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FREE s Friday, October 5, 2012

high school football ART BY TACOMA STUDENTS

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TACOMAWEEKLY 24 YE A R S O F SE R V I C E BE C A U S E CO M M U N I T Y MAT T E R S

STAFF CUTS, NEW TAXES PROPOSED FOR TACOMA DEPARTMENTS RE-ORGANIZED By John Larson jlarson@tacomaweekly.com

City Manager T.C. Broadnax has proposed eliminating 217 jobs as part of his plan for a balanced budget for the 2013/14 biennium. Broadnax proposes

HOSPITAL TAXES INCREASED

MORE MEETINGS SCHEDULED

“I would hope there are no surprises,” he said. For employees who will remain, Broadnax offers no cost of living adjustment for non-union members. He would restore pay cuts made this year, and X See BUDGET / page A4

has spoken to union representatives about union positions that could be cut. Staff in the Human Resources Department is also talking with employees on the list, to either help them shift to other jobs within city government or to prepare them for the possibility of unemployment.

a $398.4 million General Fund budget, which he discussed with Tacoma City Council on Oct. 2. His plan would close the $63 million shortfall for the next twoyear cycle facing the city. Of the jobs targeted for elimination, 64 are vacant positions. Broadnax said he

‘A VOICE FOR THE VOICELESS’ KWA celebrates 40 years of service SENIOR CARE. The KWA

board is shown here in 1992 when the organization first purchased the building used today as a senior day care for clients with Alzheimer’s and dementia.

HI, AGAIN. By Kathleen Merryman

I

n August, after 29 years at The News Tribune, I thought I could retire. I loved – love – the paper and the family of colleagues. But I did need a break, and when I got the chance for it, I took it. For nearly three decades, News Tribune editors gave me the opportunity to tell some of your best stories, the ones about how you face and fix problems. You took on crime, grief, shabbiness, injustice and the sense that in Pierce County, we settle for less. Your efforts served as patterns for the next neighborhood to use and adapt. You made this place lovely in aspect and in attitude. With your typical grace, when you heard I was leaving The News Tribune, you invited me to join you – gardening, talking up the town, painting, pulling ivy, collecting roadside trash. Just last week, Greg Newkirk of Paint Tacoma-Pierce Beautiful handed me a pickaxe to excavate a trench in the rock-packed clay of a homeowner’s front yard on 112th Street East. It was too late. I had drifted into deep sloth. I’d lost focus and was flunking retirement, the X See HI, AGAIN / page A3

By Matt Nagle

NEIGHBORHOOD COUNCILS

matt@tacomaweekly.com

W

hat started four decades ago as a small social club for area Korean women has since grown to be one of the largest social service agencies in the state, serving an average of 150,000 clients a year. Its name is the Korean Women’s Association (KWA) and on Oct. 10, KWA’s 40th anniversary will be celebrated with a “friendraising and fundraising” luncheon at the Greater Tacoma Convention and Trade Center to which the public is invited. The luncheon will feature a Northwest celebrity giving the keynote address – Jesse Jones from KING 5 News. Known widely as local hero “Get Jesse” for his investigative consumer reports, Jones is a KWA ambassador because his mother receives home-care services from the non-profit organization. “Jesse is a perfect fit for our theme ‘Hand in Hand,’ meaning together we extend our hand to people in need, creating a greater reach and impact,” said KWA Executive Director Peter Ansara. Under the theme “Hand in Hand: A Voice for the Voiceless,” the luncheon and benefit will offer cultural food and entertainment, guest speakers, client testimonies and networking opportunities with the nearly 700 people expected to attend. Organizers are calling the event a “friendraiser” with the aim of building more partnerships with the broader community. “We are looking forward to sharing the life changing impact of our program with the community,” said KWA board member Chong Dameron. “From breast cancer navigation to lowincome housing, we are about helping people in need.”

FROM HUMBLE BEGINNINGS

Back in 1972, a small group of Korean X See KWA / page A3

Shelton beats Wilson A6

CELEBRATE 20 YEARS OF ACTIVISM

PHOTOS COURTESY OF KWA

FOUNDING MEMBERS. Among KWA’s early visionary founders were (left to right, top to bottom): Myung Allard, Sulja Warnick, Kim Namhee, Oksun Wilson and Park Songja.

KOREAN WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION CELEBRATES 40 YEARS OF SERVICE WHEN:

anniversary celebration at the Asian Pacific Cultural Center, Tacoma Fire Department Medical Services Officer, Roger Edington, left, and Assistant Police Chief Mike Ake, far right, held the councils’ banner as a backdrop for Bill Baarsma, Nancy Davis, Ginny Eberhardt, Skip and Laura Vaughn and Elton Gatewood, who have been with the councils from the start. By Kathleen Merryman Kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

Wednesday, Oct. 10

TIME:

11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

WHERE:

Greater Tacoma Convention and Trade Center

TICKETS:

PHOTO BY CAROL WOLFE

20TH ANNIVERSARY. At the Tacoma Neighborhood Councils’ 20th

www.kwahandinhand.com

How would you like to have a Walmart instead of 83 acres of parkland and trails at Wapato Hills? Nuclear waste moving through the Port of Tacoma? No? Well, how about neighborhoods without speed bumps, banners, planters, murals, street lights or a strong voice at every level of local govern-

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ment? No again? Then thank the determined Tacomans who fought for – and occasionally over and at – the neighborhood councils that celebrated their 20th anniversary Sept. 27. Those councils have accomplished exactly what their founders wanted, and more than a few people in Tacoma’s city government feared: They have been the framework through which X See 20 YEARS / page A4

Windy City music B4

Hot blues B5 VISIT US ON FACEBOOK facebook.com/tacomaweekly

LIFE LESSONS: Book examines teaching youth in juvenile justice system. PAGE B3

City Briefs ................A2 Local News...............A3

Sports ......................A6 A&E ....................... ..B1

Make A Scene ........ B5 Calendar ................. B6

Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Two Sections | 20 Pages


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City Briefs

Police Blotter ;9667,9:/66;:46;690:;

A Washington State Patrol trooper shot a man on Sept. 22 after a high-speed chase. It started near the King County line, where a Puyallup man was driving erratically and fast, at speeds up to 130 mph. The motorist crashed on Interstate 5 near Bay Street, then allegedly rammed the patrol car driven by Sean Chatterton. The trooper fired at the suspect, hitting him in the wrist. The suspect drove off, eventually losing control at an on-ramp to State Route 16. He was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence.

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A man walked into the Safeway store on South 56th Street on Sept. 22. He pulled a handgun on an employee and demanded cash. He fled in a vehicle.

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A man was arrested after a shooting at a downtown bar on Sept. 22. Police report the suspect became upset with security guards at the bar, located at 728 Pacific Ave., earlier in the evening. He returned after closing time and fired shots at the front door. Officers had contacted the suspect earlier in the night. They found him at his Tacoma home, took him into custody and confiscated his weapon.

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A man allegedly tied up his roommate and hit him in the head with a sledgehammer on Sept. 20. The incident happened in the 6400 block of South ‘M’ Street. A third roommate came home and found the bound victim. The suspect fled in the victim’s car after taking his car keys, cash and credit cards. The victim was taken to a hospital for treatment.

TACOMAWEEKLY 24 YE A R S O F SE R V I C E BE C A U S E CO M M U N I T Y MAT T E R S

Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC

2588 Pacific Highway, Fife, WA 98424  ‹-(?!  7\ISPZOLY!John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com 5L^Z+LZR!news@tacomaweekly.com 4HUHNPUN,KP[VY! Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com :[HMM>YP[LYZ!John Larson / jlarson@tacomaweekly.com Kate Burrows / kburrows@tacomaweekly.com Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Kathleen Merryman / kathleen@tacomaweekly.com Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com :WVY[Z,KP[VY!Jeremy Helling/ jhelling@tacomaweekly.com 7HNPUH[PVU!Tim Meikle / tim@tacomaweekly.com; Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Tammy Vince Cruz >LI+L]LSVWLYZ! Cedric Leggin, Ed Curran 7OV[VNYHWOLY! Rocky Ross *VU[YPI\[PUN>YP[LYZ! Karen Westeen, Steve Mullen, David B. Hardt, Dave Davison (K]LY[PZPUN!Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Nicole Boote / nicole@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. Tacoma Weekly welcomes letters to the editor, your opinions and viewpoints. Anonymous letters will not be published. Tacoma Weekly reserves the right to edit letters for length, content and potentially libelous material. Please send them to above address or e-mail us at letters@tacomaweekly.com.

Subscriptions are available for $52 per year.

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County Executive Pat McCarthy proposes spending less on general government services in 2013 than is budgeted for this year. Her 2013 budget proposal makes strategic cuts in most departments to achieve a $1.6 million reduction in the General Fund, which receives undesignated revenues that finance the majority of traditional services associated with county government. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are not relying on grants or bailouts or wishes for better times. This is a stable and sustainable budget,â&#x20AC;? McCarthy said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It relies on realistic revenue assumptions, builds on our goal of enhancing customer service and continues investments in key areas that help our economy and communities grow and prosper.â&#x20AC;? McCarthy outlined themes and highlights during her annual budget address to Pierce County Council on Sept. 25. Under the executiveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposal: General Fund spending would drop from $275.6 million to $274 million; approximately 79 percent of the General Fund would be dedicated to public safety â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the same percentage as this year; total spending would increase by nearly $45 million to $884 million. The increase is primarily due to work on the expansion of the Chambers Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is needed to accommodate growth, replace aging infrastructure and protect Puget Sound; 49 full-time equivalent positions would be cut, including 33 in the General Fund. At least half would come from vacancies through retirements or departures. The executive noted that negotiations continue with all 23 of the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s labor units, so decisions have not been made regarding 2013 salaries and benefits.

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On Sept. 20 more than 100 Goodwill supporters and scholarship recipients celebrated together the unveiling of DreamMakers Plaza. The Plaza is made of individual glass pavers from the founding DreamMakers, each marked with words of encouragement and messages of honor. The DreamMakers scholarships changed the lives of 170 people who might not otherwise receive job training and placement services. Pledges were at the $1,500 and $1,000 levels and provide one full or partial scholarship per donation. The plaza is located at Tacoma Goodwillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Milgard Work Opportunity Center at 714 S. 27th St. in Tacoma, under the living wall.

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Offers of help are pouring into the

Pierce County Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office as Animal Control officers wrap up seizing 39 horses amid an investigation of neglect. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Responding to peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s compassion and generosity is almost as challenging as rescuing the 39 horses,â&#x20AC;? said Pierce County Auditor Julie Anderson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been inundated with offers of help and people wanting to know how to help. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had donation offers from farriers to feed stores and even an equine massage therapist. We were especially touched when a 4-H Club approached us, to have kids take this on as a community service project.â&#x20AC;? Unfortunately, individual volunteers cannot handle or help with the care of the horses, as they are evidence in an investigation. Many of the horses are stallions. These horses have been traumatized and are very difficult â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and sometimes dangerous â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to handle. A volunteer group of experienced horsemen is being assembled to assist with the horses. These men and women come from groups such as Peninsula Mounted Search and Rescue, Backcountry Horsemen, the Pierce County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department, the Washington State Animal Response Team and Pierce County Animal Response Team. In response to the publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desire to help, Anderson encourages people to donate money to help Pierce County pay for care and rehabilitation, which is expected to cost up to $40,000. Donations can be made to: Pierce County Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office, 2401 S. 35th St., Room 200, Tacoma, WA 98409. Donors will receive an acknowledgement letter with the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tax-deductible information. The county also could use muck rakes for cleaning stalls. If members of the public are willing to donate (not loan) these items, contact pcauditor@ co.pierce.wa.us. The Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office has already received two unsolicited donations of nearly two tons of hay, including a donation from an anonymous donor as well as former county employee Dick Zierman and King Feed. These horses are not available for adoption because Pierce County does not own them. They are being held as evidence in a criminal investigation. The owner has the option to surrender the horses to Pierce County but he has declined to do so. If the horses become available for adoption, the Pierce County Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office will make applications available to the public.

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Can you sing the national anthem? Can you entertain a crowd for 15 minutes or less? If so, the Tacoma Stars soccer team needs you. The team has put out a call in search of singers for the national anthem and for performers to

entertain at home games during halftime (approximately 15 minutes). â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is to find some really standout, local talent to showcase,â&#x20AC;? said event and press agent Jamie McCormack of J. McCormack and Company. Finding a singer to perform â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Star Spangled Bannerâ&#x20AC;? before games is the first task at hand, according to McCormack, and other performers will be considered as well for halftime entertainment. Games are family friendly so performersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; material needs to be clean. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For example, a comic would be fantastic, but their material canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be offensive,â&#x20AC;? she said. Chosen performers will not only get to show their talents in front of Tacoma Starsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fans â&#x20AC;&#x201C; both local and those traveling here to watch the games â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but performers will also be included in Stars promotional materials and on the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook fan page. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For someone trying to get a following outside their immediate area, this is a great opportunity to do that,â&#x20AC;? McCormack said. Entertainers will be allowed to bring their merchandise and CDs to sell as well. This could be a reoccurring gig for the right acts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our season runs from November to March and we have normally two to three home games a month. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no reason why we couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have multiple acts depending on what the theme is that night,â&#x20AC;? McCormack said. The Tacoma Stars first home game is in early November, so callbacks are scheduled for around Oct. 20. Those who wish to be considered for the November home games must get their submissions in before Oct. 15. Send a link to your MP3 or video to jmaccocasting@gmail. com. National anthem singers must submit an audio/video performance of the song. Games are at Pacific Sports Center at 2645 S. 80th St.

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#1 CHARD, SACHS MAKING WAVES IN LEADING FALCONS JUNIOR SWIMMERS GARNERING NUMEROUS STATE TIMES

#2 BELLARMINE CONTROLS TEMPO, TOPS STADIUM

LIONS IN EARLY FIRST-PLACE TIE

#3 FIND SHELTER FROM ZOMBIES IN DOME DISTRICT #4 BELLARMINE HAS EYES ON STATE TITLE

RUNNERS USE LAST YEARâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FINISH FOR MOTIVATION

#5 10TH ANNUAL JURIED LOCAL ART EXHIBITION AT THE GALLERY AT TCC

KATHLEEN  MERRYMAN KATHLEEN  MERRYMAN COLUMNIST EMAIL:  KATHLEEN@TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  RIGHT  WITH  TACOMA Tacomans  are  doing  it  right,  and  columnist  Kathleen  Merryman  is  writing   about  it.  In  this  city  of  grit,  sweat  and  quirks,  the    people  count  on  their   own  ingenuity  and  determination  to  address  problems,  do  right  by  their   neighbors,   and   build   community.   And   they   count   on   Kathleen   to   tell   their  stories. 0,/721Â&#x2021;('*(:22'

O T O   T   M E M E H T H   T E   M E M M A M O E A C O T E L   C T S   S WEEL W E W W E N   N   R R U U O O Y             Y

ERNEST  JASMIN ERNEST  JASMIN

ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR EMAIL:  EJASMIN@TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

TACOMA  ROCKS!

In   my   first   dozen   years   covering   the   music   here   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   seen   epic   shows,   translated   Ozzy-speak   and   kicked   it   backstage   with   the   reunited   Sonics.   And   I   still   get   paid   for   this?   Now   that   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   had   the   good   sense   to   defect   to   Tacoma   Weekly   expect   big   changes   in   our   entertainment   coverage,   especially   online   where   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   becoming   Pierce   Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   No.   1   source.   Send   me   your   tips,   rants,   concerns   and,   of   course,   your   bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  demo.  


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Pothole pigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1904

 â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;Š FfIiAaTt POTHOLE

OF THE WEEK

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The 1904 Fiat sitting in the LeMay: Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Car Museum lobby, is not only old, but it also contains all of its original parts from when it rolled off the manufacturing floor 108 years ago. The metal, paint and even the leather seats are original, which makes it a one-of-a-kind uber vintage car in a world where many â&#x20AC;&#x153;classic carsâ&#x20AC;? are largely rebuilt or pieced together from parts of several cars. The Fiat Company was formed at Palazzo Bricherasio in 1899, taking its name from an acronym of Fabbrica Italiana Automobili Torino, which is Italian Automobile Factory of Turin. The car maker got into the racing world from the start, developing cars with little regulations that lead to bare bones chassis with performance engines to keep weight down and increase speed. The 1904 Fiat, with its 60-horsepower engine, was introduced to meet

WKWA

From page A1

women in Tacoma formed a grassroots social club where Korean wives of American servicemen stationed at Fort Lewis Army Base and McChord Air Force Base could find a welcoming place where other Korean women offered help with getting acclimated to American culture. Language barriers and the inability to read or write English made daily tasks, like going to the grocery store or doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office, frustrating and difficult for immigrants. So in attempts to help, KWA sold popular Korean foods such as kimchi and rice cakes to the Korean community to raise money for outreach. Among its offerings, the club provided transportation, translation services and assisted in domestic violence situations. Seven years later, the club filed for, and received, non-profit status and became the Korean Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association of Washington State. Its program expanded to help Asian Pacific

WHi, again same way I flunked statistics in college. Always prone to laziness and disorganization, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d tried to avert the predictable. I made a list at the start, as a sort of springboard. Excavate the closets and landing upstairs. Spiff the guest rooms. Weed and plant and water, weed and plant and water. Charm my way into COBRA insurance. Go archaeological on the mini-van, pantry and laundry room. Oh, there was more. I would read worthwhile books, learn to cast a crab snare a decent distance from shore, walk five miles a day with my husband, lose seven pounds in two months, reboot the unfinished crime novel. The list, it turned out, was not a springboard. It was a plank, and the jobs at the top were the steps to the end of it. Worthwhile books? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve spent my summer vacation with wise-ass detectives and sloppy killers. The crab snare? I did not hit any strangers with it. The five miles, seven pounds and stalled mystery? Nothing but shame. Six weeks into retirement, I was carrying a solid D-minus. Enter the Tacoma Weekly. Publisher John Weymer asked if Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to keep in touch with you, and offered the chance to do it via a column. As my granddaughter (age 6 and so cute you really should ask to see pictures) recently said to her father: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, duh.â&#x20AC;? Speaking like a corporate official, which I promise never to do again, The Weekly and I share two Core Values: s The one on the masthead, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because Community Matters.â&#x20AC;?

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

the demand of rich export markets, including America, since it had a large number of would-be drivers who wanted style. Designed to a high standard of luxury in every detail, it was welcomed by American coachbuilders such as Quimby and Demarest. It was origi-

nally equipped with a four-cylinder engine block, which was later replaced with a six-cylinder engine block that delivered five more horsepower and was manufactured at the plant in Corso Dante. The car on loan to the ACM is owned by Bob Sullivan.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;From breast cancer navigation to low-income housing, we are about helping people in need.â&#x20AC;?

Âś*OVUN+HTLYVU

KWA board member

Islander immigrants and refugees to bridge language and cultural barriers, but soon KWA grew even larger to include all nationalities and the most vulnerable â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the poor, the elderly, the disabled and immigrants that speak little or no English â&#x20AC;&#x201C; thus truly becoming â&#x20AC;&#x153;a voice for the voiceless.â&#x20AC;? Today, KWA works with a budget of $20 million and employs more than 1,000 people to provide social and health services to anyone in need who lives in Pierce, King, Snohomish, Thurston, Lewis, Mason, Clallam, Jefferson, Grays Harbor, Cowlitz or Pacific counties. Since beginning in 1972, KWA has helped more than 4

From page A1

million low-income people with social and health services through partnerships with more than 100 area service organizations, non-profits and government entities. KWA services range from meal sites and day care for seniors, to citizenship and immigration services and basic food education and outreach. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We change one life at a time,â&#x20AC;? Ansara said, noting the commitment of the KWA board of directors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Their passion is unbelievable to help, to serve and to see a positive outcome.â&#x20AC;? To learn more about KWA and its services, visit www.kwacares.org.

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll catch up with personal stories when we can learn from them. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have fun, too, with quirks, work parties, mysterious changes in the cityscape, and Pothole Pigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new best friend, the Gone

for Good Elephants. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s keep in touch. E-mail me at kathleen@ tacomaweekly.com. Or give me a ring at (253) 7595773. Hi, again. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice to be back.

s The one in the office, do good work, be fair and have some fun. I have another chance to keep up with the good you are doing. Most weeks, this column will be about whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right with Tacoma. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re starting with an overview of the changes members of the Neighborhood Councils have made SPECIAL OFFER over 20 years, and where they hope to go from here. "VCVSO8BZ4"t"VCVSO 8"t Over the next few months, Two Blocks East From Muckleshoot Casino weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll check in with each of the eight councils to get more specific, and to get the flavor of the neighborhoods. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see if and how budget cuts affect programs that support the work neighbors do toward the safety, loveliness and friendliness of the city. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll drop in on gardens, Birthday community and otherwise, Roll FREE Happy Birthday Roll Any Sushi Roll with this Ad, because I like them. Under the reservation Except Special Rolls and Sushi. purchase of 50 or more Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll share cool new &YQJSFTt"VCVSO-PDBUJPO0OMZ with Ad ways to do good.

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Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;pothole initiative,â&#x20AC;? and in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and is continuing those efforts well in to 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or return â&#x20AC;&#x201C; each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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W20 years

From page A1

the people of Tacoma exercise power. The idea for the councils aired at a community summit Mayor Karen Vialle convened in 1990. Vialle later asked Elton Gatewood, Lyle Quasim, Skip Vaughn, Jim Walton, Marion Weed and Bill Baarsma to knead the idea into an ordinance to present to Tacoma City Council. Vaughn, of South Tacoma, and Weed, of Northeast Tacoma, carried grievances to the table, Baarsma said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They thought that the city was not paying proper attention to their areas, and they had some reason to believe that,â&#x20AC;? he said. That made a good many city leaders nervous, and Baarsma heard from them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first thing I found was the fear and trepidation with many people in the city bureaucracy,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some characterized the whole idea as creating forums for malcontents and naysayers.â&#x20AC;? The pols had a point.

WBudget

There were plenty of frustrated neighborhood activists out there who had waited too long to be heard. They started venting. Nancy Davis remembered the first meetings on the East Side after a wary council passed the ordinance forming the eight neighborhood councils. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Things were so emotional, people would pound the table when they had discussions,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Things were not coming together well on the issues.â&#x20AC;? Enter Elton Gatewood, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s liaison with the councils. Gatewood, a veteran community organizer, brought grace, dignity and order to the process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Under Eltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guidance we had an annual conference on how to conduct meetings and communicate, a lot of the things that were not known at the grassroots level,â&#x20AC;? Davis said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was an element of education in knowing how to interact with other policy makers.â&#x20AC;? As councils encountered issues and developed strategies to deal with them, they passed on the knowledge. It was a job for

From page A1

eligible employees would see step increases. He also projects health care costs to rise by 12 percent a year in 2013 and 2014. Broadnax said he intends to shrink the organization so it is sustainable for the future. Broadnaxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s revenue forecast for 2013/14 shows

property taxes at $106 million, up $5 million from the amount in the 2011/12 adopted budget. He has sales taxes at $80 million, down by $4 million; business taxes at $83 million, up $5 million; and utility taxes at $89 million, up $1 million. Other revenue is forecast at $39 million,

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down $8 million. He proposes two new revenue sources. The first is a vehicle tab fee of $20 a year, expected to generate $3.87 million. The second is a complete elimination of an exemption to the business and occupation tax for nonprofit health care providers. Earlier this year the council reduced this exemption to 75 percent. Broadnaxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposal would generate $5.5 million over two years. Broadnax has proposed some reorganization of city government. The Human Rights and Human Services Department would be merged with code enforcement and Community Based Services to become the new Neighborhood and Human Services Department. The Planning Division and Building and Land Use Services would be removed from their current home in the Community and Economic Development and become a new Planning and Development Services Department. Broadnax said he had heard interest in this from the council and the public. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will have benefits in the long run.â&#x20AC;? Utilities would be mov-

wonks the likes of Sally Perkins, who dove deep into the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s zoning and land-use regulations to protect neighborhoods with cheap housing from being exploited. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We did all kinds of things with getting landlords who shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be there out of there and sharing our successes and failures with each other and learning more each time,â&#x20AC;? Davis said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was so incredibly useful, but it was one of the things that bored me to death. It was like having to take castor oil.â&#x20AC;? The neighborhood councils began collaborating. When the federal Department of Energy put Tacoma on the short list for the port that would take in all inbound nuclear waste for the nation, Baarsma recalled the neighborhood councils mobilized enough protest to get Tacoma off that list. When a developer wanted to bulldoze the drumlin and wetlands at Wapato Hills and build a Walmart, they worked together to block the deal and persuade the city to buy the land. When South Tacoma needed an ally, and ing from Public Works to a new Environmental Services Department. Mayor Marilyn Strickland described the proposed budget as â&#x20AC;&#x153;honestâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;precise.â&#x20AC;? She said it is unrealistic to think the city government can continue to function without reducing in size. Councilmember Jake Fey said he appreciated the budget for its â&#x20AC;&#x153;lack of smoke and mirrors.â&#x20AC;? Fey was the sole member to vote against the budget adopted for 2011/12, which was offered by former City Manager Eric Anderson. He said Broadnaxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposed budget has clarity on assumptions on revenue and expenses. Councilmember Ryan Mello said he agrees with plans for reorganization at city hall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it is really responsive to the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s priorities.â&#x20AC;? He said they would not add new staff positions and would create opportunities for more direct communication between the staff and Broadnax. He said there would be less red tape and layers of management. He thinks the Neighborhood and Community Ser-

money, to buy the old Manitou Community Center, Ginny Eberhardt and the West End Neighborhood Council stepped up. That issue is still live. That is how it has been with the councils. They earn a benefit, from a park to a grant, then they make it better. Each year, they agree on what their neighborhoods need â&#x20AC;&#x201C; banners, speed bumps, streetlights, tools â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and apply for the money to pay for them. Give them money to buy a brush hog to clear blackberry briars, and they do the dirty work. Give them leeway to reclaim a park or a gulch, and they will drive across town for work parties with other councils â&#x20AC;&#x201C; over and over. All of this takes some support from the city. Gatewood has retired, and his successor, Carol Wolfe, has taken on his duties as well as many others. Neighborhood councils have developed the strengths to spin scarce funding into community gold, but they will always need city funding and staff time. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hope city officials remember their multiplier effect as the cutting continues.

vices Department fits well with the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s priorities for making the city safe, clean and attractive. Mello thinks shifting the environmental functions out of the Public Works Department makes sense, as the existing department will be able to better focus on roads and streetlights. Mello noted he is already in favor of the $20 tab fee. The hospital B&O tax is something he said he would like to ponder and have dialogue with the public on. Mello noted tax exemptions are often used to prop up a new industry. The hospitals in Tacoma have become established, profitable operations, he noted. And they benefit from various city services, which bolsterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the city managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s argument for eliminating the exemption. Mello said most of the revenue projections are realistic. He would like more information on the projections for utility revenue. The council will have ample opportunity for further discussions. During its noon study session on Oct. 9 it will examine the Tacoma Public Utilities budget.

A special meeting from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Oct. 11 will be devoted to city utilities, environmental services and utility rates. The study session on Oct. 16 will be on revenues, cost drivers, salaries and benefits such as health care coverage and retirement packages. On Oct. 23 it will be on Public Works and the proposed Neighborhood and Community Services Department. On Oct. 23 the topics will be Finance Department, Tacoma Public Library, Community and Economic Development Department and Planning and Development Services. On Oct. 31 a special meeting from 1-4 p.m. will focus on Tacoma Police Department. Tacoma Fire Department will be examined on Nov. 6. On Nov. 13 the council will examine Municipal Court, Information Technology Services and Public Assembly Facilities. The city also plans to hold public forums in the five council districts between Oct. 22 and Nov. 8.

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-YPKH`6J[VILY‹tacomaweekly.com‹:LJ[PVU(‹7HNL

SCHOOL PAGE

ARTWORK, POETRY AND WRITING FROM TACOMA STUDENTS An amazing teacher, Ms. Raike, at Stewart Middle School last year, pulled great creativity from her students. We were thrilled with the depth, humor, and passion in their writings. THE CHERRY BLOSSOM TREE

When I was younger, and when I cried, I found peace under this old cherry tree, where fresh cut grass lay beneath my feet. The wind that carried the sweet spring breeze made me drop to my knees to find an orange marigold. Slowly but softly, I plucked it up to smell it’s sweet and savory scent. It if wasn’t for this ‘ol cherry blossom tree, I would have never seen the beauty of the world in front of me. The Sun Heat blazing and wind carrying it through this little town. I don’t even remember why I frowned? But this old cherry blossom tree, you were always there for me. By: Courtney McCauley

READING

When I read, it’s crazy. It’s like watching a movie, for me. I can imagine it all for myself. The way I visualize the settings. The characters. The voice I hear as I read. There isn’t much in life that I enjoy more, for now. When I read, I enter a new world. I feel like I literally do. I get so consumed. Sometimes I forget that I am reading. Sometimes, I feel like I am watching everything play out, not just reading letters on paper. Reading is not a chore for me. It is a passion. A privilege. There are so many options. So many genres. Adventure. Sci-fi. Mystery. Romance. Fiction. Non-fiction. Whatever you prefer. I prefer it all. When I read, I escape. The only life I’m worrying about is my characters. There are many books that I like, but few that inspire me, that leave me in thought long after it is over, that leave me wondering and full of curiosity. I read to find those books. Whether it is fiction or non-fiction, on paper or on a computer, reading is one of the greatest things to do, and one of the greatest things to learn from. By: Moriah Rhone

Myles Albaugh, 5, and Sabine Reyns, 6, are students in Mrs. Nydegger’s class at Geiger Montessori. SECRET ISLAND

Rowen Higley, a kindergarten student at Geiger Montessori, was asked to draw a circle in the manner of an artist they studied, Wassily Kandinsky. Rowen had such fun, that he insisted on doing nine circles!

Jade was very adventurous, and that sometimes got her in trouble. “I got a boat,” said Jade’s Dad. “Yay!” said Jade. Jade walked over to the dock where the huge boat was. “It’s awesome!” said Jade. “I got a surprise for you!” said Jade’s Dad. “What! What?” said Jade. “You are old enough to drive a boat!” Jade passed the test. She drove the boat in a storm, but then she saw something ahead—an island! Jade told everybody about it and named it Jadetopia. Now she was famous! By: Kaia

Both Kaia and Hank are lower elementary students of Mrs. Bradley, at Geiger Montessori School.

ARZELLA

Teacher: Ms. Blakely

>> Kudos to the adults in Moriah’s life who have helped to foster this great love of reading! This is poem a that is every teacher’s dream for their students. One day I was thinking. I thought about what it would be like to jump out the window. I was only five, so common sense was out of the question. I said, “Okay, let’s do it.” So I stuck my feet out the window. I sat there for a few minutes, then dropped. It felt kinda cool, ‘til I reached the bottom. At the bottom there was broken glass. I yelled in pain, and lay on the ground, barely feeling my feet. Mom saw me. She vacumned my feet to get off the glass. I bandaged my feet, then went to sleep.

B

A

Watercolor by: Abrar, Geiger Montessori, Teacher: Mr. Daray By: Jaesun

Haikus and 100 word stories by SAMI students in Mrs. Shelton’s Creative Writing Classes.

Delightful watercolor drawings by Bianca (A), Kalea (B), and Zola (C), Geiger Montessori, Teacher: Ms. Diamond

C

After studying many types of creation stories, Neenah, 3rd gr., Rylan, 1st gr., and Daryna, each tried a hand at writing their own creation story. All three go to Geiger Montessori and are students of Ms. Diamond. ONCE THERE WAS NOTHING Once there was nothing except for a young girl named Ewecha and her father, Vman, floating in space. Ewecha always dreamed of a place where everybody could live with weird creatures. One day Vman caught Ewecha daydreaming about a place called Earth, and screamed at her for being childish, telling her that she needed to grow up. One hundred years later, Ewecha made up something called dance, and with each move, something she dreamed of came true. First she spun, and there was a big ball. Next she wiggled, and there was an ocean. Then she jumped three times and there was land. Next she wiggled her arms, and there were plants, and she wiggled her head, and there were animals. Two hundred years later, she did all her moves together, and there were her first people, Adam and Eve. By: Neenah

Sand bar shark feeding off crustasians, crabs, and more, then eaten in soup. By: Johnathan Sipes Dark and Dangerous, wolves hunt the weak in big packs, simple and refined. By: Jason Blair

MOON JELLIES

In a glowing place floating around, my stingers floating, I glow-in-the-dark. By: Lauren Budd

SHARKS

Ragged teeth and jaws. Called killers of the sea, these scary, gray monsters. By: Katrina Sortor

BOY OF THE GOD

Once upon a time a long time ago, there was a man

fighted for his family and animals. He did win. Yay! By: Rylan

EARTH

God first created Adam and Eve, then he created the birds. Then He created heavens and the Earth, and all the trees. Then he created the rainbow. By: Daryna

Red wolves, beautiful, prowl their territory here, so strong and loving. By: Theron Konkel

Teachers and students interested in submitting work may get guidelines or information from Shari Shelton, (253) 906-3769 (before 8 a.m. and after 3 p.m.) or at sshelto@tacoma.k12.wa.us, or may contact Donna McCracken, (253) 475-8387 or dmccra@comcast.net


Sports

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2012

:769;:>(;*/

A8 X SECTION A, PAGE 6

9(4:-(33;6 :/,3;65/67, -693,(.<,;0;3,

Veteran leaders eye postseason

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

;6<./;(5+,4. (Top) Wilson’s doubles

*<9;0:»+,-,5:, :;6<;05)36>6<;>05

Bellarmine cruises over Stadium

E

arly penalties on offense were about the only thing that could be perceived as a negative for Curtis against Todd Beamer on Sept. 28. The defense was dominant all night long for the Vikings, not allowing a first down until late in the first half as Curtis cruised to a 49-0 win at home over the Titans. E.J. Deveaux got the Vikings on the board with a 13-yard touchdown run on Curtis’ first drive after a penalty negated a 25-yard touchdown pass from Scott Wismer to Carter McKay. Another penalty negated a 47-yard strike from Wismer to Jason Williams two possessions later, but Wismer then scored from a yard out to put the Vikings up 14-0 early in the second quarter. “We’ve still got a penalty bugaboo,” said Curtis head coach Clay Angle. “We’ve got to eliminate that if we’re really going to be a decent team.” After the defense forced its sixth straight three-and-out late in the first half, the Vikings’ Beau Olson blocked a punt and recovered it at Todd Beamer’s 15-yard line, and Wismer hit McKay for a 15-yard score and a 21-0 lead at the half. Curtis’ defense held the Titans to less than 10 total yards in the first half, as Todd Beamer had seven negativeyardage plays. “Our defense has been playing stellar all year,” Angle said. “They’re doing a wonderful job.” The Vikings put the game away early in the second half, as Williams returned the opening kickoff 72 yards for a score, and Deveaux scored from one yard out on the next drive to make it 35-0 with 7:48 to go in the third. “The line was blocking pretty (well),” said Deveaux, who finished with 17 carries for 105 yards. “We were able to spread the ball (in the passing game), so that helped us.” Wismer was 10-for-13 for 190 yards, while McKay – son of Todd Beamer head coach Darren McKay – had four catches for 79 yards and Williams added three catches for 79 yards. Mitchell Hersey had a 14-yard touchdown run in the fourth quarter and finished with nine carries for 52 yards, and Peyton Spencer added a 12-yard touchdown to close out

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

36*2,+05 Curtis E.J. Deveaux (top) breaks away from the Todd Beamer defense as he rushed for 105 yards and two touchdowns. The Vikings’ Ryan Price (bottom) sacks quarterback Taylor Davis, as Curtis’ defense excelled throughout the night.

the scoring. The Vikings improved to 4-1 in league play with the win – one game behind first-place Federal Way – as Curtis was scheduled to play at Spanaway Lake on Oct. 4 at 7 p.m. By Jeremy Helling

3065:963305.>0;/)0.>05

Injuries, illnesses and overconfidence were three factors Bellarmine head coach Tom Larsen had to think

about before his squad’s game against a reeling Stadium team on Sept. 28. But before too long, those worries would be laid to rest as the Lions would score 42 unanswered first-half points, rolling to a 58-7 win to stay undefeated atop the Narrows 4A standings. “I was proud of the way that we prepared, we really came ready to play,” Larsen said. Quarterback Sefo Liufau epitomized the near perfect play, going X See FOOTBALL / page A9

=0:0;!>>>;(*64(>,,23@*64‹,4(03!:769;:';(*64(>,,23@*64

team of Cooper Eddy (left) and Seth Thomas (right) earned a win over Shelton and will look to do damage again in the postseason. (Bottom) Thomas sends a solid backhand across the net. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

Despite a setback against Shelton, the Wilson boys’ tennis team is aiming for at least a share of its second straight league title, with several playoff-seasoned veterans in the fold again. The Rams fell 3-2 to the Highclimbers on Oct. 2, as senior Peter Koessler led Wilson’s effort with a solid 6-0, 6-0 win in number-one singles over Josh Priest. “I was just making my serves and winning points – focusing on each point individually and making my shots,” said Koessler, who finished seventh in the singles bracket at the 3A state tournament last spring. “I was playing pretty well.” Koessler is one of three Wilson seniors that advanced at least to the district tournament last year, and his only singles loss of the season came to Olympia’s John Stormans, who was a member of the 4A doubles championship squad last year. “He’s been steamrolling through the league,” said Wilson coach Quoc Nguyen of Koessler. “He’s known as a grinder. He keeps the ball in play and lets the other guy make the mistake. “What he’s been able to develop this year is his short game. He’s able to come to the net and take the short balls and do more damage with the short balls.” Senior Seth Thomas and junior Cooper Eddy put up the Rams’ other win against the Highclimbers, defeating Dalton Jaske and Andrew Johnson 6-3, 6-2. The duo advanced to the district tournament last year, and aims even higher this year. “This is their third year together,” Nguyen said. “Cooper and Seth are starting to peak at the right time.” Wilson senior Boris Potapov and teammate Davin Hanton fell to Shelton’s Alex Deacon and John Pentony 6-2, 6-3 in an upset. Still, Nguyen views Potapov – who advanced to the state tournament in the doubles bracket last year – as a threat to do damage in the postseason as a singles player. The Highclimbers’ Brandon Goodale knocked off Jeremiah Bullock 4-6, 6-1, 6-3 in number-two singles, while Zach Lund and Justin Demattos defeated Ernie Enkhanzhaya and Yann Shaw 6-1, 6-2 to help give Shelton the win. But for the Rams, and Koessler in particular, the ultimate goal will be advancing to the district tournament – which now takes place in the fall instead of the spring – and then advancing to state once again. “I’m hoping to get in the top four,” Koessler said. “What I experienced at state was sort of eye-opening. The skill level grows exponentially. The guy I lost to last year graduated, so I’m more confident this year. I strive to do well.”


-YPKH`6J[VILYÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNL

;/<5+,9)09+:;67-(3*65: 05*96::;6>5*3(:/ Life Christian routs Chimacum to remain in first place By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

Displaying a good blend of experienced and youthful talent, Mount Tahoma swept past Foss 25-15, 25-16, 25-4 in the crosstown Narrows 3A volleyball tilt on Sept. 26. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m happy, what can I say,â&#x20AC;? said Thunderbirds head coach Terry Lynn Thayer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m happy that the girls played together.â&#x20AC;? The Thunderbirds raced out to an early 5-0 lead in the first set thanks to a couple blocks and a kill by Rejie Wright, but senior Breana Brown helped bring the Falcons back, and they got within 14-10 on a finish by Faâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;amanvia Faâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;alavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;au. Senior setter Aliyah Carector responded with two aces for the Thunderbirds to regain control, and freshman Alanna Bates-Carector later added a kill to claim the first set. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The future looks bright,â&#x20AC;? said Thayer of her squad, â&#x20AC;&#x153;because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really talented and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re willing to work hard.â&#x20AC;? The Falcons stayed in the second set early with solid play from Amber and Breana Brown, but strong serving from Briana Pressley and outside play by BatesCarector led the Thunderbirds on a 7-0 run midway through the set to take control. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They let a couple streaks go by, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tough, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to learn to break out of that,â&#x20AC;? said Foss head coach Ramon Maddox of his team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes everything goes wrong at one time. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tough one for the girls, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have to move past that.â&#x20AC;? Mount Tahoma charged out to a 19-1 lead in the third set, not letting the Falcons establish

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

ABOVE THE NET. (Left) Mount Tahoma freshman Alanna Bates-Carector sends a ball back

into Fossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; side of the court. (Right) The Thunderbirdsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Aliyah Carector (right) sets a ball as the Falconsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Shelondra Harris (left) goes up for a block.

any sort of rhythm as the Thunderbirds quickly closed out the match. Carector finished with 16 aces and 12 assists, while Rosalia Taula had 14 aces, Cydney Tillman added nine aces and Pressley had six kills for the Thunderbirds. Amber Brown led the Falcons with nine kills, while Monica Villanueva had 21 assists and Kylie Thornton was the defensive leader with 17 digs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve just got to find a way to support each other better and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be good,â&#x20AC;? Maddox said.

30-,*/90:;0(5

Famous Medium Coming to Camp Edgewood Lionel Owen, internationally renowned English medium, speaker, and teacher will be available for private readings October 1629 at Camp Edgewood NSAC Spiritualist camp. Readings are $50.00 for 30 minutes He will also be offering classes. To find out more about classes, prices, or to schedule a reading please call 253-927-2050 or email campedgewood@yahoo.com

+6405(;,:*/04(*<4

After a slow start against Chimacum, Life Christian used its solid depth and a couple of dominating stretches to cruise to a 25-13, 25-9, 25-4 win over the Cowboys to remain atop the Nisqually 1A standings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The girls did great,â&#x20AC;? said Eagles head coach Tracy King. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every time the ball came over they were in the right spot. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing together.â&#x20AC;? Life Christian, who lost just one player off of last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s state tournament team, held an early

13-12 lead in the first set thanks to two kills apiece by Carly Normandeau and Grace Bouffiou. They then rattled off an 11-0 run thanks to solid serving from sophomore Kylie Burton and dominant play up front by junior Johnnise Moore. Moore then took over from the outset in the second set, helping the Eagles charge out to a 15-4 lead with three aces and three kills early. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The girls have really been working hard on spot serving and serving to certain players on the court,â&#x20AC;? King said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When they

come on the floor any time out, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very focused and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ready to go.â&#x20AC;? Life Christian was never threatened from then on, with Normandeau closing out the second set with an emphatic block. Burton then took charge again with more solid serving during a 19-0 run at the beginning of the third set to put away the match. Sophomore Maddy Long had five of her six kills in the third set, further displaying the Eaglesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; talent and depth. Moore led the way up front with 14 kills, seven aces and six digs, while Bouffiou had six kills, seven assists and 11 digs and Normandeau added five kills and 21 assists. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having Grace and Carly â&#x20AC;&#x201C; both setters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; on the floor, we have hands everywhere,â&#x20AC;? said King, also noting the dominance of Moore and junior Ashlee Hamilton in the middle and the emergence of Long on the outside. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What more can we ask for? Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re amazing young ladies so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice to see them be successful.â&#x20AC;? The win put the Eagles at 7-1 in league play as they sit in first place by two games. With the number of experienced returning players, King admits that while her squad remains focused on the task at hand, the excitement is growing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is all about unity,â&#x20AC;? King said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last year we meshed so well. With only losing one player, they got (the unity) back. The first couple weeks it took us a while to get going, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just taking off (now). Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re excited for the rest of the season.â&#x20AC;?

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:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNLÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;-YPKH`6J[VILY added nine kills. Sophomore setter Taylor Brooks had a game-high 31 assists and Jayme Jacinto led the defensive effort with 12 digs. The Titans had a blistering .371 hit percentage as a team. The Titans will look to keep the winning ways going as they travel to take on Clark on Oct. 5 at 7 p.m. before hosting Lower Columbia on Oct. 8 at 7 p.m. and travelling to take on Pierce College on Oct. 10 at 7 p.m.

SPORTSWATCH LUTESâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; MEN IN SECOND The Pacific Lutheran menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer team salvaged a split at Whitworth and Whitman last weekend, but has won five of its last six matches and sits in second place in the Northwest Conference. The Lutes took a 2-1 lead early in the second half against Whitworth on Sept. 29, but the 11thranked and first place Pirates rallied for a 3-2 win. Forward Emmanuel Amarh got the Lutes on the board in the 24th minute with his fifth goal of the season to tie it 1-1, as junior midfielder Giancarlo Santoro was credited with the assist. Santoro collected another assist on Shane Gutierrezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strike from 25 yards out that made it 2-1 in the 57th minute. But the Pirates answered with two goals, including one from Gig Harbor grad Robby Ubben in the 84th minute for the win. The Lutes were outshot 22-10 in the match, but PLU keeper Joe Rayburn made eight saves to keep his squad in it. The Lutes responded with a 2-1 win at Whitman on Sept. 30, as Justin Manao put the Lutes up 1-0 with an unassisted goal in the 30th minute. After Whitman tied it midway through the second half, junior defender Jeff Piaquadio gave the Lutes the win on a goal off Amarhâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s corner in the 81st minute. Sitting at 5-1 in conference play, the Lutes now host thirdplace Puget Sound on Oct. 5 at 5 p.m.

*(.,:769;9,:<3;:

PHOTO BY HEATHER PERRY

+0--,9,5*,4(2,9 Pacific Lutheran forward Emmanuel Amarh had two goals and an

assist as the Lutes split a tough conference road trip last weekend and sit in second place in the conference. Soundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Derek Wilson placed sixth with a two-day score of 143, while PLUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Justin Lee shot a 145 to tie for eighth place. The Loggers combined to shoot a 10-over 586 as a team, five strokes ahead of the Lutes to claim second. Whitworthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lyle Rudnicki shot a 69 on both days to claim the individual title and lead the Pirates to a 10-stroke victory as a team over the Loggers. The Lutes and Loggers will get together again on Oct. 14-15 for the PLU Invitational at Chambers Bay Golf Course.

<7:73<.63-73(*, SECOND AND THIRD The Puget Sound men took second while Pacific Lutheran took third at the Whitman Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Invitational Golf Tournament at the Wine Valley Golf Club in Walla Walla on Sept. 30 and Oct. 1. Logger sophomore Adam Bean and Lute junior Dustin Hegge tied for third individually with a twounder 142, as Hegge shot a threeunder 69 on the first day, while Bean fired a 69 on day two. Puget

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Kniffinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one-yard touchdown catch in the first quarter got the Loggers on the board, and his 10-yard score in the third quarter gave Puget Sound its only lead, as the senior finished with 10 catches for 203 yards and three touchdowns. A frenetic fourth quarter featured seven touchdowns, with the Pioneers outscoring the Loggers 28-20 to help seal the win. Kniffinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third touchdown â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a 19-yard strike from quarterback Braden Foley in the fourth quarter â&#x20AC;&#x201C; brought the Loggers to within striking distance at 48-35 and was followed two minutes later by a nine-yard score from Foley to Ryan Rogers. But Pioneers quarterback Keith Welch followed less than 30 seconds later with his fourth touchdown pass to provide the final margin with just two minutes remaining in the

game. Foley finished 23-for-40 for 331 yards, with four touchdowns and two interceptions, while adding a rushing touchdown. Rogers had three catches for 68 yards, and Kupono Park led the Loggersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; running game with 24 carries for 87 yards and a touchdown. At 0-4, the Loggers will look for their first victory when they host Pacific (Ore.) on Oct. 6 at 1 p.m.

;**,=,5:3,(.<,9,*69+ Tacoma Community College picked up a three-set road win over Centralia on Sept. 29, winning 25-21, 25-16, 25-16 to even their regional record to 2-2 while they sit at 16-5 overall on the season. Stadium High grad Ellen Anderson led the Titans with 10 kills, while Brandee Victorino

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Brent â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mankillâ&#x20AC;? Knopp, of Burien, kept his perfect record intact following an impressive secondround stoppage of Brandon Pitts at â&#x20AC;&#x153;CageSport XXIâ&#x20AC;? at the Emerald Queen Casino on Sept. 29. Headlining a talent-rich card, the heavy-handed Knopp connected with crisp elbows in the opening stanza. In the second, both men came out guns blazing. Each fighter connected with strong blows, but Knoppâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s were more powerful. After repeatedly landing strong strikes on Pittsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; head, the referee stopped the contest at 4:21 in the second of a scheduled three-round middleweight contest. Knopp is now 4-0 with all four wins by knockout. Pitts, who is trained by 2000 Olympic silver medalist Matt Linland, falls to 2-2. In a battle of unbeaten lightweights, Emmanuel Sanchez bested Brandon Dudley via razor-thin three-round split decision. Welterweight Jerome Jones demolished previously unbeaten Jeff Degenhardt in 11 seconds. A hard shot dropped Degenhardt and an immediate follow up forced the stoppage. In a battle of Washington natives, CageSport favorite Ryan Mulvihill of Spokane handed Seattleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jacob Boysen his first defeat following a dramatic come-from-behind victory. Halquist Productions returns to the Emerald Queen Casino on Nov. 3 for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Battle at the Boat 89.â&#x20AC;? More information will be available shortly at www.Halquistproductions.com.

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WFootball From page A6

7-for-8 for 178 yards and three touchdowns, with slot receiver Garrett McKay on the receiving end of all three scores. The Tigers could manage only two first downs and 50 total yards in the first half, crossing midfield just once. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have to give a lot of credit to the defense, who gave our offense some good field position tonight,â&#x20AC;? said Larsen. With 40-point deficits come running clocks, and such was the case at the start of the third quarter with the Lions leading 44-0 at half time. Bellarmine sophomore Nate Golterman had four carries for 49 yards and one touchdown, a five-yard scamper midway through the fourth quarter as he took advantage of the opportunity for playing time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been working on the scout team and getting as many reps as I possibly can get,â&#x20AC;? Golterman said. Asked what it would take to continue to see more game action, Golterman answered â&#x20AC;&#x153;as many reps as I can get and then some.â&#x20AC;? Stadium finally dented the scoreboard in the fourth quarter, as quarterback Tre Scott hit Jacob Bills with a touchdown pass. With the big win, Bellarmine started to look ahead to a matchup against Capital on Oct. 5. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hope to get a few players back for the game, but we will not know until later in the week,â&#x20AC;? said Larsen. In addition to the margin of victory, the Lions also rolled up a total of 373 yards of offense, with 188 yards on the ground and 185 through the air as the Tigers had no answer for the explosive Bellarmine offense. While Larsen did not know for sure who would be available on Oct. 5, he is well aware of what the Capital Cougars can bring to the table. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They like to pound the rock and own the clock for most of the night. It will be our job to control the line of scrimmage.â&#x20AC;? By Steve Mullen

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

OUTSIDE THREAT. Curtis receiver Jason Williams (81) breaks away from a Todd Beamer defender as he finished with three catches

for 79 yards and a 72-yard kickoff return for a score in the Vikingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 49-0 win.

For blog updates on this weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s featured games visit The Daily Mash-Up at www.tacomaweekly.com/ dailymashup.

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City Life

Know your public art

B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2012

SECTION B, PAGE 1

The incomparable Wayne Brady brings it to the Pantages By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

W

ayne Brady can easily be called an entertainer’s entertainer. He is a singer, dancer, actor, comedian, television personality and, best of all, a master at improvisational comedy. He made new fans far and wide with his brilliant improv on the television series “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” and it is this kind of hilarious Brady shenanigans that he plans to bring to Pantages Theater on Oct. 11. With so much going on in the world today for him to lampoon – from the presidential race to the sagas of Honey Boo Boo – Brady will have a treasure chest of improvisational comedy topics to choose from once on the stage. “I really can’t plan what comes up,” he told Tacoma Weekly about his Pantages gig. “I’m a popculture nerd, so I’m pretty up on what’s happening and sometimes if I don’t know, that’s even better! It’s great to be surprised and kept on my toes.” While Brady definitely seems to be in his element when he is in front of a live audience thinking on his feet as he goes along, he said he thoroughly enjoys all aspects of being an entertainer. Whether he is hosting the TV game show “Let’s Make a Deal,” holding court with celebrity guests as he did on the Emmy Award-winning “The Wayne Brady Show” or writing songs to record, showbiz is in his blood. “You can never choose just one of your babies,” he said. “If I didn’t do everything you just listed, we wouldn’t be talking right now. They’re all linked and that’s why live improv is a perfect vehicle for me because I do it all at the same time.” His show at the Pantages is not suitable for children under 12, but that does not mean Brady is for adults only. Quite the contrary – he just finished up

writing and recording an album for Radio Disney called “Radio Wayne,” a collection of inspiring and cautionary songs for children. “I chose to do the CD with Disney because of my little one, Maile. I love kids and I think that if their innocence can be protected even just a little, then we should try. “I may do an adult show, or there may be adult songs on the radio, but if you’re a 6-year-old child you shouldn’t be listening to ‘shake that ass!’ My CD gives kids the same beats without the content. It’s also something you as the parent can listen to without going crazy.” Brady has numerous irons in the fire right now concerning his career, with exciting projects on the horizon that his fans are sure to enjoy. “I have the fourth season of ‘Let’s Make A Deal,’ an upcoming PBS music special and a live CD that’ll be released in February. Also, touring dates and an improv special. Come and get it!” Tickets to see Wayne Brady live at the Pantages are $38, $58 and $82, available online at www. broadwaycenter.org and at the Broadway Center box office at South 9th Street and Broadway.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF WAYNE BRADY

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE GOSPEL MUSIC FUNDRAISER

TWO TRIKE-A-THON Narrows Cooperative Preschool’s annual Trike-a-thon is Oct. 6 from 10 a.m. to noon. This child-centered event includes an opportunity to decorate the trikes, trike races and a host of fundraising opportunities; kid’s paint ceramics, low-cost bike helmets, entertainment books and the BEST bake sale. The event is free to participate and is open to any family looking for a fun, free event in the University Place area. 3219 Grandview Dr. W. Call (253) 564-4655.

THREE YVETTE WILLIAMS

On Oct. 6, Allen AME Church (1224 Martin Luther King Jr. Way) will host “An Evening of Worship Featuring Yvette Williams,” a music workshop and concert to benefit the Renaissance House transitional housing program. 6 p.m., tickets $10 available at the church, Dightman’s Bible Center (2941 S. 38th St.) and BrownpaperTickets.com.

JAZZ LIVE! The popular concert series Jazz LIVE at Marine View welcomes the reigning Earshot Jazz Vocalist of the Year Jacqueline

Tabor on Oct. 14. With her sultry alto voice of style, passion and sophistication, her career has taken a leap forward in the last year with her selection of Seattle – Kobe Jazz Queen and subsequent travel to Kobe, Japan to perform at Asahi Hall. Tabor released her debut CD “What a Wonderful World” in July 2011 to much acclaim. Her appearance at Jazz LIVE at Marine View features a who’s who of musicians: Bill Anschell on piano, Osama Afifi on bass, D’Vonne Lewis on drums and Alexey Nikolaev on saxophone. Don’t miss a superb evening of jazz in the beautiful setting of Marine View at 8469 Eastside Dr. N.E., 5 p.m. Admission is free to all ages.

FIVE BIRD LOVERS WEEKEND Museum of Glass welcomes birds and bird enthusiasts to the three-day Bird Lovers Weekend Oct. 5-7. For the weekend celebration, iittala master glassblower Tero Välimaa and Heikki Hiukkamäki will work in the Hot Shop and create a selection of Toikka’s bird designs. Other activities include a bird lovers’ brunch, live bird visits from Pt. Defiance Zoo and Aquarium, bird-related art activities and a lecture by Studio Glass historian and artist Walter Lieberman. Full schedule at www.museumofglass.org.

FOUR ART AND WINE WALK Stroll Tacoma’s beautiful and historic Stadium District while viewing local art, sampling wine and nibbling tasty tidbits at the annual Art & Wine Walk on Oct. 6, 4-8 p.m. Tickets on sale www.stadiumartandwinewalk.com. Check-in (required) at Columbia Bank & First Presbyterian Church.

“WESTERN TANAGER, 2012” DESIGNED BY OIVA TOIKKA. IITTALA, INC.


Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, October 5, 2012

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, October 5, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 3

Local author, educator writes of teaching at alternative school By John Larson jlarson@tacomaweekly.com

TROUBLED STUDENTS. Darrell Hamlin shares memories of teaching

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Many teachers would be afraid to be in the same classroom with some of the students Darrell Hamlin has taught. Few would likely want to take a dozen of them on a field trip to Mount Rainier. Hamlin tells many of his memorable stories from his teaching career in his new book â&#x20AC;&#x153;North Star Platoon.â&#x20AC;? Hamlin graduated from Wilson High School. His career as an educator began in 1982, when he became an assistant track coach at Wilson. For the next three years he worked on his degree at Central Washington University, where he majored in history and political science. Soon Hamlin was teaching at an alternative school on Tacoma Avenue called Region 5 Learning Center. It was a joint venture between Tacoma Public Schools and Washington State Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration. The students he taught had been involved in a range of criminal activity: drug dealing, burglary, prostitution. One of the more notable students was Clark, from Spanaway. When he arrives, Hamlin and the other educators are well aware of his situation. Hamlin does not reveal it at first, only hinting that Clark did something notorious that generated much coverage in newspapers and television newscasts. Hamlin is at the entrance meeting with Clark, his father and

grandmother. Hamlin describes him as a normal teenage boy. After some time in his class, Hamlin is impressed with his intelligence. Clark is academically beyond the other students, more knowledgeable than Hamlin on some topics. Excerpts from articles in The News Tribune about Hamlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s students appear at several points. One, written by John Gillie in the April 30, 1993 issue, explains Clarkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crime. A secretary at the school, not known to other teachers, had nominated Clark for a youth of the year award. We learn from Gillieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s article about the nomination that Clark had admitted to killing his mother with an axe. His first trial ended in a mistrial in January, after the jury deadlocked 10-2 in favor of conviction. His second trial was to start that June. Hamlin took students on field trips, often to Mount Rainier National Parks, other times to a small cabin he owned on a lake. Students had to exhibit good behavior to be eligible for these outings. Many of the Tacoma kids had never been to the great outdoors within view of their urban settings. The bookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s title refers to a nickname for his platoon of young adventurers. Many students were gang members affiliated with various sets of the Crips and Bloods. Sometimes rival gang members clashed, but other times they could collaborate

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to achieve something positive. One example occurred on an outing when a girl wandered onto a narrow ledge and was too scared to walk back. Two boys, a Crip and a Blood, volunteered to go up and get her down. Hamlin certainly became street smart during his years teaching at Region 5. His wife used to drive a red Pontiac Sunbird. Two months in a row, on the 23rd, the driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s side window was shot out. He told another staff member about paying the insurance deductible. A Hilltop Crip student who overheard his remark pulled him aside and informed him that after the monthly gang meeting on the 23rd, Crips would roam the area attacking anything red. Hamlin wisely began leaving the car in his backyard every 23rd day of the month. His students make appearances, sometimes just in his memories but other times in person. He is pleased to run into some as adults, happily married with children of their own. Many others end up in prison or dead. Hamlin consistently points out the good qualities of most of the students and notes that some have grown up in very dysfunctional families. He is an advocate for their right to get an education and a shot at a good life in the future. Hamlin clearly feels the switch from junior highs to middle schools was a mistake. He notes that many of his students got involved in criminal activity at age 14 or 15, during ninth grade. He thinks these kids are too young for the high school environment and belong with seventh and eighthgraders. He presses this point a few times, but could have put more emphasis on it. The book is for sale at Pacific Northwest Shop in Proctor District.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, October 5, 2012

Great singing, music and dancing KNOW YOUR PUBLIC ART Brain and Vertical Stone highlight TMPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; By John Larson jlarson@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma Musical Playhouse takes audiences back to an era when jazz was king and alcohol was illegal in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chicago.â&#x20AC;? This musical is based on the play â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chicagoâ&#x20AC;? by Maurine Dallas Watkins. Some may have seen the successful movie version released in 2002, which won six Academy Awards. The setting is the Windy City in the 1920s, the era of speakeasies and flappers. Roxie Hart is a Southern belle from a wealthy family who has moved to Chicago and married Amos Hart (Chris Serface), a boring but loving husband. She is having an affair with Fred Casely (Cameron Brown). In the movie version Roxie and her lover attend a nightclub show where Velma performs. Candi Hall, executive director of DASH Center for the Arts, puts in a strong performance as Velma. Casely has led Roxie to believe he has connections in the vaudeville circuit and can get her gigs. She ends up fatally shooting him when he admits he lied about his connections. In this performance he appears only in a bedroom scene. He hurriedly gets dressed and prepares to leave Roxieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house when she gets angry and shoots him. Serface makes the audience feel for his sympathetic character. This is exemplified in the song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mister Cellophaneâ&#x20AC;? in act II. Kristin Burch and Lauren Nance rotate between the characters Roxie and Go-ToHell Kitty on various days. Burch was playing Roxie the day this play was reviewed and she gave a commanding performance. Velma is in jail for killing her husband and her sister when she finds them

in bed together. Velma and Roxie vie for the attention of the Chicago media, which is orchestrated by their conniving lawyer Billy Flynn (Rafe Wadleigh). The newspaper reporters are depicted as easily manipulated pawns used to generate sympathy from the public for Roxie. The song â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Both Reached For the Gunâ&#x20AC;? does a great job portraying this, with reporters with strings around their arms, as puppets being controlled from above. The center of the stage appears and disappears behind a curtain throughout the play. It serves as various settings, from a bedroom to a room in the jail to a courtroom. An interesting note for his production was Musical Director Jeffrey Stvrtecky and the TMP Orchestra were not in their usual place on the floor to the left of the stage but on top of the scenery in their own small loft space. They give a strong performance of the lively jazz numbers that are so central to conveying the mood of the play. The program does not list a costume designer, but rather a costume committee and a special thanks to Lynda Pressey for costume items. The costumers play a major role in the playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success. Roxie in particular looks sexy in everything, from her striped jail uniform to her yellow and white vaudeville outfit and the black and white dress she wears during her trial. TMP has a real winner with this production. It is packed with great singing, music and dancing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chicagoâ&#x20AC;? runs through Oct. 21. It is not recommended for patrons under age 13. For information on show times and ticket prices, visit www. tmp.org.

PHOTO BY KAT DOLLARHIDE

A HAT AND A CANE. Candi Hall, left, as Velma Kelly and Kristin Burch as Roxie Hart in Tacoma Musical Playhouseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chicago.â&#x20AC;?

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TALL AND SHORT. Doug Granumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brain and Vertical Stoneâ&#x20AC;? have occupied their spot at 1131 Broadway since 1993. By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

Wayfarers and passersby along the 1100 block of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Broadway might chance to meet a pair of stony characters â&#x20AC;&#x201C; one short and stout, the other tall and lean. They have been there on the sidewalk since 1993: two big chunks of basalt stone that have been dubbed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brain and Vertical Stone.â&#x20AC;? The sculpture is the work of local artist Doug Granum. They were part of a grand commission to mark the Theater District with public art in conjunction with the opening of Theatre on the Square in one of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perennial attempts at revitalization. The stones along Broadway are archetypal opposites: tall/short, thin/fat, round/ angled. They could appear in a childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book to illustrate those simple concepts. The so-called â&#x20AC;&#x153;brainâ&#x20AC;? is a rounded, pitted boulder whose raised areas were smoothed out by the sculptorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tools. Its surface of polished portions interspersed with rough cavities invites the hand to touch. The standing stone (Granumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents hail from the Hebrides, where standing stones are a reminder of the distant past) has a convex curve in the side adjacent to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;brainâ&#x20AC;? stone. The curve echoes the shape of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;brainâ&#x20AC;? and gives the two a visual harmony despite their otherwise opposing traits. The 1993 commission began when the Theater District wanted street banners to mark its territory. The project snowballed into a lavish production of 96 separate pieces of art consisting of 31 steel banners, 20 bronze masks and six installations of stone sculptures. All of it was done by Granum who, in one fell swoop, became Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most prolific (if not overrepresented) public artist. A true renaissance man, Granum was a creative writing major at the University of Washington. In the early 1970s he fell into

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art when he took private sculpture lessons. He has gone on to master a variety of media: stone, bronze, steel, glass and paint. In each medium he has produced an astonishing amount of work. Further, each medium that Granum employs seems to inspire its own unique style. His paintings are very different from his stonework and his stonework is entirely different from his metalwork. One would never guess that the person responsible for all the rustic stone installations in the downtown core is the same individual who did the bronze masks bolted to the flanks of the various buildings. The colorful and geometric â&#x20AC;&#x153;Locomotive Monumentâ&#x20AC;? (a 1988 sculpture along â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Street) is entirely different from either the masks or the rustic stones. The basalt pillars and boulders for the Theater District sculptures came from an expansive ranch in Eastern Washington. Granum selected stones that have been shaped by the wind and marked by lichens. His addition is sometimes quite minimal; a bit of polishing here, a little etching there and the thing is good to go. Others, such as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Writing Stone,â&#x20AC;? are far more intricately worked. Granum has his critics. It could be argued that the city is oversaturated with too much Granum; that the gigantic Theater District commission should have been doled out to provide more artistic variety and to give other artists a chance to have a share of the very finite public space. On the other hand, much of Granumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public work has proved to be remarkably durable and timeless. Perhaps we are fortunate to have been able to take advantage of such an artistic dynamo here in our midst. For further information on Granum visit his website at www.douglasgranum.com. Under the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aboutâ&#x20AC;? tab there is a link to a video that shows him in the process of selecting stones for his sculptures.

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

If it sounds like a party, it must be

The Fat Tones

Friday, October 5, 2012 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Live Music TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

HEARTLESS BRINGS THEIR TRIBUTE TO HEART TO JAZZBONES ON OCT. 6. THE SHOW BEGINS AT 8 P.M. COVER CHARGE IS $10.

PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD

PHAT. The Fat Tones have several area gigs coming up in Seattle, Kirkland and Tacoma.

By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

There is no other band quite like The Fat Tones. Anchoring their music in good ol’ rocking party blues, this three-man band has been entertaining audiences for the past 10 years with songs that never fail to get feet tapping and booties shaking. Whether playing purely instrumental jams or showcasing their trademark harmonic melodies and clever lyrics, The Fat Tones bring it every time. The band’s upcoming show at Jazzbones on Oct. 12 promises to be a night to remember. “We really enjoy Jazzbones. It’s a great venue,” said percussionist Zach Cooper. Cooper’s career as a blues drummer and teacher spans a good number of years, with the past nearly three years playing with The Fat Tones. On guitar, Bobby Patterson possesses worldclass talent that he does not hold back when playing live shows especially, and Bob Ehrgott on bass completes the trio with his effortless playing and songwriting contributions. Actually, all three band mates pitch in to write the band’s original songs, according to Cooper. “In this case, and so rarely is it this way, it’s pretty much an equal effort. That’s our business approach as well:

everyone has a hand in what’s going on so it’s a pretty equal split among the three of us.”

Tickets available now for Oct. 12 show at Jazzbones A Maurice the Fish Records “Premiere Artist,” Cooper said The Fat Tones have enjoyed increased exposure since hooking up with this Tacoma-based label. This is what Maurice the Fish does – provide its artists with a platform in which they can maintain creative control of their music and attain visibility in a highly competitive market. The label wins too through the solid name the band members have made for themselves over the years. The members have won multiple awards and nominations from the Inland Empire Blues Society (IEBS). Patterson is an IEBS Hall of Fame winner, voted best blues guitarist in 2006, 2007 and 2008 and best performer in 2004 and

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2006. In 2010 he was nominated for best songwriter. Ehrgott was nominated for best bassist in 2006 and 2007. Cooper won best drummer in 2001 and 2005 and has been nominated for this award seven other times. Adding to their catalog of six studio albums, The Fat Tones recorded a live CD this year and will begin work on a seventh studio album this coming January. Their 2011 album, “Sounds Like a Party,” received rave reviews. A showcase of pure, old-school blues complete with killer harmonizing, howling harmonicas and Hammond B3 thrown in here and there, every song exemplifies the technical proficiency of the band members and their gift for mixing in highly entertaining lyrics. The track “My Big Deck” is a very cool example of The Fat Tones’ skill with hilarious lyrical innuendo and musical mastery: “I got a big deck/ it’s made outta wood/ the neighbor lady seen it and she understood/ I invited her over/ she said ‘what the heck’/ she came over and sat on/ my big deck.” This was the most requested song on KKZX 98.9 FM “The Classic Rock Station” in Spokane for three weeks in a row. The Fat Tones are gearing up for a West Coast tour this winter. In the meantime, catch them Oct. 11 at the Highway 99 Club in Seattle and Oct. 14 at The Central Tavern in Kirkland. Tickets to their Oct. 12 show at Jazzbones, 8 p.m., are $10 day of show and $6 advance purchase at www.jazzbonestacoma.com. Learn more at www.thefattones.com.

Johnny·s s 6th Annual

EMERALD QUEEN: 4More (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC

Now through Oct. 31st

AMOCAT CAFÉ: (Singer/songwriters) C.I. SHENANIGAN’S: Collaborative Works Jazz (Jazz) 8 p.m. DAWSONS: Rock ‘n Roll Magic (Classic rock) 9 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: The Boinkers (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Lloyd Jones (Blues) 7:30 p.m., $10 MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (Jazz) 7 p.m., NC NATIVE QUEST: Open mic night, 5 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Ten Pole Drunk, 9 p.m. STONEGATE: Jerry Miller (Classic rock jam) 9 p.m., NC SWISS: Just Dirt (Rock covers) 9 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Offtract, Far From Genuine, Klondike Kate, 8 p.m. VARSITY GRILL: Rock-Bot live band karaoke, 8 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, OCT. 6 GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: The Boinkers (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC

C.I. SHENANIGAN’S: Collaborative Works Jazz (Jazz) 8 p.m. DAWSONS: Rock ‘n Roll Magic (Classic rock) 9 p.m., NC EMERALD QUEEN: 4More (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Heartless (Heart tribute) 8 p.m., $10 LOCH’S: Blood and Thunder, Beyond Theory, Thou Shall Kill, Curse of the North (Metal) 8 p.m., $5 NEW FRONTIER: The Jilly Rizzo, the Dignataries, 9 p.m. STONEGATE: Ghost 211 (Top 40) 9 p.m. SWISS: Kry (Rock covers) 9 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Rickey Otto Gabbard, Blue Emerald Cowboys, 8 p.m. VARSITY GRILL: Rock-Bot live band karaoke, 8 p.m., NC

ANTIQUE SANDWICH SHOP: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVE’S OF MILTON: Tim Hall Band (Blues jam) 8 p.m. DAWSONS: Jho Blenis, Shelly Ely (Blues jam) 8 p.m. LOUIE G’S PIZZA: Acoustic open mic, 6 p.m. RED TUNA: Afrodasia (Jazz) 6:30 p.m., AA

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10 SWISS: Kareem Kandi (Jazz open mic) 7 p.m.

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (Blues jam) 8 p.m. DAWSONS: Crazy Texas Gypsies (Jam session) 8 p.m. JAZZBONES: Amanda Hardy Band, Zach Rowell Band, 8 p.m., NC, AA LOCH’S: Sea of Treachery, Abiotic, Float Face Down, the Burial, 6 p.m. RED TUNA: Afrodasia (Jazz) 6:30 p.m., AA STONEGATE: Tatoosh (Classic rock) 8:30 p.m., NC

THURSDAY, OCT. 11 UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (Blues) 7 p.m.

STONEGATE: Rich Wetzel’s Groovin’ Higher Orchestra (Jazz) 5 p.m.

JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke, 9 p.m. OPAL: Tim Hall Band (Blues jam) 8 p.m. RED TUNA: Afrodasia (Jazz) 6:30 p.m., AA

DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (Jam session) 8 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Kry (Rock covers) 9 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Deathbed Confessions, Men As Witches, Tummler & Solomon, Exit Bag (Metal) 9 p.m. PARADISE BOWL: (Rock jam) 9 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lafferty (Acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Trevalyan Triangle (Open jam) 9 p.m.

Tacoma Weekly’s Music Calendar is always available online at www.TacomaWeekly.com

  

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GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Do you have a live show or music event coming up?

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Email makeascene@tacomaweekly.com for a free listing in the Live Music calendar!

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STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (Acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

SUNDAY, OCT. 7

MONDAY, OCT. 8

Mahlzeit!

STONEGATE: Acoustic couch jam, 8:30 p.m. STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino Band (Classic rock/blues) 9 p.m., NC SWISS: Dave Roberts Band (Blues) 7 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Billy Pease & Friends (Blues) 8 p.m.

TUESDAY, OCT. 9

ANTHEM: Taxi Driver (Jazz) 7 p.m. DAWSONS: Tim Hall Band (Blues jam) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: (Bluegrass jam) 3 p.m. STONEGATE: Stonegaters (Classic rock jam) 8 p.m., NC

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Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, October 5, 2012

SAT., OCT. 6 RESPONSIBLE DOG OWNER DAY HAPPENINGS – The Staffordshire Bull Terrier Club of Puget Sound and All Terrier Club of Western Washington hosts the sixth annual Responsible Dog Owner Day from noon to 4 p.m. at Paws Abilities Total Dog Center in Fife. The clubs will be offering fun activities for dogs and lots of information for dog owners. Advice and education on pet care, training and your dog’s health will be available. Do not have a dog or not sure what type of dog to get? Check out the many breed information booths or adopt a new best friend from one of the local rescues. Need the perfect gift for a dog lover? Come shop the vendors. AKC Canine Good Citizen testing ($25), you-wash dog area ($10) and swim sessions ($15) will be available plus, goodies and giveaways for everyone. For directions visit www.EveryDogHas.com.

COMING EVENTS

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 759-5773.

TW PICK: WAYNE BRADY

WAYNE BRADY IS ONE OF THE MORE ALL-AROUND-TALENTED PERFORMERS IN SHOW BIZ! SEE THE STAR OF “WHOSE LINE IS IT ANYWAY?” AND EMMY AWARD-WINNING TALK SHOW HOST LIVE AT THE PANTAGES THEATER OCT. 11 DURING AN EVENING OF COMIC RELIEF. SEE BRADY DO WHAT HE DOES BEST – MAKE $#!% UP OFF THE TOP OF HIS HEAD – WITH A FUNNY AND SOMETIMES SWEET EDGINESS. NOTE: THE MATERIAL IN THIS SHOW IS NOT SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN OR THOSE OFFENDED BY HARSH LANGUAGE AND ADULT SITUATIONS. TICKETS: $38-$82. THE SHOW STARTS AT 7:30 P.M. INFO: WWW.BROADWAYCENTER.ORG.

TUES., OCT. 9 CLASSICAL TUESDAYS MUSIC – Scandinavia comes to Old Town during the Classical Tuesdays music series on Oct. 9 at 7 p.m. Hale Bill & the Bopps play Scandinavian dance music, joined by Bygededeal dance group in Norwegian and Swedish costumes. The performance takes place at Slavonian Hall, located at 2306 N. 30th St. Admission is free, and donations are accepted.

WED., OCT. 10 KWA BENEFIT LUNCHEON HAPPENINGS – The Korean Women’s Association will celebrate 40 years of service with a benefit luncheon at the Greater Tacoma Convention and Trade Center from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The luncheon will offer KING 5 investigator Jesse Jones as the keynote speaker, cultural food and entertainment, influential speakers and the company of great friends. This benefit will support programs providing homes for the homeless, meals for senior citizens, Alzheimer’s and dementia senior day care, citizenship and legal services to immigrants, support for victims of domestic violence, basic food assistance, breast cancer navigation and home care. Tickets are on sale for $50 at: www.kwahandinhand.com.

SAT., OCT. 13 NORDIC FESTIVAL HAPPENINGS – This is the only Nordic/Scandinavian festival this fall in the South Sound. It will have many vendors of traditional Nordic arts, crafts, baked goods, music, antiques and artifacts. Meatball dinners/pea soup/breads/cookies/beverages will be available for purchase. Admission is $1 and includes one drawing ticket for items donated by vendors. The event takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Edgemont Junior High, located at 2300 110th Ave. E. in Edgewood.

SUN., OCT. 14 OKTOBERFEST DINNER ETC – The Knights of Columbus Tacoma Council 809 will be serving German sausage, schnitzel, rot kraut, German potato salad, bread, apple strudel and beverages at St. Patrick’s Church Hall. The church is located at North 11th and ‘I’ streets. Pre-sale price is $11.50, or $15 at the door.

MON., OCT. 15 AN EVENING WITH AUTHOR ROSEMARY WELLS ETC – Rosemary Wells’ career as an author and illustrator spans more than 30 years and 60 books. She has won numerous awards, and has given readers such unforgettable characters as Max and Ruby, Noisy Nora and Yoko. She has also given Mother Goose new life in two enormous, definitive editions, published by Candlewick. This event is for her grown-up fans, for the teachers, educators and everyone else who has grown up and taught with and from her books for years. Wells will talk about incorporating her work into curriculum and the importance of teaching children’s literature. This is not a story time! A book signing will follow, with books available for purchase. The event takes place at 7 p.m. in the Main Library’s Olympic Room. The Main Library is located at 1102 Tacoma Ave. S. Info: www. tpl.lib.wa.us.

BULLETIN BOARD OKTOBERFEST Oktoberfest is more than just drinking beer, eating pretzels and pondering creative ways to invade Poland. All things GerHAPPENINGS –

man will be on display at the eighth annual Oktoberfest Northwest, presented by Emerald Queen Casino, set to take over the Puyallup Fair and Events Center Oct. 5-7. Oktoberfest Northwest is known throughout the region for providing authentic German entertainment, and this year’s event will feature an outstanding lineup of performers. This is an allages event until 7 p.m. each evening (and all day Sunday). After 7 p.m., guests must be 21 years of age or older. Admission is free before 3 p.m. on Friday and $10 for Friday night or all day Saturday. Tickets are half price on Sunday. Children 12 and under are free. For general festival information, go to www.oktoberfestnw.com.

Sun, and Moon and Constellations. The de Santillanas have interpreted elements of the Hindu cosmology in glass, creating spaces in which forms and colors correspond to physical phenomena, or the visible universe, and evoke an atmosphere of cosmic vibration. Each installation is composed of a limited, but strikingly vibrant, color palette. The exhibit runs until January.

HARVEST FESTIVAL HAPPENINGS – Metro Parks is holding a series of events to celebrate fall, with Harvest Festivals taking place Oct. 5 at STAR Center (3873 S. 66th St.), Oct. 12 at Portland Avenue Community Center (3513 Portland Ave.), Oct. 19 at Center at Norpoint (4818 Nassau Ave. N.E.) and Oct. 26 at People’s Community Center (1602 MLK Jr. Way). The festival will feature bounce houses, arts and crafts activities, movie nights, family-friendly games and more. Games and activities will take place from 5-7 p.m., and the movie will begin at 7 p.m. Info: www. metroparkstacoma.org.

NORTHWEST ART ART – “Best of the Northwest: Selected Paintings from the Collection” is on display at Tacoma Art Museum. The works on view are some of the best from its collection of paintings by Northwest artists. It runs until March.

“SCAPES” Venetian artists Laura de Santillana and Alessandro Diaz de Santillana have joined forces to create “Scapes,” a dynamic and entirely new body of work at Museum of Glass. The exhibition comprises four rooms based on the Hindu belief that the universe is divided into separate spheres of existence: Earth, Space, ART –

WATT’S VISION ART – “Marie Watt: Lodge” is a midcareer retrospective of this Portland artist at Tacoma Art Museum. The title of the exhibition refers to space of welcome; at its center is a hearth, a place where stories are shared. It is on display through Oct. 7.

‘ORIGINS’ ART – “Origins: Early Works by Dale Chihuly” runs through Oct. 21 at the Museum of Glass. The exhibit showcases works made by Chihuly in his early career, from 1968 through the 1980s. The artwork displayed includes 30 transitional pieces from prominent local collections and the museum’s permanent collection, along with historic exhibit posters from the Mary Hale Cockran Library. Collectively, the works chronicle Chihuly’s influence as an artist, a visionary and a pioneer of the American studio glass movement. Info: www.museumofglass.org. GLASS ART MASTER ART – Museum of Glass is showcasing items created by a glass art

master over the past 10 years in “Maestro: Recent Works by Lino Tagliapietra.” The Italian artist has invented numerous techniques and designs that are technically flawless and visually breathtaking, yet filled with complexity and difficulty. He is recognized around the world as the maestro of contemporary glass. The exhibition shows his evolution to larger works, bolder colors and patterns over his nearly 50 years as an artist. It runs through Jan. 6, 2013. ‘HOPE IN HARD TIMES’ ART – Washington State History Museum’s “Hope in Hard Times” exhibit showcases the 1929 Wall Street collapse as it plunged Americans into a period of great uncertainty as unemployment skyrocketed, banks failed and housing foreclosures hit record highs. President Herbert Hoover put it succinctly: “About the time we think we can make ends meet, somebody moves the ends.” “Hope in Hard Times” shares how ordinary people worked for change in their communities, pulling together to find ways to deal with the crisis. A billy club used during the 1934 “Battle of Smith Cove,” Works Progress Administration artifacts and everyday items are among some of the objects showcased in this exhibition. The paintings and sketches of Ronald Debs Ginther, also featured in the exhibition, comprise one of the more complete visual records of the Great Depression. The exhibit runs through Nov. 4. Info: www.washingtonhistory.org. HOT HULA FITNESS ETC – Every Monday through Wednesday, Asia Pacific Cultural Center hosts hot hula fitness classes from 7-8 p.m. Inspired by the dances of the Pacific islands, hot hula fitness incorporates easy to perform dance moves set to the sounds of traditional Polynesian drum beats fused with funky reggae music, resulting in a modern, hip fitness workout. Hot hula fitness is a fun, new and exciting dance workout that isolates your larger muscle groups, quads and arms, providing a total body workout in 60 minutes. All ages and fitness levels will enjoy hot hula fitness. Admission: $6 (discount with APCC membership). APCC is located at 4851 South Tacoma Way. DRUM CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages drum circle every Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. You do not need to have a drum to participate. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com. SUPPORT GROUP ETC – Suffering from fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue? Attend this support group, which meets the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month from 4:15-5:15 p.m. at the Tacoma Area Coalition for Individuals with Disabilities building, located at 6315 S. 19th St. The group’s mission is to improve the morale of people coping with these challenges. Its activities include face-to-face encouragement, networking, sharing of resources as well as individual discoveries.

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Friday, October 5, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

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COMMERCIAL Timeless,Classic Beauty APPROVED SHORTSALE 6925 Hillgrove Lane SW $335,000 Timeless, classic beauty w/ upgrades galore, sits on estate like lawn w/ lovely landscaping. W/ 4 bedrooms & 3.5 baths, this gorgeous home beckons you w/ FKDUP HDV\Ă RRU plan. Pick your master bedroomone on the main Ă RRURUWDNHWKH one upstairs- the choice is yours. Huge 2 car garage w/ additional shop area- very appealing to some; spacious living room, dining room & sweet kitchen appeal to all. Newer windows, heat pump & A/C. Rumored to have once been owned by the Rockefellers... MLS# 224641 Shannon Agent Extraordinaire 253-691-1800 or shannonsells @hotmail.com Better Properties North Proctor

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Food & Beverage Businesses 4 Sale with Owner Contract VERY SUCCESSFUL/PROFITABLE SPORTS BAR Business is For Sale for $390,000 Terms are avail. TACOMA LANDMARK TAVERN W/ Liquor, $225,000. (Bus. & R.E.), Terms Available. LAUNDROMAT W/ DROP SHOP. Same location 15 years in Lakewood. Excellent lease with contract terms. $51,000 LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? Restaurant/ Lounge For Sale for $700,000 (R.E. $600K, Bus. $100K). Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports bar and grill. DOWNTOWN TACOMA COFFEE SHOP CAFE 1,200 SF with excellent lease, $46,000, terms available. RURAL LIVING: ASHFORD, WA- Restr./Lounge, $125,000 with $50K Down, Real E. Avail: 3.4 eCommercial Acres for pric d laundromat. Future Devel., 3 BR Remodeled Home, educe

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5 Piece Pub Set Table & 4 Chairs New in Box List $1,000 Sell $350 253-5373056 3 Piece Living Room Set New in plastic. Lifetime Warranty On Frame. $495 (253) 537-3056 Free Mattress Set with Cherry Wood Sleigh Bed Never Used. In Plastic. $380 (253) 537-3056 All New Pillow Top Mattress Set! Queen Size w/Warranty, Still in Original Plastic. &DQ 'HOLYHU 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH $149 (253) 539-1600 Full or Twin Mattress Set New Factory Sealed. Delivery Available. $120 Will Take. (253) 539-1600

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Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 8 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, October 5, 2012

NOTICES

NOTICES

TO: Crystal Thomas

TO: Joshua Youell

In the Welfare of: H. JR., J. N. DOB: 03/08/12 Case Number: PUY-CW-03/12-014

In the Welfare of: Y., E. DOB: 09/19/2011 Case Number: PUY-CW-09/12-030

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Status Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Review Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

You are summoned to appear for a Status Hearing on November 15, 2012 at 4:00 pm.

You are summoned to appear for a Review Hearing on December 6, 2012 at 1:30 p.m.

If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS.

NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS.

TO: Crystal Thomas In the Welfare of: T.-B. III, G. D. DOB: 12/03/09 Case Number: PUY-CW-10/09-004 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Status Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Status Hearing on November 15, 2012 at 4:30 pm. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS.

TO: Edith Holland In the Welfare of: B., D. R. DOB: 08/25/2009 Case Number: PUY-CW-09/11-048 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Review Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Review Hearing on December 10, 2012 at 3:00 p.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. TO: Javier Gonzalez Rosas

TO: Edith Holland In the Welfare of: B., C. DOB: 11/21/2007 Case Number: PUY-CW-09/11-047 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Review Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Review Hearing on December 10, 2012 at 3:00 p.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. TO: Candace Baldeagle In the Welfare of: Y., E. DOB: 09/19/2011 Case Number: PUY-CW-09/12-030 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Review Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Review Hearing on December 6, 2012 at 1:30 p.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS.

In the Welfare of: G., V. DOB:11/13/2007 Case Number: PUY- TPR-11/11-012 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Adjudication Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Adjudication Hearing on October 15, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT.

VOLUNTEERS Portland Ave Community Center needs volunteer to drive 15 passenger van and assist with trips on Fridays starting ASAP. Call Bonnie @ 253-591-5391 253-404-3939 Help a Child Improve Reading One-on-one support makes a huge difference in an elementary studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to overcome reading challenges. As a Read2Me Tutor, you can be that person who makes a difference. The Read2Me program at Tacoma Community House is looking for committed volunteer tutors for grades 13. Starting in October, we will have sessions at Roosevelt and McCarver Elementary Schools. Call Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or email kthomas@ tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information. Literacy Tutor Tacoma Community House is looking for volunteers to help adults

improve their reading, writing, and basic math skills. Training is provided. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer tutor, please contact Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or at kthomas@ tacomacommunityhouse.org. We need a Spanish speaking volunteer Tuesday & Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10:30-11:30 AM. Volunteer to help translate for our Latino senior population. Call Portland Ave Community Center 253-591-5391 Ask for Bonnie. Leave a message if she isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in she will call you back. Volunteer needed to teach beginning basic computers skills for seniors. One day a week for 1 hour class 7XHVGD\ RU 7KXUVGD\ Ă H[LEOH IRU class any time between 10-2 pm. Class will start in mid-September. Volunteers will need to pass background check. Please call Portland Ave Community Center@ 253-591-5391. Ask for Bonnie or leave a message and she will call you back.

VOLUNTEERS Volunteer needed to get seniors up and walking. We need an avid walker that will get seniors walking for a healthier lifestyle. Tuesday or Thursday 10-11. Volunteers will need to pass background check. Please call Portland Ave Community Center @ 253-5915391. Ask for Bonnie or leave a message and she will call you back. Join us in changing lives! Changing Rein Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies, D QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W RIIHUV HTXLQH assisted services to differentlyabled individuals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and adaptive lessons. Other volunteer opportunities include: grounds maintenance and administrative/clerical work. Must be at least 14 years old to participate. Horse H[SHULHQFH KHOSIXO EXW QRW necessary. Training provided. For more information contact: Jacki Berreth at 253-961-7277 or volunteer@changingrein. org. The Tacoma Maritime Institute meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00 CONVERSATION PARTNERS NEEDED Help adults learn to speak English! Mornings, no H[SHULHQFH RU IRUHLJQ ODQJXDJH skills needed. South Tacoma. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy, 253-571-1887. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION VOLUNTEERS NEEDED If you enjoy helping toddlers learn, you can help us! 6HHNLQJ UHWLUHG RU H[SHULHQFHG YROXQWHHUVWRDVVLVWLQH[SDQGLQJ our capacity and provide quality learning for busy little people. (No diaper changing!) Background check required. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy 253-571-1887

Meals on Wheels at Federal Way Senior Center seeks morning volunteers: One Cocoordinator, Friday and Monday; two Callers, Monday; three Packers, Wednesday; two Drivers, Thursday. To learn more, call 206-727-6250. Be a Big Brother! Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG difference in the life of a child. There are several program options WR Ă&#x20AC;W \RXU VFKHGXOH DQG interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agency-planned activity. For more information, visit www.bbbsps.org or call 253.396.9630. INTERVIEWEES FOR A NON-PROFIT PROJECT â&#x20AC;&#x153;MEMORY COMMUNITYâ&#x20AC;? What It Is: We are Memory &RPPXQLW\ D QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W corporation). The Memory Community Project is a creative service to seniors. Our Goals & Objectives: To create an accessible resource that: â&#x20AC;˘ helps our senior citizens tell their stories â&#x20AC;˘ connects the young and the old â&#x20AC;˘ increases our understanding of those before us who help us be who we are â&#x20AC;˘ honors the generations before us and show our appreciation by preserving their memories â&#x20AC;˘ All seniors are welcome WRYROXQWHHUIRUĂ&#x20AC;OPLQJWKHLU story! â&#x20AC;˘ At most two days of work during daytime â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Day 1: pre-production meeting, and Release Form signing 'D\  Ă&#x20AC;OPLQJ LGHDOO\

wrapped within half a day What weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like you to talk DERXW LQ WKH Ă&#x20AC;OP 8VH  minutes or so to tell the most memorable story from your life, the lessons that were learned, and the wise words you want to pass along to your children/grandchildren. Compensation: a DVD in which you are the leading character, and a free upload to our website http://memorycommunity. org/ Contact: send your emails to deyung@ memorycommunity.org Or call Deyung at 253858-2445 for scheduling D PHHWLQJ 7KH Ă&#x20AC;OPLQJ is free, but donations are appreciated to help the project continue.*

Donate time and receive free groceries. Volunteers needed with skills in management, organization, clerical, food handling, warehousing, maintenance etc. and receive free groceries IURP D 1RQ3URĂ&#x20AC;W )RRG Distribution Program. Older teens are welcomed to volunteer and gain valuable work H[SHULHQFH &RQWDFW 0V Lee at (253) 677-7740 for further information. Knitters and Crocheters &RPH -RLQ 8V /RYLQJ Hearts is a group of volunteers who crochet or knit: hats for chemo, baby items, and blankets IRU GLIIHUHQW QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W organizations with in the community. We meet twice a month. Once on the second Tuesday, from 1:00pm to 3:00pm and again on the fourth Thursday, from 7:00pm to 9:00pm. Please join us at the WayPoint Church, 12719 134th Ave KP N, Gig Harbor. We are also in need of donations of yarn. For more information please email: lovingheartsonkp@aol. com or call Virginia at 253-884â&#x20AC;&#x201D;9619 Loving Hearts also meets 1pm to 3pm 3rd Thur. at Clubhouse Mobile Park Ardena Gale 4821 70th Ave. E., Fife 98424 Donate Your Car, RV or Boat. 7D[ 5HGXFWLRQ $OO Proceeds Go to Locale Food Bank. Free Pick 8S &DOO 7HG    5774 The Backpack Program of the St. Leo Food Connection is looking for a volunteer to pick up backpacks full of food for the weekend for students at McKinley Elementary and Sheridan Elementary from the Food Connection and deliver them to both schools the 2nd and 4th Thursday or Friday of each month for the duration of the school year. Volunteers must have their own vehicle and be able to commit to volunteering for the rest of the school year. This is a low time commitment way to make a big difference to kids! If interested, please contact Britani Hollis: jv@ foodconnection.org Hospice is seeking compassionate, caring individuals to volunteer up to 4 hrs. per week with terminally ill patients. Comprehensive training and education provided. We support your service goals and your spirit to give. Training Jan. 2010 call today! 253.301.6464

REC. VEHICLE

Cummins Diesel 360hp, Allison 6speed Trans, 9,100 miles. 4slides, auto Awnings w/wind sensor. Couch fold into Queen air bed, 2 euro recliners, 42in. Flat screen T.V. King size bed, 21in. T.V, in bedroom. 2A/C, stereo surround system. 8Kw Generator. Non-Smoker, super clean, $135,000, call 253-651-5056

PETS Need safe farms or barns

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy 253-770-8552

for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. 7KH\ DUH Ă&#x20AC;[HG vaccinated and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 298-0913

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week

1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Xena is a huge girl Kip is a very who loves people, energetic boy kids and dogs...but who LOVES to she will own any cat! play fetch! He is a She is soft spoken character and is and loves to be pet. Does not really want looking for an active to be held unless it Forever Family to is her idea! She is entertain! waiting for her Forever Family to come take her home! Currently available animals are featured on our website www.MetroAnimalServices.org

Pet of the Week

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sadieâ&#x20AC;? Meet Sadie, our Featured Pet of the Week. She is the sweetest, gentlest, friendliest dog youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ever meet! She came to the shelter as a stray about three weeks ago, and we think sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about ten years old. She is calm, walks well on a leash, and is well-mannered, but still has a lot of playful, youthful energy. If you know of a home that could use a bright spark of love, let them know about Sadie. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a gem! Her number is 432061. Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org


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&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV

CALL 253.922.5317

GET UGLY ADVERTISE RENT OR SALE FOR

FREE

LOOK FOR HOMES

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

4717 Alameda Ave W, Univ. Place Fabulous University Place School District, 5 bdrm, 3 ba home. Deck & Yard backs $429,000 to nothing but treesâ&#x20AC;Śgranite, stainless appl, brazillian cherry floors, upgrades galore. Exquisite and barely lived in. No disappointment here!

Stephanie Lynch â&#x20AC;˘ 253.203.8985 www.stephanielynch.com John L. Scott â&#x20AC;˘ Tacoma North

or 253-221-6049

price reduced

 PDLQ Ă RRU EHGURRPV DQG a full bath. Basement has 1 bedroom and 3/4 bath

253 691-0461 for more info or for a private showing! Better Properties N. Proctor

Unobstructed View Listing from Margo Hass Klein Unsurpassed View, Superior Craftsmanship, Stunning Details! 3125 N 33rd St, Tacoma Enjoy the awe-inspiring view from nearly every room of this incredible home. Each of the 4 EHGURRPVLQFOXGHVDSULYDWHEDWK<RXZLOOORYHWKHFKHI¡VGUHDPNLWFKHQEULJKWDLU\OLYLQJ spaces and opulent master retreat. Family and friends feel right at home in the separate JXHVWDSDUWPHQW,QGRRUSRROVDXQDFDUJDUDJHDQGWRRPDQ\RWKHUIHDWXUHVWRPHQWLRQ Visit our website for more information. www.potterypointviewhome.com $2,500,000

Margo Hass Klein

CONDOS & HOMES TACOMA

LAKEWOOD

3228 S UNION AVE #310

8416 PHILLIPS RD SW #62

$575 1 BED, 1 BATH 450 SF. AMAZING 1 BED UNIT HAS ALL UTILITIES IN RENT W/S/G, ELECTRICITY AND CABLE.

BONNEY LAKE

TACOMA

8403 LOCUST AVE E #L-2

4318 S ALDER ST

$875

$660

2 BED, 2 BATH 1100 SF. AMAZING 2 BED UNIT HAS WASHER/DRYER, EAT IN KITCHEN, PATIO, STORAGE AND COVERED PARKING

2 BED, 1 BATH 880 SF. IMMACULATE 2 BED DUPLEX HAS ALL APPLIANCES, EAT IN KITCHEN, FENCED PATIO AND W/S/G IN RENT.

TACOMA

TACOMA

2305 S 74TH ST #11

5406 S BIRMINGHAM ST #8

$625

$525

2 BED, 1 BATH 600 SF. WONDERFUL 2 BED UNIT HAS EAT IN KITCHEN, BALCONY , W/S/G & BASIC CABLE INCLUDED IN RENT.

Coldwell Banker Bain

$750 2 BED, 1.5 BATH 800 SF. BEAUTIFUL 2 BED CONDO HAS GRANITE COUNTERTOPS, SS APPLIANCES, HARDWOODS AND PETS WELCOME.

1 BED, 1 BATH 625 SF. PERFECT 1 BED UNIT INCLUDES W/S/G IN RENT, HAS ALL APPLIANCES AND EASY ACCESS TO I-5.

(253) 279-9949

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200

margohassklein@cbbain.com

Professional Management Services

View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

www.margohassklein.com

Doug Arbogast

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I act in your best interest, not mine. You deserve respect from the first time we shake hands to the last.â&#x20AC;?

Foreclosure & Investment Specialist

(253) 307-4055 Dougarbogast.com douga@johnlscott.com

Over 20 Years Real Estate Experience

4424 6th Ave Suite 1 Tacoma, WA 98406

www.REISinvest.com www.REIS4rentbyowner.com

REAL ESTATE I N V E S T M E N T

SERVICES

Property Management Receiverships Condo/Home Owners Association Management Bank REO Acquisitions Commercial Sales/Leasing

REIS

For Sale

For Rent

S&S Retail Center & Business Park $1,199,900 14113-14125 Pacific Ave Building SqFt: 22,578 253-752-9742

Discovery Place 6409 6th Ave,Tacoma $2,499,000 28,989 sq ft Mall. Majority Leased 253-752-9742

Chamber Bay Condo $900 4501 Grand Vie Dr W #107 2br 2 bath 253-752-9742

University Place Stratford Heights Apt with garage. 1, 2 or 3 bd Call 253-565-0343

www.REISinvest.com

www.REISinvest.com

6th Ave Commercial Space

Broadway Center 206 Broadway Ave E,Seattle $1,450,000 Small Center 199,881 NOI On Land lease 253 228 0444

Olalla Farm House

$640,000 4417 6th Ave, Tacoma 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

$1395 14637 Starr Rd SE 3br 3 bath 253-752-9742

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Tacoma (253) 752-9742 Kent

u

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Downtown Tacoma Office 3000 to 16,200 Sq Ft. With Parking 253-752-9742

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6th Ave Office/Retail Space 4412 6th Ave Suite 5 600 sq ft 253-752-9742

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3725 S Orchard St. #2

2br 1 3/4 bath 1100 sqft. 253-752-9742

Lakewood Office Gross Leases. 1290 to 1550 Sq Ft. Good Parking. Prestigious Gravelly Lake Dr. 253-752-9742

Office/Retail Space 3868 Center St 816 sq ft 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

www.REISinvest.com

www.REISinvest.com

$875

Gig Harbor (253) 514-6539

(253) 981-4098

u

For Lease

u

DuPont (253) 207-5871

Seattle South Lake Union (206) 319-5981

Now is the time to invest in Real Estate for your future! Low interest rates + affordable prices = great investment opportunities. Call me todayâ&#x20AC;Ś I am happy to help you with your Real Estate needs. (253) 307-4055 Whether you are a first time home buyer, a distressed homeowner or a veteran investor, I have the tools and systems in place to help you achieve your real estate goals.

For qualifications contact Jenn: Jennifer Pacheco Mortgage Loan Officer

253-926-4131 www.umpquabank.com/jpacheco jenniferpacheco@umpquabank.com


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, October 5, 2012

Carlos Mencia

The Commodores

Tim Allen

October 6, 8:30pm

October 13, 8:30pm

October 20, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom, $30, $55, $80, $85

I-5 Showroom, $30, $45, $65, $70

I-5 Showroom, $40, $70, $95, $100

Loretta Lynn Battle at the Boat 89

Sinbad

October 26, 8:30pm

November 3, 7pm

November 10, 8pm

I-5 Showroom, $30, $45, $60, $65

I-5 Showroom, $25, $40, $100

I-5 Showroom, $25, $40, $60, $65

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices.


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