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.com TACOMAWEEKLY YO U R CO M M U N I T Y NE W S PA P E R - 29 YE A R S O F SE R V I C E

PUYALLUP TRIBE FEEDS THE HUNGRY, CLOTHES THE POOR

PHOTOS BY MATT NAGLE

GIVING HEARTS. (Left) Puyallup Tribal Council Member Sylvia Miller has been organizing the giveaway for years now. She works throughout the day of the event as

well, here helping a giveaway visitor choose a sleeping bag. (Right) Puyallup tribal member Lisa Earl again this year brought delicious hot soups, fresh fruit and more to make sure everyone had a nutritious meal on that very cold day. By Matt Nagle

I

matt@tacomaweekly.com

t was plenty cold the morning of Dec. 17, but warmth was in abundance near the Tacoma Dome for the Puyallup Tribe’s annual giveaway for the homeless. Setting up in the Puyallup tribal parking lot next to the Dome, the allvolunteer crew offered a variety of winter clothes for all ages, a hot meal, toys for the little ones thanks to Toys for Tots – plus plenty of smiles and hugs to go around. The line began forming about an hour before the giveaway kicked off at 10 a.m., but the thoughtful volunteers had two fires going that the men, women and children

could gather around to chase the chill while they waited. Stacked on tables nearby were piles of coats, hats, blankets, sweaters, gloves and shoes, backpacks, tents, sleeping bags, tarps and even hand- and foot-warmers to take with. On side tables were all kinds of portable foods not needing to be cooked to ensure that no one left without something to take with them to eat later. Hot food was given as well. Lisa Earl, director of the tribe’s Little Wild Wolves Youth and Community Center, and her helpers arrived with two vats of homemade, steaming hot soup, hot dogs to roast on the open fires, fresh fruit and beverages to make sure everyone enjoyed a delicious and nutritious meal that day. The majority of the volunteers were members of the

LIGHT RAIL STATION PLANS TAKE SHAPE Transit watchers are now being asked to comment on art concepts and station names for the Link expansion from the Theater District to the Hilltop neighborhood.

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

LINK. Design work for Sound Transit’s extension of the Link light rail line

passed a milestone with the design basics figured out and staffers looking at station names and designs. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Transit watchers, business boosters and residents got an update on the effort to extending Sound Transit’s Link light rail system from downtown to the Hilltop at an open house last week, There, planners touched base with members of the public about station locations, public art themes and proposed station names before construction starts. Most of the design work has been completed with the

remaining work focused on design scenes and signage. People can learn more about the project and comment on the designs by visiting an online open house at tacomalink. org until Jan. 8. The 2.4-mile route will loop up the hill from the current tracks at the Theater District station on Commerce Street, albeit relocated a block away from the current station, and route to Stadium Way and North 1st Street before following u See TRANSIT / page A6

Puyallup Tribe led by Puyallup Tribal Council Member Sylvia Miller, who has organized the giveaway for years now. In between hustling about keeping everything running smoothly, she gave a whole-hearted thank you to all the volunteers who came out to brave the cold and help those who need it most. “We’re happy to be here and I’m so happy that these individuals come out every year and help,” she said. “It shows that they care about their community. It’s important that everybody here knows that.” She remarked too on how grateful those were who were receiving that day. “These guys are very appreciative of anything that

u See GIVEAWAY / page A11

JUDGE DISMISSES CAMPAIGN FINANCE CASE AGAINST PORT, BUSINESS GROUPS By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Pierce County Superior Court Judge Ronald Culpepper has ruled that the Port of Tacoma, Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber and the Economic Development Board of Tacoma-Pierce County did not violate state campaign laws when they sued Save Tacoma Water in an ultimately successful effort to stop the group from putting two water-protection initiatives on ballots in Tacoma. The Attorney General’s Office filed the legal complaint against the port and business groups in August, claiming the port violated state public disclosure rules by using $45,000 in taxpayer dollars to litigate against the two ballot propositions and that the business groups failed to disclose their $10,000 in legal bills as campaign expenses. Staffers at the state Public Disclosure Commission had first investigated the case and recommended that the disclosure commission issue penalties. The independent commission, however, u See WATER / page A6

PHOTO COURTESY OF KRIS CREWS OF WILLO

Amy and son Oliver McBride.

AMY MCBRIDE: INTRODUCING ART AND ARTISTS TO TACOMA By Larry LaRue

larry@tacomaweekly.com

Invited to a formal gathering, Amy McBride went shopping for new earrings recently, but couldn't find what she wanted. So she headed for her basement. For the past 17 years, McBride has been the arts director for the city of Tacoma, serving the Arts Commission. As such, she's changed the look of the city's public art – and the way it's viewed. Long before becoming an executive, however, she was an artist. “I worked with small metal sculpture, and I made jewelry,” she said. The tools and the raw materials she needed for the earrings remain in her basement. When McBride feels the spirit, it's where she goes. A woman who spent a year honing her craft in France, McBride had no trouble knocking out jewelry the morning of the gala. “It had been awhile, but I got compliments that night,” she said. u See MCBRIDE / page A11 FACEBOOK: facebook.com/tacomaweekly

STARS COLORING CONTEST!

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OUR VIEW No one expected that Tacoma was the last stop for Tacoma City Manager TC Broadnax and the city is now developing a process to find his replacement. PAGE A5

TWITTER: @TacomaWeekly

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Two Sections | 28 Pages


4FDUJPO " t 1BHF • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, December 23, 2016

By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

When Percival went missing, I didn’t pay much attention to it. After living with the little porker for half a year, it was clear to me that he was just about the most responsible pig that a roommate could ever hope for. I was sure he was fine. He cleaned up after himself unlike any pig I had ever heard of. Percival was a giver and more than happy to share his popcorn with anyone within reach. For the first time in my 43 years, I also had finally found a roomie that had no problem with my snoring. Some attention has been paid recently to a supposed phone call to his girlfriend. Well I’ve got news for you. Percival was still heartbroken following his recent break-up with Petunia, and there certainly was no other girlfriend in his life. I wasn’t his last roommate. That’s all I’m going to say…

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PUBLIC RESTROOMS COMING TO CONSERVATORY The Victorian-style greenhouse on the west side of Tacoma’s Wright Park will get much-needed public restrooms next year. The public is invited to an informational meeting about the planned addition and future phased additions and improvements to the W.W. Seymour Botanical Conservatory at 6 p.m. Jan. 12 at Metro Parks Tacoma headquarters, 4702 S. 19th St., Tacoma. The meeting follows a series of planning meetings held earlier in 2016 to discuss possible Conservatory improvements and expansion. In the process, participants identified public restrooms as the top priority. Right now, Conservatory visitors must cross to the other side of the park to reach the nearest public restrooms. Metro Parks Tacoma Commissioner Andrea Smith is pleased with the progress being made and encourages people to come to the meeting to find out more. “My family has enjoyed the Conservatory since I was a child,” she said. “Knowing that this is the first step to enhance the visitors’ experience is very welcome.” Metro Parks plans to construct the restroom facility at ground level, and attached to the west side of the Conservatory’s north wing. It will be built to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act standards for access, said Project Manager Kristi Evans. The goal is to complete construction by December 2017. Beyond 2017, plans are in the works for a phased expansion of the building, which over time will add more exhibit space, a new entry lobby and additional improvements. The plans were shaped with community feedback through a series of public meetings earlier this year, surveys of Conservatory visitors and website visitors and other public comments. Anyone who is unable to attend the meeting and would like more information may call Project Manager Kristi Evans at (253) 305-1054 or send a message to kristie@ tacomaparks.com. UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND NAMED BEST COLLEGE Kiplinger’s Personal Finance has named University of Puget Sound in its 2017 list of the country’s Top 300 Best College Values. The national independent liberal arts college also earned a spot in the magazine’s list of 100 Best Values in Private Liberal Arts Colleges. The annual recognition selects 300 schools that combine outstanding academics with affordable cost. The list includes public universities, private schools and private liberal arts colleges. “There’s no way around it: College is expensive, and it’s going to stay that way for a long time,” said Janet Bodnar, editor of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. “So, with our rankings – which weigh affordability alongside academic quality – our goal is to help students and their parents understand what’s really worth the price. While some may have ranked higher than others, all 300 schools on the list

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TCC BIDS FAREWELL TO ITS PRESIDENT The Board of Trustees of Tacoma Community College (TCC) has accepted the resignation of President Sheila Ruhland, effective Jan. 13, 2017. The TCC Board of Trustees has appointed Mary Chikwinya, Vice President, Student Services and Bill Ryberg, Vice President, College Advancement and Director of the TCC Foundation as acting co-presidents. Mr. Ryberg has served at TCC for five years and Ms. Chikwinya has served at TCC since 2008. The acting co-presidents will serve as leads until an interim president is appointed by the Board of Trustees. “The Board of Trustees’ priority is to identify and place an experienced interim president until the permanent TCC president takes office,” said Chair Bob Ryan. “In the meantime, we are in good hands with Ms. Chikwinya and Mr. Ryberg as our acting co-presidents.” Chikwinya and Ryberg said they are both honored to serve as acting co-presidents of TCC. “We are ready to serve our students, faculty and staff,” they said. “We are an excellent college with a superb reputation, and we will continue to maintain and strengthen the integrity and quality of our education programs. This is a great place to study and to work.” Ryan thanked the leadership and staff. “The Board deeply appreciates all of the work the staff does on behalf of our students and for each other,” he said. “We thank them for their commitment during this time of transition.”

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are of extraordinary value, being chosen out of a universe of 1,200.” Kiplinger assesses value by measurable standards of academic quality and affordability – the same key attributes that most parents and students look for in higher education. Quality measures, which are weighted more heavily than cost, include the admission rate (the number of students accepted out of those who apply), the percentage of students who return for sophomore year, the student-faculty ratio, and the four-year graduation rate. Cost criteria include the sticker price, financial aid, and average debt at graduation. The magazine also lists graduates’ future average earnings data. Although private universities and colleges generally have higher tuition than public institutions, Kiplinger notes, they also can offer generous financial aid packages that greatly reduce the cost. At the same time, liberal arts colleges offer the advantage of smaller class sizes and accessible professors committed to teaching. Puget Sound, for example, offers merit-based and/or need-based financial aid to approximately 90 percent of its students. The college, with 2,600 students from around the country and overseas and a student to faculty ratio of 11 to one, offers a high-quality education in an environment where all tenure-line faculty members hold a doctorate or equivalent degree. The school is ranked in the top 5 percent of colleges for students who go on to earn doctoral degrees. Puget Sound has been on Kiplinger’s “best value” list nearly every year since the magazine named the Top 100 liberal arts colleges in 2011.

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Friday, December 23, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • 4FDUJPO " t 1BHF

FIRCREST POLICE SEEK ID OF THEFT AND FRAUD SUSPECTS

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Fircrest police need your help to identify these suspects responsible for a theft and credit card fraud. On the morning of Monday, Nov. 7 a DAVID ROSE vehicle was prowled on Birch Street in Fircrest. Unidentified suspect(s) stole a purse from inside the vehicle. The purse contained a laptop computer, credit cards, identification and checks. Immediately following the theft, the couple in the photos used the stolen credit cards at the Target store, Famous Footwear store and the Walmart store all located along Union Avenue in Tacoma. The suspects also used the stolen checks to make over $1,500 in fraudulent deposits and cash with-

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drawals from the victim’s accounts. "The victim is devastated by this because once you lose your purse, you are usually going to lose everything you own. It's who you are and now somebody else is pretending to be who you are and not only are doing fraud and theft but they've stolen your identity," said Det. Ed Troyer with the Pierce County Sheriff's Department.

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Crime Stoppers of Tacoma-Pierce County is offering a cash reward of up to $1,000 to anyone who can identify the two suspects. "These people make a living at stealing people's identity and what we want to do is get these people caught right away," said Troyer. If you know their names, call the hot line anonymously at 1 (800) 222TIPS (8477).

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Last week, the Pierce County Council took a four yes, three no vote that rejected an 0.1 percent tax increase to fund mental health programs. (A “super majority” of five votes is needed for any tax increase.) I respect the Council’s prerogative on this vote even as I am disappointed with the outcome. I know that taxes are unpopular and I know that this tax increase would not solve all aspects of the problem. But after years of wrongheaded neglect and cutbacks at the State level, the mental health problem (including the associated problem of homelessness) has gotten out of hand. It will not go away. It will get worse. It needs to be brought under control. Fixing problems often costs money. When we fail to maintain essential systems, they deteriorate. Sooner or later, things get so bad we need to pay to correct the problem. The mental health system has been neglected. Sure, we did save money by putting off fixing it. But how does that feel now that we need to deal with

the cost of the consequences? Life is like that. There’s no free lunch. And problems don’t magically go away on their own. Basically, I see this as a question of responsibility. We have a real problem in our community. No one denies this. The state should be solving this. But it has not and will not. The state may help with some of the problem, and we could probably goad them to do more if we stepped up. But we haven’t stepped up. We have avoided responsibility. Who knows? Maybe there is another way to deal with this issue for free. But in the real world, there is not much that is free. In the meantime, people and families and communities and public safety are all suffering, and we keep spending more and more money on baling wire and bubble gum. And the problem is not going away. Sadly, and sometimes cynically, people expect law enforcement and our colleagues in fire service to “just handle” the problem. They expect us to “just handle” all the issues that they would like to ignore or don't care

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to spend resources on. Never mind that this brings costly, inappropriate overuse of jails and emergency rooms. Calls for police and emergency medical services increase, as do dangerous encounters for our personnel in the street. “Just let the cops handle it” is becoming a popular way to avoid taking responsibility. There is that word again: responsibility. It is the old fashioned idea that if you live in a community and the community faces a problem, you step up to help solve it. Guess I just have old-fashioned ideas. But you can bet that this problem will not solve itself. And it won’t be free. We admire outspoken leaders today. So here is a quote from a longago, outspoken leader who thought that citizenship was not just about rights and entitlements and perks, but also about shouldering responsibilities and costs. "Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom (or public order or public safety, for that matter), must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it." Thomas Paine, 1777. Care to "man-up" anyone?

BANK ROBBERY Tacoma Police detectives need your help to identify the suspect responsible for a bank robbery. At 12:40 p.m. on Friday, November 25th, 2016, the pictured suspect robbed a Columbia Bank branch located in the 600 block of North I St. in the City of Tacoma. The suspect entered the bank, approached a teller, and presented a note demanding cash. The suspect placed the money into a blue file folder and fled the bank. The suspect is described as mately 190 lbs., with a black curly pants, a bright red jacket and cola black male approximately 40 hair and a goatee. During the rob- lared shirt, black sunglasses, and years old, 5’9” to 6’ tall, approxi- bery he was seen wearing black a black leather cap. Fridays at 10:30pm on

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Section A • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, December 23, 2016

BE WELL YOGA STUDIO LETS STUDENTS SET THEIR OWN PACE inside & out

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Tuladhara Yoga Studio lets its students learn and stretch at their own pace by helping them gain awareness of their own bodies and their limits. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

A

licia Barrett was climbing the typical corporate ladder at a Fortune 50 retailer after receiving a bachelor’s degree from Western Washington University and a stint at a regional retailer. Yoga had long been a part of her personal life, so she decided to make marry it with her professional life by opening Tuladhara Yoga Studio rather than continue that trek through corporate America. “Yoga was very transformative for me,” she said. “I thought it was something the community could really benefit from.” She received her 200-hour Yoga Alliance accreditation and then opened her studio last spring, while she is working on her 500-hour trainer certification through Semperviva Yoga. Her Lakewood studio offers varying levels of yoga training at various times of the week to fit the needs of the students, whether they want to simply improve their physical fitness and flexibility or want to become more personally centered through meditation. “People choose yoga for a reason,” Barrett said. “They come to yoga because they weren’t finding what they were looking for in a gym. I want people to get what they need from each of the classes.” Each class includes movement and flexibility positions, meditation and

“breath work” to help students learn how to better get in tune with their bodies and their limits rather than compete with others in the class. “The idea is to respect where you’re at,” Barrett said, noting that students are encouraged to modify yoga poses to fit their needs and limits rather than feel pressured into doing it “right.” They can then build from there and reach for a physical balance through practice that then translates into a balanced life out of class. Tuladhara, after all, comes from the ancient Sanskrit word “Tula” meaning balance. Tuladhara is someone who embodies balance in their daily lives and changes the world by striving to always be the best versions of themselves through taking care of their health, practicing peace with themselves and others. “How you deal with things on the mat is how you deal with things in life,” Barrett said. Students who are frustrated on the yoga mats because they feel pressure to do the yoga pose perfectly will feel frustrated in their work, their lives and their relationships, so the studio strives to be supportive rather than competitive. The seemingly simple practice of focusing attention on breathing and being present in a yoga class can help students be present and focused in their everyday lives in the outside world. Tuladhara Yoga Studio offers an introductory package for $30 for

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Friday, December 23, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 5

Our View

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Guest Editorials

ONE BLACK WOMAN’S VIEW By Heather Mosley What is the root of racism, the cause of conflict, the answer to anger? As we transition from our nation’s first black president and the dream of a post-racial America to a man elected by supporters that include Confederate battle flagwavers, I need to reflect on my own journey to help myself deal with it all. I grew up in a family of six kids. I’m the youngest, and was born and raised in Portland, Oregon. My mom is black and native from Mississippi, and my father was a strong black man from Alabama. Both were raised in the segregation era. We were not raised to be violent or racist and would get disciplined if we showed any signs of it. My mom said she never worried about people messing over me even as a child. I was outspoken and would defend myself if it became necessary. I was a fairly small child but came with a powerful pack of energy. I never started any fights or picked on anyone, and never played the bully role. You would have to pick on me first for me to go into action. I was bussed out to all-white schools through elementary and high school. I can remember my first day of school; my oldest sister was getting me dressed to walk me to catch the bus. The buses picked us up from the black schools that were in the neighborhood to take us to the white schools. When my sister was putting me on the bus she said, “You better not let anyone treat you differently or disrespect you just because of

your color.� I did not understand. I was too young to understand about racism, but I surely learned. There were about 10 of us black kids who were bussed out to this elementary school. To this day I can remember this incident that took place when I was in the 3rd or 4th grade. I was the only black kid in the classroom and a white girl raised her hand and told the teacher her lunch bag was missing. She said she believed I was the one who took it. The teacher, who was an older white woman, asked the class who wanted to go search my stuff to see if I had stolen it. All of a sudden, I saw all the little white hands go up into the air. I remember thinking as soon as one comes toward me I was going to sock them in their face. One of the kids then said to the girl who was missing her lunch, “Isn’t that your bag over there on the window ledge?� She said yes. The class went back to normal with no apology to me from the teacher or the girl. I remember feeling so degraded even at the young age I was. That evening, I cried and told my mom what had happened. The next morning she, I and my dad headed to the school and my parents were not happy. My mom went into the principal’s office and explained how they were not going to treat her child in any disrespectful matter. My dad and I sat outside the door and then I see the teacher enter the principal’s office. I will not repeat the words I heard my mom saying to this teacher. What I remember about the incident is, the teacher no

longer taught that class, my parents and I were given a written apology, and I’m not sure what other actions may have ensued legally. I continued, graduated from that school, and had no more problems that I could not handle on my own. In this world I have seen and faced a lot of unfair racial treatment, and at times I have reacted in anger. Yes, I would get up in someone’s face and be ready to handle the situation whichever way it went. It never got physically violent but certainly got verbally violent. Over the years, I learned the only person who suffered and got hurt from handling racism this way was me. I have been a work in progress and have come a long way from being aggressive. I have learned how to approach the situation and voice my opinion without hostility. I pray for strength from God to show me, and I have nothing to prove to anyone in a violent way. Now, instead, I use constructive communication skills, take conflict resolution classes, and get my point across where it does not cause serious problems. I will continue to work on being less aggressive, for I am a woman who carries herself in a respectful manner and violence is not the answer. In the coming period, I pray we all reflect and respect and learn to overcome our inner aggressions. We will need this, I suspect, together. Heather Mosley is a returning college student.

MILLION WREATHS ACROSS AMERICA By Don C. Brunell Christmas is a difficult time for anyone grieving for lost loved ones. It is especially painful for America’s military families whose son, daughter, spouse or parent was killed while serving in uniform. Normally, the fallen are remembered on Memorial Day, but thanks to a Maine family and over 800,000 donors and volunteers, more than a million wreaths were laid on the tombstones of our fallen soldiers, sailors and airmen on Dec. 17. The panoramic view of Arlington National Cemetery’s rolling hills with its white grave markers perfectly aligned with Christmas wreaths is breathtaking. In 2015 nearly 250,000 wreaths were placed there. Since the program started in 1992, more than 1,000 burial grounds across the nation and American national cemeteries in foreign lands have joined. In Washington State, 13 memorial parks located from Walla Walla to Port Orchard participate and volunteers are expected to place over 42,000 wreaths this year. Over half of them were laid at the Tahoma National Cemetery. Each year Evergreen Memorial Gardens is involved. Brad Carlson, whose family owns and operates the Vancouver cemetery, observes: “We see moms, dads, and spouses and children really suffering from their loved one’s loss and this helps them know that oth-

ers care and remember. It is very moving and something you don’t forget.� Here is how it started. When Morrill Worcester was a 12-year-old paperboy for the Bangor (Maine) Daily News, he won a trip to Washington, D.C. His visit to Arlington National Cemetery made an indelible impression that stayed with him throughout his life. Years later, Worcester realized that he could use his family business to honor the hundreds of thousands of veterans laid to rest in Arlington. Founded in 1971, Worchester Wreath Co. of Harrington, Maine is a family-owned business that grows balsam fir in its forests. It has become one of the largest wholesalers. Wreaths Across America (WAA) sprang from a Worchester gesture in 1992 when they shipped surplus wreaths to Washington, D.C. They were placed on headstones in an older section of the Arlington National Cemetery – the most forgotten part of the burial grounds. After the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, interest in the project spiked. In fact, the Pentagon, which was struck by a jetliner on that day, is within eyesight of Arlington. In 2005, when WAA appeared on the Internet with a sobering photo of thousands of snow-covered wreaths on Arlington headstones, interest and donations mushroomed. Wreaths Across America is a privately funded charity that accepts no government money. Delivery of a mil-

lion wreaths is quite an undertaking this December, especially when much of our country is suffering from frigid arctic temperatures, icy roads and blinding blizzards. Over 100 trucking companies voluntarily load their semi-trailers and their drivers fan out across America. They absorb all of the delivery costs. At Arlington, for example, thousands of volunteers line the road waving flags as the trucks roll up to the entrance. Morrill Worcester told the Bangor Daily news that his first trip to Arlington National Cemetery helped him remember those who gave everything to keep America free. Today, the Wreaths Across America program helps us remember, as well. The wreaths provide some comfort to families and friends of America’s fallen. They also remind us not to forget those suffering with life-long mental and physical disabilities from military service. As a special note this Christmas: In today’s terrorist infected world, we should include our law enforcement officers and firefighters here at home in our thoughts and prayers. They too are in harm’s way every day. Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He recently retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the state’s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.

E-MAIL US YOUR OPINIONS! Tacoma Weekly welcomes your opinions, viewpoints and letters to the editor. You can e-mail us at news@ tacomaweekly.com. Please include your name, address and phone number when submitting your letter.

Tacoma City Manager TC Broadnax stepped into his new office at City Hall in 2012, right as the city was facing the first of a series of financial troubles. There would be more troubles to come during his five years in the City of Destiny as the city struggled to climb out of a complex web of municipal accounts used to pay for services and programs and adopt a more transparent and collaborative budgetary system that tied funding with revenues designed to support them. When the City Council selected Broadnax over the two other finalists for the position, Mayor Marilyn Strickland noted she was impressed with his “all go and no show� managerial style. That is certainly what Tacoma got. He listened more than he spoke, and he showed more than he told. Most notably, he crafted budgets based on revenues without addressing “non-core� city services and programs as a way to show that finding one thing involves cuts in others or higher taxes. Those are political decisions that should, and were, left for the elected members of the City Council to make. He didn’t as much present “his budget� as much as he laid out the numbers for the horse trading and public debates to play out so everyday residents could voice their thoughts as the community processes unfolded. Not everyone was happy, but they can’t say they didn’t have a chance to express their concerns. And now he is moving on. It was bound to happen. No one expected that Tacoma was the last stop for the 47-year-old. Frankly, Broadnax’s time in Tacoma lasted longer than expected, since city managers often last three to four years before either the political winds change and prompt a shuffle or another city hires away talent on the rise. The city is now developing a process to find his replacement, which will most certainly involve hiring a consultant to conduct a nationwide search of candidates and hold community meetings for people to meet the top candidates. Before that process plays out, however, it would be wise to talk about what people think Tacoma is and what it should be in the future. Those discussions would then dovetail into the forums for the selection of who the city would tap to “herd the cats� so that the city moves forward.

TACOMAWEEKLY Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC 2588 Pacific Highway E., Fife, WA 98424 PH: (253) 922-5317 FAX: (253) 922-5305 PUBLISHER John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com NEWS DESK news@tacomaweekly.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com STAFF WRITERS Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Derek Shuck / derek@tacomaweekly.com Larry LaRue / larry@tacomaweekly.com ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com SPORTS EDITOR Justin Gimse / jgimse@tacomaweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Dave Davison, Chance Pittenger, Matt Kite, Josh Reisberg, Randy Rutledge, Erica Cooley, Carolin Jones COPY EDITING Garrett Westcott CARTOONISTS Chris Britt, Milt Priggee PAGINATION Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar WEB DEVELOPER Ed Curran PHOTOGRAPHERS Rocky Ross, Bill Bungard, David Turnipseed, Richard Trask ADVERTISING Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Marlene Carrillo / marlene@tacomaweekly.com Andrea Jay / andrea@tacomaweekly.com

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Section A • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, December 23, 2016

CANNABIS AT EVENTS LEADS TO “HIGHER LEARNING” FROM WSLCB

PHOTOS BY RACHELLE ERICKSON

OPEN COMMUNICATION. The event made for a great opportunity for law enforcement and cannabis connoisseurs to share dialog on the rules governing cannabis use. In this case, attendees learned that cannabis consumption at events is illegal by our state’s health code and state ordinances, even for those events dubbed “private” and exclusive to those over 21 years of age.

It was a damp November evening in the quintes- a safer alternative at your wedding to the stereotypical representative. Quite the plethora of opinions and credible sentially Tacoma-esque neighborhood near Pac Ave. and alcohol-bar for your guests to consume wisely? Nope. Not input, one might say? I was inclined to believe so, but it 26th Ave, specifically, the lovely Tin Can Alley. An event happening here, folks. seemed that the ominous four-year time frame that the where mum was the word, and an invitation was essenSimply stating that this issue will take some serious WSLCB mentioned seemed to rile up the room in such tial for your highly anticipated entry, our little city came pushing from those among us that are concerned or inter- a manner that only they can accomplish so eloquently. together with just a select few of the movers and shakers ested in changing these public consumption laws to allow For obvious reasons, facing that amount of time without over at the Chamber of Commerce, as well as the being able to assist or navigate a growing demand WSLCB, to discuss the ever present question, “If is unrealistic for some people, and was met with cannabis is legal in our state, what about consumppositive, yet inquisitive questioning like one from Due to the legislative process, it appears tion at private events?” a gentleman we will call Dee. “Is adult use of we may be as long as four years out, or The answer may or may not shock you, but it cannabis allowed at a closed or private event?” was most certainly disappointing for those in attenmore, from developing public/private event WSLCB Agent T promptly pushed, “Absolutely dance that were hoping to expand their customer not.” He also mentioned that in some scenarios, consumption guidelines of any sort. service, or catering service. Simply put, cannabis unlikely as they may be, those actions may carry consumption at events is illegal by our state’s felony charges for the event organizer or anyone "T," WSLCB ENFORCEMENT AGENT health code and state ordinances, even for those involved. Essentially, the fact is that a business events dubbed “private” and exclusive to those with any type of transactional procedures or funcover 21 years of age. Not to mention that it falls under some alternatives would be an understatement. WSLCB tions is, by WSLCB standards, “public” and this makes it enforcement agent, referred to here as “T,” was quite blunt illegal to produce or participate in consumption activities federal guidelines as well. This is a seriously concerning issue for more than a few with his responses, which was honestly a breath of fresh air. no matter how private you have made it. “Due to the legislative process, it appears we may rogue cannabis consumers interested in having a “green” If I can implore you to simply do one thing, take away party or other cannabis-centric get together. On a realistic be as long as four years out, or more, from developing from this brief discussion the fact that recreational cannascale, it affects the entire state’s catering services, event public/private event consumption guidelines of any sort,” bis became legal in 2012 here in our state, but left adults coordinators, customer service businesses interested in T stated as he sat on a panel of eight other professionals. little more than their bedrooms to safely consume within. giving the ever-interested clientele, and the clients them- This panel consisted of two WSLCB enforcement agents Let’s change that. This next legislative session is when we selves! If you were interested in attending the infamous and one administrative representative from the WSLCB, as a state can uphold our reputation as a leader in the legal Hempfest, or any number of “private-parties” where the Pierce County Health Department, a prolific event cannabis industry and show the other states nationally how cannabis is being presented or offered, it is currently not organizer and designer, an avid cannabis-advocate/canna- to roll out legislation in regard to permitting adults the allowed, technically. Maybe you were interested in having bis business owner, a business attorney and an insurance ability to publicly roll up.

t Transit From page A1

MLK from Division Avenue to South 19th Street. New center-of-the-street stations will be added at Stadium and South 4th Street, North 1st Street and North Tacoma Avenue, MLK and South 3rd Street, MLK and 6th Avenue, MLK and South 11th Street and at the a terminus at MLK and South 19th Street. Outstanding questions people can voice their thoughts on include the names each of the stations will have as a way to denote the location as well as reflect the neighborhood’s identity, history or nearby landmark. Which, if any, of the four stations along MLK be named “MLK Station” or “Hilltop Station,” for example, since all of those stations serve the Hilltop neighborhood. Sound Transit guidelines state stations should avoid commercial references or avoid names of existing facilities. “Station naming is pretty important,” said Chris

Karnes, avid transit watcher and member of Pierce Transit’s Community Transit Advisory Group. “The name of a station should create a sense of identity for the neighborhoods it serves. Personally, I would like to see references to history.” The current light rail tracks run from the Tacoma Dome Station to the Theater District, so the expansion would bring rail service to the Hilltop neighborhood and its growing job centers that are anchored by Tacoma General Hospital, Group Health and Mary Bridge Children’s Hospital on one side and St. Joseph Medical Center on the other. The area has been known as the “medical mile,” because of the number of healthcare facilities along MLK between the complexes. The $150 million expansion is being funded by the voter-approved Sound Transit 2 package of projects, as well as federal and state grants. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2018 and start operation in 2022. Sound Transit 3, which

voters approved in November, will extend Link service even further by adding tracks that would run from 19th Street to Tacoma Community College on the city’s western city limits. The ST3 package adds a 0.5 percent sales tax; imposes a property tax of up to $0.25 per $1,000 of assessed valuation and increases motor vehicle tax by 0.8 percent for an average cost of about $17 a month in new taxes and fees to fund $54 billion in transit packages around Puget Sound. The Tacoma Link light rail extension to Tacoma Community College would open in 2039, when the region is expected to have added a million new residents. Estimates put the cost of the ST3 extension at about $478 million to construct a 3.65-mile route from 19th Street in downtown Tacoma to TCC. Projected ridership would be about 8,000 a day. The route would stop around Sprague Avenue, Union Avenue, Stevens Street, Pearl Street and Tacoma Community College, which serves as a hub for local bus routes.

MAP COURTESY OF SOUND TRANSIT

t Water From page A1

opted not to follow that recommendation. That decision prompted the attorney general to continue the case, which has now been dismissed. A decision on whether or not to appeal is expected after the New Year. Culpepper dismissed the case because, he ruled, the legal challenge that the groups filed against Save Tacoma Water raised constitutionality questions about the initiatives themselves. Questioning the legality of the initiatives before they reached ballots did not make their legal bills campaign expenses. The initiatives would have required a public vote for products that would use more than a million gallons of water a day. The port and business groups successfully blocked the initiatives with a ruling from Judge Jack Nevin’s court this summer. They argued that the initiatives would have thwarted economic development in the region as

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

WATER. The Attorney General’s legal complaint against the Port of Tacoma

and local business groups has been dismissed, although an appeal is being considered.

well as violated state law, which requires public utilities to provide water and power to every customer in their service area.

“Seeking judicial review is not ‘use of public funds for campaign purposes,’” the port’s filing stated. “The port took no

campaign action to influence the vote on a ballot measure. Here, any expenditures at issue were made prior to a ballot initiative campaign, and were in fact related to reviewing the legality of such a campaign on the grounds that the matters were facially unconstitutional. If a proposed local initiative is facially beyond the local initiative power and unconstitutional, it can logically never become part of a legitimate ‘ballot initiative campaign.”” Save Tacoma Water organizer Sherry Bockwinkel said she was disappointed and puzzled by the ruling since state law required the group to file campaign disclosure reports while gathering signatures and promoting the initiatives, so the expenses for challenging the initiatives should also be campaign expenses and reported as such. That should particularly be true when a government agency, in this case the Port of Tacoma, sues a group of its own citizens for championing an initiative. “Sometimes judges make the wrong decision, and this is one of them,” she said.


Friday, December 23, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 11

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the Puyallup Tribe or…Toys for Tots can do. People come up to me and say how appreciative they are and how it warms their hearts. It makes Christmas feel a lot better.” Working side-by-side with the tribal members were State Rep. David Sawyer (D-29th), who Miller said comes out to help every year, and Tacoma City Councilmember Keith Blocker. “It’s a cold day so it’s good to see everybody get what they need,” Saywer said. “It’s very generous of the Puyallup Tribe to give back to the community in this way. There’s no shortage of people who are extraordinarily grateful for the amount of time that Sylvia and others put into this. It’s just a privilege to be here.” Blocker said he was happy to be there and serve. “These people are obviously very vulnerable – it’s a cold day – and it’s going to be cold winter. This is a great way to start off the Christmas season by giving back to people who are greatly in need.” Pierce County Detective Ed Troyer of Crime Stoppers and Toys for Tots said he uses the opportunity to teach his children how to give. “I like bringing my own kids so they can volunteer and see all kinds of sides of life and see what they can do as they get older,” he said, “like all these people in the

Puyallup Tribe giving back to communities. That’s how we teach our kids.” Angel Robertiello, lead secretary for the Puyallup Tribal Council, said she comes out to volunteer “because I know that me and my family are really blessed. It’s really hard to look at all these little kids out here that don’t have anything and are the same age as my grandchildren. That’s why I’m here today. It feels just as good for us to give as it does for them to receive.” Robertiello said she wasn’t raised to turn a blind eye to the homeless but rather to do something to help. “One time me and my dad were in Seattle and there was a homeless man who was crippled and my dad gave him his belt to help him carry his bags,” she recalled from her childhood. “That was a first lesson. We all need to do that and teach our kids to do that too. We have to help.” Tribal member JD Dillon looked back on when the Puyallup Tribe had practically nothing and today has the power to give to others in need in keeping with the meaning of the Puyallup name – “the generous and welcoming people.” “This is how our ancestors started out, and we’re the giving people, so we’re doing this for them,” he said. “In the beginning we had to fight and scratch, too, and that’s why we enjoy doing this because we don’t have to fight and scratch anymore. We are blessed and it’s a good feeling to be able to do this.”

Escape

me. I didn't know that existed.” It's one that has helped produce art large and small in Tacoma, and pushed Tacoma to the forefront among cities embracing public art. “One of my jobs is to recognize talent, and over the years we've had thousands of artists come through the city,” McBride said. “The Tacoma Artist Initiative has funding for artists from all disciplines. The truth is, we don't know who's out there wanting to create art. The initiative gives $2,500 stipend, and has awarded $40,000 every two years. “What we do is telegraph artists everywhere that there are opportunities in Tacoma.”

Hw

t Giveaway

happen. McBride had lived in Wisconsin, Colorado, France, San Francisco and Seattle before finding home in Tacoma. “I got a degree in art history and French in Colorado and spent a year studying at the Michel de Montaigne University Bordeaux in France,” she said. “In San Francisco, I studied sculpture and in Seattle, I went to Bellevue College and took international education and studied fundraising management at the University of Washington.” At 31, she moved to Tacoma. “I knew I wanted an urban setting, and moved here in '98,” McBride said. “I applied for a Public Art Specialist position with the city. I didn't know it was the perfect job for

Pa cifi c

From page A1

McBride is a hard woman not to like. At 50, she is divorced, a single mother to 15-year-old son Oliver, a humble public servant who admits she “swears like a sailor.” McBride smiles easily, has a sly sense of humor and loves what she does. “A few years ago, I realized my job was to be a 'connector' between the city and artists and those who live here,” McBride said. “I've often heard 'Tacoma has so much potential.' Potential is empty space for people who want to take part in filling it.” Not surprisingly, McBride champions art and those who create it. Since she began work for the city in 1999, she has brought a wide variety of art – glass, furniture, metal work, ceramics and print-making – to Tacoma. McBride also helped shape the future of public art in the city, coming up with programs like Spaceworks and Tacoma Public Arts Month. Spaceworks, created in partnership with the Tacoma Chamber of Commerce in 2010, has been such a success that cities across the country have studied and copied it. “We had quite a few empty store fronts sitting vacant,” McBride explained. “We put

artwork in the windows of the old Woolworth building at 11th and Broadway, rotating it every month or so. “Spaceworks trained art entrepreneurs in an 8-week course on how to run a business, and matched them up with space they could use to open their business. “We've had 86 businesses start up, and 80 per cent of those paid their leases,” she said. “We want to create destinations for shoppers and tourists, and we wanted to create economy in the city.” McBride also changed the month of October forever. “Tacoma Arts Month is every October, and it's grown to hundreds of programs – dance, music, art of all kinds,” she said. On a daily basis each October, the city hosts classes, offers showings by artists both well-known and unknown. There are concerts and how-to workshops. And there are the studio tours. Begun more than a decade ago when a half dozen artists volunteered, last October 34 Tacoma artists opened their studios for a day to the public. People could walk through, mingle with the artists, ask questions and in some cases watch them work. McBride beams at the praise the city has gotten for such projects. The most remarkable aspect may be that she's managed to stay in one place long enough to see it

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SI DE TH E

Sports

LIN E

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2016

STARS BACK ON TOP TIED WITH SAN DIEGO AT TOP OF PACIFIC

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 12

PHOTOS BY ERNIE SAPIRO PHOTOGRAPHY

RUMBLE. (top) In the main event of the

evening, Bryan Nuro made short work of challenger Bobby McIntyre to capture the Cagesport Interim Lightweight title belt. With the win, Nuro has earned a rematch against Tacoma's Justin Harrington. The last time the two met, Harrington was awarded the victory by the judges, but many in the EQC Showroom thought the fight had went the other way. (middle) McIntyre was forced to tap out. (bottom) The fight between Journey Newson (facing) and Anthony Zender was one of the best of the night, as Newson finished it off with a submission in the third round.

CAGESPORT 43 SERVES UP SUBMISSION BUFFET

By Justin Gimse

I

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

t is beginning to feel like the Tacoma Stars are unable to deliver anything but an epic home field performance. There was a time, a few decades ago, when a visit by the San Diego Sockers meant nothing but heartache and heartburn for Tacoma Stars’ fans. While there were a few close games to be had, the Sockers had Tacoma’s number, and it drove the diehard fans absolutely nuts. Sure, San Diego is still an awesome team and an outstanding professional organization, but it appears that Tacoma has finally closed the gap. Facing the Sockers with a first-place tie in the Major Arena Soccer League’s Pacific Division on the line, the Stars matched San Diego’s ferocity and fire for a full 60 minutes on Sunday, Dec. 18 at the ShoWare Center. In the end, it was yet another heart-stopping victory for the Stars, as they traded blows with San Diego for an 8-7 victory in front of 2,371 ecstatic and exhausted fans. The win pushed Tacoma’s record to 6-3, matching San Diego’s and pulling them into a tie with the Sockers at the top of the standings. The Stars also ran their home record to 4-0 at the ShoWare. San Diego struck first just over two minutes into the match as Brandon Escoto fired a shot to the upper left corner of the goal, just too far out of reach for Tacoma goalkeeper Danny Waltman. It would take nearly nine more minutes until Tacoma found its own spot on the scoreboard off the foot of Raphael Cox. A Stadium Tiger alum, Cox spun toward the top of the goal box circle and crushed a low burner toward the bottom right of the goal. Meanwhile, Tacoma’s Dan Antoniuk had dropped anchor in that section of the box, successfully keeping two Sockers from covering that section of the goal. When Cox sent his shot toward the goal, Antoniuk merely had to move his left foot slightly and the ball zipped straight between his legs and into the back of the net to tie the game. Tacoma would strike again two minutes later as Derek Johnson found some open room streaking up the field, while Michael Ramos pushed the ball into firing range, with two defenders drawn to him. Seeing Johnson appear in his vision, Ramos skipped the ball across to Johnson who one-timed the shot past San Diego goalkeeper Boris Pardo. Tacoma would get another goal off u See STARS / page A14

By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS BY KAYLA MEHRING

STARDUST. (top) Following his game-winning goal with just over two minutes remaining in the match, Tacoma's Alex Megson spins into his own rendition of the "Mannequin Challenge." The former Bellarmine Lion was rewarded with his two-goal, two-assist performance by being named to the Major Arena Soccer League's Team of the Week. (left) Tacoma goalkeeper Danny Waltman lifts the winning finger following the 8-7 victory over San Diego. (second-right) Waltman with the save. (third-right) Megson puts his body on the line for the score. (bottom) Former Stadium Tiger Raphael Cox delivered two goals for Tacoma and gave the Stars a spark throughout the contest.

It was another successful and exciting night of mixed martial arts on Friday, Dec. 17 at the Emerald Queen Casino. A packed EQC Showroom was dished up a holiday smorgasbord of seven fights for Cagesport 43 and the variety of action on the menu kept fans wondering how the next fight was going to end. The first contest of the evening was a 136-pound fight between Rodney Kealohi out of Lacey, against Sean Gee out of Portland. As opening bouts go, it was a pretty good one. Gee looked like he was going to try and wear out Kealohi by pinning him against the cage and finding openings for a shot to the head, body or legs. It seemed to work as Kealohi didn’t have much of a response whenever the fight went back to the center of the ring. By the second round, it was clear that Gee was going to take the fight to the canvas. The only problem with this strategy was once he had Kealohi down on his back, he could only connect on a few shots here and there, instead of really delivering the “ground and pound” onslaught that I’m sure he was intending to rain on his opponent. Even when Kealohi scored his own takedown, Gee was able to reverse it and take control of the fight again. Less than a minute into the third round, Gee (2-2-0) forced Kealohi (1-1-0) to tap out via a guillotine choke hold. Up next was a 141-pound bout between Dylan “The Bull” Atkinson versus Daniel Elliot, fighting out of Tacoma. This would

u See MMA / page A15


Friday, December 23, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • 4FDUJPO " t 1BHF

SPORTSWATCH

TACOMA’S HOT TICKETS

BIG YEAR FOR SOUNDERS U23 COLLEGE PLAYERS

The Sounders U23 team has helped produce professional soccer players for the past five years. Over 55 players have signed professional contracts since 2012 after having suited up for the Sounders U23 team. Highlighted by Jordan Morris, who won an MLS Cup this past weekend with Sounders FC after a year winning an NCAA Championship and taking home MLS Rookie of the Year honors, the Sounders U23 team continues to help players move on. DeAndre Yedlin played every minute of the 2012 PDL season and his meteoric rise in the professional game saw him play in the 2014 World Cup and he now plies his trade in England with Newcastle. You can add Jonathan Campbell to the list of former Sounders U23 players that had big years as he started for the Chicago Fire in MLS in 2016. “The Sounders U23 experience was great for me as I wanted to be in a professional environment. Darren Sawatzky recruited a great group of guys that were able to bond together and do well in the playoffs. The practice sessions were focused and intense, providing us with opportunities to grow and prepare for the college season,” said Campbell. Sean Okoli was the MVP and Golden Boot winner in the USL for FC Cincinnati in 2016 and just signed on with NYCFC in Major League Soccer. Florian Valot won the USL Championship with NYRB2 and Clement Simonin narrowly missed an MLS Championship as his Toronto FC lost in penalties to Morris and Sounders FC. Jordan Schweitzer just made the move to Orlando City B after starting the year for S2, the Sounders FC USL team. Many more players litter the different levels of professional soccer in the United States after spending time with the Sounders U23 team. Sounders U23 players from the past also find themselves in the local professional soccer scene. Aaron Kovar joined Jordan Morris, along with Darwin Jones, on the Sounders FC MLS Championship team. Chase Hanson, Troy Peterson, Vince McCluskey, Mark Lee, Derek Johnson, Steve Mohn, Jamael Cox, Joseph Cairel, Mike Arguello, and Joey Gjertsen are currently competing for the Tacoma Stars in the MASL after spending time with Sounders U23. Michael Gallagher is currently playing for T2, the Portland Timbers USL affiliate to the south and Taylor Peay saw first team minutes for the Portland Timbers in 2016. “We pride ourselves in helping guys move on. Some of these players have played in programming I have been involved with for many years and some come to us for the finishing pieces in helping them make the leap to the next level. We are happy for all these players and the phone starts ringing in October from players looking for a good development environment for the summer as they look to make the move up,” said Sawatzky, Sounders U23 head coach and general manager. The 2016 PDL season for the Sounders U23 team was no different as many very good players came to Washington State or chose to stay home to work on their game and prepare for the college season before ultimately looking to make the jump to professional soccer. Five former Sounders U23 players have been invited to the 2016 MLS player combine with Guillermo Delgado, Kyle Bjornethun, Chris Wehan, Niko Hansen, and Brandt Bronico representing the

DEC. 22 - JAN. 7 THURSDAY, DEC. 22 – BASKETBALL Girls – Bellarmine vs. Lincoln Lincoln HS – 5 p.m.

THURSDAY, DEC. 22 – BASKETBALL Girls – Willapa Valley vs. Chief Leschi Chief Leschi HS – 5:45 p.m.

THURSDAY, DEC. 22 – BASKETBALL Girls – Stadium vs. Foss Henry Foss HS – 6 p.m.

THURSDAY, DEC. 22 – BASKETBALL PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

rave green. Chris Wingate from the University of New Hampshire was named the 2016 American East Midfielder of the Year along with being named First Team All-Conference. He was also a 2016 Senior Class Award finalist. Collyns Laokandi from St. Francis earned NEC Defensive Player of the Year for the conference. Kyle Bjornethun was named the WAC Defensive Player of the Year for the second year in a row along with being named WAC All First Team. Bjornethun was also in the 2016 Herman Trophy Watch List. Tom Teupen was the 2016 MAAC Defensive Player of the Year while competing at Canisius. Delgado finished his Delaware career breaking a 50 year old goal-scoring record and earning his fourth All-America distinction while being named the 2016 Colonial Athletic Association Player of the Year for 2016. Jose Aguinaga was named First Team All-MAAC at Rider and Paul Christensen was named the WCC Goalkeeper of the Year at Portland. Brandon Zambrano took home WCC Second-Team All-Conference at Portland as well. Rooby Dalusma was named a Second Team All-American as his Tyler Community College won the NJCAA National Championship with an undefeated record. Jeff Caldwell was named Second Team All-ACC at Virginia and Adam Jones was named the GNAC Player of the Year along with First Team All-Conference for Simon Fraser north of the border. Both Jalen Crisler and Jakob Granlund earned WCC First Team selections for Gonzaga this fall and Leeroy Maguraushe was named a NSCAA Second Team AllAmerican at UNC-Greensboro, along with an All-Southern Conference selection. The Sounders U23 will again look to help players develop and move up to the professional ranks in 2017. Please stay tuned for schedule and ticket opportunities to come watch the young guns before they make their move to the professional game. For tickets and more information, check out www.soundersu23.com.

Girls – Lakes vs. Curtis Curtis HS – 7 p.m.

THURSDAY, DEC. 22 – BASKETBALL Boys – Willapa Valley vs. Chief Leschi Chief Leschi HS – 7 p.m.

TUESDAY, DEC. 27 – BASKETBALL Girls – Tulalip Heritage vs. Chief Leschi Chief Leschi HS – 1 p.m.

TUESDAY, DEC. 27 – BASKETBALL Boys – Tulalip Heritage vs. Chief Leschi Chief Leschi HS – 3 p.m.

FRIDAY, DEC. 30 – BASKETBALL Girls – Rainier vs. Tacoma Baptist Tacoma Baptist HS – 5:30 p.m.

FRIDAY, DEC. 30 – BASKETBALL Boys – Rainier vs. Tacoma Baptist Tacoma Baptist HS – 7 p.m.

TUESDAY, JAN. 3 – BASKETBALL Girls – West Seattle vs. Curtis Curtis HS – 7 p.m.

SATURDAY, JAN. 7 – MASL SOCCER Atletico Baja vs. Tacoma Stars ShoWare Center, Kent – 6:05 p.m.


4FDUJPO " t 1BHF • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, December 23, 2016

BIG TESTS AHEAD FOR LIFE CHRISTIAN

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

FLYING. (left) Life Christian head coach Mark Lovelady recently inserted junior Eric Overgaard (#1) into the start-

ing lineup as the new point guard. The move shifts senior Anthony Kunitsa into more of an attack role as shooting guard. (right) Senior Payton Shamp will now bring his experience, hustle and scoring ability off the Eagle's bench as the sixth man. Altogether, it may be the best move Lovelady makes this season as they cast their eyes toward a run at the state 2B title. By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

It’s been business as usual for the Life Christian boys basketball team this season. The Eagles currently sit at 7-1 heading into the Christmas break and are arguably the team to beat in the 2B state classification. Following two consecutive fourth-place finishes at the 2B Hardwood Classic in Spokane, Life Christian will be hard-pressed to find a better opportunity to win a state basketball crown than this season. With a non-league schedule basically serving as their biggest tests of the regular season, the Eagles face two challenges between now and the start of the post-season. On paper, the remainder of Life Christian’s 2B Pacific League schedule should be a cake walk, other than a second contest at home against Chief Leschi on Jan. 7. The Eagles beat the Warriors by a score of 68-60 on Dec. 4, and the rematch will be a test against an athletic team that is improving and gelling quickly. That being said, a Chief Leschi win would be a major, statewide level upset. The rest of Life Christian’s league opponents haven’t been within a country mile of defeating the two-time defending league champions. Looking at who

they’ve got left on the schedule, and how those teams have played against each other, it’s going to take something other than a hot shooting night to beat these guys. That’s where the second test comes in. After running the league table to perfection over the last two seasons, and taking in the level of competition this season, it’s become clear that the only league opponent that could knock off Life Christian is probably the Eagles themselves. Life Christian finds itself in a difficult situation at the 2B level in basketball. The closest league for the Eagles is the 2B Pacific. While it is known to deliver quality football programs, the level of play in basketball from the majority of schools has been sketchy, at best, in recent years. When a quality program like Life Christian enters the picture, they are pretty much penalized for much of the season, having to play teams that are usually out of striking distance of a win by late in the first quarter, if not by the opening tip-off. Two seasons ago, the Eagles were blindsided when they entered district play and faced surprisingly talented teams from the 2B Central League. Their league play hadn’t prepared them for the competition. With this in mind, Life Christian head coach Mark

Lovelady scheduled a very difficult non-league schedule the following season. The Eagles played teams in classifications well above 2B, and the results were impressive. Not only did they go undefeated in league play again, they moved onto the district tournament and claimed the championship trophy. On Tuesday, Dec. 19, the Eagles hosted the Northwest Christian Navigators from Lacey. While Life Christian jumped out to a commanding 21-5 lead by the end of the first quarter, and a 47-23 advantage at halftime, the scrappy play of the Navigators began to pull Life Christian into playing a more reckless and loose style of basketball. The result was still a 95-64 whipping by the Eagles, but the team couldn’t have been happy with giving up 64 points to a team like Northwest Christian. What happens when the Eagles find their shots going cold, and they’re playing down to their competition? That is where the test is going to be for the Eagles. The amount of selfdiscipline to successfully grind through a string of sub-par opponents is not going to come easily. If Life Christian is going to move on and claim the state title they yearn for, the Eagles are going to have to make sure they don’t slip up against their toughest opponent of all: themselves.

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t Stars From page A12

the foot of Cox just a minute later and Tacoma was cooking up a 3-1 lead with 22 seconds left in the first quarter. Just when it seemed as though the Stars could run away with the game, San Diego pounced. A goal with 16 seconds left in the first quarter by Brandon Escoto pulled the game to 3-2 Tacoma at the end of the period. The teams held each other scoreless for the first half of the second quarter before the Sockers evened the score off a Matt Clare goal with less than eight minutes left in the first half. Clare would score again less than two minutes later to give the Sockers a 4-3 lead and the turn of fortunes left fans dizzy. Just eight seconds after San Diego took the lead, Tacoma’s Troy Peterson took a feed from Johnson and found the back of the net to tie the game at 4-4. Two minutes later, a loose ball was heading toward Pardo in the box. It looked as though Tacoma’s Alex Megson might have a shot at getting to the ball first, and he went for it. Pardo was either going to take a body blow and challenge for the ball, or he was going to turn his body and save himself. He went for the second option and Megson got just enough of a foot on the ball to see it slowly roll over the goal-line and Tacoma led 5-4. Clare would get a hat trick before the end of the first half with a goal at the 11:56 mark. The teams headed into the locker rooms tied at 5-5. The Stars again took the lead just over a minute into the third quarter as Johnson scored on an assist from Megson to make it 6-5 Tacoma. Like clockwork, San Diego answered five minutes later on a goal by Erick Tovar and the teams ended the third quarter tied at 6-6. San Diego broke the tie less than two minutes into the final stanza on a solo goal by Max Touloute. The Sockers now led 7-6 and no matter what Tacoma threw at them, they would hold the lead for the next eight minutes of play. Finally, with 4:56 left in the match, Tacoma’s Joey Gjertsen found the equalizer. The Wilson High School Hall of Famer took a pass from Megson deep on the left side of the goal box. Instead of firing, Gjertsen faked the kick and drew two defenders and Pardo into diving for the stop. Gjertsen nudged the ball to the right and put it into the back of the net for a 7-7 tie. Just under three minutes later, Cox would send the ball into the right corner. Angling into the box, Megson played the ricochet perfect and one-timed the ball into the goal, and Tacoma had its game winner at 8-7. Megson would go on to be named to the MASL Team of the Week for his two-goal, twoassist performance. The play of Waltman in goal was exceptional, as he stopped several on-target, rifle shots by the Sockers. After a break for the holidays, Tacoma (6-3) returns home to face Atletico Baja (5-3) on Saturday, Jan. 7 at the ShoWare Center at 6:05 p.m. Tacoma will then host the MASL Central Division leading Cedar Rapids Rampage (7-2) on Friday, Jan. 13 at 7:35 p.m. For tickets and more info, visit www.tacomastars.com.

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Friday, December 23, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • 4FDUJPO " t 1BHF

t MMA From page A12

be a battle of the beards, and in the end it was Atkinson who came away with the win with just eight seconds left in the second round. From the opening bell, Atkinson was in control of this fight, delivering some serious blows to the head and body of Elliot. By the time Atkinson (4-3-0) forced Elliot (1-2-0) to tap out via a north south choke hold, both fighters looked like they had seen some battle. I’d like to see both fighters again. The third fight of the night was a 140-pound affair between Journey Newson of Beaverton and Anthony Zender of Tenino. It was clear from the get-go that both of these fighters knew their way around the cage. The first round went to Newson after putting in a bit more work, but Zender was right there in the mix. Newson survived an early bloody nose in the second to finish the round on top of Zender raining down fists and forearms. The bell saved Zender from a bad beating. Zender tried to pick up the pace in the third round, but he appeared fairly spent. Newson (4-1-0) would work Zender (8-8-0) on the ground right into a guillotine choke hold that ended an exciting fight. Up next would be a fight at 156-pounds between J.D. “Berserker” Burns of Lakewood and “Pacific Northwest Bad Boy” Patrick Benson out of Federal Way. Benson came out on the attack like a man possessed, delivering some pretty good damage early on. Meanwhile, Burns was simply biding his time until the proper opening arrived and when it did, he didn’t hesitate. Working from his back, Burns (1-1-0) flipped his leg over the shoulder of Benson (2-2-0) and crossed up his legs. Burns’ opponent had no warning and was done as he was nearly triangle choked unconscious.

The fifth fight of the night was possibly the best of the card and also quite controversial. Chris Stone out of Port Orchard faced off against Jacob Ikaika Martin in a 155-pound bout and it was three rounds of solid action. While I’ll gladly give Martin the first round, Stone really put in more work in the second and third rounds, and I thought he took the fight. The fans felt the same way as they voiced their displeasure when the 29-28 unanimous decision for Martin (4-1-0) was announced. Both look like solid fighters. Stone (2-1-0) looks like he could probably get a little leaner and drop down a weight class or two. The semi-main event was a 145-pound contest between Eduardo Torres out of Wapato and hometown favorite Drew Brokenshire. No novice to big fights, Brokenshire was in command for most of the fight. Torres looked good early and later in the second round when he was working toward a choke hold on Brokenshire before the bell sounded. In the end, it was Brokenshire (13-5-0) dictating the flow of the bout as he took a 29-28 unanimous decision over Torres (7-6-0). The main event was a bit of a letdown, but that’s the way it goes sometimes. Brian Nuro out of Beaverton was facing Bobby McIntyre out of Spanaway. While I love McIntyre’s fighting spirit, he was clearly not ready for the type of work Nuro was about to deliver. With the Cagesport Interim Lightweight title on the line, Nuro made short work of McIntyre in the first round, forcing him to tap out via a guillotine choke hold. With the win, Nuro earns a shot at redemption and a rematch against hometown hero Justin Harrington. When that fight is announced, do whatever you need to do to get your hands on some tickets. Expect five rounds of war. Cagesport 44 returns to the EQC on Saturday, Feb. 25 at 7 p.m. Battle at the Boat 109 is set for Friday, Jan. 20 at 8 p.m. For tickets and more information visit www.emeraldqueen.com

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HERS KINDNESS OF OT OF THEFT TOUCHES VICTIM performance among its students for the past five years, Surprise Lake Middle School has won the 2016 School of Distinction Award from the Center for Educational Effectiveness. Now in its 10th year, the School of Distinction awards were created to honor the highest improving schools in Washington State and to recognize and celebrate school staff, students and leaders who improve performance of all students. The Center for Educational Effectiveness (CEE) partners with the Association of Educational Service Districts (AESD), the Association of Washington School Principals (AWSP), Washington Association of School Administrators (WASA), Washington State School Directors’

Depot of Fircrest “Washington’s Most Wanted” all gathered with

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you guys have just time for me, and there are far more – that “This was a tough I already knew I really do showed me what bad people out here, and R good people than rampant at SLMS, as The spirit of giving and community run my community.” – LESHAUN ALEXANDE brought in. evidenced by the haul a recent food drive See SLMS / Page 6 appreciate and admire and after it happened “I was so down me up,” he said. this sure has lifted Construction The crew at Integrity for the table money Group pooled their A3 u See THEFT / page

TO ADOPT BUDGET PREPS FIFEportion of the city’s general fund going to police services

East Tacoma overnight. he’s on a jobsite in So far, he says He was devastated.gift cards from Q13 in last received $500 who saw his story News viewers week.

S E RV I N G U N I V E R S I T Y P L AC E A N D S U R RO U N D I N G COM M U N I T IES

USE OF FORCE: A COP’S PERSP

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Out of the hosted its first ever Last year Tacoma suicide prevention and it’s coming a4 Darkness Walk for to Wright Park on Oct. 8. paGE back again this year

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PHOTO BY DEREK SHUCK

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COP TALK. Sgt. Glen Carpenter is a 24-year veteran of the PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER witness regarding use of Pierce County Sheriff’s force. Department and serves as an expert By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@universityplacepress.ne t

“The average officer experiences more than most lifetime.”

fter his first year on the job, Pierce County Sheriff ’s Department Sgt. Glen Carpenter counting the number of times stopped someone BY STEVE DUNKELBERGERhas threatened hisspeed slower life. That limits. was 24 years stevedunkel@fifefreepress.com ago. “It’s people getting used to the cam“The average officer eras again,” said Fife Police Chief Pete experiences more trauma Traffic cameras around Fife’s public in a year than most people Fisher. schools have so far captured moreexperience inThe theirspeed drivlifetime,” limit he around said. school zones“I put two of them in body bags,” Carpenter ers speeding through school zones than probably is 20has miles per hourseen while school he more is insaid, noting that he than most session, they did last year. has researched cops, with but19 is years 25 miles of service per hour during officer shootings around the on the department’s The city activated the cameras with nation to the summerSWAT break. team Duringandthe entire find patterns of what went volunteering the start of school last month and wrong and for the graveyard has year, camera shifts clocksin3,500 the drivers uses that information as an expert county’s more tallied 593 violations so far compared witness neighborhoods. withdangerous tickets that range from $101 on to matters of use of force. to 427 violations for the same During career, 47 officers period his $250 depending on around their speed. the What he concluded was that have been last year. But the rate will likelystate killed most in theofline level “The purpose duty.program the of whole officers is were killed because they gave He knew 23 of them and considered off by the holiday season, as parents 19 of the suspect-turned-shooter too much and commuters get acclimated those to theclose friends. See CAMERAS / Page leeway 5 by getting too close or allowing

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Fife High students get a crash course on debt BY DEREK SHUCK derek@mesignal.net

S SAMI SITE BREAK GROUND AT POINT DEFIANCE

daRkNESS Walk

See photos on page 4. FILE PHOTO

This year, the amount of student debt in America reached $1.2 trillion, with much more on the way. This is of great concern to Credit Abuse Resistance Education, a non-profit that provides THOMPSON OF BRADLEY financial COURTESYclasses, PHOTO counseling and

By Steve Dunkelberger

aweekly.com stevedunkel@tacom

on Sept. A roundtable talk of the many 19 that included on Tacoma’s major players a glimpse of tideflats provided SCHOOLS OF TACOMA PUBLIC could lead to a BARRENTINE/COURTESY city efforts that zoning rules Math Institute PHOTOS BY INGRID of Science and lengthy review waterSAMI. Tacoma’s Zoo and Aquarium will offer of the largely industrial as well as no public at Point Defiance for students of front at a time when hands-on education with a planned slate tideflats goes meeting about the protests. community members when it opens next fall. without community talks and presentations afternoon chat This Monday was no exception. of the About 50 members were whom BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER public, many of red clothstevedunkel@fifefreepress.com wearing the signature Tacoma the RedLine of TACOMA ing PARKS OF METRO the late-notice The Fife City Council is priming PHOTO COURTESY effort, attended spraypad, their concerns to approve the city’s two-year budget Tacoma’s only meeting to voice and includes Dunkelberger perceive as a is open daily By Steve next month that will increase taxes and about what they ALL IN! The pool aweekly.cominto savings, trim staff and pubfor toddlers. rates, dip stevedunkel@tacom utility Strickland; transparency especially of Marilyn lack designed in activities announces its ers; Tacoma Mayor how the city Woodstaffers and changeeducational lic participation lands. They to enjoy the Member Victoria teachers, last meetings and services. Member Everyone’s invited of the newly City Council About 200 students,public on the industrial on the city marked a milestone water former City Council the pool to do a first membersThe is slated councilPublic Schools’ warm, sparkling at the ards and specifically called and community all heralded of Tacoma swimming pool environmenthe Lauren Walker on Nov. 8 and a of the budgetDefiance. reading opened indoor to reopen the week in the construction Center in Taco- as the kind of community treasure (SAMI) at Point regarding Institute on Nov. 22, following reading Environmental People’s Community secondDistrict’s deserves. Fletcher tal review process Science and Math School natural Hilltop communitythe center’s citizen and hearings. sessions Defiance ofatstudy ma’s Hilltop neighborhood. a proposed liquefiedthey fear the Point The Tacoma Public months of opening celebrathat broke ground Saturday’s grand attracted about Jenkins, chair The city has a generalA5fund of recalled residents’ gas (LNG) plant issues if an Learning Center house / page steering committee, spend on city Sami to become a million tion and open u See would create safety Zoo and Aquarium. about $37 center at 1602 Martin work to help the center the center 400 people to the operations that range from police sermural on / page A5 Way. reality. Later, a u See TidEFlaTS Luther King Jr. vices, parks and programs and adminA4 president of the Erik Hanberg, of Commissionthe next two years. u See pool / page during acomaweekly facebook.com/t Facebook: istration Metro Parks Board it takes to runlya city,” “That’s what@Tacomaweek

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tion, how much the students would be paying back with interest and the average starting salary of students’ dream jobs. After filling out a simple sheet, students get a tangible number of how much money they will have for living expenses after a monthly payment on their loans. They also dived into the differences between subsidized and unsubsidized loans, borrowing from the government or private lenders, and accreditations for schools, essentially giving a crash course on what many college-grad 20-somethings wished they knew before committing. Credit Abuse Resistance Education has been coming to Fife High School for five

CHARTS COURTESY OF CITY OF FIFE

– SGT. GLEN CARPENTER

Pierce County Sheriff’s Department

the suspect to get back into their car or residence only to have them return a weapon. And the police shootings with within the first minute of contact occur between the officers and their killers. He illustrated his point with of graphic dash and body camera a series of actual police shootings. One footage involved a driver obeying a police officer to get out u See FORCE / page 9

PUBLIC INPUT SOUGHT AT SUBAREA PLAN COMMUNITY WORKSHOPS

legal services toofvulnerable about questions populations. On Wednesday, critics raising The rising number Oct. 5, 36 Energy’s High School studentsliquefied got a freenatural proposed presentation Puget SoundFife from the program Marilyn Mayor focusing on viable Tacoma college plans that includes gas plant now won’t leave students drowningCity Councilmembers in debt. two Tacoma Strickland and the The presentation, moreastransparent about “Debt Slapped,” asks students who want PSE to beknown the not only hold about their forum plans are, but to community also research a college project andwhat how much it would cost to get a degree from that instituplant.

WE CAN SEE CLEARLY NOW – CURRAN WINDOWS ARE IN

The U.P. Historical Society is proud to announce that all the windows in the Curran House have been replaced with double pane and where necessary, tempered glass. This major effort was a priority in planning for eventual public use for the Curran House. Thanks to monies raised in past U.P. Garden Tours and a grant from Key Bank, this $20,000 project was completed before the first big rain and windstorm of theSHUCK season. PHOTO BY DEREK Volunteers from the non-profit Credit Abuse Resistance Education Owned on by Oct. stopped by Fife High School the City of U.P. but 5 to give a presentation on student debt management. U.P. Historical Society, the Curran leased to the House has named years, and this is the first year the presentation was held the State and National Registers been had 50 minutes, and it wasn’t enough time. to of HisThis The year,plan we toric Places. outside of school hours and in a longer format. is that the house will one day wanted the ability to bring all the kids together at one time be a U.P. history “I think this is the fifth year that I have been working museum and gathering place in one room, and that’s how this transpired,” for our citizens.Fife High with them and every year it has evolved. Last year, we did teacher Laura Hilzendeger said. In past years, the Curran House it in February, and we decided that’s too late; it really needs has received recognition and support from to be in the fall, and we did it during a class period, so they both the National Seeand DEBT / Page 5 for Washington Trusts Historic Preservation. Viewed as a prime example of mid-century modern architecture as well as a revered local landmark, the Curran House is a cornerstone in the City of University Place. PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID TACOMA, WA PERMIT NO. 225

he all this to come,” I never imagined and said. as a carpenter Alexander works young daughters. to two is a single dad left them stolen when he His tools were

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SUPPORT HIS FAMILY

PSE starts planning for community meeting

Pastor Chuck Tipton from Capital Vision Christian Church in Olympia (left) and Fife/Milton community supporter Bob Johnson make beautiful music together to DUNKELBERGER delight of area nursing home and assisted living residents. BY STEVEthe stevedunkel@fifefreepress.com BY MATT NAGLE certs about once a month at area nursing Sound Energy is planning a public forum conhomes and assisted living facilities. Pugetmatt@mesignal.net as cerning its planned liquefied natural gas (LNG)plan “I go to nursing homes to sing to the community the at to rise Saturday, Oct.in29 2 greatest generation – their music growpressure and concernsn continue p.m., Mill Ridge Village in ing up,” he said. The residents of Mill and in City Hall. and come works in thean still host Miltonarewill afterRidge Village are big supporters of the Details about the forum Mello and Victoria Ryanperformance noon of live Fife Lions Club too, such as helping out after Tacoma Councilmembers the critics of with showcasing to address PSEmost of the call for memorable joined thesome the Lions’ annual Easter egg hunt Woodards and loved of all time. gallon plant. by stuffing hundreds of plastic eggs for proposed 8 millionshowtunes and CEO President Featuring Pastor PSE Tipton sent Chuck from children to find on that big day. This conThe councilmembers outlining Capital letter last week a formalChristian Church Harris Vision in their cert is one way for Johnson and Tipton to Kimberly Olympia more community on piano for backing call and vocals, anddialogue and their honor the seniors. concerns longtime Fife/Milton LNG facility. community activist proposed “He is an extremely talented man,” about the Bob Johnson on lead vocals, thePSE 6 said of his accompanist. “At 8 years Johnson / Page See duo will give their renditions of songs like “Hello old he could innately change keys on any Dolly,” “Singing’ in the Rain,” “The song – it was a gift given to him by the Lord. Sound of Music” and many more. I started at his church and started doing a Johnson, a graduate of Fife High few solos. He has given me a lot of voice School, has also been a longtime member lessons and taught me a lot. This has been and organizer of the Fife Lions Club, so going on for about six or seven years now.” he is certainly no stranger to doing acts of Admission is free. Mill Ridge Village kindness for others like giving free conis located at 607 28th Ave. S., Milton.

PERMIT NO. 225

Washington’s Most

LeShaun Alexander was just about speechless the SUV when he saw tools full of carpentry Depot donated by Home Integrity of Fircrest and Group’s Construction Harris. DAVID ROSE Josh and Dawn said ‘Wow, wow,” store girl, Alexander as with Harris’ little employees, along of new tools including saw handed him boxes drill, grinder, table a jigsaw, skill saw, “I’m so overwhelmed. and air compressor.

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ALL FOR

University Place Press .net

EDGEWOOD & SURROUNDING COMMUNITIES

PHOTOS BY MATT NAGLE

SHUCK PHOTO BY DEREK

BY MATT NAGLE

and Home and Dawn Harris mnagle@fifefreepress.com truck. They Group’s Josh Construction tools and work when Integrity replace his stolen fter showing consistent (in white T-shirt) got together to LeShaun Alexander(left, right in middle photo) Tuesday. improved academic was lifted from on Starr

Alexander and Danielle A huge burden (middle) to surprise SPIRIT OF GIVING.employees Christina Kancianich host David Rose

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Nov. 7: SS911 Communications Officer/K-9 Demo Nov. 14: Personal gun ownership in America Anyone can attend individual courses if they are unable to attend the full academy, which meets from 1-4 p.m. on Mondays at the University Place Police Headquarters, 3609 Marketplace West, Suite 201. Contact Jennifer Hales (253) 7983141 to reserve a spot in the classes or with questions. Safe Streets will hold a Neighborhood Safety Patrol Training from 10 a.m. to noon on Nov. 5 at Camp Curran Boy Scout Camp, 13220 50th Ave. E., for community members interested in making a change in their community by joining the Safe Streets Neighborhood Patrol Program. The program is comprised of residents who walk and drive the streets of their neighborhood looking for suspicious activities and situations that can attract crime and gangs. More information is available at safest.org.

UP VETERANS TO HOLD FLAPJACK FUNDRAISER FOR MEMORIAL PLAZA “We have a large number

Want to help shape the future of of land use in University Place? veterans here in University Then please make plans to attend upcoming Place and we want to honor workshops designed to collect citizen input on the Subarea Planning their service – a flag plaza process that is underway. with flags for all the services Representatives of the Redmondbased planning and design firm so we can honor those who OTAK will be on hand to facilitate these went into service and their workshops which are an important part of the City's effort to sacrifice and their families.” receive full designation by the Puget Sound Regional Council as a Regional – Organizer Bob Schwartz Growth Center. “Our goal is to help frame a vision By Derek Shuck for the entire subarea as well as the derek@universityplacepress.net three separate districts that are of it: 27th Street; Town Center; part The UP Veterans Plaza Committee the Northeast Mixed-Use District,” and would said like to invite one and all to Mandi Roberts of Otak. “We attend a Flapjack want Fundraiser on Saturday, Nov. understand how the public envisions to 12 at the located at 3819 Bridgeport Way. Applebees, community’s land use plan in 20 years.” The price is $10 and includes Workshops will be held two with syrup and butter, scrambled pancakes Thursday, Nov. 17 and Friday, on eggs, two Nov. strips of bacon, two sausages, 18 from 6:30-8 p.m. in City Hall with (3715 milk, juice or coffee. For ticket a choice of Bridgeport Way W.). “We are hoping call organizer Bob Schwartz information, for a really strong turnout because at (253) 381we 6453. truly want to hear what our residents All proceeds will go to fund the Veteran’s want their city to be as we move Memorial Plaza, a project undertaken into the next 20 years,” said Mariza University Place Veterans Committee, by the Craig, director of the City’s located Economic just south of the intersection Development Office and assistant of Cirque Drive City and Bridgeport Way West, in Manager. the right-of-way park located on the west side Please mark these workshops of Bridgeport on Way SW commonly known as your calendar and plan to come the Drum Road out Greenway Park. add your opinions to the process. and u See PLAZA / page 9

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Section A • Page 16 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, December 23, 2016

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Stop LNG Now!

KEEP TACOMA BEAUTIFUL Once upon a time, Tacoma had an ugly reputation for being a dirty city – even giving off its own smell that became notorious as “the aroma of Tacoma.” Adding to this, tourist traffic was low, crime was high and it seemed that Tacoma didn’t matter because Seattle was just a short drive away. This all changed in recent years, as Tacoma has made a stunning comeback and is now one of the most beautiful and livable cities on the west coast. Tacoma is back on the map and no one wants to return to those dark and dreary days.

PUYALLUP TRIBE: “NO LNG!” The extinction of salmon throughout Puget Sound is upon us.

Among the most ardent Tacoma boosters is the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, which has been a forward thinking and financially generous leader in keeping Tacoma beautiful. The Tribe’s active protection of this area’s pristine waters, the salmon and all natural resources has benefitted the entire region. The Tribe vigorously opposes the prospect of an LNG plant being sited in the metropolitan Tacoma area. Not only would the plant be placed right on the Tribe’s reservation, it would mar Tacoma’s great scenic beauty, put natural resources at risk and endanger the lives of everyone who lives and works here in the event of a catastrophic LNG accident.

A PLANT WITHOUT A CUSTOMER Pristine waterways next to an industrial complex such as LNG could cause an environmental disaster in the Puget Sound from which we may never recover.

Puget Sound Energy is in the final permitting stages of the proposed LNG plant even though at this point PSE lacks any customers for LNG. The proposal started after the private utility company landed a contract with Totem Ocean Trailer Express (TOTE) to provide ships with cleaner-burning LNG rather than diesel, but TOTE has since put those plans on hold, announcing in a news release that the company does not have an exact date for when it will retrofit its ships to use LNG. In other words, PSE wants to build a plant without a customer.

LNG PUTS AREA RESIDENTS IN JEOPARDY Also among its plans, PSE wants to form a for-profit subsidiary to handle the commercial sales of LNG to TOTE and other yet-to-be-determined customers while also storing the LNG for its utility customers to use during extreme weather conditions. Transporting LNG for local ratepayers presents the threat, and the inherent risks, of tanker trucks on our roadways and the potential for gas truck accidents in our neighborhoods or at the plant. Moreover, we would face potential risks to our health, the environment and our wallets for something PSE has yet to prove utility customers need. Thousands of oil train cars enter and leave the Port of Tacoma daily. A train derailment in the river would be catastrophic.

THE HISTORIC DANGERS OF LNG The construction of an LNG plant would require a large capacity natural gas pipeline to be constructed through the heart of the city of Fife, another booming city that lies right on the Interstate 5 corridor through Pierce County. This should deeply concern local residents considering historic on-site accidents that have occurred involving or related to LNG: r On Oct. 20, 1944 in Cleveland, 128 people died when an East Ohio Natural Gas Company’s LNG tank ruptured and exploded. LNG spilled into the city’s sewer system, vaporized and turned into a gas, which exploded and burned.

The I-5 corridor is well known for traffic congestion, which greatly increases the risk of toxic accidents on the highway.

A catastrophic LNG explosion could ignite the entire Port of Tacoma.

r On Oct. 6, 1979 in Lusby, MD a pump seal failed at the Cove Point LNG facility, which released natural gas vapors that settled into an electrical conduit. The gas vapors ignited when a worker switched off a circuit breaker, causing an explosion that killed one worker and severely injured another. r On Jan. 19, 2004 an explosion at Sonatrach LNG facility in Skikda, Algeria killed 27 people and injured 56. Three LNG trains were also destroyed. The massive hydrocarbon gas explosion was ignited when a steam boiler that was part of an LNG liquefaction train exploded near a propane and ethane refrigeration storage site. A report from a U.S. government inspection team cited that a leak of hydrocarbons from the liquefaction process initiated the domino effect of explosions. r On April 7, 2014 a “processing vessel” at a Williams Co. Inc. facility near the small town of Plymouth, Wash., exploded, spraying chunks of shrapnel as heavy as 250 pounds as far as 300 yards. The flying debris pierced the double walls of a 134-foot LNG tank on site, causing leaks. Five workers were injured, and local responders warned that vapors from the leaks could trigger a more devastating, second explosion. A county fire department spokesman said authorities were concerned a second blast could level a 0.75 mile “lethal zone” around the plant.


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EMPLOYMENT Fife Towing is looking for experienced tow operators who are hardworking and self motivated. Employment is full time. Pay is DOE. To apply email service@ fifetowing.com or visit 1313 34th Ave. E., Fife WA 98424 (253) 922-8784

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4/ +ENNETH .UGENT #ASE .AME . 1 3 #ASE .UMBER 059 ' *6 .ATURE OF #ASE 'UARDIANSHIP OF A -INOR CHILD

./ 059 #3 #3 3UMMONS IN A CIVIL ACTION !ND NOTICE OF HEARING

35--/.3 !.$ ./4)#% /& (%!2).' 0,%!3% 4!+% ./4)#% THAT A PETITION HAS BEEN lLED ASKING THE #OURT TO APPOINTED THE ABOVE NAMED 0ETITIONER S TO BE THE GUARDIAN S FOR . 1 3 A MINOR CHILD UNDER 04# 'UARDIANSHIP OF -INORS #ODE 9/5 !2% 35--/.%$ TO APPEAR AT A GUARDIANSHIP HEARING IN THIS #OURT ON THE 0UYALLUP )NDIAN 2ESERVATION AT $!9 -ONDAY $!4% &EBRUARY TH 4)-% 0,/#!4)/. %!34 34 34 4!#/-! 7! 4HE GUARDIANSHIP HEARING IS PRIVATE AND CLOSED /NLY THOSE PERSONS THE #OURT lNDS TO HAVE LEGITIMATE INTEREST IN THE PROCEEDINGS MAY ATTEND 4HE #OURT WILL HEAR TESTIMONY TO DETERMINE WHETHER GUARDIANSHIP IS IN THE BEST INTEREST OF THE CHILD AND THE 4RIBAL COMMUNITY 4HE #OURT WILL CONSIDER ALL GUARDIANSHIP REPORTS SUBMITTED FOR REVIEW !LL PARTIES SHALL BE GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO CONTEST THE FACTUAL CONTENTS AND CONCLUSIONS OF THE GUARDIANSHIP REPORTS !NY PARTY MAY lLE RECOMMENDATIONS REGARDING THE GUARDIANSHIP WITH THE #OURT AT LEAST CALENDAR DAYS BEFORE THE HEARING 9OU ALSO HAVE THE FOLLOWING RIGHTS BEFORE THE #OURT 4HE RIGHT TO BE PRESENT BEFORE THE #OURT 4HE RIGHT TO PRESENT WRITTEN AND ORAL TESTIMONY 4HE RIGHT TO SUBPOENA WITNESS 4HE RIGHT TO SUBMIT RELEVANT EVIDENCE TO THE #OURT FOR CONSIDERATION 4HE RIGHT TO COUNSEL AT YOUR OWN EXPENSE AND EFFORT THE #OURT HAS A LIST OF ATTORNEYS WHO ARE ADMITTED TO PRACTICE BEFORE THE 0UYALLUP 4RIBE AND 4HE RIGHT TO APPEAL A lNAL DECISION IN THIS MATTER

). 4(% 059!,,50 42)"!, #/524 059!,,50 ).$)!. 2%3%26!4)/. 4!#/-! 7!3().'4/. 73&# 0ETITIONER

V ,ETICIA - 3ILVA 2ESPONDENT

4HE PETITIONER lLED A CHILD SUPPORT CIVIL ACTION AGAINST YOU IN THE ABOVE NAMED COURT )N ORDER TO DEFEND YOURSELF YOU MUST lLE AN ANSWER BY STATING YOUR DEFENSE IN WRITING AND lLING IT WITH THE COURT AND SERVING A COPY ON THE PETITIONER WITHIN TWENTY DAYS AFTER THE DAY YOU RECEIVED NOTICE OF THIS HEARING )F YOU FAIL TO RESPOND A $%&!5,4 *5$'-%.4 MAY BE ENTERED AGAINST YOU WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE TO YOU ! DEFAULT JUDGMENT IS A JUDGMENT GRANTED THE 0ETITIONER FOR WHAT HAS BEEN ASKED IN THE 0ETITION 4HIS 3UMMONS ISSUED IN PURSUANT TO 3ECTION OF THE 0UYALLUP 0ARENTAL 2ESPONSIBILITY !CT ./4)#% /& (%!2).' ! HEARING ON THE PETITION IS SET FOR &EBRUARY ST AT AM AT THE 0UYALLUP 4RIBAL #OURT $ATED $ECEMBER TH +ASANDRA 'UTIERREZ #LERK OF THE #OURT 0UYALLUP 4RIBAL #OURT %AST ST 3TREET 4ACOMA 7ASHINGTON

)F YOU DO NOT APPEAR AT THE HEARING OR lLE A WRITTEN RESPONSE TO THE PETITION WITHIN DAYS FROM THE DATED OF THIS NOTICE THE #OURT MAY ENTER AN ORDER IN YOUR ABSENCE ./4)#% 05235!.4 4/ 04# ˆ$%&!5,4 *5$'-%.4 7(%. ! 0!249 !'!).34 7(/- ! *5$'-%.4 )3 3/5'(4 &!),3 4/ !00%!2 0,%!$ /2 /4(%27)3% $%&%.$ 7)4(). 4(% 4)-% !,,/7%$ !.$ 4(!4 )3 3(/7 4/ 4(% #/524 "9 !-/4)/. !.$ !&&)$!6)4 /2 4%34)-/.%9 4(% #/524 -!9 %.4%2 !. /2$%2 /& $%&!5,4 !.$ 7)4(/54 &524(%2 ./4)#% 4/ 4(% 0!249 ). $%&!5,4 %.4%2 ! *5$'%-%.4 '2!.4).' 4(% &%,)%& 3/5'(4 ). 4(% #/-0,!).4 #OPIES OF THE 0ETITION AND THIS 3UMMONS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE #OURT #LERK S /FlCE LOCATED AT % ST 3T 4ACOMA 7! )F YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS PLEASE CONTACT THE #OURT #LERK S /FlCE AT

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF PIERCE ./ !MENDED ./4)#% 4/ #2%$)4/23 )N RE THE #OMBINED %STATE OF !2$%.% % -!44)#( AND %$7!2$ 7),,)!- -!44)#( HUSBAND AND WIFE $ECEDENTS 4HE 0ERSONALS 2EPRESENTATIVE NAMED BELOW HAS BEEN APPOINTED AND HAS QUALIlED AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ABOVE ESTATE 0ERSONS HAVING CLAIMS AGAINST THE DECEASED MUST PRIOR TO THE TIME SUCH CLAIMS WOULD BE BARRED BY ANY OTHERWISE APPLICABLE STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS SERVE THEIR CLAIMS ON THE PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OR THE ATTORNEY IF RECORD IN THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW AND lLE AN EXECUTED COPY OF THE CLAIM WITH THE #LERK OF THIS #OURT WITHIN FOUR MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE lLING OF THE COPY OF THIS .OTICE WITH THE #LERK OF THE #OURT WHICHEVER IS LATER OR EXCEPT UNDER THOSE PROVISIONS INCLUDED IN 2#7 OR THE CLAIM WILL BE FOREVER BARRED 4HIS BAR IS EFFECTIVE AS TO CLAIMS AGAINST BOTH THE PROBATE ASSETS AND THE NON PROBATE ASSETS OF THE DECEDENT $!4% /& &),).' #/09 /& ./4)#% 4/ #2%$)4/23 WITH THE #,%2+ OF #OURT $ECEMBER $!4% /& &)234 05",)#!4)/. $ECEMBER $ONALD . 0OWELL 73"!

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ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Fife Towing, Fife Recovery Service & NW Towing, at 1313 34th Ave E, Fife on 12/26/2016. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130 at 11:00 a.m. Viewing of cars from 10:00-11:00 a.m. Registered Tow Numbers 5009, 5421, 5588. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

Auction Notice

Abandoned Vehicle Lakewood Towing Inc. #5002 9393 Lakeview Ave SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 Ph. 253-582-5080 Auction 12292016 Date 12/29/2016 View @ 11 am Auction Starts @ 2 pm In accordance with RCW 46.55.130 Lakewood Towing Inc. will sell to the highest bidder. See complete listing @ lakewoodtowing.com or posting at our office

WANTED WANTED: Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

(253) 752-8105

VOLUNTEERS NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE, TWEET LESS CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care has some great ways for you to serve the community and make meaningful connections. Those near the end of life need help with living. If you have 1-4 hours a week to read to someone, listen to their stories, run errands, make phone calls, or welcome people to our hospice facility, then we have several opportunities for you. Join us in the new year for trainings scheduled in January and March. Log onto www.chifranciscan. org and click “hospice and palliative care� in the “our services� tab to learn more. Or call James Bentley at 253-538-4649 #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA There are about 2,000 homeless in Tacoma and about 1.000 beds. Many are families with children. Please help #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA to provide some basic necessities. All items donated will go directly to people on the street. PROJECT FEED TACOMA is 100% volunteer. This is a true grass roots organization and they really need your help. For more information and to find more go to www. projectfeedtacoma.org. Can you help with some urgent needs as winter approaches? Here are some suggestions and a huge THANK YOU! Needed: Warm Socks for Men, Women and Children; Warm Hats; Gloves; Peanut Butter and Jam/ Jelly; Crackers, Chips and non-perishable snacks; Individually wrapped granola bars or protein bars; cookies; lotion; lip balm; tampons and sanitary napkins; wipes; soap, shampoo and conditioner; gallon sized freezer bags. A BIG THANKS TO THE COPPER DOOR FOR ALLOWING PROJECT FEED TACOMA TO COLLECT DONATIONS THERE. Wear 100 years of Fashion! Like to play dress-up? The Golden Oldies Guild (a volunteer arm of Goodwill) is looking for women to model in our vintage fashion shows. We do shows at lifestyle retirement communities, museums, assisted living facilities, churches, and a wide variety of fundraisers. The collection, from the late 1890’s to l980’s, is women’s garments in about size 12 and smaller. You don’t need to be elegant— you need to like to have fun. We also need piano and keyboard accompanists. Come join us! Contact Christine Oliver-Hammond (253) 573-3138 or goldenoldiesguild@goodwill.com for information or to apply. Help hard-working families by volunteering with VITA

VOLUNTEERS

(Volunteer Income Tax Assistance)! Provide free income tax preparation to low and moderate income households. Locations throughout Pierce County. Day, evening and weekend hours available (February to April 2017). Volunteers can serve as tax preparers, quality reviewers, greeters, or interpreters (for non-English speaking or hearing-impaired tax payers). Free training provided. Learn more and apply online at www.VolunteerTaxHelp.org. Volunteer meals on Wheels Driver Seeking a volunteer Meals on Wheels Driver. Delivers frozen meals once a week in the Pierce County area, mileage reimbursement. Must have a clean background check, WA driver’s license, car insurance and food handlers card. Call front desk for more info: 253-272-8433 AmeriCorps Opportunity: Employment Case Manager/Job Developer Tacoma Community House is seek an outgoing, enthusiastic, and motivated professional that is passionate about assisting low-income community members on their journey to self-sufficiency. This professional position is responsible for assisting people in need of employment. The case manager/ job developer will provide career counseling, employment & training information, job search skills, workshop facilitation, job placement/follow-up, and referral to other community resources. The case manager/job develop will assist in facilitation of our Employer Advisory Board and will also develop and implement 3 financial fitness events. Contact Arrie Dunlap at (253) 383-3951 or adunlap@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information. AmeriCorps Opportunity: Read2Me Program Specialist Tacoma Community House seeks an AmeriCorps member to assist in the Read2Me Program in local elementary schools. Read2Me is a one-on-one adult/student reading program for struggling first, second, and third grade readers. Duties include recruiting volunteers, producing a monthly tutor newsletter, facilitating bimonthly tutor workshops, tracking attendance for both students and volunteer tutors, researching best practicing best practices for tutoring strategies and tutor training and tutoring a student in each of the four schools. You must be 18-25 years of age at the start date of service (Sep 1, 2016-Jul 15, 2017). Contact Karen Thomas at (253)-383-3951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information.

Great Volunteer Opportunity Make friends, have fun and help seniors with simple tasks. You’ll make a big difference by helping people maintain their independence. This is volunteering, not caregiving. Volunteers must be 55 or older, low income, serve 15 hrs/wk and live in Pierce or Kitsap Counties. Drivers are especially needed. Benefits include hourly tax-free stipend and mileage reimbursement. For information call Julie at Lutheran Community Services, Senior Companion Volunteer Program, (253)722-5686.

Help furnish hope to those in need! NW Furniture Bank Volunteers needed. “NWFB helps restore hope, dignity and stability in our community by recycling donated furniture to people in need.� Tuesday-Saturday Truck Volunteers Needed- 9:00 am-2:00 pm. Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at info@ nwfurniturebank.org or call 253-302-3868.

Food Bank Eloise’s Cooking Pot Food Bank on the Eastside of Tacoma, WA is powered strictly by volunteers. We provide much needed food and other basic household items to people in need on a weekly basis. Being a volunteer driven organization we are always looking for good people who are interested in donating a few hours of their lives helping make the lives of someone else a little better. Donate as much or as little of your time you want for a wide variety of tasks, there is always plenty to do. If you are looking for a way to be part of something bigger and give a little much needed help to the local community then contact us and we’ll get you started. Please join us in helping to spread a little holiday cheer. Contact 253212-2778.

South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www. southsoundoutreach. org. Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/ nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@ tacomaparks.com or 253.305.1025.

PETS Pet of the Week

CINDERS Just in time for the holidays, we’d like to draw your attention to Cinders. This gorgeous black foster cat has been in the shelter system longer than all his other feline companions, though all he wants for Christmas is you(r love). In fact, he’ll return care and affection tenfold given his gentleness, fondness for doling out itty isses sniffing your face, hands, and hair , and eenness towards verbal interaction when approached. Cinders’ perfect person would come wrapped in cat savviness, as the 2-year-old is very picky about his litter box — he’ll need someone to keep it clean, and offer multiple potty boxes to set him up for success. An ideal household would also include a family member who is around often. Please contact Cinders’ foster mom at carmenllundy@ hotmail.com to make his wish come true — #A493073.

www.thehumanesociety.org

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Friday, December 23, 2016 s TACOMAWEEKLY COM s 3ECTION " s 0AGE

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Charming 2 story with covered porch on corner lot. Living room with soaring ceilings, gas fireplace and open spindled staircase. Kitchen with SS appl. , walk in pantry and breakfast bar, open to Family room and Dining area. Slider to patio and fenced back yard. Master with walk in closet and 5 pc bath with jetted tub. additional 2 bedrooms that share a jack and jill bath. Close to schools, shopping and JBLM. 1 year old appliances stay! New roof.

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This MUST SEE newly updated home boasts new hardwood oors, carpets and a large dec that will be finished in a couple wee s. ocated in a beautifully quiet part of North Tacoma with a partial view of the sound is just a stones throw from an amazing park and walking distance to a shopping area ith 3 bedrooms on the main level and another in the lower, this home is large yet cozy! Not to mention the huge rec room downstairs! Come and check

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LONGTIME ESTABLISHED POPULAR RESTR./LOUNGE ON 6TH AVE. Business for sale. $149,000 $110,000 OR LEASE the space, 3,300 SQ. FT. for $4,000 Month. SAME OWNER: BARTENDING ACADEMY OF TACOMA, Since 1959, Very profitable, Training provided.

RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109


3ECTION " s 0AGE s TACOMAWEEKLY COM s &RIDAY $ECEMBER 23

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A LIFE LIVED IN ART

City Life

B5

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2016

SECTION B, PAGE 1

RABBIT WILDE TO BRING INFECTIOUS FOLK TO FIRST NIGHT By Ernest A. Jasmin

that we’ve been working on the last two years and then add more toys to play with in the mix.

ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

B

etween 10,000 and 20,000 are expected to turn out for First Night, Tacoma’s all-ages New Year’s Eve celebration, which will bring an army of bands, “the World’s Shortest Parade” and other spectacles to downtown starting at 6 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 31. Among the buzz-worthy musical acts on display will be Rabbit Wilde, a Bellingham and now partly Tacoma-based outfit that will play the Pantages Theater at 7:45 p.m. The band – comprised of brothers Nathan and Zach Hamer, Miranda Zickler and Jillian Walker – plays an infectious, foot-stompin’ brand of indie-folk that’s sure to appeal to fans of the Lumineers or the Cave Singers. Recently, Tacoma Weekly caught up with Nathan Hamer to discuss his band’s sophomore disc, “The Heartland,” moving to Tacoma, and that time he thought he was about to die during a gig on New Year’s Eve. TACOMA WEEKLY: People think of you as a Bellingham band, but I hear the Hamer brothers have moved down here. HAMER: I moved here at the end of the summer, actually. It’s a beautiful city, and I’m lovin’ it so far. We’re on tour so much that we actually don’t get to spend much time in our home base, in general. Last year, we played over 35 festivals across the country, so we were gone most of the summer. Just for touring purposes, Tacoma is a little more central as opposed to Bellingham, which is nice and secluded. But it’s way up there in the corner, so we have two hours to drive to wherever we’re done on tour. TW: While we’re talking about geography, the formation of the band sounds a little complicated from that standpoint. I’ve read that you all grew up in Mount Vernon. You were based in Bellingham, but you didn’t actually form until you met in New York. HAMER: We’ve all lived in New York at various times in our lives. Zach was out there for a film internship when he was younger. I was out there for school. I went to Pace University in lower Manhattan, and Miranda was out there for musical theater. We hadn’t ever met Miranda, even though we were from the same small town. ... We met Miranda the day she was flying back to Washington from New York.

TW: I’ve seen a couple of videos you’ve submitted to NPR for their Tiny Desk concert series. Have those opened any doors for you? HAMER: It’s just a fun thing to do because all our friends in the music community, in bands across the country, normally do it. .. It’s just sort of a fun, yearly thing to do. The first year we did it, I think they used a portion of our song as an advertisement for the contest at one point. There’s definitely people seeing it, (but) it’s more of a friendly competition.

PHOTO BY LINDSEY BOWEN

RABBIT WILDE. The Bellingham-bred and now partly Tacoma-based band - which features Zach Hamer, Miranda Zickler, Jillian Walker and Nathan Hamer - is among the buzzworthy acts playing First Night on New Year’s Eve. TW: What year was this? HAMER: This is 2012, probably. We literally just met in a diner in Union Square. We recognized each other from being from the same small town. So I came back for a semester break, and we all met up and played some music together. We liked what we heard, and we were having fun. So we said, “Hey, we’ll do this over my summer break.” It’s been going good, so we haven’t stopped. TW: Your new record is called the “The Heartland,” and from what I understand the name and the songs themselves are influenced by all the traveling you alluded to doing earlier. HAMER: “The Heartland” was written mainly on the road. Some relatives in my family own this secluded cabin out in Iowa on this farm. You’ve gotta drive like 200 miles to find some vegetables to eat. (He laughs.) It’s in the middle of nowhere. So we kind of hunkered down there. This was in the middle of a tour. We were there for a week and a half, I think, just writing music and exploring different sounds. So that’s where “The Heartland” came out of, just being on the road and just writing as we’re traveling.

TW: Many of the lyrics and at least one of the song titles allude to specific places. Are the songs based on specific experiences? Or should we take them as impressions of different places you visited on the road? HAMER: I wouldn’t take the song titles too (literally). We have a song called “Jackson, WY,” but that’s not necessarily about any experience. The song is about marriage and stuff like that, and none of us have actually been married in Jackson, Wyoming. At the same time, we (explore) the highs and lows of being in transit for most of your life. That’s sort of the theme that is kind of overarching in “The Heartland.”

and sort of found how to construct a song all together as a group rather than bringing a completed song to the band. TW: Well tell me about those. Give me some song titles, and compare and contrast. HAMER: We each brought a song to the group. We have saxophone and clarinets, and we have synths on some of the new songs. It’s been a really fun process for us to sort of take that driving sound

TW: Since you’re coming here for First Night, tell me about your most memorable New Year’s Eve experience. HAMER: I think it was two years ago. We were playing on a steam ship in Seattle, on the water; and during one of our songs there was a huge boat wake that came by that tilted the whole ship. I thought the boat was sinking for a moment. But yeah, we all sort of fell over mid-song, but somehow managed to continue playing. TW: So you were kind of like the band playing on the Titanic as it was sinking. HAMER: Yeah, and we kept playing even if the ship was sinking – just to soothe everyone as they danced their way to safety.

ADMISSION TO FIRST NIGHT IS $10 TO $11. FIND TICKETS AND A SCHEDULE OF EVENTS ONLINE AT WWW.FIRSTNIGHTTACOMA.ORG. LEARN MORE ABOUT RABBIT WILDE AT WWW.RABBITWILDE.COM.

TW: How would you say your music has evolved between your debut, “The Wild North,” and “The Heartland?” HAMER: We’re actually working on four new singles now. So there’s even been another, I guess, evolutionary step. But between “The Wild North” and “The Heartland,” I guess we sort of found ourselves as a four piece. … Jillian had just joined the group, specifically just to play cello on “The Wild North.” So we became more cohesive as a fourpiece between those two records

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE TRAIN FEST

There’s still time to catch the 21st annual Model Train Festival at the Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave., which will continue through Jan. 1. This museum-wide event for families, railroad buffs and model train enthusiasts showcases the most spectacular and detailed model railroad scenes in the Pacific Northwest – including the largest permanent model train layout in Washington. Admission for members and kids, ages 5 and younger, is free. The cost to non-member adults is $12 and $8 for students, seniors and members of the military; www.washingtonhistory.org.

TWO GOOD GRIEF! IT’S CHRISTMAS There are two more chances to catch Tacoma Musical Playhouse’s production of “A Charlie Brown Christmas,” at 7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 23, and 11 a.m. Christmas Eve. The play is based on the beloved animated special that debuted on CBS-TV in 1965, featuring one of the greatest TV makeovers of all time – of Chuck’s pathetic, little tree – and that heartwarming soundtrack by the Vince Guaraldi Trio, featuring classics “Linus and Lucy” and “Christmas Time is Here.” Tickets are $10. TMP is located at 7116 Sixth Ave. For further details, visit www.tmp.org.

THREE ASIA FEST: HOLIDAY EDITION The Emerald Queen Casino will host a special edition of Asia Fest – its showcase of Vietnamese pop – which will start

at 8 p.m. Christmas Day in the casino’s I-5 Showroom. Performing will be Quang Ha, Nguyen Khang, My Huyen, Truc Lam, Truc Linh and Doan Phi. Admission is free, but you must be 21 or older to attend. The casino is located at 2024 E. 29th St. For further details, call (253) 594-7777 or visit www.emeraldqueen.com.

FOUR WINTER SKATE Participants can learn how to skateboard in only four days at Alchemy Skateboarding Winter Camps. For $125, skaters can learn from qualified instructors who can teach them regardless of skill level. Skate camps are recommended for beginners, while intermediate skaters may want to opt for private lessons. The mission of the Tacoma-based 501 (c)3 is “empowering our city’s youth through educational skateboard programs, experimental learning opportunities.” The indoor skate park is located at 311 S. 7th

St. Learn more by visiting www.alchemyskateboarding.org.

FIVE MLK TALK The University of Puget Sound announced that labor economist, author and commentator Julianne Malveaux will speak at the school’s 31st annual Martin Luther King Jr. celebration, which will be held at 7 p.m., Jan. 17 at Schneebeck Concert Hall. Described by activist Cornel West as “the most iconoclastic public intellectual in the country,” Malveaux embraces views on race, culture, gender and economics that are helping shape public opinion in 21st Century America. Her latest book is “Are We Better Off? Race, Obama and Public Policy” (J.M. Malveaux Enterprises, $21.50). Learn more at www.pugetsound.edu.


3ECTION " s 0AGE s TACOMAWEEKLY COM s &RIDAY $ECEMBER

WEEKLY REWIND Photos by Bill Bungard The Dope Music Festival – a showcase of hip-hop, fashion and cannabis culture put on by Tacoma’s Two Five Trees and Sky Movement – returned to Tacoma last weekend. Its third annual installment was a two-day gala that brought (clockwise, from top left) Busta Rhymes, Da Brat, Young Hump of Digital Underground, Kokane, DMX, Too $hort, the Pharcyde and the dynamic duo, Method Man and Redman, to the Tacoma Dome. See page B7 for Josh Rizeberg’s recap.

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Friday, December 23, 2016 s TACOMAWEEKLY COM s 3ECTION " s 0AGE

A LIFE LIVED IN ART Remembering Randy Jones

Culture Corner

A Guide to the CulturAl events of tAComA

Events of the Week: The 54th Annual Singing Christmas Tree Dec. 23, 7:30 p.m. Life Center, 1717 S. Union Ave., Tacoma, WA 98405 lifecentertacoma.com

This is the last chance to see this dazzling production, which has become a treasured holiday event for many families throughout Western Washington and beyond for 54 continuous Christmas seasons. Known for being one of the largest and longest running singing tree productions in the United States, Life Center’s rendition has brought both holiday joy and hope to thousands of people since 1963. Life Center is bringing an all new show this season with a trip to the big city and Harper’s Toy Store. See the toys in this magical world come to life and bring a renewed hope to Mr. Harper himself as he discovers the true meaning of Christmas. Experience a brand new story, new sets with new and even more spectacular costumes and music! If you have seen the Singing Tree before, you haven’t seen it like this. Life Center invites you to join them this Christmas for a celebration unlike any other in the Pacific Northwest. Bring your friends and family for an evening of festive holiday music, breathtaking lights and an inspirational story that will make you laugh and may very well bring a tear to your eye.

PHOTO BY MICHAEL KANIECKI

PROLIFIC. Tacoma artist Randy Jones passed away last month. Shown is the man hard at work in his fantastic studio in East Tacoma. "Y $AVE 2 $AVISON dave@tacomaweekly.com

In the contemporary socioeconomic landscape, we are inculcated with the notion that nothing is worth doing unless the doing is financially compensated. Activities done for pleasure are belittled as “hobbies.� From this vantage, a person who devotes their whole existence to a task for some reason other than a paycheck would be labeled as a fool. The artist, however, has a secret – the proverbial fool’s wisdom. The joy, wonder and sense of personal enrichment that comes through following one’s own inspiration is often of greater value than having a whole mansion full of luxury goods. It is those that exist for the sake of expressing their own joy, wonder and inspiration that become the conduit by which others feel joy, wonder and inspiration. A life lived for the purpose of earning money and buying the latest consumerist gizmos is bankrupt compared to a life lived in art. True wealth is stored up in the soul, not in the bank. Human beings must be measured by more than a figure on a balance sheet. Artists are the ones that are so abundant with tantalizing ideas and palpable imaginings that they would far rather work at making their ideas real and manifesting their imaginings in concrete form. For the artist, this is a more worthy endeavor than seeking after clever ways to turn a buck. Whether through sheer greatness, accident or a knack for self-promotion, some artists, like Pablo Picasso, do win fortune and fame. Most, however, do not have the whole world beating a path to their studio doors to snap up the latest sculpture, painting, drawing or print. Some artists, like Vincent Van Gogh, never see a penny’s worth of profit from a life of following after their muse. Between the poles of Picasso and Van Gogh, there is a whole spectrum from grinding poverty to super stardom. Most artists fall somewhere smack in the middle. It is nevertheless the artist’s task to follow the muse wherever it might lead, whether or not fortune smiles or frowns on the endeavor. The secret known to artists is that the muse gives one rewards that no amount of money can buy. A life lived in art is a life well worth the living. An example of the above is the life of Randy Jones – a Tacoma sculptor, painter, draftsman and designer who, last month, was lost to us unexpectedly. The 67-yearold East Tacoma artist was working on the installation of an elaborate mobile in Seattle. He then walked up to his car and expired suddenly from a heart condition. Recently, I was privileged to visit the artist’s East Tacoma home and studio in order to glean insight into the life of a man devoted to the task of building amazing works of art, utilizing a high level of craftsmanship. Primarily known for his assemblage pieces (mobiles and wind sculptures made from found objects), Jones was also a talented draftsman. In the entry area of the residence, there is a series of elaborate line drawings of the well-stocked, well-organized interior of an Alaska cabin where Jones spent a winter as part of a National Geographic team that recreated the challenges and hardships that followers of the Chilkoot Trail encountered during the 1890s Klondike gold rush. The entire wall of one room of the house is occupied by a huge, elaborate collage. The image is of a clown fish, a mosaic constructed of thousands of images clipped from magazines and catalogues. The project shows Jones’ commitment to a task, no matter how daunting. Jones’ notebooks full of calendars, lists, drawings and designs for projects are like something by a modern day Leonardo da

Vinci. The neatness of the handwriting is not something often encountered in this day. Every chance to write gave Jones an opportunity to practice his calligraphy. There are sometimes notes on a drawing that refer to another drawing on a specific page of another notebook. An active, nimble mind is evident of the pages of those notebooks. The impression of an encounter with the mind of a master artist came through again when I ventured into Jones’ studio. It was like going into the mind of the man himself. Built by Jones, the workspace has large windows that look out onto a backyard garden. The interior is so full of fascinating objects that I had a feeling of being in the middle of a pirate’s treasure trove. The studio is filled with antique tools, hoops of wire, plastic cartoon creatures, cookie cutters, toys, cake molds, springs, gizmos, doohickeys, thingamajigs. It is an inventor’s lair – a mad scientist’s laboratory. File cabinets, shelves, and banks of drawers line the walls. All of the furniture and work benches are mounted on casters for easy movement. Everything conducive to the act of creation with least amount of friction. Everything – tools and materials – are at hand and easily accessible. The workshop itself is a brilliant work of art. The place brings to mind the maxim: A place for everything and everything in its place. Because Jones used found objects as the raw material for his creations, he had a circuit of places that he would visit on a regular basis to seek out new and unusual things that could find a new purpose as parts of Jones’ quirky, colorful and well-built works of art. He would go to thrift stores, garage sales, flea markets and second hand shops. The big Goodwill store in Seattle was long a favorite. Once home, everything was filed away in a suitable location so that they did not become jumbled together and clutter things up. Jones’ studio looks like it functioned as efficiently as a tidy little factory. Trained in fine art at University of Washington, Jones always did freelance design work. Also skilled in the use of all manner of tools, Jones could function as a cabinet builder when he needed to go out to earn his daily bread. Having migrated to Tacoma from Seattle in recent years, Jones was just beginning to establish himself in Tacoma’s art world. His workshop was on the Tacoma Studio Tour for the last several years. He undertook projects to make ends meet, but clearly his true passion was for the time when he had freedom to do his own work in the studio. It was there, in his own workspace, that Jones was able to construct his often elaborate projects. Many imagine fantastic things, but Jones had the skill and the focus to turn his ideas real life objects. He was, for example working on a six foot tall “ball drop.� When complete, a set of several wooden balls could have been set off on a series of elaborate tracks, triggering all manner of clever mechanical devices on the way down. The completed portion was beautifully constructed of perfectly made, beautifully painted parts. The thing would have taken hundreds of hours of painstaking labor to finish. Unfortunately, Jones ran out of time with the project incomplete. The glitzy sheen of consumerist, digitized culture is insidious in its way of seeming to denigrate that which is hand made and labor intensive. Having a peek into the richness of the life well lived by Jones is refreshing and affirming. The artist’s road is well worth taking. Not only will you enjoy the enriching companionship of your own muse, but you will find yourself surrounded by the unique and fantastic creations that emerge, through some marvelous mystery, from the human imagination.

Vegan Book Club

Dec. 27, 7 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave., Tacoma, WA 98402 www.kingsbookstore.com

Join our Vegan Book Club, coordinated by The South Sound Vegan Meetup Group! The book club is open to anyone interested in a vegan diet, vegans and vegan-curious alike. The book for December is “Dewey: The Small-Town Library Cat Who Touched the World� by Vicky Myron with Bret Witter. Books available at King’s Books. Come join us! We meet the fourth Tuesday of every other month at the bookstore. PLEASE NOTE: The Vegan Book Club meets every other month.

Something to Tell

Dec. 28, 6 p.m. B Sharp Coffee House, 706 Opera Alley, Tacoma, WA 98402 www.bsharpcoffeehouse.com “Something to Tellâ€? in Tacoma is an open mike story telling show every 4th Wednesday of the month at B Sharp Coffee. December’s theme is “Suprisesâ€?... Have you ever been minding your own business, things going along uneventfully and bam, something comes out of left field changes everything. Perhaps someone says something shocking or you witness something that has a life altering impact. Come share a story of something that really surprised you. No Cover


3ECTION " s 0AGE s TACOMAWEEKLY COM s &RIDAY $ECEMBER

PDZA’S DOZER GETS ANOTHER GIRLFRIEND

PHOTOS COURTESY OF POINT DEFIANCE ZOO AND AQUARIUM

TRUE LOVE. Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium’s Rocky Shores Habitat has a grand total of four walruses, a male and a trio of females. The group will remain together through the breeding season in spring. If fruitful, the group will increase the population of Pacific walruses.

The Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium has added another massive walrus to its Rocky Shores Habitat in hopes of making some little walruses. A 1,346-pound calf named Kulu is on loan from the Wildlife Conservation Society’s New York Aquarium. Earlier this month, she joined 3,650-pound male

Dozer, 23, and females Joan and Basilla which are 21 and 33, respectively. While Joan and Basilla have hung out at Rocky Shores for years, Dozer arrived at Point Defiance from Sea World San Antonio last month on a breeding loan through the Walrus Conservation Consortium, a group of zoos and aquariums

that either have walruses in their care or are active in the quest to conserve the iconic marine mammals. Dozer will remain in Tacoma through the breeding season, which generally runs into spring. It is a rare opportunity to see so many Pacific walruses on display since there are only 14 at accredited zoos and

aquariums in the United States. The zoo is operating on a special Winter Break schedule and is open from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily through Jan. 2 but will be closed on Dec. 25. To learn more, visit www.pdza.org. Ernest A. Jasmin, Tacoma Weekly

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: BEN HARPER & THE INNOCENT CRIMINALS Nearly nine years passed between “Lifeline,â€? rock n’ soul star Ben Harper’s first album with The Innocent Criminals and this year’s “Call It What It Is,â€? an album Entertainment Weekly calls “a welcome homecoming.â€? On July 21, Harper will showcase those new sounds during a 7:30 p.m. performance at Tacoma’s Pantages Theater. Tickets are on sale now with prices ranging from $55 to $129. Visit www.broadwaycenter.org for further details on that show, and see www.ticketmaster.com for info on these other upcoming concerts except for where otherwise indicated. • Miranda Sings: 8 p.m. Jan. 11, Pantages Theater, $39.50 to $75; www.broadwaycenter.org. • Smokey Robinson: 8:30 p.m. Jan. 13, Emerald Queen Casino, $70 to $170. • Northwest Sinfonietta presents “Prokofiev & Tchaikovskyâ€? featuring Joseph Swensen: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 11, Rialto Theater, $20 to $50; www. broadwaycenter.org. • Air Supply: 8 p.m. Feb. 14, Emerald Queen Casino, $30 to $75. • Eric Burdon & The Animals: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 18, Pantages Theater, $29 to $85. • Blake Shelton: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 25, Tacoma Dome, $29.50 to $65.

• Eric Church: 8 p.m. March 18, Tacoma Dome, $20 to $86. • Lewis Black: 8 p.m. March 18, Pantages Theater, $59.50 to $75. • “The Spin Stops Hereâ€? with Bill O’Reilly, Dennis Miller and Jesse Watters: 5 p.m. March 25, Tacoma Dome, $65 to $125. • Regina Spektor: 8 p.m. April 3, Paramount Theatre, Seattle, $28.50 to $68.50. • The Weeknd: 7:30 p.m. April 26, KeyArena, Seattle, $35.50 to $121. • Lionel Richie and Mariah Carey: 7 p.m. April 28, KeyArena, Seattle, $35.95 to $495.

BEN HARPER

• Soul 2 Soul Tour with Tim McGraw and Faith Hill: 7:30 p.m. May 27, Tacoma Dome, $66.50 to $1,249.

PHOTO BY ERNEST JASMIN

• “Sasquatch Music Festivalâ€? featuring Frank Ocean: May 26 to 28, Gorge Amphitheatre, George, $275 to $295 festival pass. • Roger Waters: 8 p.m. June 24, Tacoma Dome, $55 to $199.50.

• Tommy Castro and the Painkillers: 8:30 p.m. Feb. 25, Temple Theatre, $22.50.

• Chris Stapleton with Maren Morris: 7 p.m. March 28, KeyArena, Seattle, $30 to $65; on sale at 10 a.m. Friday, Oct. 28.

• Chris Botti: 8 p.m. March 17, Tacoma Dome, $26.50 to $196.

• Chris Tomlin: 7 p.m. May 4, KeyArena, Seattle, $13 to $65.75.

• Neil Diamond: 8 p.m. July 26, KeyArena, Seattle, $41 to $145.

• John Cleese: 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. March 17, Pantages Theater, $39 to $110; www.broadwaycenter.org.

• PJ Harvey: 8:30 p.m. May 5, WaMu Theater, Seattle, $59.50.

• Coldplay: 7 p.m. Sept. 23, Century Link Field, Seattle, $25.50 to $185.50.

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Make a Scene

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HOW DOPE WAS THE DOPE MUSIC FESTIVAL? By Josh Rizeberg josh@tacomaweekly.com

On Friday, Dec. 16, and Saturday, Dec. 17, the third annual Dope Music Festival was held at the Tacoma Dome. Two Five Trees Productions planned the first night and Sky Movement took over for the second night. Friday evening was dubbed Old School Night at the Dome featuring E-40, Busta Rhymes, DMX, Too $hort, Da Brat, Kokane, Method Man and Redman, Money B and Young Hump from Digital Underground, The Pharcyde, and Curtis Young. Saturday had a more contemporary vibe with the night’s line-up including Meek Mill, Gucci Mane, Clemm Rishad, Lil Uzi Vert, and Russ. Both nights were hosted by Nate Jackson who could very well be the funniest man in Washington. During both shows he entertained the crowd, and himself, with jokes and toasts. He truly was the right person for the job because he seems to be at one with a hip-hop audience. Jackson knows all the songs and he can rap along, getting the crowd to join in and participate, as well. This festival was a big deal for Tacoma. The entire week before the festival, the weekend of and the Sunday after, social media timelines were filled with promotions, live videos, and concert-goers’ reactions to the shows. The sheer number of artists on these bills was impressive. Seeing 15 artists in two days is a lot for our city. Many around here would be happy to see this many artists in one year’s time, much less a weekend. The actual production of both shows was close to perfect. Both nights started on time and there were only 10 minutes or so between acts. Every artist had between 25-30 minutes to perform. Friday night began with Curtis Young warming up the crowd with some of his original music and also some covers of his father’s music. Young is the first son of Andre Young, better known as Dr. Dre. Curtis has a strong resemblance to his father and is continuing in his legacy of pushing West Coast hip-hop to the limits. Next up was Los Angeles’ Pharcyde. Originally the crew consisted of four members, however only two were there for the Tacoma show. This did not in any way affect their music negatively. Current members Imani and Bootie Brown exploded onto the stage like two energetic, underground rap superheroes. Pharcyde’s music has always been fun, light-hearted, funny, yet still dipped in South Central Los Angeles. It is true party-rocking material as they have jams that are odes to women, weed, and just fooling around. Money B and Young Hump were up next. With each act the crowd’s reaction grew. These members of Digital Underground played all their hits such as “The Humpty Dance,� “Kiss You Back,� “Freaks of the

Industry� and “Doowutchyalike.� They also had a tribute to 2Pac, as he was an original member of the crew back in the late 80’s and early 90’s. Method Man and Redman came to the stage next. They are two of the best live hip-hop performers around – seasoned vets yet still able to jump and run all around, making hiphop boisterous and jovial. Each of them sprayed the crowd with plenty of water and threw water bottles out into the crowd to build-up the frenzy of their performance. All of their music is upbeat and energetic. Next came Kokane. Although he is a West Coast staple of G-Funk, he is best known for being a hook man, so he performs parts of other artists’ songs that he was featured on. He also let his 21-year-old daughter perform two R&B songs. Da Brat followed. She is extremely charismatic on stage. Her raps are razor sharp live and she has a nice, loud delivery that demands attention. She joked around with us during her set and pretty much left many believing that she is one of the best women to ever do it. Then out came Too $hort. He keeps it simple and oldschool with no hype man, no jumping around, no antics, just his East Oakland raps and his dripping swag. Too $hort truly is an old-school artist with hits to draw from reaching back into the 80’s. He fed us well, giving us a taste of all his biggest songs. Accompanying him on stage was a female back-up dancer who sauntered around with neon pink lights emanating from her sneakers. It was hard to take your eyes off of the two of them. It was obvious the crowd was waiting to see DMX. He came out with his Ruff Ryder crew standing on the side of the stage. All the people up there added to the excitement of his set. X is at his best when he is spitting his acapellas and doing his signature prayers for the crowd. He is an intense artist who emits incredible amounts of emotion while performing. Then came Busta Rhymes who brought one of hip-hop’s most famous backup men, Spliff Star of the Flipmode Squad. The two of them rocked all of Busta’s hits. They poured champagne on the front rows and were very theatrical. Busta might have lost a step or two with his age but his raps are more dexterous than ever. He is one of the few M.C.s who can rap his fast rhymes just as well as he did in the studio while recording them. It is truly impressive. Lastly was E-40, the town favorite. Seats emptied out as his fans flocked to the front to dance along with his music in the aisles by the stage. He performed classic Click hits to his new commercially successful chart-toppers like “Choices� and he and Big Sean’s song “I Don’t F**ck With You.� This night was a little more crowded than the second night. It was full

of beautiful people ranging from parents with their school-age children on up to stylish seniors sporting Mr. Mac type suits. Saturday had a younger crowd, plenty of teenagers and young adults. Russ started the night off. He performed his Atlanta hip-hop and R&B flawlessly. His style ranges from Trap-like, to moody, emo music. He can sing as well as he can rap and he got the show off to a great start. Lil Uzi Vert came up next. Out of both nights he easily got the crowd the most hype. Without warning this young man jumped off the stage and performed his songs up and down the aisles. Every time one of his songs came on it was like a wave taking over the crowd. They all jumped, pumped, and danced in unison. It was quite the sight to see. Tacoma’s own Sky Movement artist Clemm Rishad performed after that. Although he does not have recognizable hits to rap, he did his set with professionalism and he made sure to pay lots of homage to his hometown and the love and support he receives from Tacoma. Gucci Mane was perhaps the most chill of all the artists. He really lets his infectious music do the talking. He confidently, in the most relaxed manner, strolls back and forth on the stage while the crowd does most of the rapping for him. There is no climbing up on speakers or jumping around with Gucci. He is much too cool for all of that. It still makes for a completely entertaining set. Last up to bat was Meek Mill. His set had a live drummer and keyboarder. This gave his music a big stadium sound. The lighting on stage was also magnificent for him as he had a neon panel of lights behind him. It was a big arena type show and his music is fast and exhilarating. Make sure to thank Two Five Trees and Sky Movement for working so hard to bring Tacoma such an enormous festival. There will be more to come in the future as the cannabis industry and Tacoma continue to grow. Tacoma is lucky the two were able to work together to fill the Dome with so many legends and stars in one weekend.

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Nightlife TW PICK OF THE WEEK: TWO GREAT REGIONAL POP TALENTS

WILL TEAM UP AS WILL JORDAN (SHOWN) JOINS SOTARIA GIBSON AT 8 P.M. FRIDAY, DEC. 23 AT JAZZBONES. JOINING THEM ON THE BILL WILL BE SAINT CLAIRE AND DJ QJ. TICKETS ARE $10 IN ADVANCE, $15 THE DAY OF SHOW; WWW.JAZZBONES.COM.

PHOTO BY CHARLICE JORDAN

FRIDAY, DEC. 23

TUESDAY, DEC. 27

THE SWISS: Gritty City Sirens Caroling Pub Crawls (caroling) 5 p.m., NC’ Brad Birkedahl with The Dempseys (rock) 9 p.m.

CULTURA: “Azul Fridays� with DJ Mauro (bachata, salsa, reggaeton and hip-hop DJ) 10 p.m., $5-$10 G. DONNALSON’S: Sunday + Mr. Goessl (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Will Jordan, Sotaria Gibson, Saint Claire, DJ QJ (pop, electronic) 8 p.m., $10-$15 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC REAL ART TACOMA: “Worst Christmas Ever II: Nu Metal Revenge� with Into the Flood, Empyrean, We Walk Alone, A Taste of Daylight (metal) 7 p.m., $10, AA TACOMA COMEDY: Susan Johnson (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $16-$22, 18+ early show UNCLE SAM’S: Mental Rex (hard rock) 8 p.m.

SATURDAY, DEC. 24

STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (open mic) 8 p.m., NC

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Doug Skoog and Brian Feist (blues) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA NORTHERN PACIFIC: Stingy Brim Slim (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lefferty (open mic) 8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 28

G. DONNALSON’S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA

REAL ART TACOMA: “Emo Dance Party� (emo) 12:30 p.m., $1, AA

SUNDAY, DEC. 25

EMERALD QUEEN: “Asia Fest� featuring Quang Ha, Nguyen Khang, My Huyen and more (Vietnamese pop) 8 p.m., NC

MONDAY, DEC. 26 THE SWISS: Chuck Gay (open mic) 7 p.m., NC

B SHARP COFFEE: “Something to Tell� (storytelling open mic) 6 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 8 p.m., NC NORTHERN PACIFIC: Open mic, 7:30 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, DEC. 29

TACOMA COMEDY: Jake Johannsen (comedy) 8 p.m., $10-$16, 18+

DAWSON’S: Heather Jones and the Groove Masters (R&B, soul, funk) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: “Guitar Going Monday� (blues, jazz guitar) 7 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke (live band karaoke) 7 p.m., NC

CULTURA: “Ladies Night Out: Christmas Edition� with DJ K-Phi (DJ dance) 10 p.m., $5-$10 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

2611 N. Proctor 253.752.9500 LA LA LAND (128 MIN, PG-13) Sat 12/24: 5:40, Sun 12/25-Thu 12/29: 11:35 AM, 2:35, 5:40, 8:30

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JACKIE (99 MIN, R) Wed 12/21-Fri 12/23: 11:40 AM, 2:00, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10, Sat 12/24: 11:40 AM, 2:00, 4:30, 6:50, Sun 12/25: 11:40 AM, 2:00, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10, Mon 12/26: 11:40 AM, 2:00, 4:30, 9:10, Tue 12/27-Thu 12/29: 11:40 AM, 2:00, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10

MANCHESTER BY THE SEA (137 MIN, R)

BROADNAX

Friday, December 23, 2016 s TACOMAWEEKLY COM s 3ECTION " s 0AGE

Wed 12/21-Fri 12/23: 12:00, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00, Sat 12/24: 12:00, 3:00, 6:00 Sun 12/25-Thu 12/29: 12:00, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00

THE EAGLE HUNTRESS (87 MIN, G) Wed 12/21: 12:10, 2:15, 4:20, 6:30, 8:40 Thu 12/22: 12:10, 2:15, 4:20, 9:00 Fri 12/23: 12:10, 2:15, 4:20, 6:30, 8:40 Sat 12/24: 12:10, 2:15, 4:20, 6:30

LOVING (123 MIN, PG-13) Wed 12/21: 11:30 AM, 4:00, 9:00, Thu 12/22: 4:30, Fri 12/23: 11:50 AM, 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, Sat 12/24: 11:50 AM, 2:30

MIRACLE ON 34th STREET (96 MIN, NR)

Seeking Freelance Writer Pierce County Community Newspaper Group (PCCNG) is the premier producer of community newspapers in the Tacoma and Pierce County area. Along with our flagship publication, the Tacoma Weekly, we publish the University Place Press, Fife Free Press, Milton-Edgewood Signal and Puyallup Tribal News. PCCNG is seeking experienced, dependable, community-minded writers. All areas are needed – news, sports and entertainment. Must be a self-starter capable of following up on assignments and also developing in-depth stories independently in a deadline-driven environment. Photography skills are a big plus, as are copyediting/proofreading skills (AP style). Will include some evening work and occasional weekend hours.

Wed 12/21: 1:45, 6:45

WHITE CHRISTMAS (120 MIN, NR) Thu 12/22: 1:30, 6:30, 7:05

LIFE OF BRIAN (94 MIN, R) Mon 12/26: 6:35

&AWCETT 4ACOMA 7!

s GRANDCINEMA COM

Send cover letter, resume and at least three examples of published work to matt@tacomaweekly.com or via regular mail to PCCNG, 2588 Pacific Hwy, Fife, WA 98424. Please, no phone calls or walk-ins.


3ECTION " s 0AGE s TACOMAWEEKLY COM s &RIDAY $ECEMBER

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: ZOO LIGHTS Mon., Dec. 26, 5-9 p.m. Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, 5400 N. Pearl St. Need something to do with the kids now that they’re out of school on break? Bundle up and stroll the Zoo as it comes aglow with more than a half-million lights. Be inspired by dazzling animal-themed displays, lighted trees and everything a-glow during these dark days of winter. Ages: All ages. Price: $17; $16 seniors; $13 children 5-12; $8.75 children 3-4; free for children 2 and under. Info: (253) 591-5337

‘A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS’ Fri., Dec. 23, 7-7:45 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 Sixth Ave. The award-winning, “A Charlie Brown Christmas� special, debuted in 1965 on CBS and has aired during the Christmas season every single year since. Ages: All ages. Price: $10. Info: (253) 565-6867; www.tmp.org LAS POSADAS DE BELEN Fri., Dec. 23, 6-7:30 p.m. Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 101 E. 38th St. Advent Festivities with simple worship service, singing, refreshments and kid-friendly activities. Ages: All Ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 4740525; blctacoma.com ‘MIRACLE ON 34TH STREET’ Fri., Dec. 23, 7:30 p.m. Tacoma Little Theatre, 210 N. I St. If you really believe, anything can happen. By chance, Kris Kringle, an old man in a retirement home, gets a job working as Santa for Macy’s. Kris unleashes waves of good will with Macy’s customers and the commercial world of New York City by referring parents to other stores to find exactly the toy their child has asked for. Price: $24; $22 students, seniors & military; $20 12 and under. Info: (253) 272-2281; www. tacomalittletheatre.com SANTA PHOTOS AT TACOMA MALL Fri., Dec. 23, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tacoma Mall, 4502 S Steele St. It’s time for holiday photos with Santa. Santa will be available for photos at Tacoma Mall from November 4 to December 24. Santa is waiting, so come share your wish list, or make an appointment. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 475-4566; tacomamall.fullslate.com CHRISTMAS EVE FAMILY SERVICE & CHILDREN’S PAGEANT Sat., Dec. 24, 4 p.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St. All are welcome. Sing carols, remember the meaning of Christmas and share Christmas Communion. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 564-4402 FOOD ADDICTS IN RECOVERY ANONYMOUS Sat., Dec. 24, 8-9:30 a.m. Trinity Lutheran Church, 12115 Park Ave. S. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous is an international fellowship of men and women who have experienced difficulties in life as a result of the way we used to eat. Price: Free. Info: (253) 310-8177 JINGLE BELL RUN Sat., Dec. 24, 10 a.m to 12 p.m. Wright Park, 316 S. G St. This race will feature hundreds of jingling bells that will definitely put you in the holiday spirit. This is a 3-mile

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

BLUES AND BEYOND JAM Tues., Dec. 27, 7-11 p.m. Dave’s Restaurant, 1502 11th Ave. Blues and Beyond Jam every Tuesday night at Dave’s of Milton. Special guest artists Jerry Miller and CD Woodbury alternate. Ages: All ages until 10 p.m. Price: Free. Info: (253) 926-8707; www. davesofmilton.net

DAFFODIL VALLEY VOLKSSPORT CLUB Wed., Dec. 28, 9:15 a.m. Daffodil Valley Volkssport Association, 8718 159th St. E., Puyallup We start walking promptly at 9:30, but you must register, so don’t be late. Be at the Hampton Inn by 9:15 to register and be ready to walk. We start out along the Interurban Trail. Price: Free. Info: (253) 845-6592; www. daffodilvalleyvolkssport.com

CLAW OPEN SWIM Wed., Dec. 28, 7:30 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave. Join the Cartoonist’s League of Absurd Washingtonians for their monthly Open Swim. Participants will draw a word from the fez and incorporate that into their drawing. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-8801 run/walk at Wright Park with race times of 10 a.m. and noon. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 305-1000 CHRISTMAS EVE TRADITIONAL COMMUNION SERVICE Sat., Dec. 24, 9:30 p.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St. Come out for this Traditional Christmas Eve Communion Service beginning with 30-minutes of caroling and special music. All are welcome from any background or spiritual journey. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 564-4402; www.saintandrewstacoma.org SPANISH WORSHIP SERVICE Sun., Dec. 25, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 101 E. 38th St. We are offering a new Spanish worship service for the community. All are welcome to this new outreach which will use the same format as our English service. Ages: All Ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 474-0525; blctacoma.com CHRISTMAS DAY WORSHIP AND CAROLS Sun., Dec. 25, 8 a.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St. All are welcome to celebrate Christmas Day with carols, communion, and good news for spiritual seekers. This is a welcoming congregation in an accessible building, so come and see. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 564-4402; www.saintandrewstacoma.org FUCHSIA DISPLAY GARDEN Sun., Dec. 25, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Point Defiance Park, 5400 N. Pearl St. The Pacific Northwest has one of the finest climates for growing a large variety of fuchsias. Display gardens help to convey the beautiful varieties of fuchsias that can grow in your yard. Ages: All ages. Price: Free Admission. Info: (253) 3051000; www.tacomaparks.com COAST TO CASCADES: C. C. MCKIM’S IMPRESSIONIST VISIONS Sun., Dec. 25, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave. McKim’s artistic career as an impressionist painter flourished in Portland, Oregon, during the early 20th century. McKim’s light-filled, evocative images of Oregon landscapes capture the unique beauty and character of the Northwest. Ages: All ages. Price: Adult $15, Student/Military/Senior (65+) $13, Family $40 (2 adults and up to 4 children under 18). Children 5 and under free. Members always free. Info: (253) 272-4258; www.tacomaartmuseum.org ‘MONTY PYTHON’S LIFE OF BRIAN’ Mon., Dec. 26, 6:30 p.m. Grand Cinema, 606 S. Fawcett Ave. Monty Python delivers the group’s sharpest and smartest satire of both religion and

Hollywood’s epic films. Brian is born on the original Christmas, in the stable next door. He spends his life being mistaken for a messiah and hilarity ensues. Ages: Rated R. Price: $10 Adult, $8 Senior/ Student/Military. Info: (253) 593-4474; www.grandcinema.com/films/life-of-brian 21ST ANNUAL MODEL TRAIN FESTIVAL Mon., Dec. 26, 10 a.m to 5 p.m. Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave. History and holiday magic unite at the Washington State History Museum during the 21st Annual Model Train Festival. Ages: All ages. Price: Free for members, $12 nonmember adults, $8 students/ seniors/military, kids under 5 free. Info: (253) 798-5902; www.wshs.org/ HOLIDAY LIGHT DISPLAY AND CANNED FOOD DRIVE Mon., Dec. 26, 6-9 p.m. Insurance West, 11602 101st Ave. E., Puyallup This year, in addition to our Holiday Lights Display, we are hosting a canned food drive benefiting the Puyallup Food Bank. If you would like to bring a can or two or more, we would be very appreciative. Price: Free. Info: (253) 446-1300 ALCHEMY SKATEBOARD WINTER CAMPS Tues., Dec. 27, 10 a.m to 12 p.m., 1-3 p.m. Alchemy Indoor Skatepark and Education Center, 311 S. 7th St. Learn to skate in only four days. Alchemy Indoor Skatepark and Education Center is pleased to offer four day skate camps. With two time slots available, learning to skateboard has never been easier. Ages: Recommended for ages 6-12. Price: $125/ camper. Info: (253) 2374281; alchemyskateboarding.org/camps-1 ARGENTINE TANGO BEGINNERS CLASS Tues., Dec. 27, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Backstreet Tango, 3505 S. 14th St. Join this group for an Absolute Beginner Level Class. The studio was built with the sole purpose of teaching only authentic social Argentine Tango. You will learn the basic elements for this wonderful dance by a Master Tango Instructor. Ages: teenagers 16 and above. Price: $40 for eight classes and two practicas. Info: (253) 3048296; backstreettango.com VEGAN BOOK CLUB Tues., Dec. 27, 7-8:30 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave. Join King’s Vegan Book Club, coordinated by The South Sound Vegan Meetup Group. The book club is open to anyone interested in a vegan diet, vegans and vegan-curious alike. Meets the fourth Tuesday of every other month. Price: Free. Info: Info: (253) 272-8801; www.kingsbookstore.com

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar� link.

THURSDAY NIGHT SINGLES DANCE Thurs., Dec. 29, 6:30-11 p.m. Allenmore Golf Course, 2125 S. Cedar St. We have a live band here every Thursday to play Ballroom dance music for all you dancers out there. We have a dance lesson for an additional $10 with April Morrow. Ages: 18+ Price: $10. Info: (253) 6271161; www.facebook.com/pg/ ElksAllenmore/events/

ARGENTINE TANGO LESSONS Wed., Dec. 28, 7-9:30 p.m. Cultura Event Center, 5602 S. Washington St. Learn to dance Tango in the style of Argentina, where tango was created. Learn the art of connection and moving with another person in this incredible and versatile dance. Ages: 18+ Price: $10, $15 couple. Info: (253) 2220105; tangointacoma.com

PEAKS AND PINTS LODGE MEETING WITH LAGUNITAS BREWING CO. Thurs., Dec. 29, 6-9 p.m. Peaks and Pints, 3816 N. 26th St. Lagunitas Brewing Co. will pour seasonal Cappuccino Stout and other craft beers. Ages: 21 and older. Price: no cover. Info: (253) 328-5621

OZOBOTS - PROGRAM MINIATURE ROBOTS USING COLOR Wed., Dec. 28, 11:30 a.m. Thurs., Dec. 29, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Tacoma Public Library, 1102 Tacoma Ave. S. Have fun with Ozobots that move in patterns, play games and dance. By using different color markers to draw, these mini robots can be programmed to follow commands. Price: Free. Info: (253) 292-2001; www.tacomapubliclibrary.org

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HERON’S KEY HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE Thurs., Dec. 29, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Heron’s Key, 4021 Harborview Dr., Gig Harbor Heron’s Key, an amenity-rich senior living community by Emerald Communities set to open in mid-2017, invites one and all to a Holiday Open House. Bring a guest and join us for a preview of the exceptional lifestyle at Heron’s Key. Price: Free. Info: (253) 851-8100; HeronsKey.org

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