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FREE s Friday, December 13, 2013

FALCONS OUTLAST TIGERS

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THE SPIRIT OF THE SEASON

CARROT TOP IN CONCERT

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Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

BIOT SISTER CITY FLOATS EXCITEMENT

Put A Sock In It!

Glass floats raise funds

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

STAMPED. Sarah Gilbert stamps

the seal on a glass float celebrating Tacoma’s sister city relationship with Biot, France. By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO BY JEFFREY JENSEN

PUT A SOCK IN IT. Nathan Jensen personally took Tacoma’s sock drive to fire stations in Tacoma and Graham.

WHAT’S RIGHT WITH TACOMA

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HONOR STUDENT WARMS FEET WITH CHRISTMAS PROJECT By Kathleen Merryman

We’ve told you stories about homeless men and women who need woolpoly socks to keep their feet from getting sick. We’ve introduced you to school kids who aren’t making a fashion statement with that no-sock look. We’re pretty sure you get the picture. As the drive heads into its 11th

Cold feet are the worst. That’s why, each holiday season, Tacomans try their best to get socks to the people who need them.

X See SOCKS / page A10

Here is where to put a sock in it: Both Tacoma Strength locations: Cross/Fit Tacoma, 411 Fawcett Ave.

COUNTY’S BUDGET CONTAINS FUNDING FOR NEW STATION

All Emergency Food Network and FISH Food Banks in Pierce County.

Strength & Conditioning, 3113-c Pine St.

All Tacoma fire and police stations. Thank you firefighters and officers!

Catholic Community Services & Hospitality Kitchen

All Graham Fire & Rescue stations.

1323 S. Yakima Ave. Tacoma, WA 98405 Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.

Oakland High School

Tacoma Weekly

2588 Pacific Highway, Fife Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.

Tacoma Life Christian Academy

1717 S. Union Ave. Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m.- 3 p.m.

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Pierce County’s budget passed late last month and outlines how the county’s $271 million General Fund budget will be spent. That $271 million is some $5 million less than the current budget, though the seeming shortfall is more of an accounting shift. Total spending for 2014 amounts to $978.1 million. That includes $151 million for sewer construction as the county expands the Chambers Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant to accommodate growth. The budget funds 3,007 full-time equivalent positions - 481 fewer than in 2008. It also includes a 1.88 percent cost of living raise for employees, the first such adjustment in three years. Highlights include opening a new Sheriff ’s Department precinct in the Parkland/ Spanaway area. It has been in the works for years as a way to provide more visible law enforcement presence. It will also fund performance audits

Sock Deal of the Week:

3319 S. Adams St., Tacoma, (253) 571-5136 Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m.- 3 p.m.

Grocery Outlet stores have packs of six pairs of poly-wool wicking socks for $4.99.

Interested in joining this roster, and being a collection site for people in need? E-mail kathleen@tacomaweekly.com or call Kathleen Merryman at (253) 922-5317.

All-City Football A7 Helping kids have a Merry Christmas A3 SALMON SATURDAY: Gather up the kids and head to Swan Creek Park on Dec. 14 and help “welcome home” Swan Creek salmon. PAGE A4

year, we’re celebrating with stories about the people and organizations stepping into the tradition. It’s the simplest of operations: Someone puts out a basket with a poster; people put socks in the basket; the socks go straight to people in schools, food banks, transitional housing, shelters and drop-in centers.

The Museum of Glass is floating a new plan to support Tacoma’s Sister City relationship with Biot, in the warm and sunny south of France. The hot shop crew, led by Ben Cobb and Sarah Gilbert, is making floats – bubbly, Medieval glass floats. They’re selling them to raise money to send young Tacoma glass artists to learn from the masters in the hot shops of Biot and to get a glimpse of global glass. “We want to help fund future exchanges between future glassmakers,” Cobb said. In April, Gilbert and Cobb joined the sister city delegation to Biot and blew glass all over town. City Councilwoman Lauren Walker and Mayor Emeritus Bill Baarsma and his wife, Carol, talked urban policy with Biot’s Mayor JeanPierre Dermit. Agnes Jensen found her inner Knight Templar and joined nobles Cathy Sarnat and Chris and Gwen X See BIOT / page A10

Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

FILE PHOTO

SAVINGS. The county budget will fund performance

audits of the Pierce County Jail to help identify cost savings.

of the Pierce County Jail to help identify cost savings so it can attract more contract business from other jurisdictions – namely Tacoma – that has been lost to Fife. “The economic outlook for Pierce County continues to improve,” said Council Chair Joyce McDonald (District 2) in a release. “Rev-

Danny Quintero holiday favorites B4

enues from sales and property taxes are up, thanks to an increase in construction and consumer activity. Our conservative budgeting in recent years has left us in a stable and secure financial position, particularly because our employees found innovative ways to streamline operations.”

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Sports ........................A6 Make A Scene ........B5 A&E ....................... ....B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Two Sections | 20 Pages


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Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK VISIT US ON FACEBOOK MHJLIVVRJVT[HJVTH^LLRS`

No. 14th and Shirley Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.� And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

Learning Sprout Toys Your Hometown, Downtown Toy Store 0ACIFIC!VE 4ACOMAk  

SPEND $100

AND GET 15% OFF!

/FFERGOODUNTIL$ECEMBER .OT to be combined with any other sales offer.

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 CcAaRr By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The Chevrolet Corvette convertible served a tour of duty in the 1998 Indianapolis 500 by working as the official pace car of the legendary race, when four cars were used in the race and 1,600 of the cars were produced for sale to the public. The driver of the pace car that year was pro golfer Greg Norman, who drove the test runs but was replaced at the last minute with Parnelli Jones because Norman withdrew because of shoulder surgery. Corvette has served as the official pace car more than any other car, a tally of 11 times. The 1998 Corvette was among the most flashy of the bunch with its 345 horsepower engine, Radar Blue paint and its signature yellow and black interior. A checkered flag stretched from the Corvette’s functional front gill panel all along the sides of the car and up over its tail. The public production Corvette was identical to the pace car although the public version didn’t come with the specially fitted strobe lights on

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

the actual pace car that was mandated by the Speedway for safety reasons. It also came in a four-speed automatic transmission with a performance axle ratio at no extra charge, or the optional six-speed manual transmission at additional cost. The car featured a Delco electronically tuned AM/FM radio with seek and scan modes, automatic tone control, CD player, digital clock, speedcompensated volume control and a Bose speaker system. Also included

City News CITY ISSUES REQUEST FOR 79676:(3:-69/033;67:0;, In keeping with a vision contemplated by both the City of Tacoma and the Washington State Department of Commerce for the continued revitalization of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic Hilltop neighborhood, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Community and Economic Development Department has issued a Request for Development Proposals for mixed use commercialresidential development on roughly 1.5 shovel-ready acres at Martin Luther King Jr. Way and South 11th Street. The site is owned by the Washington State Department of Commerce. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The City is excited about a partnership with the State of Washington to help this valuable property achieve its best and highest use that will benefit the community and generate tax revenue,â&#x20AC;? said Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This parcel sits at a pivotal location along the planned expansion of Sound Transitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Link Light Rail and represents a great opportunity to support mixed use development.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The recent healthcare related developments and expansion, as well as the pending redevelopment of the Browneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Star Grill, which is a historic landmark site, demonstrates the opportunities which are available for redevelopment on this site at Martin Luther King Jr. Way and South 11th Street,â&#x20AC;? said Community and Economic Development Director Ricardo Noguera. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Workforce housing and retail services are highly sought after along this corridor.â&#x20AC;? A pre-bidders conference will be held on Monday, Dec. 16, 2013 at 2:30 p.m. in the Visibility Center on the ninth floor of the Tacoma Municipal Building (747 Market St.) and first proposals will be accepted starting Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2014 at 11 a.m., and every Tuesday thereafter at 11 a.m., until the solicitation is closed by the City. Proposals and questions from developers should be directed to Chuck Blankenship in the Finance Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Purchasing Division at cblankenship@cityoftacoma.org. /0:;69@4<:,<4;6*9,(;, -9,,*644<50;@.(33,9@ The Washington State Historical Society has announced the creation of the WSHS Community Gallery. The WSHS Community Gallery is intended for Washington State artists and community groups, giving them a display venue that is free and open to the public. Participants selected through the application process will curate their own exhibits under the guidance of museum professionals. The WSHS Community Gallery Guidelines, application, and gallery space layout are available online at www.communitygallerywashington.org. What are the requirements you might ask? Any submissions must represent a group or organization in Washington State, the theme of the proposed exhibition must relate in some way to Washington State history, and works must be available for display during the 2014 calendar year.

in the car was an electronic dual-zone heating and air conditioning system, dual-power leather adjustable sport bucket seats, memory package and floor mats. Beginning with the 1998 pace car production, Chevrolet introduced an active handling chassis control system that utilized a yaw sensor, steering angle sensor, lateral accelerometer and other space-age technologies to enhance Corvetteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s handling with added accident avoidance capabilities.

Applications will be accepted from Dec. 15 through Jan. 17, 2014 electronically at community@wshs.wa.gov or by mail/delivery at the Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave.

4(2,9,+<*05./630+(@>(:;,(;9(+0;065 As holiday preparations start or maybe start to wrap up, consider what can be recycled and reused to reduce waste. The City of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s solid waste management staff wants to remind residents to consider recycling, reusing and composting options. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Much of the packaging and the wrapping paper we use around the holidays is easily recyclable,â&#x20AC;? said Jetta Antonakos, City of Tacoma environmental specialist for solid waste management. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can put much of the paper, plastic, cardboard and metals in your blue curbside container, and food waste can be placed in your yard waste container.â&#x20AC;? Still, not everything can be recycled, so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to know what can be added to your curbside recycling, taken to the Tacoma Recycling Center or may just have to be thrown in the garbage. A full list of what can be recycled can be found at TacomaRecycles.org. For residents who already are thinking blue and brown bins first and want to reduce their amount of holiday waste further, some simple ideas include: s Using recyclable wrapping materials s Using reusable wrapping materials, such as pillow cases, cloth napkins or dish towels s Wrapping presents inside other presents s Avoiding items in excessive and unrecyclable packaging â&#x20AC;&#x153;An even better alternative for a holiday present is to give the gift of an experience,â&#x20AC;? Antonakos said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Giving a gift certificate or a donation to a charity is one of the most basic ways we can reduce holiday waste.â&#x20AC;? @6<5.:;,9:=:63+:;,9:(;-09:;50./; At this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s downtown First Night festivities to ring in the New Year, Tacoma artist-about-town Lynn Di Nino and a local cast of talented artists bring you â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nose Ringers vs. Old Farts,â&#x20AC;? a gravity-powered art car race pitting youngsters against oldsters, 9 p.m. at 9th Street and St. Helens. This spectacle features Karl Reyes and his operatic crew singing â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ride of the Valkyries,â&#x20AC;? Doug Mackey as race emcee, action, music, elevated stages, lights, loud noises, costumed â&#x20AC;&#x153;extrasâ&#x20AC;? and breaking glass from the giant bottle smashing machine as starter bell created by â&#x20AC;&#x153;Woodsâ&#x20AC;? and Steve LaBerge. Four prizes of intrinsic value will be awarded to four of the eight car designers who are: The Belina Interiors crew, FabLab crew, Randy Jones formerly of Seattle, Ann and Paul Meersman, Indian Owen of Olympia, Carlos Taylor Swanson, Galen Turner and Otto Youngers. Besides being fast, these cars will have lights, fire, sound and theatrical enhancements. Car sponsors are Dirty Oscarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annex Moonshine Bar & Eatery, Belina Interiors, Madera Furniture Company, Glennaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing, Puget Sound Revels, Beautiful Angle, Dick Weiss Industries and LeRoy Jewelers/Art Stop. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to want to say you were there! Photo opportunities!


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/,37;6@:-69;6;:/,3720+: HAVE A 4,99@*/90:;4(: By Ed Troyer

3LHUFH&RXQW\6KHULII·V Department

One of the highlights of the year for me is working with Toys for Tots. I have had the privilege of being the co- ED TROYER coordinator the past five years with George Hite from the Marine Corps League of Pierce County. Toys for Tots began in 1947. Major Bill Hendricks, USCR, was inspired by his wife, Diane, when she tried to donate a

homemade Raggedy Ann doll to a needy child but could find no organization to take her gift. At her suggestion, Major Hendricks gathered a group of local Marine reservists, who coordinated, collected and distributed some 5,000 toys for local youth in need in Los Angeles. Now, 66 years later here in Tacoma, the Toys for Tots program distributes 50,000-plus toys each year to local kids in need. This could not be done without the coordinated efforts of many groups and people. The majority of the work is done by the Marine Corps League here in Pierce County Detachment 504.

Man charged in assassination of Eastside gang leader Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist has charged Naitaalii Toleafoa, 18, with Murder in the First Degree, Assault in the First Degree and Unlawful Possession of a Firearm in the First Degree. The defendant participated in a shooting that killed Eastside Lokotes Sureños (ELS) gang leader Juan Zuniga and left Dean Salavea paralyzed. One co-defendant, Juan Ortiz, 20, remains at large. “Our Gang Unit relentlessly pursues justice,” said Prosecutor Mark Lindquist. “This is an example of what is meant by, ‘You can run, but you can’t hide.’” On the night of May 11, 2010, the victims were at Zuniga’s residence in Tacoma. Zuniga told Salavea that the defendants were coming over to pay a debt owed to Zuniga. The defendants arrived shortly after midnight and were welcomed into the home. The defendants and victims walked into the attached garage. Within seconds, Ortiz shot Zuniga in the back of the head. Salavea attempted to flee through a side door and was shot in the back. The defendants left through the front door. Investigators determined that the assassination was ordered by

NAITAALII TOLEAFOA

four ELS gang members who were in prison at the time. They did not approve of the way Zuniga was running the gang. All four were charged for their roles in the murder. Three other co-defendants were also charged with Murder in the First Degree and Assault in the First Degree for assisting in the planning the murder. They provided Toleafoa and Ortiz with cell phones, transportation to and from the murder, and drove them to Los Angeles so they could catch a bus to Mexico. In December 2012, Toleafoa was extradited from Mexico. Although he was 15-years-old at the time of the murder, Toleafoa will be charged as an adult because of the seriousness of the crime.

Additional help from Crime Stoppers volunteers and financial backing from the Puyallup Tribe of Indians along with 300 individual volunteers, including many members of the Pierce County Sheriff ’s Department, ensure every child gets a new toy for Christmas. Toys for Tots is a mammoth undertaking and is 100 percent volunteer, including a team of women from the Washington State Women’s Correctional Center. They work for a month prior to Christmas in a cold warehouse with no heat or other amenities to make sure toys are sorted and ready for distribu-

tion. Donated toys are sent to sites throughout Pierce County including the new Elks Club here in Tacoma where members handle the distribution. The toys are given to families identified by DSHS, school counselors and other non-profits vetted by our program to ensure the gifts end up in the hands of kids in need. You can help make sure every child gets a toy this year by donating a new unwrapped toy – without the donations from you, none of this works and kids will go without. So thanks to all of you who continue to support us and give the kids hope.

:<7,9:(;<9+(@ Get help filing for health coverage

Want insurance coverage beginning Jan. 1? Then come to “Super Saturday” on Dec. 14 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 13 organizations throughout the county. The event is just in time for the Dec. 15 deadline. In-person assisters will answer questions and help you enroll at these locations: South Sound Outreach, 1106 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, (253) 593-2111; Community Health Care, East Tanbara Health Center, 1708 E. 44th St., (253) 722-2154; Hilltop Regional Health Center, 1202 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, (253) 722-2154; Lakewood Library, 6300 Wildaire Rd. SW, (253) 847-2304; Planned Parenthood, 1515 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, (206) 320-7610; Planned Parenthood (Puyallup), 702 30th Ave. SW, (206) 3207610; Sea Mar Community Health Care, 2121 S. 19th St., (855) 289-4503; Sea Mar Community Health Care (Puyallup), 10217 125th St. Court E., (855) 289-4503; Asia Pacific Cultural Center, 4851 South Tacoma Way, (253) 383-3900; Eatonville Family Agency, 305 W. Center St., (360) 832-6805; Brown Tones Productions/HELP, Bethlehem Baptist Church, 4818 Portland Ave., (253) 238-3642; Korean Women’s Association, 123 E. 96th St., (253) 535-4202; AARTH Ministry, Roosevelt Heights Church, 4819 S. 12th St. Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department organized the “Super Saturday” event with the support of the participating organizations. The Health Department is one of 10 lead organizations that the Washington Health Benefits Exchange selected to train and coordinate local in-person assisters. Through various community agencies, Pierce County residents can get one-on-one support that will allow those who are not likely to use a website or call center to learn about their options and enroll in health coverage. In October, 6,306 Pierce County residents signed up for health insurance. Of these, 5,786 were Medicaid eligible. Open enrollment continues through March, 2014. Those who are eligible for Medicaid can enroll any time. For more information on getting health insurance, visit www. tpchd.org/healthcarereform.

A man who was seen speeding 50 miles per hour in a 35 mph zone and almost hitting a family in a crosswalk along the 7000 block of Pacific Highway on Dec. 6 faces reckless driving charges. He admitted to the arresting officer that he had smoked marijuana before driving, but the police officer didn’t have backup to process the needed blood test and warrant for the more serious charge. He berated the officer on his way to jail. Booty calls can get complicated when you’re trying to repair a marriage. A man learned that lesson on Dec. 6, when his “ex -girlfriend” paid a visit to his house while his wife was home. The wife, who suspected burglary, called police as the “ex lover” drove away. Officers found the woman and learned she had been living in the house when the husband and wife were separated last summer and had continued to see the man while he was trying to repair his marriage. The man and his girlfriend apparently had “gotten together” the previous week. The man first denied knowing the woman, finally admitted that she was his exgirlfriend but denied the current affair. Police left the case open, since there was no sign of a theft at the house. The girlfriend, however, was arrested for three warrants, including a felony forgery warrant out of Las Vegas. Compiled by Steve Dunkelberger

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Toy Drive

Join Ron & Don from KIRO Radio and Santa & Friends

THIS FRIDAY from 2pm - 7pm at Walmart - 110th & Meridian, South Hill

From now until Christmas, drop off toys at any TAPCO branch or at Steel Creek American Whiskey Co. on Broadway


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RING IN THE HOLIDAYS AT STERINO FARMS Starting Dec. 18, all items will be 25 percent off or more By Kate Burrows kburrows@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF STERINO FARMS

:\UYPZL9V[HY`*S\IOVZ[Z :HU[HH[HUU\HSIYLHRMHZ[ The Tacoma Sunrise Rotary Club provided 800 children and adults with â&#x20AC;&#x153;face timeâ&#x20AC;? with Santa during the clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 22nd annual Santaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Breakfast on Dec. 7. Tacoma Goodwill hosted the free community event at their Milgard Work Opportunity Center in the Hilltop neighborhood of Tacoma. The event featured a pancake breakfast (with all the fixings), crafts, face painting, a balloon room and some valuable one-on-one time with Santa. Families received books, toys and a stuffed animal to take home. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saturday was all about the kids â&#x20AC;&#x201C; giving families and children an outlet to celebrate the season,â&#x20AC;? said Sunrise Rotary President Karen Veitenhans. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Today Santa, Sunrise Rotary and our partners and volunteers made a differ-

ence, had fun, and took a small step towards improving our community and inspiring our leaders of tomorrow.â&#x20AC;? AmeriCorps, Goodwill, Tacoma Young Professionals Network and the Youth Leadership Group from Life Center volunteered assistance and helped with outreach. Flyers were distributed to area schools, daycares and families visiting the Salvation Army, Washington Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Employment and Education, Tacoma Community House, Associated Ministries and others. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re happy to host the breakfast every year,â&#x20AC;? said Tacoma Goodwill CEO and President Terry Hayes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Helping and reaching out to the community at this time of year is joyous â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all the families enjoying the moment and each other is what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about.â&#x20AC;?

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Gather up the kids for this family event Head to Swan Creek Park on Saturday, Dec. 14, and help â&#x20AC;&#x153;welcome homeâ&#x20AC;? Swan Creek salmon at the 10th annual â&#x20AC;&#x153;Salmon Saturday in Swan Creek Park,â&#x20AC;? 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 2820 Pioneer Way E. (Canyon Entrance/Parking Lot). Friends of Swan Creek Watershed, Tacoma EnviroChallenger Program, Tacoma Nature Center environmental educators and community partners invite you to join them in welcoming Swan Creek salmon as they return home to spawn. Experience the special wonder of watching salmon make their way upstream in an urban setting. The event includes tours of the park to see the spawning salmon, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities, salmon-friendly home and gardening information and more. Learn what a watershed is, and what we can do to protect our valuable water resources, through

hands-on activities for all ages. New this year, you will be able to personally test the water, and see how its current conditions impact the survival of salmon in Swan Creek in an activity provided by Citizenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s For A Healthy Bay. Take a tour, stroll or hike on your own, or simply stop by to pick up free resource materials, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss this great event. Friends of Swan Creek Watershedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to cultivate environmental stewardship through educational and volunteer opportunities. They welcome the participation of individuals, families, groups and schools to learn and work together to preserve this valuable natural resource in our urban landscape. For more information about their activities, or to sign up for email notices, contact Sue Bernstein at (253) 472-7264 or swancreek@prodigy.net.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS

THANK YOU FOR ALL YEAR

from

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come and see!â&#x20AC;?

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unique, hand-made hanging tree baskets.

A C H I L D N E E D S Y O U T O D AY !

MAGICAL. Sterino Farms is stocked full of Christmas trees, wreaths, swags and

As the holidays quickly approach, Sterino Farms is ready and willing to help customers deck the halls, and it has never been easier. With a full stock of Christmas trees available, customers can take advantage of free home delivery, where employees will take care of the hassle of transporting the tree from the farm to the living room. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just want to take care of our customers any way we can,â&#x20AC;? said owner Jake Sterino. Sterino and his employees took special care this year to hand pick each tree to ensure quality. Depending on the size of the tree, prices range from $19.98 to $149.98, plus extra for flocking. Customers can also browse through the countless wreaths, swags

and hanging Christmas tree baskets hand crafted by skilled employees. Sterino Farms produce stand is still packed full of fresh fruits and vegetables, but the market is closing soon for the season. Starting Dec. 18, all items will be on sale for 25 percent off or more, and everything must go. Sterino hopes to sell out completely by Dec. 22, so arrive early to take advantage of the best deals. The produce stand will re-open on April 1, with the same fresh, delicious produce customers have come to expect. Next year, the farm will hold even more events and attractions throughout the season, so be sure to â&#x20AC;&#x153;likeâ&#x20AC;? Sterino Farms on Facebook to stay informed. Sterino Farms is located at 6116 52nd St. E. in Puyallup. For more information, visit www.sterinofarms.com.


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Our View

Remember to give â&#x20AC;&#x201C; year round

EDITORIAL CARTOON BY CHRIS BRITT s CBRITTOON@GMAIL.COM s 7774!#/-!7%%+,9#/-%$)4/2)!,#!24//.3 FIND CARTOONS, THE ART OF FREE SPEECH: CHRIS BRITT AT TEDXTACOMA ON YOUTUBE.COM

Guest Editorial

The importance of the Safe Schools Improvement Act By Laura Finley & Joseph Schroer Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgendered (LGBT) youth are among the most vulnerable to bullying and harassment, both in and out of schools. The Gay Lesbian & Straight Education Network (GLSEN) conducts a biennial National School Climate Survey in which they measure how frequently bullying of LGBT students occurs in schools and the responses to it. The 2011 survey includes responses from 8,584 students between the ages of 13 and 20. Students were from all 50 states and the District of Columbia and from 3,224 unique school districts. Results indicated that eight out of 10 LGBT students (81.9 percent) experienced harassment at school in the past year because of their sexual orientation, three-fifths (63.5 percent) felt unsafe at school because of their sexual orientation and nearly a third (29.8 percent) skipped a day of school in the past month because of safety concerns. Further, the majority of students in this study who were harassed or assaulted (60.4 percent) did not report it because they believed nothing would change or that the situation might worsen. Of those who did report, 36.7 percent said school officials did nothing. This finding reinforces research that has continually shown that many teachers and administrators do little to counteract homophobic attitudes, including studies in 2003 and in 2010. There have been very little (and in some instances no) improvements in the quality of the learning environment for LGBT youth. Similar studies 10 to 15 years ago found virtually the same results as those reported by GLSEN. And, a study reported in the UKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s TES magazine for educators found that

gay teachers are even less likely to respond out of fear for their own job security. This daily harassment and abuse takes a heavy toll on LGBT youth. The 2011 National School Climate Survey found that almost 30 percent of students skipped a class at least once in the past month because they felt uncomfortable and/or unsafe, and almost 32 percent skipped a full day of school each month for those reasons. Scholarly research in 2012 found incredibly similar results, noting that almost 30 percent of students had skipped at least one class, and 32 percent skipped an entire day of school within the past month because they felt unsafe. Students experiencing this form of bullying have, on average, lower grade point averages, and are less likely to report that they intend to pursue postsecondary education. They suffer from higher levels of depression and lower self-esteem than do their peers. What is more, 50 percent of homeless youth are LGBT, most of whom are homeless because they were kicked out by their family (the other percent run away also because of the unsafe home environment). Although many state laws prohibit school-based bullying, some do not explicitly cover harassment of LGBT students. Interestingly, Montana still does not have a statewide anti-bullying law. According to stopbullying.gov, harassment or bullying based on sexual orientation is not covered under civil rights laws, which might allow some schools to dismiss bullying of LGBT students. However, many cases of bullying of LGBT students would fall under Title IX based on sexual normative discrimination. Schools absolutely must take action to demonstrate their commitment to the wellbeing of all students. One step in the right direction is the

introduction of The Safe Schools Improvement Act (SSIA). The bill was introduced in the House of Representatives by Democratic Rep. Linda Sanchez (CA) and in the Senate by Sen. Bob Casey (PA). SSIA would require that states and school districts develop comprehensive antibullying and harassment policies that include all students. Schools would be required to report incidents of bullying and harassment to their state departments of education so that additional improvements can be made. Further, SSIA would require that teachers and other personnel receive professional development related to these issues. As the forthcoming article â&#x20AC;&#x153;What Every Educator Needs to Know About Queer Youthâ&#x20AC;? notes, â&#x20AC;&#x153;teachers are in a unique position of power, and their decision to take action, or to turn a blind eye to the needs of queer youth can literally mean the difference between life and death.â&#x20AC;? When educators and administrators know how to create classroom and school climates in which all students feel safe and welcomed, it can only result in a better educational experience, one in which all youth can live up to their true potential. As members of the Peace and Justice Studies Association (PJSA), we support the passage of SSIA and applaud those districts that are working to ensure that LGBT students are afforded their human rights and are treated with dignity. Laura Finley, Ph.D., teaches in the Barry University Department of Sociology & Criminology and is syndicated by PeaceVoice. Joseph Schroer is Clinical Faculty in the Department of Educational Psychology at Miami University of Ohio.

Letter to the Editor Dear Editor, This is my first time hearing about the poor little pig breaking its leg from the many potholes in the city of Tacoma. Indeed, this pothole pig represents the millions who have suffered, sprained and broke parts of their own bodies just trying to walk around this town. Hence, all the damage to everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tires and shocks. Yes, Tacoma has a gigantic pothole problem that not too many council people seem to care about. Oh, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right, they drive a car paid for by us taxpayers. I was starting to name this Tacoma Pothole City. Grateful, that you have already attached the wording to the town of Tacoma. Fortunately, I am getting pretty darn good at remembering where these potholes are and avoiding them. Especially my street, seriously thinking of buying some black top and do some repairs myself. Another pet peeve is drivers that insist on blocking intersections. Guess they do not see the signs posted. In California they actually spray paint the words (Keep Clear) onto the road at most intersections. I agree this does make it much easier to read and hopefully understand. Just another pothole lover that sends prayers out to those of us that have to deal with this problem. Barbara Evanger Tacoma Dear Editor, In a guest editorial 11-22-13, Don Brunell questions whether Washington state will be big in Boeingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jumbo jet future. I think, based on recent experience with the 787 Dreamliner, the anti-union, higher level executives should have learned a lesson. Boeing decided to build the 787 Dreamliner in North Charleston SC, a right-to-work state. Production has been beset with problems and delays for over three years. The SC plant was scheduled to produce three 787s a month, but it can only manage to produce one a month. Some airlines have cancelled their Dreamliner orders. Boeing gave the Puget Sound machinistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; union an ultimatum on the 777X production with one week to decide after the legislature rushed through the $8.7 billion package of tax breaks. The union said â&#x20AC;&#x153;noâ&#x20AC;? to a contract that reduced current and future benefits.

Building the 777X outside of the region with the most highly skilled aerospace workers will be a big challenge in order to save a few bucks for the highly profitable Boeing Company. Mary Ann Leskie Tacoma Dear Editor, As we wrap up Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 12th annual Art at Work Month, we want to take a moment to thank the hundreds of artists, businesses, organizations, and patrons who help bring the arts to life in Tacoma. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve enjoyed this occasion to explore our community and sincerely hope you will join us in continuing to support the creative energy in Tacoma. Remember that most of the organizations and artists that were showcased this November produce programming all year long for your enjoyment and enrichment. Continue being a tourist in your own backyard! Naomi Strom-Avila Cultural Arts Specialist City of Tacoma Dear Editor, (Re: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pastor Ron Pierre Vignec brought peace and the poetry of service to Salish,â&#x20AC;? TW 11-15-13): My wife, Ann, and I had the privilege of meeting Ron and Nancy 25 years ago. We supported Pastor Ronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mission Church and worshiped there as often as we could. Why? Because Pastor Ron was the greatest earthly â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shepardof-his-flockâ&#x20AC;? we had ever known. And, we have known many. One of the most important features of Pastor Ronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life and death is this ...while Pastor Ron didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t â&#x20AC;&#x153;store-up treasuresâ&#x20AC;? down here on Earth, he has left behind many local â&#x20AC;&#x153;heroes-of-faithâ&#x20AC;? whom he first nurtured. Names that come to my mind are those like Norma, Ms. Cory, Lesta Rodgers, Christine, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big-Lâ&#x20AC;? Lawrence Stone and many more names, too numerous to list. Tacoma folks, you are perhaps the most fortunate of cities ...because God blessed you with residents like Pastor Ron (and Nancy) Vignec. John Lenz Montgomery, Ala

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Tis the season of giving. Mounds of colorful gifts under trees and beside fireplaces form as the scent of pine and nutmeg fills the air. Ugly sweater contests are the mainstay of seemingly every holiday party that also involve nut-covered cheese logs and spiced apple cider in red and green mugs. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Norman Rockwell version of the holidays but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a dream for too many of our neighbors. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have presents. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have sweaters of any style to shield themselves from the coat. They â&#x20AC;&#x153;couch surf â&#x20AC;? between spare rooms courtesy of family and friends as a way to avoid another night of sleeping in their car and struggling both with money issues and the demands of their children trying to live â&#x20AC;&#x153;normal lives.â&#x20AC;? People more fortunate give much to food bank donation sites this time of year to celebrate and share their bounty with others. The trouble is that there are far too many â&#x20AC;&#x153;others.â&#x20AC;? Even with a recovering economy that has created more jobs, wages donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t often allow ends to meet. Known as the working poor, people often work full jobs and overtime only to find their paychecks donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cover the rising costs of living â&#x20AC;&#x201C; school clothes, heating bills, rent, medical bills and car repairs. Food often is the only flexible budget line. Emergency Food Network, a wholesale distributor of food to more than 60 food banks around Puget Sound, handles more than 15.1 million pounds of food annually. That translates to about 1.3 million visits to food banks that sent the needy on their way with enough food for 11 meals. It does this by leveraging bulk buys of discounted food, donations and a streamline administration that yields $12 of food for every $1 donated. Its recent Empty Bowls event, an annual gathering where bowls created by artists are sold to fund food purchases, raised $26,000, the equivalent of 161,379 meals. That helps the effort through the holiday season, but people are in need every day, particularly during the summer since family budgets are stretched without the aid of food programs at schools and the added expense of day care during the summer school break. Tables piled with clothing, blankets and toiletries line a graveled parking lot below the Tacoma Dome each month. The tables are cleared in a matter of hours as the snaking line of those in need file through to get donated supplies to ward against the winter chill. The Puyallup Tribe organized the donation of items as well as their distribution. The next event will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 20 at the lot at South â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Eâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and 26th streets. Donations can be dropped off at the Puyallup Tribal Administration Building, 3009 Portland Ave., from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. any weekday. Donated food and clothing help adults and children get through another chilly night without empty stomachs or the shivers, while other efforts try to solve homelessness with shelter and social services. Phoenix Housing Network serves lowincome families in Pierce County. The program provides a place to live for families experiencing, or at risk of, homelessness, while helping to build skills that maximize family stability and self-sufficiency in order to prevent future homelessness. Giving to Phoenix House or any of the programs above makes the perfect way to honor the season now and to provide for those in need all year round. The above opinion represents the view of Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s editorial board.

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Sports

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s new sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy!

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

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SECTION A, PAGE 6

TOP UPCOMING MATCHUPS GIRLS BASKETBALL

Dec. 18 – Timberline @ Wilson – 7 p.m. Defending league champ Rams host runner-up Blazers.

BOYS SWIMMING

Dec. 19 – Olympia @ Stadium – 3:30 p.m. Tigers, Bears both feature state-tested swimmers.

WRESTLING

Dec. 19 – Wilson @ Mount Tahoma – 7 p.m. Crosstown wrestling matchups always entertaining.

BOYS BASKETBALL

Dec. 21 – Wilson vs. Bellarmine Prep 7 p.m. – ShoWare Center Good nonleague test for both at ShoWare Shootout.

STADIUM STRUGGLES EARLY, FALLS TO FIFE

Bellarmine Prep outlasts Wilson

FALCONS OUTLAST TIGERS FOR SECOND STRAIGHT YEAR Defenses stand tall in battle of Cocke’ brothers

against Fife, Stadium freshman Vanessa Higgins has carried the Tigers’ offense in the early season.

S

By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

The younger sibling has bragging rights once again. For the second straight year, Foss head coach Mike Cocke’ got the better of his older brother – Stadium head coach Doug Cocke’ – as the Falcons hung on for a 47-43 win over the Tigers in an early nonleague test on Dec. 6. “For us, it’s fun because we have such a close relationship,” Mike Cocke’ said. “We really talk about our problems, our good things and bad things with our teams.” Clinging to a two-point lead with less than four minutes to go, Foss senior guard Ar’Mond Davis collected back-to-back steals – feeding Sam Dabalos-McMahon for a layup and following with a coast-to-coast layup – to help the Falcons take a 43-37 lead. The Falcons maintained at least a four-point lead the rest of the way, and Davis finished with a team-high 14 points. “For 32 minutes it’s all-out war,” said Doug Cocke’ of the matchup against his brother. “I really wanted to win it, but mostly for (my team) to improve. It was a fun game. There was a lot of family here.” Davis gave the Falcons their first lead at 9-7 with a layup late in the first quarter, and later drained a three-pointer to extend it to 17-11 early in the second quarter. But Stadium clawed back to within 23-21 at the break, as forwards Malik Mayeux and Lucious Brown had four points each during the stretch. Mayeux finished with a team-high 16 points for Stadium, going 10-for-11 from the free-throw line, while Brown finished 6-for-9 from the field and tallied 15 points. The duo also finished with nine and eight rebounds, respectively. “We’re trying to establish the inside game with those two,” Doug Cocke’ said. Mayeux regained a 31-29 lead for the Tigers midway through the third with two free throws, but Dabalos-McMahon – who was 5-for-7 from the field for 12 points – answered with a three-pointer, setting off a stretch of lead changes. Mayeux gave the Tigers their final lead, at 35-34, with two free throws with 6:36 left. Davis immediately answered with a jumper, and gained control for the Falcons for good with his back-to-back steals three minutes later. “I thought the defense the first 25 minutes wasn’t very good, and I think the last five or six minutes we got some key stops,” Mike Cocke’ said. Olashawan Miller added seven points for the Falcons, while teammates Chris Reynolds and Simon McCann had four points apiece. Bobby Moorehead tallied six points and Mark Gandlesi added four points for Stadium.

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

QUICK START. Despite a tough game

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

GOING UP (Top) Foss forward Olashawan Miller goes up for

a breakaway dunk as teammate Ar’Mond Davis (22) looks on. (Above) Stadium’s Malik Mayeux (30) gets up a shot over Miller (3) and Sam Dabalos-McMahon (10).

tadium was hoping a strong start defensively would translate into a nice non-league victory over Fife. But after leading the Trojans for nearly the first six minutes, the roles were reversed, and Fife scored 19 unanswered points on the way to a 45-25 victory over the Tigers on Dec. 10. “We had trouble with their zone all night,” said Stadium head coach Mark Stewart. “We tried to work on spacing and good ball movement, and when we got our chances we just didn’t score.” Despite shooting just 1-for-8 from the field in the early going, the Tigers forced six turnovers in the first five minutes and held a 3-2 lead after a free throw from Shawndriea Brown. But the Trojans’ Karli Knudson gave her squad the lead for good with two free throws with 2:18 left in the period. That started a 19-0 run that spanned until the 2:36 mark in the second quarter, when Tigers freshman Vanessa Higgins scored on a layup to cut Fife’s lead to 21-5. Higgins was the lone bright spot offensively for Stadium, continuing a strong start to the season by finishing with a team-high nine points and nine rebounds. “She’s been our main factor offensively,” Stewart said. “But we needed more out of her when she got opportunities.” Fife’s Breanna Richardson – who also tallied nine points and nine rebounds – fed Knudson and Courtney Morton on back cuts for easy layups during the Trojans’ big run, and Karisa Caraballo capped the stretch by hitting Savannah Barber for a layup. Barber finished with nine points and a game-high 13 rebounds, and tied with Kilcup for a team-high five steals. Fife’s defense led to their offensive success all night, as Richardson had four steals, Morton snagged three steals and Caraballo and Knudson had two steals apiece. “We want to see if we can’t get transition (baskets) going,” said Fife head coach Mark Jones. “It’s something we’ve been working on for a couple years. A lot of (the offense has to do with) good decision making, too.” Stadium finished strong offensively, outscoring Fife 16-10 in the fourth quarter. Higgins highlighted the late effort with a three-point play, Katie Tonellato drilled

X See BASKETBALL / page A9


-YPKH`+LJLTILY‹tacomaweekly.com‹:LJ[PVU(‹7HNL

TACOMAWEEKLY 2013 ALL-CITY FOOTBALL TEAM

BIG-TIME OFFENSIVE NUMBERS, 0476:05.+,-,5+,9:/0./30./;.96<7

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

GROUND GAME. (Left) Lincoln running back Rayshaun Miller was a threat running and catching the ball, and earned the Narrows 3A MVP award. (Right) Wilson running back Isaiah Simpson torched opposing defenses for over 1,300 rushing yards and 14 touchdowns this fall. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

With the high school football season officially coming to a close, we take a look back at 30 of the best players within the city limits and highlight their accomplishments in our All-City Football Team.

OFFENSE QB LOU MILLIE – SR ),33(9405,79,7

Millie made a smooth transition from running back to quarterback and ran the show well, completing over 61 percent of his passes for over 1,600 yards, with 16 touchdowns. He added over 600 yards rushing and seven touchdowns.

QB JORDAN KITNA – SO LINCOLN

In his first year at the helm,

Kitna showed great arm strength and maturation beyond his years. He completed over 60 percent of his passes and threw for over 2,000 yards and 27 touchdowns.

QB JULIUS YATES-BROWN JR – WILSON

Yates-Brown was a big playmaker for the Rams, and the offense wasn’t the same after his late-season injury. He completed 66 percent of his passes for over 1,000 yards and 12 touchdowns, and added 650 rushing yards and nine scores.

9)0:(0(/:047:65¶:9 WILSON

Simpson was another focal point for the Rams and could score in a flash, piling up 1,348 rushing yards – averaging over 10 yards per carry – and 14 touchdowns. He added two touchdown catches and a kickoff return for a score.

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RB NATHAN GOLTERMANN 19¶),33(9405,79,7

The 5-foot-4, 122-pound Goltermann was a sight to see, as his toughness helped him compete against much bigger defenders. The Lions’ workhorse carried the ball 222 times for 1,465 yards and 18 touchdowns.

WR J’MAKA LOVE – SR LINCOLN

Switching from quarterback to receiver, Love used his shiftiness and playmaking ability to thrive in the Abes’ spread attack. He tallied a team-high 25 catches for 484 yards and four touchdowns.

WR GARRETT MCKAY – SR ),33(9405,79,7

The seasoned Lions veteran was at his best in the playoffs, including a monster 250-yard, three-touchdown day against

HOT DEALS

Newport. In all he tallied 52 catches for 945 yards and 11 scores, and added a punt return for a score.

WR BRANDON MONTGOMERY SR – WILSON

Montgomery used his blazing speed to become the Rams’ deep threat, hauling in 26 passes for 635 yards and six touchdowns. He added two rushing touchdowns and had a 96-yard kickoff return and 64-yard punt return for scores in the same game.

ATH RAYSHAUN MILLER SR – LINCOLN

The Narrows 3A MVP was nearly unstoppable wherever he was on the field. He tallied 742 rushing yards – eight yards per carry – and six touchdowns, had 16 catches for 409 yards and a team-high seven touchdowns and added a 95-yard kickoff

return for a score.

TE BEN COTTRILL – SR STADIUM

Cottrill made the most of his opportunities, hauling in 11 passes for 221 yards – over 20 yards per reception. He also put up a team-high four touchdown catches, recording two scores against both Central Kitsap and Mount Tahoma.

OL MATTHEW HALLIS – SR ),33(9405,79,7

Hallis provided experience and stability to the line for the Lions, who ran for over 2,600 yards this year.

OL BEN KING – JR LINCOLN

King used his bulk to bulldoze defenders out of the way, protecting Kitna and making way for the Abes’ runners. X See FOOTBALL / page A8

CHENEY STADIUM IS NOW TACOMA’S BEST SPORTS BAR

SEAHAWKS S U N D A Y S AT THE STERLING BANK SUMMIT CLUB

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WFootball From page A7

OL ZACH OTA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SR ),33(9405,79,7

Like Hallis, Ota was another strong and steady blocker and protector. An unsung hero up front.

63),57<(7<(.(Âś19 LINCOLN

+3)033@.9,,9Âś19 WILSON

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DB DEHONTA HAYES 19Âś305*635

Another defensive stalwart for the Ramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; strong defense, which allowed just 14 points per game this season. It started up front, as Greer helped Wilson control the line of scrimmage with technique, instincts and speed.

Like much of the Abesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; line, Puapuaga was a tough-minded, hard-nosed blocker that could move well.

Another piece of the Falconsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; intimidating defensive line, Faalavaau seemed to step up in big moments. He dominated in a close contest against North Thurston, tallying three tackles for loss.

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The 275-pounder used good leverage to make way for the Falconsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; solid rushing attack, and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let up.

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Pesefea was the leader of a stout defensive front for the Falcons, as he overcame blockers to put up 55 tackles and seven sacks. The Narrows 3A defensive MVP also doubled as a bruising fullback, scoring five rushing touchdowns on the year.

Playing in just the second half of the season, Tusi dominated defensively, collecting 83 tackles to place second on the team. He tallied an astounding 29 tackles against Shelton, and had 14 tackles for loss on the year.

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Glueck burst onto the scene this year for the Lions, flying to the ball and putting up a teamhigh 82 tackles in the regular season, including six tackles for loss and a forced fumble.

3))1/(>;/695,Âś19 LINCOLN

+3(19<--05Âś:6 WILSON

Ruffin was a disruptive force for the Rams, making a living in the opposing backfield and registering several games with multiple sacks. At 6-foot-4, he doubled as an effective tight end, catching three touchdown passes.

Hawthorne was a playmaker, and always found a way to be near the ball. He was a solid tackler, and had a 35-yard interception return for a touchdown against Shelton and an 85-yard fumble return for a score against Eastside Catholic.

Roelofs was the Eaglesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; do-itall man, as he put up a team-high 95 tackles from his linebacker spot. He also guided the attack offensively, passing for over 1,000 yards and rushing for nearly 800 yards and 12 touchdowns.

Hayes was an excellent defender in space for the Abes, coming up with several touchdown-saving tackles as the last line of defense. But his speed led to great range in the defensive backfield as well, as he was a good cover man.

DB TRE SCOTT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SR :;(+0<4

Scott was everywhere on the field for the Tigers, putting up 41 solo tackles and adding 94 assisted tackles. He displayed great instincts and athleticism, and threw for nearly 900 yards and ran for over 500 more as the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; quarterback.

+)4(9*<:16/5:65 LINCOLN

Johnson was well-known for his ability to snuff out plays with bone-crunching hits. He was an intimidating presence at corner, and had a 25-yard interception return for a touchdown. He added 70 carries for over 500 yards and eight touchdowns.

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Reynolds used his 6-foot-4 frame to lock down opposing receivers, as he hauled in six interceptions and tallied 51 tackles. He was one of a number of hard-hitting Falcons defenders,

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

AIRBORN. Bellarmine Prep defensive back Drew Griffin (10)

was a dual threat for the Lions, using his athleticism to make big plays.

and added 25 catches for 366 yards and five touchdowns.

+)+9,>.90--05Âś:9 ),33(9405,79,7

It was another solid year allaround for Griffin, as he was an excellent fundamental tackler and hauled in five interceptions for the Lions. But his contributions didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t end there, as he added 34 catches for 571 yards and five touchdowns.

724(;;/,>7/030*/0 ),33(9405,79,7

Philichi simply had a knack

for coming through in the clutch, drilling three late game-winning field goals, including a 37-yarder in overtime against Bothell. He was 52-for-58 on points after touchdown and 8-for-10 on field goals.

7(3=0516/5:65Âś305*635 Johnson averaged 35 yards on his 17 punts this season, and opponents had a total of just 16 return yards against the Abes. Oh, by the way, Johnson was also a dangerous receiver, tallying 16 catches for 236 yards and two touchdowns.

TACOMA

     

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to create a truly comfortable and inviting environment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our families volunteered so much of their time to help us open the shop,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was an unbelievable amount of work to be done.â&#x20AC;? But the hard work paid off, if the long list of loyal customers means anything at all. Many appreciate the ability to understand exactly where the meat is coming from. All the sausage, jerky, pepperoni and more are prepared in-house, minimizing the preservatives found in many grocery store brands. The shop is especially known

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WBasketball a three-pointer and Shaya Murray added three points in the period. Murray finished with five points and six rebounds, while Kallie Broughton and Amber Longrie grabbed five steals apiece for the Tigers. Still, Stewart lamented the poor overall offensive outing by his Tigers, who dropped to 3-2 overall on the season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get our layups in,â&#x20AC;? Stewart said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybody missed layups tonightâ&#x20AC;ŚWeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to spend a lot of time in the gym shooting.â&#x20AC;? By Jeremy Helling Bellarmine Prep head coach Kevin Meines wondered which Lady Lions

team would show up in an early nonleague test against Wilson: the one that now featured a highpowered offense with Claire Martin dominating in the middle, or the one that was stagnant at Wilson last winter. His question was quickly answered, as Martin scored a gamehigh 20 points to lead Bellarmine to a 57-53 win at home over the Lady Rams on Dec. 6. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We talked about composure before the game, and how it got away from us last year, and the girls responded well to the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intensity,â&#x20AC;? said Meines. Another factor in the game was the play of Lions guard Jayana Ervin, who contributed 17 points with

slashing drives down the middle to take some pressure off of Martin and give Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s defense more than one scoring option to think about. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jayana has been great for us in the leadership department, and has been a huge lift for us on the scoring sheet, too,â&#x20AC;? said Meines. Wilson, meanwhile, was looking for players to pick up the scoring load from some star graduated players, including Bethany

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Montgomery â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who now plays at Eastern Washington University. Kiara Knox stepped up to score a team-high 16 points and returning starter Violet Morrow added 10 to keep the Lady Rams close, but they could not come up with key hoops down the stretch to come away with the win. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We let some late opportunities slip through our hands tonight, but with some experience from our younger players it will

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WBiot From page A1

Porter in the annual Biot et les Templiers torchlight parade. Twice. (You can read about, and see pictures of, the adventure on Tacoma Weekly’s blog glasssisters@ tumblr.com.) Delegates visited museums, a high-tech district, schools, recreational spots, and, on visits to artists and hot shops, learned the secret to Biot’s signature bubble glass. It’s an effervescent effect created by dipping molten glass into a baking soda solution. The soda hits the heat and expands, forming small bubbles that give the glass texture and a sense of whimsy. Cobb and Gilbert kept

SEASONS GREETINGS from

that in mind when they considered ways to raise money to send Tacoma student-artists to Biot. Established artists come to Tacoma often for residencies, demonstrations and exhibits funded by the Museum of Glass. Likewise, local glass artists travel to glass hubs the same way. “I invited Antoine Pierini and Nicolas Laty for a joint residency next Oct. 22 through the 26th,” Cobb said of two Biot stars. That will fall on the last Sunday of the month, Kids Design Glass day at MOG, and Laty, a master of humorous glass, will be a fun fit. Pierini has already stopped by Tacoma for a visit this fall, reconnecting with the delegates and talking about future projects.

Trips like that are likely out of the realm of dreams for a Hilltop Artist at Jason Lee Middle School. So Gilbert and Cobb, working at the Museum of Glass, are starting a fund to subsidize them. They wanted to make an affordable, lovely object that reflects the two cities. The glass float is a Northwest icon, Gilbert said, and it’s relatively quick to make. Blowing it with bubble glass brought in Biot style. To design the seal for the floats, Gilbert thought back on the trip and the themes, including the threeday Biot et les Templiers festival. There was jousting, and there were costumes, and Maltese Cross flags draped every street in the walled hill town. That

cross is the centerpiece of the seal, which includes the names of the two cities. Through the fall, they, joined by Hilltop Artists, have been making the balls in pale blues and golds. They have enough, now, to sell them at $45 in the museum gift shop and at Hilltop Artists events. They’ve sent one home to France with Pierini, who will see if the Biot glassmakers are interested in making them there to sell to support future exchanges. They see it as a sustainable effort that will welcome lots of participants. They noted, too, that if you are shopping for Christmas gifts, you can’t do much better than a lovely piece of glass promoting intercontinental art, peace and bubbles.

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From page A1

New socks are a kindness with no down side. If, for example, you worry that giving money to homeless people might pay for their addictions, give them socks. If you want your donation to stay in your neighborhood, take socks to your nearest food bank. If you think it would seem weird to offer socks to a school kid, drop the socks off with Communities in Schools – or at any school’s reception desk. Variety is a good thing, so each year workplaces join the drive, or move to an equally helpful charity. That’s how Nathan Jensen came to the drive. Tacoma’s firefighters, who have done socks for a decade, are collecting toys this year. (Tacoma Weekly is, too, and we think they have made a happy choice.) But Nathan understands the value of warm feet, and giving, and assuming new responsibilities. He’s growing up in a family of firefighters, and he’s a National Junior Honor Society member. Nathan saw the value of sock drop sites in every neighborhood, so he wanted to keep the sock boxes in every station. Here, in his own words, is how he did it: “The reason that I became involved in the sock drive this year is because the Tacoma Fire Department was not going to run the sock drive, and I think that this is a great way to help the homeless keep warm. So I asked my dad, who is in the fire department, if I could organize the sock drive through the fire department, and they approved of me helping. “The best way to collect the socks, in my opinion, was to have boxes at every fire station. I went to every fire station on November 26 and talked to the firefighters about helping me collect socks at their stations. They all agreed, so I left the boxes, and I will check occasionally to collect the socks. “After I learned that I could help the fire department with the sock drive, I thought my school would like to help. I attend Tacoma Life Christian Academy and they love to help the community. I talked to my National Junior Honor Society advisor, Mrs. Brown, and asked if the school wanted to help me with this project. She asked my middle school Principal Mr. Lovelady, and they said that that would be OK. “I also talked to my brother Todd Jensen, the assistant chief at Graham Fire & Rescue, if Graham wanted to join the sock drive. He agreed to participate in the sock drive as a collection point. “I will collect for the last time on December 20th.” Thanks to Nathan, Put A Sock In It has a donation spot in every Tacoma – and Graham – neighborhood. Socks given in Graham will stay in Graham, so Nathan has spread warmth to that community.

Put A Sock In It! Join Tacoma Weekly’s Sock Drive, and donate a new pair for adults and children who rely on your kindness for warm and healthy feet. From Black Friday through New Year’s Day, we’ll get your socks to the tootsies that need them. Foot favorites are made with a mix of wool and acrylic that wicks moisture away from the body - and saves feet.

Here is where to put a sock in it:

Tacoma Weekly: 2588 Pacific Highway Fife, WA 98424 Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.

Catholic Community Services & Hospitality Kitchen: 1323 S. Yakima Ave. Tacoma, WA 98405 Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.

Oakland High School: 3319 S. Adams St. Tacoma, WA 98409 (253) 571-5136 Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m.- 3 p.m.

Oakland also welcomes new socks, toiletries, new or gently used clothing and shoes.

The Grand Cinema: 606 S. Fawcett Ave. Tacoma, WA 98402

CCS also welcomes hoodies, shoes, coats, toiletries and washed towels and blankets.

The drive will collect socks for Communities in Schools, Catholic Community Services and Project Homeless Connect. Look for donation sites at www.tacomaweekly.com!

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CONNECTING VETS TO BENEFITS 


City Life

My Night with Drake

B3

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013

SECTION B, PAGE 1

With Carrot Top, there’s more than meets the eye See for yourself Dec. 14 at the EQC

Carrot Top in concert 8 p.m. Dec. 14

Emerald Queen Casino 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma $25 to $65 Ticketmaster.com PHOTO BY JOHN KNOPF

By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

T

here’s a case to be made that Scott “Carrot Top” Thompson is the Nickelback of comedy. He’s easily one of the most recognizable acts in the biz, having parlayed his prop-powered antics and distinctive look into loads of TV and movie appearances, a lucrative residency at the Luxor Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas and a net worth that’s been estimated at $75 million. But he’s also one of pop’s biggest punching bags. From celebrity roasts to “South Park,” few comics get slammed quite like Carrot Top, the main attraction at the Emerald Queen Casino on Saturday, Dec. 14. Earlier this week, he checked in to discuss his divisive image and a recent change in his appearance. Tacoma Weekly: It’s been a minute since we did an interview, so long ago that I don’t think you were so buff then. What happened? Did you … Carrot Top: Actually, now I’m not buff again. I guess I went through a phase for a year or so where I got really big. I’m back to my normal size now. I still work out and stay in shape, but I don’t have that mass on me any more. TW: Oh, really? I was gonna ask if you’d been exposed to gamma radiation or something. Did you notice a difference in the amount of hecklers when you were so pumped up? Carrot Top: That’s funny. No, I’ve never really had hecklers my whole career, thank God. (There were) comments and people on

the Internet and that kind of stuff. People were like, “Oh my God, have you seen Carrot Top? Holy (crap), he’s huge.” I just did Craig Ferguson’s show, and I came around the corner to get ready to go on. He goes, “Oh my God! What happened to you?” I went, “What do you mean?” He was like, “You lost so much weight? Are you OK?” I’m like, “Yeah.” It took him for a shock for a second. I’d say I lost it for a role, but it didn’t (fly.) I was up against Matthew McConaughey, so I lost it to see if I could get in a movie. TW: You’re one of those entertainers that’s really successful, but you have a lot of haters. Carrot Top: If you walk with me through the airport or a mall or whatever … you don’t hear any haters. I’m very lucky. But if you go on the Internet and look at stuff you’re gonna get so much crap. … That comes with the job. But I do have those people, the lovers and haters. I kind of zone all that out. TW: What’s the meanest thing you’ve ever heard or read about yourself? Carrot Top: Well, the meanest thing I saw – which actually became more of an urban myth or whatever – is that I’ve had face work done, plastic surgery. That’s the most retarded thing I’ve ever heard in my life, because I’ve never had anything done. So I do a joke in my act. I go, “Goddamn, wouldn’t I look better if I had a (freakin’) facelift?” TW: I have seen one of those videos on YouTube asking, “Did he have work done?��� So, for the record, none of that. Carrot Top: No, in fact I would say the

meanest thing that anyone ever said to me was on a roast. I want to say it was Greg Giraldo, who I think passed away. Giraldo just came up and said, “Jesus Christ! Will you stop with all the (freakin’) facelifts already?” And people thought (it was) literally true. From that day on, that’s been one of those things they say: Carrot Top, plastic surgery. No, it was just a comic making a joke. But, oh well. It’s kind of silly. TW: What’s maybe the most surprising thing people don’t know about you based on your image? Carrot Top: Wow, probably that I’m just the opposite of that. I’m a skinny, mellow dude. ... There’ll be a perception of me just being this beast, but I’m actually teeny. TW: Of course, you’re known for doing the props; and I’m trying to picture your house. Carrot Top: I just did a whole thing on Oprah. They came to my house, and that was one of the things we discussed. “Oh my God, your house is so normal.” There’s not anything wacky or crazy at all. My backstage at the show in Vegas is kind of fun and full of crazy stuff and props. TW: So you do have a laboratory where you come up with that stuff. Carrot Top: Well, I have a warehouse that’s near the Luxor where I can go and build all the stuff. Then backstage there’s a little workshop because I might come up with something day of, or a minute before the show. But my house is completely normal; just my little dog sittin’ there lookin’ at me. TW: I’ve read that you sometimes don’t use the props at all. Carrot Top: I don’t ever do a show

without the props at all unless I’m doing a talk show or something. The live show, I usually do my share of ‘em, but I don’t do as many as I used to do. There’s more stories and stuff that I tell. The Vegas show is probably 50-50. The road show might be a little different. TW: Do you have any big plans for 2014? Carrot Top: Well, there was a movie that’s still coming out. They haven’t given us a release date yet. Tom Green and I, we play ourselves. It’s a stretch. It’s called “The SwearNet,” and it’s based in Canada. It’s, basically, the “Trailer Park Boys.” I don’t know if you’ve heard of them. TW: Oh yeah, I love that show (a “mockumentary” series that aired on Canada’s Showcase network from 2001 to 2007). Carrot Top: They go through all these crazy things to get their show back; and me and Tom Green are celebrities that they bring in from L.A. for this big road race they have. TW: Is this a documentary? Carrot Top: No, it’s an actual movie. They’re not playing their characters, though. They’re playing themselves. So they’re not Bubbles. There’s (actor) Mike (Smith.) TW: It’s maybe like that movie, “This Is the End,” where people are playing fictional versions of themselves. Carrot Top: Yeah, indeed. Except James Franco’s not in ours. TW: Well, he’s in everything else. Carrot Top: I know. Jesus, honestly, he’s in every movie.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE THE GRINCH The Grand Cinema and Click! Cable TV present another free family movie on Dec. 21, the Jim Carrey laugh-fest “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” (PG). Doors open at 9:30 a.m., film at 10. Arrive early to get a good seat.

TWO THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA Lakewood Playhouse presents its second annual special joint presentation with Lakewood Institute of Theatre – C.S. Lewis’ “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe” for 10 shows only, Dec. 12-22. Plays Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at

7 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. All tickets $15. With its cast of 30 actors, this show is a must-see for the whole family.

THREE LORI PAINE, ARTIST For the month of December, C o n s t e l l a t io n Art Gallery at 3013 Sixth Ave. welcomes painter Lori Paine as Artist of the Month. In collaboration with Tacoma City Ballet she has brought the beloved “snow scene” from “The Nutcracker” to life in the gallery’s window installation. She will also create a custom pet portrait of your beloved pet friend. In addition to Paine’s artworks, the gallery has an amazing collection of one-of-a-kind holiday gifts, including gift sets that can be viewed at ConstellationArtGallery.com. Info: constellationtacoma@gmail.com.

FOUR ACCLAIMED AUTOHARPIST Acclaimed autoharpist Bryan Bowers will perform in a free family concert at 2 p.m. on Dec. 14 at Tacoma’s downtown Main Library (1102 Tacoma Ave. S.). For more than four decades, Bowers has been to the autoharp what Earl Scruggs was to the five-string banjo. He presents instrumental virtuosity combined with warmth, eloq u e n c e, ex p r e s s i o n and professionalism. The library concert provides an intimate musical experience from the man who has redefined the autoharp. More information is available at www. tacomapubliclibrary.org or by telephoning the library at 253.292.2001.

FIVE COMEDY PET THEATER

Voted “Best Family Show” in Las Vegas, Popovich Comedy Pet Theater is the most beloved family show in the world, featuring an amazing cast of house-cats, dogs, parrots, even geese and mice! Critics describe the show as a unique blend of physical comedy, world-champion juggling and the extraordinary talents of more than 30 performing pets. Dec. 14, 1 p.m. at Theatre on the Square. Tickets $15, $25 at www.broadwaycenter.org.


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, December 13, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

Hold on, we’re going to the Dome:

My night with Drake By Sean Contris Special to Tacoma Weekly

O

n Dec. 4, hip-hop artist Drake, in support of his third studio LP “Nothing Was The Same,” brought his world tour, titled “Would You Like a Tour,” to the Tacoma Dome. Being the hip, privileged, smug, cutting edge journalist that I am, I was able to secure myself a ticket and spent the night on the floor of the Dome with the so-called “Softest In The Game.” Rapper Future opened the show with his own brand of Southern-styled trap heavy bangers, which included the Ace Hood helmed hit, “New Buggati.” Future’s set was surprisingly short, lasting a little under 30 minutes, but he was exactly what the crowd needed to get the night started. R&B singer Miguel followed. Miguel, who is still touring in support of his 2012 LP “Kaleidoscope Dream,” was in fine form and was accompanied by an entire wellrehearsed backing band. The band was a nice surprise and gave his set a more personal touch. On first listen, “Kaleidoscope Dream” painted Miguel in a very different light. It wasn’t hard to imagine him as an incredibly smooth ladykiller dressed in a beautiful, million dollar suit who would rather die than break his cool. Therefore, it was a bit of a trip to see him performing under the guise of a Michael Jackson-esque rock star who spent much of the night grinning, dancing and cracking jokes. Miguel powered through his 40-minute set, running through the singles of “Kaleidoscope Dream” with ferocious power and passion. Many of the songs took on new forms with a more rock-inspired sound; opener “The Thrill” in particular felt like it was always meant to be performed with a heavier focus on guitar and going back to the soulful, subtle sound of the studio version feels a bit wrong. The highlight of the set, and perhaps the entire night, was his closer. “Now for the song you’ve wanted to hear from me all night,” he said with a smile before the skipping beats and vocal samples of “Adorn” flooded the Dome. For as long as Miguel continues to make music, “Adorn” will be his signature song. It’s just too damn good for it not to be. Like “The Thrill,” “Adorn” took on new life as an arena

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rocker, and brought Miguel’s set to a thunderous jamming conclusion. The main act of the night took to the stage sometime around 10 p.m. He appeared in fantastic fashion on a fantastic stage. Sure, there was no mountain for him to climb, or Jesus Christ lookalike to bow to, but Drake had a stage that was quite the spectacle, complete with escalator, backing lightshow and glowing circular platform. Drake started his set with the first verse of “Tuscan Leather,” the first track off “Nothing Was The Same.” He then spliced together a medley of his best cuts from his 2011 release, “Take Care,” including “Headlines” and The Weeknd assisted “Crew Love.” Drake had energy to burn. “If you guys want to go all night, I got about 100 of these (expletive) set. Just let me know,” he said half-jokingly. In the fashion of “Nothing Was The Same” (where Jay-Z was the only actual feature to appear on the whole album), Drake performed much of his material on his own, with the only guest spots coming from Future and vocalist Jhene Aiko. I couldn’t help but notice the quality of the show dipped when Drake gave up the spotlight and allowed these guests to shine with him. Were Future or Aiko particularly bad? Nah, but Drake is at his brightest when it’s

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just him. He really gave the impression of being a one-man band, and I think he said it best with the line, “Every song sounds like Drake featuring Drake.” Highlights from the set include the current R&B centric hit, “Hold On, We’re Going Home,” a song which he paused mid-performance to ask a girl to come on stage in order to sing to her in a hilarious, grandiose attempt at seduction. Then there was another medley of hits that included A$ap Rocky’s “F***ing Problems,” French Montana’s “Pop That” and, of course, the legendary “The Motto.” Perhaps the most bizzare and eyebrow raising moment of the show involved Drake walking around on a platform that had descended from the ceiling while giving brief shoutouts to anyone in the audience who caught his eye. “Yeah, I see you with the Nothing Was The Same shirt jumping up and down, yeah I see you girl don’t tease me, oh lord!” Were there certain aspects of the show I was disappointed with? Yeah, I mean when you have as many hits as Drake (we’re talking about a man who in three years beat Jay-Z for most No.1 hits on the Billboard Top 100) you were probably going to miss a few standout tracks. But really, Drizzy? You couldn’t give a throwback “Best I Ever Had” to a kid whose eighth grade year was practically defined by that song? It was also disappointing to hear tracks like “Take Care,” “Forever” and tracks from “So Far Gone” featured only in a medley put on by DJ Future the Prince. These were all minor details when Drake closed the show with an incredible rendition of “Started From The Bottom,” which concluded with a fireworks show and thunderous applause. I suppose the biggest surprise I experienced while watching Drake’s hour-and-a-half performance came with his overall attitude. For a man who catches so much flack for being “the sensitive one” or “the softest in the game,” the dude didn’t seem to care about how he was perceived – he simply wanted to have a good time and give a good time to the audience. I think that at the end of the day, Drake isn’t really all that concerned with success, or No. 1 hits, or however many of his exes are living in Texas. I think the dude’s just enjoying the ride, and it’s a pleasure to be along with him.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, December 13, 2013

The Spirit of the Season

SINGER DANNY QUINTERO SAYS â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Singing Christmas Treeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; features â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MERRY CHRISTMASâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; IN SONG festive entertainment with a message Newly released CD will warm your heart By Matt Nagle

matt@tacomaweekly.com

J

PHOTO BY WESLEY BURK PHOTOGRAPHY

SING IT. More than 175 talented musicians and actors will take the stage

during this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Singing Christmas Tree production, running through Dec. 22. By Kate Burrows kburrows@tacomaweekly.com

S

ince 1963, Life Center Churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Singing Christmas Treeâ&#x20AC;? has been entertaining audiences with a festive show, always with the goal to shed light on the true meaning of Christmas. With more than 100,000 lights illuminating the stage, the production is sure to delight viewers of all ages. The show features festive Christmas carols performed by about 175 talented musicians and performers. One of the most awe-inspiring features of the production is its living Nativity portraying the birth of a baby born in a lowly manger, surrounded by animals, kings and angels alike. For the past 10 years, the show has featured a unique theme and story line to enlighten and inspire members of the audience. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story is completely original, and features a little girl whose birthday is forgotten on Christmas Eve in all the hustle of the season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Her toys begin to console her and counsel her in small part, by saying that Jesusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; birthday is Christmas, and that is forgotten every year, too,â&#x20AC;? said Life Center Pastor Dean Curry. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The message this year is

about Jesus, and how we often forget the real meaning of Christmas.â&#x20AC;? This simple message will resonate with audiences of all ages, and was developed by church members and organizers based on some of the biggest issues of the day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We try to look at whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happening in our culture, and it seems to be all about consumerism,â&#x20AC;? Curry said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have 24 hours of Thanksgiving but before the stroke of midnight weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re out buying presents. We like to remind people about family values and the notions of generosity, forgiveness and grace that Christmas is intended to remind us about.â&#x20AC;? Life Center will be taking donations during the show to benefit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kids of the 253â&#x20AC;? by providing local needy families with meals, presents and more. The church will also be selling Christmas tree ornaments each night, with all proceeds benefiting these families. Curry hopes to raise $20,000 this year through these efforts. Performances take place through Dec. 22 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Fridays at 7:30 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. All tickets are $14. Life Center Church is located at 1717 S. Union Ave. in Tacoma. For more information, visit www.singingtreetacoma.com.

ust in time for the holidays, singer and entertainer par excellence Danny Quintero has released a CD of holiday favorites. Titled simply â&#x20AC;&#x153;Merry Christmas,â&#x20AC;? the collection is made up of 13 Christmas classics he chose specifically for this music project he has wanted to do for a very long time. Pianist Randy Halberstadt provides the music and another reason to make this CD part of your family holiday music experience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My driving force was to create an album that families could listen to year after year as they decorate their Christmas trees, as theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re driving from party to party, and as theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re sitting around the fireplace spending quality time with each other,â&#x20AC;? Quintero said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I truly want to be a part of their lives, regardless of where they live, where theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re from, and who they are.â&#x20AC;? Quintero has a voice like no other, as he seems lifted from the very Rat Pack he idolizes. He could easily duet with Sinatra or Bennett, and keep people entertained like Dean Martin. His rich tenor holds its own and with something extra that comes through in his voice telling you that this man was destined to be doing exactly what he is doing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; keeping alive the tradition of great American singers and the songs that made them famous. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every song on this album has a special place in my heart,â&#x20AC;? Quintero said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some are family favorites that have memories attached to them, and the others are ones that I love so much, I actually listen to them all year long.â&#x20AC;? Some songs he chose to record in their traditional style out of respect for tradition, while on others â&#x20AC;&#x153;we juiced up and put different twists on them.â&#x20AC;? On â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Christmas Songâ&#x20AC;? Quintero breaks into a jazz moment and on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Santa Claus is Coming to Townâ&#x20AC;? he launches into scatting with Halberstadtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s piano. Quinteroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voice really shines on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmasâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; he sings this song the way it was meant to be sung, with heart and soul. Then comes â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blue Christmas,â&#x20AC;? a brilliant movement from the previous merry little

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song. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s here that Quintero taps into the melancholy thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as much about Christmastime as the unabashed joy thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in our faces left and right at this time of year. Halberstadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s piano solo will push you over the edge into tears if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ready to go there. Percussionist Clarence Acox joins the Quintero/Halberstadt duo for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Little Drummer Boy.â&#x20AC;? Acox delivers a drum solo here that could very well get you shaking a tail feather while you decorate the Christmas tree. â&#x20AC;&#x153;White Christmasâ&#x20AC;? takes it back to the blessedly familiar sounds of the season. Another special guest, Seattle jazz vocalist Katie Davi, sings on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Baby, Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cold Outsideâ&#x20AC;? and listeners unfamiliar with her could very well become instant fans. The CD finishes, appropriately, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Be Home for Christmas.â&#x20AC;? Having received funding for the album through Kickstarter, Quintero wished to thank all those who helped him achieve his dream. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just those who donated, but those who also offered to help in any way possible because they could not afford to monetarily contribute. So many people wanted to be a part of this album, more people than I ever would have imagined. I love you all and thank you from the bottom of my heart.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I gave it my all, I hope you enjoy it. I love you all and wish you a very Merry Christmas!â&#x20AC;? Go to www.DannyQuintero.com to purchase the CD or to download it. Or click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Upcoming showsâ&#x20AC;? to find out where Quintero will be performing this month in order to pick one up in person.

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

ACES UP TELLS WHY THEY HAVE THE WINNING HAND

Friday, December 13, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Nightlife

TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

LOCAL JAZZ GUITARIST MICHAEL POWERS WILL HEADLINE HIS FIFTH ANNUAL HOLIDAY SHOW AT 5 P.M. ON SUNDAY, DEC. 15, AT MARINE VIEW CHURCH, 8649 EASTSIDE DR. NE, IN TACOMA. EDDY FERGUSON WILL JOIN HIM ON BASS AND RONNIE BISHOP ON DRUMS. ADMISSION IS FREE AND ALL AGES ARE WELCOME; WWW. MARINEVIEWPC.ORG.

FRIDAY, DEC. 13 PHOTO BY MICHAEL BAUER

LUCKY DRAW. Aces Up is Brendan Abshier (top right, black shirt), Eric Banke,

JAZZBONES: The Fat Tones (blues) 8 p.m., $7

Barrett Nelson (middle) and Jason Adams and Ty Adams (bottom, in flannel). By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

I

n 2013, Bonney Lake-bred country band Aces Up toured more, played higher profile gigs and laid the foundation for its next record, the follow-up to 2011’s radioready “Backyard Superstars.” The band will cap off its big year by headlining Jazzbones on Saturday, Dec. 14. So we caught up with singer-guitarist Tyler Adams to find out what makes this local buzz band tick. Tacoma Weekly: How did you guys get started? Adams: Well, my brother and I, we got an apartment together after he got out of the military. He was in the Marine Corps from 2000 to 2004, and he went over to Iraq for two tours and came home. I’d been playing guitar since I was nine, so I had been writing a little bit here and there. He looked at me one day and said, “What are you playing?” It was just a little riff I wrote, and we decided to write a song around it, and it just turned out to be country. That’s what we grew up listening to. It was kind of in our roots and in our blood. So we decided to start the country band, and went to the radio station, told ‘em we had some stuff goin’. They listened to the song, told us it wasn’t that great. TW: What station are we talking about here? Adams: The Wolf (KKWF-FM, 100.7) when they first started, back in ‘05. TW: Is this a song you still play? Adams: We don’t play ‘em any more. One was called “Lost Love” and the other one was called “Four Years Gone.” We played those songs for ‘em, and they said, “We gotta hear the whole band.” And truth be told we didn’t have a band, but we told ‘em we did. So they gave us a show with Steve Holy as our first show; and we put a band together, played a show and just never stopped.” TW: Obviously, you got better. Adams: Like to think so. (Laughs) TW: You started the band with your brother. Is it usually smooth sailing,

or does it ever stray into the Oasis, Black Crowes territory? Adams: We have our spats. We try to do different things and we just butt heads. But at the end of the day we’re brothers, we’re family and always get over whatever we’re mad about and end up working together. He’s the best business partner I could think of, and he’s the best friend I’ve got. So it couldn’t be any better for me. TW: There’s not the same local country scene that there was even a decade ago when there were a couple more places to play. Where did you guys cut your teeth? Adams: We opened up for Josh Gracin after we opened for Steve Holy. Then we started playing the Little Creek Casino in Shelton. It was four hour sets, and we were playin’ all night long. So we had to learn about 45 songs. It was all the songs that everybody else wanted to hear, not the stuff that we wanted to play that was our own music. … We wanted to play our own music, but you gotta cut your teeth and earn your way. TW: On your last album, “Backyard Superstars,” you’ve got a really radio ready sound. And you can point to people like Blaine Larsen and Lila McCann that are from this area. But do you feel it’s a steeper hill to climb being from the Northwest and trying to make it as a country band? Adams: Rae Solomon, she moved out to Nashville. Robbie Walden, he also moved out to Nashville, but they’re both from here. Chance McKinney still plays around here, and there are several other bands. But at the same time it’s tough when you go to places like Tennessee or Texas. ... When you tell ‘em you’re from Seattle, some of ‘em almost laugh at ya. So it makes it good for us up here in the Northwest. But it makes it really, really tough when we try to head south or southeast. TW: You guys are really gaining traction. I saw you were nominated for the KOMO best bands poll, you’re doing more touring and you’re getting more high profile gigs. What are some of the highlights from

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this year? Adams: Well, the biggest highlight for me of 2013 was getting to do a run with Florida Georgia Line. That was just an awesome experience. The two guys, Brian (Kelley) and Tyler (Hubbard), that make up the duo, they’re awesome guys; and then the whole band, too, they were all really personable people. They taught us a lot in just the few days we were hangin’ out with ‘em. TW: Are you doing any recording next year? Adams: We have a producer picked out, and we’re writing songs as much as we can, every single day. Mine and (my brother) Jason’s phones are filled with voice notes and written notes or typed notes and lyrics and hooks and ideas for songs. So really, all we have to do is find the time to sit down together and write ‘em out. We’re trying to record early next year and put the CD out by spring or summer. TW: What to you have planned for this weekend at Jazzbones? Adams: The night’s gonna start with C-Leb & The Kettle Black. After that it’s Cody Beebe & The Crooks, and they’re good friends of ours. We’ve played several shows with ‘em. We haven’t played at home in a long time. We used to play as much as we can, and it’s been a lot less because we’ve been touring. We’re gonna have probably three new songs we’re gonna debut here. We played them a little bit on the road, and people seemed to like ‘em. TW: What are some titles people can listen up for? Adams: There’s one called “It Rains in California, Too.” There’s a song we wrote with a buddy of ours, Adam Craig, called “It’s All Good.” And then we might even throw one in we wrote with … Austin Jenckes, from “The Voice.” We went down to Nashville two months ago and wrote one with him called ‘Rolling in the Evergreen.” That’s a song for home. There’s a hidden meaning behind it. It’s Washington, I’ll just leave it at that.

NEW FRONTIER: Open bluegrass jam, 3 p.m., NC RIALTO: Christmas Revels (rootsy holiday music) 1, 5 p.m., $16-$31, AA STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffmann Allstars (open jam) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Tacomedy Competition (comedy contest) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

MONDAY, DEC. 16 BOB’S JAVA JIVE: Criminal Dawn, Widow’s Scourge, Feisty Felines (“pirate karaoke”) 9 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Harmonious Funk (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Bruce Jingles (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Oh Dear!, The Spider Ferns, J. Martin (indierock) 9 p.m., $5 STONEGATE: Subvinyl Jukebox (rock covers) 9 p.m., NC SWISS: Radio 80 (dance) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Mike E. Winfield (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 TRIPLE PLAY: Xanadu, The Llanos Brothers (prog-rock) 9 p.m., $5 UNCLE SAM’S: Hambone Blues Band (blues) 8 p.m. UNCLE THURM’S: Delvon Lamarr Trio (funk) 7:30 p.m., NC URBAN GRACE: Magical Strings (Celtic Christmas) 7:30 p.m., $12-$28

SWISS: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 9 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke (karaoke band) 11 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Jazz & beyond (live jam) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino, Brooke Lizotte (experimental jam) 9 p.m., NC SWISS: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 9 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Blues jam, 8 p.m.

TUESDAY, DEC. 17 JAZZBONES: Host Ralph Porter, Greg Kettner (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5

SATURDAY, DEC. 14 EMERALD QUEEN: Carrot Top (comedy) 8 p.m., $25-$65

B SHARP COFFEE: Leanne Trevalyan (singer-songwriter) 8 p.m., NC, AA DOYLE’S: Ethan Tucker Band (rock) 9:30 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Harmonious Funk (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Bruce Jingles (comedy) 8:30, 10:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: Aces Up, Cody Beebe & The Crooks, C-Leb & The Kettle Black (country, blues, rock) 8 p.m., $10 LAST STAND (formerly CHUPACABRA CAFE): Navigator, Idols, Cultures, Extortionist, Love the Lost (rock) 6:30 p.m., $12, AA NEW FRONTIER: Future Bass (DJ dance) 9 p.m., $5 RIALTO: Christmas Revels (rootsy holiday music) 2, 7:30 p.m., $16-$31, AA SPAR: Spunkmonkey (rock) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Chris Jones Band (rock) 9 p.m., NC SWISS: Kry (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Mike E. Winfield (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 TACOMA COMMUNITY COLLEGE: Rich Wetzel’s Groovin’ Higher Jazz Orchestra (Stan Kenton Christmas) 7:30 p.m., $15-$20, AA TRIPLE PLAY: Xanadu, The Llanos Brothers (prog-rock) 9 p.m., $5 UNCLE SAM’S: Justice Creek (southern rock) 8 p.m.

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVE’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC RIALTO: Christmas Revels (rootsy holiday music) 7:30 p.m., $16-$31, AA STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Subvinyl Jukebox (rock covers) 8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 18 SWISS: Barley Wine Revue (country) 9 p.m., NC

DAVE’S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC LAST STAND: Hotel Books, When All We Love Is Lost. Tony the Voice, The Lost Side Project (Christmas rock show) 5 p.m., AA RIALTO: Christmas Revels (rootsy holiday music) 7:30 p.m., $16-$31 STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, $8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m., NC

THURSDAY, DEC. 19 TACOMA COMEDY: Brad Upton CD release (comedy) 8 p.m., $10

SUNDAY, DEC. 15 SPAR: Crazy Texas Gypsys (blues) 7 p.m., NC

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m. IMMANUEL PRESBYTERIAN: Geoff Muldaur (blues, toy drive) 5 p.m., NC, AA

502 MARTINI: Kim Archer (singer-songwriter) 5 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Kry, DJ Switch (rock covers) 9 p.m., $7 STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open jam) 8 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

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Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, December 13, 2013

FRI., DEC. 13 MAGICAL STRINGS For many in the Northwest, it wouldn’t be the holidays without the harps, dulcimers, and other energetic Celtic sounds of acclaimed family ensemble Magical Strings. The tradition continues this year, as Magical Strings announces its 35th triumphant year of annual Celtic Yuletide Concerts taking place throughout Puget Sound in December 2013! Featuring the lyrical and joyful sounds of Celtic harps, hammered dulcimers, violins, cello, whistles, concertina, percussion and more, each Celtic Yuletide performance is more than a concert – it’s a holiday gala of Celtic-inspired song, dance, theater and storytelling. The performance takes place at 7:30 p.m. at Urban Grace Church, located at 902 Market St. in Tacoma. Info: www. magicalstrings.com.

COMING EVENTS

BULLETIN BOARD ‘THE NUTCRACKER AND THE TALE OF THE HARD NUT’ Throughout the world, “The Nutcracker” has become a generational Christmas tradition. Tacoma City Ballet celebrates its 30th performance season at the Broadway Center for Performing Arts with a World Premiere production of “The Nutcracker,” told in its entirety. Beginning with “The Prequel or The Tale of the Hard Nut” and ending in the familiar “Kingdom of the Sweets,” the adventures of Princess Pirlipat, the Nutcracker Prince, and of course, Clara, will charm and delight audiences more than ever before. See the World Premiere of “The Prequel or The Tale of the Hard Nut” and “The Nutcracker” you know and love together for the very first time. This glorious production transports you to a land filled with music, magic, and wonder. Under the artistic direction of Erin M. Ceragioli, and accompanied by the Northwest Sinfonietta under the direction of Christophe Chagnard, this world premiere of “The Prequel or The Tale of the Hard Nut” and “The Nutcracker” promises to be enchanting. Performances take place at the Pantages Theater at 3 p.m. on Dec. 14-15 and 21-22. Tickets: $20-$60. THE CHRISTMAS REVELS Cold and snowy, winter in Appalachia was traditionally a time to bring out the fid-

class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

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A LITTLE CHRISTMAS? ENJOY A DELIGHTFUL AFTERNOON OR EVENING OF TRADITIONAL AND MODERN BARBERSHOP STYLE HOLIDAY MUSIC, PRESENTED BY THE TACOMA TOTEMAIRES MEN’S BARBERSHOP HARMONY CHORUS. THE SHOW ALSO FEATURES UPLIFTING SEASONAL TUNES BY SELECTED QUARTETS. IN ADDITION, THE EVENT SHOWCASES THE LODGE ROOM AT THE NEW ELKS CLUB IN TACOMA, LOCATED AT 2013 S. CEDAR ST. AT ALLENMORE GOLF COURSE. THE PERFORMANCE TAKES PLACE DEC. 14 AT 7 P.M., AND DEC. 15 AT 2 P.M. TICKETS: $15. INFO: (253) 752-5135.

cultural history through the work of the famed Scottish naturalist and his discovery of more than 200 species in the Northwest. Guest curated by Jack and Claire Nisbet, the exhibit displays Douglas’ journals and observations of Native tribes, rare 19th century botanical books and his original pressed specimens, bird mounts, pelts and skins. In addition, the exhibit traces the origins of the eponymous Douglas fir tree. David Douglas: “A Naturalist at Work” will be on display through Feb. 23, 2014. The Washington State History Museum is located at 1911 Pacific Ave. Info: washingtonhistory.org. HANDS AT WORK EXHIBIT An exhibit of 24 stunning photographs showing human hands and the work they do. From gardener to midwife, fisherman to puppeteer, “Hands at Work” chronicles Washingtonians and their extraordinary range of work. Developed by photographer Summer Moon Scriver and writer Iris Graville. The show runs through May 2014 at the Washington State History Museum. Info: www.washingtonhistory.org.

FRI., DEC. 20 ‘MESSIAH’ One of the most famous works for chorus and orchestra is Handel’s “Messiah.” Although not written specifically for Christmas, it has come to be an important tradition of the Holiday season for people throughout the world. “Hallelujah Chorus” is one of the most enduring and widely known passages of music of all time, as is the poignant aria “I Know that My Redeemer Liveth.” The Tacoma Symphony Chorus, along with the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra, will present the work at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 20 at St. Charles Borromeo Church, located at 7112 S. 12th St. in Tacoma. Chorus Director Geoffrey Boers will conduct the performances. Joining him will be soprano Maria Mannisto, mezzosoprano Melissa Schiel, tenor Eric Neuville, and baritone Peter Tuff. The concert is sponsored by Franciscan Health System. For tickets, $25, call (253) 272-7264 or visit www.tacomasymphony. org.

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dles and banjos, the pies and cakes, the hot wassail bowl. It was a time for music-making, dancing and story telling and the passing of these from one generation to the next. This year’s Christmas Revels is a high-energy, toe-tapping, tall-tale telling celebration stripped of the complexities we in the 21st century have heaped on the season. In the musical bounty and local lore hidden in isolated hamlets, we’ll discover the raw beauty and simplicity of an earlier time. The Christmas Revels is a joyous, timeless celebration for all ages – a high-spirited concoction of folk tradition and high art. Gather your friends and family together and join us at the Rialto in December. Please note: The 7:30 p.m. show on Dec. 14 is ASL interpreted. Performances take place at the Rialto Theater Dec. 14 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 15 at 1 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.; Dec. 17 at 7:30 p.m. and Dec. 18 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $16-$31. ‘IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE’ Tacoma Little Theatre warms up the holiday season with its stage adaptation of Frank Capra’s classic film “It’s a Wonderful Life” by Anthony Palermo. The saga of George Bailey, the Everyman from the small town of Bedford Falls whose dreams of escape and adventure have been quashed by family obligation and civic duty. George’s guardian angel must descend on Christmas Eve to save him from despair and to remind him, by showing him what the world would have been like had he never been born, that his has been, after all, a wonderful life. This production is directed by Maria Valenzuela and includes a cast of 25 local actors including Dan Lysne (George Bailey), Kirsten Deane (Mary Bailey), Gary Spees (Clarence) and Tom Birkeland (Mr. Potter). “It’s a Wonderful Life” will run through Dec. 22. Friday and Saturday showings are at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. This show is recommended for all ages. Tickets: $15-$22, available at tacomalittletheatre.com. ‘THE SANTALAND DIARIES’ Tacoma Little Theatre in partnership with The Chang-

ing Scene Theatre Northwest, the Kitsap peninsula’s only fringe theatre, presents David Sedaris’ irreverent holiday one-man show “The Santaland Diaries,” about a starving actor in New York City who reluctantly takes a job as an elf at Macy’s department store. In what The New York Times calls “a delightfully thorny account of working as a Yuletide elf at Macy’s,” the story follows our hero, Crumpet, through a maze of terrified children, outlandish holiday shoppers, and drunken Santas. This production features Charlie Birdsell as Crumpet, and is directed by Pavlina Morris. For mature elves ages 14+ due to strong language and content. Two performances only: Dec. 12 and 15 at 7:30 p.m. All tickets are $12 and may be purchased online at www. tacomalittletheatre.com, or by calling the Box Office at (253) 272-2281. ZOOLIGHTS Bundle up and stroll the Point Defiance Zoo as it comes aglow with more than a halfmillion lights! Be inspired by dazzling animal-themed displays, including brand new 3-D displays of a swooping bald eagle, a regal polar bear family, and a Sumatran tiger head. Warm up in the steamy South Pacific Aquarium, ride a camel or take a spin on the antique carousel. There’s so much to see and do! Zoolights runs through Jan. 5 from 5-9 p.m. (Closed Dec. 24 & Open Dec. 25 & Jan. 1) Info: www. pdza.org/zoolights/. 12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS Drive in to America’s Car Museum this holiday season for 12 Days of Christmas! From December 13th through 24th, ACM will feature family-friendly holiday activities, including Santa photos, crafts and ticket giveaways. Festivities take place Dec. 13–24 from 10 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Info: www.lemaymuseum. org/events.php?eid=1247. ACM is located at 2702 E. D St. in Tacoma. A BIZARRE BAZAAR This is not your average holiday gift/craft show! From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Dec. 1315, St. Helens Mercantile will feature a collection of unusual hand made products for the non-traditional gift giver. You’ve been to the rest...none

like this. There will be oneof-a-kind cards, ornaments, artwork, t-shirts, dolls, food, music and fun. St. Helens Mercantile is located at 753 St. Helens Ave. in Tacoma. FANTASY LIGHTS The 19th annual Fantasy Lights display will dazzle viewers with new themes and yearly additions to the largest drive-through display of lights in the Northwest. Fantasy Lights operates for 35 nights through Jan. 1 nightly from 5:30-9 p.m. The beautiful two-and-a-quarter-mile drive takes place in Spanaway County Park. Info: www.piercecountywa.org.

COMEDY OPEN MIC The Happy Thursday Comedy Open Mic is a weekly standup comedy open mic hosted by comedian Kareem Walters, featuring some of the best rising comics and established headliners. Each week professional and amateur comedians test new material to develop their acts. It is an opportunity to test your new material in a non-comedy club atmosphere You can catch the action at Triple Play – the newest sports bar on sixth Avenue – every Thursday. Happy Thursday Comedy Open Mic offers a fun, unpredictable show experience you won’t find anywhere else. Enjoy rare and exciting burgers while watching some of the funniest comics in the Northwest. Every Thursday at 9 p.m. Info: www.tripleplaytacoma.com.

IRISH CYLINDERS BY DALE CHIHULY Created almost 40 years ago, the legendary “Irish Cylinders” by Dale Chihuly are now on exhibition at Museum of Glass. Among the earliest series of Chihuly’s oeuvre are the little-known, legendary Irish Cylinders, created in 1975 at the Rhode Island School of Design, begun on St. Patrick’s Day and completed over Thanksgiving weekend. The 44 vessels, loosely categorized as St. Patrick’s Day Cylinders, Irish Cylinders and the Ulysses Cylinders, which were inspired by James Joyce’s masterpiece “Ulysses.” Minty and milky, the Irish Cylinders feature glass-drawing pick-up techniques similar to Chihuly’s more abstract Blanket Cylinders. The series was briefly exhibited at the Benson Gallery in Bridehampton, NY in the summer of 1976, but then placed in storage. The complete series of Irish Cylinders has been previously exhibited at the Portland Art Museum in 1997. The Stromple Collection now numbers more than 500 objects and is the largest single holding of Chihuly’s work. The Museum of Glass is located at 1801 Dock St. Info: www.museumofglass.org.

T-TOWN SWING Get your Tacoma swing dance fix every Thursday at Urban Grace Church, located in downtown. Intro to swing dance: 8:30-9 p.m., free with dance admission. Social dancing, 9-11:30 p.m., is $5. The atmosphere is super laidback and fun, and features great guest instructors and DJs playing swing music from the 1930s and 1940s to keep dancers hopping all night long. In addition, blues will be played every second and fourth Friday of the month and kizomba every fourth Sunday.

‘DAVID DOUGLAS: A NATURALIST AT WORK’ Discover the history and intrigue of nature in the Northwest. After the age of exploration, the discovery and identification of new species continued to generate great excitement among nations. “David Douglas: A Naturalist at Work” studies the intersection of geography, science and

BALLROOM DANCING The STAR Center hosts ballroom dancing on the first Sunday of every month and every Monday afternoon from 1-3 p.m. There is live music. Admission is $5. It is a good idea to come with a dance partner. This dance was formerly held at South Park Community Center. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org/

PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT Each month, on the first and third Friday from 6-9 p.m., is parents’ night out! Bring the kids to the Children’s Museum of Tacoma, where organizers will entertain the kids in a safe and fun environment. Cost is $25 per child, $10 each additional sibling. Members receive a 10 percent discount. Parents’ Night Out is most appropriate for children 3-10 years old. All children must be able to use the toilet independently. Registration is required. Register early, spots fill up quickly! Info: www. playtacoma.org/programs.


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1H[W+HDULQJ'DWH7LPH $SULO#SP ',//211DGLQH-'2% 3HWLWLRQHU9V 3(7(5621.\OH Respondent 5HVSRQGHQW,GHQWLĂ&#x20AC;HUV Male, Race I, Black Hair +HLJKW¡:HLJKW(\HV%URZQ 1. Respondent is Restrained form causing petitioner SK\VLFDOKDUPERGLO\LQMXU\DVVDXOWLQFOXGLQJVH[XDO assault, and from assault, and from molesting, KDUDVVLQJWKUHDWHQLQJRUVWDONLQJ3(7,7,21(5 2. Respondent is Restrained from harassing, follow, NHHSLQJXQGHUSK\VLFDORUHOHFWURQLFVXUYHLOODQFH F\EHUVWDONLQJDQGXVLQJWHOHSKRQLFDXGLRYLVXDO or other electronic means to monitor the actions, locations, or wire electronic communication of 3HWLWLRQHU 3. Respondent is Restrained from coming near and IURPKDYLQJDQ\FRQWDFWZKDWVRHYHULQSHUVRQRU WKURXJKRWKHUVE\SKRQHPDLORUDQ\RWKHUPHDQV GLUHFWO\RULQGLUHFWO\H[FHSWIRUPDLOLQJRUVHUYLFHRI SURFHVVRIFRXUWGRFXPHQWVE\DUGSDUW\RUFRQWDFW E\UHVSRQGHQW¡VODZ\HU V ZLWK3HWLWLRQHU 5HVSRQGHQWLV5HVWUDLQHGIURPJRLQJRQWRWKH JURXQGVRIRUHQWHULQJSHWLWLRQHU¡V3HWLWLRQHUZDLYHV FRQĂ&#x20AC;GHQWLDOLW\RIWKHDGGUHVVZKLFKLV(DVW QG6WUHHW7DFRPD:$ 5HVSRQGHQWLV3URKLELWHGIURPNQRZLQJO\FRPLQJ ZLWKLQRUNQRZLQJO\UHPDLQLQJZLWKLQIHHWRI petitioner work place The respondent is directed to appear and show cause ZK\WHPSRUDU\VKRXOGQRWEHPDNHHIIHFWLYHIRURQH \HDUDQGZK\WKHFRXUWVKRXOGQRWRUGHUWKHUHOLHI UHTXHVWHGE\WKHSHWLWLRQHURURWKHUUHOLHI)$,/85( 72$33($5$77+(+($5,1*0$<5(68/7,1 7+(&2857*5$17,1*68&+5(/,()7+(1(;7 +($5,1*'$7(,66+2:1213$*(21( :DUQLQJVWR5HVSRQGHQW$YLRODWLRQRISURYLVLRQV 1through 6 of this order with actual notice of its terms is a criminal offense under chapter 26.50 RCW DQGZLOOVXEMHFW\RXWRDUUHVW,IWKHYLRODWLRQRIWKH protection order involves travel across state lines RUWKHERXQGDU\RIDWULEDOMXULVGLFWLRQRIWKH8QLWHG 6WDWHVZKLFKLQFOXGHVWULEDOODQGV\RXPD\EHVXEMHFW to criminal prosecution in federal court under 18 86&$RU A violation of provisions 1 through 6 of this order is a gross misdemeanor unless one of the following FRQGLWLRQVDSSO\$Q\DVVDXOWWKDWLVDYLRODWLRQRIWKLV RUGHUDQGWKDWGRHVQRWDPRXQWWRDVVDXOWLQWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVW GHJUHHXQGHU5&:$LVDFODVV$IHORQ\ $Q\FRQGXFWLQYLRODWLRQRIWKLVRUGHUWKDWLVUHFNOHVV and creates a substantial risk of death or serious SK\VLFDOLQMXU\WRDQRWKHUSHUVRQLVDFODVV&IHORQ\ $OVRDYLRODWLRQLIWKLVRUGHULVDFODVV&IHORQ\LI\RX have at least two previous convictions for violating a SURWHFWLRQRUGHULVVXHGXQGHU7LWOHVRUWK RCW. ,IWKHFRXUWRUGHULVVXHGDĂ&#x20AC;QDOSURWHFWLRQRUGHUDQG \RXUUHODWLRQVKLSWRWKHSHWLWLRQHULVWKDWRIDVSRXVH RUIRUPHUVSRXVH>DUHQ¡WRIDFRPPRQFKLOGRUIRUPHU or current cohabitant as intimate partner, including DFXUUHQWRUIRUPHUUHJLVWHUHGGRPHVWLFSDUWQHU\RX PD\QRWSRVVHVVDĂ&#x20AC;UHDUPRUDPPXQLWLRQIRUDVORQJ DVWKDWĂ&#x20AC;QDOSURWHFWLRQRUGHULVLQHIIHFW86& 922A $YLRODWLRQRIWKLVIHGHUDOĂ&#x20AC;UHDUPVODZFDUULHVD PD[LPXPSRVVLEOHSHQDOW\RI\HDUVLQSULVRQ DQGDĂ&#x20AC;QH$QH[FHSWLRQH[LVWVIRUDODZ HQIRUFHPHQWRIĂ&#x20AC;FHUVDQGPLOLWDU\SHUVRQQHOZKHQ FDUU\LQJGHSDUWPHQWJRYHUQPHQWLVVXHGĂ&#x20AC;UHDUPV 86&LI\RXDUHFRQYLFWHGRIDQRIIHQVHRI GRPHVWLFYLROHQFH\RXZLOOEHIRUELGGHQIRUOLIHIURP SRVVHVVLQJDĂ&#x20AC;UHDUPRUDPPXQLWLRQ86& 5&: <RX&DQ%H$UUHVWHG(YHQLIWKH3HUVRQ¡V:KR 2EWDLQHGWKH2UGHU,QYLWHGRU$OORZ<RXWR9LRODWHWKH 2UGHU¡V3URKLELWLRQV<RXKDYHWKHVROHUHVSRQVLELOLW\ WRDYRLGRUUHIUDLQIURPYLRODWLQJWKHRUGHU¡V SURYLVLRQV2QO\WKHFRXUWFDQFKDQJHWKHRUGHUXSRQ written application. 3XUVXDQWWR86&DFRXUWLQDQ\RIWKH VWDWHVWKH'LVWULFWRI&ROXPELD3XHUWR5LFRDQG 8QLWHG6WDWHVWHUULWRU\DQGDQ\WULEDOODQGZLWKLQWKH 8QLWHG6WDWHVVKDOODFFRUGIXOOIDLWKDQGFUHGLWWRWKH order. It is in the further order that the clerk of the court shall IRUZDUGDFRS\RIWKLVRUGHURQRUEHIRUHWKHMXGLFLDO GD\WR3X\DOOXS7ULEDO/DZ(QIRUFHPHQW 7KHFOHUNRIWKHFRXUWVKDOODOVRIRUZDUGDFRS\RI WKLVRUGHURQRUEHIRUHWKHQH[WMXGLFLDOGD\WR3LHUFH &RXQW\'RPHVWLF9LROHQFH&RRUGLQDWRU-DPHV3RUWHU 'DWHGDWDP

REAL ESTATE

www.cityoftacoma.org/jobs Looking for Keyboard Player with or without own Keyboard. New Church Services in Fife. Needed for Sunday Mornings 10 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11 am. Contact Pastor John: (253) 686-5953

Front Desk Clerk Needed. Friday and Saturday 4 p.m. - 12 midnight. Come in and fill out application. Tower Lanes 6323 6th Ave., Tacoma. 564-8853

FOR RENT

4-plex, 5021 So. Orchard. Fireplace, Washer & Dryer. $775, ½ off 1st Month Rent. (253) 565-7250

CONDOS & HOMES BONNEY LAKE

FIFE

8403 LOCUST AVE E #H-3

5336 35TH ST E

$875

$1195

2 BED 2 BATH 1100 SF. BEAUTIFUL CONDO HAS EAT IN KITCHEN, WASHER/DRYER, RESERVED PARKING & COVERED PATIO W/STORAGE.

2 BED 1.5 BATH 1114 SF. NEWER GATED COMMUNITY CONDO HAS ALL APPLIANCES, EXTRA STORAGE AND 2 CAR GARAGE.

LAKEWOOD

LACEY

8416 PHILLIPS RD SW #25

3350 BALI STREET NE

$650

$1425

1 BED 1 BATH 600 SF. 1 BED CONDO HAS HARDWOODS, SS APPLIANCES, GREAT AMENITIES AND PETS WELCOME.

3 BED, 2 BATH 1588 SF. AMAZING OPEN FLOOR PLAN RAMBLER HAS LAMINATE FLOORS, EAT IN KITCHEN, HUGE ROOMS & PETS OK.

NORTH TACOMA

TACOMA

509 N YAKIMA AVE #203

4322 S ALDER ST

$800

$675

2 BED 1 BATH 1100 SF. CORNER UNIT HAS AMAZING VIEW, ALL APPLIANCES, FAMILY ROOM, DINING AREA & W/S/G INCLUDED.

2 BED 1 BATH 880 SF. UPGRADED 2 BED DUPLEX HAS FRESH PAINT, EAT IN KITCHEN, PATIO AND $24 FOR W/S/G.

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200

FOR SALE FURNITURE

FURNITURE

NEW!!! 7 Piece Cherry Bedroom Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, 1 Nightstand, Headboard, Rails. 3OXV 1HZ 0DWWUHVV 6HWVWLOOLQSODVWLF (253) 539-1600

Black Iron Canopy Bed Z  2 U W K R S H G L F 0DWWUHVV 6HW 1HZ 6WLOO LQ %R[ 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH  (253) 539-1600

5 Piece Pub Set  7DEOH   &KDLUV New in Box List   6HOO  253-537-3056 3 Piece Living Room Set New in plastic. /LIHWLPH :DUUDQW\ 2Q )UDPH  (253) 537-3056 Free Mattress Set with Cherry Wood Sleigh Bed Never Used. In 3ODVWLF    537-3056 All New Pillow Top Mattress Set! 4XHHQ 6L]H Z :DUUDQW\ 6WLOO LQ 2ULJLQDO3ODVWLF&DQ 'HOLYHU 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH      1600 Full or Twin Mattress Set 1HZ)DFWRU\6HDOHG 'HOLYHU\ $YDLODEOH  :LOO 7DNH (253) 539-1600

All New King 3LOORZ 7RS 0DWWUHVV %R[ 6HW   3LHFHV 1HZ  )DFWRU\ 6HDOHG Z:DUUDQW\  &DQ 'HOLYHU (253) 537 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3056 New Adjustable Bed :LWK0HPRU\)RDP Mattress. Wall Hugger ZLWK:DUUDQW\ :LOO6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FHIRU 253.539.1600 New Platform Bdrm Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, Nightstand, H e a d b o a r d , Footboard, Rails. 6WLOO %R[HG 5HWDLOV DW  :LOO 7DNH  New Overstuffed 0LFURĂ&#x20AC;EHU 6RID /RYHVHDW6WLOOLQSODVWLF &DQ KDYH IRU  (253) 539-1600 Absolutely New! 0HPRU\ )RDP 0DWWUHVV 6HW  &DQ Deliver. Worth  $VNLQJ  (253) 537-3056

View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Professional Management Services

VOLUNTEERS Citizenship Volunteers Looking for a rewarding experience? Help immigrants prepare to become citizens. You will help to provide instruction to legal permanent residents who need practice with the written and oral. Training will be offered the Ă&#x20AC;UVW ZHHN RI -DQXDU\ and classes will start LQ PLG-DQXDU\ 3OHDVH contact Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or kthomas@tacomacomPXQLW\KRXVHRUJ IRU more information.

Help a Child Improve Reading One-on-one support makes a huge difference in an elHPHQWDU\ VWXGHQW¡V DELOLW\ to overcome reading challenges. As a Read2Me TuWRU\RXFDQEHWKDWSHUVRQ who makes a difference. Read2Me, now a program ZLWK 7DFRPD &RPPXQLW\ House, is looking for committed tutors for grades 13. We will have sessions DW 0DQLWRX 3DUN 0DQQ McCarver, and Roosevelt (OHPHQWDU\ 6FKRROV  2ULentations will be held in 6HSWHPEHU  &DOO .DUHQ Thomas at 253.383.3951 for more information.

PETS Need safe farms or barns

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy

253-770-8552

IRULQGRRURXWGRRU semi-feral cats. 7KH\DUHĂ&#x20AC;[HG vaccinated and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 298-0913

Pet of the Week

ANTIQUES WANTED â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tonkaâ&#x20AC;?

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105

AUTOS 1996 Volvo 960  GU VHGDQ UXQV DQG GULYHV JUHDW /HDWKHU power sunroof, automatic transmission,  ZZZ GDQVTXDOLW\FDUVFRP :H Ă&#x20AC;QDQFH  3636

2004 Kia Optima

This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Featured Pet is an adorable 6 year old brown and white German Shepard Mix named Tonka. This happy-golucky pup came to us as a stray last month and is looking for his equally fun-loving forever family. Tonka is a dog who could FKDVHWHQQLVEDOOVIRUKRXUVLI\RX¡GOHWKLP3OD\LVWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWWKLQJ on this guyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mind, and of course making sure his new owner is having just as much fun as he is. When you get tired of playing, this pup is great at keeping himself entertained with toys. Tonkaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s manners are pretty good, but in need of some work. He responds very well to treats, so honing up on his doâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ts should be a breeze. This dog truly has a wonderful personality DQGZRXOGĂ&#x20AC;WLQSHUIHFWO\ZLWKDQDFWLYHIDPLO\ZLWKFKLOGUHQRYHU 10 years old. Make Tonka yours today. Reference #A481652.

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week 1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

1999 Dodge Ram 1500 Quad cab 4x4 Lifted, newer tires, Automatic transmission, /HDWKHU DQG PRUH  ZZZ GDQVTXDOLW\FDUVFRP 253-229-3636

1997 Mercury Sable Wagon

 GRRU VHGDQ A u t o m a t i c WUDQVPLVVLRQ UHFHQWO\ serviced, great fuel HFRQRP\  GRZQ ZH Ă&#x20AC;QDQFH ZZZGDQVTXDOLW\FDUV com 253-229-3636

A u t o m a t i c transmission, 3rd row seat, power windows, locks, runs and drives JUHDWZZZ GDQVTXDOLW\FDUVFRP 253-229-3636

1988 Honda Accord  GRRU VHGDQ A u t o m a t i c transmission, economical and dependable, 'RZQZZZ GDQVTXDOLW\FDUVFRP 253-229-3636

1995 Lexus LS400 Excellent condition, Leather, loaded, A u t o m a t i c WUDQVPLVVLRQ 3RZHU VXQURRI DQG PRUH 2QO\ZZZ GDQVTXDOLW\FDUVFRP 253-229-3636

Adopt a pet this holiday season! These cats are so ready for a warm home to cuddle up to. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget, we have Christmas kittens coming in next week!!!

Add a new addition to your family, and adopt one of current dogs this week. They are all looking for loving homes this holiday season.


Friday, December 13, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV Stephanie Lynch

Doug Arbogast

Let me help! Call today.

253.203.8985 www.stephanielynch.com Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award Recipient 2008-2012

REPRESENTING BOTH BUYERS AND SELLERS Proven Results Experienced Integrity High Service Standards HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St.

HOMES FOR SALE

North End Charmer! 3310 N. 30th

$399,000 A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with no +2$+LJK&HLOLQJVJDVÂżUHSODFHVVHSDUDWHO\PHWHUHG Call for private VKRZLQJWRGD\253.606.0689 BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME

1232 S Adams St. Super charming home w/ the ease of newer amenities... Box beam ceilings, KDUGZRRGĂ RRUV marble entry, picture/plate UDLOV SHULRGVW\OHOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHVDGGWRWKH ambience, while newer roof, furnace/heat pump, indoor/outdoor speakers, newer ZLULQJSOXPELQJ JDVĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHDGGWRWKH ahhhh factor. Spacious living room, large kitchen, HUGE dining room, a bedroom and FXWHUHPRGHOHGEDWKURRPJUDFHWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWĂ RRU Gigantic deck w/ seating- welcome home. Move in and make it yours. $219,950

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

Advertise Your Real Estate Listing in the Pierce County Community Classifieds CALL 253-922-5317

$375,000

Sound Views! Fabulous location close to Proctor, UPS, the waterfront and freeways. 4beds/1.5 EDWKVKDUGZRRGĂ RRUV and coved ceilings. One car garage + oversized two car garage with heated shop (a mechanic, wood worker, or artists dream!) Exceptional 9000 sq. ft. lot possible sub-divide (buyer to YHULI\ 1HZHUURRIZLQGRZVDQGIXUQDFH7HUULĂ&#x20AC;FKRPH 7HUULĂ&#x20AC;FORFDWLRQIDEXORXVRSSRUWXQLW\ Call Pam (253) 691-0461 for more details or a private showing! MLS# 482872 Better Properties North Proctor

5007 S Alaska St Cozy, warm & inviting are usually words one uses to describe a small cottage- not todaythis house has room for everyone. W/ 4 bedrooms, EDWKVRIĂ&#x20AC;FH MLS#518929 workshop, enclosed $159,950 covered patio, a media/den area, greatroom/kitchen, plus formal livingroom & diningroom- this house OLYHVHDVLO\ HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWO\$ODUJHIHQFHG\DUG tons of offstreet parking & an inviting master VXLWHDUHDZRZQĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHPDNHWKLVKRPH even more welcoming; add proximity to HYHU\WKLQJ DJUHDWĂ RRUSODQDKKK+RPH

ng

i

p

d en

Better Properties Shannon 253.691.1800

936 S Sheridan $229,000 Beautiful Victorian 4-plex in good location back on the market after remodel. Walking distance to hospitals, downtown, SDUNV 0DLQ Ă RRU XQLW KDV one bedroom plus attached bonus room, dining room, lg kitchen with nook, new carpet throughout, bay windows. Upstairs unit has 2 bedrooms, bath, lg living room, kitchen & balcony. Lower level has 2 studio apts & bath. Sep. utilities for main and upper units. 3,064 sq ft MLS# 523770

Better Properties Heather Redal 253.363.5920

Green Page Alternative Medicine G R A N D

253 446-6443

WE CARRY CAPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;N COSMIC BEAST BROWNIES!

O P E N I N G

FREE GRAM OF KEIF (w/minimum $10 donation) 1 0 A M - 8 P M DA I LY

7824 River Road, Ste E â&#x20AC;˘ Puyallup, WA 98371

T Town Alternative Medicine â&#x20AC;˘HIGHEST GRADE MEDICINEâ&#x20AC;˘ Collective Hours Mon-Sat 10:30-8 â&#x20AC;˘ Sun 10:30-7

4823 S. 66 St. â&#x20AC;˘ Tacoma

253-226-5973 To Advertise Call 253-922-5317

Now is the time to invest in Real Estate for your future!

Foreclosure & Investment Specialist

We are now experiencing a sellers market which brings more money when selling your home. Call me today if you are thinking about selling for your free market analysis and learn how I will sell your home for the most dollar to you!

HOMES FOR SALE

CALL 253.922.5317

(253) 307-4055

Low interest rates + affordable prices = great investment opportunities.

Dougarbogast.com douga@johnlscott.com

Over 20 Years Real Estate Experience

Call me todayâ&#x20AC;Ś I am happy to help you with your Real Estate needs.

4424 6th Ave Suite 1, Tacoma, WA 98406

Tired of renting? Jennifer Pacheco Monthly payments Mortgage Officer on a new home Loan NMLS #486264 could be less than 253-926-4131 your rent. Call me www.umpquabank.com/jpacheco jenniferpacheco@umpquabank.com for details! Loan products subject to credit approval

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

For qualifications contact Jen COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

1388 N Lenore St. Fantastic mid century modern centrally located near stores, schools, parks and easy commuting to freeways, yet house feels secluded and private due to professionally landscaped, lovely yard with zen paths and sustainable design. Fantastic kitchen, hardwood Ă RRUVPDVWHURQPDLQJUHDWSDWLRIRUHQWHUWDLQLQJ this is a wonderful home with lots of space. Move in ready and awaiting new owners. $282,000

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

33 N Salmon Beach MLS # 477936 Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton hydraulic boat /LIWEULFNZRRGEXUQLQJĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHZLWKLQVHUWH[SDQVLYH decking on all sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout the last 9 years, including roof, siding, VRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZVGRRUVGHFNLQJERDWKRLVWZDWHU system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more. $450,000

Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties

(253) 222-8480

Selling Your Commercial Building or Business? Call

Jean Bonter 253-312-2747 FOR LEASE

Point Defiance CafĂŠ and Casino. Fully operational with unique card room and gambling facility. Only licensed casino between Lakewood and Bremerton. Or as an alternative, this facility could be used as full service restaurant with banquet rooms. Many other possibilities including day care, private pre- school, dance studio, and the list goes on. All handicap accessible.

DEER RIDGE HOME, PUYALLUP

Beautiful home crafted by Steve Jensen and meticulously cared for. All the Jensen signature touches - soaring spaces, coffered ceilings, crown molding, wainscoting, 6â&#x20AC;? base trim, tile, granite, and expansive windows. Sited on an elevated lot that adjoins natural area to the rear. Listen to the birds and your private waterfall from your patio. Wonderful landscaping designed for beauty and easy care. Sensational island kitchen opens to stunning family room. Huge master suite with fireplace. MLS #479207

UNIQUE BOUTIQUE BISTRO

With Beer and Wine License. $20,000 Full Price.

GIG HARBOR ž ACRE BUILDING LOT

Beautifully wooded, water and power available. $79,000. Perfect setting for your custom home. Owner/agent

Evergreen Commercial Brokerage

3728 N Gove St, Tacoma Cute little bungalow in Proctor! Nice upgrades include a new family room, windows, roof, energy package & carpet 6 years ago. Detached garage was converted to extra living space. It has a separate electric panel, heat & lights - lots of possibilities... music studio, art studio, exercise / yoga room, etc. Parking for 3 cars off the alley next to garage. Charming back \DUGWRR+DUGZRRGĂ RRUVXQGHUFDUSHWH[FHSWLQ family room. MLS# 518902. $204,950

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

PROPERTY

PROPERTY

MT. RAINIER VIEW $125,000 Beautiful Level Buildable Site! Located off of Ray Nash Drive NW, this 1.25 Acres of natural setting and mature Evergreen trees is perfect to build your dream home and enjoy the Country Lifestyle! Peek-a-Boo View of Mt. Rainier. Just minutes away from sought after Schools, Uptown Gig Harbor Amenities, Restaurants, WA-Hwy 16, Hospitals, Boat launch/water activities, tennis courts & Kopachuck State Park! Electricity is available at corner.

Michelle Anguiano Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood

253.720.6525

OLD TOWN $499,950 Amazing development potential with this unique 2OG7RZQSURSHUW\&LW\KDVJLYHQĂ&#x20AC;QDOSODW approval for 4 lots on this prime 3 acre piece. Big views possible from all lots in this great neighborhood, tucked back & out of the way. Walk to the historic Old Town district with its coffee shops, wine bar & restaurants.; then stroll down to the waterfront & enjoy the gorgeous Puget Sound setting with walking paths, public docks, shoreline restaurants & more! MLS# 332653

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

www.jeanbonter.com

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract GIG HARBOR CHINESE RESTR., same owner 25 years. $100,000 w/terms. $50,000 Down Payment NORTH END GAS STATION/MINI MART High gross sales, excellent profit, positive cash flow, Price is $1,100,000 (Bus. & Prop.), possible terms LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? Restaurant/ Lounge Huge Price Reduction - For Sale For $510,000 (R.E. $485K) Bus. $25K. Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports baricand e grill. pr reduced

RURAL LIVING: ASHFORD, WA- Price for business, $105,000 with $25,000 down. Price for the real estate, $390,000 with $75,000 down. Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract includes a 3 B/R house, laundromat, restr./ lounge bldg. on 3.4 acre, commercial zoned parcel. price

GREEN PUP SPORTS BAR & GRILL reduced (famous for its pizza) $189,000, Terms av. HIGH GROSSING, VERY PROFITABLE COFFEE SHOP CAFE FOR SALE $95,000 High trafic Count location. price d reduce

VINOTIQUE WINE SHOP/BAR/DELI IN LAKEWOOD Business is for sale for $85,000. Cash/terms. â&#x20AC;&#x153;UNDISCLOSEDâ&#x20AC;? BEAUTY SALON In Puyallup, Great Location, $20,000 Cash.price

reduced

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;CALLAHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB & GRILL IN KEY CENTER Business is for sale for $300,000 with $100,000 down, High gross sales. Saler will also consider leasing the space COLLISION CENTER Same owner 15 yrs. Retiring, 6621 So. Tacoma Way. $130,000 with terms to qualified buyer - some training provided at o cost to buyer.

CALL RICHARD PICTON or ED PUNCHAK 253-581-6463 253-224-7109


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, December 13, 2013

Carrot Top

Natalie Cole

John Kay & Steppenwolf

December 14, 8pm

December 20, 8:30pm

December 31, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $25, $40, $60, $65

I-5 Showroom $40, $60, $85, $90

No Cover Charge; Bracelet Required

ESPN2 Friday Night Fights:

Battle at the Boat 94

I-5 Showroom

Smokey Robinson Brian McKnight

January 10, 6pm

January 18, 8pm

February 14, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $35, $75, $150

I-5 Showroom $50, $70, $95, $100

I-5 Showroom $40, $55, $85, $90

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


Twa 12 13 13 p01