clinching basket at the end and tallying a team-high 19 points. Bobby Moorehead added 18 points for the Tigers, and Malik Mayeux finished with 11 points. But the Tigers knew it would be a tough matchup with the Tornadoes, who at 5-5 are fighting for their playoff lives. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone is still alive,â&#x20AC;? said Cockeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; about the Narrows 4A standings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting their best shot. When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re number one you have a target on you, and you tend to get their best effort.â&#x20AC;? The Tigers were set to host South Kitsap in their season finale on Feb. 6 at 7 p.m. They will open the district playoffs when they host the ninth seed from the SPSL â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which will be determined by the SPSL North/South crossover matchups on Feb. 11 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; on Feb. 13 at 7 p.m.

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City Life

Sir Mix-A-Lot at Jazzbones

B5

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

SECTION B, PAGE 1

La Luz bounces back after fall tour catastrophe

PHOTO BY ANGEL CEBALLOS

SURF ROCKERS. La Luz is Marian Li Pino, Shana Cleveland,

Abbey Blackwell and Alice Sandahl. The band will play songs from its new album “It’s Alive” on Feb. 8 at Bob’s Java Jive. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

P

opular Seattle surf-pop quartet La Luz is fairly sick of talking about the accident. But singerguitarist Shana Cleveland politely obliges, phoned during a windy tour stop in Arizona last week. Cleveland had vividly chronicled the incident on her band’s Tumblr page. She and her bandmates were headed home last November after being on the road with popular indie-rock band Of Montreal. Their tour van hit a patch of black ice. The women swerved out of control before plowing into a concrete barricade. They caught their breath. Thinking the worst was over, they dialed AAA and waited in the dark. Then came drummer Marian Li Pino’s ominous declaration. “Oh no, it’s coming,” she said, gazing into the rear view mirror. Helpless and horrified, the women watched as a semitruck plowed into their vehicle, turning it into a gnarled heap of metal and destroying most of their gear. Miraculously, the women suffered only minor injuries. “We are beaten up but grateful and amazed to be alive today,” Cleveland wrote after the incident. Against the odds, the band will wrap up its latest West Coast tour on Saturday, Feb. 8, playing shimmery cuts from their new album “It’s Alive” at Bob’s Java Jive. The disc came out weeks before the wreck, and its title is sure to add to Cleveland’s growing penchant for seeing premonitions in her music. TACOMA WEEKLY: You had the scary incident just a little while ago. I was wondering how you’re doing after that. CLEVELAND: We’re with the doin’ OK. We still F---ing Eagles have some health and the issues related to the Tom Price accident; but, for the most part, everyDesert Classic body’s doin’ a lot bet8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8 ter, and we were able Bob’s Java Jive, to kind of rebuild and re-buy some of the 2102 South Tacoma Way gear that we lost with $5 suggested cover the help of a lot of (253) 475-9843 people that donated to us.

LA LUZ

TW: It’s good to see you guys are OK. I’ve seen a picture of the car. CLEVELAND: Yeah, it was a really bad hit. TW: Now that you’re back on the tour what have been some of the highlights so far? CLEVELAND: Most of the dates are with the band Pure Bathing Culture, from Portland; and about a third of them we’re playing by ourselves. It’s been really awesome. Almost every show has been really well attended. It’s been really encouraging. TW: I was reading a story in Seattle Weekly that traced the beginning of this band back to an open mic five years ago. CLEVELAND: I think I was mostly just talking about … how I first started playing music in Seattle, and a lot of the songwriting - as far as the songs on the EP (“Damp Face”), and some of the songs from the album (last year’s “It’s Alive”) - came out of a time when I was dealing with the aftermath and a weird premonition of the mass shooting that happened at Cafe Racer. (Six people lost their lives at the Seattle venue in 2012.) I started going there ... and was truly taken in by the community of people. So that event was sort of this creepy, heavy time that put things into perspective in a way that made me more creative. It was one of those dark times from which inspiration can arise, I guess. TW: I can only imagine with something like that. And, from the new album, “Call Me In the Day” is one of those earlier songs. CLEVELAND: Mm hmm. TW: Is that what you mean when you said you had a premonition? CLEVELAND: I was freaked out by that song after the shooting because it’s sort of about this character with this ominous feeling that something’s coming that you can’t stop. After the shooting I was sort of thinking about these lyrics that I was writing that made a lot of sense into that. That song now is one I’m having kind of a weird time singing since the accident because we knew that semitruck was coming for us a moment before it hit us. Every time I sing that line now, I think about that semi-truck coming down the hill towards us. TW: Is that a song you still sing? Or do you skip that one? CLEVELAND: No, we still do it. Yeah, I don’t know. (She pauses to consider.) I’m just kind of like, ‘Wow, that’s really interesting. I should pay attention to the fact that

that happened.’ But I’m not so creeped out that I can’t sing it or anything. TW: How did you come up with the sound we hear on the new record? CLEVELAND: I was listening to a lot of old soul music and old country music - a lot of different music from the ‘50s and ‘60s I would hear on Mississippi Records compilations. (The Portland label specializes in hard-to-find music.) It seemed like everything I liked from that time period had a lot of background vocals. So I just really wanted to hear more of that in newer bands. I also felt a lot of bands were claiming to have a surf influence, but it would sound more like newer indie-rock … than a vintage sound. TW: I wouldn’t have guessed vintage soul and country. CLEVELAND: Yeah, everybody kind of listens to some old girl group music and early stuff from that era, too. I think I was the only one that was into the surf stuff, but we all liked old Buddy Holly and stuff like that. TW: How did you all come together? I think some of you come from your previous band (the Curious Mystery.) CLEVELAND: Yeah, me and Marian were in that group before. Then Marian and Alice (Sandahl) were in a band together, called the Pica Beats. They already knew each other, so she was kind of the obvious choice for our keyboard player. Abbey (bassist Blackwell) I met at Cafe Racer. There’s a jazz improv session that happens there every Sunday that some of her friends put on, and I used to go watch it. So I met her through that. TW: So when did you know you really clicked? CLEVELAND: I don’t know. It just felt right right away. After our first few shows, the response was really amazing. So that was exciting. None of us really had any other main projects we were doing at the time, so we just put all of our energy towards this. But Abbey’s actually pretty involved in orchestra music and our show at the Java Jive will be her last with us. TW: So she’s just busy with her other stuff and has to drop out? CLEVELAND: She’s not that into touring, which is the most rational way to be. (She laughs) It’s not really that fun a lot of the time, and it’s really hard. You can’t really have another job when you’re touring as much as we are. TW: So are you going to do something special during the show to commemorate her leaving? CLEVELAND: I hadn’t thought about it, but we should. (Laughs.) We’re open to ideas.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE FLAMENCO EN VIVO The Northwest’s most prominent Flamenco dancer, Savannah Fuentes, presents “El Sol de Medianoche, Flamenco en Vivo,” a night of powerful Spanish Flamenco music and dance featuring singer Curro Cueto of Seville and guitarist Jose Vega of Cadiz. Feb. 19 at the New Frontier Lounge, 8 p.m. This performance is the first of a 17-date tour that will take the trio to intimate venues in Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada. Tickets $20, VIP $35 available at www.brownapertickets. com or call 1 (800) 838-3006, 75 seats available. Complete tour information at www.savannahfuentes.com.

TWO COUTURE VALENTINE’S Be at London Couture (746 Broadway) on Valentine’s Day for a celebration of

the holiday of love with some bubbly, chocolate-covered strawberries and amazing fashion, 6-8 p.m. – and it’s free. Drink a little, snack a little, shop a little (free gift with every purchase) and share the love. There will be a best-dressed contest, so adorn yourself in your most fabulous red or pink ensemble and come ready to strut your stuff, runway style. Register at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/ be-mine-a-night-of-love-and-fashion-atlondon-couture-tickets-10360030129.

THREE ‘BARBER OF SEVILLE’ The beloved comic opera, one of the funniest and most joyous in history, comes to Tacoma, Feb. 7 and 9, at the Rialto Theater. Gioachino Rossini’s romp has been delighting

audiences for nearly 200 years with its celebrated antics and arias. The dashing Count Almaviva, in cahoots with Figaro the Barber of Seville, plan to rescue the lovely Rosina from the clutches of the greedy Dr. Bartolo. Get tickets at www.tacomaopera.com.

or $20, 18 and under free. INFO: www.salishseafestival.org or (253) 537-0201.

FIVE LOCK-ON TACOMA

FOUR SIMPHONIE NOUVELLE The 2014 Salish Sea Early Music Festival continues with a CPE Bach Concerto Festival featuring Simphonie Nouvelle, a baroque chamber orchestra led by German harpsichordist Hans Jürgen and baroque flutist Jeffrey Cohan, in celebration of the 300th anniversary of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach’s birth. The program will include several of the most well known orchestral works by C. P. E. Bach and his father, Johann Sebastian Bach, on Thursday, Feb. 20, 7 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church in Parkland, 12115 Park Avenue South. ADMISSION: suggested donation of $15

The Rainbow Center and local artist Diane Hansen present “LOCK-ON with LOVE, TACOMA” as a special Valentine’s-themed Craft Thursday Artlatch held at the Rainbow Center (2215 Pacific Ave.). Participation in this event helps promote “The Locks,” otherwise known as “Lock On Tacoma”, which is a large-scale communal sculpture integrated into the ‘A’ Street pedestrian passageway underpass between South 25th and South 26th streets. Artlatch drop-in hours are 1-5 p.m. Feb. 13. Locks and basic art supplies will be provided, but additional supplies, embellishments, nail polish and paints to personalize an ornamental lock are encouraged. All ages are welcome to this free event.


Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 7, 2014 &RIDAY &EBRUARY   s tacomaweekly.com s 3ECTION " s 0AGE 

SCHOOL PAGE

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BELIEVE, DREAM, INSPIRE. We are continuing with the PTA Reflections contest entries this month, as we believe their theme fits in so well with Dr. King’s themes, and many others who worked alongside him, as well as other great Americans that we honor in February, during Black History Month.

Kennedy Fast, 4th grade, Pt. Defiance Elementary

Tiffany Howell, 8th grade, Meeker Middle School

“I made a collage because each piece means something, and they mean Dream, Inspire, and Believe. The different letters symbolize they can be anyone.” Malanah Seibold, 6th grade, Truman Middle School

TRYING NEW THINGS Jon didn’t like trying new things. No new food, no new games, no new toys. His parents wanted him to change his habits. He never got good grades because he never wanted to learn new things either. One day his parents took him for a hike, and about halfway, Jon turned back to the car because he had never been more than halfway before. His parents went home and started plotting. They decided to go on a trip to Asia for a month. When the family got to Vietnam, they rented a flat and settled down. Later that day Jon was hungry, so they told him to close his eyes and eat. What they gave him was rice. He liked it because they made it in the shape of a hamburger and put flavoring in it. Later they showed it to Jon and he was amazed he had liked the new food his family had given him. The next day the family went sightseeing and Jon, for once, wanted to see new things. After a week, Jon was almost normal about learning new things, and his parents were teaching him all kinds of stuff. In another week, they left Saigon and went to Halong Bay, and to the Junks. Everyone was amazed by the islands. Halong Bay is one of the natural wonders of the world. They went kayaking and swimming, and John loved it. Then they moved to China and saw the Terracotta Warriors. After that, they rented a tour bus with a DVD player, layback seats, a fridge, and a cooker. They

toured around the country on their tour bus, and went to the Great Wall of China, and walked almost a mile on it, and walked back when they shut it down at night. Then they went to the Forbidden City and wandered around the city for hours. There were such amazing architecture and carvings in all the buildings. It was one of the most amazing things that the family had ever seen in their lives. As they traveled around China, they learned how to cook Dim Sum and dumpling recipes, and had yummy food for every meal. Even though everything was going amazingly well, every time they saw a McDonalds, they had a pang of homesickness, and wanted to go home. After having another amazing week in China, they flew home. When they got home, everything went phenomenally well. Jon became very popular with his friends in school, and became the third smartest in his class in all subjects. He became inspired to learn new things, because while on his trip, he saw how good learning new things could be. –Oliver Stenehjem, 4th grade, Pt. Defiance Elementary

DREAM BIG, BELIEVE IN YOURSELF, INSPIRE OTHERS I’ve always been told to follow my dreams, no matter how great or small, because you never know what you’ll get out of it. Start a legacy, and make it a good one. Your legacy could be being a great artist, or getting A’s on every project. Leave something behind that people can remember you by. Here’s my legacy and how I earned it: My 5th grade year had started out and it was going pretty great, but that year I decided it could get even greater! I dreamed I would run for President at our school, and be the best one there has ever been, or will be. First up in the long race for President, was the primary election, because there were so many people running. I was sure I’d be out of the race soon, but at least I could say I tried. The next day we voted for the candidates, and every-

“I dream I can ride on a cloud. Then I could go to China. I can go to see my best friend—Grandma. She just moved to China. I miss her.” Mengjiao Chen, Kindergarten, Kailyn Ayres, 5th grade, Pt. Defiance Elementary Downing Elementary

one in my class was talking about how they voted for some guy in another class. I was doomed, fated, in the cards, starcrossed, luckless, and lost, I was sure. I slunk home and prayed that whatever happened, it was for a good reason. The next day, after school, the school board announced who was moving on in the race. Sure enough, they never called my name…until the very end. I jumped with joy, threw on my backpack, and couldn’t hold my excitement in! I had made it to the finals! Now I might actually stand a chance. I told myself I had to stay positive. I BELIEVED I could do it, and I believed I would start a legacy by being the best President Browns’ Pt. Elementary will ever have! I made three neon green posters with tabs, candy, and a mirror telling the face in it to vote for me. I tried to be as cre-

I DREAM... I dream of a time when mankind will not fight wars. I dream to be successful. I dream that nobody will steal things from other people. I dream that nobody will pollute the Earth, and that the Earth will stay green. I dream that bad people will turn good, and if bad people remain, they will not kill other people. I dream that everything and everyone will be safe and that plants will stay green. I dream that good people will not turn bad. I dream that everyone will follow the laws. –Daniel Abraham, 2nd grade, Pt. Defiance Elementary

“This drawing is about an island in the sky which represents that you can believe in anything.” Maxwell Mosley, 5th grade, Browns’ Pt. Elementary “I believe the love shared between brothers and sisters is magical. I am inspired by their creativity and am in awe of their strength. And when your feelings are hurt, they are there to comfort you.” Emily Pittrof, 3rd grade, Pt. Defiance Elementary

ONE SMILE AT A TIME I believe that the way to spread world peace is one smile at a time. If you smile at someone, it will have a huge effect. If someone, (and anyone can do this), were to do something they regret, one smile could turn their whole perspective around. All it takes is just one smile at a time. I dream that one day there will be world peace. Everyone will live in perfect harmony. I believe my dream will succeed if everyone smiles at everyone they meet: Doctors, classmates, teachers, even rivals! Everyone. If you smile at someone, most likely it will make them smile. They will most likely then smile at someone else.

ative as I could with what I put on the posters and where I hung them. By now I was feeling a little more confident, so confident that during my election speech, I got thundering applause from the audience, and proudly sauntered back to my seat. I made sure to cheer and clap for the other candidates as well. You never know how much that means to a person. This time around, I was the guy everyone in my class was talking about. A few days later, the school board announced again who had won. This all added up to this moment, all of my work, my dreams, everything! They said, “The new 2012-2013 president of Browns’ Point Elementary is…Max Stewart.” That was me! I couldn’t believe it! That year I earned respect from my teachers, started my own newspaper, got a great report card, hit my first homerun, and made many new friends. I was a great leader and noticed lots of little kids that looked up to me. I was kind to them and made them feel good about themselves the way that I wished I had felt when I was little. In the end, me, Max Stewart, left my legacy and completed my dreams, and hope to INSPIRE the little kids that had voted for me. One day they will leave their own legacies and inspire others, just the way I did for them.

The pattern will continue until that someone being smiled at is on the other side of the world! I was inspired one day when I watched a story on the news about a girl that was bullied so much she did something very bad, something she will regret for the rest of her life. In my mind I thought, “If only someone had smiled at her, maybe this wouldn’t have happened. One smile could have turned her whole perspective on life around! But no one did. The first step to stop all of this is to smile. So put on your smile and start saving the world! –Jamillia Pringle, 5th grade, Grant Elementary

STAY SAFE & NO BEING about some September MEAN! (Written 2013 incidents) A week ago I started the 4th grade. When I got in the building, I noticed people looking sad, so I asked one of them what was wrong. She answered, “People are being mean to me, and I don’t like it.” I told her, “People are just jealous of you.” I also realized that people wouldn’t just stop being mean. I felt bad for her because she was so lonely, and no one would talk to her. The only things they would say were mean and hurtful things. But she wouldn’t listen to them. She knew it would get better and she wouldn’t feel better if she just said something mean back. After a good five days, my counselor, Mrs. Smith, tried to put an end to all of the teasing, but it didn’t work. She tried to stop it every time, but that was no use because the kids kept doing it, that is until one day when all of them finally stopped being mean. All of this made me think, no one likes to be made fun of or anything like that. If someone said a mean thing to you, how would you feel? So don’t be mean to other people. I hope this story helped you know how it feels to be bullied, so that you won’t do it. Stay safe, and no being mean! –Cecilia Kerrigan, 4th grade, Pt. Defiance Elementary

–Max Stewart, 6th grade, Meeker Middle School

Teachers and students interested in submitting work may get guidelines or information from Shari Shelton, (253) 906-3769 or at ssheltonz@centurylink.net, or may contact Donna McCracken, (253) 475-8387 or donnamccra@comcast.net.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, February 7, 2014 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

WINE ECONOMIST TELLS ALL By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

V

alentine’s Day is coming up and you’re planning the perfect romantic dinner, but you’ve got so many questions about picking the right wine. What’s the difference between Shiraz and Syrah? What kind are you supposed to serve with chicken vindaloo? And is that fancy Zinfandel you’ve been eyeing really worth 200 bones? Aggghh! Better check with the Wine Economist. That would be Tacoma blogger, author and economics professor Mike Veseth, who sums up the angst many consumers feel in his new book, “Extreme Wine: Searching the World for the Best, the Worst, the Outrageously Cheap, the Insanely Overpriced, and the Undiscovered” (Rowman & Littlefield, $24.95): “There are lots of wines out there, and consumers are worried that they are choosing poorly, paying too much, or getting advice from biased or incompetent wine gurus. The search for the best is often motivated by fear of the worst.” Veseth will be on hand to talk about “Extreme Wine,” and then take questions starting at 7 p.m. on Feb. 13 at King’s Books, 218 St. Helen’s St., in Tacoma. In the interest of getting our own dinner plans rolling, we jumped the gun with a few questions of our own. Tacoma Weekly: What are the main points you want

VESETH

people to take away from your talk? Veseth: I’m interested in helping people understand and appreciate more about wine and encouraging them to try new things and enjoy the experience. I am a storyteller; and while wine itself is a good thing, wine and a story about the wine is even better! TW: Your latest book covers “extreme” wines. What counts as extreme wine? Veseth: Wine itself is pretty extreme. Basically, it is fermented fruit juice, but it comes in thousands of variations at prices ranging from $2 to $200 to $2000 to ... well, the sky is the limit. In “Extreme Wine,” I try to examine as many different extremes as I can. My method is simple: if you want to know what’s happening in wine today, look at the extremes, where the pace of change is the fastest. TW: What are the most pervasive myths people embrace when it comes to selecting a good wine? Veseth: The biggest myth is, surely, that more expensive wines are necessarily better than cheaper ones. I argue that while economy wines may not necessarily be the best on earth, they are almost never the worst wines available. I would like consumers

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“Introibo ad altare Dei” 757 138th St. South Tacoma, WA 98444 (253) 535-9477 Sunday Mass: 8 and 10:30 A.M. www.stmarys-parish.org Ladies and girls, please wear modest dress and head covering.

to trust their own tastes about wine and not worry so much about price or wine ratings. TW: People who read your book may feel a little better about bringing “Two Buck Chuck” to their next dinner party. What are some of the biggest bargains in wine? Veseth: Many Washington wines are great values! You really cannot go wrong with products from Chateau Ste Michelle, Columbia Crest, the Magnificent Wine Company (the maker of House Wine) or Pacific Rim. In general, I suggest that consumers try to ignore “top 100” lists and look for wines from unfamiliar grapes or unfamiliar places. That’s often where the best values are found. Sherry is a bargain category, too. Riesling is a great bargain choice; it comes in many styles, you can buy really good Washington Riesling for less than $10, and some of the best in the U.S. for about $20. TW: Surprisingly, you write that Mad Dog and Night Train are “far from the world’s worst fortified wines.” What’s the worst wine you’ve ever sampled? Veseth: I have a long list of “worst wines,” some of which I reveal in “Extreme Wine.” One of my all-time least-favorite wines was an early effort from a Chinese producer. My tasting note was “ashtray, coffee grounds and urinal crust.” Sound good to you? Many Chinese wines today are excellent, but that one was a real loser. Visit www.wineeconomist.com for more.

CULTURE CORNER

A GUIDE TO THE MUSEUMS OF TACOMA Museum of Glass

1801 Dock St. Wed.-Sat., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sun., noon to 5 p.m. Info: http://museumofglass.org FEB 2014

This Week’s Events:

Family Day: Valentine’s Delight! Sat., Feb 8, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Design your own Victorian inspired 3-D Valentine for that special someone in your life with the help of artist Jennifer Adams. Performers from the Comerford School of Dance will be back for their annual performance and are sure to delight the crowd with traditional Irish dance! Performances at 1 and 3 pm.

Visiting Artist Sarah Gilbert Fri., Feb. 7, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Visiting Artist Sarah Gilbert works in the hot shop through Sunday, Feb. 9.

Conversation with the Artist Sun., Feb. 9, 2-3 p.m.

Conversation with Visiting Artist Sarah Gilbert

New Exhibit Opens Feb. 7: Look! See? The Colors and Letters of Jen Elek and Jeremy Bert Feb. 7-Sept. 21

Seattle-based artists Jen Elek and Jeremy Bert have collaborated to present a multi-media exhibition that challenges assumptions about how art can be experienced in a museum setting. By actively encouraging visitors to not only touch but wear some of the artworks in the gallery, the artists are implicitly suggesting that art should be actively encountered rather than passively observed. The dynamic exhibition features a variety of glass sculptures combined with approximately 50 large, refurbished neon letters that visitors can touch, rearrange and wear like apparel. With a primary color palette reminiscent of children’s play equipment, Look! See? The Colors and Letters of Jen Elek and Jeremy Bert will engage visitors of all ages in an exploration of art.

Gloria Dei Lutheran Church - ELCA Mark E. Woldseth, Pastor 3315 South 19th St. Tacoma, WA 98405 (253) 383-5515 lutheransonline.com/gloriadeilutherantacoma

“Come and see!”

Sunday Worship - 10:45am

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, February 7, 2014

LOCAL PODCAST â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;BEATS & EATSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; TAKES OFF By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

W

ith just a microphone and a computer, Tacoma resident Ty Ray has broadcast his voice all over the world, and people are starting to listen. Rayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s podcast, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beats & Eats,â&#x20AC;? has begun to earn a huge following, and was nominated for the 2013 Sticher Awards in San Francisco, a celebration honoring excellence in podcasting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beats & Eatsâ&#x20AC;? was recognized in the Food and Wine category. Boxing Ray and his co-host Nick Gelso into one category is a huge mistake, as the show covers the entire pantheon of pop culture â&#x20AC;&#x201C; everything from music to comedy to television to, yes, food and wine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The concept was two guys getting together at a

really cool, hip, happening bar after work, having some cocktails, sitting and talking to each other,â&#x20AC;? Ray said. Ray was involved with sports broadcasting in the Pacific Northwest for over 20 years, while Gelso has owned restaurants and is currently a food consultant. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We mesh together. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great. We bring all sorts of different knowledge to the table and it just kind of works as the perfect cocktail,â&#x20AC;? Ray said. The twist in the relationship is that neither of the co-hosts has actually met the other in person. While Ray broadcasts from his Tacoma home in the Stadium District, Gelso is situated in Scranton, Pa. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that speaks to the power of technology, to the power of the Internet and, I think, to the power of podcasting,â&#x20AC;? Ray said.

Ray and Gelso met when Ray began podcasting about the Boston Celtics in spring of 2012. When Gelso heard the podcast, he decided to ask Ray to take part in his Internet radio station, CLNS, based out of Boston. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What we found is weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d get on these phone calls with each other talking about the Celtics, and then weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d talk about food, music, movies and wine and the next thing you know it would be a twohour phone call,â&#x20AC;? Ray said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One day we just said to each other, why donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t we make this a show?â&#x20AC;? With that idea in mind, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beats & Eatsâ&#x20AC;? was launched in October 2013 on iTunes and Sticher, a podcast app for Android. A big part of becoming a part of the Sticher family is being eligible for the Sticher award, where podcast fans can nominate their favorite Sticher shows for various categories. Despite only being around for four months, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beats & Eatsâ&#x20AC;? was nominated in Food and Wine against competition like cooking superstar Alton Brown, who ended up taking home the award, which Ray was okay with. As the co-host who brings more

PHOTO COURTESY OF TY RAY

PEAS IN A POD. Ty Ray (left), co-host of the podcast â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beats & Eats,â&#x20AC;?

poses for a picture with actress Lydia Cornell and Sticher co-founder Noah Shanok at the 2013 Sticher Awards. Cornell hosts â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Lydia Cornell Showâ&#x20AC;? on the Beats & Eats Network.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beatsâ&#x20AC;? than â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eats,â&#x20AC;? Ray was nervous to accept an award for Food and Wine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought if we win this award, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to go up there, and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even know how to boil water,â&#x20AC;? Ray said of his nerves. Just being nominated saw the podcast get a huge bump in popularity, with the showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Twitter followers jumping from 200 to about 1,500 after the nomination. Today, the Twitter

  

 

   

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account has around 7,000 followers. The Sticher Awards gave Ray the opportunity to meet his peers and see the world of podcasting up close. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a room full of entrepreneurs,â&#x20AC;? Ray said. The hostâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s background in broadcasting gives him a unique insight into the future of podcasting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The beauty of podcasting is, from my own apartment with a USB mic and a laptop, I can create something and I can compete against the big boys,â&#x20AC;? Ray said. Not only can Ray compete with big corporations from his small apartment in Tacoma, he now has reach all over the world. His favorite moment in the show came when a cab driver in Milan tweeted a picture of himself listening to the podcast. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just pictured this cab driver in Italy, having perhaps a horrible day, and somehow we were making it better,â&#x20AC;? Ray said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That

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was very moving to me.â&#x20AC;? The guys just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t keep the party to themselves; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beats & Eatsâ&#x20AC;? has already featured several different guests. Rayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love for rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll recently brought â&#x20AC;&#x153;X-Factorâ&#x20AC;? contestant Jeff Gutt to the show, while his love of the 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inspired him to get Gavin MacLeod of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Love Boatâ&#x20AC;? fame for an interview. With the success the guys have had, they have been able to expand â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beats & Eatsâ&#x20AC;? into its own network. Now, rather than just being one show, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beats & Eatsâ&#x20AC;? website features shows from the likes of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchenâ&#x20AC;? contestant Barret Beyer, MTVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Awkwardâ&#x20AC;? star Matthew Fahey and actress Lydia Cornell. Ray hopes to one day podcast for a living, but for now his success has given him an opportunity to live his dream. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This has really rejuvenated me. This has given me new life. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s letting me pursue my passion again,â&#x20AC;? Ray said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beats & Eatsâ&#x20AC;? can be downloaded from iTunes or Sticher, and the entire network can be found at http://66.147.244.83/ ~beatsan2/.

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

SIR MIX-A-LOT HOLDS BEST SEAHAWKS PARTY IN TOWN

Friday, February 7, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 5

Nightlife

TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

SEATTLE SUPER-GROUP WALKING PAPERS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FEATURING MEMBERS OF MISSIONARY POSITION, SCREAMING TREES AND GUNS Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ROSES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; RETURNS TO JAZZBONES ON FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, FEB. 7 AND 8. A LEAF WILL OPEN FRIDAY AND VAUDEVILLE ETIQUETTE ON SATURDAY, WITH MUSIC STARTING AT 8 P.M. TICKETS ARE $15; WWW.JAZZBONES.COM. .

FRIDAY, FEB. 7 PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD

ANTHEM COFFEE: Brian Kellogg, Stan St. Louis (singer-songwriter) 7 p.m., NC, AA

RAP LEGEND. Sir Mix-a-Lot delivered his hits, pumped up Seahawks fans at Jazzbones.

By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hooptiesâ&#x20AC;? were commemorated. Big butts were shaken on command. And jersey-clad Seahawks fans blew off steam hours before they completely lost their minds watching their favorite team annihilate the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl 48. Anthony Ray, a.k.a. Seattle rap legend Sir Mix-A-Lot, oversaw the best Super Bowl pre-funk party imaginable Saturday night at Jazzbones, a soldout show that was cause for jubilation by itself. Mix had been away far too long, his cameo last year at the Tacoma Dome with New Kids on the Block aside. He may live just up the road in Auburn, but his last full-blown Tacoma performance was way back in 2008 at Jazzbones in support of longtime hype man Mike â&#x20AC;&#x153;Outtasiteâ&#x20AC;? Singleton. And, frankly, we kinda missed the guy. Tacoma rapper Mr. Von and the Staxx Brothers got the crowd warmed up, with funky tunes and lots of pigskin-themed call-and-response boosting the mood. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sea! Haaaaaawks!â&#x20AC;? Then MixA-Lot made his entrance around 10:30 p.m., setting

the tone with the tonguetwisting flow of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buckinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; My Horse,â&#x20AC;? a cut from his 1996 album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Return of the Bumpasaurus.â&#x20AC;? Casual fans were, of course, primed for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Baby Got Back,â&#x20AC;? the bootylicious anthem that made Mix a household name in 1992. He pulled a few female fans onstage to wiggle some rump shaken during that number, which predictably showed up toward the end of the set. But, for my money, the eveningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best party jam was â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Hooptie,â&#x20AC;? a track about cruising Tacoma in a beat-up 1969 Buick Electra, years before all those â&#x20AC;&#x153;Baby Got Backâ&#x20AC;? royalties started pouring in. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was back when money wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t so good, but I had game,â&#x20AC;? Mix said as he introduced the song. And it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only selection to highlight his auto obsession. There was also â&#x20AC;&#x153;Testarossa,â&#x20AC;? a bass-heavy banger about his V-12 Ferrari, one of his first big impulse buys; and, of course, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Posse on Broadway,â&#x20AC;? the song that put Seattle on the hiphop map decades before Mixâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s buddy, Macklemore, reclaimed the airwaves for Jet City. Mix-A-Lot dedicated the latter to the Seahawks

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and all their doubters, notably the ESPN Awards which named Carolina Panthers linebacker Luke Kuechly defensive player of the year over the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hawks Richard Sherman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Haters will hate,â&#x20AC;? he said, the song serving as his suggestion for where to hold the victory parade. Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s set was a reminder of how underrated Mix-A-Lot is as a rapper, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got us pretty stoked about that â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dun 4got About Mixâ&#x20AC;? album weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been hearing about for the past few years. Drop that thing already, Mix! Fans can go online for more photos by Tacoma Weekly freelancer Bill Bungard and a few bootleg clips posted on our Daily Mashup blog, at www.tacomaweekly.com/ dailymashup. MONUMENTS MEN (118 MIN, PG-13)

2/7: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 2/8-2/9: 11:45am, 2:30, 5:15, 8:00 2/10-Thu 2/13: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00

NEBRASKA (115 MIN, R)

2/7: 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 2/8: 11:40am, 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 2/9: 11:40am, 5:30, 8:15 2/10-2/13: 2:45, 5:30, 8:15

PHILOMENA (98 MIN, PG-13)

2/7: 1:45, 4:10, 6:30, 8:50 2/8-2/9: 11:35am, 1:45, 4:10, 6:30, 8:50 2/10: 1:45, 4:10, 6:30, 8:50 2/11: 4:10, 8:50 2/12-2/13: 1:45, 4:10, 6:30, 8:50

LABOR DAY (111 MIN, PG-13)

2/7: 1:55, 6:45, 9:05 2/8-2/9: 11:30am, 1:55, 6:45, 9:05 2/10-2/13: 1:55, 6:45, 9:05

THE INVISIBLE WOMAN (111 MIN, R)

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SEAHAWKS

FISH WARS

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SOUND TRANSIT

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B SHARP COFFEE: Carletta Sue Kay, Kye Alfred Hillig, Silver Dollars (folk, indie-rock) 7 p.m., $5 GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Notorious 253 (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Thai Rivera (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 MAXWELLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Jesus on the Moon, Battersea, Boreal, The Sun Thieves (indie-rock) 9 p.m., $5 NORTHERN PACIFIC: The Rusty Cleavers CD release, Shotgun Kitchen (country, bluegrass) 8 p.m., $5, AA THE SWISS: Afrodisiacs (dance) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Ty Barnett (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Hambone Blues Band (blues) 8 p.m., NC UNCLE THURMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Delvon Lamarr Trio (funk) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA

SATURDAY, FEB. 8 BOBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAVA JIVE: La Luz, The Fâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;-ing Eagles, Tom Price Desert Classic, Pony Time (garagerock, surf) 8 p.m., $5 B SHARP COFFEE: Barleywine Revue (bluegrass, country) 8 p.m., NC DOYLEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Naive Melodies (Talking Heads tribute) 9:30 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Notorious 253 (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Thai Rivera (comedy) 8:30, 10:30 p.m., $15 KEY PENINSULA CIVIC CENTER: Merrilee Rush and Gabriel, Kim Archer, FilĂŠ Gumbo (rock, R&B, zydeco) 7 p.m., $30-$35 LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: The Tenants, Champagne Sunday (rock, folk) 8 p.m., $5, AA NEW FRONTIER: Mos Generator, CFA, Antihero (stoner metal) 9 p.m., $5 THE SPAR: The Bog Hoppers (bluegrass, country) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Spazmatics (dance covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Ty Barnett (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Hambone Blues Band (blues) 8 p.m., NC

GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Khmer Surin, Jane Saijai (Cambodian pop) 8:30 p.m., NC

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JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Jazz & beyond (live jam) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino, Brooke Lizotte (experimental jam) 9 p.m., NC UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Blues jam, 8 p.m.

TUESDAY, FEB. 11

STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12 CLIFF HOUSE: Champagne Sunday (folk, pop, rock) 6:30 p.m., NC

DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Dave Nicholsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Kareem Kandi (jazz open mic) 9 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, FEB. 13 THE SWISS: Height Requirement (rock) 9 p.m., NC

SUNDAY, FEB. 9

2/11: 1:45, 6:30

WALKING THE CAMINO (84 MIN, NR)

MONDAY, FEB. 10 THE SWISS: Tatoosh (blues) 8 p.m., NC

2/7-2/13: 4:20

2/9: 2:00

STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman Allstars (classic rock) 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comic vs. Food (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m. NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 3 p.m. THE SPAR: Hook Me Up! (blues) 7 p.m., NC

502 MARTINI: Kim Archer (singer-songwriter) 5 p.m., NC DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC LAST STAND: Genocide District, Reformers, Ashylus, Drowning, Navigator, Undertaker (metal) 4 p.m., $5, AA STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open jam) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Jimmy Shubert (comedy) 8 p.m., $10 TRIPLE PLAY: Comedy open mic, 9 p.m., NC UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

                               

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Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 7, 2014

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: PEARL DJANGO

Guy and his famous stunt dogs are out of this world! With star performances on “The Tonight Show,” “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” and Animal Planet’s “Pet Stars,” these canine daredevils will thrill your entire family with doggone amazing tricks. Info: www.stuntdog.com PRECIOUS METAL CLAY Sun., Feb. 9, 11:00 a.m. Tacoma Metal Arts Center Instructor Ruth Greening, certified PMCC senior instructor, gives hands-on introduction to precious metal clay. Learn basic handling, forming and firing of this amazing silver. Info: www. tacomametalarts.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF BAND Sun., Feb. 9, 5 p.m. Marine View Church With a performance history spanning almost two decades, Pearl Django endures as one of the most highly regarded gypsy jazz style groups working today. Info: www.marineviewpc.org

SCHOLAR SEARCH WEEKEND Fri., Feb. 7, 12 p.m. The Great Hall of Annie Wright School Girls entering grades 9-11, bring your brain, sense of humor and open mind for Scholar Search Weekend and compete for a merit scholarship. Info: (253)272-2215 6TH AVE CHOCOLATE STROLL Sat., Feb. 8, Noon to 4 p.m. Sixth Avenue, Tacoma, WA All proceeds benefit Free University, which provides free classes on a variety of subjects. All classes are taught by local teachers who are experts in everything from Gluten free and vegan cooking to art and spirituality. Stroll the Ave and pick up chocolates from participating businesses. Turn in your

completed Chocolate Stroll map to be entered to win a gift basket. Tickets: Ubiquitous Journey, 2607 6th Ave., or (253) 572-2550. WOOD AGED BEER FEST Sat., Feb. 8, 2 p.m. Tacoma Brewing Company The response to Tacoma Brewing Company’s bourbon oaked stout has been so overwhelming that TBC thought you might like to taste some other woods. Come to this first annual Tacoma Brewing Wood Aged Beer Fest and taste stouts, IPAs, and other ales. Info: www.facebook.com/ TacomaBrewing CHRIS PERONDI’S STUNT DOG EXPERIENCE Sat., Feb. 8, 3 p.m. Pantages Theater Chris Perondi is the Stunt Dog

“ROCKARAOKE” Mon., Feb. 10, 9:00p.m. Jazzbones Rockaraoke is the best way to experience being a rock star without actually being one. “Karaoke with a live band on stage, in front of a large crowd.” Info: www. jazzbones.com/events ARGENTINE TANGO Tues., Feb. 11, 1 p.m. Cultura Event Center Dance Argentine tango every week at the Cultura Event Center. Practica dance $5 from 7-9:30 p.m., open to all tango dancers or those interested in learning tango in the style of Argentina. Info: www.T-TownTango.com/ CONSERVATORY STORY HOUR Wed., Feb. 12, 11 a.m.-noon W.W. Seymour Conservatory Join Bonnie Beaudoin among the Conservatory’s beautiful flowers for weekly storytelling along with a short hands-on science and art project! Info: www.seymoreconservatory.org

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

DRUM CIRCLE Thurs., Feb. 13, 6:30 p.m. Ted Brown Music Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages drum circle every Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. You don’t need to have a drum to participate. Info: www.tedbrownmusic.com/

ASIAN NEW YEAR Sat., Feb. 15, 10:30 a.m. Tacoma Dome Exhibition Hall Featured community is Island of Tahiti along with Japan, Hawaii, Philippines, China, India, Korea, Indonesia/Thailand and Samoa. Info: www. asiapacificculturalcenter.org

KIDS NIGHT OUT Fri., Feb. 14, 6-10 p.m. Lakewood Commuity Center Kids ages 6-12 can share a fun evening with other kids at the Lakewood Commuity Center, 9112 Lakewood Dr. SW in Lakewood. Info: www.piercecountywa.org/parks

SPECIAL OLYMPICS POLAR PLUNGE Sat., Feb. 22, 9 a.m. Owen Beach Take a dip in the ice waters across Washington State and be a part of the “coolest” event of the year! Join the fun, help raise funds and win prizes all in support of Special Olympics Washington. Info: www.specialolympicswashington.org/calendar/ letr_events/polar_plung

VALENTINE’S DAY RED CARPET EVENT Fri. Feb. 14, 8 p.m. Serious Soul Cafe’, Federal Way House of Matthew Transitional Housing Services is holding another fundraiser event to benefit homeless veterans. Info: www.thehouseofmatthew.org/

LGBT WEDDING EXPO Sun., Feb. 23, 1:30 p.m. McGavick Conference Center Celebrate equality in Tacoma! The afternoon promises the opportunity to meet with dozens of LGBT-friendly wedding vendors. Enjoy a variety of delicious samples, music, LGBT-specific planning tips and much more! Info: www.samelovesamerights.com

DANCING WITH THE TACOMA STARS Sat. Feb. 15, 5:30 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse Selected representatives of the Tacoma community go through the rigors of learning ballroom dance and compete for top honors in this exciting and innovative fundraising event for Tacoma Musical Playhouse. Info: www.tmp.org/specialshows. aspx#show1

COMEDY OPEN MIC Every Thursday, 9 p.m. Triple Play Sports Bar The Happy Thursday Comedy Open Mic is a weekly standup comedy open mic hosted by comedian Kareem Walters and featuring some of the best rising comics and established headliners. Info: www. tripleplaytacoma.com

SOUNDSCAPES Sat., Feb. 15, 7:30 p.m. Rialto Theater Go green with these natureinspired masterpieces, including Beethoven’s supreme ode to his beloved countryside. Info: www. broadwaycenter.org

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE Kerri Bailey is a horticulturist and a certified herbalist. She makes custom blends and consults at Ubiquitous Journey (www.UBJourney.com) on 6th Avenue. Kerri owns two businesses – the online herb store www.HerbalElements.net and a water garden store inside Alpine Nursery in South Hill (www. AlpineGrows.com) called The Pond Pad (www.ThePondPad.com). She writes blogs on gardening, ponds, natural health and herbal remedies and teaches classes through Free University (www.FreeUNW.com).

ARIES March 21 – April 19 Do you feel like you are sinking into self-absorption? Excessive self-examination may be causing you to be introspective. Your attention will soon drift to those you care about. Don’t be blind or burdened by their troubles that could cause many distractions.

LIBRA September 23 – October 22 Your home or family life may be going through drastic transformative changes. The choices may be difficult with a possible move or split as a result. You have the power to control your life. Don’t let others bully you.

TAURUS April 20 - May 20 Lost in your thoughts? You may feel the need to be in your own space to think things through. This process will lead to intense desire for determined action. Try to stay focused to avoid schedule conflicts with others.

SCORPIO October 23 – November 21 You will find out whatever you needed to know. Your psychic antenna is in tune with those around you. There may be a chance to repair a broken relationship with a sibling. Forget grudges and let go.

GEMINI May 21 – June 20 Your hard work pays off and is producing results. Are you due for a raise or bonus? Try not to be too direct when asking. Don’t let outsiders deviate you from your goals. Remember that true friends will understand.

SAGITTARIUS November 22 – December 21 There are some people in your life you will soon appreciate and see them in a more positive light. Try to relax and receive the changes life brings you. You have a lot of projects going on, don’t spread yourself too thin.

CANCER June 21 – July 22 Write down your dreams, desires and goals. Focus your attention to attain them. Let friends help you sort out your ideas. Make your own vision boards. This mental stimulation energizes you. Avoid overeating.

CAPRICORN December 22 – January 19 Team building will be a main focus for you as you may be asked to develop and stick to a plan. You have a chance for transformation so take those extra steps to make it happen. Achieving harmony and happiness can take practice.

LEO July 23 – August 22 Interesting and harmonious interactions are likely this week. Your inner strength and stamina may be tested by co-workers or a partner. You handle things smoothly and feel like a superhero.

AQUARIUS January 20 – February 18 A cosmic detox is happening in your life. Make your thoughts clear so others can fully understand. If you don’t like what you see, then change it. Work smart and your efforts will pay off favorably. Explore your interests.

VIRGO August 23 – September 22 Imagine the consequences of your actions before speaking your mind. Make decisions in terms of how others may be affected. Keep communications clear and set boundaries. Don’t feed into insecurities.

PISCES February 19 – March 20 Dream opportunities may arise. A sentimental connection may surprise you to tears. Social media may connect you with a long awaiting answer. Swimming in circles gets you nowhere.

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*valid under 100 transactions per month

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PAINTING

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BOOKKEEPING

PAYS YOU! FOR YOUR Junk Cars

  

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Call to get Mid Winter Special

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$ $ WE PAY CA$H FOR $

SERVING GREATER PUGET SOUND 10 YEARS

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Fall Clean-up. GET READY FOR WINTER. Gutter Cleaning, Pruning, Trees.

www.alliedmarinecorp.com

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LANDSCAPING

ALEXâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Landscaping

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

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ACE DRYWALL We Deliver Brian Hall 206-463-9624

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BOAT & RV SHRINK WRAPPING â&#x20AC;˘ Weather Proof â&#x20AC;˘ UV Resistant â&#x20AC;˘ We Wrap Anything â&#x20AC;˘ We Come To You! Shrink Wrapping is Economical and Reliable for Storing and Protecting Boats & Recreational Vehicles Outdoors.

We Wrap Anything on Land, Water or Marinas 206-931-6384 â&#x20AC;˘ 206-463-9624

CUSTOM HOME

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253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma WA, 98417

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Advertising Representatives: â&#x20AC;˘ Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Colleen McDonald, cmcdonald@tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Marlene Carrillo, marlene@tacomaweekly.com


Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 8 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, February 7, 2014

SERVICES CONSTRUCTION

NOTICES

FOR SALE FURNITURE

CONSTRUCTION

JT GENERAL License & Bonded JTLANLF94INA CONTRACTOR ROOFING

TO: Denise Elseth Bowen

FENCING

Kristine Siddle vs Denise Elseth Bowen

New t Repairs t Tear-Off t3e-Roof Wood t Chain Link t Repairs

LANDSCAPING

Retaining Walls t Sod Clean-Up t.aintenance

253-222-1 136 Â? Â? LOW PRICES

FREE ESTIMATES

NOTICES

Case Number: PUY-CV-PO-2014-0009 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 25th day of March, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT.

Auction Notice

TO: Eugene Jerry Thomas In the Welfare of: S.J.O. DOB: 6/23/2008 Case Number: PUY-CW-TPR-2013-0029 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Guardianship Hearing on the Monday the 14th day of April, 2014 at 2:30 PM.

Abandoned Vehicle 2nd Thursday Monthly Lakewood Towing Inc. #5002 9393 Lakeview Ave SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 Ph. 253-582-5080 Auction 02132014 Date 2/13/2014 View @ 11 am Auction Starts @ 2 pm In accordance with RCW 46.55.130 Lakewood Towing Inc. will sell to the highest bidder. See complete listing @ lakewoodtowing.com or posting at our office

If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS TO: John Sr., Michael J. In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs John Sr., Michael J. Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0054 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Continued Initial Hearing on March 04, 2014 at 10:00am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE -PML;V^PUN-PML9LJV]LY`:LY]PJL  5>;V^PUNH[(]L,-PML VU0UJVTWSPHUJL^P[O[OL 9*>H[!WT=PL^PUNVM JHYZMYVT!!WT9LNPZ[LYLK ;V^5\TILYZ *HZO (\J[PVU6US`^^^Ă&#x201E;ML[V^PUNJVT

In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs Sharp, Floyd J. Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0058

If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Name: Puyallup Tribe of Indians vs. Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0065 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing onTuesday the 1st day of April, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on Tuesday the 1st day of April, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT.

TO: Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Name: Puyallup Tribe of Indians vs. Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0074 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on Tuesday the 1st day of April, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT.

New 5 Piece Bedroom Set Full or Queen set includes: Headboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, & mirror. BRAND NEW! Only $400 253-539-1600 5 Piece Dining Room Set Table & 4 Chairs. New in box. Only $300 253-539-1600 Microfiber Sectional Brand New REVERSIBLE sectional with chaise lounge. NEW! Only $500 253-539-1600 All New Pillow Top Mattress Queen Size with warranty. Still in original plastic. Can deliver. $120. 253537-3056 Solid Wood Bunk Beds Available in 2 colors. Brand new in box. Can break down to two separate twin beds. Delivery available. $250 253-539-1600 Low Profile Leather Bed Frame Still in box. Available in Full or Queen. Very nice. Can deliver. $250 253-539-1600

All New King Mattress Set 3 Piece King Mattress set for only $275. Still in original packaging with factory warranty. Can deliver. 253-537-3056

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy

253-770-8552

Pet of the Week

New Mission Style Bedroom Suite Solid wood Mission bedroom set. $699. Includes: headboard, footboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, and mirror. 253-539-1600 New Overstuffed Microfiber sofa & Love Seat Still in plastic with manufactures warranty. Can have for $700. Lifetime warranty on frame. 253-539-1600 BRAND NEW! Queen Memory foam mattress set with 20 year warranty. Can Deliver. $400. 253-537-3056 New Pillow Top Full Mattress Only $99. Never used! Comes with manufactures warranty. Delivery available. 253537-3056

AUTOS

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keiraâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Old dogs, like old shoes, are comfortable. They might be a bit out of shape and a little worn around the edges, but they Ă&#x20AC;WZHOOÂľ7KLVTXRWHULQJVWUXHIRURXU)HDWXUHG3HWWKLVZHHN Keira. This sweet and playful girl is a nine year old Labrador Retriever Mix. Keira came to us last month as a stray, and is eagerly looking for her forever family. Although she is an experienced dog, she has a surprising amount of energy. Do you love to go on walks? So does Keira! Taking strolls on her leash is a favorite activity for list lady. Keira is a treat lover, so sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll make sure to be on her best behavior when out and about. Due to the fact that she is a bit older, it is recommended that Keiraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new family have children over the age of ten. It is unknown if this pup has experience with other dogs or cats, so a slow introduction would be necessary. If you think Keira ZRXOGĂ&#x20AC;WSHUIHFWO\LQWR\RXUIDPLO\FRPHDQGPHHWKHUWRGD\ Reference #A371688

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week 1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Salem has had a rough life before he was brought into the shelter. He is so easy going, and just adores being pet while he eats. He is gentle with kids, and would make an excellent lap cat. Take this big boy home today, and show him what a real tender loving Forever Family looks like.

Bonnie & Clyde are quite the duo. Just yesterday Bonnie was adopted, so now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clydeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s turn. He is about 4 months old, loving, and eager to play. This young boy is rambunctious and ready to take on the world. You could say Bonnie was Clydeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading lady, and with her gone he is so ready for his Forever Family to take him home. Stop by today!

DANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S QUALITY CARS 429 ST HELENS AVE â&#x20AC;˘ TACOMA, WA 253.221.2209 OR 253.229.3636

VOLUNTEERS

Help Wanted Earn Extra Income, Become an Avon representative Only $10 to start Sign up online at: www.start.youravon.com Use reference code FORTIZ Or call (253) 226-6683

for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. 7KH\DUHĂ&#x20AC;[HG vaccinated and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 298-0913

Adjustable Power Bed Brand New with memory foam mattress. Wall hugger with warranty. Delivery available. $995 253-537-3056

SPEND YOUR TAX DOLLARS HERE! Exp. Breakfast Cook Needed. Part/Full Time. Flexable Schedule. Come in and fill out application. Tower Lanes 6323 6th Ave., Tacoma. 564-8853

FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT.

TO: Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Name: Puyallup Tribe of Indians vs. Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0066

Need safe farms or barns

Behind Couch Table $60. Small Square Curio $45. Bloodhound Dog Table $35 Cabelaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Log Cabin Dog House $75. 253-320-4751

1999 Toyota Solara SLE Automatic transmission, power windows, leather interior, sun roof, tinted windows, smooth ride, great condition and runs well. Mileage: 134,515 Asking $4,500 If you interested call (253) 474-6556 and leave a message.

TO: Sharp, Floyd J.

You are summoned to appear for a Continued Initial Hearing on March 04, 2014 at 10:00am

FURNITURE

EMPLOYMENT

FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT.

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

PETS

DIVORCE? BANKRUPTCY? FORECLOSURE?

PAWS NEEDS WILDLIFE VOLUNTEERS PAWS in Lynnwood is looking for volunteers to help care for wildlife this spring. Every year, PAWS cares for more than 3,000 injured, orphaned or abandoned wild-

REPOSSESSION? BAD CREDIT? NO CREDIT?

NO PROBLEM! WWW.DANSQUALITYCARS.COM

Proudly Serving Puget Sound For 27 Years Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Largest WE ARE THE BANKâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; WE WILL FINANCE YOU!

DIRECTV is currently recruiting Satellite Installation Technicians for the following locations in Washington: â&#x20AC;˘ Forks â&#x20AC;˘ Lacey â&#x20AC;˘ Long Beach â&#x20AC;˘ Neah Bay â&#x20AC;˘ Ocean Park â&#x20AC;˘ Pierce County

â&#x20AC;˘ Port Angeles â&#x20AC;˘ Puyallup â&#x20AC;˘ Sequim â&#x20AC;˘ Tacoma â&#x20AC;˘ Astoria, OR

If you are not able to access our website, DIRECTV.com, mail your resume and salary requirements to: DIRECTV, Attn: Talent Acquisition, 161 Inverness Drive West, Englewood, CO 80112. To apply online, visit: www.directv.com/careers. EOE.

ANTIQUES WANTED Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105

BUY HERE PAY HERE DEALER!

WE WILL FINANCE ANYONE! YES WE CAN! NO B.S.!

TAX REFUND SERVICES AT MAPLE LEAF MOTORS MAPLE LEAF MOTORS Will MATCH 150 for EVERY $500 Of Your Tax Refund You Put Toward Your Down Payment. Maximum Match Of $600 $

Plus Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Receive $100 Discount On Tax Preparation Done By Us Thru Tax Refund Services! MAPLE LEAF WOULD LIKE YOU TO COMPARE THEIR IMPRESSIVE BENEFITS TO WHAT YOUR LAST DEALERSHIP OFFERED YOU WHEN YOU PURCHASED A USED CAR! t8&0''&33&"40/"#-& %08/1":.&/54646"--: "4-08"4 0' 163$)"4&13*$& t8&3&1035505)&$3&%*5 #63&"6"--08*/(:06503& &45"#-*4):063$3&%*53"5*/(

t8&0''&3"%":4 .*-&4 #6.1&350#6.1&3-*.*5&% 8"33"/5:0/"--'*/"/$&% %&"-4 /0540-%"4*4



t0/-*/&$3&%*5 "11-*$"5*0/"5 ."1-&-&"'.05034$0.

t"/%.03&30"%4*%&4&37*$& i'3&&w-0"/&3$"348)*-&  :063$"3*4*/'034&37*$&"50634&37*$&$&/5&3 -0$"-  )0.&508/4&37*$&/05 .*-&4"8": (3&"5#&/&'*54  '033&1&"5$6450.&34 WE REALLY WANT AN OPPORTUNITY TO EARN YOUR BUSINESS. STOP BY AND LET US SHOW YOU WHAT MAKES OUR DEALERSHIP DIFFERENT.

T W O L O C AT I O N S W I T H O V E R 150 VEHICLES TO CHOOSE FROM!

So. Tacoma Way Lot

Spanaway Lot

(Corner of 72nd and So Tacoma Way)

(Across from Super WALMART)

888-733-9536

888-753-8516

7035 So Tacoma Way

20310 MTN HWY E.

WWW.MAPLELEAFMOTORS.COM "/FHPUJBCMF%PDVNFOUBSZGFFPGJTJODMVEFEJOBMMTBMFT"MM'JOBODFE%FBMT"SF%POF0"$0O"QQSPWBMPG$SFEJU "MTPUIFSFJTB1JDLVQ1BZNFOUUIBUJT%VF8JUIJO%BZTPG%FMJWFSZ

life. Join the team and you can help feed and care for these remarkable animals. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a remarkable experiHQFH \RX ZRQ¡W Ă&#x20AC;QG DQ\where else! For any questions please contact Mark Coleman, Communications Manager, at 206.419.6646. Citizenship Volunteers Looking for a rewarding experience? Help immigrants prepare to become citizens. You will help to provide instruction to legal permanent residents who need practice with the written and oral. Training will be offered the Ă&#x20AC;UVW ZHHN RI -DQXDU\ DQG classes will start in mid-January. Please contact Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information. Help a Child Improve Reading One-on-one support makes a huge difference in an elementary studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to overcome reading challenges. As a Read2Me Tutor for Tacoma Community House, you can be that person who makes a difference. We are on the lookout for committed tutors for grades 1-3. There are sessions at Manitou Park, Mann, McCarver, and Roosevelt Elementary Schools. The next orientations will be held in January. Call 253.383.3951 for more information. These are exciting times and you can make a difference! South Sound Outreach Services invites you to be trained as an In Person Assister Volunteer to help Pierce County residents enroll online for health insurance in the Washington Health Plan Finder. Open Enrollment is October 1 until March 31st. Coverage begins January 1st, 2014 for those enrolled by December 15th. Interested trainees may call Heather at SSOS 253-593-2111. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be glad you did!


Friday, February 7, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV HOMES FOR SALE

Why NOW is the Time to Sell Your Home!

HOMES FOR SALE

1232 S Adams St.

â&#x20AC;˘ Interest rates are on the rise. Sell now and buy your next home before prices increase.

â&#x20AC;˘ Buyers are plentiful and listings are few. More buyers means a better environment for you to sell.

â&#x20AC;˘ Your home may no longer meet your needs. It is amazing how when you are in a home 3, 5, or 10 years how much your needs change. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get you into the right home for you while prices are still affordable for your next move.

I have buyers approved wanting to buy homes! Call Me Today! <RXUQH[WVWHSLVWRFDOOPHIRUDPDUNHWDQDO\VLVWRĂ&#x20AC;QGRXW what your home will sell for in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s market!

253-203-8985

www.StephanieLynch.com

Super charming home w/ the ease of newer amenities... Box beam ceilings, KDUGZRRGĂ RRUVPDUEOHHQWU\SLFWXUHSODWH UDLOV SHULRGVW\OHOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHVDGGWRWKH ambience, while newer roof, furnace/heat pump, indoor/outdoor speakers, newer ZLULQJSOXPELQJ JDVĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHDGGWRWKH ahhhh factor. Spacious living room, large kitchen, HUGE dining room, a bedroom and FXWHUHPRGHOHGEDWKURRPJUDFHWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVW Ă RRU*LJDQWLFGHFNZVHDWLQJZHOFRPH home. Move in and make it yours. $219,950

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

1950 S G St Tacoma Information deemed liable but not guaranteed.

RENTALS

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

33 N Salmon Beach

CONDOS & HOMES LAKEWOOD

BONNEY LAKE

8416 PHILLIPS RD SW #25

8403 LOCUST AVE E #C-1

$650

$750

1 BED 1 BATH 573 SF. 1 BED CONDO HAS HARDWOODS, SS APPLIANCES, GREAT AMENITIES AND PETS WELCOME.

1 BED 1 BATH 900 SF. BEAUTIFUL CONDO HAS EAT IN KITCHEN, WASHER/DRYER, RESERVED PARKING & COVERED PATIO W/STORAGE.

UNIVERSITY PLACE

FIRCREST

7514 41ST. ST CT W #D-10

321 FARALLONE AVE

$820

$1050

2 BED 1 BATH 800 SF. LARGE 2 BED APT HAS NEWER APPLIANCES, WASHER/DRYER, $24 FEE FOR W/S/G AND MORE.

3 BED 1 BATH 1662 SF. PERFECT HOME HAS EAT IN KITCHEN, FINISHED ATTIC, SMALL DOGS OK AND AND NEWER PAINT.

DUPONT

PUYALLUP

2277 MCDONALD AVE

11227 185TH ST E

$1495 3 BED 2 BATH 1403 SF. AMAZING HOME HAS ALL APPLIANCES, MUST SEE MASTERS, 2 CAR GARAGE AND FENCED YARD.

$1495 4 BED 2.5 BATH 2415 SF. LARGE HOME HAS INCLUDES HUGE KITCHEN, EXTRA STORAGE, 5 PIECE MASTERS AND FENCED YARD.

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200 View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Professional Management Services

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

FOR SALE IN ORTING MOBILE 55+ PARK 2 BED, 2 BATH 836 HARMAN WAY S SPACE 44 360-893-0960

Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton hydraulic boat Lift, brick wood EXUQLQJĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHZLWKLQVHUWH[SDQVLYHGHFNLQJRQ all sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout WKHODVW\HDUVLQFOXGLQJURRIVLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZV doors, decking, boat hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more. $450,000 Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties

$399,000 Call for private showing today. 253.606.0689 BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME

1388 N Lenore St. Fantastic mid century modern centrally located near stores, schools, parks and easy commuting to freeways, yet house feels secluded and private due to professionally landscaped, lovely yard with zen paths and sustainable GHVLJQ)DQWDVWLFNLWFKHQKDUGZRRGĂ RRUVPDVWHURQ main, great patio for entertaining- this is a wonderful home with lots of space. Move in ready and awaiting new owners. $282,000

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

936 S Sheridan $229,000

Keller Williams PS 253-777-9062

3728 N Gove St, Tacoma Cute little bungalow in Proctor! Nice upgrades include a new family room, windows, roof, energy package & carpet 6 years ago. Detached garage was converted to extra living space. It has a separate electric panel, heat & lights - lots of possibilities... music studio, art studio, exercise / yoga room, etc. Parking for 3 cars off the alley next to garage. Charming back \DUGWRR+DUGZRRGĂ RRUVXQGHUFDUSHWH[FHSWLQ family room. MLS# 518902. $204,950

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

PROPERTY

PROPERTY

MT. RAINIER VIEW $125,000 Beautiful Level Buildable Site! Located off of Ray Nash Drive NW, this 1.25 Acres of natural setting and mature Evergreen trees is perfect to build your dream home and enjoy the Country Lifestyle! Peek-a-Boo View of Mt. Rainier. Just minutes away from sought after Schools, Uptown Gig Harbor Amenities, Restaurants, WA-Hwy 16, Hospitals, Boat launch/water activities, tennis courts & Kopachuck State Park! Electricity is available at corner.

Michelle Anguiano Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood 253.720.6525

OLD TOWN $499,950 Amazing development potential with this unique Old Town property! City has given Ă&#x20AC;QDOSODWDSSURYDOIRUORWVRQWKLVSULPH acre piece. Big views possible from all lots in this great neighborhood, tucked back & out of the way. Walk to the historic Old Town district with its coffee shops, wine bar & restaurants.; then stroll down to the waterfront & enjoy the gorgeous Puget Sound setting with walking paths, public docks, shoreline restaurants & more! MLS# 332653 Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

Selling Your Commercial Building or Business? Call

Jean Bonter 253-312-2747 FOR LEASE

Point Defiance CafĂŠ and Casino. Fully operational with unique card room and gambling facility. Only licensed casino between Lakewood and Bremerton. Or as an alternative, this facility could be used as full service restaurant with banquet rooms. Many other possibilities including day care, private pre- school, dance studio, and the list goes on. All handicap accessible.

DEER RIDGE HOME, PUYALLUP

Beautiful home crafted by Steve Jensen and meticulously cared for. All the Jensen signature touches - soaring spaces, coffered ceilings, crown molding, wainscoting, 6â&#x20AC;? base trim, tile, granite, and expansive windows. Sited on an elevated lot that adjoins natural area to the rear. Listen to the birds and your private waterfall from your patio. Wonderful landscaping designed for beauty and easy care. Sensational island kitchen opens to stunning family room. Huge master suite with fireplace. MLS #479207

UNIQUE BOUTIQUE BISTRO

With Beer and Wine License. $20,000 Full Price.

GIG HARBOR ž ACRE BUILDING LOT

2711 Henry Road N

Beautifully wooded, water and power available. $79,000. Perfect setting for your custom home. Owner/agent

Evergreen Commercial Brokerage

www.jeanbonter.com

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract Beautiful Victorian 4-plex in good location back on the market after remodel. Walking distance to hospitals, GRZQWRZQSDUNV0DLQĂ RRUXQLWKDVRQHEHGURRPSOXV attached bonus room, dining room, lg kitchen with nook, new carpet throughout, bay windows. Upstairs unit has 2 bedrooms, bath, lg living room, kitchen & balcony. Lower level has 2 studio apts & bath. Sep. utilities for main and upper units. 3,064 sq ft MLS# 523770

Better Properties Heather Redal 253.363.5920

Call us today to place your classified ad! 253-922-5317 or fill out this form and mail with payment to: Tacoma Weekly

2588 Pacific Hwy Fife WA 98424

Ad Copy Here:

Eric Paffenroth

(253) 222-8480

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St. A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo OLYLQJZLWKQR+2$+LJK&HLOLQJVJDVÂżUHSODFHV separately metered.

This beautiful craftsman home has been remodeled with all new appliances and updated in the heart of downtown Tacoma. It is located only 2 blocks up the street from UW Tacoma Campus with a city, mountain and water view. This home is a 3 bedroom 2 bath with a large yard. The 2nd parcel is included with the purchase and has a single car garage in the backyard. This home KDVQHZĂ RRULQJZDOOVFDELQHWVTXDUW]WRSV appliances, furnace, and mill work and comes with a 1 year warranty! $249,000.

CALL 253.922.5317

Absolutely Charming, Mediterranean Style, custom built North Tacoma view home. Enjoy Commencement Bay view from Mstr Br balc. ,QVLGHIHDWLQFO0DUEOHĂ RRUHQWU\6W6WHHO$SSO *UDQFRXQWWRSV&XVWEXLOW+LFNRU\FDE%HDXW %UD]LOLDQ&KHUU\KDUGZRRGĂ RRU%D\ZLQGRZV 0VWUVXLWHZ)3 /UJEDWKVWHDPVKRZHU &DOLFORVHW1HZ(QHUJ\(IĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWKHDWLQJ&HQW YDFXXPQHZSDLQWLQ RXWQHZFDUSHW)LQLVKHG %VPWZNLWFKHQ&ORVHWR6FKRROV3DUNV )UHHZD\+RVSLWDOV :DWHUIURQW$623,000.

Gil Rigell Better Properties N. Proctor (253) 376-7787

805 N Steele St

LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? Restaurant/Lounge Huge Price Reduction - For Sale For $510,000 (R.E. $485K) Bus. $25K. Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports bar and ice grill. pr reduced RURAL LIVING: Restaurant/ price Lounge in Ashford, WA reduced Price for business, $105,000 with $25,000 down. Price for the real estate, $390,000 with $75,000 down. Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract includes a 3 B/R house, laundromat, restr./ lounge bldg. on 3.4 acre, commercial zoned parcel. HIGH GROSSING, VERY price PROFITABLE COFFEE reduced SHOP CAFE FOR SALE $95,000 High trafic Count location, owner will accept $25,000 down payment. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;CALLAHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB & GRILL IN KEY CENTER Business is for sale for $300,000 with $100,000 down, High gross sales. Saler will also consider leasing the space

Name: Address: Phone: Cash

$15.00 30 Words and Under: ______________ Extra words @ .05:_________________ Check

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Sub Total:_________________________ x Number of Weeks = ______________

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Cost: $15 for 30 words for one week. 5¢ per each additional word. Deadline: Tuesday, 12 noon for Thursday publications. Payment: Required on all classified ads at time of placement. We accept cash, check, money order or Visa/ Mastercard. Mail or bring payment to Tacoma Weekly at 2588 Pacific Hwy, Fife. Email: advertising@tacomaweekly.com

w w w. t a c o m a w e e k l y. c o m

Want bragging rights & the ability to name drop? Hans Grohe, Duravit, Kohler, & Porcher to name a few... Then this is the house for you-high end everything & custom touches galore. Need this spelled out in layman terms? Fabulous, fantastic & close to hip 6th Ave Biz District, this 4 bed, 2.5 bath home has natural, original woodwork, is an entertainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream, and is ready for new owners... Leave your hammer at your old houseWKLVRQHLVĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGDQGĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGZHOO,PLJKWDGG Welcome! $368,000

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

COLLISION CENTER Same owner 15 yrs. Retiring, 6621 So. Tacoma Way. $130,000 with terms to qualified buyer - some training provided at o cost to buyer. LAKEWOOD CAFE/LOUNGE on a busy intersection, $81,500 CASH.

CALL RICHARD PICTON or ED PUNCHAK 253-581-6463 253-224-7109


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 7, 2014

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