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WHAT’S RIGHT ųWITH TACOMA

HUD boss, panel highlight housing challenges

Welcome to the Lucky Woman’s Breast Cancer Stories

PHOTO BY CEDRIC LEGGIN

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDY DE LOS ANGELES PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

HOUSING. A local hous-

ing market forum organized by Congressman Denny Heck was keynoted by Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan. The panel, moderated by former Weyerhaeuser CEO Dan Fulton, included: BRC Family owner Bill Riley, Tacoma-Pierce County Affordable Housing Consortium Director Connie Brown, Washington Housing Finance Commission Executive Director Kim Herman, Homestreet Bank’s Residential Lending Director Rich Bennion and Vulcan, Inc.’s Vice President of Real Estate Ada Healey.

BILL WOULD RIGHT ‘FISHING WARS’ CONVICTIONS By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

A

bill working its way through the state Legislature would allow tribal members who were convicted on charges associated with exercising their federal treaty rights to fishing grounds around the state to have those convictions removed from their records, decades after their trials. House Bill 2080 unanimously passed the House of Representatives’ Community Development, Housing and Tribal Affairs with a minor substitution that would add ways for family members and tribes to petition the court on behalf of American Indians who were convicted but have since died. “This has been so many years ago; many of these folks have passed away,” said State Rep. Norm Johnson, R-14th District of Yakima. “This gives their families an opportunity to right a wrong.” If approved as expected, HB 2080 requires a sentencing court to vacate any pre-1975 fishing convictions of a tribal member who was exercising a treaty right if the tribal member or a representative requests the convictions be removed from their records. Commonly known as the “Fishing Wars,” Native Americans around the state were arrested and jailed in large numbers in the 1960s and 1970s as tribes fought to uphold their treaty rights to fish in their traditional and accustomed ways and areas. These treaty points between tribes X See FISHING / page A4

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

A housing forum that drew more than 300 policy makers, real estate developers and housing advocates gathered by Congressman Denny Heck (D-Olympia) at Hotel Murano last week showcased the challenges and the opportunities of the local housing market. The event was keynoted by Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan. Donovan assured everyone that the housing meltdown that started in 2008 is well on its way back to health, albeit slowly. He noted that much of the credit for housing’s return to wellness can go to Heck’s work at crafting legislation to help keep homeowners from foreclosure, adding that more work needs to be done. That work is being hampered by the nation’s tight bank account and partisan politics. “As bad as our financial difficulties are, I

X See HOUSING page A4

PHOTO COURTESY OF DANIEL FEAR

PHOTO COURTESY OF DANIEL FEAR

ENCAMPMENT. (Top) The Puyallup Tribe’s encampment on the

Puyallup River brought much needed attention to the Tribe’s fight for its fishing rights. Members of other tribes came to help too, especially the Nisqually. Here, Nisqually fishing rights leader Al Bridges speaks through a bullhorn. In the foreground are Puyallup tribal men and ardent fishing rights defenders Charlie Cantrell (with hands on hips) and Silas “Boo” Cross (next to him in hat). (Middle) On the day authorities raided the Puyallup’s encampment, fire broke out on the Puyallup River bridge train trestle, sending billows of black, acrid smoke into the air. (Bottom) Local law enforcement kept a close eye on the encampment day and night. Despite tribal members’ pledge of nonviolence, officers from Tacoma Police Department are seen here aiming a telescopic rifle at the camp as if ready to shoot at any moment. HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE

Vikings hold off Rams A7 KEEPING LOVE ALIVE: Tacoma Weekly is prepping for Valentine’s Day and wants to know your romantic tricks of the trade. Enter the contest and win some great prizes. PAGE A2

Smokey Robinson at the EQC B4

Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

ARIES March 21 – April 19 The end of the month could be socially stressful but will lighten up as Venus turns direct today. Be careful of excesses that may overburden you. Your self-confidence grows stronger allowing you to make radical changes.

LIBRA September 23 – October 22 Tension on the home front may arise at the end of the month. Your happiness is questioned. Don’t make any rash changes. After Venus turns direct on the 31st, things may look and feel differently. Relax, think positively.

TAURUS April 20 - May 20 Tensions rise, especially at work, so be prepared. Co-workers’ threats may be short-lived and are due to insecurities. Learn how to play the game and have a plan in place. Keep your focus and your temper!

SCORPIO October 23 – November 21 You may feel drained and may question the intentions of those around you. This will pass as Venus turns direct today. Don’t overreact to situations. Take a step back, relax and remember to breathe!

GEMINI May 21 – June 20 This week looks prosperous, so take that chance. Venus retrograde ends soon so try to lay low, be sincere and selectively generous. You are compelled to deal with the truth of what “is” not merely as it may appear.

SAGITTARIUS November 22 – December 21 Money concerns and feeling of unworthiness may be predominate this week. You may choose to borrow or invest to boost finances. You’re the life of every party and have a vast network of admirers and friends.

CANCER June 21 – July 22 The end of the month may have been challenging as you try to keep your partner happy. The happy vibes will return as Venus turns direct today. Don’t blame yourself. You will learn how to back off and let things flow more naturally.

CAPRICORN December 22 – January 19 Set and determine your boundaries at work. Let others know your feelings and beliefs in a calm manner. Think about your needs to accomplish your goals. Stay focused with daily routine. A partner admires you.

LEO July 23 – August 22 Social situations could be embarrassing before Venus turns direct today. Minor disagreements may arise. Keep your stride by remaining solid and grounded. Others may look up to you and appreciate your style.

AQUARIUS January 20 – February 18 Get ready for an emotionally charged week. Hot buttons may be exposed and punched. These feelings won’t last as the end of Venus retrograde approaches. Insults have no merit. Forgiveness is divine.

VIRGO August 23 – September 22 This week may be emotional and confusing. Wishful thinking and willingness to overlook the flaws in others outweighs your usual clear better judgment. You are becoming more comfortable with changes for the better.

PISCES February 19 – March 20 Arguments with partners or loved ones may hurl harsh words. These episodes will subside when Venus turns direct. Protect your heart and guard your feelings this week. Laugh out loud and have some well-deserved fun.

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Horoscope, word search and more B6

PEACE. Kits, who now has a bar code and a QR code, flashed the V-sign for her cancer fight. We can’t show you the salute she gave to creepy carcinoma in general.

By Kathleen Merryman I’ll be cutting back on work for a while, and we decided you deserve an explanation: I’m the luckiest person with breast cancer you know. This poor, weak cancer of the stage 2 B ductal invasive type is doomed. One wonders why it even bothered, given the scores of smart, skilled, kind people arrayed against it with the best science and equipment anywhere. As the website says, I F***ing Love Science. And I love crazy, blessed timing. At 12 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 1, I went on Medicare, which I have earned and paid for throughout a long, long working life. I’d already enrolled in a solid supplemental insurance policy. At 11:30 a.m.,Sunday, Dec. 8, my doctor called to tell me the results of the needle biopsy I’d had the week before at the Carol Milgard Breast Center. Though there is no good kind of cancer, she said, this is the least bad. I will have an occasionally unpleasant walk through it, and I’ll survive. This cancer will not break me, physically. Because I was born on Dec. 28, 1948, and because we as a nation have invested in and protected our seniors with Medicare, it will not break my family financially. My heart breaks for

X See CANCER page A4

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Sports ........................A6 Make A Scene ........B5 A&E ....................... ....B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

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Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK VISIT US ON FACEBOOK MHJLIVVRJVT[HJVTH^LLRS`

KEEPING LOVE ALIVE

,U[LY[OLJVU[LZ[HUK^PUZVTLNYLH[WYPaLZ Tacoma Weekly is prepping for Valentine’s Day and wants to know your romantic tricks of the trade. Send us a paragraph description of your fail-safe way of keeping love alive in your relationships. We will post them and let readers vote on the

best tip. Winners of the contest will receive a dinner for two at the Adriatic Grill and a dozen roses from Fife Flowers. Submissions must be submitted by noon on Feb. 4. The submissions will be posted at Tacomaweekly.com

City News

17th and Fawcett Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.� And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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;(*64(3052:;67:-69;9(*24(05;,5(5*, Light rail service in Tacoma will not operate Saturday, Feb. 1 through Sunday, Feb. 2 while work crews perform track maintenance south of Union Station. Tacoma Link will resume regular service on Monday, Feb. 3. During the two-day closure, Sound Transit will operate free bus service along a route similar to that used by Tacoma Link, on a schedule that mirrors Tacoma Link service. The buses will be labeled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacoma Linkâ&#x20AC;? and will operate northbound to downtown Tacoma and southbound to the Tacoma Dome from these locations: Northbound Service to downtown Tacoma: Tacoma Dome Station at East 25th and East D streets Temporary stop South 25th and A streets (across the street from the station platform) Temporary stop at Union Station at Pacific Avenue and South 19th Street (across the street from the station platform) Temporary stop at Convention Center at Pacific Avenue and South 14th Street (one block northeast of the station platform) Commerce Station at Commerce and South 11th streets Theater District Station at Commerce and South 9th streets Southbound Service to Tacoma Dome: Riders traveling southbound to the Tacoma Dome will board buses at the same locations as northbound stops, except at South 25th Street, where riders will use the South 25th Station. Riders can visit www.soundtransit.org to find holiday service information, an easy-to-use trip planner, updates and schedules for all Sound Transit rail and bus services. Riders can sign up to receive automatic e-mail service alerts for Sounder, Central Link, Tacoma Link or ST Express. Rider Alerts can help you plan your trip around service disruptions caused by weather conditions or other issues, inform you about special service to events, and alert you to holiday schedule changes. More information on Sound Transit train and bus schedules can be found at soundtransit.org/schedules. :6<;/)6<5+:*/<:;,97(92>(@ ;6*36:,;,4769(903@ To allow for stormwater improvements, southbound Schuster Parkway will close to vehicular traffic between South 4th Street and Pacific Avenue from Monday, Feb. 10 through Friday, March 21. Northbound lanes will remain unaffected. The improvements are designed to improve storm drainage and prevent flooding on Commerce Street near the Spanish Steps. Detour signs will direct southbound traffic from Schuster Parkway to South 4th Street, Dock Street and to downtown or I-705 via the South 15th Street ramp. View a map of the detour route from the project web site, cityoftacoma.org/stadiumway. The Schuster Parkway sidewalk will be closed to pedestrians and users for two to three weeks during the road closure. Signs will notify pedestrians when the sidewalk is closed. The pedestrian detour will be the same as the vehicle detour. For more information contact Environmental Services Project Manager Erik Ward, (253) 502-2171. .66+>0333(<5*/,:5,>Âş*6--,,)<AAÂť:/67 Tacoma Goodwillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Youth Barista Program officially launched its upgraded curriculum on Jan. 30 with a â&#x20AC;&#x153;first pourâ&#x20AC;? ceremony at their new training facility and coffee shop at the Hilltop Regional Healthcare Center in Tacoma. District managers from Starbucks volunteered that day to help with the program kickoff and CEO David Flentge opened the cafĂŠ. This new, second coffee shop and hands-on classroom, with customer traffic from a full medical and dental facility, a new area pharmacy, other tenants and the surrounding neighborhood will allow for expanded training when linked with the original location at the Milgard Work Opportunity Center. With two sites students train in multiple environments that new hires would experience in coffee chains. During the 16-week program youth baristas (ages 16â&#x20AC;&#x201C;24) learn hands-on training in espresso arts, coffee history, customer service and cafĂŠ operations â&#x20AC;&#x201C; training from barista basics to cafĂŠ management. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coffee Buzzâ&#x20AC;? is a small contribution to the Hilltop Regional Health Center, but a critical facility for the hundreds of students who will work here in the years ahead. As students move through Tacoma Goodwillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 16 week program â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and through the two coffee shop locations â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they will now experience different paces and customer flow, different cus-

that afternoon as well as in the Feb. 7 edition. Votes will be collected online through Feb. 10, with the winner being announced in the Feb. 14 edition and online that day. Send your tips to Stevedunkel@ Tacomaweekly.com.

tomers, environment and equipment. Adapting to different locations make them more qualified to step into both single shop and chain businesses, making them more competitive for job placement. Enriching the Barista Training program is part of Tacoma Goodwillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s larger strategy to look for ways to improve job training to stay current and adapt with the various industries they support, so that businesses and organizations will hire graduates as the best qualified professionals. Tailored around corporate and locally-owned specialty coffee shops and standard industry positions that are in area demand, the Youth Barista Training Program specializes in the basic operations of an espresso bar and cafĂŠ facility. With the additional location, Tacoma Goodwill will offer seven cycles each year, with four students in each cycle. Program orientations are open to the public the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 1:30 p.m. in the Milgard Work Opportunity Center â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coffee Buzz,â&#x20AC;? at 714 S. 27th St., Tacoma, WA 98409. For more information: Audra Laymon at 253.573.6560 alaymon@tacomagoodwill.org).

:;(;,-(09.,;:05;6;/4(5:7090; Seahawk fans around the region are flying â&#x20AC;&#x153;12th Manâ&#x20AC;? flags, but only the Washington State Fair Events Center can claim four flags atop the 185-foot Extreme Scream. These new toppers to the thrill ride make it the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest â&#x20AC;&#x153;extreme screamâ&#x20AC;? for our Seahawks, who are playing in the Super Bowl Feb. 2. The Events Center in Puyallup started with two â&#x20AC;&#x153;12th Manâ&#x20AC;? flags at its Gold Gate entrance weeks ago. As soon as four 4-foot by 6-foot flags were available from the flag distributor, they were installed atop the Extreme Scream, which is over 18 stories high, and the tallest structure in Puyallup. Another â&#x20AC;&#x153;12th Manâ&#x20AC;? flag was placed on the Classic Coasterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highest point on Monday. :/6>:,(/(>2790+,(5+:(=,65(+40::065 At Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, the porcupine is putting up a prickly pass-rushing defense, while over at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blitz-ardâ&#x20AC;? the polar bear is pretty great on D, too. And â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hogan the harbor seal Harvin?â&#x20AC;? Well, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got all the pass-receiving, ball-running moves of Seahawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; No. 11. To celebrate the Seattle Seahawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; appearance in the 2014 Super Bowl, sister zoos Northwest Trek in Eatonville and Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium in Tacoma are offering $5 off adult and senior general admission and $3 off youth and tot general admission now through Sunday, Feb. 2, to all visitors wearing Seahawks-themed attire. And there will be special ZOO-per Bowl activities at both places on Saturday, Feb. 1. Visitors on ZOO-per Bowl Saturday can look for some animals receiving Seahawks-themed enrichments. And zookeepers no doubt will draw parallels between how fast a golden eagle can fly and the swiftness of wide receiver Golden Tate. Or how a tiger goes all Beast Mode on its prey in the same way Marshawn Lynch explodes up the middle. In the meantime, the animals at both zoos will be practicing running, jumping, huddling, rushing and defending their territories, just as they do every day. 5.<@,59,(77605;,+;6 <:*4>692-69*,)6(9+ Linda Nguyen, chief executive officer for WorkForce Central, was re-appointed to the board of trustees for U.S. Conference of Mayors Workforce Development Council. The council, established in 1977, provides a forum for mayors and their chief administrators to comprehensively examine workforce development issues and to strengthen the ability of cities to meet the needs of their citizens and business community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ensuring a sufficient supply of globally competitive talent is critical to a healthy economy for all regions, including Tacoma,â&#x20AC;? stated Nguyen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m honored to join workforce development leaders from across the country to address key issues and advance the message that public and private investments in workforce development have a significant multiplier effect.â&#x20AC;? As CEO of WorkForce Central, Nguyen oversees all facets of the organization from business and individual services to building future partnerships and charting workforce development trends. She has more than 20 years experience in all aspects of workforce development. Nguyen has a Baccalaureate degree from University of Puget Sound and is also a board member of the Tacoma Pierce County Economic Development Board, Washington Economic Development Association, Geneva Foundation, United Way of Pierce County, and Metropolitan Development Council.

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.66+;04,:-69*/(90;@(; ;(*64(-09,-0./;,9:)(33 By David Rose Correspondent

You know when your legs are sore the next day that you were tearing up the dance floor like it was 1985 again? And DAVID ROSE who wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t when the outrageous â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spazmaticsâ&#x20AC;? are performing awesome hits like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whip itâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;What I Like About You.â&#x20AC;? With neon pink and green painted floppy disks and shutter shades decorating each table, hundreds of Tacoma Firefighters and their guests packed the Emerald Queen Casino Showroom last Saturday night for Winter Blaze. Many came decked out in full 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s regalia with big hair and

hot pants. The annual fundraiser sends kids with cancer and their siblings to Camp Goodtimes on Vashon Island. Crime Stoppers of Tacoma-Pierce County board members were among those who donated money to the cause. I was honored to serve as emcee and auctioneer for the event that raised $34,225. A Russell Wilson signed football was the most popular item donated, selling for $1,500. Matt Frank with IAFF Local 31 says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are so grateful for a partner like the Emerald Queen Casino and their support again this year in helping us raise money for children with cancer.â&#x20AC;? One note, never try to compete on the dance floor with a firefighter â&#x20AC;&#x201C; those guys have moves!! Good times for a great cause.

PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID ROSE

7/6;6)64) Crime Stoppers of Tacoma-Pierce County

Board President Ed Hauge (left) and Det. Ed Troyer (right) with Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wanted host David Rose being photo bombed by Mandon Foley.

Four family support centers close Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department has $626,000 less in funding for its Family Support services programs this year. Now, it must close Family Support Centers in Hilltop, Parkland, Lakewood and Puyallup to close the gap, effective Feb. 28. The funding cut is the result of the Dec. 31, 2013 ending of the Early Family Support Service (EFSS) contract with Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Administration. EFSS was a home visiting program for clients who needed help to develop better parenting skills but were not active Child Protective Services (CPS) cases. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The services the Family Support Center network provides to Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most vulnerable residents are a critical part of the fabric of our community,â&#x20AC;? said Anthony L-T Chen, MD, MPH, director of health. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Closing Family Support Centers is a sad outcome of the ending of a significant contract, but we are keeping our focus on preserving services to as many people as possible.â&#x20AC;? To implement the budget cut, the Health Department received input from its Board of Health and its Family Support Services Task Force on a strategy that focuses on preserving six geographically distributed centers throughout the county. The geographic focus aims to maintain the greatest level of client access possible. About 10 contract family support workers will continue to serve families through six Family Support Centers that include Bethel,

Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas Pretending the officer isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t to news@tacomaweekly.com.

Key Peninsula, Eastside, Sumner, Orting and White River. The Family Support Services program will continue to serve all of Pierce County through the remaining Family Support Centers, adjusting catchment areas based on numbers of families who need home-visiting in each area. Funding challenges for the Family Support Center network are not new. Last March, several centers faced the threat of closure because of challenges with federal Title XIX Medicaid Administrative Match funding. In July, the Board of Health convened a Family Support Services Task Force made up of community partners, Board of Health members and Department staff. The groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s charge was to explore how the community can work together to preserve family support services in Pierce County. The task force met weekly from September to December and again in January to review the impacts of the contracting change. At the Jan. 22 study session, the Board received the Task Forceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s broad recommendations to guide future planning for family support services. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Staff and our partners will now focus on looking at the Task Force recommendations in the areas of structure, funding, advocacy and communication,â&#x20AC;? said Sebrena Chambers, Strengthening Families division director. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We appreciate the Task Forceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passion and dedication in helping chart the path forward for these valuable services to some of our most vulnerable residents,â&#x20AC;? she said.

;67:;690,:65 [HJVTH^LLRS`JVT

#1 BEST OF TACOMA 2014 BALLOT #2 SEVEN SPARK GRANTS WILL BOLSTER COMMUNITY STRENGTHS #3 NEW EASTSIDE MURAL DOUBLES AS HISTORIC REPRESENTATION #4 YOUNG LADY RAMS HUMBLED BY TOP-RANKED CLEVELAND WILSON SITS ATOP NARROWS 3A, AIMS TO LEARN FROM LOSS

#5 TACOMA LOVES YOU, SIR MIX-A-LOT! BUT PLEASE DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T WATCH THE SUPER BOWL RAP LEGEND RETURNS ON FEB. 1, HOPEFULLY AVOIDS HIS TV THE NEXT DAY

there is no way to get out of a DUI, as one man pulled over on Jan. 21 at South 25th Street found out. When the arresting officer attempted to pull the man over for driving without headlights on, he refused until the officer flipped on the patrol vehicleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s siren. After the officer approached the vehicle, the man appeared to not notice the officer standing at his window, and the officer had to knock several times before the man finally rolled the rear window down. After convincing the man to roll down the correct window, the officer was overwhelmed with the smell of intoxicants, at which point he asked for the manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license and registration, only to be met with the man turning his radio up to full volume. Then, perhaps in an attempt to trick the officer, the man handed him his cell phone in the place of his license. It didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work. The man then proceeded to fail the field sobriety test and was eventually booked into Fife Jail for Driving Under the Influence, Driving while License Suspended and Operating a Motor Vehicle without Ignition Interlock When Required. A woman caught trespassing at an apartment complex on 34th Street was perhaps trying to save its residents from something extraterrestrial. When approached by an officer after messing with the power and gas meter of the building, she began to mumble things about the planet Mars. In between her ramblings, she was nice enough to mention the narcotics pipe in her purse. Upon examination of the pipe by the officer, he determined it is a type often used for smoking methamphetamine. The woman is now barred from being on the premises. Compiled by Derek Shuck

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SPECIAL OLYMPICS POLAR PLUNGE TACOMA

FEBRUARY 22, 2014 AT OWENS BEACH Check-In at 9:00am-11:30am, Costume Contest 11:15am, Plunge at 12:00pm

Take a dip in the ice waters across Washington State and be a part of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;coolestâ&#x20AC;? event of the year! Join the fun, help raise funds and win prizes all in support of Special Olympics Washington. Special Olympics Polar Plunge Series is a fundraising effort organized by law enforcement agencies across the state to benefit Special Olympics Washington. This unique opportunity gives individuals, organizations and businesses the chance to support Special Olympics Washington by collecting pledges for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;opportunityâ&#x20AC;? to plunge into frigid water across Washington State.

Visit www.specialolympicswashington.org for more info.


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WCancer From page A1

the families who have to scramble for the money to treat a mom, dad or child in the fight of their life. My heart breaks, too, for the people whose employers do not support them as mine has. My heart breaks for the people whose cancers are vicious and tenacious. They humble me with their bravery and determination. My stupid cancer (I like insulting it) will slow me down â&#x20AC;&#x201C; already has â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good, in its own way. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s giving me the chance to recognize inspiration, and share it. You may be surprised by how frank, funny and fierce women wearing only socks and bathrobes can be. Last month, for instance, snugged into one of the Milgard Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s terry robes and reading Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sexiest Man Alive issue, I overheard two young women complaining about the wait. A dignified woman, senior even to me, finished her Time just as I was not grasping the appeal of Adam Levine. We traded, and she mentioned that she was on the way to matching perky boobs. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d had a lumpectomy last year, she said, and it perked that saggy breast right up. Now that the other breast needs a lumpectomy, too, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on her way to dual pertness. Be warned that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be using the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;boobsâ&#x20AC;? as much as I want, and I may grab some nasty vocabulary when I write about the greedy, creepy cells behind my breastbone, where some of them have holed up. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a cancer chick now, and I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be washing my mouth out with soap. I will, however, be washing my body out with chemicals for the next few months, then zapping it with radiation for six weeks or so. Though writing is how I think things through, my husband, a few friends, pals at work and my surgeon

WFishing From page A1

and the federal government clashed with beliefs by state officials that tribal members had to follow all state fishing regulations when they fished in waters located outside their designated reservations. The federal government sued the state and it resulted in the landmark decision by U.S. District Judge George Boldt in 1974. The decision largely barred state regulators from enforcing state laws against tribal fishery activities on traditional waters. The particulars of that shared responsibility and management of fishing

- talked about whether or not to publish any of this. I surely donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want anyone to think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m some kind of inspiring journalist sharing the brave fight of her life for the good of humankind in general. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not that selfless woman. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a practical, smartass reporter, and I know this cancer is going down like the Denver Broncos. Until it does, though, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be saying no to most of you when you ask me to cover a good story. But this is a good story, too, said Janne Hutchins, executive director of LASA and cancer whapper. Some people attach stigma to cancer and the people it invades. Be a stigmabuster she advised. Tell people what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like. Truth is often better than the worst we can imagine. Tim Miekle, Matt Nagle and John Weymer, my bosses and friends at The Weekly, said I shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t write anything that might make me uncomfortable. We had a dilemma, though: If I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t show up in the paper, readers might worry that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d been fired, or expired, or was really sick. We decided to go with this story, and tell more about the people, and the cool science, in occasional stories over the next eight months. Dr. Virginia Stowell, Goddess of Boob Surgery and reader of The Tacoma Weekly, said that, no matter how much is written about breast cancer, more is better. When a friend gets it, people do their breast self-exams and schedule mammograms. She also offered a caveat. The good people of Tacoma, she said, would inundate me with healing wishes, and I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the energy to respond with the thanks I feel. So letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make a deal: Let me thank you in advance for your kind thoughts. Instead of putting them into words, point them at your own boobs. Do a breast self-exam. Set up a mammogram time. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll make me happy, and it will keep you in touch with your breast health..

grounds has been fodder for court cases and clarifications ever since. But it did establish the legal fact that tribal members committed no crime by fishing on traditional waters with their gill nets because the federal government had signed treaties in the 1850s allowing the practice. While hundreds of Native Americans were jailed or fined for fishing under their treaty-protected rights, only about 80 are alive today, according to state records. The convictions ranged from misdemeanors to felonies, which not only hampered the individualsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; employment prospects and from receiving some state benefits but

4H`VYÂťZ`V\[OLTWSV`TLU[ WYVNYHTYLJLP]LZNYHU[ SummerJobs253, the youth summer employment program initiated by Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland, has been awarded a $4,000 U.S. Conference of Mayors 2014 DollarWise Youth Campaign grant. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am delighted that Tacoma has been recognized for its efforts to create a well-rounded summer employment program that helps prepare local youth for the responsibilities of adulthood,â&#x20AC;? said Strickland. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I look forward to expanding the program this summer and giving more of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s youth a chance to participate.â&#x20AC;? Established as a pilot program in June 2013, SummerJobs253 enrolled 50 students attending public high schools in Tacoma.

The students worked a total of 160 paid hours each, with the opportunity to earn academic credit. They also participated in the National Endowment for Financial Education High School Financial Planning program. The program â&#x20AC;&#x201C; spearheaded by Columbia Bank â&#x20AC;&#x201C; included lessons on money management, borrowing, investing and other relevant topics. Recruitment for SummerJobs253 2014 will begin in the spring. For more information on how to participate as a financial donor or host employer, contact Chris Wright at (253) 591-5075. For more information about the DollarWise Youth Campaign Grant, visit BeDollarWise.org.

WHousing

ty Affordable Housing Consortium Director Connie Brown, Washington Housing Finance Commission Executive Director Kim Herman, Homestreet Bankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Residential Lending Director Rich Bennion and Vulcan, Inc.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vice President of Real Estate Ada Healey. Aside from the general sense that the housing market will improve, unknowns still exist. One big unknown about the future of housing involves the demographic shift underway around the nation. As younger people wait longer to start families, it is unknown if they will seek houses in suburban areas or within cities. Baby Boomers are aging and seeking options to downsize from their largely suburban homes where they raised families to smaller residencies. It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t clear if they will shift from single-family homes to smaller units in urban areas. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are going to have a real problem in the next few years housing these people,â&#x20AC;? Herman said. Heck organized the event as a member of the House Financial Services Committee, which has jurisdiction over federal housing policy, Wall Street reform and consumer protection, and commercial insurance and banking issues.

From page A1

worry more about our â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;trust deficit,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Donovan said, adding that where someone decides to live is a massive decision for families. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are not just talking about bricks and mortar. We are talking about homes and housing. We are talking about something fundamental to peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives.â&#x20AC;? Housing decisions affect where children go to school, where residents work, transportation routes and the health of communities. Those core, quality of life decisions have been shaken by the housing market locally, which still has about a third of all homeowners owing more on their house than the home is worth. Pierce County also has one of the highest rates of foreclosure in the state. Correcting those facts will take time, the creation of quality jobs for people entering the housing market and favorable lending terms for both builders and buyers, a panel of housing experts agreed. The panel, moderated by former Weyerhaeuser CEO Dan Fulton, included: BRC Family owner Bill Riley, Tacoma-Pierce Coun-

also limited travel to Canada, which does not allow American felons to enter the country. One Native American was not able to adopt his own granddaughter because he had a decades-old fishing violation. It also served as an unjust black mark on family histories for many tribal members around the state. Puyallup Tribal elder Jim Young was part of that struggle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They talk about the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Fishing Wars,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; but there were a lot of things that happened before that,â&#x20AC;? he said. He remembers a time in November of 1954, when the 21-year-old Young and Bob Satiacum went fishing on Clear Creek. Game officials were waiting.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The state was always watching,â&#x20AC;? Young said. Young and Satiacum and were cited as they pulled into shore. The game official handed them citations for the charges of Possession of Food Fish, Possession of Game Fish and Possession of Fishing Equipment. Young was fined $75, while Satiacum was fined $150 because he owned the boat and nets. On top of game officials watching Native fishermen in those days, non-tribal anglers would often harass and threaten them from the riverbanks, Young said. Railroad workers would routinely drop lit flares from the trestles onto the fishing canoes that were tied up along the river.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;These things were going on all the time,â&#x20AC;? Young said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But if you arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t there, the fish will go by without you.â&#x20AC;? The convictions would be challenged and overturned â&#x20AC;Ś twice. A lower court dismissed the charges on the grounds that the state had failed to prove the ban on net fishing was â&#x20AC;&#x153;reasonable and necessary for the conservation of fish.â&#x20AC;? State officials then appealed that decision to Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Supreme Court under the argument that its fishing rules applied to Indians and non-Indians alike. The state high court didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy that argument when it issued its decision in 1957. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No other conclusion would give effect to the treaty, since to hold that their right was equal to that of the citizens of the territory would be to say that they were given no right at all, except that which any citizen subject to state statutes and regulations may enjoy to fish at the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;usual and accustomed grounds and stations,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? the court wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The treaty of Medicine Creek of 1855 is

the supreme law of the land and, as such, is binding upon this court, notwithstanding any statute of this state to the contrary, and its provisions will continue to be superior to the exercise of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s police power respecting the regulating of fishing â&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? That â&#x20AC;&#x153;supreme authorityâ&#x20AC;? over state laws could only be lessened if the treaty itself were modified by a federal Act of Congress and the tribes, the treaty is abandoned, or the federal Supreme Court reverses its longstanding views of international treaty rights and obligations, the court wrote. But that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop tribal members from being arrested and heavily fined or forced to pay costly attorney fees. Ironically, Young didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know his conviction had been dismissed until recently. He had entered the Army after the incident and never heard about the final outcome until talk of the current legislation started. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had no idea the charges were dismissed,â&#x20AC;? he said.

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Our View

The best of a bad route seems clear

EDITORIAL CARTOON BY CHRIS BRITT s CBRITTOON@GMAIL.COM s 7774!#/-!7%%+,9#/-%$)4/2)!,#!24//.3 FIND CARTOONS, THE ART OF FREE SPEECH: CHRIS BRITT AT TEDXTACOMA ON YOUTUBE.COM

Guest Editorials

Throwaway Society By Laura Finley Many commentators have referred to the U.S. as a throwaway society. Typically, they are referring to our excessive consumption of disposable products. We are a society in which the average family throws out a quarter of its food, and each individual generates around 4.5 pounds of trash every day, all year long. As bad and unsustainable as this is, even more bothersome is our penchant for throwing away people. One in three black men in America will go to prison during his lifetime. This means families left fatherless. It means that when they are released, these men will likely not be able to vote, hold office, serve on a jury, or obtain many professional licensures. Consequently, job opportunities are severely limited

and the chance for re-offending is maximized. Although not nearly as staggering, one in six Latino men will also end up in the wasteland that is an American prison. Critics might contend that these statistics reflect higher crime rates, but the primary thing they reflect is a system in which blacks and Latinos are more likely to be stopped, searched, arrested, tried and convicted than their white counterparts. Indeed, a new study conducted by researchers from the University of South Carolina found that nearly half of all black men in the U.S had been arrested at least once before the age of 23, and about 30 percent had one arrest before their 18th birthday. Sadly, studies have shown that while we are throwing these young men into the abyss of the corrections system, prison

is actually the safest place to be a black man in America. A study conducted in North Carolina in 2011 found that black men were half as likely to die in prison than they were out in society. This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the first time that researchers have found lower death rates among incarcerated marginalized groups, who often receive healthcare and square meals routinely for the first time in their lives when they are inside the big house. Mahatma Gandhi once commented that you can measure the greatness of a nation by the way it treats its weakest members. Given the statistics presented above, we are, so far, an epic fail. Laura Finley, Ph.D., teaches in the Barry University Department of Sociology & Criminology and is syndicated by PeaceVoice.

U.S. ranks behind Azerbaijan for entrepreneurs By Don C. Brunell With the ongoing debate about income inequality and increasing the minimum wage, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to revisit the basics. In order to demand a wage increase, you must first have a job. In order to have a job, someone must create that job. In order to create that job, someone must start a business. But now, when our economy desperately needs more â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and better â&#x20AC;&#x201C; jobs, a major study shows that starting a business in the U.S. is more difficult than ever. The study by the World Bank and the International Finance Corp. ranked 189 nations on how easy it is to start a new business. They considered the number of procedures required, the time necessary to complete the

paperwork, and the expense involved. The U.S. ranked 20th, down from 11th last year. Our showing was well behind countries like Rwanda, Belarus and Azerbaijan. The good news? We narrowly beat out Uzbekistan. New Zealand is the best place in the world for entrepreneurs, according to the report. Starting a business there requires â&#x20AC;&#x153;one procedure, half a day, (and) less than 1 percent of income per capita and no paid-in minimum capital,â&#x20AC;? the study noted. New Zealand was followed by Canada, Singapore, Australia and Hong Kong in the top five. By contrast, the U.S. requires, on average, six procedures, takes five days and requires 1.5 percent of the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s income per capita. The study also listed the countries

that made it easier to start a business in 2012/13. The U.S. was not on that list. Despite our slide in this global ranking, the U.S. couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hold a candle to Surinam, where it takes almost 7 months to start a business. Why is this important? Because most jobs are created by small businesses, and research shows that economic growth is driven by the entry of new businesses rather than by the growth of existing firms. Don Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He recently retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at TheBrunells@msn.com.

Senator Patty Murray responds to Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s State of the Union Address â&#x20AC;&#x153;The fact that I was even in the House Chamber tonight, listening to the President deliver his message of opportunity to the nation, is direct evidence that government can and should help provide the lifeline that middle class families teetering on the brink many times need. After all, serving as a Senator was something that I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t imagine as a teenager many decades ago when my father fell ill and my mother was forced into the role of both breadwinner and caregiver for seven kids. But thanks to a federal worker training program, VA benefits, student loans and even food stamps for a time, my family made it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Millions of families across Washington state and our nation now stand at that same crossroads. And tonight those families heard President Obama rightly focus on specific proposals aimed at helping them. Policies focused on creating jobs, addressing our nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wage and skills gaps, growing the middle class and investing in educational

opportunities for the next generation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are proposals that Americans of all political stripes have said they overwhelmingly support. So I am hopeful that Republicans will work with us to build on the bipartisan foundation we built with last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget deal instead of pushing our country to another absolutely unnecessary debt limit crisis. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am particularly glad that the President focused so much attention on education, the heart of true opportunity for this generation and the next. As a former preschool teacher, I have seen first-hand the value of early childhood education in making sure our youngest students start off on the right track and are ready to succeed. So I am very glad that President Obama doubled down on his commitment to a national preschool initiative that will not only help our youngest children and pay dividends in future economic growth, but also empower millions of women who would be able to go to work and give back to their communities.

,4(03<:@6<96705065: Tacoma Weekly welcomes your opinions, viewpoints and letters to the editor. You can e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly. com. Please include your name, address and phone number when submitting your letter.

I challenge anyone to explain to me why this should be a partisan issue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I also strongly support President Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s call to raise the minimum wage. The minimum wage has fallen further and further behind the rising cost of living and we owe it to our workers to make sure their hard work is properly rewarded. I expect Congress to act in the near future to give millions more workers a raise and I am hopeful that Republicans decide to work with us instead of playing politics. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The President also talked about the clear need to reform our immigration system, support our veterans and wounded warriors, reform our bloated and unfair tax code, and invest in our nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infrastructure priorities. The American people are expecting their elected officials to work together to tackle these issues, and many more, over the coming months and years. I am ready to keep working to build on the bipartisan budget deal, and I hope Republicans are ready to join me at the table.â&#x20AC;?

Tacoma City Council is primed to make a recommendation to Sound Transit on its preferred route for the Tacoma Link expansion that will bring light rail services to Hilltop. A decision is expected in February, which will then lead to more review and detailed work by Sound Transit. The City Council Committee of the Whole is set to ponder the issue on Feb. 4. The general corridor has already been established after hearings and votes last summer. The Link will run from Commerce Street and up the hill to Martin Luther King Jr. Way and head toward the heart of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Medical Mileâ&#x20AC;? between Tacoma General and Franciscan Health Systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s medical complexes. How far the Link will run and along which streets are up for discussion. But the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Planning Commission and Transportation Commission have already weighed in on the issue. The Planning Commission opted out of actually endorsing a route, instead offering up a slate of guidelines the City Council should consider that range from boosting economic development, least disruptive to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;urban lifestylesâ&#x20AC;? of the area, and ease of connections to other mass transit options. The Transportation Commission actually did its job and evaluated the proposed routes and issued a recommendation. It wants the routes known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;A1â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;B1.â&#x20AC;? Those routes would take Link from the Theater District Station up Stadium Way and straight onto MLK. Other options would have run a line along â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Jâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Street. The recommendation further says the Link should run to 19th Street instead of stopping at 11th. The recommended route is the least expensive, least impactful and most straightforward as well as the route that received the most positive comments at open houses. All of the options are projected to cost more than the $150 million initially projected, but at $165 million, the recommended route comes closest. That said, the idea of running light rail up to the Hilltop doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem like it was the best route to begin with but that train has left the station so to speak. What are the future expansion plans after this line opens? How many people will actually pay to go from downtown to the Hilltop or vice versa? How can such a massive investment in infrastructure designed to promote economic development not push out the low and middle income residents already living in the neighborhood? The math just doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to work, but here we are and the decision seems clear. Like the initial routing decision to run rail lines along Commerce instead of Pacific Avenue in a way that created the awkward patch known as Tollefson Plaza and the â&#x20AC;&#x153;scenic viewsâ&#x20AC;? of the alley way in the Theater District, Tacoma is going to try to make the best out of a bad call. At some point Tacoma should start thinking two or three steps head on such matters instead of just making decisions because decisions need to be made to keep a project on track. Heaven forbid policy makers talk about future expansions before there is a deadline at hand. The above opinion represents the view of Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s editorial board.

*699,*;065

In the Jan. 24 cover story â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Eastside mural doubles as historic representation,â&#x20AC;? Daniel Duenas was mistakenly identified as David Duenas in the photo caption. Tacoma Weekly apologizes for the error.

Letter to the Editor Dear Editor, My daughter lives in the area of the old Gray Middle School. I was taking her home yesterday, and as we passed the west side of the grounds, she asked me what something was that we noticed on the incline between the street and the fence of the athletics field. When we parked to investigate, we discovered a beautiful early brick design denoting the school and its mascot (about 25â&#x20AC;&#x2122; in diameter). Just below the emblem was a concrete anchor with a couple symbols in the center honoring Capt. Robert Gray. All this wonderful art was well overgrown with moss and grass. It seemed to be such a shame to see this outstanding piece of Tacoma history being swallowed up into oblivion! Here I am on Google researching what I can of interesting slice of history and trying to bring it to the attention of anybody that care, wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t aware of it, or might have the wherewith-all to save it from obscurity. Thank you for taking the time to read this. I hope some concerned people might be able to save it! Frank Johns Tacoma

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Sports

FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 2014

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

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LINCOLN TAKES CITY CHAMPIONSHIP AGAIN Abes crown seven wrestlers, Lions right behind

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 6

TOP UPCOMING MATCHUPS BOYS BASKETBALL

Feb. 6 – Yelm @ Bellarmine Prep – 7 p.m. Lions’ playoff life could be on line against Tornadoes in season finale.

GIRLS BOWLING

Feb. 7 – High School State Bowling Tournament 10 a.m. – Narrows Plaza Bowl State tourney begins Friday with individual play, continues Saturday at 8 a.m.

BOYS WRESTLING

Feb. 7 – Narrows League Championships 5 p.m. – Foss Wrestlers battle for bid to districts, tournament continues Saturday at 9 a.m.

BOYS SWIMMING

Feb. 7 – West Central District 4A Meet 4:30 p.m. – Curtis Swimmers gather for prelims on Friday, with finals set for Saturday at 4:30 p.m.

FOSS RALLIES PAST NORTH THURSTON MINUS STAR Falcons overcome big deficit in final minutes

By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

T

he Lincoln wrestlers are kings of Tacoma once again. For the second straight year, the Abes sent 12 wrestlers to the finals, and claimed seven individual championships to edge Bellarmine Prep for the city title at the Tacoma City Championships on Jan. 24 at Bellarmine Prep. “It’s incredible for us as a team,” said Lincoln senior 220-pounder Aliyas Fletcher. “We’ve been winning a lot of tournaments, we’ve been getting a lot of success. But now we’re able to say we’re the best in the city…and that’s something we should be proud of.” Fletcher avenged a loss to Bellarmine Prep’s Elliot Villars two weeks ago in a dual meet, getting a takedown midway through the third round on the way to a 3-2 decision. Lincoln senior teammate Keidrick O’Bannon, who returned to action just two weeks ago after having surgery for a hernia, earned the 170-pound title over Wilson’s Ricky Siller with a pin with 30 seconds left to go in the match. “I was just going with the pace a little bit,” said O’Bannon, who is setting his sights toward the Mat Classic for the second straight year. “I could have picked it up a little bit more.” Highly-rated 195-pounder Jeremy Lukosh earned an injury default victory for Lincoln, and Chris Jackson started the Abes’ quest with a three-overtime victory over teammate Jordan McKinney at 113 pounds. Abes sophomore Robert Mathews dominated the third round to win 10-4 over Foss’ Joey Wurtz at 132 pounds, and junior 138pounder Loren Carrillo got a late near fall to outlast Foss’ Hung Mai 15-14 in one of the more entertaining matches of the day. Lincoln freshman William Willsey closed the day with a 12-8 win over Wilson’s Tyler Ferris to claim the title at 285 pounds. But Bellarmine Prep held close with Lincoln the entire day, as the Lions took second by finishing with 246 team points to the Abes’ 266.5. Senior Hunter Taylor earned arguably the most emotional victory of the day, topping highly-ranked Lincoln 182-pounder B.J. Hawthorne 13-10 after getting a reversal and near fall early in the third round. “I just knew to take him three rounds, and he’ll be (tired) by the end of the second,” said Taylor, who had fallen twice to Hawthorne in the previous two weeks. “I knew for city’s I had to beat him.” Lions junior Andrew Turner dominated on the way to a 13-2 victory over Lincoln’s Tommy You at 120 pounds, and sophomore Josiah Mayo followed by pinning the Abes’ Solomon Sok

X See WRESTLING / page A9

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

BREAKAWAY. Foss freshman Roberto

Gittens goes up for a breakaway dunk as North Thurston’s David Marrero tries to swipe the ball away. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

LOCKING UP. (Top) Lincoln’s Keidrick O’Bannon (left) tries to get an

advantage over Wilson’s Ricky Siller in the 170-pound match. (Middle) Bellarmine Prep’s Aidan Moore (right) tries to get Foss’ Nick Burton in a choke hold. (Bottom) Lincoln’s Loren Carrillo (right) locks up with Foss’ Hung Mai in an entertaining 138-pound match.

Foss felt the effects of missing star guard Ar’Mond Davis most of the game against North Thurston. But with the Rams on the verge of a major upset, the Falcons rallied from an eight-point deficit to earn a 50-47 win at home on Jan. 24 to stay in third place in the Narrows 3A. Trailing 47-39 with under two minutes to play, Foss’ Sam Dabalos-McMahon helped spark a quick turnaround. The junior guard nailed a three-pointer, and added a quick steal and layup to cut it to 47-44 with 1:44 remaining. “We just all had to step up and play bigger roles,” said Dabalos-McMahon, who finished with a team-high 17 points. “My teammates just did a really good job of playing hard. I was just in the right spot, I guess. They made big plays and kind of made it happen. I just hit a couple shots.” Freshman Roberto Gittens followed with a steal and an emphatic dunk for the Falcons 15 seconds later to trim the deficit to one point. Gittens converted a three-point play to give Foss a 49-47 lead with 19 seconds remaining, sinking a layup while being fouled after a nice pass from the Falcons’ Olashawan Miller. “We wanted to pressure probably from the (start), and we just struggled with it,” said Foss head coach Mike Cocke’. “Finally in the fourth quarter, the guys dug in and started making plays on the ball.” North Thurston, meanwhile, was 0-for-6 from the free-throw line in the closing seconds, helping seal the victory for Foss. McMahon hit two three-pointers in the first quarter to help Foss to a 9-6 lead less than three minutes into the game. But the Falcons’

X See BASKETBALL / page A9


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*<9;0:,:*(7,:>0;/>05 6=,9:7090;,+96.,9: VIKINGSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BASKET IN FINAL MINUTE SPOILS RAMSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; COMEBACK

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

9,;<9505.3,(+,9:. (Left) Curtis guard Jason Williams (23), who finished with seven steals, dribbles inside as Rogersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Marcus Rogers defends. (Right) Tory Causey, who finished with 15 points for the Vikings, goes up for a layup. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

Curtis is a very different team than the one that emerged with the 4A state title last winter. But the Vikings, who sit in second place in the SPSL 4A South, know that teams are still gunning for them. After an overtime loss to firstplace Todd Beamer the Friday before, the Vikings were pushed until the very end at home against Rogers, but got the clinching basket in the final minute for a 60-56 win over the Rams on Jan. 28. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was telling our guys, and

some of theirs, sometimes itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better to be lucky than good,â&#x20AC;? said Curtis head coach Tim Kelly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We made enough plays in the fourth quarter, but for the majority of the game they outplayed us, they outworked us, and they had a lot more energy than we did.â&#x20AC;? Rogers senior forward Zaequan Satterthwaite â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who finished with game highs of 24 points and 12 rebounds â&#x20AC;&#x201C; tied the game 56-56 with a driving layup while being fouled with 1:19 remaining. But he missed the free throw, and the Vikings got the game-winning basket when Aushanti Potts-Woods rebound-

ed Tory Causeyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s missed threepointer, and delivered a pass to Jason Williams for an open layup with 41 seconds remaining. Satterthwaite missed a tying jumper at the other end, and teammate Marcus Rogers missed a threepointer to take the lead, allowing Curtisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Travis Parker to clinch it at the other end with two free throws. The Vikings looked like they might pull away early, taking a 15-8 lead after Parkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s steal and dish to Causey for a layup with 2:15 left in the first quarter. The Vikings used their trademark pressure defense to force 17 turnovers, as Williams collected

seven of Curtisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 13 steals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our bread and butter,â&#x20AC;? Kelly said, noting the Vikings have relied on steals to generate offense. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think just (with) the lack of energy tonight, that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t happen as much as we would like to see it happen.â&#x20AC;? But Satterthwaite took over in the second quarter, scoring eight points and getting the Ramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first lead at 22-21 with a layup three minutes into the period. C.J. Urps gave Rogers a 28-26 lead at the break with a jumper at the buzzer. The Vikings responded by launching an 11-3 run that was capped by Gage Fergusonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three-

pointer midway through the third quarter. Potts-Woods gave the Vikings their biggest lead with a jumper with 5:23 to go in the game, making it 54-43. But the Rams wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go away, as Satterthwaiteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s late game-tying basket capped a 13-2 run. Causey led four Vikings double-digit scorers with 15 points, while Potts-Woods finished with 14, Williams had 11 and Parker added 10. The Vikings improved to 12-2 in league play to remain in second place with two games to play. They travel to face Emerald Ridge on Jan. 31 at 7 p.m. and host Spanaway Lake in their season finale on Feb. 4 at 7 p.m.

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SPORTSWATCH

Nelson and Dan Cheledinas added 12 points apiece, but the Loggers shot just 34 percent collectively from the field on the night.

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Pierce College swept Tacoma Community College in both the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball games on Jan. 25 in Lakewood in the first of two meetings between the crosstown rivals. The Raidersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; men emerged with a 79-69 win over the Titans, as Pierceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Christopher Parker hit nine three-pointers and scored a game-high 33 points in the victory. Lincoln grad Isaac Barsh added 14 points for the Raiders, and Devin Matthews added 14 assists for Pierce. Anthony Harper went 8-for-11 from the field for a team-high 17 points while adding 10 rebounds for TCC, which led 32-29 at halftime. David Gethers added 11 points while Tony Chynoweth and Andre Lewis scored 10 points apiece for the Titans. But Pierce shot 63 percent from the field in the second half to overcome the deficit, and Parker nailed six of his threes in the second period. Pierce improved to 6-2 in the NWAACC West Division and sat in second place, while TCC dropped to 2-6 to fall to eighth place in the division standings. Haley Hutchinson led the Raidersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; women to a 67-63 win over the Lady Titans, scoring 20 points and adding 15 rebounds in the winning effort. Alyssa Simonson had 12 points, 10 rebounds and five steals for Pierce, and Kami Hansen added 10 points and six rebounds. The Titans were led by Alexus Grantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game-high 22 points, as she went 8-for-12 from inside the three-point line. Jordan Stewart added 13 points and Tyanna Barton had 12 points and 10 rebounds for TCC. The loss dropped the Titans to 3-5 in the NWAACC West Division, as they sat in sixth place below Pierce, which improved to 4-4.

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Several local high school girls bowlers advanced to the district tournament after competing at the Narrows League 3A/4A Championships on Jan. 24 at All Star Lanes in Silverdale. Wilson tallied 2,951 total pins to take second place in the 3A tournament and advance to dis-

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The Pacific Lutheran menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team got two muchneeded wins in a road trip at Oregon last weekend to snap a five-game losing streak and stay in the hunt for postseason play. The Lutes won 62-53 at Linfield on Jan. 24, as Brandon Lester hit five three-pointers for a teamhigh 16 points to lead the way. Terrell Williams had 10 points, nine rebounds and four assists, and Arvid Isaksen and Daniel Landram added 12 and 10 points, respectively, for PLU. Lester kept his hot streak going the following day, nailing six threepointers for a game-high 22 points in a 76-56 win at Willamette. The Lutes shot over 50 percent from the field in the game, and were 12-for-20 from three-point range collectively. Williams was 7-for10 from the field for 18 points for the Lutes. The wins helped PLU improve to 3-5 in the Northwest Conference, as they sat a game behind Pacific (Ore.) in seventh place.

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PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

;0;(5:-(33 Anthony Harper tallied a double-double for TCC, but the Titans fell at Pierce College on Jan. 25 to drop to eighth in the division standings.

tricts as a team, as Brianna Osborn led the way with 516 total pins in individual play while Shannon Bailey added 502 pins for the Rams. Mount Tahomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Emily Eriksen put up 476 pins to help the Thunderbirds advance to districts as a team, as they placed fourth with 2,650 pins. Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Miriam Cabrera was the secondplace individual bowler in the 3A tournament with 540 pins, and will advance to districts along with teammates Kassie Seifert and Triana Williams. Fossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Kiersten Luedtke and Kylie Thornton also advanced to the district tournament after placing among the top eight individual qualifiers. Stadium took fourth place in the 4A tournament with 2,321 pins

and fell short of qualifying as a team, but Ali Fouch will represent the Tigers at districts after finishing among the top four individual qualifiers. The 2A/3A and 4A West Central District bowling tournaments will be held on Feb. 1 at 9 a.m. at Pacific Lanes in Tacoma.

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The University of Puget Sound menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team split two games on the road last weekend to move to 5-3 in the Northwest Conference, tied with two others for third place. Led by four players in double figures, the Loggers charged to a 10-point lead at halftime on the

way to a 68-62 win at Pacific (Ore.) on Jan. 24. Nick Holden led UPS by going 6-for-6 from both the field and the free-throw line, putting up a game-high 18 points and nine rebounds. Erin Barber added 14 points, Rex Nelson had 11 points and eight rebounds and A.J. Maw had 11 points and eight assists for the Loggers, who shot 64 percent from the field in the first half. Barber exploded for a seasonhigh 33 points the following day, but it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough as UPS fell 89-77 at George Fox. Barber was 11-for-16 from the field, 3-for-5 from three-point range and 8-for-9 from the free-throw line on the way to putting up the most points by a Loggers player all season.

The University of Puget Sound womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team moved into a fourth-place tie in the Northwest Conference after splitting a pair of road contests last weekend. The Loggers used a dominant second half to earn a 76-60 win at Pacific (Ore.) on Jan. 24, shooting 53 percent from the field in the period after being tied at the break. Allie Wyszynski scored 10 of her 12 points off the bench in the second period, and Katy Ainslie led UPS with 15 points. Amanda Forshay had 13 points and Emily Sheldon added 11 points, and the Loggers were 18-for-21 from the free-throw line in the game. The Loggers hung tough, but ultimately fell 70-58 at No. 8 George Fox the following day to drop to 4-4 in conference play, tied for fourth place with Lewis & Clark. Sheldon scored 18 points and Forshay added 14 points and nine rebounds, but UPS shot just 39 percent from the field and was outrebounded 46-34.

Local Restaurant Spotlight THE OFFICE: A SPORTS BAR FOR ALL By Derek Shuck

day, and The Office looks to offer a large variety of food to please everyone. f youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still looking for a Stopping by from 11 a.m. place to watch The Big Game to 3 p.m. will net you this weekend, look no fur- the lunch time menu, 11 ther than Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own The different items for $7 a Office Bar and Grill located on 813 piece, including: Pacific Ave. The Office was opened The Portobello MushPHOTO COURTESY OF THE OFFICE BAR AND GRILL - CHRIS LAYBOURN by Matt Henderson and Travis Scheff room Burger â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Charin 2010 with the intention off adding a broiled Portobello mush- THE OFFICE BAR AND GRILL SHOWS OFF ITS LOYAL LEGION OF SPORTS FANS. fun, casual sports bar to the city. room, roasted red pepOver the past four years, the bar pers, provolone cheese, The Turkey Pesto Sandwich â&#x20AC;&#x201C; has been able to build a loyal base of arcadian blend of lettuce and pesto Sliced turkey breast on a telera roll Seahawks and Sounders fans, with a mayo on a telera roll. topped with provolone, creamy pesto, little help from seven high-definition The Roast Beef Dip â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thinly sliced arcadian greens, red onion and tomato. televisions. The Officeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happy hour runs roast beef on a telera roll topped with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an electric atmosphere,â&#x20AC;? said provolone, creamy horseradish mayo from 3-6 p.m. and 9 p.m. to midnight general manager Chris Laybourn. Monday-Friday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and and au jus for dipping! The Office offers a wide variety The Cobb Salad â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blend 9 p.m. to midnight on Saturday and of food including pizza, sandwiches, of greens with bleu cheese crumbles, all day on Sunday. During this time, house-made soups, burgers, tacos, tomato, avocado, bacon, diced egg you can score $3.50 well pours, $1 steaks and desserts. As a bar, the cus- with house bleu cheese dressing and off house drafts and $1 off wine. tomer base changes throughout the a side of warm garlic bread. The Office bar and grill aims to create a friendly, open environment no matMON-THUR 3PM-6PM & 9PM-12AM MON-FRI 3PM-6PM & 9PM-12AM FRIDAY 3PM-6PM ter the occasion. - 11AM-6PM & 9PM-12AM - 11AM-6PM DRINKS SATURDAY FOOD SATURDAY SUNDAY - "--%":-0/( SUNDAY - "--%":-0/( â&#x20AC;&#x153;Business suit for lunch, sweats after a - MONDAY - TUESDAY - WEDNESDAY - THURSDAY - FRIDAY - SATURDAY - SUNDAY game or festive holi$5 Burger Trivia $8 Fish Steak ALL DAY $5 Steak ALL DAY $150 Gift Card day attire, we welcome HAPPY HOUR Friday! Giveaway! Night! Monday & Salad "--%":-0/( you,â&#x20AC;? Laybourn said. $4 Bloody :PVS ANY 7â&#x20AC;? $2 Beers! Trivia 3pm to Close Marys ALL DAY $2 Rainier $IPJDF$8 The Office is open PIZZA Win Office Gift Cards! $4 Mimosas 3pm to Close Tall Boys 7pm to Close from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. 11am to 3pm and has a variety of 8 1 3 PA C I F I C AV E drinks and game day TA C O M A , WA 9 8 4 0 2 W W W. T H E O F F I C E O N PA C I F I C . C O M specials.

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WBasketball offense struggled without Davis, who was averaging 25 points per game but wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t able to play after showing up to school late because of illness. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you lose that type of offensive production, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to replace,â&#x20AC;? Cockeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really in a good offensive rhythm all night.â&#x20AC;? North Thurstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Darin Sroor was the one in a rhythm in the first half, going 7-for-7 from the field for 14 of his game-high 18 points. Foss, meanwhile, was just

From page A6

6-for-24 from the field in the first two quarters, and trailed 21-18 at the break. The Falcons began to find some success in the third quarter behind Miller, who scored 7 of his 13 points in the period. Gittens, meanwhile, scored seven of his 10 points in the fourth quarter to help lead the comeback. The win put the Falcons at 12-4 overall and 5-3 in league play, as they faced a matchup at second-place Lincoln on Jan. 29.

If you work in the City of Tacoma and believe you have been discriminated against, call Frank

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

CLOSING OUT. Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Malcom Martin (top) tries to pin Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leonel Acosta during his win at 145 pounds

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WWrestling late in the first round at 126 pounds. Sophomore Jed Klein looked to be pinned in the final seconds against Stadium freshman Trey Caldwell at 106 pounds, but pulled a late reversal to earn a 5-2 victory. Lions junior 160-pounder Carson Grissafi went up 13-4 on Fossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Clayton Nichols before getting a pin with two seconds remaining in the match, and senior Aidan Moore used a late takedown to seal a 10-5 victory over Foss senior Nick Burton at 152 pounds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew with a little bit of time left, the one second heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out of position Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to jump on it,â&#x20AC;? Moore said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a) small window of

253-565-6179

From page A6

opportunity, and at this level youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to take those opportunities.â&#x20AC;? Junior 145-pounder Malcom Martin helped Wilson tally 167 points as a team to take third place, as he cruised to a 15-2 lead over

Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leonel Acosta in the finals before getting a pin with 46 seconds remaining. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It means a lot for me,â&#x20AC;? said Martin, who was injured all of last year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is me trying to reclaim (last) season and do the best I can.â&#x20AC;? Led by its four appearances in the finals, Foss put up 129.5 points to place

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fourth, while Mount Tahoma took fifth with 73 points and Stadium finished sixth with 41.5 points. The squads now set their sights on the Narrows League Championships, which begins on Feb. 7 at 5 p.m. and continues on Feb. 8 at 9 a.m. at Foss High School.

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City Life

To Kill a Mockingbird

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 2014

SECTION B, PAGE 1

to watch, what to eat and how MAXIMIZE YOUR GAME DAY FUN Where to imbibe on Super Sunday By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

G

PHOTO BY ERNEST JASMIN

SUPER FANS! (From left) Jason Cook, Maranatha and Quin Anderson, Stacy Funk, John and Pam Vance, Lindsay Westnedge, Justin Gimse, Jacque Justice and Kris “Save Our Sonics” Brannon are all stoked for Super Sunday.

Five places with super screens for game day viewing CHENEY STADIUM (2502 S. Tyler St., Tacoma): Nobody in town has a bigger screen for catching every bone-jarring hit than Tacoma Rainiers, who will be showing the Super Bowl on the 50-foot screen that looms over left field. Ivar’s will provide grub for the buffet and there will be domestic and craft beer specials throughout the game. The event is free and open to the general public, but you must be 21 or older to attend. Reserve a table by calling (253) 572-7707 during regular business hours or by e-mailing reservations@tacomarainiers.com. EMERALD QUEEN CASINO (2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma): The EQ has been a ‘Hawks hot spot all season, and it’s sure to be standing room only on Sunday with the game projected onto the 40-foot, HD screen in the casino’s I-5 Showroom. There will be plenty of chances to cash in on the game, with seven sports boards paying out $250 to two winners each quarter. But you’ve got to be 21 or older to attend this event; (253) 594-7777 or www. emeraldqueen.com for further details. LIBERTY THEATER (116 W. Main Ave., Puyallup): The Liberty has got its own 40-foot screen and will have drink specials, three all-you-can-eat food stations and prize drawings throughout the game. Admission is $35 per person for this one or $250 per table of eight. E-mail polly@gallucis.com for further more info. THE RAM (3001 Ruston Way in Tacoma or 10019 59th Ave., Lakewood): Known as a sports bar through the entire season, the waterfront Ram International will have drink specials throughout the game, including a drink-as-a-meal Proud Bloody Mary concoction. The main sports screen in the bar spans 10 feet for easy viewing. More info: (253) 756-7886 in Tacoma, (253) 584-3191 in Lakewood or www.theram.com. HARMON TAP ROOM (204 St. Helens Ave., Tacoma): Once one of Tacoma’s best game day secrets, you’d better stake your claim early if you want to watch the game on the 12-foot projection screen the Tap Room keeps in its back showroom. Enjoy all day happy hour and possibly a special game day buffet, which owners were contemplating at press time. More info: (253) 212-2725 or www.harmonbrewingco.com.

Five easy snacks that will be a hit at your Super Bowl party MAHOGANY CHICKEN WINGS (from AllRecipes.com) Ingredients: 3 pounds chicken wings, split with tips discarded; ½ cup soy sauce; ½ cup honey; ¼ cup molasses; 2 tbsp chile sauce; 1 tsp. ground ginger; 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped Preparation: In a medium bowl, mix soy sauce, honey, molasses, chile sauce, ground ginger and garlic. Pour the mixture over the chicken. Cover and refrigerate for an hour.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Arrange chicken in a single layer on a large baking dish. Bake for approximately 50 minutes, turning once and brushing often with remaining soy sauce mixture. The wings are done when the meat is no longer pink and juices run clear. SPICY-SWEET PRETZEL MIX (from Delish.com) Ingredients: 2 cups thin pretzel sticks, 1 cup natural almonds, 2 tbsp. unsalted butter, 2 tbsp. darkbrown sugar, 1/8 tsp. cayenne pepper Preparation: Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Toss pretzels together with almonds in a large bowl. Bring butter, sugar, cayenne and 1 tbsp. water to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring constantly. Pour over pretzel mixture and gently toss to combine. Spead mixture in a single layer on a prepared baking sheet. Bake until almonds crisp, about 20 minutes, tossing occasionally. Cool and serve. GARLIC-HERB DIP (from FoodNetwork.com) Ingredients: 3 heads garlic; 1 cup mayonnaise; 1 tsp. lemon zest; 1 tsp. lemon juice; olive oil; chopped sage, parsley and salt to taste Preparation: Cut heads of garlic crosswise, drizzle with olive oil, wrap in foil and roast at 400 degrees for 40 minutes. Squeeze out pulp and mix with other ingredients. HAM AND CHEESE PULL APARTS (from Recipe4Living.com) Ingredients: ½ cup mayonnaise, ¼ cup Italian dressing, 1 loaf soft Italian bread, 6 slices sharp cheddar, 1 pkg brown sugar ham, tomato slices. Preparation: Mix mayo and dressing and set aside. Cut off ends of bread and slice loaf, being careful not to cut all the way through to bottom. Spread dressing mix between every other pair of bread slices. Fill with ham, cheese and tomato. Serve with cheese nip crackers. BAKED TOFU FRIES (from OneGreenPlanet.org, vegan) Ingredients: 1 package tofu, frozen, thawed, drained and pressed; 1/3 cup hot sauce; 4 tbsp vegan butter, melted; 1 tbsp agave nectar, ½ cup chickpea flour; 2 tsp garlic powder; 1 tbsp onion powder; 2 tsp. dried parsley; 2 tbsp safflower oil; salt and pepper to taste. Preparation: Cut tofu into shapes that resemble fries. Add tofu, flour and spices to a resealable bag or shallow bowl and toss gently. Heat oil over medium heat in large pan. Shake off excess flour and cook fries in batches until browned and crispy, about 4 to 5 minutes a side. While fries are cooking combine hot sauce, butter and agave in large bowl and whisk. Toss cooked fries in sauce mixture to coat. Serve with celery, carrot sticks and the dipping sauce of your choice.

ary Payton versus Jordan in the 1996 NBA championship. The Mariners’ record 116win season in 2002. That thing that happened in Detroit in early 2006 (the details escape us.) All were high water marks in local sports history, but they will pale in comparison to a Seattle Seahawks win in Super Bowl 47. The game will air at 3 p.m. on Channel 13, preceded by something like 50 hours of pregame analysis. Needless to say, you want this Super Bowl experience to be epic, and we’ve compiled three lists aimed at maximizing your game day fun.

the Super Bowl part of the equation. Then follow these rules with your favorite soda and “shots” of hot sauce. Wink, wink. (But seriously, people. Consume responsibly, take a cab, and don’t wind up in jail or E.R.) TAKE A SIP … … for every Broncos player clinging desperately to Marshawn Lynch when he’s in Beast Mode. … for every related mention of Skittles. … every time you see an ad featuring Bud Light, Papa John’s or that freaky, talking baby. … for every mention of Peyton Manning’s legacy. … for every mention of that overblown incident involving Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman. … whenever Manning barks “Omaha!” from the line of scrimmage. There is no shame in tapping out of this or the previous rule. You don’t want your liver and kidneys shutting down before halftime. Or ever, really. FINISH YOUR BEVERAGE … … if Sherman talks trash about any Broncos receiver after the game. … every time Manning breaks a record … … or exposes his ginormous, Mount Rushmore forehead. … in the event that Lynch is finally featured in a Skittles commercial. Who is this guy’s agent, and why – for the love of God - has this not happened yet? TAKE A SHOT … … if a reference to this being the Pot Bowl makes it into mainstream coverage. … if Marshawn Lynch utters more than two words into a microphone after the game. … if the camera catches any player bawling on the sidelines, two if it’s Bronco Knowshon Moreno again (shedding tears of sorrow this time, of course.) … if Joe Namath is spotted in the crowd and he drunkenly leans in for another kiss. … if there is a “wardrobe malfunction” during Bruno Mars’ or the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ halftime performances. Take two if said malfunction recalls the Chili Peppers’ strategically placed tube sock days. (This will help you forget what you’ve just seen.)

15 drinking game rules to enhance (or possibly ruin) your viewing experience Maybe you’re in it more for the party and less for

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE 6TH AVE CHOCOLATE STROLL

Stroll the Ave and pick up chocolates from participating businesses during the 6th Ave Chocolate Stroll on Feb. 8, noon to 4 p.m. Turn in your completed Chocolate Stroll map to be entered to win a gift basket. Tickets are just $10 and all proceeds benefit Free University, which provides free classes on a variety of subjects. All classes are taught by local teachers who are experts in everything from gluten free and vegan cooking to art and spirituality. Tickets can be purchased at Ubiquitous Journey, 2607 6th Ave., or by calling (253) 572-2550.

TWO REVELS WINTER SING Everyone is a singer! Join the Puget Sound Revels in a family-friendly evening of singing old songs, new songs, camp songs, fun songs and Revels songs. Admission is free and all ages welcome. Song sheets and light refreshments provided. Feb. 12, 7-8:30 p.m. at King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave. Visit www.PugetSoundRevels.org.

com, $15 or $30 VIP. He plays regularly at Keys on Main, a dueling piano show in Seattle and Tacoma. The man with the golden voice certainly has a way with melodies that stay with you, so visit www. KittBender.com to hear his tunes and learn more

ALICE STUART

From her time with Van Morrison and Frank Zappa’s The Mothers of Invention, to being a guest on “The Dick Cavett Show” and featured in “Rolling Stone” magazine, Stuart’s musical history continues being made in the new millennium. Joining her will be Dan Tyack on pedal steel and Weisenborn, Pat Tennis on guitar, Marc Willett on bass, Steve Flynn on keyboards and La Mont Atkinson on drums. For tickets and more, visit www.AliceStuart.com.

After suffering a mild stroke last year, Alice Stuart – renowned American blues and folk singer-songwriter and guitarist – is coming back strong with an exciting concert Feb. 1 at the Triple Door main stage in Seattle.

SUPER BOWL @ EQC Want to see the big game on a gigantic 40-foot HD screen? You can at Emerald Queen Casino’s I-5 Tacoma Showroom, where a Super Sunday party will be in full swing on Feb. 2 starting at 1:30 p.m. You could also win $2,000 in cash prizes – two $250 winners each quarter. Your favorite beverages and game time grub available too – must be 21 or older to enter.

FOUR

FIVE

THREE KITT BENDER Kitt Bender kicks off his “Little Black Dress” CD release and concert series with a party Feb. 7 at the Jewel Box Theatre in The Rendezvous in Seattle, 7 p.m. For tickets, to go to www.KittBender.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 2 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, January 31, 2014

Performer Peter Serko details brotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;My Brother Kissed Mark Zuckerbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

PHOTO COURTESY OF PETER SERKO

PHOTO BY CLAY WALKER

ACT UP. (Left photo) Peter Serko (Left) and David Serko on Vashon Island circa 1986. After growing up separately for more than 20 years, Peter was drawn

into Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life after his HIV diagnosis. (Right photo) David Serko is arrested during a protest on Wall Street in 1988. The photographer, Clay Walker, is one of the people Peter Serko got in contact with during the David Serko Project. By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

I

n the 1980s and 1990s, the AIDS epidemic began its sweep across the world. Millions died, and still die yearly from the disease. Every fight is a story, and one man is looking to chronicle one of them with a little help from Facebook. Peter Serko will detail the life of his brother David in the one-man show â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Brother Kissed Mark Zuckerberg,â&#x20AC;? Feb.1 and 8 in Dukesbay Theater on the third floor of the Merlino Art Center in downtown Tacoma. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The last thing my brother said to me before he died was, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Listen to your heart,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Serko said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew what he meant when he said that, I just didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how to do it.â&#x20AC;? The play is a culmination of both Serkoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ambition to follow his brotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advice and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The David Serko Project,â&#x20AC;? a Facebook page that Serko has used to connect with acquaintances of his brother since 2012. With the help of the project, Serko was able to talk to more than 100 people who knew his brother and has drawn a lot of his show from their anecdotes. Interspersed between these stories are poems written by Peter as an alternative way to tell the tale of Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The show really started out with poems, which is

interesting because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never written poems,â&#x20AC;? Serko said. In addition to these poems and prose, the play will also feature various forms of media, including photos and videos of David, to give the audience a visual sense of who he was. The show is about an hour and a half long and is split into two acts. The first act details Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life before he was diagnosed as HIV positive in March of 1988. The next act details the final years of Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life until he passed away in November 1992 at the age of 32. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve discovered in the show that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m also really telling a story about AIDS,â&#x20AC;? Serko said. Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fight takes place during the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Plague Yearsâ&#x20AC;? of the 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and 90â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wherein AIDS took many lives, with no hope of a cure. During this time, David was a part of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP), a group advocating for medical research, legislative action and treatment for those affected with the disease. David was a part of many protests during this time and was even arrested during a protest on Wall Street in 1988. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a horrible, horrible time. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m trying to share that in a different way,â&#x20AC;? Peter Serko said. Serko hopes the show gives the audience an appreciation for his brother and the life he lived. He also wants his kids, nieces and nephews to know who is brother was, and the impact he had on hundreds of people.

He said that while searching for a name for the show, the unique â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Brother Kissed Mark Zuckerbergâ&#x20AC;? almost immediately came to my mind, due to the playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s close ties with Facebook. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have done this without Facebook,â&#x20AC;? Serko said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I could not have found these people.â&#x20AC;? A Facebook app gave Serko the ability to see a map of where all of these connections hail from, and everywhere from Hawaii to his home state of New York were represented. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a comment about something, and other people have really added a lot. An aggregate really tells an interesting story,â&#x20AC;? Serko said. Though he is preparing for shows here in Tacoma, Serko plans to take the show East in July to New York to perform at the Cider Mill Playhouse, the very same theater his brother once worked with. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;My Brother Kissed Mark Zuckerbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? gives voice to one story,â&#x20AC;? Serko said in a written introduction to the play. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A personal story, a remarkable story that I am finally able to share.â&#x20AC;? The show will be performed Feb. 1 at 7 p.m. and Feb. 8 at 7:30 p.m. at Dukesbay Theater on the third floor of the Merlino Art Center, 508 S. Sixth Ave., #10. For tickets, $15 and online only, go to peterserko.brownpapertickets. com.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, January 31, 2014 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

Tacoma Little Theater outs on ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’

CULTURE CORNER

A GUIDE TO THE MUSEUMS OF TACOMA Museum of the Week: Tacoma Art Museum JAN

20 FEB 2014

PHOTO COURTESY OF DK PHOTOGRAPHY

CLASSIC. Liberty Evans-Agnew (left) as Scout, Jim Rogers (center) as Atticus Finch and Gunnar Johnson as Jem. By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

P

erforming “To Kill a Mockingbird” comes with a lot of pre-attached weight. The 1960 Harper Lee novel is considered a classic, already giving the audience high expectations. The character of Atticus Finch is so iconic that an actor not prepared for the role could easily fall short of the high standard set by Gregory Peck in the 1963 film adaptation. Furthermore, the complicated role of 6-year-old Scout could flounder should the young actress not understand the character’s arc. Finally, portraying the feel of 1930’s Macomb, Ala., to an audience in 2014 is no easy task. Luckily, Tacoma Little Theater’s production of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” written by Christopher Sergel and directed by Jennifer Niehaus-Rivers and Martin J. Mackenzie, hits all these points perfectly. The play, set in Alabama during the 1930’s, tells the story of Atticus Finch, a lawyer defending a black man accused of raping a white woman. The trial shakes up the whole town, including Finch’s own children Scout and Jem. Liberty Evans-Agnew, who is a standout in the superb cast, brings Scout’s wide-eyed innocence and naivety to life. The 12-year-old is able to hit the emotional moments home while delivering a perfect southern dialect, making Scout a believable character whose growth is subtle yet apparent by the end of the story. Theater veteran Jim Rogers fits into

the role of Atticus Finch like a glove. Finch, rated by the American Film Institute as the number one hero of cinematic history, has a place in American culture as a man with outstanding moral qualities as both a lawyer and a father. Rogers has a cadence about him that gets across both the wisdom of the character and the burden that same wisdom brings. Rogers’ performance climaxes in a famous courtroom scene, in which Finch makes an impassioned plea to a silent jury, played by the audience. Finch’s final monologue during the case is the standout moment of the show, and Rogers fires on all cylinders, delivering the speech with conviction and passion. The set design only adds to the terrific performances. The yellow-hued lighting moves the audience to a warm southern afternoon, while the all-wood sets give a classic feel to the proceedings. With everyone being forced to adopt a southern dialect, there were a few noticeable misses that detracted from the atmosphere; but overall, Tacoma Little Theater’s version of “To Kill a Mockingbird” is just as affecting as the source material. “To a Kill A Mockingbird” is being performed through Feb. 9 on Friday and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. The Feb. 2 performance has been moved to noon to avoid conflicting with the Super Bowl. Tickets are $15 and $22 and the theater can be found at 210 N. ‘I’ St. Due to coarse language and heavy themes, the play is not recommended for young children.

1701 Pacific Avenue,Tacoma, WA 98402 Wed.–Sun., 10 a.m.–5 p.m. (Closed Mondays and Tuesdays.) www.tacomaartmuseum.org

This Week’s Events:

A Punch of Color with Curator Rock Hushka Friday, January 31, 11 am

Members’ Opening: Meet the Artist! Saturday, Feb 1, 6–9 pm

Learn how Northwest artist Camille Patha has asserted her power as a painter over her celebrated 50-year career.

Come in, learn from, and get to know local artist Camille Patha as she energetically shares stories about her life’s work and experiences.

Music of Remembrance presents Mirror of Memory Saturday, February 1, 2 pm

An Introduction to Western American Art Wednesday, February 5, 11 am

Seattle-based Music of Remembrance makes its Tacoma debut with a free concert at Tacoma Art Museum.

The Haub Family Collection of Western American Art contains masterworks from 200 years of Western American art. Learn about this exciting addition to the museum from Laura F. Fry, Haub Curator of Western American Art.

New Exhibit: A Punch of Color: Fifty Years of Painting by Camille Patha February 1–May 25, 2014 Throughout her five-decade career, Camille Patha’s painting has oscillated between the figurative and the abstract. Patha began painting gestural abstraction in the 1960s then deliberately explored various painting styles, including hard-edged abstraction and surrealist infused photorealism and, finally, a return to abstraction. During each era of her career, Patha demonstrated a full mastery of painting, presenting canvases that wholly embody her imagery and vocabulary with an unwavering voice and shocking vigor.

Ongoing Exhibits: Agnes Martin: The New York-Taos Connection (1947-1957) January 25–April 20, 2014 Widely recognized as one of the preeminent artists of the late 20th century, Agnes Martin (1912–2004) is best known for her subtly rendered grids and stripes. Produced from the early 1960s until the end of her career in 2004, her spare, reductive works in vaporous hues distinguish her as one of the key innovators in American abstraction. But what of the artist before this? Her mature vision did not come naturally and fully, without preparation. In the 20 years previous, Martin worked in a com-

pletely different style, far more spontaneous, organic, and aggressive, expressing an inner angst that seems wholly incompatible with the absolute control and serenity of her later grids. These early works seem to have been done by another artist, another person in another world.

Optic Nerve: The Art of Perception November 2, 2013–April 20, 2014 Chihuly: Gifts from the Artist Always on view

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, January 31, 2014

SEE THE ICONIC SMOKEY ROBINSON AT THE EMERALD QUEEN CASINO

PHOTO COURTESY OF ARTIST

SILKEN SONGS. Smokey Robinson will perform at Emerald Queen Casinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s I-5 showroom Feb. 21. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

I

cons donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come much bigger than one William â&#x20AC;&#x153;Smokeyâ&#x20AC;? Robinson, among the most legendary and prolific singers and songwriters of the 20th century. The Rock and Roll Hall of Famer will perform a slew of hits he wrote or performed for the Miracles, the Temptations, and during his last four decades as a solo artist, on Feb. 21 at the Emerald Queen Casino, the new date for his recently rescheduled Jan. 18 appearance there. Based on previous appearances at the casino, fans can expect the silky-voiced â&#x20AC;&#x153;poet laureate of soulâ&#x20AC;? to deliver â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tears of a Clown,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Girl,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ooo Baby Baby,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Tracks of My Tearsâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quiet Storm,â&#x20AC;? among other hits.

CITY OF DESTINY FLOAT & MASSAGE

And perhaps heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll toss in a few tracks from his most recent studio recording, 2009â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Time Flies When Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Having Fun.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The title of this CD depicts my life because I love my life,â&#x20AC;? Robinson said in 2011. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love the fact that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m extremely blessed, because I get a chance to live a life that I love. I get a chance to do a craft that I love. I get a chance to do a job that I love. When your job is something that you absolutely love, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a blessing. I have never taken that for granted. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t trip on â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Smokey Robinson.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; You talk about 50 years going by overnight? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exactly what has happened.â&#x20AC;? The Detroit native first joined forces with Berry Gordy, Jr., founder of the legendary record label Motown, in the late 1950s. Smokey Robinson first rose to fame as a member of the Miracles. The groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1960 hit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shop Aroundâ&#x20AC;? helped establish Motown as a major player in American popular music. The group placed 25 songs in the Top 40 during the decade, including classics such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Second That Emotionâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Going To A Go-Go.â&#x20AC;? In 1970 they released one of their more popular tunes, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Tears Of A Clown.â&#x20AC;?

Smokey Robinson wrote many songs for other Motown acts. Mary Wells had a big hit in 1964 with a song he wrote, â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Guy.â&#x20AC;? He was a primary songwriter for the Temptations, and penned such hits as â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Girlâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Get Ready.â&#x20AC;? He left the Miracles in 1972 to pursue a solo career. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cruisinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being With Youâ&#x20AC;? were among his bigger hits. Smokey Robinson has been the recipient of a Grammy (for 1987â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just To See Herâ&#x20AC;?), and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987. In 1991 he received the Soul Train Music Award for Career Achievement, and in 1999 the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. He is also a rare double-honoree of a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as a solo artist and member of The Miracles. Smokey Robinson will headline the Emerald Queenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s I5 showroom just two days removed from his 74th birthday. Music will begin at 8:30 p.m. on Feb. 21. Tickets are still available with prices ranging from $50 to $100. For further details, visit www.emeraldqueen.com or call the box office at (888) 831-7655. Dinner and hotel packages also available.

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

Merrilee Rush teams up with Gabriel for Mardi Gras show By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

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ans of classic Northwest rock may have noticed that Grammy Award-winning â&#x20AC;&#x153;Angel of the Morningâ&#x20AC;? singer Merrilee Rush has, of late, teamed up with Gabriel, one of the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hottest bands throughout the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;70s. They appeared together last summer at Proctor Arts Fest and more recently at the Swiss Tavern. Fans will be able to catch another rare appearance on Feb. 8, when the super-group headlines a Mardi Gras themed show at Key Peninsula Civic Center, with support from Tacoma singer-songwriter Kim Archer and zydeco band FilĂŠ Gumbo. Recently, we caught up with Rush, who reflected on her career and the dawn of Northwest rock. TW: When you were getting started, you were part of that vibrant teen dancehall circuit in the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;60s. Rush: It was the best in the nation. In the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;60s, we had the greatest dancehall circuit â&#x20AC;&#x201C; here, Spokane, Oregon. It was just enough to keep us busy all the time. In the early â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;60s I was with a rhythm and blues band called Tiny Tony & The Statics for about three years. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when R & B was huge; and then the Beatles came along, and R&B disappeared, and we all shifted over to pop. In â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;65, we started the Turnabouts, so it was Merrilee & The Turnabouts. TW: What do you remember about what very first sparked your interest? Rush: The first band that I saw was Little Bill & The Bluenotes at the Lynnwood Roller Rink, and Buck Ormsby, who later was in the Wailers, was in that group. TW: I think Buck left the Bluenotes in 1960, so youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking about â&#x20AC;Ś Rush: 1959, probably, is when I saw him with Little Bill. â&#x20AC;Ś That was really my first, and from that I met Neil Rush, who put me in his band. It was called the Aztecs. I joined the band, and it really brought a pop feel to what they were doing. That band broke up because it really wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t their cup of tea, you know. They were more serious musicians. So we went on and formed Merrilee & Her Men, which lasted about a year and a half, probably. Then we joined the Statics, and that was a very hot band at the time. TW: So thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when you started gaining some real traction, with the Statics. Rush: That was my favorite period ... because it

RUSH

COURTESY OF ARTIST

gave me a wonderful background to combine rock and R & B. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve loved, the combination of rock and R & B. Later, I was a huge Bad Company fan. Delbert McClinton (had) that combination. Foreigner had it. And Tina Turner was my idol. We used to go to the Evergreen Ballroom (a defunct venue in Lacey) and see Bobby Blue Bland and Ike & Tina Turner every time theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d come to town. Tina was it, and still is to me. I rarely go see live acts because nobody compares to what she did. TW: You mentioned the Evergreen Ballroom, and so much of that happened here in the Northwest can be traced to that one venue. Rush: Oh yeah, yeah, the teen dances and the national acts that came through. To bring rhythm & blues to the Evergreen Ballroom was pretty wild because â&#x20AC;Ś it was kind of out in farmland, north of Olympia, in the Lacey area. They would draw all the blacks from the area, and then the Wailers and us, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be the only white kids in the front. (She laughs.) That was our school. TW: A lot of people know you for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Angel of the Morning.â&#x20AC;? How did you wind up recording that song? Rush: (Paul Revere & The Raiders) were going to do a southern tour. â&#x20AC;Ś They put me on as the opening act, and they ended up in Memphis where they were cutting their â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to Memphisâ&#x20AC;? album. I was just along for the ride, so I did a demo for the producer, Chip Moman, and he liked my voice. I went back a month later, and they brought me â&#x20AC;&#x153;Angel.â&#x20AC;? It had been released on Cameo (Parkway Records) by â&#x20AC;Ś Evie Sands. She was a protege of the writer, Chip Taylor, who is also John Voightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brother. The problem Evie had with Cameo is they went out of business right then, so her version never saw the light of day. They played the song for me, and I just went, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh, my gosh.â&#x20AC;? I never care about lyrics, but the lyric was really revolutionary for its time; and, basically, the chord progression is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Louie Louie.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wild Thing.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that old chord progres-

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sion. I just went, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh, this is it.â&#x20AC;? TW: Lately, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been active with Gabriel. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that connection all about? Rush: I was a big fan of Gabriel. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what this thing on Feb. 8 is about. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Mardi Gras party, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gabriel doing their tunes. They were, to me, musically the best, as far as singing, writing, playing. They had it all. Terry Lauber is the lead singer now ... and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just got the most beautiful voice youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever heard. I can listen to him all day. What I do is songs from the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;60s and stuff that people know. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be doing â&#x20AC;&#x153;China Grove,â&#x20AC;? stuff like that. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more about my long-time love of this band. The drummer, Michael Kinder, is one of the very best. Gary Rule, one of the best; Terry Lauber, and then my husband, Billy Mack, is on the keys. TW: What are you working on now? Rush: Right now weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re concentrating on Billy Mack because he has great opportunities out of L.A., to get songs pitched. So everything is being focused on him right now. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been dog showing, and I have a breeding coming up. (She breeds Old English Sheepdogs.) This is what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m focusing on now. But I do go out and do these shows once in a while, so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a nice balance. I get to live on this farm with my dogs and my husband, and go out and do things once in a while. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a perfect life. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t complain at all. And I have a horrible birthday coming up on Sunday (Jan. 26) People say what are you gonna do for that birthday? (She laughs) I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even say the number. TW: Is it one of the even, 10-year ones? Rush: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an even number, yes it is. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an ugly, even number. A friend of mine is turning this age this summer, and I said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, what are you doing?â&#x20AC;? She said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m building my coffin.â&#x20AC;? (She cracks up.) LABOR DAY (111 MIN, PG-13)

Fri 1/31: 2:20, 6:00, 8:30 Sat 2/1-Sun 2/2: 11:55am, 2:20, 6:00, 8:30 Mon 2/3-Thu 2/6: 2:20, 6:00, 8:30

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TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

FOLK LEGEND JUDY COLLINS WILL PERFORM WITH PASSENGER STRING QUARTET ON JAN. 31 AT TACOMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PANTAGES THEATER. MUSIC STARTS AT 7:30 P.M. WITH TICKETS RANGING FROM $28 TO $64; WWW.BROADWAYCENTER.ORG.

FRIDAY, JAN. 31 TACOMA COMEDY: Hippieman (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15

JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Jazz & beyond (live jam) 7 p.m., NC UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Blues jam, 8 p.m.

TUESDAY, FEB. 4 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Jeremy Greenberg (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 MAXWELLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC SWISS: The Hipsters (dance) 9 p.m., $5-$10 UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Hereticon, Skinwalker, Carnotaurus (metal) 8 p.m. UNCLE THURMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Kareem Kandi Band (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA

SATURDAY, FEB. 1 LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Q Dot CD release, Square Biz, Frank Good, Aaron J, X (hip-hop) 8 p.m., $8-$10, AA

B SHARP COFFEE: Billy Stoops (singer-songwriter) 7 p.m., NC, AA BOBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAVA JIVE: Grave Babies, Wimps, Full Moon Radio, Wild Berries (indie rock) 8 p.m. DOYLEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Wet City Rockers (reggae) 9:30 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Jeremy Greenberg (comedy) 8:30, 10:30 p.m., $15 IMMANUEL PRESBYTERIAN: â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Candle Lit Showâ&#x20AC;? with Star Anna, Josiah Johnson, Bryan John Appleby (singer-songwriter) 8 p.m., $13-$17, AA JAZZBONES: Sir Mix-A-Lot (hip-hop) 8 p.m., $15 NEW FRONTIER: Ten Pole Drunk, Dead Bats Society, Amigos on Speed, Raptor Tractor (rock) 9 p.m., $7 SWISS: Kry (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Hippieman (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5 LAST STAND: Capsize, State Faults, Voice of Champions, Believer, The Further (rock) 7 p.m., $8, AA

DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Dave Nicholsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+

THURSDAY, FEB. 6 DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

SUNDAY, FEB. 2

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NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 3 p.m., NC

502 MARTINI: Kim Archer (singer-songwriter) 5 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open jam) 8 p.m., NC UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

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MONDAY, FEB. 3 STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino, Brooke Lizotte (experimental jam) 9 p.m., NC

Do you have a live show or music event coming up? Email makeascene@ tacomaweekly.com for a free listing in the Live Music calendar!

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Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, January 31, 2014

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: CHRIS PERONDI’S STUNT DOG EXPERIENCE

PHOTO: CAMERA PRESS/JAMES VEYSEY

Sat., Feb. 8, 3 p.m. Pantages Theater Chris Perondi is the Stunt Dog Guy and his famous stunt dogs are out of this world! With star performances on “The Tonight Show,” “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” and Animal Planet’s “Pet Stars,” these canine daredevils will thrill your entire family with doggone amazing tricks. Info: www.stuntdog.com SATURDAY 5K TACOMA RUNNERS Sat., Feb 1, 8 a.m. Five Mile Drive With one month of 2014 already gone, how’s your New Year’s running resolution doing? Keep up the good work (or get back to it…) with this weekly free 5k. Fast, slow, or somewhere in between, all are welcome, so bring a friend. Info: www. TacomaRunners.com PIER PEER IN TACOMA Sat., Feb. 1, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Bring your family and join Foss Waterway Seaport and Metro Parks Tacoma for a “Pier Peer” aquatic nighttime adventure. Info: www. metroparkstacoma.org/pierpeer

A CANDLE LIT SHOW Sat., Feb. 1, 8 p.m. Broadway Center for the Performing Arts An intimate evening featuring musical artists Star Anna, Josiah Johnson (of “The Head and the Heart”) with Carleigh Aikins, and Bryan John Appleby with minimal instrumentation in an beautiful setting lit only by candles at Immanuel Presbyterian Church. Info: www.broadwaycenter.org SUPER BOWL PARTY Sun., Feb. 2, 1:30-4 p.m. Emerald Queen I-5 Tacoma Showroom Catch the biggest game of the year on a 40-foot HD screen! Info: www.emeraldqueen.com

COASTAL ALCHEMY: ANNA SKIBSKA AND ASSOCIATES Feb. 2-Sept. 28, 10 a.m. Museum of Glass Known for her large-scale glass installations, Seattlebased artist Anna Skibska continues to explore the ways in which artworks are viewed with Coastal Alchemy, an exhibition of her newest work in collaboration with painter Meg Holgate and poet T.s. Flock. Info: www.museumofglass.org

“ROCKARAOKE” Mon., Feb. 3, 9 p.m. Jazzbones Rockaraoke is the best way to experience being a rock star without actually being one. “Karaoke with a live band, onstage, in front of a large crowd.” Seattle Weekly said, “Nothing in Seattle compares.” Info: www.jazzbones. com/events L.E.A.D CERTIFICATE PROGRAM Tues., Feb. 4, 1:30 p.m. University of Washington – Tacoma Gain an overview of leadership theory and establish your own framework/path for leadership growth. Put theory into practice with activities and begin to think intentionally like a leader. Info: dawgden. tacoma.uw.edu/organization/ leadership SCHOLAR SEARCH WEEKEND Fri., Feb. 7, 12 p.m. The Great Hall of Annie Wright School Girls entering grades 9-11, bring your brain, sense of humor and open mind for Scholar Search Weekend and compete

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

for a partial merit scholarship. Info: (253)-272-2215

Pearl Django endures as one of the most highly regarded Hot Club style groups working today. Info: www.marineviewpc.org

6TH AVE CHOCOLATE STROLL Sat., Feb. 8 , Noon to 4 p.m. All proceeds benefit Free University, which provides free classes on a variety of subjects. All classes are taught by local teachers who are experts in everything from Gluten free and vegan cooking to art and spirituality. Stroll the Ave and pick up chocolates from participating businesses. Turn in your completed Chocolate Stroll map to be entered to win a gift basket. Tickets: Ubiquitous Journey, 2607 6th Ave., or (253) 572-2550.

CONSERVATORY STORY HOUR Wed., Feb. 12, 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. W.W. Seymour Conservatory Join Bonnie Beaudoin among the Conservatory’s beautiful flowers for weekly story telling along with a short handson science and art project! Info: www.seymoreconservatory.org KIDS NIGHT OUT Fri., Feb. 14, 6-10 p.m. Kids ages 6-12 can share a fun evening with other kids at the Lakewood Commuity Center, 9112 Lakewood Dr. SW in Lakewood. Info: www. piercecountywa.org/parks

PUGET SOUND WOMEN’S SHOW Sat., Feb. 8, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tacoma Mall This heart-felt event is all about loving yourself! Head on over to Tacoma Mall for an afternoon of fashion, wellness and beauty tips, free chair massages, aromatherapy and more!

SOUNDSCAPES Sat., Feb. 15, 7:30 p.m. Rialto Theater Go green with these natureinspired masterpieces including Beethoven’s supreme ode to his beloved countryside. Info: www.broadwaycenter. org

WOOD AGED BEER FEST Sat., Feb. 8, 2 p.m. Tacoma Brewing Company The response to Tacoma Brewing Company’s bourbon oaked stout has been so overwhelming that TBC thought you might like to taste some other woods. Come to this first annual Tacoma Brewing Wood Aged Beer Fest and taste stouts, IPAs and other ales. Info: www.facebook. com/TacomaBrewing

1ST ANNUAL TACOMA GAY & LESBIAN WEDDING EXPO Sun., Feb. 17, 4:30 p.m. McGavick Conference Center Celebrate equality in Tacoma! The afternoon promises the opportunity to meet with dozens of LGBT-friendly wedding vendors. Enjoy a variety of delicious samples, music, LGBT-specific planning tips and much more! Info: www. samelovesamerights.com

PEARL DJANGO Sun., Feb. 9, 5 p.m. Marine View Church With a performance history spanning almost two decades,

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE Kerri Bailey is a horticulturist and a certified herbalist. She makes custom blends and works at Ubiquitous Journey (www.UBJourney.com) on 6th Avenue. Kerri owns two businesses – the online herb store www.HerbalElements.net and a water garden store inside Alpine Nursery in South Hill (www.AlpineGrows.com) called The Pond Pad (www.ThePondPad.com). She writes blogs on gardening, ponds, natural health and herbal remedies and teaches classes through Free University (www.FreeUNW.com).

ARIES March 21 – April 19 The end of the month could be socially stressful but will lighten up as Venus turns direct today. Be careful of excesses that may overburden you. Your self-confidence grows stronger allowing you to make radical changes.

LIBRA September 23 – October 22 Tension on the home front may arise at the end of the month. Your happiness is questioned. Don’t make any rash changes. After Venus turns direct on the 31st, things may look and feel differently. Relax, think positively.

TAURUS April 20 - May 20 Tensions rise, especially at work, so be prepared. Co-workers’ threats may be short-lived and are due to insecurities. Learn how to play the game and have a plan in place. Keep your focus and your temper!

SCORPIO October 23 – November 21 You may feel drained and may question the intentions of those around you. This will pass as Venus turns direct today. Don’t overreact to situations. Take a step back, relax and remember to breathe!

GEMINI May 21 – June 20 This week looks prosperous, so take that chance. Venus retrograde ends soon so try to lay low, be sincere and selectively generous. You are compelled to deal with the truth of what “is” not merely as it may appear.

SAGITTARIUS November 22 – December 21 Money concerns and feeling of unworthiness may be predominate this week. You may choose to borrow or invest to boost finances. You’re the life of every party and have a vast network of admirers and friends.

CANCER June 21 – July 22 The end of the month may have been challenging as you try to keep your partner happy. The happy vibes will return as Venus turns direct today. Don’t blame yourself. You will learn how to back off and let things flow more naturally.

CAPRICORN December 22 – January 19 Set and determine your boundaries at work. Let others know your feelings and beliefs in a calm manner. Think about your needs to accomplish your goals. Stay focused with daily routine. A partner admires you.

LEO July 23 – August 22 Social situations could be embarrassing before Venus turns direct today. Minor disagreements may arise. Keep your stride by remaining solid and grounded. Others may look up to you and appreciate your style.

AQUARIUS January 20 – February 18 Get ready for an emotionally charged week. Hot buttons may be exposed and punched. These feelings won’t last as the end of Venus retrograde approaches. Insults have no merit. Forgiveness is divine.

VIRGO August 23 – September 22 This week may be emotional and confusing. Wishful thinking and willingness to overlook the flaws in others outweighs your usual clear better judgment. You are becoming more comfortable with changes for the better.

PISCES February 19 – March 20 Arguments with partners or loved ones may hurl harsh words. These episodes will subside when Venus turns direct. Protect your heart and guard your feelings this week. Laugh out loud and have some well-deserved fun.

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(866) 407-2074 (866) 854-8671 (866) 407-1976 (866) 839-3239 0  ""&'%))!'&*( /( '&     ',$,*"'&%.)!'-*+()'(*+()%.,(.(""& )+#**'!& -"*!'+*&'*"'*,"$$*$$$'*"'&)

fatherandsonhauling@hotmail.com

CONTACT US Phone: Mail:

253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma WA, 98417

VISIT OUR WEBSITE

www.tacomaweekly.com

950451

Advertising Representatives: â&#x20AC;˘ Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Colleen McDonald, cmcdonald@tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Marlene Carrillo, marlene@tacomaweekly.com


Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 8 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, January 31, 2014

SERVICES CONSTRUCTION

NOTICES

CONSTRUCTION

JT GENERAL License & Bonded JTLANLF94INA CONTRACTOR ROOFING

New t Repairs t Tear-Off t3e-Roof

FENCING

Wood t Chain Link t Repairs

LANDSCAPING

Retaining Walls t Sod Clean-Up t.aintenance

253-222-1 136 Â? Â? LOW PRICES

FOR SALE

FREE ESTIMATES

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE -PML;V^PUN-PML9LJV]LY`:LY]PJL  5>;V^PUNH[(]L,-PML VU0UJVTWSPHUJL^P[O[OL 9*>H[!WT=PL^PUNVM JHYZMYVT!!WT9LNPZ[LYLK ;V^5\TILYZ *HZO (\J[PVU6US`^^^Ă&#x201E;ML[V^PUNJVT

NOTICES

In the Matter of: Puyallup Nation Housing vs SATIACUM, Frederick Case Number: PUY-CV-EVT-2013-0301 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing onTuesday the 1st day of April, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 5th day of March, 2014 at 1:30pm

FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT.

If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

TO: Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Name: Puyallup Tribe of Indians vs. Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0066

FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Candice C. BaldEagle Case Name: WSFC vs, BALDEAGLE, Candice C. Case Number: PUY-CS-FC-2013-0059 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Show Cause Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Show Cause Hearing on the 5th day of March, 2014 at 9:00 p.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT.

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on Tuesday the 1st day of April, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT. TO: Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Name: Puyallup Tribe of Indians vs. Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0074 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

TO: Eugene Jerry Thomas In the Welfare of: S.J.O. DOB: 6/23/2008

You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on Tuesday the 1st day of April, 2014 at 9:00 a.m.

Case Number: PUY-CW-TPR-2013-0029 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Guardianship Hearing on the Monday the 14th day of April, 2014 at 2:30 PM. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT.

EMPLOYMENT

NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS TO: John Sr., Michael J. In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs John Sr., Michael J. Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0054 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Continued Initial Hearing on March 04, 2014 at 10:00am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Sharp, Floyd J. In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs Sharp, Floyd J. Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0058 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Continued Initial Hearing on March 04, 2014 at 10:00am If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT.

Exp. Breakfast Cook Needed. Part/Full Time. Flexable Schedule. Come in and fill out application. Tower Lanes 6323 6th Ave., Tacoma. 564-8853

Help Wanted Earn Extra Income, Become an Avon representative Only $10 to start Sign up online at: www.start.youravon.com Use reference code FORTIZ Or call (253) 226-6683

ANTIQUES WANTED Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105

SPEND YOUR TAX DOLLARS HERE!

DANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S QUALITY CARS 429 ST HELENS AVE â&#x20AC;˘ TACOMA, WA 253.221.2209 OR 253.229.3636

253.302.4030 CAMPER

CAMPER

10â&#x20AC;&#x2122; ALASKAN CAMPER. It Raises. It Lowers. Older Model. Good Shape. Make Offer. (253) 906-9410

TO: Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Name: Puyallup Tribe of Indians vs. Peterson Sr., Scott G. Case Number: PUY-FH-FISH-2013-0065 TO: Frederick Satiacum

Round Dinning Table 24â&#x20AC;? Diameter, 6â&#x20AC;? Extension Leaf plus 3 chairs $150. Whirlpool 25 cu. ft. Refrigerator/ Freezer, Side/side doors with water dispensor. $600 Tool Box with misc. tools. $50.

AUTOS

FURNITURE

FURNITURE

New 5 Piece Bedroom Set Full or Queen set includes: Headboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, & mirror. BRAND NEW! Only $400 253-539-1600

All New King Mattress Set 3 Piece King Mattress set for only $275. Still in original packaging with factory warranty. Can deliver. 253-537-3056

5 Piece Dining Room Set Table & 4 Chairs. New in box. Only $300 253-539-1600 Microfiber Sectional Brand New REVERSIBLE sectional with chaise lounge. NEW! Only $500 253-539-1600 All New Pillow Top Mattress Queen Size with warranty. Still in original plastic. Can deliver. $120. 253537-3056 Solid Wood Bunk Beds Available in 2 colors. Brand new in box. Can break down to two separate twin beds. Delivery available. $250 253-539-1600 Low Profile Leather Bed Frame Still in box. Available in Full or Queen. Very nice. Can deliver. $250 253-539-1600

New Mission Style Bedroom Suite Solid wood Mission bedroom set. $699. Includes: headboard, footboard, rails, nightstand, dresser, and mirror. 253-539-1600 New Overstuffed Microfiber sofa & Love Seat Still in plastic with manufactures warranty. Can have for $700. Lifetime warranty on frame. 253-539-1600

Citizenship Volunteers Looking for a rewarding experience? Help immigrants prepare to become citizens. You will help to provide instruction to legal permanent residents who need practice with the written and oral. Training will EH RIIHUHG WKH Ă&#x20AC;UVW ZHHN RI January and classes will start in mid-January. Please contact Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information. Help a Child Improve Reading One-on-one support makes a huge difference in an elementary studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to overcome reading challenges. As a Read2Me Tutor for Tacoma Community House, you can be that person who makes a difference. We are on the lookout for committed tutors for grades 1-3.

REPOSSESSION? BAD CREDIT? NO CREDIT?

NO PROBLEM! WWW.DANSQUALITYCARS.COM

PETS Need safe farms or barns for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. 7KH\DUHĂ&#x20AC;[HG vaccinated and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 298-0913

Adjustable Power Bed Brand New with memory foam mattress. Wall hugger with warranty. Delivery available. $995 253-537-3056

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy

253-770-8552

Pet of the Week

BRAND NEW! Queen Memory foam mattress set with 20 year warranty. Can Deliver. $400. 253-537-3056 New Pillow Top Full Mattress Only $99. Never used! Comes with manufactures warranty. Delivery available. 253537-3056

VOLUNTEERS PAWS NEEDS WILDLIFE VOLUNTEERS PAWS in Lynnwood is looking for volunteers to help care for wildlife this spring. Every year, PAWS cares for more than 3,000 injured, orphaned or abandoned wildlife. Join the team and you can help feed and care for these remarkable animals. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a remarkable experiHQFH \RX ZRQ¡W Ă&#x20AC;QG DQ\where else! For any questions please contact Mark Coleman, Communications Manager, at 206.419.6646.

DIVORCE? BANKRUPTCY? FORECLOSURE?

There are sessions at Manitou Park, Mann, McCarver, and Roosevelt Elementary Schools. The next orientations will be held in January. Call 253.383.3951 for more information. These are exciting times and you can make a difference! South Sound Outreach Services invites you to be trained as an In Person Assister Volunteer to help Pierce County residents enroll online for health insurance in the Washington Health Plan Finder. Open Enrollment is October 1 until March 31st. Coverage begins January 1st, 2014 for those enrolled by December 15th. Interested trainees may call Heather at SSOS 253-593-2111. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be glad you did!

Meals on Wheels Office Volunteer Do you want to put your RIĂ&#x20AC;FH VNLOOV WR ZRUN LQ D UHwarding volunteer opportunity? We are seeking a volunteer with strong customer service and computer skills to assist in our Meals on :KHHOV 7DFRPD RIĂ&#x20AC;FH RQH morning a week. Must enjoy working with seniors, using the telephone and computer, inputting data and setting up Ă&#x20AC;OHV  )RRG KDQGOHU¡V FDUG required. For more information call Linda at Lutheran Community Services: 253272-8433.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shiaâ&#x20AC;? Are you looking to bring some peace and tranquility to your home? Are you looking for a companion whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s low maintenance and loving? Then you need to meet Shia!This wonderful 6 year old black kitty was brought to our shelter in mid-January, as his owners could no longer afford to keep him. Shia is a very sweet boy, but is equally as shy. It takes him a bit longer to warm up to strangers, but scratching his head is a great way to break the ice! Since he is on the shy side and somewhat skittish, it is recommended that he goes to a calm and quite home without young children. Shia has had positive interactions with both cats and dogs in the past, but a slow introduction to any other pet(s) would be necessary. Shia is also a bit overweight, so his new family will have to keep him on a new food regiment. This handsome guy is a declawed cat, so keeping him safe inside is a priority! If Shia sounds like the kitty for you, stop by and see him today! Reference #A405148

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week 1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Check out Newman! He is an adorable bunny that loves toys, yogurt chips, and lots of affection. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss out on his playful personality, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s from out of this world. Stop by today!

Hurry on down to Metro, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got KITTENS! These two brothers are searching for their loving Forever Families to take them home. Better come quick, as these boys wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t last long!

Call us today to place your classified ad! 253-922-5317 or fill out this form and mail with payment to: Tacoma Weekly

2588 Pacific Hwy Fife WA 98424

Ad Copy Here:

Name: Address: Phone: Cash

$15.00 30 Words and Under: ______________ Extra words @ .05:_________________ Check

Visa/Mastercard Card #

Money Order Exp.

Sub Total:_________________________ x Number of Weeks = ______________

Total Amount:________________

Cost: $15 for 30 words for one week. 5¢ per each additional word. Deadline: Tuesday, 12 noon for Thursday publications. Payment: Required on all classified ads at time of placement. We accept cash, check, money order or Visa/ Mastercard. Mail or bring payment to Tacoma Weekly at 2588 Pacific Hwy, Fife. Email: advertising@tacomaweekly.com

w w w. t a c o m a w e e k l y. c o m


Friday, January 31, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV HOMES FOR SALE

Why NOW is the Time to Sell Your Home!

HOMES FOR SALE

1232 S Adams St.

â&#x20AC;˘ Interest rates are on the rise. Sell now and buy your next home before prices increase.

â&#x20AC;˘ Buyers are plentiful and listings are few. More buyers means a better environment for you to sell.

â&#x20AC;˘ Your home may no longer meet your needs. It is amazing how when you are in a home 3, 5, or 10 years how much your needs change. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get you into the right home for you while prices are still affordable for your next move.

I have buyers approved wanting to buy homes! Call Me Today! <RXUQH[WVWHSLVWRFDOOPHIRUDPDUNHWDQDO\VLVWRĂ&#x20AC;QGRXW what your home will sell for in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s market!

253-203-8985

www.StephanieLynch.com

Super charming home w/ the ease of newer amenities... Box beam ceilings, KDUGZRRGĂ RRUVPDUEOHHQWU\SLFWXUHSODWH UDLOV SHULRGVW\OHOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHVDGGWRWKH ambience, while newer roof, furnace/heat pump, indoor/outdoor speakers, newer ZLULQJSOXPELQJ JDVĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHDGGWRWKH ahhhh factor. Spacious living room, large kitchen, HUGE dining room, a bedroom and FXWHUHPRGHOHGEDWKURRPJUDFHWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVW Ă RRU*LJDQWLFGHFNZVHDWLQJZHOFRPH home. Move in and make it yours. $219,950

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

1950 S G St Tacoma Information deemed liable but not guaranteed.

HOMES FOR SALE

RENTALS

33 N Salmon Beach

N. Lakewood. Single Unit Apt. 1 Bed Above Laundry Room. RV Court. No Pets. No Smoking. Screen $45, $600 Rent. $500 Deposit. (253) 381-8344 REALTORS

HOMES FOR SALE

Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton hydraulic boat Lift, brick wood EXUQLQJĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHZLWKLQVHUWH[SDQVLYHGHFNLQJRQ all sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout WKHODVW\HDUVLQFOXGLQJURRIVLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZV doors, decking, boat hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more. $450,000 Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties

REALTORS

If I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell it to you and if I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live in it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t list it.

Eric Paffenroth Keller Williams PS 253-777-9062

(253) 222-8480

1388 N Lenore St. Fantastic mid century modern centrally located near stores, schools, parks and easy commuting to freeways, yet house feels secluded and private due to professionally landscaped, lovely yard with zen paths and sustainable GHVLJQ)DQWDVWLFNLWFKHQKDUGZRRGĂ RRUVPDVWHURQ main, great patio for entertaining- this is a wonderful home with lots of space. Move in ready and awaiting new owners. $282,000

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

Shannon

Agent Extraordinaire

936 S Sheridan $229,000

7OVUL!  -H_! ,THPS!ZOHUUVUZLSSZ'OV[THPSJVT HOMES FOR SALE

This beautiful craftsman home has been remodeled with all new appliances and updated in the heart of downtown Tacoma. It is located only 2 blocks up the street from UW Tacoma Campus with a city, mountain and water view. This home is a 3 bedroom 2 bath with a large yard. The 2nd parcel is included with the purchase and has a single car garage in the backyard. This home KDVQHZĂ RRULQJZDOOVFDELQHWVTXDUW]WRSV appliances, furnace, and mill work and comes with a 1 year warranty! $249,000.

3728 N Gove St, Tacoma Cute little bungalow in Proctor! Nice upgrades include a new family room, windows, roof, energy package & carpet 6 years ago. Detached garage was converted to extra living space. It has a separate electric panel, heat & lights - lots of possibilities... music studio, art studio, exercise / yoga room, etc. Parking for 3 cars off the alley next to garage. Charming back \DUGWRR+DUGZRRGĂ RRUVXQGHUFDUSHWH[FHSWLQ family room. MLS# 518902. $204,950

Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

2711 Henry Road N

PROPERTY

MT. RAINIER VIEW $125,000 Beautiful Level Buildable Site! Located off of Ray Nash Drive NW, this 1.25 Acres of natural setting and mature Evergreen trees is perfect to build your dream home and enjoy the Country Lifestyle! Peek-a-Boo View of Mt. Rainier. Just minutes away from sought after Schools, Uptown Gig Harbor Amenities, Restaurants, WA-Hwy 16, Hospitals, Boat launch/water activities, tennis courts & Kopachuck State Park! Electricity is available at corner.

Michelle Anguiano Real Estate Broker Better Properties Lakewood 253.720.6525

OLD TOWN $499,950 Amazing development potential with this unique Old Town property! City has given Ă&#x20AC;QDOSODWDSSURYDOIRUORWVRQWKLVSULPH acre piece. Big views possible from all lots in this great neighborhood, tucked back & out of the way. Walk to the historic Old Town district with its coffee shops, wine bar & restaurants.; then stroll down to the waterfront & enjoy the gorgeous Puget Sound setting with walking paths, public docks, shoreline restaurants & more! MLS# 332653 Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

Selling Your Commercial Building or Business? Call

Jean Bonter 253-312-2747 FOR LEASE

Point Defiance CafĂŠ and Casino. Fully operational with unique card room and gambling facility. Only licensed casino between Lakewood and Bremerton. Or as an alternative, this facility could be used as full service restaurant with banquet rooms. Many other possibilities including day care, private pre- school, dance studio, and the list goes on. All handicap accessible.

DEER RIDGE HOME, PUYALLUP

Beautiful home crafted by Steve Jensen and meticulously cared for. All the Jensen signature touches - soaring spaces, coffered ceilings, crown molding, wainscoting, 6â&#x20AC;? base trim, tile, granite, and expansive windows. Sited on an elevated lot that adjoins natural area to the rear. Listen to the birds and your private waterfall from your patio. Wonderful landscaping designed for beauty and easy care. Sensational island kitchen opens to stunning family room. Huge master suite with fireplace. MLS #479207

UNIQUE BOUTIQUE BISTRO

With Beer and Wine License. $20,000 Full Price. Beautifully wooded, water and power available. $79,000. Perfect setting for your custom home. Owner/agent

Evergreen Commercial Brokerage

www.jeanbonter.com

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St.

BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME

PROPERTY

GIG HARBOR ž ACRE BUILDING LOT

HOMES FOR SALE

$399,000 A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with no HOA. High Ceilings, gas ÂżUHSODFHVVHSDUDWHO\PHWHUHG&DOOIRUSULYDWH VKRZLQJWRGD\253.606.0689

CALL 253.922.5317

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract Beautiful Victorian 4-plex in good location back on the market after remodel. Walking distance to hospitals, GRZQWRZQSDUNV0DLQĂ RRUXQLWKDVRQHEHGURRPSOXV attached bonus room, dining room, lg kitchen with nook, new carpet throughout, bay windows. Upstairs unit has 2 bedrooms, bath, lg living room, kitchen & balcony. Lower level has 2 studio apts & bath. Sep. utilities for main and upper units. 3,064 sq ft MLS# 523770

Better Properties Heather Redal 253.363.5920

Green Page Alternative Medicine

Absolutely Charming, Mediterranean Style, custom built North Tacoma view home. Enjoy Commencement Bay view from Mstr Br balc. ,QVLGHIHDWLQFO0DUEOHĂ RRUHQWU\6W6WHHO$SSO *UDQFRXQWWRSV&XVWEXLOW+LFNRU\FDE%HDXW %UD]LOLDQ&KHUU\KDUGZRRGĂ RRU%D\ZLQGRZV 0VWUVXLWHZ)3 /UJEDWKVWHDPVKRZHU &DOLFORVHW1HZ(QHUJ\(IĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWKHDWLQJ&HQW YDFXXPQHZSDLQWLQ RXWQHZFDUSHW)LQLVKHG %VPWZNLWFKHQ&ORVHWR6FKRROV3DUNV )UHHZD\+RVSLWDOV :DWHUIURQW$623,000.

Gil Rigell Better Properties N. Proctor (253) 376-7787

805 N Steele St

T Town Alternative Medicine Collective Hours Mon-Sat 10:30-8 â&#x20AC;˘ Sun 10:30-7

253-226-5973

To Advertise Call 253-922-5317

RURAL LIVING: Restaurant/ price Lounge in Ashford, WA reduced Price for business, $105,000 with $25,000 down. Price for the real estate, $390,000 with $75,000 down. Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract includes a 3 B/R house, laundromat, restr./ lounge bldg. on 3.4 acre, commercial zoned parcel. HIGH GROSSING, VERY price PROFITABLE COFFEE reduced SHOP CAFE FOR SALE $95,000 High trafic Count location, owner will accept $25,000 down payment. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;CALLAHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB & GRILL IN KEY CENTER Business is for sale for $300,000 with $100,000 down, High gross sales. Saler will also consider leasing the space

â&#x20AC;˘HIGHEST GRADE MEDICINEâ&#x20AC;˘

4823 S. 66 St. â&#x20AC;˘ Tacoma

LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? Restaurant/Lounge Huge Price Reduction - For Sale For $510,000 (R.E. $485K) Bus. $25K. Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports bar and ice grill. pr reduced

Want bragging rights & the ability to name drop? Hans Grohe, Duravit, Kohler, & Porcher to name a few... Then this is the house for you-high end everything & custom touches galore. Need this spelled out in layman terms? Fabulous, fantastic & close to hip 6th Ave Biz District, this 4 bed, 2.5 bath home has natural, original woodwork, is an entertainerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream, and is ready for new owners... Leave your hammer at your old houseWKLVRQHLVĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGDQGĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGZHOO,PLJKWDGG Welcome! $368,000

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

COLLISION CENTER Same owner 15 yrs. Retiring, 6621 So. Tacoma Way. $130,000 with terms to qualified buyer - some training provided at o cost to buyer. LAKEWOOD CAFE/LOUNGE on a busy intersection, $81,500 CASH.

CALL RICHARD PICTON or ED PUNCHAK 253-581-6463 253-224-7109


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, January 31, 2014

CageSport MMA XXIX

Brian McKnight

Air Supply

February 8, 7pm

February 14, 8:30pm

February 15, 8pm

I-5 Showroom $35, $55, $100

I-5 Showroom $40, $55, $85, $90

I-5 Showroom $30, $40, $60, $65

Smokey Robinson Merle Haggard Battle at the Boat 95

February 21, 8:30pm

March 1, 8pm

March 22, 7pm

I-5 Showroom $50, $70, $95, $100

I-5 Showroom $35, $50, $65, $70

I-5 Showroom $25, $40, $100

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


Twa 1 31 14 p01