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FREE s Friday, October 19, 2012

Elections 2012:

‘What’s your opinion?’ HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL A6

WHO IS ON YOUR LIST?

SEE PAGE

A4

HALLOWEEN ACTIVITIES B1

CAST YOUR VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE CANDIDATE FOR THE 2012 ELECTION AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM/BALLOT

TACOMAWEEKLY 24 YE A R S O F SE R V I C E BE C A U S E CO M M U N I T Y MAT T E R S

Tiger gets the royal treatment with arrival By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

T

acoma got a new resident last week and the arrival brought out the paparazzi. After a threehour flight from Tulsa on a private jet that was donated by an animal lover in Oklahoma, 6-week-old Malayan tiger cub Berani found his new home and friend, 7-week-old Sumatran cub Dumai, at Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium. Both tigers are extremely rare and their sub-species are endangered. It is unusual to rear different sub-species together. But it seemed the best option in hopes of saving the tigers from extinction.

“It is absolutely important to save each and every one of these animals,” said Dr. Karen Goodrowe Beck, general curator at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium. Berani means “brave” in Malay. The name was given to the tiger by the Tulsa Zoo staff. Dumai was named by PDZA staff after a Sumatran city when members of the public voted on six options. Minutes after Berani landed at the Narrows Airport on Oct. 10, he met Dumai for the first time in an enclosure as photographers and video camera operators captured the moment from behind glass. A television crew from Tulsa flew with the furry feline to document

X See TIGERS / page A3

SNUGGLE PARTY.

Malayan Malayan tiger tiger cub Berani found found his his new new home home and and friend, friend, 7-week-old 7-week-old Sumatran cub cub Dumai, Dumai, at Point Point Defiance Defiance Zoo Zoo and and Aquarium last last week.

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

WHAT’S RIGHT WITH TACOMA

TACOMA BUDGET CUTS EYED BY SURROUNDING MUNICIPALITIES By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO BY RUSS CARMACK, COURTESY OF METRO PARKS

CHIP IN! Green Tacoma Day offers chances for people of all ages to chip in, yank out and plant to restore open space in their public lands.

GREEN TACOMA DAY Making the city beautiful one

uprooted blackberry bush at a time

By Kathleen Merryman If you think Green Tacoma Day is all about community, conservation and beauty, you’re selling it short. Saturday, Oct. 20, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Green Tacoma Partnership’s marquee event offers a chance to unleash naked aggression then go home tired but happy. Or you could write nature poems – organizers have the good grace to roll their eyes when they admit to calling them “poetree” – at Point Defiance Park. Families can opt for kid-friendly activities there and at Wapato Hills, Swan Creek and Julia’s Gulch. There will be games and demonstrations, even some tree climbing, and not so many sticky brambles, sharp tools and dangerous drops. Still Jennifer Chang prefers the ground war. Forterra’s South Sound Green Cities Project Coordinator, it turns out, has vegetative murder in her heart. “My favorite is grubbing out the giant blackberry root wad,” she said. “It’s like a little battle and I won. I feel so triumphant afterward.” Pulling ivy, uprooting Scotch broom, decimating invasive clematis, and, above all, assassinating blackberries, soothe Chang’s sense of green justice. She’s got company. Last year, 3,150 volunteers put in close to 29,000 hours of good work at Tacoma Green partnership events. They yanked and hauled 21 acres of open green space into conservation, which brought the total up to 50 acres. Since 2009 they have done what the city of Tacoma and Metro Parks Tacoma cannot afford to

X See GREEN / page A8 Debate rumble A5

SIGHTS ON OLYMPIA: Interviews with candidates in 27th Legislative District. PAGE A6-7

DRESS FOR A MESS ON GREEN TACOMA DAY ON OCT. 20.

For work parties, bring gloves and tools to fit the project. Wear sturdy clothes and footwear and bring water. Plan to work from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. All events are for all ages. FOR MORE INFORMATION, AND TO SIGN UP FOR A WORK PARTY, GO TO

HTTP://CEDAR.GREENCITYPARTNERSHIPS.ORG/GTP/EVENT/MAP. ‹Point Defiance Park – Familyoriented educational activities including tree climbing, tree-themed art projects with Tacoma Art Museum and Ask an Arborist. A 10:30 a.m. ceremony will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the gift of cherry trees to Washington, D.C. The Japanese Consulate will mark it with a gift of cherry trees for the Japanese Gardens. Contact Jennifer Chang at jchang@forterra.org. ‹ Wapato Hills – Hub site for family-oriented education and restoration activities with REI. Planting 400 native trees and shrubs. REI will have “Get Dirty” T-shirts for the first 100 people who sign up to volunteer. Meet near South Wapato and 62nd

Soccer crusade A9

City Briefs ................A2 Pothole Pig ...............A3

streets. Contact Jennifer Chang at jchang@forterra.org. ‹ Julia’s Gulch – Hub site for family-oriented activities with the City of Tacoma EnviroChallengers. Habitat restoration. Park at View Point Park. Contact Heather Halabisky at halabcoles@nventure.com. ‹ Swan Creek – Hub site for family-oriented education and restoration activities from Tacoma Nature Center. Meet at the Gathering Place by East 42nd Street and East Roosevelt Avenue in Salishan. Contact Jennifer Chang at jchang@forterra.org.

X See EVENTS / page A8

As details of Tacoma’s budget cuts to cover a $63 million shortfall face debates within city hall, those discussions are echoing around Pierce County, as the suburban areas worry about the trickle-down they will face as their own budgets tighten. And their solutions might revolutionize how police officers answer calls. Much of the concern focuses on the effects the surrounding cities will face if the proposed cuts to police services come to pass. The Tacoma Police Department is set to cut 29 positions, 13 patrol officers and 16 positions that were funded but are currently vacant. The cuts would save roughly $7 million and translate to “minimum patrol staffing levels” around Tacoma. Suburban police departments fear that level of service will mean higher crime rates that will bleed into their cities. Tacoma’s police cuts would mean roughly 52,000 fewer patrol hours. “That is a lot of hours of cops on the road to lose,” said Fife Police Chief Brad Blackburn, who runs a 31-officer-and-staff department. “Everyone will get together to get the job done, but it will be tougher with fewer people.” Rosters will be especially tight during festivals or protests, which require more officers than normal staffing, he said. But the rise in crime in Tacoma that is expected with the police cuts will also mean higher crime rates in surrounding communities, since crime knows no boundaries. “It’s already happening,” Blackburn said. Gang members and other organized criminals commonly commit crimes in Tacoma and flee to Fife because of its quick access to Interstate 5, the Port of Tacoma and Highway 18. A recent case of child prostitution illustrates that point. Eugene Andre Young, 28, and Claude Anthony Hutchinson, 25, have been charged second-degree rape and promoting commercial sexual abuse against a minor after they were arrested after Lakewood police and FBI agents linked them to a Backpage.com advertisement showing a 16-year-old girl being offered for sex. The girl told officers that she met the men after she agreed to cash a check for them, only to find herself in a Fife motel. The men reportedly then forced her to wear lingerie and pose for photographs that were used for her escort ad. The girl told officers that she had sex with as many as 30 men and made some $2,000, all of which allegedly went to the two defendants. The police departments around Pierce County operate under mutual support agreements, which means any officer will answer emergency calls regardless of the jurisdiction if a local officer is not available. Those agreements are getting worked more often as departments cut staff to make their budgets balance.

Cross country meet A10 Sports ......................A9 A&E ....................... ..B1

X See BUDGET / page A3 Canadian duo B3

Make A Scene ........ B7 Calendar ................. B8

Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

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Two Sections | 24 Pages


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Police Blotter CRAZY EX-BOYFRIEND

! 4ACOMA MAN WAS ARRESTED ON /CT  FOLlowing an incident involving his ex-girlfriend and another man. It began on McKinley Avenue when the suspect began following the pair and motioned for them to pull over. The woman and her new boyfriend continued driving. The suspect allegedly struck their car with his vehicle and fired rounds from a handgun as they drove ON %AST @, 3TREET (E SPED OFF 0OLICE LOCATED the man at his home in the 500 block of Wright Avenue. They used a public address system to CONVINCE HIM TO COME OUT AND SURRENDER (E WAS booked on suspicion of vehicular assault and first-degree domestic violence assault.

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A police officer was dragged a short distance DURING A TRAFFIC STOP ON /CT  4HE INCIDENT OCCURRED IN THE  BLOCK OF %AST @& 3TREET The officer, Bret Terwilliger, stopped a vehicle associated with a domestic violence warrant. The driver refused to obey commands and had WHAT APPEARED TO BE DRUGS (E GRABBED 4ERWILliger and drove away, holding the officer against the vehicle. Terwilliger fired several rounds. The driver released his hold on Terwilliger and drove away. Terwilliger was not seriously injured. /N /CT  SHERIFFS DEPUTIES PULLED OVER A vehicle driving without headlights in the 5300 BLOCK OF %AST @) 3TREET ! PASSENGER GAVE A false name to the deputies, but they recognized him as the suspect from a flyer distributed to LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES (E WAS ARRESTED AND booked on suspicion of first-degree assault.

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Tacoma resident Jimmy Arevalo died after A SHOOTING ON /CT  4HE INCIDENT HAPPENED AT A HOME IN THE  BLOCK OF 3OUTH TH 3TREET Residents were throwing a party when a suspect arrived who the people in the home did not know. An argument ensued between the suspect and a man at the party. The stranger pulled a HANDGUN AND FIRED SEVERAL SHOTS INTO !REVALO (E WAS TAKEN TO 4ACOMA 'ENERAL (OSPITAL WHERE HE was pronounced dead. 4HE FOLLOWING DAY 3TEVEN 0AWLAK WAS ARRESTED AT 3EA4AC )NTERNATIONAL !IRPORT ! ONE WAY airline ticket to Chicago had been purchased in HIS NAME (E HAS BEEN CHARGED WITH FIRST DEGREE murder. According to information from Pierce CounTY 0ROSECUTORS /FFICE 0AWLAK HAD BEEN DRINKING and pulled a gun at the party. It accidentally discharged. Arevalo told him to put the gun down. Instead, Pawlak fired several shots at Arevalo. Investigators found 10 spent shell casings at the scene. According to a witness who rode to the party with Pawlak, he showed her the loaded clip of the gun and said he might “kill someone tonight.�

City Briefs VOICE YOUR THOUGHTS ABOUT CITY BUDGET

Tacoma City Manager T.C. Broadnax has presented staff recommendations for the 2013-14 proposed biennial budget. As part of the budget development process, the city will hold a second round of community budget input meetings through Nov. 5. An integral part of the city’s current budget development strategy, these community budget input meetings are designed to engage residents and community stakeholders, and give them an opportunity to learn more about the service and program changes for the next biennium. Upcoming community budget input meetings s /CT    PM -AIN ,IBRARY /LYMpic Room), 1102 Tacoma Ave. s .OV    PM ,INCOLN (IGH 3CHOOL

 3 TH 3T s .OV    PM #ENTER AT .ORPOINT

 .ASSAU !VE .% These are public meetings so anyone is welcome to attend. The meeting will include a video presentation followed by an overview of the proposed 2013-14 budget given by Broadnax. This will be followed by an opportunity for people to speak – you can sign up to speak in advance of the meeting. More information about the City of Tacoma’s 2013-14 proposed biennial budget is available at www.cityoftacoma.org.

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The rains are finally arriving, which is both good news and challenging news for 7ASHINGTON 3TATE $EPARTMENT OF 4RANSPORTATION 73$/4 4HE GOOD NEWS IS THAT THERE will hopefully be fewer fires throughout the region. The challenging news is that 73$/4S WEATHER DEPENDENT WORK MUST now be scheduled around the forecasts. Wetter weather also means crews will refocus attention on water treatment and erosion control activities at construction sites. For example, at the eastbound Nalley Valley site crews installed erosion-protecting covers on various hillsides. Please note that with the return of rain, the construction schedule may deviate from what is listed below. /N /CT  CREWS WILL CLOSE ALL EASTBOUND 3TATE 2OUTE  LANES AT  PM 4HEY WILL CLOSE THE 3OUTH 5NION !VENUE ON RAMP TO EASTBOUND 32  A FEW HOURS EARLIER "OTH the ramp and lanes will reopen the following Tuesday by 4 a.m. /N THE NIGHTS OF /CT   CREWS ARE scheduled to close the southbound Interstate  RAMP TO 3OUTH TH 3TREET 4HAT CLOSURE

will begin at 11 p.m. each night and end by 5:30 a.m. each following morning. Motorists WILL BE DETOURED VIA THE 3OUTH TH 3TREET interchange during the closure. The same closure is scheduled to occur again for the SAME HOURS ON /CT  

*0;@765+,9:)0>,,23@ TRASH COLLECTION

Tacomans may find themselves shifted to an every-other-week garbage collection schedule in the coming months. 4ACOMA #ITY #OUNCILS %NVIRONMENT AND Public Works Committee is pondering the idea after city staff proposed it as a way to save money after the added $3.5 million expense of shuttling out larger trash bins and INFORMING CUSTOMERS OF THE SHIFT 3AVINGS could be up to $1.3 million a year, however, through lower staff costs and increased recycling.

GAY MARRIAGE, BUSES .,;*6<5*03:<7769;

Tacoma City Council expressed its support for gay marriage and a transportation tax in two resolutions approved last week. The council voted in favor of Referendum Measure 74, which would recognize same-sex marriages in Washington while preserving domestic partnerships only for seniors while also allowing religious leaders the right to refuse to perform, recognize or accommodate any marriage ceremony between same-sex couples. Mayor MariLYN 3TRICKLAND AND #OUNCILMEMBERS -ARTY #AMPBELL *AKE &EY ,AUREN 7ALKER $AVID Boe, Anders Ibsen and Ryan Mello voted in FAVOR OF THE RESOLUTION /NLY $EPUTY -AYOR *OE ,ONERGAN OPPOSED THE RESOLUTION #OUNcilmember Victoria Woodards was absent. The council unanimously voted to support Proposition 1, which would add a 10th of a percent onto the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sales tax to support Pierce Transit services. Campbell and Woodards, however, were absent for the vote.

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%XITCOM REPORTS THAT 0OLAR 0LAZA will be returning again this holiday season, and it is going to be bigger and better than ever. For six weeks Tollefson Plaza will once again be transformed into the winter wonderland called Polar Plaza, and this year it is going to be 20 percent bigger. &RANCISCAN (EALTH 3YSTEM AND 4ACOMA Art Museum are once again sponsoring the open-air ice rink. Along with bigger and better fun on THE ICE THIS YEAR THE 0OLAR 0LAZA %XPRESS will add a short â&#x20AC;&#x153;trainâ&#x20AC;? ride to the fesTIVE FUN $EC  THROUGH  AND  &OR $2 each way, your inner child can hop onboard the express for the ride from 7ASHINGTON 3TATE (ISTORY -USEUM TO Tacoma Art Museum. The plaza will include hot drinks to warm up with, and 25Trees will once again be selling Christmas trees in the PLAZA 3PECIAL THEMED NIGHTS WILL RETURN again this year too. And if you are feeling the holiday spirit already, now is the time to sign up to volunteer or as a sponsor to help the event sponsors make Polar Plaza A MAGICAL PLACE FOR THE   SKATERS they hope to welcome this year. More information, hours and pricing details at www.PolarPlaza.com.

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#2 BEST OF TACOMA 2012 RESULTS #3 OUR VIEWS

VOTE YES ON PROPOSITION 1

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&ORMER STATE LEGISLATOR 2 ,ORRAINE 7OJAHN DIED /CT  3HE WAS  Wojahn served 32 years as a lawmaker in /LYMPIA BETWEEN HER TIME IN THE (OUSE AND THEN THE 3ENATE STARTING IN  (ER ARDENT SUPPORT OF 4ACOMA LED TO HER nickname around the Capitol, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Norse Goddess of Terror,â&#x20AC;? particularly when it came to social issues and government projects in THE #ITY OF $ESTINY NAMELY THE 7ASHINGTON 3TATE (ISTORY -USEUM AND THE 5NIVERSITY OF Washington-Tacoma campus. Wojahn is survived by her husband GilBERT 3R AND SON -ARK 'ILBERT *R PRECEDED her in death.

#4 WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RIGHT WITH TACOMA PROJECT HOMELESS CONNECT GROWS TO MEET THE NEEDS

#5 FEW ARE WHISTLING WHILE THEY WORK THESE DAYS TACOMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PROPOSED BUDGET CUTS 217 WORKERS NEXT YEAR TO THE ROSTER OF 109 LAYOFFS ALREADY APPROVED

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 â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;ŠCcAaRr By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Howard â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dutchâ&#x20AC;? Darrin was a flamboyant Hollywood designer. And he had a vision. He had sold a few of his custom cars to celebrities of the silver screen, namely Clark Gable and his crowd. From that success, he proposed marketing his custom convertible as a glamour leader for the Packard brand. The Packard 180 made its debut in 1941 in New York and was to be a replacement for the legendary Packard Twelve. The Packard 180 had a modern, deco design with headlights integrated into the fenders, which was an innovation for the time. The interior was equally as modern, with a dash fascia molded almost entirely in a revolutionary new material called plastic. Near the close of the 1930s, Darrin created a series of special-bodied convertible Victorias atop the Packard chassis. They were distinguished by their â&#x20AC;&#x153;veeâ&#x20AC;? windshields, long hoods and the famous â&#x20AC;&#x153;Darrin dipâ&#x20AC;? in the beltline near the rear of the doors. The demand for these cars quickly rose and in response, Darrin set up production

WBudget And it is the use of those agreements that is feeding the debate of changing the fundamental way police services are handled into more of a metropolitan system, where several cities are served by a pooled roster of officers. The system is common on the East Coast, where handfuls of villages and cities have shared officers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That makes sense to me. We have been kicking

WTigers

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

in Connersville, Ind. They carried a price tag of a whopping $4,595, which was more than the average income of workers at the time, clearly making it a luxury car. All of the 50 example cars produced were sold, with 15 being assembled in 1942, before World War II ended production. The factory would not restart. The company sold its tooling to the Russians. But the car would not die. A Packard was used in the filming of

From page A1

that around,â&#x20AC;? Milton Police Chief Bill Rhoads said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But it is hard for the councils and the mayors to give up that local control, not to mention the chief who would be out of work, but if it continues, we will have to start looking at that.â&#x20AC;? Informal talks are already underway, he said, as several smaller departments look to pool their resources as their budgets shrink.

From page A1

the adventure. Both tigers were less than impressed with each other and seemed to prefer being petted by their zoo handlers than play with each other. Belly rubs largely won out over playful fighting between the house cat-sized felines. Had the 12-pound tigers not liked each other, they would have hissed and pounced on each other. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But none of that happened,â&#x20AC;? Goodrowe Beck said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are getting along really well.â&#x20AC;? Both will stay at PDZA for two to three years before they find their way to breeding programs in hopes to save the species from extinction. They will

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be about 300 pounds by then. Species Survival Plan coordinators and zoological and veterinary staff at both zoos opted to put the two male cubs together for hand-rearing, so they could become socialized with and learn tiger behaviors from one another. Each of them was the only cub in a litter, and zoo officials separated them from their mothers when it was clear that intervention was necessary for the health of the cubs. As few as 300 Sumatran tigers remain in their native habitat on the Indonesian island. There are 74 Sumatran tigers in Association of Zoos & Aquariums accred-

the 1970s television detective series â&#x20AC;&#x153;Banacek.â&#x20AC;? The Darrin-bodied Packard Model 180s rode on a 127-inch wheelbase and were powered by a 356 cubicinch straight-eight engine offering 165 horsepower. They had a three-speed transmission with overdrive. The bodies were modified by coachbuilder Hess & Eisenhart in Cincinnati. The LeMay collection car is one of only three built by Rollston, Inc.

Milton, which has a department of 12 officers, might have to get smaller next year to make the budget balance. It would be the fourth year in a row the department has cut back. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our preliminary numbers donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look good, but I am trying to avoid that,â&#x20AC;? Rhoads said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tough. If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the money, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hire the bodies.â&#x20AC;? Anyone familiar with metro police models should not hold out hopes, however. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nowhere in sight,

and no one is really talking about it,â&#x20AC;? Pierce County Sheriff â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department spokesman Ed Troyer said, noting however cities already contract for specific services from each other as well as from the sheriff already. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Consolidation of services makes sense. We do a ton of contracting.â&#x20AC;? Smaller municipal departments, for example, contract with Pierce County when they need a SWAT team or have to conduct a major crime investigation.

ited zoos in North America; a total of 375 are in five regionally managed programs around the world as part of the Global Species Management Plan. Fewer than 500 are believed to live in the wild. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it speaks very

highly of our expertise,â&#x20AC;? Goodrowe Beck said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There has been a lot of trust put into us.â&#x20AC;? To learn more about the tigers, the Tiger Conservation Campaign and what people can do to help them, go to www.pdza.org. Advertisement

45th and Winnifred Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;pothole initiative,â&#x20AC;? and in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and is continuing those efforts well in to 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or return â&#x20AC;&#x201C; each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Voteâ&#x20AC;? Greg Hartman State Representative, 2nd LD, Position #1 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Democratâ&#x20AC;?

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Elections 2012: Âş>OH[ÂťZ`V\YVWPUPVU&Âť

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acoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kathleen Merryman took to the streets this week asking people their thoughts on this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s elections. Here is what she found out.

Nan Bohanan, 77, Tacoma

Q) Where do you get your political news? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;TV and newspaper primarily.â&#x20AC;? Q) What seals your deal? Ads, debates, candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; records, long-held political viewsâ&#x20AC;Ś? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some or all, probably records more than anything. I have paid very close attention to the debates, and for once they were worthwhile.â&#x20AC;? Q) Do you talk about politics with people who disagree with you? How does it go? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unfortunately I do talk politics with people if they agree or disagree. If they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not so good. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m from Kentucky and have a lot of relatives who live back there. You can only keep your mouth closed so long. We have had some heated debates.â&#x20AC;? Q) On a scale of 1 to 10, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your level of ad nausea? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am sick of the ads. I feel they are not accomplishing anything with them. They are not giving information.â&#x20AC;? Q) Do you judge people by their yard signs? Bumper stickers? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;No. I just look at them as garbage on the street. When I rule the world there wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be any.â&#x20AC;? Q) Want to tell us more? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;In this particular race, I could be listed as undecided.â&#x20AC;?

Julie Kappelman, 20, Tacoma, student at UPS Q) Where do you get your political news? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I normally go to the New York Times online.â&#x20AC;? Q) What seals your deal? Ads, debate, candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; records, long-held political views? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The candidateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s record. Ads can be pretty misleading, and so can debates, which are a one-time thing. A record says more than a thing at a given point in history.â&#x20AC;? Q) Do you talk about politics with people who disagree with you? How does it go? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t talk politics too often with too many people. I was raised in Alabama so I have had some interesting conversations with friends and people from the West Coast with very different political views. Sometimes there is a point where the conversation stops.â&#x20AC;? Q) On a scale of 1 to 10, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your level of ad nausea? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a television, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d still say an 8 or a 9. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t appeal to me at all.â&#x20AC;? Q) Do you judge people by their yard signs? Bumper stickers? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would say no.â&#x20AC;?

Athena Nation, 41, Tacoma, student at Evergreen College Q) Where do you get your political news? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mostly I get a lot from AP and Reuters, maybe a little of Huffington Post. I like â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Colbert Reportâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and Bill Mahar.â&#x20AC;? Q) What seals your deal? Ads, debate, candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; records, long-held political views?

A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I vote for the people who built our country. A candidate of substance. A worker among workers.â&#x20AC;?

whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your level of ad nausea? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t watch ads. I record shows and scroll right through them.â&#x20AC;?

Peter Pentescu, 27, Auburn, student at University of Washington-Tacoma

Q) Do you talk about politics with people who disagree with you? How does it go? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Absolutely. They teach me about my level of tolerance and my level of political literacy. I refuse to argue, but I tend to be passionate.â&#x20AC;?

Q) Do you judge people by their yard signs? Bumper stickers? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;No. Everybody has their own views. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want anyone judging me.â&#x20AC;?

Q) Where do you get your political news? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mostly online. A mix of CNN, AP, Reuters, Publicola and the Seattle Times.â&#x20AC;?

Q) On a scale of 1 to 10, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your level of ad nausea? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aagh. Yeah, 15, or 10 to the 25th power.â&#x20AC;? Q) Do you judge people by their yard signs? Bumper stickers? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hate to admit it, but on occasion, yes, I am quick to judgeâ&#x20AC;Ś When you start putting up political signs, it lets me know where you stand. It always lingers.â&#x20AC;? Q) Want to tell us more? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I walk around with my 7-year-old son, he asks questions, about why the elephant and what that color means. I try to be very objective, so he can form his own opinions. My father did that for me, and I am doing it for my son.â&#x20AC;?

Cheryl Clark, 51, Tacoma Q) Where do you get your political news? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Newspapers, TV, friends and my ex-pastor. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a man of God. He moved to Portland.â&#x20AC;? Q) What seals your deal? Ads, debate, candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; records, long-held political views? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Their beliefs. Their Christian values.â&#x20AC;? Q) Do you talk about politics with people who disagree with you? How does it go? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;No. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annoying.â&#x20AC;? Q) On a scale of 1 to 10,

Zak Mohammed, 18, Kent Q) Where do you get your political news? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;From my Yahoo, online, mostly, and CNN.â&#x20AC;? Q) What seals your deal? Ads, debate, candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; records, long-held political views? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Friends and family.â&#x20AC;? Q) Do you talk about politics with people who disagree with you? How does it go? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I talk about it. I try to be civil.â&#x20AC;? Q) On a scale of 1 to 10, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your level of ad nausea? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pay attention to them.â&#x20AC;? Q) Do you judge people by their yard signs? Bumper stickers? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;No.â&#x20AC;?

Q) What seals your deal? Ads, debate, candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; records, long-held political views? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do a little bit of volunteer work with Bob Fergusonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign.â&#x20AC;? Q) Do you talk about politics with people who disagree with you? How does it go? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yes, with people who agree and disagree. Even when people disagree, they are usually civil face to face.â&#x20AC;? Q) On a scale of 1 to 10, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your level of ad nausea? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The e-mails have got to stop. You sign up to work for one campaign, and they will never stop asking you for money.â&#x20AC;? Q) Do you judge people by their yard signs? Bumper stickers? A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I try not to judge people by who they are voting for.â&#x20AC;? Find these responses and more at tacomaweekly.com.

WHO IS ON YOUR LIST? CAST YOUR VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE CANDIDATE FOR THE 2012 ELECTION AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM/BALLOT

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Our View

Same-sex marriage rights are long overdue

Guest Editorials

Christian clergy support marriage equality ballot measure By Tacoma Christian clergy In just a few days, voting will begin in Washington. As Christian clergy in the Tacoma area, we feel compelled to weigh in on one of the more crucial issues voters will face. Referendum 74 offers this state the historic opportunity to extend the freedom to marry to all committed couples. We offer our wholehearted support for Referendum 74 and join with people of faith throughout the state in working and praying for its adoption. First, we want to be clear about what Referendum 74 does and does not do. It does not compel clergy or faith communities who oppose same-sex marriages to perform such ceremonies. It does grant clergy who feel called to officiate marriages for all committed couples the religious freedom to do so. As clergy who understand it to be our pastoral and prophetic calling to celebrate same-sex marriages, we say to our colleagues who oppose Referendum 74: please do not impose your religious views on all of Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clergy. We respect your freedom to choose whose weddings you will officiate. Respect our freedom to do the same. For us, this issue is indeed a matter of faith. As Christian clergy, we strive to be followers of Jesus, who said â&#x20AC;&#x153;You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind... You shall love your neighbor as yourself. On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.â&#x20AC;? (Matthew 22:37-40) Love is at the core of Jesusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ministry as it is recorded in our Gospels. In our ministries

throughout Tacoma, we see evidence of Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love at work in a multitude of ways, including in the supportive and committed partnerships of both samesex and heterosexual couples. We celebrate the blessings that these partnerships bring to our congregations, our families and our community. In order to follow Jesusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; commandment to love our neighbors, we must speak up in support of our lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender brothers and sisters. Marriage is an important part of the life of our congregations, and we believe it is a sacred and holy act. Marriage also plays an important role in secular society, offering legal recognition and protection for couples. For too long, same-sex couples have been denied these protections. Extending civil recognition for marriage to same-sex couples, as Referendum 74 does, will end this discrimination. We offer our support for Referendum 74 not only on behalf of committed couples who wish to marry, but also on behalf of the children of our state who will grow up wondering if they, too, have been created in Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s image. We have been haunted by the stories of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender children and teens who have been bullied, harassed and marginalized to the point of severe depression and, too often, suicide. We grieve for the wounds that have been inflicted on too many of Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s children â&#x20AC;&#x201C; some of whom we have ministered to in our congregations. We raise our voices in support of Referendum 74 to show these children that we value and affirm them and the relationships they will one day have.

Rev. Jan Bolerjack, Riverton Park United Methodist Church Kelvin Brown, certified lay minister, The Bridge, a ministry of United Methodist Church Michael Collier, certified lay minister, The Bridge, a ministry of United Methodist Church Rev. Molly Fraser, Light of the Hill United Methodist Church Rev. Gordon Hutchins, The Bridge, a ministry of United Methodist Church Pastor Emily McNeill, Parkland United Methodist Church and First United Methodist Church of Tacoma Rev. Sharon Moe, district superintendent, Tacoma District of United Methodist Church Rev. Elizabeth Ingram Schindler, United Methodist Church Rev. Michael Seui, Kalaveria United Methodist Church Rev. Jim Simpson, Bethany United Methodist Church Rev. Monty Smith, Epworth LaSourd United Methodist Church Rev. Bonnie Chandler-Warren, Mason United Methodist Church Pastor Jen Walters, United Church in University Place Rev. Melvin Woodworth, First United Methodist Church of Tacoma Rev. Sarah W. Wiles, Bethany Presbyterian Church Rev. David Brown, Immanuel Presbyterian Church

In some respects, Washington residents could make political history by being the first state in the nation to legalize same-sex marriages through a ballot measure rather than through legislative action. On one side, it would be great to have the distinction of being the first in the country to acknowledge that rights for gay couples have been denied them for so long and that voters rectified that by approving Referendum 74. But it is also a sad day that such rights have been denied for generations. Referendum 74 would not just allow samesex couples to marry; it would preserve domestic partnerships for seniors, and preserve the right of clergy or religious organizations to refuse to perform, recognize or accommodate any marriage ceremony that is not within their beliefs. It is that simple. Referendum 74 recognizes that same-sex couples have the right to marry each other in a full and legally binding sense, in the same way that opposite-sex couples have enjoyed since time began. The ballot summary states the following: â&#x20AC;&#x153;This bill allows same-sex couples to marry, applies marriage laws without regard to gender, and specifies that laws using gender-specific terms like husband and wife include same-sex spouses. After 2014, existing domestic partnerships are converted to marriages, except for seniors. It preserves the right of clergy or religious organizations to refuse to perform or recognize any marriage or accommodate wedding ceremonies. The bill does not affect licensing of religious organizations providing adoption, foster-care, or child-placement.â&#x20AC;? The right of marriage between two consenting adults under the referendum is not a gay rights issue; it is a civil rights issue. It is a matter of humanity. The persecution of adults for wanting to be bound together in matrimony was, not too long ago, in full swing against interracial couples in much the same way as Bible-quoting, â&#x20AC;&#x153;sanctity of marriageâ&#x20AC;? opponents cry out against same-sex couples. But the ship of that argument sailed long ago. Washington is a no-fault state, where marriages are allowed to dissolve without reason or cause. A spouse can simply opt out. Allowing same-sex couples to marry adds to the pool of potentially successful marriages to model for future generations. No reliable evidence suggests that same-sex marriages are less stable than heterosexual ones. It seems illogical to say that legalizing same-sex marriages â&#x20AC;&#x201C; so that a gay man could be at the bedside of his dying spouse, or that a lesbian could receive retirement benefits under her wifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s estate â&#x20AC;&#x201C; would lead to Washington becoming a West Coast version of the Biblical city of Gomorrah. Same-sex marriages recognize the fact that consenting adults love who they love and should not be hampered in expressing that love with a legal contract binding them together with the public commitment, legal benefits and responsibilities that come with that proclamation. There is a definite religious element to marriage for most people. Making an oath to a higher power to love, honor and cherish a spouse elevates the commitment to each other into a heavenly bond, for these believers. That notion is to be commended. However, that oath to heaven is not the same for everyone, if it is there at all. Those differences do not invalidate their marriage. Ultimately, their oath is to each other. Religious arguments against same-sex marriage further seems hypocritical since it only recognizes certain interpretations of religious texts and discounts dissenting takes on the same scriptures. It also does not take into account the fact that laws are meant to be religiously neutral. Outside of religious arguments against same-sex marriage, where all laws should reside anyway, the referendum should be passed by Washington voters.

Friar Andre Cuesta, His Loving Word Bishop David Strong, Christian United Church

Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC

Tacoma needs to grow up and adopt a new form of government

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By John Ladenburg, Sr.

7\ISPZOLY!John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com 5L^Z+LZR!news@tacomaweekly.com 4HUHNPUN,KP[VY! Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com :[HMM>YP[LYZ!John Larson / jlarson@tacomaweekly.com Kate Burrows / kburrows@tacomaweekly.com Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Kathleen Merryman / kathleen@tacomaweekly.com Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com :WVY[Z,KP[VY!Jeremy Helling/ jhelling@tacomaweekly.com 7HNPUH[PVU!Tim Meikle / tim@tacomaweekly.com; Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Tammy Vince Cruz >LI+L]LSVWLYZ! Cedric Leggin, Ed Curran 7OV[VNYHWOLY! Rocky Ross *VU[YPI\[PUN>YP[LYZ! Karen Westeen, Steve Mullen, David B. Hardt, Dave Davison (K]LY[PZPUN!Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Nicole Boote / nicole@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma needs to grow up. Now, we are all aware of the financial crisis that Tacoma finds itself in. A $63 million deficit! How did we get ourselves into this mess? Truth is that we got into this mess because of the poor judgment of one man and because our system of government is flawed. Yes, we can blame the prior city manager for producing unsustainable budgets. As far back as 2008, when I was county executive, I was questioning how Tacoma could be avoiding the recession. Answer is that they were not. The city manager was producing and selling budgets to Tacoma City Council based on borrowing, changing due dates, raiding other funds and frankly, smoke and mirrors. Eventually, when the council found out, he was sent packing, but the damage was done. Why didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the council know sooner? Shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t we blame the elected council for not knowing? The answer is no. In Tacoma, we have a council-manager form of government, but we have a very ineffective and poorly structured one. The council was created as part-time positions, so they have very little time to analyze a budget as large as Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

Believe it or not, the individual council members do not even have staff. The mayor is full time and has but one staff. How can we expect a part-time council without staff to challenge the word of the manager and his staff? The answer is not in firing the mayor and council. If we want to hold them accountable, we need to give them the ability to do the job. We will continue to see these problems if we insist on having a government structure not suited to the size of our city. We need to change our charter and move Tacoma into the ranks of substantial cities with a full time elected mayor and a full time elected council. We need to eliminate the city manager and his staff and restructure our government so that we can hold it accountable. First, the council is simply too large. We need to eliminate four council positions, including the part-time mayor. The new mayor position, like the mayor of Seattle, would be the administrator of the executive branch of government and responsible for appointing department directors, confirmed by the council. We should have a five-member council who would represent five separate districts, with no at-large positions. The council and mayor will be full-time administrators

and would have appropriate staff. This probably will actually save money in the first year. When we eliminate four council positions (mayor is one now), and we eliminate the city manager and his staff, we can probably provide the mayor and council staff with fewer positions. The advantage of this form of government is you have six people who are accountable. You no longer have a city manager in such a position of power and information that the council can be fooled. You no longer have a council who cannot keep up with the budget process. In fact they will monitor it all year. If trouble starts to brew, you have six full time elected officials, any one of whom can call it out. The council should appoint a Charter Review Committee, not to write amendments, but to propose a completely new charter that will give us a government that we can truly hold accountable. The sooner the better.

Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. Tacoma Weekly welcomes letters to the editor, your opinions and viewpoints. Anonymous letters will not be published. Tacoma Weekly reserves the right to edit letters for length, content and potentially libelous material. Please send them to above address or e-mail us at letters@tacomaweekly.com.

Subscriptions are available for $52 per year.

John Ladenburg, Sr. is an attorney with the Tacoma firm Ladenburg Law. He served as Pierce County executive from 2001-08. Prior to that he was Pierce County prosecutor and served on Tacoma City Council.

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:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNLÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;-YPKH`6J[VILY 

Election 2012

This is the 2nd in a series of interviews with candidates on the ballot for the general election in November.

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Democrat Laurie Jinkins seeks re-election to position 1 in Washington State House of Representatives for the 27th Legislative District. She was first elected in 2010. Jinkins works as the deputy director of Tacoma/Pierce County Health Department. Her challenger is Republican Steven Cook.

Q) What makes you the best choice for voters in this campaign?

COOK: I believe I can more effectively work to get things accomplished on the budget â&#x20AC;&#x201C; so that we do not have to go into extra sessions; having spent 12 years on George Town Council, where we had to balance the budget without regular tax increases. JINKINS: I bring two decades of proven, collaborative leadership and a track record of seeking out common ground to achieve goals. I am running for office not to hold an elected position but to tackle the critical problems facing our families and region. In my career as an assistant attorney general, public health leader, Tacoma Community College trustee and active community volunteer, I have earned a reputation as a principled, collaborative and thoughtful advocate willing to take on tough issues and get results. I am proud of my track record during my first term as a state representative, and look forward to returning to Olympia to continue to take on entrenched

budgetary and other issues.

Q) As you are interacting with voters, what is the top concern they have with state government they express to you?

COOK: Budgetary concerns â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and the fact that they do not have any money to pay more in taxes, especially in light of $4 a gallon gasoline and higher food prices. JINKINS: My constituents are very concerned with unemployment and the economy, affordable healthcare, and access to high quality education for their families. I have spent my first term addressing these three things. I have taken on reforming our revenue system so that it is fair, adequate and stable. I sponsored a bill that would eliminate tax loopholes for big banks to provide funding to education. There is no way we will be able to adequately fund our education system without reforming our revenue system. While on the capital budget committee I helped push through the jobs package that ultimately passed the legislature. This will not only help build new schools and crucial infrastructure, it will also create 18,000 jobs across the State. Finally, as Vice Chair of the House Health Care & Wellness Committee, I helped prepare Washington for implementation of Affordable Care Act. Last session, we created the Washington Health Exchange, which assures many more people will have access to health insurance. I will continue

to focus my work on increasing access to care and controlling health care costs.

COOK

JINKINS

Q) What will the Legislature need to do in the near future in regard to the state budget?

Q) What can be done to increase collaboration between Democrats and Republicans in the LegislaCOOK: They need to focus on the ture?

budget, until it is done, and then if there is time, work on other items â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and their fiscal impacts. Personally, I believe the Legislature needs to go to priorities of government process and zero-based budgeting. JINKINS: We need to close tax loopholes that do not benefit Washingtonians and diversify our tax base. States that rely solely on income tax to generate revenue are in no better shape than those that rely too heavily on sales tax. We need a tax system that is fair, adequate and stable. It will take a group of committed legislators some time to replace our regressive system with a fair, progressive tax system. I believe I have strongly evidenced my commitment to do so during my one term in the legislature. I was the prime sponsor of the only loophole closure bill that made it to the House floor in 2011. While that bill did not get the two-thirds majority required by I-1053, the bill did become the basis for a constitutional challenge to the initiative. The case was recently heard by the state Supreme Court, and its outcome will heavily impact how the Legislature handles the budget.

COOK: I believe that getting them to focus solely on budgetary issues, until the budget is passed, would go a long way to getting them to work together more effectively. JINKINS: By and large there is a great deal of collaboration between Democrats and Republicans in the state Legislature. The vast majority of bills are voted off the floor of the House unanimously. Perhaps press coverage recognizing this bi-partisan work would help. There are no two people, let alone 98 elected officials, who agree on everything. Each legislator comes to Olympia to help out his or her district and the entire state. And there are valid disagreements on priorities, values and approaches. Even when we disagree, it is important that our debates remain respectful. In my first term I have worked across party lines to set goals and priorities, and then worked together to build consensus between the parties to pass bills that will help everyone. There will always be differences, but we are able to work across party lines when we focus on what brings us together.

*V\UJPSJVSSLHN\LZMHJLVMMPU/V\ZLYHJL With State Representative Jeannie Darneille running for the Senate, two members of Tacoma City Council seek her position 2 in the House of Representatives for the 27th Legislative District. Jake Fey faces Lauren Walker in the race. Both are Democrats. Feyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full-time job is director of Washington State University Extension Energy Program. Walker is executive director of Fair Housing Center of Washington.

Q) What makes you the best choice for voters in this campaign?

FEY: I believe that my positive record as a community volunteer and elected official make me the best candidate to serve the citizens of the 27th District in the Washington State Legislature. I have been a courageous leader on the Tacoma City Council, willing to take on difficult issues and do what is best for the people of this community. When presented with faulty and unrealistic revenue assumptions that jeopardized the financial health of our city, I voted against the past city managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget. Furthermore, when it became clear that a leadership change at the city was badly needed I worked with my City Council colleagues to

remove the past city manager. This balance of independence and collaboration is badly needed in the Legislature. That is why I have the sole endorsement of Councilmembers Victoria Woodards, Ryan Mello, David Boe, Marty Campbell and Anders Ibsen. WALKER: I have proven political courage for standing up on important issues and being able to tell the story in a persuasive way. My community organizing and mediation background has served to effectively bring people together on complex issues. The 27th District needs someone to speak up convincingly, not just be the lonely vote, on womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issues, our environment, a strong safety net and excellence in education. I will bring expertise on education and human services, two of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s key budget issues in Olympia. The 27th District needs an independent and strategic thinker who knows the issues in her bones. Voters want a candidate they can trust, who is a fighter and has the courage speak up within the caucus and deliver on the House floor. The 27th District has a great history of electing women to the House and Senate.

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My key goals are to use my strengths to address education, health care and to bring capital dollars back to our district for economic development. My many endorsements include State Representative Laurie Jinkins, County Executive Pat McCarthy, Washington Education Association, Master Builders Association, Black Collective, Service Employees International Union and Planned Parenthood.

Q) As you are interacting with voters, what is the top concern they have with state government they express to you?

FEY: As I have done in my previous campaigns, I have visited extensively with thousands of voters. The biggest issue on votersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; minds is the present economic climate â&#x20AC;&#x201C; locally and nationally. Too many residents of the 27th District are unemployed or underemployed and nearly all voters are worried about their familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial future. Legislators must focus on creating and sustaining family-wage jobs. The second most common concern, especially among families, is education.

FEY

WALKER

Many families and/or students are feeling the pressure of rising tuition costs and are uncertain about whether they can continue their education pursuits at the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fouryear and two-year educational institutions. Likewise, there is a concern among parents about the educational outcomes for their children and whether kids will be well prepared for life and future jobs. We must fully fund education and give it our highest priority. Finally, one of the common themes from constituents is a concern for how many people in our community are faring given the dramatic cuts in social service programs, fearing the State Legislature has cut services too far and put too many members of our community at risk. We X See HOUSE RACE / page A7

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Ignite your bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural healing abilities at Fife Chiropractic and Health Awareness Center Since 1977 Fife Chiropractic and Health Awareness Center has been serving 3LHUFH&RXQW\ZLWKWKHĂ&#x20AC;QHVW chiropractic wellness care available. Over the years the multi-doctor clinic has grown to become one of Fifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most successful businesses, offering expertise and services not found anywhere else in the South Sound. As Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading health center, Fife Chiropracticâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long list of satisĂ&#x20AC;HG FOLHQWV LV WHVWLPRQ\ WR the effectiveness of the centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s many programs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I cannot say enough good things

about Fife Chiropractic,â&#x20AC;? says patient Mary Ellen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have been to several other chiropractic doctors and although they were all good and brought some relief, this group at Fife Chiropractic are by far the best I have been to EDU QRQH , Ă&#x20AC;QG WKH IRONV DW )LIHWDNHWKHLUWLPHZLWK\RX DQG WDON WR \RX HYHU\ WLPH you come in. They seem to care and you are not just another patient.â&#x20AC;? Adult and pediatric chiropractic care is the centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary focus, which includes: Â&#x2021; QXWULWLRQDO FRXQVHOLQJ

that analyzes the body to determine the underlying causes of ill or non-optimum health; Â&#x2021;FROGODVHUWKHUDS\WRKHOS Ă XVKRXWLQĂ DPPDWLRQSRVW surgery swelling, scarring and more; Â&#x2021;WKHUDSHXWLFH[HUFLVHVWKDW can be performed in the comfort of your own home; Â&#x2021; PDVVDJH WKHUDS\ WR KHOS relax the body and the mind; Â&#x2021;KHDOWK VFUHHQLQJVWKDWFDQ reveal important biological LQIRUPDWLRQ DQG XQORFN WKH door to improved well-being; Â&#x2021;GHFRPSUHVVLRQWKHUDS\WR help reduce the need for surJHU\E\DOOHYLDWLQJEDFNSDLQ

sciatica, leg pain, herniated discs, numbness, arm pain, QHFN SDLQ DQG RWKHU UHODWHG conditions; Â&#x2021; IUHH SXEOLF OHFWXUHV RQ health-related topics for patients and their loved ones; Â&#x2021; DQG OLIHVW\OH DGYLFH whereby patients are coached on certain activities they should avoid or do differently to avoid aggravating their particular health challenge. Rather than rely on invasive surgeries or prescription medications, Fife Chiropractic and Health Awareness Center bases its practice on â&#x20AC;&#x153;the wellness approachâ&#x20AC;?

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to ignite the bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural healing abilities. Wellness care does not add something to the system; instead it removes anything that might interfere with normal function. Wellness care trusts that WKHERG\ZRXOGNQRZZKDWWR do if nothing were interfering with it. That environment encourages natural healing and minimizes the need for invasive treatment, which Fife Chiropractic doctors believe should be administered only when absolutely necessary. Reaching beyond the walls of the clinic and out into the broader community, Fife Chiropractic and Health Awareness Center extends a helping hand to those in need YLDHIIRUWVOLNHIRRGGULYHVIRU the St. Martin of Tours Food %DQN LQ )LIH DQG WKH 3X\DO-

lup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s battered womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shelter. Next month (and just in time for the holidays) the clinic will hold a food drive in which current patients can bring in 10 cans of food and $10 and receive a chiropractic adjustment. Current patients of Fife Chiropractic and Health Awareness Center can also receive complimentary chiropractic adjustments for the family dog or cat; all thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s required is a monetary donation that center staff will give WRDQRNLOODQLPDOVKHOWHU All of Fife Chiropractic and Health Awareness Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doctors and massage WKHUDSLVWVDUHLQQHWZRUNZLWK all major providers. To learn more about all the center has WR RIIHU YLVLW ZZZĂ&#x20AC;IHFKLropractic.com or call (253) 944-0450.


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WHouse Race From page A6

must protect the vulnerable. WALKER: I have knocked on more than 10,000 doors in the 27th District. Voters express a mixture of concerns about our state government, but are most concerned about the budget. They are aware that good government is here to help the most infirm, to educate our children at a high level and to fix our crumbling infrastructure. Voters are worried about the economy and jobs, health care coverage for themselves and others, and a strong educational system through college. Voters are paying attention, are happy about meeting the candidate who will represent them, and have strong opinions about how best to serve the 27th District. It has been powerful to engage in these conversations. I look forward to serving as their 27th District state representative. Q) How has your full-time job and your time as an elected official prepared you to serve in Olympia?

FEY: My professional experience will serve residents of the 27th District well in the State Legislature. I will bring more than 30 years of effective public sector management experience at the state and local level.

I understand where there are opportunities to save taxpayers money and make state government work more effectively. I have spent virtually every year representing my employers at the State Legislature. I have successfully worked to pass state legislation, including this last session, when the State Legislature funded a program my office administers in their Jobs Bill (Capital Budget). My City Council experiences will benefit the voters of the 27th District in two ways. I have been a leader on the City Council and I understand that to best serve the public, I need to work with my colleagues and earn their trust and respect. The endorsements I have from them demonstrate that. In addition, my service on the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency, Puget Sound Regional Council and the Association of Washington Cities has given me an opportunity to represent those agencies before the Legislature. I am a well-tested elected official and am ready to go to work should voters give me an opportunity to do so. WALKER: My professional life of more than 30 years, to include a second term on the council, has been devoted to policy initiatives and service to our community at the local, state and national level. I spent the first half of my career on health care policy (long-term care, home care and related budget issues). The second part of my profes-

sional life has been devoted to civil rights and housing issues to include serving on a national board of directors and effectively advocating with members of Congress on Capitol Hill. Having lived in the Hilltop neighborhood for 22 years, I have been an effective community advocate bringing neighbors together on issues that range from safe neighborhoods to responsive schools to the restoration of Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pool. My nonprofit agency, where I have served as executive director since 1995, received the Chamber of Commerceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spotlight on Business Award for the best nonprofit agency in 2007. A few of my proudest moments in professional and public official leadership roles include working to pass Massachusettsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first in the country universal health care bill, being the impetus for the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s food waste recycling program, passing the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s affordable housing policy with consensus from a bi-partisan group of community leaders, working with a diverse group of businesses and neighbors to ensure the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mixed Use Centers best serve the district. My broad experience of working on policy issues that interface directly with our state budget is why I am needed in Olympia.

Q) You have served on committees on Tacoma City Council. If elected to the House, what committees there would you like to serve on?

FEY: The 27th District and Pierce County have very capable legislators. Representatives Jeannie Darneille and Laurie Jinkins understand health care and social services issues very well. What Senator Debbie Regala would tell you is that I bring great background on jobs, education, environmental and transportation issues, as well as a comprehensive understanding of budgets. I am well prepared to serve on committees that deal with these topics. WALKER: I am the current chair of the Neighborhoods & Housing Committee and serve on the Environment & Public Works and Economic Development committees. I have had leadership positions on the Puget Sound Regional Council, Pierce County Regional Council, the Tacoma Arts Commission and Joint Municipal Action Committee. My greatest interests are Capital Budget Committee, or other budget-related committees, Health and Human Services, Community Development and Housing, Education and Transportation. It is of key importance to maintain a balance with my House of Representatives seatmateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s committees.

Long-awaited general election is now underway

T

he long-awaited general election is underway. More than 3.85 million registered voters are being mailed their ballots by their county elections office and the official Votersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pamphlet already has arrived in most Washington homes. Voters are free to mark and return the ballots just as soon as they wish, Secretary of State Sam Reed noted. Postmark deadline is Nov. 6, although Reed strongly recommended that voters get their ballots in the mail several days ahead of that so their ballots are definitely postmarked on time. Another increasingly popular option are county ballot drop boxes. Each county also has at least one centralized voting center for voters with handicaps; other voters also may use the facility. Since Washington switched to vote-by-mail, the state no longer has poll-site voting. The state has some of the best

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voter participation in the country. Reed said he is expecting a strong turnout this year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The presidential/gubernatorial election year always has the best turnout, and this year really has something for everyone,â&#x20AC;? he remarked. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a presidential race that is essentially tied at the national level and an open governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s race that is very close and hotly contested. Four of our eight partisan statewide offices are wide open, including governor, secretary of state, attorney general and auditor, and we are having our first election ever for the new 10th Congressional District that we were awarded after the 2010 Census. We will also elect new legislators, fill a U.S. Senate seat, elect our judges, and decide numerous local issues and races.â&#x20AC;? He also discussed the ballot measures. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have probably the most exciting assortment in the

country this year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including everything from same-sex marriage and legalizing marijuana to charter schools and supermajority for taxes. I expect the initiatives to draw hordes of both supporters and opponents.â&#x20AC;? Katie Blinn and Shane Hamlin, state elections codirectors, said there is a wealth of solid voter information available, in addition to the print and online votersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; guides from state and county governments. A great online voter information vault, called MyVote, is also a great place to get customized voter information via www. myvote.wa.gov. State races also are featured on the Video Votersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Guide from TVW and the state Elections Division. Online registration is closed for this election, but new registrations may be obtained in-person at your county elections office by Oct. 29. Blinn said people can try to avoid long lines by not waiting until Oct. 29.

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WGreen do: Reclaim public land from invasive plants â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and people. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is how you win for nature,â&#x20AC;? said Ramie Pierce, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s urban forester. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t talk for the trees. You pull out blackberries. You get all that ivy and clematis off of them.â&#x20AC;? Pierceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s friends call her the town Lorax, but they underestimate her hard edge. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intent on using data to figure out what works, and where, and acting on that knowledge. This year, that means switching Arbor Day celebra-

From page A1

tions from April to Green Tacoma Day. Put a tree in the ground in the spring and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be thirsty all summer, Pierce said. Put a tree in the ground during planting season â&#x20AC;&#x201C; early November to early March â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and the Great Northwet will meet its water needs. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be the case for the flowering cherry trees Japanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Honorable Consul General will give to Metro Parks Saturday at 10:30 a.m. at the Point Defiance Pagoda in honor of the centennial of Japanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gift of 3,000 cherry trees to Washington, D.C.

Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why, after a summer of yanking and digging, volunteers will be planting at Wapato Hills, Garfield Gulch, Franklin, Titlow and McKinley parks and Gog le hi te Wetland. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also why the big green spaces are safer now than they were before volunteers started clearing them. When they were choked in vines and brambles, they made good places for encampments, drug deals and prostitution. Pierce, Chang and Metro Parksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Outreach Coordinator Richard Madison work with Tacoma police and with Colin DeForrest, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Homeless Housing First coordinator.

Together, they have cleared encampments and gotten their residents into more appropriate resources. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s made volunteering safer for young people, from scouts to Mount Tahoma High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s JROTC. Chang, who helps her mother, Donna Chang, with First Creek Middle Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s science club activities, saw how working at Swan Creek affected the kids. They had cleared an area and, a few weeks ago, discovered someone had pulled them up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were so upset,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was scared they would be turned off, but I think it made them more determined in their work.â&#x20AC;? The kids found the trees, and replanted as many as they could save. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how kids are when they get the chance to do worthy, tangible work, said Madison. And if they show up Saturday, Chang will log their hours and notify their school â&#x20AC;&#x201C; on Forterra letterhead, no less â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to get them on the path to meeting school volunteerism requirements, and, possibly, lettering in public service with United Way. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tacoma for you, reclaiming land, opening opportunities, getting exercise, and the occasional T-shirt. And letting Jennifer Chang at those blackberries. Green Tacoma Day sponsors include the City of Tacoma, Metro Parks, Pierce Conservation District, Forterra, Urban & Community Forestry and the United States Forest Service.

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Executive  Pat  McCarthy  has  stabilized  the   countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  budget,  trimmed  the  size  of   government,  consolidated  programs,  and   challenged  managers  to  find  operational   efficiencies  while  improving  the  quality     of  public  service.       Vote  to  re-­â&#x20AC;?elect  Pat  McCarthy  

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A  proven  leader.  

Paid  for  by  People  for  Pat  McCarthy  Ć&#x201D;  2661  N  Pearl  St.  #269,  Tacoma,  WA  98407  Ć&#x201D;  253.414.1798    info@reelectpatmccarthy.com  Ć&#x201D;  www.reelectpatmccarthy.com  

From page A1

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Sports

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

(33*0;@*96:: *6<5;9@4,,;

A10 X

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2012

SECTION A, PAGE 9

;(*64()(7;0:; 4(9*/05.;6>(9+ 76:;:,(:65(.(05

McDonald, Slattery are unique additions

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

:*6905.76>,9 (Top) Tacoma

Baptist’s Casey Slattery (in white) is tripped up by the Christian Faith defense, as the forward scored two goals and added two assists in the win. (Bottom) Becca McDonald, the Crusaders’ leading scorer this season, tries to fend off an Eagle defender.

-(:;:;(9;30-;: >03:657(:;-6:: Bellarmine inches closer to league title W

ith an opportunistic defense and a healthy Devon Phillips, the Wilson Rams are hoping to make a late-season run to a playoff spot. The Rams got three turnovers and scored three touchdowns in the first quarter on the way to a 39-14 win over Foss on Oct. 12, as Phillips led the way with 20 carries for 194 yards and four touchdowns. Jake Ferris recovered a fumble on the second play of the game for the Rams, and Phillips scored on a 10-yard sweep around the right side four plays later to make it 7-0. Wilson then stopped a fake punt on Foss’ next possession, and Phillips capped off another drive with an 11-yard score to make it 14-0 halfway through the first quarter. “We just kept running to the outside,” Phillips said. “That was killing them, really. That’s all we really did.” Rickey Perry intercepted Foss quarterback Nick Burton on the second play of the next drive, and Wilson quarterback Moses Lewis hit Santana Johnson for a 25-yard touchdown to put the Rams up 20-0 after one quarter. “We were shooting ourselves in the foot a little bit with turnovers,” said Foss head coach Pat Johnson. “Our kids work really hard, and they never quit on us ever.” Backup quarterback Omar Morris finally got the Falcons on the scoreboard late in the half, engineering a 10-play, 90-yard drive and capping it with a seven-yard touchdown run to make it 20-6. But Phillips was in the end zone five plays later for Wilson, scoring on another 10-yard run to make it 26-6 at the half. Lewis hit Connor Patterson for a 41-yard touchdown on Wilson’s second drive of the second half, and Phillips’ fourth score – from 11 yards out early in the fourth quarter – put the game out of reach at 39-6. Still, despite the big lead, Wilson coach Don Clegg was not completely pleased with the effort. “We have a tendency to relax, and we have some penalties,” Clegg said, also referencing the two red zone turnovers. “We didn’t do well in the red zone

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

.96<5+.(4, (Top) Wilson’s Devon Phillips (right) carries the ball as

Carter Luvaas (left) looks to lead the way. (Bottom) Foss quarterback Omar Morris, who scored one of the Falcons’ two touchdowns, looks for running room.

tonight. We’ve got to look at that. But at least we won.” The Falcons’ Baacari Kiner provided the final margin, scoring on a three-yard plunge late in the fourth quarter. Lewis finished 8-for-13 for 142 yards, with two touchdowns and an interception for the Rams. Morris was 7-for-15 for 112 yards for Foss, while adding 10 carries for 38 yards and a touchdown. With the win, Wilson improves to 2-3 in the Narrows 3A, with a big matchup at Lincoln on Oct. 19 with a playoff spot likely at stake. “Lincoln has a lot of weapons, (they’re) quick,” Clegg said. “They play really well defensively at times. We’ve got to play our best game.” By Jeremy Helling

3065:*9<0:,6=,9;695(+6,:

Like a speeding train rolling down the tracks toward a second consecutive league title, the Bellarmine Lions overcame a sluggish first quarter and went on to bury the Yelm Tornados by a score of 56-7 on Oct. 12 to set up a date with the Olympia Bears with the Narrows 4A title at stake. “We got off to a really slow start in the first quarter, but finished really well for an impressive win,” said Bellarmine head coach Tom Larsen. With Yelm’s odd offensive sets and a host of injured starters entering the game, Larsen had a number of questions that needed to be answered. When the Lions fell behind 7-0 late in the

X See FOOTBALL / page A11

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By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

Take one look at the Tacoma Baptist soccer team this year on the field, and you will notice something different. With the Crusaders deciding against having a girls’ team for the second straight year because of low numbers, Becca McDonald and Bryanna Slattery accepted the open invitation to join the boys’ team. “They’re very good club players,” said Tacoma Baptist head coach Josh Narayan of the duo, who both have made their way into the starting lineup and helped lead a 7-0 rout of Christian Faith on Oct. 16. McDonald, a senior who also plays basketball and runs track, got the Crusaders on the board early by knocking a ball in off a cross from fellow forward Casey Slattery in the second minute. Two minutes later, McDonald returned the favor by sending a ball to the far post, and Slattery headed it home to quickly make it 2-0. “We passed better than we have in a while (today),” McDonald said. “We all took a lot of shots, but a few went in. I think we worked well as a team.” McDonald has stepped in and quickly helped offset the loss of SeaTac 2B League MVP Jake Zimmer – who is training with the Crossfire Academy and by rule is ineligible to play high school soccer – by leading the team with 14 goals to that point. Combining with Casey Slattery, who has 12 goals and a team-high 15 assists, the Crusaders’ formidable offensive attack has not been lacking. Brandon Turner made it 3-0 for the Crusaders with a strike from 20 yards out in the 12th minute, and top defender Austin Lutterloh – who recently returned from injury – made it 4-0 at the half by stealing a ball near midfield and sending a low shot through the left side. Turner and Casey Slattery each picked up their second goal midway through the second half to salt it away for the Crusaders, who responded to their first loss of the season the day before to first-place Bear Creek. The win put the Crusaders at 9-1-1 overall on the year, as they are set to close the season on Oct. 24 at Puget Sound Adventist. With more competitive teams in the 2B playoff landscape this year, Narayan noted the road will be challenging when the postseason arrives. “The parity of the teams this year (makes it) a lot harder,” he said. “Anybody can beat anybody, and we don’t have any undefeated teams.” But with the added skill of players like McDonald and Bryanna Slattery in the fold, do not be surprised if the Crusaders make another deep run. “We’re looking forward to going up against the big teams and surprising them,” McDonald said. “People are saying we aren’t going to do well, but we surprise people and it’s fun.”


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-YLZO^H[LYZ(SVUNPUL[PUKP]PK\HS^PUZ By Jeremy Helling

while fellow Stadium seniors Garrett Harp, Connor Cochrane and Moses Chege finished Both experience and seventh through ninth, youth shone bright at the respectively. Andrew BabAll-City Cross Country son led Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s effort by Meet on Oct. 10 at Wright finishing in 17 minutes Park, with the Stadium and 37 seconds â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a perTigers placing six runners sonal record â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to place in the top 10 of both the third, while teammate boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; races to Austin Lawrence finished take the team titles. sixth for the second-place Stadium senior CamRams. Zachary Bennett eron Freshwaters won the was Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top finisher, boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; race in 16 minutes running in a personal best 19 minutes and 6.5 sec2723 N. Pearl St., Tacoma onds to place 14th. 235.752.7675 For Freshwaters, who www.flyingfishtacoma.com has run at the district meet all three years so far, the race served as a warm-up SPECIAL OFFER the Narrows meet on Special Offers for Oct. 17 and the upcoming "VCVSO8BZ4"t"VCVSO 8"t district and state meets. Two Blocks East From Muckleshoot Casino â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is my last year Receive a FREE to really make an impression,â&#x20AC;? said Freshwaters. Happy Birthday Roll â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been giving it my 2723 N. Pearl St., Tacoma on your birthday! all during practices and 235.752.7675 havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been backing off.â&#x20AC;? www.flyingfishtacoma.com Wilson sophomore Shelby Alongi, in just her Birthday Buy 2 Rolls

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the Falcons, while senior Cora Ann Snider led the Lincoln girls by placing 15th in 24 minutes and 32 seconds. Alongi noted the cohesiveness and unity of the Wilson squad has pushed her to new heights this season, while also crediting her preseason training for her success. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been running with the boys all summer and all year (so far), so I was always running,â&#x20AC;?

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said Alongi, who aims for the district and state meets and hopes to eventually continue running in college. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That would be awesome.â&#x20AC;? With the Narrows League meets wrapped up as well, the runners now focus on the Westside Classic District Meet at American Lake Golf Course on Oct. 27 at 10:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The past few years Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had bad races at district,â&#x20AC;? said Freshwaters, who is aiming for a time under 16 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ran (the time) I wanted to. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve actually done less races this year so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have energy for districts, hopefully.â&#x20AC;?

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Our machine is self propelled and will fit though a 36â&#x20AC;? gate, so we can get to most stumps even in difficult spots. We can grind stumps 12-14â&#x20AC;? below the surface so that you can plant another tree, bush, or grass.

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THINNING

Thinning will enhance the health and beauty of your trees. Often when trees become too thick, foliage in the middle dies off or limbs become too heavy and crowded. Dead, damaged, crowded, and inverted limbs are removed to allow wind to pass through and to allow more light on the remaining foliage.

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second year running cross country, won the girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; race and set a personal best by finishing in 21 minutes and 31.7 seconds, almost 30 seconds faster than second-place finisher Audrey Holloway of Stadium. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really work on trying to keep pace and not slow down, so I think that helped a lot,â&#x20AC;? Alongi said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It means so much. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve worked so hard for this.â&#x20AC;? Senior Katie Cribb and freshman Giorgia Holloway placed third and fourth for Stadium, who also placed freshman Lillie Williams, sophomore Skye Johnson and junior Nicole Amdahl in the top 10 to take the team title. Senior Michelle Bone finished fifth while teammate Kaja Sanders placed seventh for Wilson, who again placed second as a team. Foss junior Jasha Wharton placed sixth with a time of 22 minutes and 58 seconds to lead

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and 57.3 seconds, four seconds ahead of teammate Shay Glackin-Coley to lead the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; effort. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The plan was just to go out with the pack at the end, and turn it on the last two miles,â&#x20AC;? said Freshwaters of the 5,000-meter race. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It felt pretty easy. I just took it conservatively. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m (going to) go harder at (the league meet).â&#x20AC;? Ian Spencer finished fourth for the Tigers,


-YPKH`6J[VILY Â&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNL

WFootball From page A9

first quarter, the questions became more magnified. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of guys stepped up after that,â&#x20AC;? said Lars-

en. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zach Ota was huge on the offensive line and Nick Dionas played well on defense. They were two of many who contributed tonight.â&#x20AC;? Starting on their own 39-yard line opening the second quarter, Bellarmine got down to busi-

ness when Sefo Liufau hit Garrett McKay with a 47-yard touchdown strike to tie it 7-7. Just four minutes later, Brandon Thompson found the end zone from five yards out to cap a 65-yard drive in four plays to give the Lions a 14-7

lead. Leading 28-7 with 12 seconds left in the half, Liufau found McKay down the left sideline with an amazing, leaping catch to give the Lions a 35-7 lead at halftime. While Bellarmine was moving on the Tornados at will, the ground-pounding Yelm squad managed a paltry 63 yards on the ground in the first half, and wound up with 21 more in the second half for 84 total yards in the game.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had not seen formations like that ever before,â&#x20AC;? said Dionas. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coach (defensive coordinator Dan) Shaw was very happy with the win, and this was a great momentum-builder for Olympia next Friday.â&#x20AC;? With familiarity breeds contempt, and there is much to be had in this burgeoning rivalry with Olympia on both sides. But as Larsen said, do not believe all the hype. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They know us and we know them,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Both

teams know what is on the line and both will be ready to go on Friday night. It should be a great one. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Olympia is always a formidable team that likes to pound it, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have to get them in a lot of third-and-longsâ&#x20AC;Śweâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be ready.â&#x20AC;? By Steve Mullen For blog updates on this weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s featured games visit The Daily Mash-Up at www.tacomaweekly.com/ dailymashup.

th  Annual  Marcus  Trufant    

100  Andover      Parkway  West                                                              

Join Seattle Seahawk Marcus Trufant, his family and fellow teammates - as they take to the lanes for charity! The Bowling and Billiards Classic raises money for youth programs in the Greater Tacoma and Seattle Area.

Monday, November 12, 2012 5:30-10pm ACME Bowl 100 Andover Parkway West Tukwila, WA 98188

EARLY BIRD SPECIALS END OCT 19TH!

GET INVOLVED! With Sponsorship, Bowling and/or Billiards. For more info, call 253-301-0704 or go to www.trufantfamilyfoundation.com. PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

COLLISION. Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Ben Matz (14) looks to escape the tackle of Fossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Marcellus Potts (7) in the Ramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 39-14 win on Oct. 12.

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City Life

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B3

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2012

SECTION B, PAGE 1

Halloween activities haunt the entire month By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

While many ghouls and gals set their sights on Halloween for their costume festivities, ghost and zombie events run throughout the month and into November. Tacoma Art Museum is partnering with Centro Latino and Proyecto MoLÉ once again to celebrate Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) beginning on Oct. 21, culminating with a free festival on Nov. 4. This eighth annual, free festival has grown to be the museum’s largest annual community event, bringing in more than 3,700 visitors. Anchoring the opening of the festivities will be artist Fulgencio Lazo and his team filling the museum’s lobby with a colorful, round, floral-inspired tapete (sand painting). This year’s tapete will be an exploration of flowers in honor of the marigolds so important to the Día de los Muertos celebration, as well as the upcoming exhibition “Andy Warhol’s Flowers for Tacoma,” opening Nov. 3. Día de los Muertos is an ancient celebration of the eternal cycle of life. The holiday combines centuries of indigenous practices with contemporary traditions and spiritual beliefs. Observed in Mexican and other Latin American communities, the holiday is a symbolic way to honor relatives and friends who have died. More information is available at www. TacomaArtMuseum.org. A new addition to the local fright scene comes from a partnership between Goodwill Industries and Washington State History Museum for “Creepshow: Terror in Tacoma,” a haunted house of frightening displays of scary things through the last century of pop culture. The attraction was developed by Hollywood special effects artist Marcel Banks, who worked on “FaceOff ” and “Chronicles of Riddick,” and museum staff. Proceeds benefit Washington State Historical Society. While attending “Creepshow,” visitors can stop by Goodwill’s Boo-Teek, a Halloween costume wonderland. “Creepshow: Terror in Tacoma” runs Oct. 25, 26 and 27. Tickets are $13. Visit www.creepshowtacoma.com for more information. The Witches’ Ball 2012 is being tagged as the premier event for all things pagan. Set to go down at 6 p.m. on Oct. 27 at Dryer Masonic Center, witches and warlocks can expect divinations and door prizes. There will be a ritual by Mahlora of Mahloran Green Craft as well as live music by Green Fey and DJ Dave’s Dance Music. Tickets available at www.terratacoma.org and Crescent Moon Gifts and Ubiquitous Journey. Tickets are $20 single/$35 couple or $25 each at the door.

Ernest Jasmin gives the lowdown on Halloween happenings for Tacoma’s “big kids,” pg. B4

PHOTO BY MEREDITH BACHMANN. COURTESY OF TACOMA ART MUSEUM

DEAD FUN. Tacoma Art Museum is partnering with Centro Latino and Proyecto MoLÉ to celebrate Día de los Muertos, Day of the Dead.

LeMay’s Halloween Trunk-or-Treat car event will run from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Oct. 27 at LeMay’s Marymount Event Center. The free event is suitable for all ages as LeMay provides a safe environment for families to enjoy an inexpensive afternoon of Halloween fun. Costumed children will trick-or-treat outdoors by going from car trunk to car trunk to get their bag filled with goodies. Families, individuals or groups host and decorate a trunk and provide candy to be given out to the children at the event. Trick or Treat on Antique Row runs from noon to 5 p.m. on Oct 31 at Tacoma’s Antique Row as a way to promote local businesses as well as provide parents a place to bring their little ghosts and goblins down to the heart of Tacoma for safe and fun trick-or-treating. Zoo Boo at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium takes over from the complex on Oct 20. This all-ages event includes a chance to watch animals enjoy special pumpkin enrichments and see how creative zookeepers are at designing their jack-olanterns. Festivities are free with zoo admission and everyone in costume will receive a $2 discount off the general zoo admission rate. The popular event features indoor and outdoor activities, camel rides, as well as treats, photos and fun. Visit PDZA.org. Bonfires, Beaver Pelts & Bogeymen Halloween Storytelling, an extremely popular event at Fort Nisqually, returns at 7 p.m. on Oct. 26. Visitors c a n

celebrate Halloween in the style of past centuries with ghost stories told around a roaring bonfire in the meadow outside the fort’s walls. Visit Fortnisqually.org. A “Dawn of the Dead Dash” is set to take over downtown Tacoma on Oct. 26. This scavenger hunt turned survival race is an exciting “life-changing” adventure run through the streets of Tacoma, with humans running for safety as zombies set to pounce. There will be blood, lots and lots of blood. Participants will be asked to challenge themselves to see if they can escape death and remain human as a rapidly growing zombie population infects the city. Prizes will be awarded to the top male and female human finishers as well as the zombie who infects the most human participants, as well as honors going to top costumes in human and non-human categories. The race is simple. Get from point A to point B before being tagged by a zombie. If

a human runner is infected with the virus, he or she then becomes a zombie and their hunt for humans begins. Tickets are $35. Information is available at Dawnofthedeaddash.com. The 2012 Corn Maze, Pumpkin Patch and Harvest of Terror are now open at Maris Farms, which is presenting a tribute to firefighters. The scare crew is back in force, however, with a trio of haunts that will fan those flames of fear with the allnew Harvest of Terror that includes The Haunted Woods, The Reaping and The Monster Safari. Now in its 13th season at the quaint and historic dairy farm location in Buckley, fall attractions featured also include: zip lines, Tractor Tire Mountain, pumpkin patch, pig races, tractor rides

u See HAUNTED page B6

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE ART BY MATTHEW SCOTT For the rest of this month and throughout November at The Hub, check out the artwork of Matthew Scott, one of Tacoma’s more prolific and accomplished painters. While you are there, enjoy any of The Hub’s amazing artisan pizzas, home-style pastas and fresh menu items. 203 Tacoma Ave. S.

TWO STRING FESTIVAL

THREE ST. ANDREW’S CELTIC FAIRE Mark your calendars now for St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church’s fifth annual Celtic Faire on Oct. 27, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Enjoy high tea, vendors’ marketplace, entertainment, children’s activities, Celtic dancers, talent show, bake shop, lunch shop and more. 7410 S. 12th St.

FOUR

KANTOR

“ALWAYS LOOKING BACK”

University of Puget Sound’s String Festival Faculty Recital welcomes leading violinist Paul Kantor to perform Oct. 20 and 21 along with selected high school musicians and UPS School of Music string faculty members. Both concerts feature chamber music from the classical and romantic eras, 7:30 p.m. in Schneebeck Concert Hall on campus. Order tickets at http://tickets. pugetsound.edu or call (253) 879-6013.

YOUTH SYMPHONY COSTUME CONCERT Ta c o m a Y o u t h Symphony Association continues its golden anniversary season with its annual “A Night at the Movies Costume Concert” Oct. 28 at Urban Grace Church, 4 p.m. Costumed players play from “Star Wars,” “Pirates of the Caribbean,” “Beauty and the Beast,” “Star Trek” and

more. Come dressed as your favorite movie character. Tickets at www.broadwaycenter. org.

FIVE LORETTA LYNN The First Lady of Country Music gives a rare concert Oct. 26 at the Emerald Queen Casino I-5 Showroom, 8:30 p.m. Find out why this American icon continues to draw the adoration of fans everywhere. Must be 21 or older to attend. Tickets at www. emeraldqueen.com.


Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, October 19, 2012

HAPPY HALLOWEEN! You're invited to the Fife Police Department's annual

Halloween youth carnival!

What: When: Where: Cost:

Games, Prizes, Flashlights and safe F UN for all! Sponsored by the Fife Police Department. Games galore, candy, prizes, free flashlights, goody bags and much, much more. Wednesday, October 31, 5 to 7pm Fife High School Cafeteria 5616 20th St. E. Fife, WA 98424 One non perishable food item for the Food Bank

Fun for all ages! Special thanks to our Sponsors: Uʈviʈœ˜ÃÊ ÕL Uʈviʈœ˜ÃÊ ÕL

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, October 19, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 3

Dala to perform first show in Tacoma

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Rockabye Dead Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Tacoma-made film to premier at WSHM

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSEPH KEPHART

WHODUNIT. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rockabye Dead Man,â&#x20AC;? a film noir rock opera, makes its prePHOTO BY LUKE DIVERS

DYNAMIC DUO. Dala is Amanda Walther (left) and Sheila Carbine. They will headline Broadway Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Theatre on the Square on Oct. 25. Ernest A. Jasmin

word and just fill it with meaning. ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com TW: You should just make up a different answer for each interview. It has been a big year for Dala, the AW: Yeah, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve said that we felt the Canadian folk duo comprised of singercalling when we were in India and the songwriters Sheila Carbine and Amanda name â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dalaâ&#x20AC;? was written in the sky and Walther. all sorts of others things. But I actually The lilting vocal harmonies and affecttold you the truth this time. Booooooring lyricism of new album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Day,â&#x20AC;? ing. have garnered some of the highest praise TW: You are pretty huge in Canaof their 10-year run, along da. What kind of reacwith three nominations for tion would you say you Dala in concert the forthcoming Canadian 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 25 get here as opposed to up Folk Music Awards. And north? Broadway Center this fall they hope to make AW: Well, Canadians Theatre on the Square a big splash south of the are, in our experience so border, as well, with a far, much more reserved 901 Broadway, Tacoma West Coast tour that will than American audiences. $36 culminate in their first We werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sure if what (253) 591-5890 appearance in Tacoma, at we do would translate to www.broadwaycenter.org Broadway Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thethe United States, but it atre on the Square on Oct. totally has â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and especial25. ly on the West Coast and Recently, we caught up with Walther the East Coast. ... They seem to love us. as she was enjoying a little down time on (Chuckles) I hope theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not lying. Nevadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lake Tahoe. And, for starters, TW: You are known for having those we had to ask... great vocal harmonies. How did you develop your style? TW: What is a Dala? AW: Vocal harmony is really the heartAW: Dala comes from the â&#x20AC;&#x153;laâ&#x20AC;? of beat of our songwriting. ... Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always Sheila and the â&#x20AC;&#x153;daâ&#x20AC;? of Amanda. Very deep come natural to us. I mean, I was ecstatic and insightful. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to find a name for to find a friend who could sing melody a duo, and Sheila & Amanda just sounded so that I can harmonize to her. And ever pretty boring. So we decided to create a u See DALA/ page B5

mier 7:30 p.m. Oct. 29 at Washington State History Museum. By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

It all began in a flash of inspiration, an image in the mindâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eye: Tacoma filmmaker Joseph Kephart imagined a scene from a 1940s-era detective movie. He saw the point in the story line in which the suspects of a murder are gathered to have their alibis questioned by the intrepid detective. Instead of speaking their lines, however, the characters in Kephartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s imagined movie were singing their lines to rock music. Thus began a frenzy of songwriting and filmmaking that would occupy much of Kephartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for the next two years. The result is a short film (26 min.) called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rockabye Dead Man,â&#x20AC;? which is set to premier Oct. 29 at the Washington State History Museum. Perhaps the greatest proof of the potency of Kephartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s moment of inspiration was that he was able to attract an enthusi-

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astic and dedicated (they worked for free) cast and crew that jumped into the project with zeal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rockabye Dead Manâ&#x20AC;? is billed as â&#x20AC;&#x153;film noir rock operaâ&#x20AC;? and stars Darryl Small, Rich Bundy, Lorraine Gill, James Moniz, Holly Rose, Loretta Howard, Doug Mitchell, Nate Dybivik and more. Equally important are the musicians that played the soundtrack. Dave McKibbin wielded guitar. Hillary Spear plays French horn to set the haunted tone. The multitalented Rich Bundy of the Plastards functions as percussionist and as a member of the cast (as the gardener). John Kephart, brother of Joseph Kephart (and a filmmaker, artist, writer and musician in his own right), laid down the bass lines and also did duty as producer and provider of pizza. Director of cinematography Ian Price allowed use of his North End home for much of the filming. Much of the costuming and props came courtesy of Ramp Art on Broadway, among other places. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The film was not shot on a shoe string,â&#x20AC;? said actor Darryl Small, â&#x20AC;&#x153;it was more like dental floss.â&#x20AC;? During the course of the project, the thing seemed to take on a life of its own. Auditions took place all over town, in libraries and parking garages as well as

rehearsal spaces. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Things just happened to fall into our laps pretty much,â&#x20AC;? said Small. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacoma has a lot of talent and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s being utilized,â&#x20AC;? Kephart noted. By hook or by crook the deed was done. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rockabye Dead Manâ&#x20AC;? is in the can and ready for its audience. Beyond the Oct. 29 premier, the filmmakers are eager to show their Tacoma-made gem at a variety of film festivals. The tightknit group is also ready to work together on future projects. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the end of the day,â&#x20AC;? said Kephart, â&#x20AC;&#x153;one of the things Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m most proud of is that, two years after the fact, I can look back and see all these people who know each other and are friends all because of this idea that I had in my head.â&#x20AC;? Come to the Oct. 29 premier and see what all the fuss is about before there is a fuss. Be one of those who can say â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was there at the beginning, when â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Rockabye Dead Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; made its first splash.â&#x20AC;? These T-town talents could go all the way to the stratosphere. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rockabye Dead Manâ&#x20AC;? shows at 7:30, Oct. 29 at Washington State History Museum for an affordable $3 entry fee. The cast and crew will be on hand and DVDs of the film will be available.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, October 19, 2012

New diner set to shake Halloween is for big kids, too things up in Stadium District

PHOTO BY ERNEST JASMIN

SHAKE IT. Co-owner Steve Naccarato hopes to have Shake Shake Shake

open next month. It will be a vintage, ‘40s style diner with burgers and gourmet shakes. By Ernest A. Jasmin TW: Yeah, what was that? Last summer. ejasming@tacomaweekly.com

Something tasty this way comes. For the last four months, brothers Steve and Gordon Naccarato (of Pacific Grill fame) and partner Robert Stocker have been assembling Shake Shake Shake, a retro-style diner that is headed to Stadium District. Earlier this month, participants in the Stadium District Art & Wine Walk got their first peek at the new joint, which is slated for an early November opening at 124 N. Tacoma Ave., a stone’s throw from Stadium High School. Between pours, we got Steve Naccarato to give us the skinny on what to expect. TW: Kind of break down your concept. Obviously, you have a vintage thing going. SN: Yeah, we wanted to do a modern take on a ‘40s vintage diner - not ‘50s. We don’t want it to be a theme park. It’s not Johnny Rockets. It’s a fun, contemporary setting, paying respects to that old cafe that used to be the community gathering spot. Our goal is to serve the best hamburger, fries, shakes in Tacoma, and we take it really seriously. It’s not gonna be just a hamburger thrown out there. We have spent years developing this idea. So, hopefully we’re a month away from letting the public have a taste. I mean, you tasted it.

[Referring to a private function where he and Stocker served prototypes. And yes, they were worthy of a little hype.] SN: Yeah, that was the hickory burger. We’re doing the classic and the steak and bacon burger. They’re all phenomenal, you know. And then any of them can be served with a veggie patty. I would like to get a gluten-free bun to serve that kind of underserved market. But we’ll see. No alcohol to start. Maybe down the road, but it kind of changes the vibe of a place. TW: Plus, you are right by a high school. SN: Yeah, and I’m a Stadium guy. We’re gonna have the Tiger shake ... and bring local flavors and local produce and products to the greatest extent we can that makes sense. It’s all about quality and freshness. I think our burgers will be unique in the market. And it’s gonna be affordable in a fabulous setting. TW: And what is your target opening date? SN: Well, first of November. I don’t know if that’s realistic or not, but we’d like to shoot for November. Check out Tacoma Weekly’s Daily Mashup blog for more photos and a menu from Shake Shake Shake at www.tacomaweekly. com.

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By Elena Lombardi, Freelance Writer Just because you have macular degeneration (or other vision-limiting conditions doesn’t always mean you must give up driving or reading. Ever look through a pair of field glasses or binoculars? Things look bigger and closer, and easier to see. Washington optometrist, Dr. Ross Cusic, is using miniaturized binoculars or telescopes to help people who have lost vision from macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy or other eye conditions. “Some of my patients consider me the last stop for people who have vision loss”, said Dr. Cusic, a low vision optometrist who limits his practice to visually impaired patients in his offices throughout Washington. Macular Degeneration is the most common eye disease among seniors. The macula is one small part of the entire retina, but it is the most sensitive. When it degenerates , macular degeneration leaves a blind spot right in the center of vision making it impossible to recognize faces, read a book, or pass DMV’s vision test.

PHOTO BY ERNEST JASMIN

MAID OF HONOR. Alegra Thornsburg shows off her sexy maid look at Tacoma’s New Frontier Lounge, which is sure to be a hotbed of Halloween pre-funk activity again this year. By Ernest Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

Sure, the little squirts get to load up on free Warheads and Snicker’s bars until they achieve sugarbuzz Nirvana. But Halloween is prime party time for us big folks, too. Hey, when else is it socially acceptable to dress up like Freddy Krueger, Superman or a slutty nurse? You can’t rock those looks on casual Friday unless you want to wind up in H.R. for scaring and/or sexually harassing your co-workers. So get your costume all sorted out, and then try one of these to options to pre-funk for All Hallow’s Eve. Helter Skipper & the Gilligan Mansons costume party 8 p.m, Oct. 19 at Liberty Theater, 116 W. Main Ave., in Puyallup. After 15 years apart, this popular Puyallup band from the ‘90s is “older, fatter and

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less famous,” as the handbill for tonight’s reunion show reads. But of interest to today’s scenesters is the band’s links to Fun Police. “Up until the Fun Police I’ve never played in a band that was as fun as Helter Skipper,” says Kevin Schulz, a ringleader in both collectives. “We just took a bunch of different songwriters and all kinds of crazy instruments and put them in a room to see what would happen and didn’t put too many boundaries on it.” The band’s “borderline anarchy” mindset could only be enhanced by General Ed, the namesake for Helter Skipper’s sole CD “General Ed’s Naked Circus.” “He was an old man who maybe suffered from dementia,” Schulz recalls. “But he thought he was a general and he would run around naked and tell people there was a prostitution ring going on down there. There was all kinds of chaos.” Fun Police, the Bog Hoppers and C.F.A. satellite project, Furry Buddies, are also on the bill. Admis-

sion is $6 at the door or $8 if you’re too cool to wear a costume. And the show is all-ages, with alcohol available for the 21-andover set; 253-230-2503 for more info. Tacoma Mob Riders’ annual Reaper Ride 7 p.m., Oct. 27 at Broken Spoke, 1014 S. Martin Luther King Way, Tacoma The Mob Riders organize pedal-powered pub crawls each month in honor of their two greatest passions: bikes and beer. That explains that whooping, blinking, neon cluster of bikers you occasionally see cruising towards the Red Hot some Saturday nights. Now imagine that motley bunch dressed as vampires, killer clowns and “zom-bees.” (That would be an undead bee. Had to be there last year.) And anyone who wants to join this year’s ghoulish voyage on the 27th need only show up in costume with their bike at new Hilltop hot spot, Broken Spoke. Typically, Mob Riders make four to five stops, but other locations are secret u See BIG KIDS/ page B6

Famous Medium Coming to Camp Edgewood Lionel Owen, internationally renowned English medium, speaker, and teacher will be available for private readings October 1629 at Camp Edgewood NSAC Spiritualist camp. Readings are $50.00 for 30 minutes He will also be offering classes. To find out more about classes, prices, or to schedule a reading please call 253-927-2050 or email campedgewood@yahoo.com

¸ 6\YQVIPZ[VÄN\YL V\[ L]LY`[OPUN HUK HU`[OPUN WVZZPISL[VRLLWH WLYZVUM\UJ[PVUPUN¹ “In some states, Bioptic Telescopic Glasses can be used to pass the vision test for driving”, says Dr. Cusic. “This can allow some with conditions like macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy to continue driving”. “Our job is to figure out everything and anything possible to keep a person functioning,” says Dr. Cusic. “Whether it’s driving, reading, TV, seeing faces, check writing, bingo or bridge. We work with whatever is on the persons “wish list”. With interest free payment options this technology is now more affordable than ever. If you want to experience the freedom and independence that custom de- signed low vision telescope glasses can bring, call Dr. Cusic now, for a free telephone consultation. For more information and a FREE phone consultation,

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)PVW[PJ;LSLZJVWPJ.SHZZLZ/LSW>VTHU[V2LLW+YP]PUN Ethel Stroope, who suffers from macular degeneration sought help for reading, watching television and movies and for seeing street signs at a distance. Bioptic telescopic glasses were prescribed. “These glasses have made it very easy for me to continue my activities both at home and on the road with these glasses. “I should have done this two years ago, says Ms. Stroope.

ReElect


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

P Dala

Friday, October 19, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 5

From page B3

since then itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just grown into this other thing. I feel like our voices combine in a very organic way and become something new. TW: For your latest album you are getting a lot of good feedback. You are up for a couple of awards in Canada. What was maybe the jumping off point for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Day?â&#x20AC;? AW: We wrote a couple of songs a number of years ago, while we were still touring the last record, that set the tone for the album, I think. One of them is the song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Day,â&#x20AC;? which felt like it came from somewhere else. It was a melody that I had written very quickly and left an answering machine message on my phone so I would remember it. And then it took a few months to find the right words for it because we felt that it had sacred simplicity to it, and we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to mess with that. But on the whole, I think the album is very personal, very much our best work. And I feel like we simplified the production on the album to highlight the melodies, the words and the heartbeat of where weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re coming from. TW: Which songs are closest to you or have the most meaning? AW: The song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good As Goldâ&#x20AC;? is close to the heart for both myself and

Sheila. The song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fatherâ&#x20AC;? is pretty much word for word my experience with my father. And the song â&#x20AC;&#x153;First Loveâ&#x20AC;? is also one I wrote about my first boyfriend and the insanely beautiful experience I had with my first innocent love. TW: Does he know you wrote a song about him? AW: Actually I still have his contact information, though weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not close any more. But I shot him an e-mail and shot him a copy of the album when it was released just so he could get a kick out of it. I hope he got a kick out of it. I hope he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t burn it or something. TW: He will think of the one that got away. AW: (giggles) Yeah, maybe. TW: And what is your live show like? I hear you guys are funny. AW: You know, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just ourselves, so we end up saying ridiculous things from time to time and just having fun. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infectious. We giggle when weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re together. We laugh, we tell jokes. We bring our friendship onto stage so people get a sense of what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re like on long drives â&#x20AC;&#x201C; when we have had no sleep and lots of coffee. TW: That is when the magic happens. AW: Yeah, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where the magic is â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in your fifth cup of coffee.

Mahnhammer returns to the scene with a new direction By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

Those tectonic riffs. Frontman Micah Hembreeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sinister swagger. It is no wonder local sludge-metal act Mahnhammer was one of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier hard rock acts this time last year. But Mahnhammer abruptly called it quits as 2011 drew to a close, with drummer Chris Roxx squarely to blame. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all my fault,â&#x20AC;? he joked, recently, perched behind his kit at the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dome District practice pad. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I somehow stumbled onto a job opening at the Ritz Carlton in St. Thomas, the Virgin Islands. And so I went to explore that. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I lived on the island in a really weird situation, on a very weird island for about four months. It didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really work out the way I wanted it to, so I came back.â&#x20AC;? A few months later and the mighty Mahnhammer has reloaded. The band â&#x20AC;&#x201C; also guitarist Shawn Lanksbury and bassist Sean Horst â&#x20AC;&#x201C; will play a big comeback set on Oct. 25 at the New Frontier Lounge, one that will showcase a streamlined sound and a few cuts written since last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s debut CD, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Above the New Frontier.â&#x20AC;? But as excited as fans will be for the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s return, they will also notice someone conspicuously absent from the stage: guitarist and resident wild man, Dave Takata, who left Mahnhammer to focus on two of his other bands, C.F.A. and Argonaut. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing now is a totally new direction,â&#x20AC;? Takata said, also citing the need to simplify his creative life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having me in their band would be like having this really antiquated obstacle. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to grow, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m doing Black Sabbath riffs. I was just too lazy and frustrated to want to stay in the band.â&#x20AC;? All involved describe the parting as amicable. But Takataâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s former band mates agree that Mahnhammerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sound and dynamic have changed in his absence. The quartet has been practicing â&#x20AC;&#x153;Molecularizeâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in A Lake,â&#x20AC;? two new cuts that hint at a more prog-rock direction (think Mastodon, not King Crimson.) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The newer songs that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re writing, they are a little more technical,â&#x20AC;? Hembree said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at a space where we can actually expand on those techniques that we want to do as opposed to how we feel like we should sound.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is no slam against Dave,â&#x20AC;? Salisbury said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But he likes meat and potatoes. He likes to keep it simple. In a way, he acted as a breaker against my tendencies, which are to be complicated to everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chagrin.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll still stop you,â&#x20AC;? Roxx chimed in, laughing.

PHOTO BY ERNEST JASMIN

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT.

Mahnhammer frontman Micah Hembree singing a â&#x20AC;&#x153;tender balladâ&#x20AC;? at his bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dome District practice space.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right, not that it became this flood of prog-rock or anything,â&#x20AC;? Lanksbury added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s less of that natural balance of Dave against me and the sort of push and pull in that dynamic. Now thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a little more freedom for me. But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m also mindful of the fact this is still Mahnhammer. This is still a certain kind of band with a certain kind of sound, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re gonna make it surprising in the right ways.â&#x20AC;? Furry Buddies and Argonaut are also on the bill. Costumes are encouraged, and there will be a celebration for Argonaut and Mico de Noche bassist Chad Bakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 40th birthday. Music starts after 9 p.m. You must be 21 or older to get in and cover is $5; (253) 572-4020 or www.thenewfrontierlounge.com for further details.

Check our Daily Mashup blog for video of Mahnhammer and samples of the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new songs at www.tacomaweekly.com.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, October 19, 2012

P Haunted around the pumpkin patch, monster truck rides and pony rides. Visit www.marisfarms.com. 2012 Fright Fest at Wild Waves includes all the rides, but with the added thrill of being in the dark. Visitors may wear costumes to Fright Fest but cannot have a mask or makeup that is construed as a mask. Guests ages 12 and under may wear full costumes. Costumes should be child friendly, meaning they must be non-obstructive, non-offensive and non-violent. Activities run Friday and Saturday nights through the month. On the amusement park grounds, MOViN 92.5 FM radio will have Scream Factory Haunted House. Visit WildWaves. com for details. Tacoma’s Freighthouse Square will have its celebration between 4 p.m. and 7 on

From page B1

Oct. 31. Visitors can trick-ortreat throughout the Square, enjoy a magic show and visit a balloon artist. Children ages 6 and under and 7 to 12 can also visit freighthousesquare.com and download a special Halloween coloring contest drawing. Once completed, artwork can be dropped off at Freighthouse Square, located at 2501 E. ‘D’ St., at any store or restaurant. Prizewinners will be announced on Oct. 31 at 6 p.m. in the Freighthouse Square Art Gallery. The granddaddy of all local haunted houses will take over Cheney Stadium with the Hillbilly Haunt, which grew larger than its previous home at Freighthouse Square could hold. Visitors must be older than 18 because the house will have scantily-clad zombies, ghouls and ghosts and

blood, lots and lots of blood. Expect be frightened, excited, squirted with goo and touched, Proceeds benefit Fisher House Foundation. The house runs 7 -11 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 6 p.m. to 10 on Sundays. Tickets are $13. Visit www. thehillbillyhaunt.com. Metro Parks’ annual Black Cat Fun Run is set for Oct. 27, when runners and walkers can get into costume, lace up those running shoes and show off their Halloween spirit on a 2.5mile or five-mile course. This spooktacular, familyfriendly event is guaranteed to turn an evening of ghoulish exercise into a howling good time. Visit www. metroparkstacoma.org. Lakewood Playhouse will be staging its fifth annual live radio show with “Frankenstein” and “Chicken Heart from Lights Out,” made popular by the famous

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story from Bill Cosby’s childhood and a special musical performance by The “Sinister” Sisters. The entire performance will be presented as if it were live in the radio studios of the 1930s and ‘40s, complete with live sound effects at 8 p.m. on Oct. 27. Tickets are $25. Visit www.lakewoodplayhouse.org. Tacoma City Ballet will transform its studio spaces for its fourth annual production of The Haunted Theatre: Backstage Tour & Eerie Dances. The hourlong production features a tour through the Haunted Hat Check, a ghostly cemetery and TCB’s spooky wardrobe. Following the tour, guests enter the Jan Collum Ballroom to view the Eerie Dances, featuring enchanted marionettes, miniature monsters, and mummified cats along with dancing witches, ghosts, pumpkins, skeletons and more. Shows run Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays Oct.20-28.Tickets are $5 per person and are available at tacomacityballet.com.

.

P Big Kids until they depart; follow the Tacoma Mob Riders Facebook group or @cruiserbikegirl on Twitter for updates. Grindhouse Theater presents “Phantasm” on 35 mm film 9 p.m. Oct. 26 and 27, Grand Cinema, 606 S. Fawcett Ave., Tacoma All year is Halloween for fans of Grindhouse Theater, the Grand Cinema’s monthly tribute to gory horror and exploitation flicks. But, of course, host Justin Giallo has something special in mind for the actual holiday, namely director Don Coscalleri’s 1979 cult classic “Phantasm,” the movie that introduced us to creepy zombiemeister, the Tall Man. Several short films will precede the main attraction, including one based on H.P. Lovecraft’s “The Shunned House,” along with a costume contest and other surprises. Admission is $9 each night; 253-593-4474

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From page B4

or www.grandcinema.com for more info. Rock n’ Roll Halloween Bash with Dr. Love 9 p.m. Oct. 26, The New Frontier Lounge, 301 E. 25th St., Tacoma What rock band embodies Halloween more than KISS? OK, shut up about GWAR and Slipknot for a minute. And don’t get your hopes up that Gene Simmons and company will show up; those money-grubbing whores cost way too much for the New Frontier. But fake blood will, indeed, be spewed and peeps will rock n’ roll all night thanks to local KISS tribute band, Dr. Love. The bill also includes Splendid Vengeance and local garage-rock favorites, the Dignitaries. You must be 21 and older to attend and five bucks gets you through the door; 253-572-4020 or www.thenewfrontierlounge. com for more details. Zombies vs. Cheerleaders Doors open at 7 p.m. on Oct. 27, The Lochs, 928 Pacific Ave., Tacoma These will be the styles du jour at the space formerly occupied by Hell’s Kitchen. Come dressed as a flesh eater and/or a pompom shaker and you could cash in with the $300 first prize for the costume contest. Live entertainment includes ‘80s cover band, the M-80s, Pink Bread and DJs. All ages are welcome, but the minors have to bounce by 10 p.m. Cover $10 and you can learn by following the Lochs on Facebook.


Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

Dr. Love prepares for its first house call

Friday, October 19, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

Live Music TW PICK OF THE WEEK: SONNY LANDRETHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MUSIC HAS ALWAYS BEEN EVOCATIVE, A VIBRANT MIXTURE OF INDIGENOUS SOUNDS AND IMAGES. HE RECENTLY RELEASED HIS FIRST INSTRUMENTAL ALBUM, â&#x20AC;&#x153;ELEMENTAL JOURNEY.â&#x20AC;? HE BRINGS HIS TOUR TO JAZZBONES FOR A SHOW AT 8 P.M. ON OCT. 20. COST IS $27.50 AND $30.

PHOTO BY JOHN LARSON

THE DOCTORS. Dr. Love is, from left to right, Chance Pittenger, Peter Tietjen, Jason Flom and Vinny Beatty. By John Larson jlarson@tacomaweekly.com

A radio show host and three veterans of the local music scene have joined forces as Dr. Love, a Tacoma-based KISS tribute band. It consists of Jason Flom as guitarist Ace Frehley, Chance Pittenger as guitarist/vocalist Paul Stanley, Peter Tietjen as drummer Peter Criss and Vinny Beatty as bass player/vocalist Gene Simmons. The members are well known in the local scene. Tietjen has played with Billy Farmer and a Neil Diamond tribute. He was in Umber Sleeping, which later became I Like Science. Flom is a co-founder of Legend of Big Foot, a band he still plays in. Beatty has been in Color of East and Never Quiet Never Still. Pittenger has not been in local bands but hosts the show â&#x20AC;&#x153;Northwest Metal Zoneâ&#x20AC;? on Internet radio station NWCZ. Pittenger and Flom have known each for about 30 years, as Pittenger is a close friend of Flomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s older brother. Both are big KISS fans.

Flom has seen KISS live 13 times. The two started jamming about 18 months ago. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we knew in the back of our minds that this band would happen,â&#x20AC;? Flom remarked. Needing a drummer, Flom thought of Tietjen. Around that time Beatty ran into Flom at a show at the New Frontier. They began talking about forming a KISS tribute band. The band came together in August. At their first practice, they came up with the name from the KISS song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Calling Dr. Love.â&#x20AC;? The four musicians have been busy preparing for their debut show, slated for Oct. 26 at the New Frontier Lounge. The plan is to have a theme for each performance. This first show will have a medical theme, with the members wearing medical outfits and the makeup KISS is famous for. They plan limited theatrics, such as spitting fake blood. Two members plan to wear black wigs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are going to play the music with passion,â&#x20AC;? Flom promised.

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They play music from 1974 to 1982, when KISS had its original lineup. Why does the music of KISS still hold so much appeal for them? â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I was 7 years old and I saw them, they were like super heroes,â&#x20AC;? Flom said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It has been a love affair ever since. When I look at Peter, I know he feels the same way.â&#x20AC;? He just purchased the new KISS album â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monster.â&#x20AC;? Tietjen remembers clipping out photos of KISS and putting them on the wall of his bedroom as a child. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it is amazing music,â&#x20AC;? he remarked. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those four faces are four of the most recognized faces in rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;n roll,â&#x20AC;? Flom declared. The band knows about 15 KISS songs. For their debut show, they plan a set list with 10 songs. Pittenger requests that fans bring a new or gently used coat to the show. They will be donated to needy foster children. The show starts at 9 p.m. on Oct. 26. Also playing will be the Dignitaries and Splendid Vengeance. It will be a costume party, so fans are encouraged to dress in their Halloween outfits.

FRIDAY, OCT. 19 EMERALD QUEEN: Nite Crew (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC

MONDAY, OCT. 22 AMOCAT CAFĂ&#x2030;: (Singer/songwriters) C.I. SHENANIGANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Collaborative Works Jazz (Jazz) 8 p.m. DAWSONS: Steve Cooley & the Dangerfields (Blues) 9 p.m. GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nhu Quynh, 8:30 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: E. Pruitt Band, Darrius Wilrich, Klyntel, 8 p.m., $8-10 LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Riot In Rhythm, Syztem Seven, Amadon (Rock) 7 p.m., NC, AA MAXWELLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Lance Buller Trio (Jazz) 7 p.m., NC NATIVE QUEST: Open mic night, 5 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Jerry Miller (Classic rock jam) 9 p.m., NC SWISS: M80s (â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s covers) 9 p.m. UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Blacktop Demons, 8 p.m. UNCLE THURMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Gary Cook (Jazz guitarist) 5:30 p.m. VARSITY GRILL: Rock-Bot live band karaoke, 8 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, OCT. 20

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Perks of Being a Wallflowerâ&#x20AC;? 103 min., PG-13 10/19: 2:15, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10 10/20-10/21: 11:50 am, 2:15, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10 10/22-10/25: 2:15, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Searching for Sugarmanâ&#x20AC;? 85 min., PG-13 10/19: 1:45, 6:20, 8:30 10/20-10/21: 11:35 am, 1:45, 6:20, 8:30 10/22-10/23: 1:45, 8:30 10/24: 1:45, 10/25: 1:45, 8:30 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somewhere Betweenâ&#x20AC;? 88 min., NR 10/19-10/21: 4:00 10/22-10/23: 4:00, 6:20 10/24: 4:00, 10/25: 4:00, 6:20 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Well-Diggerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Daughterâ&#x20AC;? 107 min., NR 10/23 only: 2:00, 6:35 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Much Ado About Nothingâ&#x20AC;? 167 min., NR 10/25 only: 7:00

STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino Band (Classic rock/blues) 9 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke, 9 p.m. OPAL: Tim Hall Band (Blues jam) 8 p.m. STONEGATE: Acoustic couch jam, 8:30 p.m. SWISS: Billy Roy Danger & the Rectifiers (Blues) 7 p.m. UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Billy Pease & Friends (Blues) 8 p.m.

TUESDAY, OCT. 23 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (Acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

STONEGATE: Shyan Selah (Rock/soul/hip-hop) 8 p.m., $10 ANTIQUE SANDWICH SHOP: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: Tim Hall Band (Blues jam) 8 p.m. DAWSONS: Jho Blenis, Shelly Ely (Blues jam) 8 p.m.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Masterâ&#x20AC;? 137 min., R 10/19: 2:50, 6:00, 8:50 10/20-10/21: 11:55 am, 2:50, 6:00, 8:50 10/22-10/24: 2:50, 6:00, 8:50 10/25: 2:50, 8:50 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Samsaraâ&#x20AC;? 102 min., PG-13 10/19: 2:00, 4:15, 6:35, 9:00 10/20-10/21: 11:40 am, 2:00, 4:15, 6:35, 9:00 10/22: 2:00, 4:15, 6:35, 9:00 10/23: 4:15, 9:00 10/24-10/25: 2:00, 4:15, 6:35, 9:00

NEW FRONTIER: (Bluegrass jam) 3 p.m. SPAR: Junkyard Jane (Blues) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Stonegaters (Classic rock jam), 8 p.m., NC SWISS: Puget Sound Music for Youth Association (Jam session) 2 p.m., AA

C.I. SHENANIGANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Collaborative Works Jazz (Jazz) 8 p.m. EMERALD QUEEN: Nite Crew (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: The Jayne Sanction (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Sonny Landreth, 8 p.m., $27.50-$30 LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Devil On A Leash, Body Box NEW FRONTIER: Shrouded in Veils, Midnight Graves, 7 p.m. SPAR: Five Live, 8 p.m. STONEGATE: Rumble Underground (Top 40) 9 p.m. SWISS: Kry (Rock covers) 9 p.m. THREE CHICKS CATERING: High Rollers (Classic rock) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: December In Red, Three Quarter Minus, William Thomas Anderson, 8 p.m. VARSITY GRILL: Rock-Bot live band karaoke, 8 p.m., NC

SUNDAY, OCT. 21

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24 DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (Blues jam) 8 p.m.

DAWSONS: Crazy Texas Gypsies (Jam session) 8 p.m. STONEGATE: Tatoosh (Classic rock) 8:30 p.m., NC

THURSDAY, OCT. 25 JAZZBONES: Kry (Rock covers) 9 p.m., NC

JOHNNYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DOCK: Blues Redemption (Blues) 5 p.m.

606 Fawcett, Tacoma, WA

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ANTHEM: Taxi Driver (Jazz) 7 p.m. DAWSONS: Tim Hall Band (Blues jam) 8 p.m., NC IMMANUEL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH: Blues Buskers (Blues) 5 p.m.

DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Billy Shew Band (Jam session) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Mahnhammer, guest, 9 p.m. PARADISE BOWL: (Rock jam) 9 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lafferty (Acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Billy Roy Danger & the Rectifiers, 8 p.m. UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jerry Miller (Blues) 7 p.m.

Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Music Calendar is always available online at www.TacomaWeekly.com GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Do you have a live show or music event coming up? Email makeascene@tacomaweekly.com for a free listing in the Live Music calendar!

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Section B • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, October 19, 2012

SUN., OCT. 21 GOSPEL CONCERT MUSIC – The United Methodist Church is holding an old-fashioned gospel concert at 3 p.m. The concert will take place at The Bridge, located at 5601 S. Puget Sound St., and will feature eight quartets, soloists, small choirs and more. The evening would not be complete without the audience joining to sing a few old loved hymns as well. A freewill offering will be taken to help with the music program.

COMING EVENTS

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 759-5773.

TW PICK: ‘A CHORUS LINE’

THE NATIONAL TOUR OF THE PULITZER PRIZE AND TONY AWARD-WINNING MUSICAL “A CHORUS LINE” IS MAKING A STOP IN TACOMA OCT. 26-27. THE PRODUCTION WILL TAKE PLACE AT THE PANTAGES THEATER AT 7:30 P.M. KNOWN AS ONE OF THE LONGER-RUNNING SHOWS IN BROADWAY HISTORY, MICHAEL BENNETT’S “A CHORUS LINE” IS A MARVEL. IN THE STARKNESS OF A NAKED THEATER, CASTING FOR A NEW BROADWAY MUSICAL IS ALMOST COMPLETE. FOR 17 DANCERS, THIS AUDITION IS THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME. IT IS THE ONE OPPORTUNITY TO DO WHAT THEY HAVE ALWAYS DREAMED – TO HAVE THE CHANCE TO DANCE. THIS IS THE STORY FOR EVERYONE WHO HAS EVER HAD A DREAM THAT REQUIRED “YOU TO PUT IT ALL ON THE LINE.” TICKETS: $49-$84, AVAILABLE AT WWW.BROADWAYCENTER.ORG.

SUN., OCT. 28 ‘THE CAPITOL STEPS’ HAPPENINGS – “We didn’t start satire; it was always burning since the world was turning . . . ” The Capitol Steps will bring down the house . . . and Senate with their unique blend of music and political comedy. Not for the faint of heart nor for those considering a run for office. The show puts the “mock” in Democracy! Coming just in time to rebalance your political nervous system ahead of the fall election. The performance will take place at the Rialto Theater at 3 p.m. Tickets: $35-$68, available at www.broadwaycenter.org.

WED., OCT. 31 ‘FRIGHTHOUSE’ SQUARE ETC – Halloween is just around the corner and already Tacoma’s historic Freighthouse Square is making big plans to celebrate the holiday with contests, prizes, live entertainment and trick-or-treating throughout the Square for the community. Visit on Halloween Day from 4-7 p.m. There will be trick-or-treating, a magic show and balloon artist from 6-7 p.m., and through Oct. 26, children ages 6 and under and 7 to 12 can visit www.freighthousesquare.com and download a special Halloween coloring contest drawing. Once completed, artwork can be dropped off at Freighthouse Square (2501 E. ‘D’ St.,) at any store or restaurant. Prizewinners will be announced Oct. 31 at 6 p.m. in the Freighthouse Square Art Gallery. Info: www. freighthousesquare.com.

FRI. & SAT., NOV. 2, 3 FALL FESTIVAL AND BAZAAR HAPPENINGS – Summit United Methodist Women are organizing a Fall Festival and Bazaar for Nov. 2 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Nov. 3 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Families are invited to enjoy crafts, vendors, garden art, apple dumplings and more! The bazaar supports Summit United Methodist Church’s Tacoma/Pierce County community outreach programs to help feed the hungry, care for the homeless and more. 5316 104th St. E. (104th Street and Canyon Road). Info: (253) 537-6560.

FRI., NOV. 9 VIDEO GAMES LIVE! HAPPNEINGS – This immersive concert event features music from the most popular video games of all time. Taking place at the Pantages

Theater at 7:30 p.m., the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra will perform along with exclusive video footage and music arrangements, synchronized lighting, solo performers, electronic percussionists, live action and unique interactive segments to create an explosive entertainment experience! It is not just a concert, but a celebration of the entire video game phenomenon that people of all ages will adore. Tickets: $39-$94, available at www.broadwaycenter.org.

BULLETIN BOARD ‘NIGHT WATCH’ THEATER – Tacoma Little Theatre is proud to continue its 94th season with “Night Watch” by Lucille Fletcher and directed by Randy Clark. Elaine Wheeler screams as she sees (or believe she sees) the body of a dead man in the window across the way. The police find nothing. Her husband, claiming that Elaine may be on the verge of a breakdown, calls in a lady psychiatrist who agrees with his suggestion that Elaine should commit herself to a sanitarium for treatment. The plot moves quickly and grippingly as those involved – Elaine’s old friend and house guest Blanch; the inquisitive and rather sinister man who lives next door; and the nosy German maid, Helga – all contribute to the deepening suspense and mystery of the play as it draws towards its riveting and chilling climax. Performances take place Oct. 19 through Nov. 11 on Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. A pay-what-you-can performance takes place Oct. 26 at 7:30 p.m. FLOWERS FOR TACOMA ART – Andy Warhol’s Flowers for Tacoma explores the context and development of flower imagery in

Warhol’s career, focusing on his 1982 proposal for Tacoma Dome. Warhol’s extensive use of flowers throughout his career will be represented by early illustrations from the 1950s, series of flower prints, and numerous photographs made by Warhol and his circle that illustrate the artist’s fascination with the fragility and beauty of flowers. The exhibit opens Nov. 3 and runs through Feb. 10. Info: tacomaartmuseum.org. ‘SCAPES’ ART – Venetian artists Laura de Santillana and Alessandro Diaz de Santillana have joined forces to create “Scapes,” a dynamic and entirely new body of work at Museum of Glass. The exhibition comprises four rooms based on the Hindu belief that the universe is divided into separate spheres of existence: Earth, Space, Sun, and Moon and Constellations. The de Santillanas have interpreted elements of the Hindu cosmology in glass, creating spaces in which forms and colors correspond to physical phenomena, or the visible universe, and evoke an atmosphere of cosmic vibration. Each installation is composed of a limited, but strikingly vibrant, color palette. The exhibit runs until January. NORTHWEST ART ART – “Best of the Northwest: Selected Paintings from the Collection” is on display at Tacoma Art Museum. The works on view are some of the best from its collection of paintings by Northwest artists. It runs until March. ‘ORIGINS’ ART – “Origins: Early Works by Dale Chihuly” runs through Oct. 21 at the Museum of Glass. The exhibit showcases works made by Chihuly in his early career, from 1968 through

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the 1980s. The artwork displayed includes 30 transitional pieces from prominent local collections and the museum’s permanent collection, along with historic exhibit posters from the Mary Hale Cockran Library. Collectively, the works chronicle Chihuly’s influence as an artist, a visionary and a pioneer of the American studio glass movement. Info: www.museumofglass.org. GLASS ART MASTER ART – Museum of Glass is showcasing items created by a glass art master over the past 10 years in “Maestro: Recent Works by Lino Tagliapietra.” The Italian artist has invented numerous techniques and designs that are technically flawless and visually breathtaking, yet filled with complexity and difficulty. He is recognized around the world as the maestro of contemporary glass. The exhibition shows his evolution to larger works, bolder colors and patterns over his nearly 50 years as an artist. It runs through Jan. 6, 2013. ‘HOPE IN HARD TIMES’ ART – Washington State History Museum’s “Hope in Hard Times” exhibit showcases the 1929 Wall Street collapse as it plunged Americans into a period of great uncertainty as unemployment skyrocketed, banks failed and housing foreclosures hit record highs. President Herbert Hoover put it succinctly: “About the time we think we can make ends meet, somebody moves the ends.” “Hope in Hard Times” shares how ordinary people worked for change in their communities, pulling together to find ways to deal with the crisis. A billy club used during the 1934 “Battle of Smith Cove,” Works Progress Administration artifacts and everyday items are among some of the objects show-

cased in this exhibition. The paintings and sketches of Ronald Debs Ginther, also featured in the exhibition, comprise one of the more complete visual records of the Great Depression. The exhibit runs through Nov. 4. Info: www.washingtonhistory.org. HOT HULA FITNESS ETC – Every Monday through Wednesday, Asia Pacific Cultural Center hosts hot hula fitness classes from 7-8 p.m. Inspired by the dances of the Pacific islands, hot hula fitness incorporates easy to perform dance moves set to the sounds of traditional Polynesian drum beats fused with funky reggae music, resulting in a modern, hip fitness workout. Hot hula fitness is a fun, new and exciting dance workout that isolates your larger muscle groups, quads and arms, providing a total body workout in 60 minutes. All ages and fitness levels will enjoy hot hula fitness. Admission: $6 (discount with APCC membership). APCC is located at 4851 South Tacoma Way. DRUM CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages drum circle every Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. You do not need to have a drum to participate. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 2723211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic. com. SUPPORT GROUP ETC – Suffering from fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue? Attend this support group, which meets the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month from 4:15-5:15 p.m. at the Tacoma Area Coalition for Individuals with Disabilities building, located at 6315 S. 19th St. The group’s mission is to improve the morale of people coping with these challenges. Its activities include face-to-face encouragement, networking, sharing of resources as well as individual discoveries. CHARITY BOOT CAMP ETC – Jeff Jowers, owner and founder of Tacoma’s Ultimate Fitness Boot Camps, is hosting charity fitness boot camps every Saturday benefiting Mary Bridge Tree House. People who sign up for Ultimate Fitness Boot Camp can now donate pieces of clothing, which earns them a spot in a fast-paced, interval-style class free of charge. Info: www.tacomabootcamps.com. FREE FIRST WEEKENDS ETC – Bank of America bankcard holders and employees receive free admission to the Tacoma Art Museum the first weekend of every month as part of Bank of America’s national Museums on Us program. Info: museums.bankofamerica.com. ORGANIZING FOR AMERICA Organizing For America is a grassroots movement with the goal of re-electing President Barack Obama in 2012. It is an organization of volunteers hoping to educate, recruit and build a strong network all across the United States. The group welcomes all interested parties to attend their monthly meetings on the second Wednesday of each month at Native Quest, located at 2354 Jefferson Ave. in Tacoma. ETC –

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Friday, October 19, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

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HOMES FOR SALE

Mobile Home For Sale. 17103 Spanaway Loop Rd, Spanaway 6HQLRU3DUN Water Front. One Bedroom. $7900. (253) 219-6523

Timeless,Classic Beauty APPROVED SHORTSALE 6925 Hillgrove Lane SW $335,000 Timeless, classic beauty w/ upgrades galore, sits on estate like lawn w/ lovely landscaping. W/ 4 bedrooms & 3.5 baths, this gorgeous home beckons you w/ charm & easy Ă RRUSODQ3LFN\RXU master bedroomone on the main Ă RRURUWDNHWKHRQH upstairs- the choice is yours. Huge 2 car garage w/ additional shop area- very appealing to some; spacious living room, dining room & sweet kitchen appeal to all. Newer windows, heat pump & A/C. Rumored to have once been owned by the Rockefellers... MLS# 224641 Shannon Agent Extraordinaire 253-691-1800 or shannonsells @hotmail.com %HWWHU3URSHUWLHV 1RUWK3URFWRU

Sweet Victorian! 1245 S. Adams $195,000. MLS#403341

CHARMING, TURNKEY HOME ON THE

18TH HOLE

4420 40th Ave NE $349,000

3 Bed, 2.5 Bath. Charming, turnkey home on the 18th hole in super quiet community- feels secluded, yet minutes from I-5. Enchanting details & warm, Tuscany colors throughout- this home is a gem. Move in & start relaxing- the work has already been done. Enjoy morning coffee on covered front porch, dine al fresco & listen to nature from your back deck. Granite slab counters, master on main, a den which could easily double as 4th bedroom, yummy media nook upstairsthis house has it all. Welcome home. Shannon Agent Extraordinaire 253-691-1800 or shannonsells @hotmail.com %HWWHU3URSHUWLHV 1RUWK3URFWRU

1513 N. 7th St, Tacoma, WA 98403 $289,000 Lovingly maintained Victorian on a large fully fenced lot. The charm is evident the minute you step into the entry and see the high ceilings, open staircase and EHDXWLIXO Ă&#x20AC;U Ă RRUV 0DLQ Ă RRU KDV OLYLQJ rm., dining rm., bedroom, full bath, kitchen and utility rm. Upstairs with 2 bedrooms, and a 3/4 bath. Large windows throughout the home provide tons of light! A great location...walk to 6th Ave. and enjoy all it has to offer! Call 3DP# for more details or for a private showing. %HWWHU3URSHUWLHV 1RUWK3URFWRU 3$0/,1'*5(1 BETTER 3523(57,(6 1257+352&725 plindgren@ betterproperties.com 253 691.0461

REAL ESTATE WATERFRONT

FOR RENT

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43:   902 N Stevens IKIHZM ;HJVTH  

Experienced Real Estate Brokers. Fife Location Better Properties. 90-10 split. Low Cap. Allen (253) 861-7386

City of ma o Tac Jobs

FOR RENT

Reduced for Quick Sale Bar/Lounge and Commercial Building for Sale, South Tacoma location, very clean, $250,000.00. Call #253-472-8164

COMMERCIAL

www.cityoftacoma.org/jobs Pierce County Community Newspaper Group is seeking an

Experienced

ADVERTISING SALES Representative

The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated selfstarter with a proven record of achieving sales goals. They will demonstrate the ability to develop new business and possess excellent time management skills. Additionally, they should be able to manage all aspects of the sales cycle: prospecting, cold calling, setting appointments, performing needs analysis, presentation, negotiation, and closing, all while maintaining a high level of customer service to existing customers.

Food & Beverage Businesses 4 Sale with Owner Contract

Evergreen Realty NW Evergreen Commercial Brokerage www.jeanbonter.com

VERY SUCCESSFUL/PROFITABLE SPORTS BAR Business is For Sale for $390,000 Terms are avail. LAUNDROMAT W/ DROP SHOP. Same location 15 years in Lakewood. Excellent lease with contract terms. $51,000 LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? Restaurant/ Lounge For Sale for $700,000 (R.E. $600K, Bus. $100K). Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports bar and grill. DOWNTOWN TACOMA COFFEE SHOP CAFE 1,200 SF with excellent lease, $46,000, terms available. RURAL LIVING: ASHFORD, WA- Restr./Lounge, $125,000 with $50K Down, Real E. Avail: 3.4 Commercial Acres for Future Devel., 3 BR Remodeled Home, price laundromat. reduced

,I\RXWKLQN\RXZRXOGEHDJRRGĂ&#x20AC;WIRURXUFRPSDQ\ ZHZRXOGOLNHWRKHDUIURP\RX3OHDVHVXEPLW\RXU UHVXPHWRHPSOR\PHQW#WDFRPDZHHNO\FRP

BUILDERS! 3 beautiful wooded building lots



 

in Gig Harbor/Arletta area. Water and electricity available on 40th St NW. Owner/Agent may consider a trade.

# !& %( !& %('$""# #!&"  $%"##"#!&# !!& %( '$""#$ %! # !& %(#! '% !&#)$""&%! %!('"&$%  ##$$ %!  '!!  &(&"#'$

OAKBROOK 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath home on

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beautiful, large lot. 2165 SQ ft. Grand entry, huge master, One owner home. $234,950.00 NWMLS # 410774



 

Â&#x2DC;Kcf_]b[_bck`YX[YcZ=bhi]hEi]W_Vcc_g Â&#x2DC;?bck`YX[YcZWcadihYfgUbXfY`YjUbhgcČ&#x152;kUfYUdd`]WUh]cbg Â&#x2DC;JYfVU`UbXkf]Č&#x153;YbWcaaib]WUh]cbg_]``g Â&#x2DC;DfcZYgg]cbU`dYfgcbU`dfYgYbhUh]cb Â&#x2DC;;ccXdYcd`Yg_]``g

FABULOUS FIRCREST COFFEE SHOP,

three years young. A must see. Priced to sell at $50,000.00 nwmls # 407461 Call for details.

     

Â&#x2DC;5bgkYf gWfYYbUbXX]fYWhWU``g Â&#x2DC;HU_YUbXfY`UmaYggU[Yg Â&#x2DC;;YbYfU`UXa]b]ghfUh]jYUbXW`Yf]WU`giddcfh

Jean Bonter 253-312-2747

CALL RICHARD PICTON or ED PUNCHAK 253-581-6463 253-224-7109

Send resume   

to employment@tacomaweekly.com

SERVICE DIRECTORY MOVING

253.922.5317

2 Men and a Truck Affordable Rates

Find the right business for your home, garden, pet, personal service needs and more right here! SHRINKWRAP

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PAINTING

FIREPLACE

(253) 353-1251

FIREPLACE

*\Z[VT-PYLWSHJL:LY]PJL

Custom FirePlace Service provides Servicing & Repairs for your Fireplace needs. â&#x20AC;˘ Gas FirePlace Inserts â&#x20AC;˘ Glass FirePlace Doors â&#x20AC;˘ Custom Gas Logs â&#x20AC;˘ Lava Rock FirePlaces â&#x20AC;˘ Glass Shard Fires â&#x20AC;˘ Custom Outdoor Fire Pits â&#x20AC;˘ Service All Gas FirePlaces Family Owned Since 1958

www.hearthdesires.com â&#x20AC;˘ 253-474-2519 â&#x20AC;˘ 866-557-1626

PAINTING

Monica Scott 253-861-0449

MOVING

Budget Family Movers

www.tacomaweekly.com

LANDSCAPING

LANDSCAPING

Senior Services Landscaping, etc. Painting, Weeding, Fall Clean-up, Pruning, Gutter Cleaning. Residential. Storm Clean-up Trees

Big Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawn Care Fall Clean-up

Contact Alex 253-564-5743 Free Estimates

(253) 397-7013

ELECTRICAL

CASH FOR CARS

Allied Electric Service

The Happy Hooker

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

PAYS YOU! FOR YOUR Junk Cars

Toll Free 1-877-272-6092 www.alliedmarinecorp.com

Bonded & Licensed CUSTOFS9040A

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Cherry Bedroom

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HAULING

HAULING

HAULING

253-606-1647 HAULING

Father AND Son Hauling

Owners say sell!!

43:  3504 N. Monroe 5VY[O,UK*SPURLY )YPJRMP_LY  

COMMERCIAL

Contractors Dream Commercial land for sale, corner lot, 4 sewer hook ups, one block from the Tacoma Mall on the 3LQH6WUHHWVLGH Call #253-472-8164

Lakewood. $495/month 1 Bedroom Apts.. Laundry on site. Quiet $UHD*RRG3DUNLQJ0RVWXQLWVQR stairs. Water, Sewer & Garbage included. Call Manager (253) 983-9383

SHRINKWRAP

Classic Victorian w/ the comfort of modern updates. Hardi plank siding, newer roof, plumbing & electrical. Beautiful hardwoods WKURXJKRXWPDLQĂ RRU Great size living room w/original built-ins Ă RZV LQWR VSDFLRXV dining room off of kitchen. 3 bdrms & gorgeous full bath on QG Ă RRU )LQLVKHG family room on 3rd Ă RRU PDNHV VSDFH for everyone! Roomy but maintainable Ă DW EDFN\DUG LV perfect for outdoor entertaining. Call Today

COMMERCIAL

CRESCENT PARK APARTMENTS

COMMERCIAL

EMPLOYMENT

REAL ESTATE

WATERFRONT

WATERFRONT North Salmon Beach Community on Tacoma Narrows, 35-feet overwater frontage leasehold property. Deck, davit & parking lot rights. $40,000. Contact Salmon Beach North: Sheri 253-879-1201

CALL 253.922.5317

ld o s

Serving all your hauling needs. We will haul anything at any time.

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OFFICE

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CONTACT US

CLASSIFIED DEADLINES

Phone: Mail:

Classified Display - Mondays @ 12 noon Classified Line Ads - Tuesdays @ 12 noon

253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma WA, 98417

CELL

253-222-9181

Advertising Representatives: VISIT OUR WEBSITE www.tacomaweekly.com

â&#x20AC;˘ Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Nicole Boote, nicole@tacomaweekly.com


Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 10 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, October 19, 2012

FOR SALE FURNITURE

FURNITURE

NEW!!! 7 Piece Cherry Bedroom Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, 1 Nightstand, Headboard, Rails. Plus New Mattress Set still in plastic $499 (253) 539-1600

Black Iron Canopy Bed w/Orthopedic Mattress Set. New, Still in %R[ 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH  (253) 539-1600

5 Piece Pub Set Table & 4 Chairs New in Box List $1,000 Sell $350 253-5373056 3 Piece Living Room Set New in plastic. Lifetime Warranty On Frame. $495 (253) 537-3056 Free Mattress Set with Cherry Wood Sleigh Bed Never Used. In Plastic. $380 (253) 537-3056 All New Pillow Top Mattress Set! Queen Size w/Warranty, Still in Original Plastic. &DQ 'HOLYHU 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH $149 (253) 539-1600 Full or Twin Mattress Set New Factory Sealed. Delivery Available. $120 Will Take. (253) 539-1600

All New King Pillow Top Mattress Box Set 3 Pieces. New & Factory Sealed w/ Warranty.. $249. Can Deliver (253) 537 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3056 New Adjustable Bed With Memory Foam Mattress. Wall Hugger with Warranty. $2800 Will 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FHIRU 253.539.1600 New Platform Bdrm Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, Nightstand, Headboard, Footboard, Rails. Still Boxed. Retails at $2600. Will Take $850. 253.539.1600 New Overstuffed 0LFURĂ&#x20AC;EHU 6RID Loveseat. Still in plastic Can have for $750 (253) 539-1600 Absolutely New! Memory Foam Mattress Set! Can Deliver. Worth $2,000 Asking $450 (253) 537-3056

ANTIQUES The Red Grand Piano Antique Mall at So. 23rd & Tacoma Ave, Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Your Almost Everyday Estate Sale. Vintage clothes, furniture, glass/china, RedWing crocks, toys, taxidermy & MORE! W-Sat 10am-6pm/Sun noon-5pm (253) 627-8288

ANTIQUES WANTED

VOLUNTEERS VOLUNTEERS NEEDED! Come be a part of Gig Harborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 13th Annual Haunted House! We are now recruiting volunteers to help set up and work our Annual Haunted House! Needed are Teens & Adults who can build scenes,decorate, paint,sell tickets,work security,work the parking lot,put up posters,be an actor and special f/x. If you are interested in being a part of our Haunt, SOHDVH FDOO WKH RIĂ&#x20AC;FH DQG sign up. We are looking for approx. 60 volunteers of all ages who enjoy Haunted Houses. No experience necessary. Kids 12 & under need to have a parent work the event with them. Come be a part of our Haunt & scare our guests in a safe environment! Contact: vrichards@ paradisetheatre.org or 253-851-PLAY (7529) Like us on FACEBOOK! Portland Ave Community Center needs volunteer to drive 15 passenger van and assist with trips on Fridays starting ASAP. Call Bonnie @ 253-591-5391 253-404-3939

Help a Child Improve Reading One-on-one support makes a huge difference in an elementary studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to overcome reading challenges. As a Read2Me Tutor, you can be that person who makes a difference. The Read2Me program at Tacoma Community House is looking for committed volunteer tutors for grades 1-3. Starting in October, we will have sessions at Roosevelt and McCarver Elementary Schools. Call Karen Thomas at (253) 3833951 or email kthomas@ tacomacommunityhouse. org for more information. Literacy Tutor Tacoma Community House is looking for volunteers to help adults improve their reading, writing, and basic math skills. Training is provided. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer tutor, please contact Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or at kthomas@ tacomacommunityhouse.org. We need a Spanish speaking volunteer Tuesday & Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10:30-11:30 AM. Volunteer to help translate for our Latino senior population. Call Portland Ave Community Center 253-591-5391 Ask for Bonnie. Leave a message if she isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in she will call you back.

NOTICES TO: Courtney Simchen Bullplume In the Welfare of: B. JR., D. DOB: 08/12/2001 Case Number: PUY-CW-04/12-015 In the Welfare of: B., P. DOB: 09/05/2002 Case Number: PUY-CW-04/12-016 In the Welfare of: B., D DOB: 05/14/2004 Case Number: PUY-CW-04/12-017 In the Welfare of: B., J. DOB: 08/23/2005 Case Number: PUY-CW-04/12-018 In the Welfare of: B., S. DOB: 06/15/2006 Case Number: PUY-CW-04/12-019 In the Welfare of: B., L. DOB: 12/27/2010 Case Number: PUY-CW-04/12-020

REC. VEHICLE

If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. TO: Marjorie Marie Loween (AKA Marjorie Smock) FOR THE MATTER OF: GEBHARDT, Sharon and LAHR, Rebecca vs. LOWEEN (SMOCK), Marjorie Marie CASE NUMBER: PUY-PO-09/12-036 DV The Petitioner has filed a Civil Petition against the Respondent in this Court. Both the Petitioner and Respondent have the right to legal representation in this case. This Court has a list of attorneys and spokespersons who are admitted to practice in this Court.

Cummins Diesel 360hp, Allison 6speed Trans, 9,100 miles. 4slides, auto Awnings w/wind sensor. Couch fold into Queen air bed, 2 euro recliners, 42in. Flat screen T.V. King size bed, 21in. T.V, in bedroom. 2A/C, stereo surround system. 8Kw Generator. Non-Smoker, super clean, $135,000, call 253-651-5056

Volunteer needed to teach beginning basic computers skills for seniors. One day a week for 1 hour class 7XHVGD\ RU 7KXUVGD\ Ă H[LEOH IRU class any time between 10-2 pm. Class will start in mid-September. Volunteers will need to pass background check. Please call Portland Ave Community Center@ 253-591-5391. Ask for Bonnie or leave a message and she will call you back.

Volunteer needed to get seniors up and walking. We need an avid walker that will get seniors walking for a healthier lifestyle. Tuesday or Thursday 10-11. Volunteers will need to pass background check. Please call Portland Ave Community Center @ 253-5915391. Ask for Bonnie or leave a message and she will call you back. Join us in changing lives! Changing Rein Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies, D QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W RIIHUV HTXLQH assisted services to differentlyabled individuals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and adaptive lessons. Other volunteer opportunities include: grounds maintenance and administrative/clerical work. Must be at least 14 years old to participate. Horse experience helpful, but not necessary. Training provided. For more information contact: Jacki Berreth at 253-961-7277 or volunteer@changingrein. org. The Tacoma Maritime Institute meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00

CONVERSATION PARTNERS NEEDED Help adults learn to speak English! Mornings, no experience or foreign language skills needed. South Tacoma. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy, 253-5711887. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION VOLUNTEERS NEEDED If you enjoy helping toddlers learn, you can help us! Seeking retired or experienced volunteers to assist in expanding our capacity and provide quality learning for busy little people. (No diaper changing!) Background check required. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy 253571-1887

Meals on Wheels at Federal Way Senior Center seeks morning volunteers: One Co-coordinator, Friday and Monday; two Callers, Monday; three Packers, Wednesday; two Drivers, Thursday. To learn more, call 206-727-6250. Be a Big Brother! Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG difference in the life of a child. There are several SURJUDP RSWLRQV WR Ă&#x20AC;W \RXU schedule and interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agency-planned activity. For more information, visit www.bbbsps.org or call 253.396.9630. INTERVIEWEES FOR A NON-PROFIT PROJECT â&#x20AC;&#x153;MEMORY COMMUNITYâ&#x20AC;? What It Is: We are Memory &RPPXQLW\ D QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W corporation). The Memory Community Project is a creative service to seniors.

NOTICES

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Show Cause Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Continued Show Cause Hearing on November 26, 2012 at 9:00 a.m.

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105.

VOLUNTEERS

The Respondent must respond to this Civil Petition within twenty (20) days after being served. The Respondent must respond by serving a copy of a written answer on the Petitioner and by filing this written answer with this Court along with an affidavit of service. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear in the Puyallup Tribal Court on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, in the matter of which is located at 1638 East 29th Street, Tacoma, Washington, and you are to stay until this Court may hear this matter. YOU ARE SUMMONED to appear on December 13, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR AFTER RECEIVING NOTICE MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT.

The City of Milton will hold the following Special Meetings: Saturday October 20, 2012 from 9am to 1pm in the Activities Center, Red Room, for 2013 Budget work; Monday October 22, 2012, at 5:00 pm if needed for 2013 Budget work; and Monday, October 29, 2012 at 7:00 pm for the purposes of Bid Award Porter Way Project, and Visioning work-brainstorming with consultants. Please contact Milton City Hall, 253-922-8733, with any questions. On the 15th day of October, 2012, the City Council of the City of Milton, WA, passed the following Ordinances, a summary of content consisting of titles shown here: ORDINANCE NO. 1799-12 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an ordinance of the City of Milton, WA, amending Ordinance No. 1782-11 adopting the annual budget of the City of Milton for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2012; providing for severability; and establishing an effective date. ORDINANCE NO. 1800-12 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; An ordinance of the City of Milton, WA, amending Title 6 of the Milton Municipal Code in order to adopt by reference recent amendments to the City of Sumnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s animal control ordinance, and fixing a time when the same shall become effective. ORDINANCE 1801-12 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; An ordinance of the City of Milton, Pierce County and King County, WA; establishing the regular tax levy for properties located in Pierce and King County for the year 2013; establishing an effective date; and establishing severability. ORDINANCE 1802-12 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; An ordinance of the City of Milton, Pierce County and King County, WA; setting the increase both in dollars and percentage for the EMS regular tax levy for real properties located in Pierce and King County, WA for the year 2013; establishing an effective date; and establishing severability.For the full text of the Ordinances, please contact Milton City Hall, 1000 Laurel Street or call (253) 5172704.

VOLUNTEERS Our Goals & Objectives: To create an accessible resource that: â&#x20AC;˘ helps our senior citizens tell their stories â&#x20AC;˘ connects the young and the old â&#x20AC;˘ increases our understanding of those before us who help us be who we are â&#x20AC;˘ honors the generations before us and show our appreciation by preserving their memories â&#x20AC;˘ All seniors are ZHOFRPHWRYROXQWHHUIRUĂ&#x20AC;OPLQJ their story! â&#x20AC;˘ At most two days of work during daytime â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Day 1: pre-production meeting, and Release Form signing Day 2: Ă&#x20AC;OPLQJ LGHDOO\ ZUDSSHG ZLWKLQ half a day What weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like you WRWDONDERXWLQWKHĂ&#x20AC;OP8VH minutes or so to tell the most memorable story from your life, the lessons that were learned, and the wise words you want to pass along to your children/ grandchildren. Compensation: a DVD in which you are the leading character, and a free upload to our website

http://memorycommunity.org/ Contact: send your emails to deyung@memorycommunity. org Or call Deyung at 253858-2445 for scheduling a PHHWLQJ 7KH Ă&#x20AC;OPLQJ LV IUHH but donations are appreciated to help the project continue.*

Donate time and receive free groceries. Volunteers needed with skills in management, organization, clerical, food handling, warehousing, maintenance etc. and receive free groceries IURP D 1RQ3URĂ&#x20AC;W )RRG Distribution Program. Older teens are welcomed to volunteer and gain valuable work experience. Contact Ms. Lee at (253) 677-7740 for further information.

PETS Need safe farms or barns

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy 253-770-8552

for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. 7KH\ DUH Ă&#x20AC;[HG vaccinated and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 298-0913

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week

1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Sparky is a very Angel is a beautiful happy boy with lots medium hair of personality! He is kitty! She would looking for an active prefer to be the Forever Family that only animal in her has the time to train future Forever him properly - he would Family and she is do great with lots of patiently waiting property with room to for someone to run and a job to do to channel his energy! cuddle with. Currently available animals are featured on our website www.MetroAnimalServices.org

Pet of the Week

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Estherâ&#x20AC;? Domestic Shorthair tabby, one year old. #465006. If you adopt our Featured Pet, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be getting two cats in one! Esther can be calm and quiet, but most of the time sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bundle of wild, energetic fun. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only a year old, and needs a house where she can dash about and entertain an audience or sit and gaze out the window. If you want to add some sparkle to your life, come visit Esther â&#x20AC;&#x201C; look past her shredded cage card and upturned bed and give her a chance to show her contemplative side. Her number is 465006, and you can name your own adoption fee.

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org


GET U GLY : October 19, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 11 Friday, LIST F REE W CODE ITH T mAx1 HIS C 79 GE ODE m T U Ax179 G LY : LI WITH GET U ST FR THIS GLY : EE WI CODE LIST F TH TH m A REE W x179 IS CO UGLY ITH T GET U DE m : LIST HIS C Ax179 GLY : FREE ODE m LIST WITH GET U FREE mAx1 Ax179 GLY : L THIS W 79 GE CODE I I GET U S T T H FREE THIS T UGL m GLY : A W x CODE Y : LIS 179 G I LIST F T H THIS THIS ET UG mAx1 T R F R E C CODE E WIT LY : LI 79 GE ODE m ST FR H THI mAx1 T A U x G 1 79 GE LY : LI S COD EE WI 79 GE T UGL ST FR FREE TH TH T UGL E mAx WITH EE W Y : LIS IS CO 179 G ITH T T FRE THIS DE m ET UG HIS C E WIT Ax179 CODE L Y : L ODE m GET U IST FR H THI mAx1 GET U S COD GLY : EE WI 79 GE GLY : L LIST F E mAx TH TH T UGL IST FR REE W I Y 1 S 7 E : 9 C E L IST F ODE m GET U CODE WITH ITH T REE W GLY : L mAx1 TH Ax179 HIS C ITH T IST FR 79 GE ODE m GET U HIS C T E G U A E L G x W Y 1 LY : LI WITH ODE m 79 GE ITH T : LIST S HIS C T UGL FRE T FRE THIS Ax179 ODE m E WIT Y : LIS CODE GET U H THI T FRE Ax179 mAx1 GLY : UGLY S E 7 G C W L 9 E O I S I T G DE m TH TH : LIST T FRE ET UG UGLY Ax179 FREE E WIT IS CO LY : LI WITH GET U DE m H THI ST FR mAx1 Ax179 GLY : L THIS S E E C O W DE m 79 GE CODE IST FR ITH T GET U Ax T UGL HIS C mAx1 EE WI GLY : Y : LIS ODE m 79 GE LIST F TH TH THIS T FRE T R I A S U E x G E C 1 CODE E WIT LY : LI WITH 79 GE ODE m ST FR H THI mAx1 T UGL THI Ax179 S COD EE WI 79 GE Y : LIS GET U FREE TH TH T UGL E mAx T FRE GLY : L WITH Y : LIS IS CO E 1 7 W I 9 S I T G T FRE TH TH THIS DE m FREE ET UG E WIT Ax179 CODE IS CO LY : LI GET U H THI ST FR mAx1 DE m GET U S COD GLY : A EE WI 79 GE G x L 1 Y 7 : LIST 9 GET E mAx TH TH LIST T UGL FREE FREE IS CO Y : LIS 179 G WITH WITH DE m ET UG WITH T FRE THIS A THIS L E x Y T 1 W : H 7 L IS CO 9 GET ITH T CODE IST FR CODE HIS C UGLY DE m EE WI mAx1 mAx1 ODE m : LIST Ax179 TH TH 79 G 79 G FREE Ax179 IS CO GET U ET U ET UG WITH DE m GET U GLY : GLY : LY : L Ax179 GLY : LIST LIST LIST IST F GET U LIST F FREE FREE FREE REE W G R L W Y W E WITH E WIT : LIST ITH T ITH T ITH T H THI HIS C THIS HIS C HIS C CODE S COD CODE ODE ODE ODE mAx1 m E m m m m A A A x A A x179 179 G x179 x179 79 G x179 GET ET UG GET U ET UG GET U UGLY UGLY GLY : LY : L LY : L GLY : : LIST : LIST I I L S S L I S T I T S T FREE T FRE FREE FREE FREE FREE E WI WITH WITH WITH WITH THIS TH T THIS THIS THIS THIS CODE HIS C C C C O O O C DE m DE m mAx1 ODE DE m ODE Ax179 mAx1 Ax179 79 G Ax179 ET UG 79 G GET U GET U GET U ET UG LY : L G G G L Y L L YHOMES HOMES FOR SALE HOMES FOR SALE HOMESISFOR HOMES FOR SALE LY : : LISTFOR SALE : LIST FOR SALE Y : LIHOMES T FRSALE ST FR FREE EE W FREE WITH Brick home IT T WITH DQ WITHZLWK VSDFH IRUEEĂ&#x20AC;QLVKLQJ Classic in 723 S. Tyler H $219,000 HIS C THIS Completely Remodeled Double Wide In THIS THIS CODE with 3 additional ODE amazing condition rec/family room! C O m D mAbaths. Ax1bedrooms Milton in Desirable Gated Adult Park. and 1.75 fenced x179 Private, fullyE m 79 G Ax179 back G E E T Living rm. pellet Tyard mature landscaping GET UGwith UGwith New Kitchen and Bathroom, 2 Bedroom, L : newer LY : L system! Really stove to keepYyou Lwarm IST Fin the and a sprinkler I REE W great house.ST FREE W winter months! Retro kitchen 2 Bathroom. New Heat Pump, A/C, Covered ITH w/newer appliances and ITH TH Come see! ISMLS# Deck, Garage, Fenced Yard. $109,000 COD391728 eating nook, separate dining E mA x179 rm. and beautiful hardwoods! Call Pam Lindgren Call Larry 253-835-0642

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Now is the time to invest in Real Estate for your future! Low interest rates + affordable prices = great investment opportunities. Call me todayâ&#x20AC;Ś I am happy to help you with your Real Estate needs. (253) 307-4055 Whether you are a first time home buyer, a distressed homeowner or a veteran investor, I have the tools and systems in place to help you achieve your real estate goals.

For qualifications contact Jenn: Jennifer Pacheco Mortgage Loan Officer

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Section B • Page 12 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, October 19, 2012

Tim Allen

Loretta Lynn Battle at the Boat 89

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October 26, 8:30pm

November 3, 7pm

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You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices.

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