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TACOMAWEEKLY 24 YE A R S O F SE R V I C E BE C A U S E CO M M U N I T Y MAT T E R S

THE YEAR AHEAD

CITY BUDGET, TRANSPORTATION, ELKS LODGE AMONG TOP STORIES TO WATCH FOR 2013

WHAT’S RIGHT WITH TACOMA

PROPOSITION 1 IS GOOD FOR KIDS AND COMMUNITIES

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

W

hile 2012 comes to a close and prompts a time of reflection on the year that was, Tacoma must also look ahead at the year that will be 2013. There are plenty of big events and changes in the works. Here is a collection of the Top 10 issues to watch as Tacoma flips the calendar to the New Year.

Effects of city budget cuts Tacoma’s projected shortfall for the 2013-14 budget prompted deep cuts in city services and municipal spending as city leaders sought ways to cut $63 million in spending to make the budget balanced and sustainable. Those cuts take effect in January and will take several months to start showing their trickle-down ramifications, from potentially slower police response times, longer lines at municipal counters and higher taxes and fees. The city’s mid-year budget process should provide for some interesting discussions about the role of government and the validity of revenue and cost projections done during the start of the budgeting process this summer.

PHOTO COURTESY OF TACOMA SCHOOL DISTRICT

RENOVATED. McCarver Elementary School

SR 167 funding could be in the cards Plans to run State Route 167 to shipping operations on the Tideflats have been in the works for decades. Land purchases, designs, studies and route selections have trickled in ever since, but the massive price tag of more than $1.5 billion has kept it from being fully funded until now. The project has reached the point both in design and in political support to have a chance at state and federal dollars in the coming legislative session as a “road of regional significance.” Not only would the road streamline freight traffic from the shipping terminals to warehouses and distribution centers in East Pierce and South King counties, but it would aid the effort to clear routes through the area, namely Interstate 5 and State Route 16, that have cars battling for space with cargocarrying tractor trailers. For a project first conceptualized in the early 1950s, construction took another 30 years to even start. Now three decades later, the road might

finally get completed, but it will likely include higher state gas tax, tolls and federal grants to get shovels turning again. “Washington’s transportation system forms the backbone of our economy,” Gov. Christine Gregoire said of her transportation package during her final days in office. “Legislative action in 2013 is essential for maintaining and boosting Washington’s economic competitiveness. This project represents a critical missing link in the state highway network. Completion of the existing SR 167 will move freight faster and more economically as well as relieve congestion on local roads and other highways through new travel options.” Her transportation plan failed, however, to address a revenue package to actually fund the work or for any other transportation project for that matter. The package proposes $1 billion wholesale excise tax on gasoline and diesel fuel to pay for K-12 student transportation services.

Link expansion routes could connect Tacoma to the region Transit officials are reviewing a roster of a half dozen routes for Link expansions around the city in hopes of drafting a shorter list for further study in 2013. Some of the proposed routes are little more than people movers from one side of a neighborhood to another, while others could provide significant economic potential for the region. Options range from running rail from the North End to downtown, along Hilltop’s emerging “Medical Mile,” through the East Side or along Pacific Highway to Fife and the Puyallup Tribe’s commercial center. The idea now is to gauge potential rider information as well as ponder what economic impacts the various routes would have. The current 1.6-mile Tacoma Link light rail line serves six stations from the Theater District to the Tacoma Dome Station. Trains run every 12 minutes during the day and served nearly a million riders last year. Voters in 2008 approved an expansion of Tacoma Link as part of the Sound Transit 2 ballot measure. The year-long “alternatives analysis” effort to look at routes to expand with either an extension of the existing line through the Stadium District or lay separate tracks elsewhere in the city looks at ridership, partnership funding potential, impacts on low-income and minority communities and economic potentials. It is those factors that drive the financial train. A route, for example, might have higher ridership than others, but fail to drive new private development because the tracks are laid in commercial areas that are already built out, or that have higher-income residents that make it score low with the low-income ranking.

HAYDEN SPEAKS: Local musician discusses his current projects. PAGE B5

By Kathleen Merryman I was pleased but puzzled when Tacoma Citizens for Schools invited me to join Willie Stewart and Dan Barkley as community co-chairs for the campaign for Proposition 1. Stewart and Barkley are heroes of education in Tacoma and the state. I’m just a person who believes that honoring kids with the best schools, teachers and community support we can manage is the surest way to build a better world. I believe that schools aren’t merely buildings. They are tools. They are community resources, and the more community members use them, the more they will support the work that goes on in them. That, Stewart told me, is what they wanted. Done. I’m in on the effort to raise the money for safety, health and educational improvements at schools citywide, and to replace or renovate 14 failing school buildings. X See BOND / page A10

Tacoma Community House gives children a brighter future

PHOTO COURTESY OF TACOMA COMMUNITY HOUSE

READ2ME. Volunteer tutor Dwight A rail line from Portland Avenue on the East Side to the current station at Tacoma Dome could bring huge benefits not only by providing transportation to the residents of the low-income Salishan development but also solve parking issues facing Tacoma Dome. It could ease the longstanding lack of hotel beds that has caused the convention center to under-book larger events. The lack of parking for the Dome and convention center could be solved through a partnership with the Puyallup Tribe’s Emerald Queen Casino, which sits along the route. The hotel rooms would come with the development of the tribe’s hotel complex that has been in the works for years. The route would also be one step closer to linking Tacoma to Federal Way’s Sounder hub that could provide a flow of travelers from SeaTac International Airport directly to the City of Destiny, finally linking Tacoma to its namesake airport.

X See 2013 / page A4

Bridge news A3

would be renovated if voters approve Proposition 1, a $500 million bond issue to upgrade safety, health and classroom features and replace or renovate 14 schools throughout Tacoma School District.

Creative kids A5

City Briefs ...............A2 Pothole Pig ...............A3

Mason meets regularly with first-grade student Dat Phan. Mason is one of several tutors that have sessions with students at both McCarver and Roosevelt. By Kathleen Merryman Kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

Words matter. Especially if you can’t read them. Students who fall behind on reading at the beginning, and who stay behind for lack of extra help, face a grim future – and not just in academics. If they’re behind in fourth grade, only one in eight will ever catch up to grade level. The rest are at risk of dropping out of school. Eight out of 10 juvenile offenders have trouble reading. Six of 10 prison inmates can’t read.

Angelic interview B2

Hoops action A6

Sports ......................A6 A&E ....................... ..B1

X See HOUSE / page A10

VISIT US ON FACEBOOK facebook.com/tacomaweekly Make A Scene ........ B5 Calendar ................. B6

Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Two Sections | 20 Pages


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Police Blotter 7630*,9,:765+;6796;,:;

Police were called to Tacoma Mall on Dec. 26 to handle a demonstration near the food court. Demonstrators rallied in support OF &IRST .ATIONS PEOPLE WHO ARE LOBBYING Canada’s government to improve living conditions of natives in that country and defeat legislation that would allow natives to sell reservation plots to non-natives. Security guards asked the demonstrators to leave, but they refused. Police officers arrived and ordered the group, which was estimated to be between 80 and 100 people, to leave. The demonstrators complied. They were banned from the mall for one day.

CHRISTMAS JAIL ALTERCATION

A Tacoma woman has been charged with custodial assault related to an incident in Pierce County Jail on Dec. 25. AudreyANNA .EWELL IS IN JAIL ON A CHARGE OF THEFT of a motor vehicle. A female corrections OFFICER ASKED .EWELL TO RETURN TO HER CELL .EWELL RAISED HER FISTS AND THREW A PUNCH 4HE OFFICER GRABBED HER .EWELL GRABBED THE OFFICERS SHIRT 4HE OFFICER KICKED .EWELL /THER OFFICERS RESPONDED !S .EWELL SPIT AT THEM ONE USED A TASER TO SUBDUE HER .EWELL PLEADED NOT GUILTY ! JUDGE SCHEDULED A competency hearing for her on Jan. 4.

CAR SET ON FIRE

A woman discovered her car on fire on Dec. 25. The incident occurred in the 500 block of South 70th Street. Police officers and firefighters responded and the flames were extinguished. The woman told police her ex-husband had vandalized her car in the past. The fire is being investigated as a possible case of domestic violence arson.

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Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deputies used a taser on a man on Dec. 25. The suspect fled from a crash in the 1900 block of Westridge Avenue West after he was involved in another accident in the 1900 block of South Mildred Street. He resisted, which led the deputies to use the taser. Another person involved in the second CRASH SUFFERED HEAD INJURIES AND WAS TAKEN to a hospital. The suspect was arrested for investigation of vehicular assault and driving under the influence.

NORTH END CHURCH VANDALIZED

Six windows were broken at a church on Dec. 24. The incident occurred at Holy Cross Catholic Church, located in the 5500 BLOCK OF .ORTH TH 3TREET ! MEMBER OF THE congregation attended a Christmas Eve mass AND NOTICED THE DAMAGE IN A BUILDING ADJAcent to the church used for social functions. Windows on the building have been broken several times this year. Possible hate-related paperwork was left at the scene. The church has a court order against a person suspected of vandalizing the building in the past. The suspect was seen in the area, but officers did not locate the individual. The incident is

being investigated as a hate crime.

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A teenager wanted in a gang shooting in Tacoma has been extradited to Pierce CounTY FROM -EXICO .AITAALII 4OLEAFOA  HAS been a fugitive since May 2010, when gang leader Juan Zuniga was killed in a West End home. Prosecutors claim Toleafoa and Juan Ortiz killed Zuniga over dissatisfaction over his leadership of the gang. Another man was paralyzed from being shot at the scene. Toleafoa made a court appearance on Dec. 24. A future hearing will be held to deterMINE IF HE WILL BE TRIED AS A JUVENILE OR AN adult. Ortiz remains at large.

SHOTS FIRED ON EAST SIDE

Shots were fired in the 3400 block of Portland Avenue on Dec. 23. A man fired several rounds into the ground and ran away. .O ONE WAS INJURED /FFICERS DID NOT LOCATE the suspect.

GOT THE TIME?

A vehicle was shot during what appears TO HAVE BEEN AN ATTEMPTED CARJACKING ON Dec. 22. The victim pulled into his driveway in the 4300 block of East â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Street and got out of his vehicle. Another vehicle pulled up next to him and the driver of that vehicle asked what time it was. The suspect then punched the victim, who got in his vehicle and honked the horn. The suspect fired several shots at the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s car. The victim was NOT INJURED AND THE SUSPECT FLED

OFFICER SHOOTS WOMAN

An officer fatally shot a young woman on Dec. 22. A woman called police to report her daughter fired several shots inside a house in the 3500 block of South Fawcett Avenue. Sophia Strickland, 22, refused to communicate with officers. She walked down a set of stairs with a handgun pointed at an officer, who shot her.

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Officers contacted several people in the 7600 block of Pacific Avenue on Dec. 21. One had a warrant for arrest on an assault charge. The suspect fled. A K-9 unit was unable to locate the suspect.

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A man is accused of threatening to blow up the Department of Corrections office in the 10100 block of South Tacoma Way. On Dec. 21 employees called police about an OBJECT IN THE LOBBY )T WAS DETERMINED TO BE a fake bomb. Two others were found buried outside. During the investigation, Emil Herman Haag told employees he planted the devices. According to court documents, he threatened to bring dynamite to Lakewood Municipal Court and blow it up. Haag had previously been under Department of Corrections supervision. The day before he was kicked out of the office. Haag was charged with intimidation or harassment with an explosive. He pleaded not guilty. His bail was set at $250,000.

City Briefs

activities get close to live traffic. WSDOT anticipates several such night closures, and will continue issuing alerts and updates.

COUNTY UNDER STAGE 1 BURN BAN

Effective Dec. 29, the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency issued a Stage 1 burn ban for Pierce County. This ban remains in effect until further notice. As weather conditions are expected to continue to be cold and dry, air pollution is expected to build up to levels unhealthy for sensitive groups, especially in communities where wood-burning is common. These cold and stagnant conditions could persist into next week, when a weak system is forecast to arrive and disperse pollution. The purpose of a burn ban is to reduce the amount of pollution that is creating unhealthy air usually due to excessive wood smoke. The Clean Air Agency will continue to closely monitor the situation. Burn ban enforcement has significantly increased in the Tacoma-Pierce County Smoke Reduction Zone. Wood burning during a ban may result in a fine, with fines in the past reaching $1,000. Increased enforcement and night patrols will increase the likelihood of violators receiving substantial fines this season. During a Stage 1 burn ban: s .O BURNING IS ALLOWED IN FIREPLACES OR UNCERTIfied wood stoves. Residents should rely instead on their homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other, cleaner source of heat (such as their furnace or electric baseboard heaters) for a few days until air quality improves, the public health risk diminishes and the ban is cancelled. The only exception is if a wood stove is a homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only adequate source of heat. s .O OUTDOOR FIRES ARE ALLOWED 4HIS INCLUDES RECREational fires such as bonfires, campfires and the use of fire pits and chimneys. s "URN BAN VIOLATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO A   PENALTY It is okay to use natural gas, propane, pellet and EPAcertified wood stoves or inserts during a Stage 1 burn ban.

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Even through the holiday season, WSDOT crews conTINUED TO WORK HARD ON THE ) 32  %ASTBOUND .ALLEY 6ALLEY PROJECT 9OU MAY HAVE EXPERIENCED DRIVING ON THE new eastbound SR 16 detour over the valley. Moving eastbound traffic onto that structure freed contractor Mowat Construction to begin demolishing the old eastbound structure. Mowat has begun that work, which means another period of noisy construction. Most demolition will occur during the day, and the entire structure will take up to three months to remove. For the most part, motorists will not be affected by this work, although there will be single-lane closures during daytime hours on both South Center Street and South Tacoma Way as necessary. There are three notable exceptions to the above statement. Those exceptions include two total weekend closures of the two roads under the viaduct and some night closures on eastbound SR 16. 1. The first total street closure is scheduled to occur on South Tacoma Way from 9 p.m. Jan. 4 to 4:30 a.m. Jan. 7. Motorists will be detoured around the closure via Pine and Wilkeson Streets. 2. The second total street closure will occur in early February (specifics to be determined) on South Center Street under the viaduct. The same detour route, in the other direction, will be in place. Please note that either South Center Street or South Tacoma Way will always be open. These two total weekend closures will allow the contractor to demolish the sections of the old eastbound viaduct that span those two city streets. 3. Then the third noteworthy set of closures will be of eastbound SR 16 lanes overnight when demolition

CHARGES FILED AGAINST BURGLAR SHOT BY HOMEOWNER

Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist has charged Christopher Rhodes, 20, with residential burglary for the June 19, 2012, home invasion burglary of a Tacoma area residence. The homeowner shot the defendant as he entered the home through a broken window. On June 19, the victim was home alone when he heard knocking at his back door. He ignored the knocking as he was not expecting company. After the knocking stopped, the victim heard noises from the defendant prying open a window. The victim armed himself with a shotgun and called 911. The defendant smashed a bay window with an unknown OBJECT AND WAS ENTERING THE HOME WHEN THE victim fired one shot, hitting the defendant in the face. The defendant ran to a neighboring home and pounded on the window of a garage where two men were watching television. The defendant was bleeding from the face and arms, and asked the men to hide him. Moments later, the defendant collapsed. Medical aid arrived and transported the defendant to an area hospital, where he was treated for HIS INJURIES At the time of the alleged burglary, the defendant was in possession of a cell phone with an application that allowed him to monitor police radio broadcasts. One of the witnesses heard dispatch communications coming from the phone. An inspection of the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home revealed a spent shell casing on the floor near the broken bay window and holes in the curtain covering the window, consistent with a shotgun blast fired from inside the home. The victim told police that the defendantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s torso was inside his house when he fired the shot. The defendant was charged and arrested on a bench warrant after he was released from the hospital.

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#1 TOP 10 OF 2012

TACOMA WEEKLY LOOKS BACK ON A YEAR IN ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

#2 TOP 2012 STORIES SHOWS A CITY IN TRANSITION #3 BEST SPORTS STORIES OF 2012 #4 TOP 10 MOST READ STORIES OF 2012 ON TACOMAWEEKLY.COM #5 FIRST NIGHT ADDS A LITTLE SOMETHING THIS YEAR

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1909

 â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;ŠRrEeGgAaLl

 â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;Š30 By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The Regal Motor Car Company of Detroit built automobiles from 1907 through 1914. The car maker was one of the pioneers in what was once a â&#x20AC;&#x153;cottage industryâ&#x20AC;? filled with dozens of automotive builders that dotted the nation after the turn of the last century. Regal shipped its first 175 cars in 1908, but that launch was less than successful as many of the new car owners immediately began reporting engine troubles. In fact, the cars were so bad that the company recalled the entire line in 1908, marking the first automotive recall in history. This led to their motto â&#x20AC;&#x153;honest with itself, honest with its product, and honest in its dealings with its distributors and ownersâ&#x20AC;? as the company struggled to turn a profit while fixing cars it had already sold. Mechanical problems, however,

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

were quickly corrected and more than 2,000 copies of the updated cars were shipped in 1909. The Regal in the LeMay collection was the 1,411th to come off the assembly line. And they proved reliable. A transcontinental journey of 4,031 miles was set by George Wilcox by

driving the route in just 38 days. The same car repeated the trip five more times, accumulating more than 22,000 miles. The 1909 Regal Model 30 was a five-passenger car that was powered by a four-cylinder engine that produced just 30 horsepower, hence the name.

Murray Morgan Bridge opening delayed a month By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Some bad weather earlier this month and some minor repairs found during the renovation have delayed the official opening of the Murray Morgan Bridge another month. It was set to be open before the end of 2012. The new opening date is Feb. 1, with a grand opening ceremony on Feb. 14 complete with fireworks and a car parade. The actual ceremony will happen two weeks after the bridge is open to traffic. The first day wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have much fanfare, with crews simply set to move the concrete safety barriers and construction signs to the side of the road and let cars drive to the tideflats. There are no plans to have a ceremonial â&#x20AC;&#x153;first carâ&#x20AC;? across the bridge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of people have asked me that,â&#x20AC;? City of Tacoma engineer Tom Rutherford said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I guess it will be whoever is there when we take the barriers down.â&#x20AC;? The $57.4 million restoration project has been under way since May 2007. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We still have a lot of work to do on the bridge,â&#x20AC;? Rutherford said, noting that the work includes finishing the seismic retrofit and the installation of the elevator. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It really is a tight quarters out there with all the staging of equipment and things. This way we will be able to work fullbore without having to dodge people driving on the bridge.â&#x20AC;? About 50 people are working on the bridge site at any given time. Even after the span opens crews will continue working on the bridge to add additional seismic re-enforcements to bring the span up to current standards. The city started work on the bridge after it took ownership of the span from Washington State Department of Transportation, which had been pondering simply removing that link between downtown Tacoma and the waterfront. The agreement called for the state to pay the city $37 million to go toward repairing the aging

Pothole pigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

:7(5 The Murray Morgan Bridge that connects

11th Street to the Tideflats has been closed since TPKI\[PZZL[[VYLVWLUI`[OL[PTL[OL ZWHU[\YUZ`LHYZVSKPU-LIY\HY`

span and support city efforts to gain state and federal grants to further cover the repair costs. Initial estimates put the total repair cost of the bridge at about $62 million. That is less than half of the original $160 million it was expected to cost for a new bridge along the same route. Tacoma argued that the bridge should be saved not only as an iconic city landmark but as a vital roadway between downtown and the Tideflats as the city seeks ways to boost economic development and access to the Center for Urban Waters, existing businesses on the Tideflats, and the proposed developments on the east side of Thea Foss Waterway. The current funding for the bridge will get the span operational for vehicle traffic, but more work will need to be done in future phases, as money allows, to fully bring the span to current standards. In bridge engineering terms, the bridge was closed when it received a safety rating of two on a 100-point scale. Phase I work brought that rating up to about 80. Phase II would increase that rating to about 90. A new bridge is rated at 100. That phase II work will include more seismic upgrades, construction of a new bridge deck, new electrical systems and a fresh coat of black paint, the original color of the bridge. Newer estimates put the cost of that work at between $10 million and $15 million. The drop

in projected costs for the work came after research done after the city first released its initial estimate. Since the additional work is not yet funded, the projects might be split into separate contracts to allow the work to be done as money is available. No time line is available. The first bridge at the location, a swing span over the waterway from South 11th Street, opened in 1894 and provided the only route for Tacomans to take between their homes in the city and the shipping operations on the Tideflats. The current span was designed by the Kansas City firm of Waddell and

Harrington, which also designed Portlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hawthorne bridge, and opened in 1915. It was upgraded in 1957, when it became a section of SR-509 between Tacoma and King County. The route was then shifted to the current SR-509 bridge at South 21st Street with the creation of that cable-stay bridge in 1997, which dramatically dropped the traffic along the span from South 11th Street. What followed was a decade of on-and-off discussions about whether to repair, replace or simply remove the bridge. It has been closed to vehicle traffic since 2007 after it failed a safety inspection. The span had gained the name Murray Morgan in 1998, to honor the Tacoma historian who had worked as a bridge tender along the span and even did some of his writing for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Skid Roadâ&#x20AC;? there. He died in 2000. At its peak, the bridge handled some 15,000 cars a day. The SR-509 shift dropped that usage to about 4,500 cars a day, a rate that will likely return once it reopens. Allowing vehicles over the bridge again will also save the city some $2 million a year in staffing changes of emergency responders.

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72nd and Wilkeson Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;pothole initiative,â&#x20AC;? and in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and is continuing those efforts well in to 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or return â&#x20AC;&#x201C; each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pothole Pig â&#x20AC;&#x153;Percevalâ&#x20AC;? gained his name after one of King Arthurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legendary Knights of the Round Table. Perceval is the earliest recorded account of what has gone down in legend as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quest for the Holy Grail,â&#x20AC;? a mythical golden chalice used by Jesus during the Last Supper that is believed to have special powers. Our Perceval Pig, however, is on an endless quest for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;perfect potholeâ&#x20AC;? and runs into many along his adventures through Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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TACOMAWEEKLY 24 YE A R S O F SE R V I C E BE C A U S E CO M M U N I T Y MAT T E R S

Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC

2588 Pacific Highway, Fife, WA 98424  Â&#x2039;-(?!  7\ISPZOLY!John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com 5L^Z+LZR!news@tacomaweekly.com 4HUHNPUN,KP[VY! Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com :[HMM>YP[LYZ!John Larson / jlarson@tacomaweekly.com Kate Burrows / kburrows@tacomaweekly.com Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Kathleen Merryman / kathleen@tacomaweekly.com Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com :WVY[Z,KP[VY!Jeremy Helling/ jhelling@tacomaweekly.com 7HNPUH[PVU!Tim Meikle / tim@tacomaweekly.com; Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Tammy Vince Cruz >LI+L]LSVWLYZ! Cedric Leggin, Ed Curran 7OV[VNYHWOLY! Rocky Ross *VU[YPI\[PUN>YP[LYZ! Karen Westeen, Steve Mullen, David B. Hardt, Dave Davison (K]LY[PZPUN!Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Nicole Boote / nicole@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. Tacoma Weekly welcomes letters to the editor, your opinions and viewpoints. Anonymous letters will not be published. Tacoma Weekly reserves the right to edit letters for length, content and potentially libelous material. Please send them to above address or e-mail us at letters@tacomaweekly.com.


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W2013

From page A1

7VY[VWLYH[PVUZ Shipping operations at Port of Tacoma are the â&#x20AC;&#x153;economic engineâ&#x20AC;? of the region in ways many people do not realize. International and regional trade through the Tideflats support more than 43,000 jobs in Pierce County and more than 113,000 jobs in Washington, with annual wages of $637 million flowing into local wallets. Washington is the most tradedependent state in the nation, and Tacoma is the most trade-dependent city in the state. Increased international trade brought by the economic recovery as well as the growing traffic through the Grand Alliance operations means all economic eyes will be looking at the waterfront for prosperity following years of stagnation. The portâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10-year master plan sets a series of goals that include: doubling container volumes to 3 million containers a year, doubling its dry bulk volumes to 12 million metric tons a year, increasing auto imports by 20 percent to 200,000 units a year and increase port-related jobs by 4,700 and associated jobs by 2,000.

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PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

The renovations of the Murray Morgan Bridge that links downtownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s South 11th Street to the Tideflats are now done and the bridge is set to have a â&#x20AC;&#x153;soft openingâ&#x20AC;? by the end of the year. The $57 million renovation project might take some fine tuning into early 2013 but should be all done well in time for the bridgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 100th anniversary celebration set for February. Washington State Department of Transportation closed the bridge in 2007 because of needed repairs. The state transferred ownership to the City of Tacoma in 2009, and restoration efforts began.

;PJRL[[VYPKL& The failure of the Pierce Transit sales tax hike outlined by Proposition 1 by less than a single percentage in November translates into deep cuts for bus and transit services heading into 2013. The particular cuts, which will mean the transit system will be about the size it was 30 years ago, will be worked out in the coming months. The system will be about half of what it was as the area entered into the Great Recession. But what is known is that special event buses for the State Fair in Puyallup and Freedom Fair will be gone, as will all weekend routes and most late-night buses. What is also in the works are talks between suburban cities about finding ways to fund commuter-only services from their cities to job centers in the region rather than funding a full slate of bus routes during work days that are not generally used by residents of the area because they are at work. Other cities could see significantly reduced bus routes and decide to opt out of the transit system entirely. That would mark the second time in as many years cities have left the taxing boundaries that define the transit system, which would further mean cuts as tax revenue shrinks.

>H[LY^H[LYL]LY`^OLYL Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newly formed Flood Control District will be busy in 2013 as it not only sets out to create the district operations from the ground up, but also sets out on its efforts to raise taxes and fund water-retention projects around the county with specific attentions on Puyallup River waters. The task at hand is to figure out how to best manage water flows in the 1,000-square-mile basin that sends melting snow from Mount Rainier to the south and the rainwater from as far north as Auburn into the Carbon, White and Puyallup rivers onto its final destination of Commencement Bay and Puget Sound without flooding areas that are becoming more dense with residential and commercial developments. The center of the study is the final seven miles of the Puyallup River since it is the collection point for much of that water and runs perpendicular to Interstate 5. The main roadway through the area, therefore, could face a shutdown if a massive flood hit the area and mitigation projects were not in place. Projects on just the last stretch of the Puyallup River will likely cost about $300 million. The newly formed Flood Control District is only set to collect 10 cents per $1,000 of property value, or $21.50 for a $215,000 house. That only brings in about $8 million a year.

4HYPQ\HUHSLNHSPaH[PVU Now that personal possession of small amounts of marijuana for recreational use is legal in the state and the federal government has made statements that it will not enforce federal laws on pot smoking by small-time users, the state Liquor Control Board is tasked with creating a state-run, regulated system to grow and sell marijuana that is both liberal in its guidelines and controlled so tax revenues do not leak out of the system. Left unknown is not only how the process will work, but also how cities will zone and control such operations. The board has a year to figure all this out, so this on-going story is not disappearing from headlines anytime soon.

;V\YPZTPU;[V^U City officials have handed over the marketing and booking efforts for the Greater Tacoma Convention and Trade Center to the Tacoma Regional Convention + Visitor Bureau in a contract that is meant to not only trim city spending but also boost conventions at the 8-year-old venue that has long been suffering from a lack of events. The convention centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main ballroom was only used 56 percent of the time, with 206 days in use, while its exhibition hall was used even less, at 44 percent or 159 days, this year. The industry benchmark is between 50 and 70 percent. The lack of events at the convention center has led to a need for $1.2 million from the General Fund this year to shore up the departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bottom line and a projected $895,000 next year, according to city documents. Shifting the marketing efforts away from city staff to the Tacoma Regional Convention + Visitor Bureau will enable the convention center to have three regional sales people, one national sales person and one sales representative in Washington, D.C., which is seen as a key feeder location for landing conventions for national associations. The change, which is more in line with trade standards, will allow for flexibility in trade shows and familiarization tours of the facility as well. Rob Hanson pointed out during his presentation that the same marketing efforts would have cost the city about $700,000 a year if they were done in-house by city workers.

(SSL`LZVU[OL,SRZ Work is underway to transform the long-dormant Tacoma Elks Lodge in downtown Tacoma into a landmark pub and entertainment spot by this time next year. While an official grand opening date is still in flux, the McMenamins Elks hotel and pub in the historic building will turn heads at each milestone of its transformation. The landmark pub operators spent $1.2 million on the former lodge as well as added a nearby site for another $980,000 as the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scope grows. The Elksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; annex building is now set to be hotel rooms, while the main building will be entertainment venues and 150 more rooms in the 1916 lodge site that has undergone a series of changes since the purchase was announced three years ago. The property will include 45 guestrooms with private baths; space for live music, events, weddings and meetings; a ballroom that will feature a tiny indoor city with â&#x20AC;&#x153;cabins,â&#x20AC;? skylights, gardens, terraces and more; three restaurants; a McMenamins brewery; and a rooftop garden (vegetables, herbs and flowers) that will provide the restaurants with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Completion is set for the fall of 2013.


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SCHOOL PAGE

!247/2+ 0/%429 !.$ 72)4).' &2/- 4!#/-! 345$%.43 )EGL]IEVXLIPSGEPWXEXIERHREXMSREP48%KVSYTWLSWXE6IĂ&#x20AC;IGXMSRWGSRXIWXJSVWXYHIRXW8LMW]IEV¡WXLIQI[EWTHE MAGIC OF A MOMENT;IORS[SYVVIEHIVW[MPPKVIEXP]IRNS]XLITMIGIWXLEXJSPPS[SRXLMWTEKIERHXLEX[MPPWLS[YTSRWYFWIUYIRX TEKIWMRXLIQSRXLWXSJSPPS[

A LITTLE BOYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LOVING HEARTâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;A TRUE STORY It was a beautiful sunny day. A kid named Dylan, who was 6 years old, was very excited because his Mom was going to take him to the Pikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Place Market. They drove in a car to get there. When they got there, Dylanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mom gave him 10 dollars, and told him he could spend the money on anything. When he walked around the market, he saw lots of cool things he would like to buy. Then he saw a beggar. He was old, with ripped and ragged clothes, and looked very cold. He was begging for food, water, and money. Dylan looked at this poor beggar, and felt so sad for him, so he gave the beggar all his money. When Dylan went back to his Mom, his Mom asked, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What did you spend your money on?â&#x20AC;? Dylan replied: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I gave all the money to a poor beggar.â&#x20AC;? This is a true story. I heard it from Dylanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mom, my Aunt Brandy. Now Dylan has already graduated from high school. The moment when Dylan gave money to the beggar, I think the beggar must have been very happy because he felt loved, and Dylan must have been very happy, too, because he helped others. I think that is the magic of the moment. Brian Zhang, 2nd gr., Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pt. Elementary

THE MAGIC OF A MOMENT

Oliver Smith, gr. 2, Washington-Hoyt Elem.-- â&#x20AC;&#x153;I chose to write an essay about a dream I have that would be a magic moment when it comes true.â&#x20AC;?

THE RABBIT AND HIS WATCH A pocket watch of brilliant gold, Ticks in a pocket of satin blue, Counting the minutes gone by. A pocket watch of old unused minutes, Warns those who hold it they have no time to waste! Keep on, keep moving, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let a second go by! You must not let go of what you could be, If only you would try. A white rabbit, wearing a waistcoat of satin, Pulls his ears and murmurs, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh, look at the time!â&#x20AC;? His pocket watch glints in the sun, As the rabbit runs off again, And around a bush and under a hedge. Quickly, for he never has time to spare! He could be in another land, having tea with the hatter, Or enjoying the freshly-painted roses. So soon he must be on his way. If you see him, oh please, follow, For he and his pocket watch Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bear a child who simply stares. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d much prefer One who takes chances, And lives, And follows him into a land of untold wonders. Down, down, the rabbit hole, Into Wonderlandâ&#x20AC;Ś EAT THE CAKE. TAKE THE CHANCES. YOU WILL GROW. Ashley Smith, 7th gr., Truman M.S. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;My poem is about how the White Rabbit is always seen rushing around, trying to be everywhere at once, and explains that he wants to enjoy everything, and to not waste a moment.â&#x20AC;?

A FRIEND: THE BEST MEDICINE OF ALL I was seven when I was forced out of any normal I could have, because instead of like most kids, playing swords with sticks or going to the movies, at that time, I was in tons of pain. I was doing the only thing I could, which was writing inspirational

stories about health patients, partly because thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all I felt, and partly because thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all I saw. After all, I had just had major brain surgery. And at seven, I already knew I would never be changed, so I longed to be a cancer kid, for at least then I could be understood. By the time I was in 6th grade, I was longing even more. It seemed selfish, but it was true. Cancer kids have treatments and are understood by doctors, whereas me, I had no treatment, and no one understood. For cancer kids, it might be horrid, but at least you know where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going in life. But soon after I walked through the doors of Giaudrone Middle School, I found some hope, a friend named Lillian Ball. She was my best friend, and still is. It made sense we both didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fit in, because neither of us believed in being the prettiest or meanest. We just wanted to be ourselves. It was that moment, when you realize you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to hide your ways of life. How I thought about it all was that Lillian needed a friend, and I needed some hope. Early on I figured out that we loved to tease each other, which was good, because we were best friends. And we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care that she got made fun of for being friends with me. I got remarks about her not being a good friend, but the point was that we cared about each other, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all that mattered to us. Eighth grade came far too quickly. We both agreed it was going to be over before we knew it. So one day I turned to her and said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Promise me we will always be best friends.â&#x20AC;? She looked at me and replied, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cross my heart, hope to die, stick a cupcake in my eye,â&#x20AC;? and that was the most magical moment for me.

An animal cleaning and helping itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s young one is magical. And looking and touching a newborn baby is magical. Catherine Rawlings, 4th gr., Pt. Defiance Elem. -- â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wrote this because when I hear the word â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Magical,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I think of so many magical things that have happened.â&#x20AC;?

FIRST SNOW The first snow is like heavenly flowers Falling from the sky Twirling all around Little crystal dandelions Falling to the ground. First snow Is shimmering ice that tastes Like magic. Make a bouquet, then throw it up In the air And let it shimmer down. The first snow whispers, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am here. I am here. Arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you happy I am here?â&#x20AC;? Zoe Maeve Carlisle, gr. 2, Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pt. Elem. -â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first snow of the year feels magical.â&#x20AC;?

MAGIC IN THE MOMENT

Melissa Kotschmer, 8th gr., Giaudrone M.S. -- â&#x20AC;&#x153;For a girl with many medical problems, what can I say? A friend is the best medicine of all!â&#x20AC;?

To me, it is Christmas: the giving and being with family, and celebrating the birth of Jesus.

MAGICAL MOMENTS

To me, it is writing a story: when I come up with ideas to put in the story, and filling papers with words I write down.

My Grandfather is magical to me because he served in World War II. A winning football game for the team you like. Getting my dog. I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s magical in Disneyland because you can see it like a lifetime moment. Collecting souvenirs is magical because you can look back when you are an adult, and remember where you went with your family or friends.

To me, it is drawing a picture: when I imagine how the picture will look like, then signing my initials. To me, it is Disney: the characters shown in movies and on T.V., and the special place I have for it in my heart. To me, it is the gift of life: it is long and happy and I will not waste it. That is what the Magic in the Moment is To me. Michael Travis, 7th gr., Truman M.S.

O

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Magic feels like a surprise. My magical moment would be when I am asked to be on the U.S.A. Olympic BMX racing team. I know what it feels like to be at the gate and you are scared, but you always say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can win. You can win.â&#x20AC;? I know what it feels like to be getting in line for a trophy at a big national race. It feels really exciting, and my heart starts racing, and I start to say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew I could do it.â&#x20AC;? When I am peddling on the track, I feel so happy because I have tons of people cheering for me, and I know I can win. As I am getting my gear on, my Mom and Dad always say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go out and have fun, and pedal your heart out.â&#x20AC;? When I go down to staging, I start to worry, but I know I have it in me, so I start to say a chant, saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can win. I can win. I can win.â&#x20AC;? If I was asked to be on the U.S.A. Olympic team, it would mean my training, my eating well, my practicing, my driving 14 hours to big races, my family packing up and traveling to support me and care for me, was all worth it for that magic moment. I think everyone can have a big dream. Anyone can feel the magic of a moment. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be an Olympic trophy like in my dream, but it could be a soccer medal or meeting a new friend and becoming best friends, or it could be

Christmas Eve when you are waiting for Santa. My moment that would feel like magic, would be getting on the Olympics team for the United States of America. I know one day, I will feel the magic of this moment!

Miranda Anders, 5th gr., Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pt. Elem.

2 GIRAFFES

T

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Ashley Fisher, 4th gr., Pt. Defiance Elem. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I made this picture because I was inspired when I went to a zoo and saw in person. It was beautiful the way they nodded their heads at each other.â&#x20AC;?

C

Eddie

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Haleigh, 5th gr., Grant Elem.

Jovita Martinez, 8th gr.

F

Stacee Wright 8th gr.

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Drue Brotman, Kindergarten, Grant Elem. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kristen and Aaron got married. It was magical. There was a waterfall and a puppy dog. Everything at the Rose Garden was so pretty.â&#x20AC;?

Elina Schumach, 8th gr.

Evan Wimbles, 1st gr., Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pt. Elem. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I drew and painted this picture close to Halloween. Halloween is a magical time of the year. In my picture, there is a witch flying on a magical broom in a purple sky.â&#x20AC;?

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Madeleine, 4th gr., Grant Elem. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The dewdrops on the leaves look like diamonds sparkling.â&#x20AC;?

Teachers and students interested in submitting work may get guidelines or information from Shari Shelton, (253) 906-3769 (before 8 a.m. and after 3 p.m.) or at sshelto@tacoma.k12.wa.us, or may contact Donna McCracken, (253) 475-8387 or dmccrac@tacoma.k12.wa.us.


Sports

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 2013

Tacoma Sports Online

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SECTION A, PAGE 6

;9(+,4(92 DEFENSE LEADS LADY *9<:(+,9: 6=,9-0-, Zeitler dominates inside for Tacoma Baptist

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

BIG GAME. Forward Sarah Zeitler gets

off a shot in the Lady Crusaders’ 39-27 win, as she scored 23 points for Tacoma Baptist. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

SENIOR TRIO LEADS T-BIRDS PAST GRAHAM-KAPOWSIN

Stadium, Tacoma Baptist fall to SPSL opponents By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

M

ount Tahoma started by dominating inside against Graham-Kapowsin. That opened up the outside, and the Thunderbirds hit shots from there as well, relying on a trio of seniors in a 79-63 win over the Eagles at home on Dec. 28. Senior guard Brian Neal helped lead the way, scoring 16 of his game-high 24 points in the second half, while forward Andre Wiley added 23 points and nine rebounds and Ray West had 17 points for the Thunderbirds. Wiley started quickly, scoring seven first-quarter points as Mount Tahoma held an 18-16 lead. Then Neal took over from the outside, scoring four baskets in the first five minutes of the second quarter to help boost the lead to 32-24. “The first quarter was more getting it to the inside and get Wiley buckets,” Neal said. “Outside, it was more me and Ray shooting it and our teammates all getting involved.” But Eagles star forward Alexander Jones kept GrahamKapowsin in it in the first half with 15 of his team-high 21 points, and Robby Gill pulled them within 32-30 with a jumper with just under two minutes left. West responded by nailing one of his three three-pointers on the night, and the Thunderbirds led 35-32 at the half. The Eagles pulled to within 40-38 early in the second half, but Neal helped lead a 12-2 run with three baskets in the next three minutes, and West added five points during the run. “Everyone goes on runs, but the good teams keep the game on lock,” said Neal of the spurt. The Thunderbirds’ defense, meanwhile, held Jones to just six points in the second half, forcing others to try to beat them. “(Jones) played aggressive,” said Wiley. “I just tried my best to keep my hands up and be in his chest at all times and try to box him out, tried to keep him away from the basket.” The Thunderbirds controlled the fourth quarter, mainX See BASKETBALL / page A9

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

6<;:0+,;/9,(;:(Top) Ray West puts up a shot in

Mount Tahoma’s 79-63 win over Graham-Kapowsin on Dec. 28, as the senior hit three three-pointers and finished with 17 points. (Bottom) Brian Neal, who led the Thunderbirds with 24 points, tries to get past the Eagles’ Robby Gill (33).

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The success of the Tacoma Baptist girls basketball team this season will depend on playing good defense and getting the ball inside on offense. That formula worked to perfection on Dec. 29, as junior forward Sarah Zeitler scored 17 of her game-high 23 points in the first half, and the Lady Crusaders were stifling on defense in a 39-27 win at Fife. Holding a slim 11-8 lead midway through the second quarter, Zeitler ripped off eight points in two minutes to help give the Crusaders a 21-10 lead at the half. “I was getting good passes,” said Zeitler, who added nine rebounds. “It’s all (for the) team… We play for the glory of God.” The Trojans closed to within 25-18 thanks to a couple baskets by Karli Knudson midway through the third quarter, but started getting in foul trouble late in the period. Forward Breanna Richardson – who led Fife with 11 points and 11 rebounds – picked up her fourth foul late in the third quarter, and Katie Cameron converted both free throws to give the Crusaders a 29-20 lead heading into the fourth. With the defensive focus on Zeitler for much of the half, speedy senior guard Becca McDonald stepped up to help direct the offense with a supporting cast of younger players. “We knew they were going to come out hard because they were losing,” said McDonald, who had four points and four rebounds. “We had to push it and try to get it into Sarah and get her good passes. We just worked together.” The Crusaders extended the lead to 35-22 after baskets by Amy Kliewer, Ashley Brooks and Jane Cooksley on consecutive possessions early in the fourth quarter. Jennifer Brooks finished with 11 rebounds while Cameron added nine rebounds for the Lady Crusaders. And while the young Crusaders – there are three freshmen who play significant minutes – are still figuring out the offense, it is clear they are beginning to embrace the school’s trademark defensive mindset. “We’ve grown so much as a team in the past month on defense,” Zeitler said. “We had a rough time in the beginning. Everything is just starting to click with our defense.” “That’s our focal point is defense,” added head coach Josh Narayan. “You play great defense, you’re going to get a victory or you’re going to be in the game.” The Lady Crusaders were set to take on the Mornington Breakers, a traveling team from Australia, on Jan. 5 at 7 p.m. in their final nonconference game.


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NEW BASEBALL FACILITY 796=0+,:@,(996<5+;9(0505. Trolia helps lead effort through organization

PHOTOS BY JEREMY HELLING

>,(3;/6-256>3,+., (Right) Former long-time major-leaguer Mike Sweeney instructs kids in one of the new batting cages at the AT Baseball Athletic

Training Complex on Dec. 26. (Left photo) Sweeney (left), Jim Nettles (middle) and Aaron Trolia (right) talk with players before beginning drills on Dec. 26. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

For the last several years, former Seattle Mariners draftee Aaron Trolia has been traveling around with various instructors to put on clinics and training sessions for youth around the area. Now, after a long and arduous search, Trolia and his organization AT Baseball have a new place to call home. The group secured a 10,000-squarefoot facility in October â&#x20AC;&#x201C; featuring 20-foot high ceilings â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to become its new Athletic Training Complex, where they will host all the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s instructional programs. The building, located at 815 S. 28th St. in Tacoma, is not set to open to the public until mid-January, but the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already-existing programs are currently taking place there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had some phenomenal help from outside resources,â&#x20AC;? said Trolia, noting the help he received in acquiring netting and padded sport turf for the building. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of great people have been helping getting

it going.â&#x20AC;? With the acquisition of the new facility, Troliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision to provide training and mentoring to more local youth is beginning to create new partnerships. On Dec. 26, former Seattle Mariner and five-time All-Star Mike Sweeney helped lead a small one-day clinic alongside Trolia and seven-year major-leaguer and long-time coach Jim Nettles, Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father-inlaw. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wanted to use today as a foundation for my relationship with Aaron, kind of to set the tone for future events,â&#x20AC;? said Sweeney, who like Trolia is a devout Christian and runs Catholic baseball camps in his hometown San Diego. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is just step one. I envision a year from now coming out and seeing hundreds of kids right here in the summer time playing baseball.â&#x20AC;? Sweeney noted that his goal is to not only teaches kids baseball, but mentor them in the game of life â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a philosophy that mirrors that of Trolia. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe baseball is more of a vehicle for getting these kids to understand what

it takes to become a man when they get older,â&#x20AC;? Trolia said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The constant failure baseball brings, and understanding the coping skills to rebound from that, I think will take these kids farther than the actual game of baseball will.â&#x20AC;? Along with an All-Star caliber cast of instructors â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including Los Angeles Dodgers roving hitting instructor Todd Takayoshi, Puyallup High School Baseball coach Marc Wiese, former Washington State player Tim Kuykendall, former University of Washington softball national champion Taylor Smith and strength and conditioning coach Keith Eisenmenger â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Trolia hopes to offer as many different types of camps as possible in the new facility. He will also continue to host summer camps at Curtis High School, his alma mater, along with former teammate Bryan Robinson â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the Vikingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; head coach. He noted that individual instruction and team programs are available, with most offseason programs taking place twice a week for six months. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all progression-based stuff, so kids can join in

whenever they want toâ&#x20AC;Śand get enough individual attention they can get caught back up and prepare themselves for their season.â&#x20AC;? Trolia added that the organization is looking to do potential partnerships with Metro Parks and the YMCA, and is also seeking sponsored programs. He also hopes to provide programs for families of local soldiers following a recent opportunity to hold a camp in Germany for children of deployed soldiers. With the facility opening to the public in the coming weeks and baseball offseason training slowing down in late winter, AT Baseball will offer facility rentals in the spring and summer for other sports or activities. And with the long search for a permanent facility over, Trolia now has another example of a valuable lesson to teach his players. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dreams really can come true, as long as you pursue them and work at them.â&#x20AC;? For more info, or to sign up for camps or clinics, visit www.atbaseball.com.

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TACOMA WEEKLY 2012 HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETES OF THE YEAR

3P\MH\)YPNNZZOV^Z[YVUNJOHYHJ[LYHUKSLHKLYZOPW By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

A

s is the case in any year, it is difficult to single out an individual high school athlete amongst the numbers of local students who can stake a claim to a title such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Athlete of the Year.â&#x20AC;? There are numbers of excellent athletes in their various sports within the city limits, and all deserve to be honored. And excelling in two sports is not uncommon as well. Such is the case with this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s male and female athletes of the year, as we look back at both of their achievements in the past calendar year.

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You would be hard-pressed to find a more devoted athlete than Liufau, who twice found himself deep in the state playoffs at Tacoma Dome â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in separate sports. Way back in February, Liufau helped guide the Lionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; basketball team deep into the state playoffs at the Dome after averaging 13 points, 10 rebounds and four assists per game. The Lions had earlier claimed a Narrows League championship and finished 13-1 in league play, with a 24-5 overall record. Liufauâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all-out effort was on display in a 22-point, 20-rebound game against Mount Rainier in the Lionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opener at the Dome, an eventual 66-50 win on the way to claiming fifth place. His dominance on the gridiron was even more impressive, as the University of Colorado-bound senior quarterback guided the Lions to the state title game this fall. Liufau passed for more than 2,500 yards and 24 touchdowns in his final campaign, while also rushing for eight more scores. Despite losing to Skyline in the state final, Liufau consistently demonstrated leadership, athleticism and character all year long.

TIA BRIGGS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; WILSON

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Briggs is another outstanding athlete whose character and humility almost contradict her dominant and imposing athletic skill. She began her year on the basketball court as well, leading the Wilson girls to the Narrows 3A title with a perfect 10-0 league record last winter. The then-junior forward was the Ramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; go-to player in the post, averaging 14.4 points and 7.7 rebounds per game â&#x20AC;&#x201C; not to mention a 31-point outing early in the season â&#x20AC;&#x201C; on a roster full of talented players. The effort garnered Briggs the Narrows 3A MVP award, as the Rams advanced to the state regional playoffs with a 19-4 overall record. But she was not done, helping the Lady Ramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; volleyball team to the district playoffs for the second straight year this fall by being a force up front. The senior middle blocker tallied 121 kills â&#x20AC;&#x201C; second on the team â&#x20AC;&#x201C; while adding 29 blocks. Her season earned her recognition on the All-Narrows 3A second team. With the way in which Briggs was able to combine her size and ability to move in both sports, she proved well-deserving of all of her accolades.

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WBasketball

From page A6

taining a nine- to ten-point lead the rest of the way. West provided the outside threat for the Thunderbirds, hitting three three-pointers while senior guard Michael Rollins added seven points. The win moved Mount Tahoma to 6-1 overall on the year, and they added a 72-68 win over River Ridge on Dec. 29. They were set to host Bellarmine Prep on Jan. 4 at 7 p.m. in their final non-conference test.

STADIUM FALLS TO DECATUR

It looked as if Stadiumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offense was going to be effective as they jumped out to a 13-10 lead on Decatur in the first quarter. But the Tigers began missing shots and turning the ball over against the Gatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; zone defense, becoming ineffective for most of the game in an eventual 54-40 loss on Dec. 28 at the Bill Riley Communities Family Holiday Classic at Decatur High School. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They did a good job in their zone of flying around, and they kept the ball out of the middle,â&#x20AC;? said Stadium head coach Doug Cockeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of Decatur. After falling behind early, Taylor Strickland tied it 8-8 with a layup with two minutes left in the first quarter after leaping to catch a nice pass from Jordan Powers. Eric Anderson-Connolly then gave the Tigers their first lead with a jumper on the next possession. After the Gatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jason Young hit a three-pointer to tie it early in the second, Bobby Moorehead nailed a three for the Tigers to give them a 16-14 lead. It would be their last lead of the game. The Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; offense hit a funk, scoring four points in the final seven minutes of the half, and the defense had no answer for Young and fellow senior, Kevin Locascio. Youngâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s layup gave Decatur a 24-20 lead at the half, and after Malik Mayeux pulled Stadium within 24-22 quickly after halftime, the Gators launched a quick 9-0 run â&#x20AC;&#x201C; capped by Locascioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three-point play â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to take control. The Tigers never got closer than a nine-point deficit the rest of the way, as Young finished with 20 points while Locascio added 19 points for the Gators. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not the swiftest team out there,â&#x20AC;? Cockeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those guys really stepped up and hit big shots for Decatur, and defensively we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t close out very well on the shooters.â&#x20AC;? One bright spot for Stadium was the play of forward Lucious Brown, who came off the bench to lead the Tigers with 13 points and nine rebounds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coming along (well), he can play,â&#x20AC;? said Cockeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of Brown, who is still recovering from an injury. Mayeux added seven points for Stadium, while Decatur held forward Corey Glackin-Coley to just six points and Anderson-Connolly to four points. The Tigers responded on Dec. 29 with a 71-58 win over Kennedy in their second game at the Holiday Classic.

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With an already-thin roster, Tacoma Baptist could not afford to lose anybody if they wanted to compete against a bigger school. But the Crusaders suffered two key injuries â&#x20AC;&#x201C; losing forward Taylor Martindale early in the game and forward Dalton Wintersole in the third quarter â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as they could not keep up with Fife in a 57-32 loss on Dec. 29. Tacoma Baptist took a quick 5-2 lead on Brandon Stoehrâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s threepointer three minutes in, and trailed just 13-11 after the first quarter. But Martindale took a hard hit inside and was forced to leave early in the game, and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t return. Wintersole tied it 13-13 two minutes into the second quarter, but the Crusaders would be held scoreless the rest of the half as Fife went on a 10-0 run. After Wintersole scored to cut it to 25-17 early in the second half, Fife launched another 10-0 run â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with Wintersole injured in the middle of it â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and the Trojans held a commanding 40-21 lead heading into the fourth quarter. Drew Jordan led the Crusaders with 10 points, while Wintersole and Stoehr finished with eight points apiece. Alex Lemoncelli led Fife with 13 points, while Brock Carpenter had 12 points and eight rebounds.

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

-69>(9+4(9*/Tacoma Baptistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drew

Jordan (3), who led the Crusaders with 10 points, looks to get a shot up as Fifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Teddy Hardy defends.

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WBond

From page A1

The upgrades include earthquake retrofits, fire, sprinkler, security and intercom systems, new windows, plumbing and HVAC systems. They include updating classrooms for computers and labs, getting rid of portables, replacing worn carpets and making schools accessible. Most schools in the district need items on that list. Six â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Geiger, Jefferson, Mann and Stafford elementaries and First Creek and Baker middle schools â&#x20AC;&#x201C; are in such good shape, they need no upgrades Fourteen are so worn out that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve become money pits. Their average age is 74, and the older they get, the more expensive they are to repair and maintain. One of them, the Science and Math Institute (SAMI), is nothing but a bunch of portables on the edge of Point Defiance Park. It would get a permanent building for $10 million Three, Washington and McCarver elementaries and Stewart Middle School, are registered historic buildings. Like Jason Lee Middle School and Stadium and Lincoln high schools, they would be renovated inside to retain their character. Two schools, Hunt Middle School and Wainwright Elementary, are closed now, but the bond measure would put money in place to rebuild them when the student population warrants. Wilson High School would get $40 million in renovations and new construction.

WHouse From page A1

Those are the stats at the start of the Read2Me Tutor Handbook, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the reason Tacomans have been so tenacious about keeping their reading tutorial program alive. Tacomans know the cost, in crime and unpro-

The rest â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Arlington, Browns Point, Lyon, Birney, Grant, Boze and Downing elementary schools â&#x20AC;&#x201C; would be torn down and rebuilt. How that would happen is one of the most encouraging things about this plan. School District leaders realize a great new building does not make a great school. But it does make it easier for parents, community members, partner programs, teachers and staff to work together to make a school great. Already, they are tailoring schools to what the students, and their community, want and need. Lincoln Center offers an extended school day and extra academic support for collegebound students. SAMI and School of The Arts are geared to students passionate about science and the arts, respectively. First Creek Middle School is a hub for non-profits working for students and adults who use the classrooms and computers after hours. The district counts groups as diverse as Metro Parks, Tacoma Community House, Castings, soccer clubs, and Northwest Leadership Foundation among its new partners in schools. This, said the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deputy superintendent Joshua Garcia, is the future, and it will guide the development of the schools the bond would build. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be designed to be the hubs of the neighborhoods,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our facilities are owned by the community.â&#x20AC;? In each case, he said, the questions will

ductive lives, of letting kids fail. Pragmatic to the core, Tacomans know that if they invest 45 minutes a week in helping a kid learn to read, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re building students who can succeed and contribute. To do that, they founded SMART in 1988 and went into elementary schools. SMART became Werlin Reading, which merged

with Pierce County Reading Foundation and rebranded itself as Read2Me. In 2007, the optimists running the program tried to double it in size, a natural effort, given the value of its successes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was not sustainable,â&#x20AC;? Community House Executive Director Liz Dunbar said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They grew too fast, and then they shut down.â&#x20AC;?

be, â&#x20AC;&#x153;How do we design the buildings more creatively and open to the community. Who needs access? How do we design to meet their needs?â&#x20AC;? How refreshing. Kids, neighbors and taxpayers deserve schools that can take more use than their builders imagined in 1924, 1957, even 1969. In those days, schools were only that, places to go to class, play sports, have a few concerts, plays, bake sales and PTA meetings during the school year, then shut down for vacations. We expect more of them now, as we should of any building into which we invest $10 million to $58 million. We expect a building that can take yearround use, one that can share its computer labs, kitchen, gym, playfields and gardens with other programs. We have the opportunity to replace buildings that are worn out, outdated and unsafe with schools that meet our new expectations. Yes, the $500 million 30-year bond measure at stake in the Feb. 12 election is a serious commitment. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a pretty good deal. Interest rates are as low as theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever been. Construction costs are low, too, because of the recession. Because of the recession, too, Tacoma can use the jobs the work would create. Tacomans can put it all off, and continue to pour tax dollars into buildings that will never get any better. Or they can see the value of investing $58.24 a year - $4.85 a month â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and approve Proposition 1. Stalwarts rounded up money to keep the volunteering going, looked for a new agency home. Tutors Peter Darling and Julia Garnett approached Tacoma Community House. Dunbar saw the match. For over a century people new to this country have come to Community House to learn the language and skills to become productive citizens. In 2011, Community House adopted Read2Me, which was operating at McCarver and Roosevelt elementary schools. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have over 115 students, and we are exactly at 100 tutors,â&#x20AC;? said Mark Rud, Americorps Read2Me program specialist.

Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be in good company. Proposition 1 has endorsements from the League of Women Voters, Metro Parks Tacoma, Boys & Girls Clubs, Safe Streets, Tacoma Pierce County Association of Realtors, Tacoma Education Association, Tacoma Professional Firefighters, IAFF Local #34 and the Tacoma Pierce County Black Collective. Want to learn more? Want to ask tough questions? Representatives from Tacoma Citizens for Schools and many of the endorsing groups will be at the campaign kick-off Saturday, Jan. 5, with presentations from 10:30 a.m. to noon at Metro Parksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; STAR Center, 3873 S. 66th St. One final thing. Many of you know I live outside the Tacoma School District boundaries. You should ask how I can be a credible backer if I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help foot the bill. The answer is, I will. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve pledged to make an annual payment, based on our homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s value, when Proposition 1 passes. The students whose school life will improve because of it this commitment will affect us all. I figure $58.24, plus or minus, is a good investment.

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The program is stable now, and ready to reach kids at Mann and Manitou Park elementary schools. That is why you are reading this story: Read2Me needs 70 new tutors, and is holding an orientation from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Jan. 12 at Community House, 1314 South L St. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are looking for someone who likes to work with children, wants to help the community and thinks the best way to do that is through education,â&#x20AC;? Rud said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 45 minutes, once a week. All the materials are provided by the schools and the Read2Me coordinator. There is always someone there to monitor.â&#x20AC;?

When Rud was new to the program, he worried that, because teachers pick the students who need the most help, there might be some stigma attached to being called out of class for the sessions. Not so. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They see it as a privilege,â&#x20AC;? Dunbar said. One easy test proves that. When a child is absent and the tutor is there, teachers ask if anyone would like to go to the session. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All the hands go up,â&#x20AC;? Rud said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They see this as something students want to be a part of.â&#x20AC;? They hope more adults would like to be part of it, too.

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City Life

Love Tacoma Lane

B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 2013

From GaGA to ’Garden

SECTION B, PAGE 1

There is plenty to look forward to in 2013 PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

BURN BABY BURN. Lady GaGa’s Jan. 14 show at the Tacoma Dome kicks off a full year of entertainment for Tacoma audiences.

1. The opening of Keys on Main (early 2013)

By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

L

ast year, Tacoma music fans witnessed the closures of some of popular nightclubs, Hell’s Kitchen, Mandolin Cafe and Tempest Lounge, the return of hometown rock heroes the Sonics, and they got punk’d by that Justin Bieber jerk. So what big musical happenings will everyone be talking about in 2013? The year is only four days old, and many of the biggest concerts won’t be announced for another couple months. But already it promises to be another eventful year in music, and here are 10 happenings you should mark on your calendar. Which is probably actually a smart phone app.

The owners of Tacoma’s premiere piano bar, Chopstix, may have shuttered their 6th Avenue operation last year, but locals will soon have a new place to sing along to Journey, Van Morrison and ivory-powered renditions of “Baby Got Back.” Chopstix’s former owner George Hasenohrl is putting the finishing touches on Keys on Main at 1003 Pacific Ave. It will be the third location for the Utah-based piano bar chain, after the one located at 11 Roy St., in Seattle and the original in Salt Lake City, which is actually located on Main Street. That explains why the new joint isn’t called Keys on Pacific. Which, really, it should be. Learn more at www.keysonmain.com.

2. Lady GaGa (Jan. 14)

GaGa – born Stefani Germanotta – will continue her reign as the planet’s biggest pop star as the latest leg of her Born This Way Ball tour launches in Vancouver, B.C. and makes its way to the Tacoma Dome, 2727 E. ‘D’ St., on Jan. 14. How will she top the eye-popping spectacle of previous tour stops, which have included pianos topped with fiery cyclones, Cousin It-style hair suits and a 30-foottall, tentacled piranha monster that took up most of the T-Dome stage in 2010. And that’s not to mention all the provocative getups GaGa’s fans, her Little Monsters, will show up in. Added bonus: The chance to hear new material from Ms. G’s forthcoming album, “ARTPOP,” which is due

u See 2013/ page B3

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE CLASSICAL TUESDAYS Classical Tuesdays in Old Town presents new music for the New Year. On Jan. 8, saxophonist Erik Steighner will perform a fun and unusual program in Slavonian Hall (2306 N. 30th St.) featuring a variety of instrumentation, STEIGHNER soundscapes and pre-recorded electronics with Steighner on alto, baritone and soprano saxes and trumpeter Zachary Lyman joining him. Hear premieres of pieces by Tacoma composers Deborah Anderson and Greg Youtz. This free/voluntary donation event begins at 7 p.m.

TWO ‘THE CHILDREN’S HOUR’ One of the great successes of distinguished writer Lillian Hellman, “The Children’s

Hour” is a serious and adult play about two women who run a school for girls. After a malicious youngster starts a rumor about the two women, the rumor soon turns to scandal. As the young girl comes to understand the power she wields, she sticks by her story, which precipitates tragedy for the women. It is later discovered that the gossip was pure invention, but it is too late. Irreparable damage has been done. Parental discretion is strongly suggested. Opens Jan. 11 at Lakewood Playhouse. Get tickets at www.lakewoodplayhouse.org.

THREE BROADWAY SONG & DANCE Award-winning Broadway producer, lyricist and composer Neil Berg’s widely acclaimed “100 Years of Broadway Song and Dance” returns to the Pantages Theater. Berg will be joined by his multi-talented

cast of veteran Broadway singers, dancers and musicians to celebrate Broadway’s best-loved song-and-dance numbers. This new show highlights some of Broadway’s most memorable choreography and recreates the greatest moments from the finest shows of the past 100 years and features the actual stars of shows such as “The Phantom of the Opera,” “Les Miserables,” “Cats” and “Chicago.” Plays Jan. 11 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets on sale now at www. broadwaycenter.org. Bring a non-perishable food item for the Emergency Food Network food drive.

FOUR PITTSBURGH CYCLE Broadway Center and Northwest Playwrights Alliance, in partnership with Wa s h i n g t o n State Historical Society, present August Wilson’s WILSON “Pittsburgh Cycle – King Hedley II” on Jan. 13, 3 p.m., at Studio III at 9th and

Broadway. This will be a staged reading of the award winning drama set in 1980s Pittsburgh. It tells the story of an ex-con trying to rebuild his life. This play is one of Wilson’s darkest, telling the tale of a man trying to save $10,000 by selling stolen refrigerators so that he can buy a video store. The story revisits characters initially presented in Seven Guitars. Get tickets at www.broadwaycenter.org.

FIVE PARENTING WORKSHOP A series of parent education classes is being offered at Tacoma Nature Center to give parents a variety of views and techniques in support of guiding young children in their early learning of self-control, responsibility, communication, cooperation and following directions. Information and resources, large and small group interactions and group discussions are all included. One or both parents are welcome, as are child-care givers and grandparents, but children should be left at home. Come for one or all of the workshops, beginning Jan. 9, 6-8 p.m. Pre-registration required at www.metroparkstacoma.org.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 2 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, January 4, 2013

Missionary Position frontman gears up for busy 2013 By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already shaping up to be a hectic 2013 for Tacoma native Jeff Angell, who finds himself in the enviable position of fronting not one but two popular Seattle bands. One, the Missionary Position, will play songs from its sophomore album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Consequences,â&#x20AC;? on Jan. 5, at Jazzbones, 2803 6th Ave. And recently, Angell and his Missionary band mate, keyboard player Benjamin Anderson, found themselves unexpectedly in a new, budding super-group called Walking Papers, which also includes Barrett Martin of Screaming Trees and Mad Season fame and Duff McKagan of Guns Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roses and Velvet Revolver, with contributions from Pearl Jam guitarist Mike McCready. That band released its self-titled debut album in October to critical acclaim at home and abroad. And Angell recently gave the Weekly a call to discuss what may be his most prolific musical year to date. TW: So how did Walking Papers come together? Angell: Missionary Position opened some shows for some band that Barrett had. So we kind of made friends with him, and he actually played some upright (bass) and some percussion on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Consequences.â&#x20AC;? Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty serious about jamminâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. I thought we were just playinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; for fun, and he was kind of recordinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; it and goinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hey weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re makinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; a record.â&#x20AC;? So within six or eight practices he was like, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have some studio time for this other thing Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m doinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. So if you want to come down, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll just record some of the songs.â&#x20AC;? And there was enough there to get a record goinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;.

TW: So this year youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been mostly in Walking Papers mode, and now youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re about to transition back into Missionary Position mode. Angell: Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re kind of hoping that when the Walking Papers stuff slows down, after the next round of tours, then weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll maybe release another Missionary Position record. With new connections and a new network, hopefully weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get that thing over to Europe. TW: So you have the songs ready and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just kind of tying it to... Angell: Yeah, still finishing touches. Sometimes youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotta let â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;em marinate for a while and then come back to them and see how you feel about â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;em. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to maintain being objective when you get too close to it. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of nice to have a different project to work on. You put the one down for a minute, and then you go do the other thing. When you come back to it you have a new, clearer perspective. TW: Tell me what direction youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going in for the third record. Angell: Well, for one thing, we recorded it totally in live chunks. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d redo the vocals, but (we used) no Pro Tools or edits or anything like that. So it went totally organic. We intentionally left a lot of warts and crooked teeth and hair on it. The last record, we went kind of the opposite and tried to make it really meticulously tight and produced. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one thing. But also ... Ben has done a lot of ambient music before. So we kind of pulled that into it a little bit and mixed it with what we do. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still some Nick Cavey, Tom Waitsy kind of stuff in there. But now there are some ambient, droney qualities that I think are really cool.

PHOTO BY LORD FOTOG

IN POSITION. The Missionary Position has included (L-R) Gregor Lothian (no longer in the band),

Benjamin Anderson, Michael Alex and Jeff Angell. The band plans to release a new album, the follow up to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Consequences,â&#x20AC;? in 2013.

TW: When and where did you record this one? Angell: All the other records we recorded at our own studio here in Seattle. This time we built a studio over in Spokane for a friend, so he was kind enough to let us use it. Our friend Dan Spalding, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s played some upright bass and some saxophone and stuff with us at different shows, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s his studio. ... So this time we totally removed ourselves from Seattle and Tacoma and turned our phones off and just completely focused on it, which made it come together really quick. TW: And you said youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re already working on the next Walking Papers. Angell: Yeah, we recorded five new songs for that already. We recorded one at Joshua Tree, down there where the Queens of the Stone Age do their

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Desert Sessions.â&#x20AC;? A couple of guys who play with Queens of the Stone Age and Eagles of Death Metal have their own studio there. We recorded some there, and we recorded some at Avast up here. TW: Did you work with (Queens leader) Josh Homme and those guys? Angell: Oh no, it was Dave Catching. It was his studio, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where they recorded that stuff down there. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m kind of friends with those guys, and Barrett played all over the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rated Râ&#x20AC;? record. Josh wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even there, but Dave Catching and Brian (Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor) from the Eagles of Death Metal were hanginâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; around, and we did some jams and stuff. But weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not writing any songs with anybody else, really. TW: Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got their record thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s under wraps. Angell: Yeah, I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

wait to hear that â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dave Grohl on drums again. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10 years after â&#x20AC;&#x153;Songs for the Deaf,â&#x20AC;? and here it comes again â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the same kind of lineup. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sure youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re gonna get Lanegan up in there, though. Who knows? Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a mysterious stranger. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s his thing. (Chuckles) TW: Is he still up in Seattle? Angell: I think he lives in L.A. I actually donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know him. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on my â&#x20AC;&#x153;not to meet list.â&#x20AC;? I have certain people that I like their music so much I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want it to be skewed by knowing them personally. In my world, Mark Laneganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hanginâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; out under streetlights in the rain somewhere. He doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t actually eat breakfast ... or watch TV or nothinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, you know. He wanders in the night under artificial light with the traffic buzzinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; by. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not

a real person. He doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even sleep. (Laughs) My Tom Waits still gets drunk and sleeps in the gutter and hangs out with hobos all day. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not on an exercise bike at the Hilton reading the Wall Street Journal. And my Nick Cave, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clawinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; at the lid of a coffin somewhere. They only let him out to make a record and do a tour, you know. TW: So what should people expect from your set at Jazzbones? Angell: There might be some surprises in there. I really like our band live. Playing with the Walking Papers kind of has this slower, heavier groove. And then thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something frenetic about the Missionary Position. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sultry, but at the same time itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s high strung. So thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be trying to bring to the peeps.

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We can enhance the aesthetic value of your property by trimming or pruning trees, bushes, fruit trees, etc. Limbs or foliage over houses, other structures, or wires can be removed or cut back to protect your roof, utility lines, or to allow more light in the yard.

Topping can be a viable option when windsail reduction is not desired or a view is in jeopardy. The fact remains that topped trees do not blow over (at least until large new tops grow upâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;generally 1520 years), unless there is a systemic problem (root rot, disease, etc). Topping, however, will promote rot at the top of the tree over a period of time, can reduce the life span of a tree, cause the limbs to grow oversized, and upper limbs may grow upward to form new tops which will not be well attached. This process takes a long time and the trees will be safe for at least 15-20 years. They can be trimmed back or re-topped when they become a problem. We are not rabid â&#x20AC;&#x153;anti-toppersâ&#x20AC;? as some areâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but we will give you honest advice if we feel another option may be better.

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P 2013 From page B1 from Interscope in the spring. Madeon and Lady Starlight will open with a start time of 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $51.50 to $177, plus service charges; (253) 272-3663 or www. tacomadome.org for further details.

3. Did we mention the Sonics? (Feb. 2)

Friday, January 4, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

made him the first black actor to co-star in a dramatic TV series – to his popular standup albums and his groundbreaking ‘80s sitcom, “The Cosby Show,” few have made their mark on popular culture like The Coz. Most recently, the 75-year-old actor, author and comedian penned a new collection of humorous observations, “I Didn’t Ask to Be Born (But I’m Glad I Was).” And on Feb. 10, he’ll get back to his standup roots with a performance that’s part of the University of Puget Sound’s 125th anniversary celebration. The fun starts at 7:30 p.m. at UPS Memorial Fieldhouse, North 11th and Union Streets, in Tacoma. Tickets are $25 to $32.88 and are available through Ticketmaster, www.ticketmaster.com. Call (253) 879-3236.

6. Roberta Flack (Feb. 15)

9. Fleetwood Mac (May 20)

PHOTO COURTESY OF ARTIST

Fleetwood Mac rocks the Tacoma Dome May 20.

The bad news first: Christine McVie won’t be with the recent Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductees when they return to the Tacoma Dome for the first time since 2009. But original members Mick Fleetwood and John McVie will, along with Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks from the “Rumours” era lineup. That classic album – which included hits “Dreams,” “Don’t Stop” and “Go Your Own Way” - will get special treatment in honor of its 35th anniversary. The show starts at 8 p.m., and tickets range from $49.50 to $149.50.

10. Taylor Swift (Aug. 31)

PHOTO COURTESY OF ARTIST

The Sonics play the Showbox Feb. 2.

These guys packed South Tacoma Way’s Red Carpet Inn with rowdy teens dancing to “Cinderella,” “The Witch” and other regional hits in the mid-1960s. Then Tacoma’s garage-rock gods largely disappeared for four decades, adding a sheen of mystery to the sound that inspired generations of rockers that emulated them. The Sonics roared back into action at New York’s Cavestomp Festival in 2007, with singer and keyboard player Jerry Roslie, guitarist Larry Parypa and sax player Rob Lind remaining from the classic lineup. They’ve played just three Northwest dates since then, including their first Tacoma performance since the Johnson Administration at the Pantages Theater in July. But thankfully, they’re not making us wait another two years for their next regional gig, which will take place on Feb. 2 at Showbox at the Market, 1426 First Ave., in Seattle. Seminal grunge band Mudhoney will add support. Doors will open at 7 p.m. that night, and tickets are $25 in advance, $30 the day of the show; 1 (888) 929-7849 or www.showboxonline.com.

4. Soundgarden (Feb. 7 and 8)

PHOTO COURTESY OF BROADWAY CENTER

Roberta Flack appears at the Pantages Feb. 15.

Lori Lieberman sang it first. Al B. Sure and the Fugees translated it for later generations. But Roberta Flack’s 1973 version of “Killing Me Softly with His Song” remains one of the most potent and enduring soul ballads of all time. That’s not to mention “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face,” “Feel Like Making Love” and other R&B classics the Grammy Award-winning diva is sure to pack into her set at Tacoma’s Pantages Theater, 901 Broadway. The show starts at 7:30 p.m., and tickets are $49 to $109; (253) 591-5890 or www.broadwaycenter.org.

7. Big Beer Festival (Feb. 16)

PHOTO BY MICHAEL LAVINE

Soundgarden performs at the Paramount Feb. 7 and 8.

Speaking of bands that tend to go AWOL for long stretches, grunge titans Soundgarden hope to sustain the momentum from last summer’s comeback tour, which found singer-guitarist Chris Cornell, drummer Matt Cameron, guitarist Kim Thayil and bassist Ben Shepherd picking up right where they left off in 1997. Following the November release of new album “Kingdom Animal,” they have they have 13 compelling, new tracks to sprinkle into their set lists on Feb. 7 and 8 at the Paramount Theatre, 911 Pine St., in Seattle. But fans are sure to scream loudest for “Outshined,” “Pretty Noose” and other grunge classics that made them fall in love in the first place. The Paramount shows start at 8 p.m., and tickets are $66.75; 1 (877) 784-4849 or www.stgpresents.org for details.

Locals have gotten their malty swerve on at Tacoma Craft Beer Festival these last four years, and now organizers have added a winter counterpart to their popular event. The Big Beer Festival will take place in two installments, beginning at noon and 4:30 p.m. on Feb. 16 at Petrich Marine Dock, 1118 E. ‘D’ St., Tacoma. And if your euphemism detector just went off, that’s because “big beer” refers to brews that are a minimum of 6 percent alcohol by volume. Organizers expect to have 60 such beers provided by 20 regional vendors, the likes of Tacoma’s Harmon Brewing Co. and Engine House No. 9; Bremerton’s Silver City Brewery; Graham’s M.T. Head Brewing Company; Seattle’s Full Sail Brewing Company and Deschutes Brewery from Portland. Advance tickets are $20 and include a 5.5 oz., commemorative taster glass and six tasting tokens. Additional pours will cost $1.50 each. Admission will go up to $25 the day of the event. Proceeds will benefit YWCA. Find the latest updates on the Tacoma Craft Beer Fest website, www.tacomacraftbeerfest.com.

By Ernest A. Jasmin

PHOTO COURTESY OF BROADWAY CENTER

Hey, hey, hey! It’s America’s Dad, Biiiiiillll Coooosby! From his starring role on “I Spy” in the ‘60s – which

KLAY-AM picks up left-leaning talk shows

ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

Weird Al Yankovic plays the Pantages April 28.

PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND

It would sound silly to say this when she debuted with “Tim McGraw” back in 2006. But Taylor Swift is a juggernaut. The country hit maker’s latest album, “Red,” sold 1 million copies its first week and has topped the Billboard 200 chart since its release in October. We’ll go out on a limb and say her new tour – which will drop in on the Tacoma Dome this summer- will do bigger numbers than her previous 2011 trek, which raked in $97 million. Nice work if you can get it, so long as you keep your head on a swivel looking out for Kanye West. Ed Sheeran will open in Tacoma at 7 p.m. Tickets are $40.17 to $101.15 and are available through Ticketmaster.

8. Weird Al Yankovic: The Apocalypse Tour (April 28)

5. Bill Cosby (Feb. 10)

Bill Cosby will appear at UPS Feb. 10.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ARTIST

Taylor Swift performs at the Tacoma Dome Aug. 31.

Wait, wait! Hear us out. If your tastes in music skews more toward stuff that won’t get you beaten up for your lunch money, you may not realize how much of a draw our man Al still is, even after 3 ½ decades in the pop parody/food pun biz. He packed the Puyallup Fair & Event Center’s 11,000-capacity grandstand the last time he was in the area, and fans still get geeked (literally) for hits like “Eat It,” “My Bologna” and “White & Nerdy.” He’ll headline the Pantages Theater at 7:30 p.m. on April 28. Tickets range from $36 to $68; www.broadwaycenter.org.

Lakewood’s KLAYAM (1180) has picked up two popular syndicated hosts from Seattle’s KFNQ-AM (1090), which will switch formats from political talk to sports on Jan. 2. Beginning Jan. 7, the Stephanie Miller Show will air on KLAY from 35 p.m. weekdays, and the Thom Hartmann Program will air from 5-7 p.m., station hosts Frank Blair and Traci Kelly announced on their Friday afternoon political talk show, Equal Time Radio. “I believe this is something that is going to put us in a positive direction, that will help us pick up listernship,” Kelly said. Kelly contrasted Miller’s quirky emphasis of pop culture with Hartmann’s wonky, cerebral style. “While they’re both progressive hosts, they can bring in different types of listenership,” she said. “We’re going to have people drawn to the humor, people that are drawn to the politics and

people that are drawn to learning things.” The losers in this equation are conservative talkers Jerry Doyle, whose program will be booted from KLAY’s schedule, and the Dennis Miller Show, which will be trimmed to two hours and air from 1-3 p.m. weekdays. Station owner Ron Huntington said he expected the balance of left- and right-leaning talkers to better serve South Sound listeners better than other stations that cater to only one end of the political spectrum. “We think that will create some healthy conversations in our area,” Huntington said. “This came at us kind of out of the blue, and we’re delighted to have a nice smorgasbord of options to pick from.” Huntington did not rule out picking up more programming from KFNQ, a station owned by conglomerate CBS Radio. But he said he was is leaving those decisions up to station manager Bob McClusky and program director Bruce Bond.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, January 4, 2013

Love Tacoma Lane takes art to the streets By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Art lovers and downtown boosters faced a problem that only simple brilliance could solve. They faced a chain link construction fence along 6th Avenue and St. Helens Avenue. They hated looking at it. So they set out to spruce it up. Love Tacoma Lane was born. Notes of inspiration, love and hope or just shout-outs to the City of Destiny flowered on the fence and a community effort took root. Tacoma Urban Landscaping, local businesses, artsy Tacomans and just passersby have added their notes since the celebration wall took shape this fall. The concept is simple. Visitors just take an â&#x20AC;&#x153;I LOVE _____â&#x20AC;? tag from the fence, fill it out, hang it, snap a picture of it and post it on their social media page to share the love. The project is a first interactive art installation case study by Tacoma Urban Landscaping and is supported by the School of The Arts students and University Of Washington-Tacoma Interdisciplinary Arts graduate school students. The art installation has been evolving, with interactive participantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; involvements starting with Seong Shin, a principal at McGranahan Architects, announcing the

project idea on her Facebook page and asking her friends to join. Babe and Brian Lehrer as well as Paul Sparks joined via Facebook and worked as the core organizers. Teresa Placentia, Ian Wheelock, Holly Knoll, Claire Mendenhall, Patricia Lecy-Davis and Tammy Scarlett joined along the way. Holiday lights went up. ARC Printing donated the tags. Volunteers gathered at Morgan Alexanderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AMOCAT Cafe to prepare the tags in late November. Businesses joined the effort, including Ledger Square Retailers, Ruby Chambers, The Mix, Market on Market, Embellish Salon, Smooth and Juicey, The Tacoma Brewing Co. and Alfa of Tacoma. Tags now flutter in the wind like fall leaves. Hundreds of them. More are added several times a day as people walk by, read notes and add to the project. The seeds of this work are about to sprout in other spots around Tacoma as well. A couple of people have shown interest in developing similar community art works in their neighborhoods in the coming year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really want it to have every neighborhood doing their own thing,â&#x20AC;? Shin said. While Love Tacoma Lane is on its way out in the coming weeks, a new one is set to take shape near Embellish Salon just in time for Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day.

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

LOVE LETTERS. Visitors to Love Tacoma Lane have the opportunity to express what they love about out fair city.

Raymond Hayden shares the healing power of music on new EP â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Brokenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Fans, friends invited to listening party Jan. 16 at Smoky Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

By Matt Nagle

As founder and co-owner of Maurice the Fish Records in Tacoma, Raymond Hayden spends the large majority of his time and energy helping other musicians and singer/songwriters achieve their dreams. Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Haydenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s turn for the spotlight, as he has released a new, and excellent, EP called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Broken.â&#x20AC;? Featuring six tracks, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brokenâ&#x20AC;? is Haydenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third release (his others are solo CDs â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Doorway Through Your Tearsâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;September Skyâ&#x20AC;?). All the songs are Haydenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original compositions except one â&#x20AC;&#x201C; his cover of Pink Floydâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Breathe.â&#x20AC;? Produced by Chris Tussing, who also plays drums and percussion on the EP, the players include some of the Northwestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest musicians: Hayden on piano and vocals, Leah Tussing on backing vocals, Jim Tussing on bass and keys, Scott Malone on guitars, Paul Sawtelle on saxophone and Emily Ann Peterson on cello. Hayden said each musician contributed much to each song on the EP to create the whole, making for a real group effort. Maybe this is some of why â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brokenâ&#x20AC;? sounds like it was a charmed project from the start, with

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Beneath the surface, though, the stress from the situation continued to gnaw at him in ways he could shirk no longer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My life was a bunch of puzzle pieces all over the place,â&#x20AC;? as he described it. Then, he fell in love with someone he clicked with deeply, and a spark of change was ignited inside of him â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the new relationship brought out some of the things that hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t healed inside of him yet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When someone loves us enough to care, they fix us,â&#x20AC;? Hayden said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is how the song â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Brokenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; came about.â&#x20AC;? Hayden plays piano beautifully on this song, and his voice is strong and clear as he sings, â&#x20AC;&#x153;It never occurred to me that my problems resided withinâ&#x20AC;ŚI was broken until I found you.â&#x20AC;? Petersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cello brings in a special layer of emotion to the music, and Malone striking extended chords on guitar adds body and richness to the sound. Not all of the songs on the album are about being broken, but they relate to it. Opening with the popping, crackling sounds of a needle on a vinyl record, the EP is meant to be heard u See HAYDEN/ page B5

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Hayden providing the inspiration for all the musicians to shine. Like so many of the artists involved with Maurice the Fish, Hayden bares his heart and soul through music. In both his writing and singing on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Broken,â&#x20AC;? he lets listeners in to know of his personal struggles in the hopes that universal truths will be revealed and thus help those who hear his music to know they are not alone in dealing with lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s downs. This is all part of a healing process for Hayden and, by extension, those whom he hopes will hear what he has to say about his journey from being spiritually and emotionally broken to attaining healing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a message in this album I want to share with people because we all go through trials and tribulations,â&#x20AC;? Hayden said, starting with the EPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s title. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The reason I went with â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Brokenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is because this album is basically about realizing that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s okay to be broken. Fixing it is the important stuff.â&#x20AC;? About five years ago Hayden was experiencing a crisis in his life that left him feeling broken. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was a lot of pain, but after two or three years I thought I had gotten over it all,â&#x20AC;? he said.

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

Friday, January 4, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Live Music

TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

LANCE BULLER TRIO WILL PLAY JAZZ FAVORITES DURING THEIR WEEKLY GIG AT MAXWELL’S. THE SHOW BEGINS AT 7 P.M.

FRIDAY, JAN. 4

MONDAY, JAN. 7 EMERALD QUEEN: Notorious 253 (Top 40) 9 p.m, NC

PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD

PIANO MAN. Raymond Hayden’s new EP, “Broken,” is ready to go.

P Hayden from start to finish. The order of the songs shows this to be true. The EP opens with Hayden seeming to remind himself (and listeners) to not get overwhelmed with anger and grief, but rather to “Breathe.” Accompanied by only an acoustic guitar, Hayden’s version of this classic gives pause to hear the words anew, and makes for an interesting beginning to the inner journey of healing the artist tells of through the rest of his songs. By the HYDE PARK ON THE HUDSON (94 MIN, R) Fri 1/4-Sun 1/6: 11:45am, 2:05, 4:15, 6:50, 9:00 Mon 1/7: 2:05, 4:15, 6:50, 9:00 Tue 1/8: 4:15, 6:50, 9:00 Wed 1/9-Thu 1/10: 2:05, 4:15, 6:50, 9:00

SILVER LINING PLAYBOOK (122 MIN, R) Fri 1/4-Sun 1/6: 12:45, 3:20, 6:15, 8:50 Mon 1/7-Thu 1/10: 3:20, 6:15, 8:50

HITCHCOCK (98 MIN, PG-13) Fri 1/4-Sun 1/6: 11:35am, 4:30, 9:15 Mon 1/7-Thu 1/10: 4:30, 9:15

ANNA KARENINA (130 MIN, R) Fri 1/4-Mon 1/7: 1:45, 6:40 Tue 1/8: 1:45 Wed 1/9-Thu 1/10: 1:45, 6:40

LINCOLN (150 MIN, PG-13) Fri 1/4-Sun 1/6: 11:30am, 2:45, 6:00, 9:05 Mon 1/7-Thu 1/10: 2:45, 6:00, 9:05

TEDDY BEAR (92 MIN, NR) Tue 1/8: 2:05, 7:05

606 Fawcett, Tacoma, WA

253.593.4474 • grandcinema.com

From page B4

EP’s end, “I Feel Tonight,” Hayden comes full circle to sing of his passion for the source of his joy and sense of place in the world – music. Interestingly, this is the most rockin’ and upbeat songs in the collection, which has the power to leave listeners with a sense of hope for the future and perhaps the strength to find their own life’s purpose in the things or people they love the most. To celebrate the release of “Broken,” Hayden is throwing a free listening party for his friends, fans and anyone who wants to attend. It will be held on Jan. 16 at Smoky Joe’s Cigar Lounge (inside BJ’s Bingo in Fife) at 4411 Pacific Hwy. E. in Fife, 6-9 p.m. Hayden and the band will hold a questionand-answer session, and copies of “Broken” and other merchandise will be for sale. Everyone who attends the listening party will receive a free single that Hayden recorded just for this event. “I’m not going to say which song it is,” Hayden said, “but it’s one the people always ask to hear, so I’m going to redo it with Leah (Tussing) duet style.” Then on Feb. 22, Hayden joins headliners Champagne Sunday at the Hard Rock Café in Seattle

for a very special performance with guitar master and fan favorite Rafael Tranquilino. Purchase “Broken” on iTunes and CDBaby.com.

“…have you ever been BROKEN? …then out of nowhere, someone comes along and fixes you? …and when you look back, you never realized you were BROKEN. …this EP is inspired by that journey… …and it continues…” – Raymond Hayden

BACKSTAGE: Stravinsky Riots, Tyranny Theory, Sin Circus, 9 p.m. C.I. SHENANIGAN’S: Collaborative Works Jazz (Jazz) 8 p.m. GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Chapter 5 (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: James King & the Southsiders (Blues) 8 p.m., $5 MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (Jazz) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Rusty Cleavers, 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Gunsmoke & the Wild Bunch, the Whywoves, Petting Zoo, 8 p.m. UNCLE THURM’S: Gary Cook (Jazz guitarist) 5:30 p.m. VARSITY GRILL: Rock-Bot live band karaoke, 8 p.m., NC

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (Blues) 9 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Rockaroke, 8 p.m. STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino (Blues jam) SWISS: TBA (Blues) 9 p.m.

TUESDAY, JAN. 8 ANTIQUE SANDWICH SHOP: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3

SATURDAY, JAN. 5 GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Chapter 5 (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Tim Hall Band (Blues jam) 8 p.m. DAWSONS: Jho Blenis, Shelly Ely (Blues jam) 8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 9 SWISS: Kareem Kandi Band (Jazz) 7 p.m., $5, AA

C.I. SHENANIGAN’S: Collaborative Works Jazz (Jazz) 8 p.m. EMERALD QUEEN: Notorious 253 (Top 40) 9 p.m, NC JAZZBONES: Missionary Position, Deborah Page (Rock) 8:30 p.m., $7 NEW FRONTIER: Santee, 8 p.m. SPAR: Vibe Project, guest (Reggae) 8 p.m. SWISS: Kry (Rock covers) 9 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Negative Inside, 8 p.m. VARSITY GRILL: Rock-Bot live band karaoke, 8 p.m., NC WESTGATE: True Holland (Rock) 9 p.m., $5

SUNDAY, JAN. 6 STONEGATE: Rich Wetzel’s Groovin’ Higher Orchestra (Jazz) 5 p.m.

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Bill Pease (Blues jam) 8 p.m. DAWSONS: Crazy Texas Gypsies (Jam session) 8 p.m. GIBSON’S (STADIUM DISTRICT): Ephraim Richardson (Open mic) 7 p.m. STONEGATE: N.M.W.P. (Rock jam) 8:30 p.m., NC

THURSDAY, JAN. 10 STONEGATE: Billy Stoops, 8 p.m.

ANTHEM: Taxi Driver (Jazz) 7 p.m. BACKSTAGE: Nolan Garrett, December In Red, Insuburban Avenue, 7 p.m. DAWSONS: Tim Hall Band (Blues jam) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: (Bluegrass jam) 3 p.m. SPAR: Ravin Wolf (Blues) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Bill Pease (Blues jam), 8 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Shandee Jam Band, 7 p.m.

DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (Jam session) 8 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (Blues) 7 p.m.

Tacoma Weekly’s Music Calendar is always available online at www.TacomaWeekly.com GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Do you have a live show or music event coming up? Email makeascene@tacomaweekly.com for a free listing in the Live Music calendar!

VISIT US ON FACEBOOK facebook.com/tacomaweekly


Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, January 4, 2013

TUES., JAN. 8 CLASSICAL TUESDAYS MUSIC – New Music for the New Year: saxophonist Erik Steighner performs a fun and unusual program in Slavonian Hall. The evening will feature a variety of instrumentation and soundscapes with Erik on alto, baritone and soprano saxes and trumpeter Zachary Lyman joining him. Two compositions will incorporate pre-recorded electronics. Classical Tuesdays is also celebrating Tacoma composers, and the audience will hear premieres of pieces by Tacoma composers Deborah Anderson and Greg Youtz. This free/voluntary donation event begins at 7pm. Slavonian Hall is located at 2306 N. 30th St., Old Town Tacoma. Info: http://classicaltuesdays.blogspot.com or call (253)752-2135.

COMING EVENTS

TUES., JAN. 15 WRITING YOUR LIFE STORIES ETC – Tacoma author Evonne Agnello will present a one-hour workshop, “Writing Your Family Stories,” at Franke Tobey Jones’ Senior University. She will speak from her experiences based on her recently published memoir, “Shaking Shame from Mental Illness.” Her book has a message of hope for anyone who has suffered from depression or trauma. This free event begins at 3 p.m. Frank Tobey Jones is located at 5340 N. Bristol St.

THURS., JAN. 17 AUTHOR BOOK SIGNING ETC – Author Evonne Agnello will read from and discuss her new book “Shaking Shame from Mental Illness” at the University Place Library. It is a memoir with a message of hope for anyone who has suffered from depression or trauma or known someone who has. Agnello retired from 30 years as a newspaper journalist to write this book. The library is located at 3609 Market Place W.

SAT., JAN. 19 FILM FOCUS: HITCHCOCK FILM – Broadway Center’s latest Film Focus installment features Alfred Hitchcock classic “The Birds” starring Rod Taylor and Tipi Hedren. The residents of Bodega Bay are confronted with a malicious, full-scale attack by birds of all shapes and sizes. This film is the pure expression of an arbitrary universe that may strike out; it is an idea that haunts us. The screening takes place at Theatre on the Square. Tickets: $14; includes free popcorn.

class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

TW PICK: FRANCISCAN POLAR PLAZA

VISIT DOWNTOWN TACOMA’S FRANCISCAN POLAR PLAZA IN ITS LAST WEEKEND FOR ART, ICE AND EVERYTHING NICE THIS WINTER AS THE SKATING RINK RETURNS FOR ITS SECOND YEAR OF HOLIDAY MERRY-MAKING. POLAR PLAZA IS A SPECIAL PLACE FOR PEOPLE TO COME TOGETHER AND MAKE MEMORIES TO LAST A LIFETIME. ENJOY MUSIC, SPECIAL EVENTS AND MORE IN PARTNERSHIP WITH TACOMA ART MUSEUM. FRANCISCAN POLAR PLAZA IS OPEN THROUGH JAN. 6.

sounds of traditional Polynesian drum beats fused with funky reggae music, resulting in a modern, hip fitness workout. Hot hula fitness is a fun, new and exciting dance workout that isolates your larger muscle groups, quads and arms, providing a total body workout in 60 minutes. All ages and fitness levels will enjoy hot hula fitness. Admission: $6 (discount with APCC membership). APCC is located at 4851 South Tacoma Way. DRUM CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages drum circle every Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. You do not need to have a drum to participate. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com.

FRI., JAN. 11 100 YEARS OF BROADWAY HAPPENINGS – Awardwinning Broadway producer, lyricist and composer Neil Berg is joined by his multitalented cast of veteran Broadway singers, dancers and musicians to celebrate Broadway’s best-loved songand-dance numbers. This new show highlights some of Broadway’s most memorable choreography and recreates the greatest moments from the finest shows of the past 100 years and features the actual stars of shows such as “The Phantom of the Opera,” “Les Miserables,” “Cats” and “Chicago.” The performance takes place at the Pantages Theater at 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $29-$64. Info: www.broadwaycenter.org.

Promote your community event,

SUN., JAN. 20 ‘PETER AND THE WOLF’ MUSIC – The Tacoma Symphony Orchestra kicks off a new series of concerts for kids and parents with this program featuring the full orchestra and Sergei Prokofiev’s great introduction to orchestral music. This concert is just right for children ages 4 to 9 and their families. Come an hour early for an instrument petting zoo where your kids can touch and try out real musical instruments for themselves! The performance takes place at the Rialto Theater. Tickets: $5 for children, $7 for adults. Info: www.broadwaycenter.org.

WED., JAN. 23 AUTHOR BOOK SIGNING ETC – Visit the Wheelock Library at 7 p.m. for a book talk and signing for two interesting books by Vaughn Sherman. Vaughn is a former CIA agent and wrote an espionage novel “Sasha Plotkin’s Deceit” and a book on his uncle’s adventures locally and abroad as a master seaman. “Sea Travels, Memoirs of 20th Century Master Mariner.” Admission is free. The Wheelock Library is located at 3722 N. 26th St. in Tacoma.

FRI., JAN. 25 ZOE KEATING AND PORTLAND CELLO PROJECT MUSIC – One-womanorchestra, Zoe Keating, will join Portland Cello Project to blur musical perception. Keating uses a cello and a foot-controlled laptop to record layer upon layer of cello, creating a lush, beautiful and otherworldly music. No two shows are alike when Portland Cello Project takes the stage, with a repertoire of more than 800 pieces of music you would not normally hear coming out of a cello. The performance takes place at the Rialto Theater at 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $19-$39.

BULLETIN BOARD ‘THE CHILDREN’S HOUR’ THEATER – The Lakewood Playhouse is proud to present “The Children’s Hour,” the third show of its 74th season of plays. Lillian Hellman’s riveting, controversial drama addresses current events in

ways that are even more relevant today than when it was first presented to protesting crowds in 1934. The play will take place Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Tickets: $24. The play runs from Jan. 11-Feb. 3. TEDDIE BEAR MUSIC MUSIC – Teddie Bear Music is a child and parent musical adventure. Join instructor Janice Berntsen as she shows students how to share the gift of music and movement with their children, ages 1-4. Sessions are held Thursdays at 8:45 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. at Ted Brown Music, located at 6228 Tacoma Mall Boulevard. For more info visit tbmoutreach.org. FLOWERS FOR TACOMA ART – “Andy Warhol’s Flowers for Tacoma” explores the context and development of flower imagery in Warhol’s career, focusing on his 1982 proposal for the Tacoma Dome. Warhol’s extensive use of flowers throughout his career is represented by early illustrations from the 1950s, series of flower prints and numerous photographs made by Warhol and his circle that illustrate the artist’s fascination with the fragility and beauty of flowers. The exhibit runs through Feb. 10. Info: www.tacomaartmuseum.org. ‘SCAPES’ ART – Venetian artists Laura de Santillana and Alessandro Diaz de Santillana have joined forces to create “Scapes,” a dynamic and entirely new body of work at Museum of Glass. The exhibition comprises four rooms based on the Hindu belief that the universe is divided into separate spheres of existence: Earth, Space, Sun, and Moon and Constellations. The de Santillanas have interpreted elements of the Hindu cosmology in glass, creating spaces in which forms and colors correspond to physical phenomena, or the visible universe, and evoke an atmosphere of cosmic vibration. Each installation is composed of a limited, but strikingly vibrant, color palette. The exhibit runs through January. ‘MEMORIES AND MEDITATIONS’ ART – “Memories and Meditations: A Retrospective on Michael Kenna’s Photography” exhibit is on view now at Tacoma Art Museum through

March 24. Michael Kenna has been capturing the ethereal essence of locations across the globe for more than 30 years. His unique point of view evokes a sense of calm that enhances the intimate connections of history and geography. The first United States retrospective of internationally acclaimed photographer Michael Kenna’s photography in nearly 20 years, “Memories and Meditations: A Retrospective of Michael Kenna’s Photography” comes to Tacoma Art Museum through March 24. The exhibition explores Kenna’s ongoing investigations of everything from the natural beauty of an island among Eastern countries to the haunting shadows of abandoned buildings in the midwest of the United States. Kenna is known to frequently return to certain locales in order to record them over the course of several years to capture the brilliance of time passing and memory. His wonder at the alchemy of printmaking translates into a wonderland of visual poetry. Info: www. tacomaartmuseum.org. NORTHWEST ART ART – “Best of the Northwest: Selected Paintings from the Collection” is on display at Tacoma Art Museum. The works on view are some of the best from its collection of paintings by Northwest artists. It runs until March.

SUPPORT GROUP ETC – Suffering from fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue? Attend this support group, which meets the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month from 4:15-5:15 p.m. at the Tacoma Area Coalition for Individuals with Disabilities building, located at 6315 S. 19th St. The group’s mission is to improve the morale of people coping with these challenges. Its activities include face-to-face encouragement, networking, sharing of resources as well as individual discoveries. CHARITY BOOT CAMP ETC – Jeff Jowers, owner and founder of Tacoma’s Ultimate Fitness Boot Camps, is hosting charity fitness boot camps every Saturday benefiting Mary Bridge Tree House. People who sign up for Ultimate Fitness Boot Camp can now donate pieces of clothing, which earns them a spot in a fast-paced, interval-style class free of charge. Info: www.tacomabootcamps.com. FREE FIRST WEEKENDS ETC – Bank of America bankcard holders and employees receive free admission to the Tacoma Art Museum the first weekend of every month as part of Bank of America’s national Museums on Us program. Info: museums.bankofamerica.com. THE VALLEY CHORALE ETC – The Valley Chorale, a soprano-alto-tenor-bass singing group, meets every Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Lutheran Church of Christ the King, located at 1710 E. 85th St. in Tacoma. If you like singing, contact Joy Heidal at (253) 848-1134 or Dixie Byrne at (253) 677-5291 for more information and a personal invitation to join the group.

GLASS ART MASTER ART – Museum of Glass is showcasing items created by a glass art master over the past 10 years in “Maestro: Recent Works by Lino Tagliapietra.” The Italian artist has invented numerous techniques and designs that are technically flawless and visually breathtaking, yet filled with complexity and difficulty. He is recognized around the world as the maestro of contemporary glass. The exhibition shows his evolution to larger works, bolder colors and patterns over his nearly 50 years as an artist. It runs through Jan. 6, 2013.

MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT ETC – Caring for someone with memory loss? Alzheimer’s Association caregiver support groups provide a consistent and caring place for people to learn, share and gain emotional support from others who are also on a unique journey of providing care to a person with dementia. A free information and support group for care partners, family members and friends of individuals with dementia will be held the second Monday of each month from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St. Contact group facilitator Chuck Benefiel at (253) 584-3267.

HOT HULA FITNESS ETC – Every Monday through Wednesday, Asia Pacific Cultural Center hosts hot hula fitness classes from 7-8 p.m. Inspired by the dances of the Pacific islands, hot hula fitness incorporates easy to perform dance moves set to the

UKULELE CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages ukulele circle every Wednesday from 6:30-8 p.m. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic. com.


Friday, January 4, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

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5 Piece Pub Set Table & 4 Chairs New in Box List $1,000 Sell $350 253-537-3056 3 Piece Living Room Set New in plastic. Lifetime Warranty On Frame. $495 (253) 537-3056 Free Mattress Set with Cherry Wood Sleigh Bed Never Used. In Plastic. $380 (253) 537-3056 All New Pillow Top Mattress Set! Queen Size w/ Warranty, Still in Original Plastic. Can 'HOLYHU 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH $149 (253) 5391600 Full or Twin Mattress Set New Factory Sealed. Delivery Available. $120 Will Take. (253) 539-1600

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bradleyâ&#x20AC;? Can you imagine this sweet face curled up under your tree this Christmas? This is Bradley our Featured Pet of the week. Bradley is a sweet 3-year-old tan Pit Bull; he is happy and ready to please. Bradley is looking for an active family with time for training, but his favorite is just being with YOU! &XGGOLQJZDONVZKDWHYHU\RXZDQWWRGRLVĂ&#x20AC;QH with him. Bradley is having a holiday from the shelter and is in the loving care of one of our foster families. For more information about Bradley, please visit our website www. thehumaesociety.org. His number is A464656.

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week

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China & Peanut are two handsome little boys who are hoping to be able to find a Forever Family together. They are both 9 years old and have never been apart. China is the first to climb up into a lap, while Peanut is the playful one that loves toys. They have both been well loved and spoiled their entire lives and are both looking to continue with that lifestyle! Felix is a shy boy but warms up very quickly, especially if you know his name! He loves to burrow himself under his blankets and cat bed. Felix is completely declawed and needs to be an indoor only kitty and prefers to be the only animal in the house. He is patiently waiting for a Forever Family to come take him home today!

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Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 8 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, January 4, 2013

NOTICES

NOTICES

NOTICES

Notice of Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 RCW ;6!(SPJPH7H\S 0U[OL>LSMHYLVM!.(0 +6)! *HZL5\TILY!7<@;79 @6<HYLOLYLI`Z\TTVULK[VHWWLHYMVYHU (KQ\KPJH[PVU/LHYPUNPU[OL*OPSKYLUÂťZ*V\Y[VM[OL 7\`HSS\W;YPILVM0UKPHUZVU[OL7\`HSS\W0UKPHU 9LZLY]H[PVU^OPJOPZSVJH[LKH[,HZ[ [O :[YLL[;HJVTH>HZOPUN[VU  @V\HYLZ\TTVULK[VHWWLHYMVYHU(KQ\KPJH[PVU /LHYPUN1HU\HY`H[!WT 0M`V\OH]LHU`X\LZ[PVUZWSLHZLJVU[HJ[[OLJV\Y[ JSLYRZH[ 56;0*,7<9:<(5;;6;90)(3*6+,:,*;065 ;/,*6<9;4(@-05+;/,7(9,5; .<(9+0(569*<:;6+0(505+,-(<3;-69 -(03<9,;69,:765+69(77,(9(;(*6<9; /,(905.;/0:4(@9,:<3;05@6<9*/03+9,5 ),05.73(*,+05(56;/,9/64,(5+;/, 7(9,5;69+,9,+;6*699,*;*,9;(05 796)3,4: ;6!,]LS`U.HSSLY -69;/,4(;;,96-!7\`HSS\W;YPIHS/V\ZPUN (\[OVYP[`]Z,]LS`U.HSSLY *(:,5<4),9!7<@*=  ;OL7L[P[PVULYOHZĂ&#x201E;SLKH*P]PS7L[P[PVUHNHPUZ[[OL 9LZWVUKLU[PU[OPZ*V\Y[ )V[O[OL7L[P[PVULYHUK9LZWVUKLU[OH]L[OLYPNO[[V SLNHSYLWYLZLU[H[PVUPU[OPZJHZL;OPZ*V\Y[OHZHSPZ[ VMH[[VYUL`ZHUKZWVRLZWLYZVUZ^OVHYLHKTP[[LK[V practice in this Court. ;OL9LZWVUKLU[T\Z[YLZWVUK[V[OPZ*P]PS7L[P[PVU ^P[OPU[^LU[`KH`ZHM[LYILPUNZLY]LK;OL 9LZWVUKLU[T\Z[YLZWVUKI`ZLY]PUNHJVW`VMH ^YP[[LUHUZ^LYVU[OL7L[P[PVULYHUKI`Ă&#x201E;SPUN[OPZ ^YP[[LUHUZ^LY^P[O[OPZ*V\Y[HSVUN^P[OHUHMĂ&#x201E;KH]P[ VMZLY]PJL @6<(9,/,9,)@:<4465,+[VHWWLHYPU [OL7\`HSS\W;YPIHS*V\Y[VU[OL7\`HSS\W0UKPHU 9LZLY]H[PVUPU[OLTH[[LYVM^OPJOPZSVJH[LKH[ ,HZ[ [O:[YLL[;HJVTH>HZOPUN[VUHUK`V\HYL[V Z[H`\U[PS[OPZ*V\Y[TH`OLHY[OPZTH[[LY @6<(9,:<4465,+[VHWWLHYVU;O\YZKH` [OLZ[KH`VM1HU\HY`H[!HTMVYHU 0UP[PHS/LHYPUN -(03<9,;6(77,(9(-;,99,*,0=05.56;0*, 4(@9,:<3;05(+,-(<3;1<+.4,5; +(;,![OPZKH`VM+LJLTILY 7\`HSS\W;YPIHS*V\Y[*SLYR ;6!+`SHU39HZT\ZZLU 0U[OL>LSMHYLVM!(3/+6)! *HZL5\TILY!7<@. @V\HYLOLYLI`Z\TTVULK[VHWWLHYMVYHU0UP[PHS /LHYPUNPU[OL*OPSKYLUÂťZ*V\Y[VM[OL7\`HSS\W ;YPILVM0UKPHUZVU[OL7\`HSS\W0UKPHU9LZLY]H[PVU ^OPJOPZSVJH[LKH[,HZ[ [O:[YLL[;HJVTH >HZOPUN[VU 

Grantor: LK Broadway, LLC Successor Trustee: Philip S. Brooke III )LULĂ&#x201E;JPHY`!(TLYPJHU>LZ[)HUR (IIYL]PH[LK3LNHS!<UP[)YVHK^H`H *VUKVTPUP\T -\SS3LNHSVU!7HNL (ZZLZZVYÂťZ7HYJLS5V!  7YPVY+VJ\TLU[9LMLYLUJL5V! TO: LK Broadway, LLC :[/LSLUZ(]L :\P[L  ;HJVTH>(  6JJ\WHU[Z )YVHK^H`<UP[ ;HJVTH>(  3PULILYY`2LUUL`733* :[/LSLUZ(]L :\P[L  ;HJVTH>(  +VUHSK12LUUL` 3LTVSV:OVYL +YP]L 7V\SZIV>(  LK Broadway, LLC )YVHK^H`<UP[ ;HJVTH>(  LK Broadway, LLC 7HJPĂ&#x201E;J/PNO^H` ,HZ[ -PML>(  3PULILYY`2LUUL`733* )YVHK^H`<UP[ ;HJVTH>( 

+VUHSK12LUUL`  -QVYK+YP]L5, :\P[L 7V\SZIV>(  1VOU2LUUL`  -QVYK+YP]L5, :\P[L 7V\SZIV>(  <UP[LK:[H[LZ:THSS )\ZPULZZ(KTPUPZ[YH[PVU -YLZUV*VTTLYJPHS Loan Center 9:[YLL[:\P[L -YLZUV*(  ,]LYNYLLU)\ZPULZZ Capital  0U[LY\YIHU(]L :V\[O:\P[L :LH[[SL>(  (KTPUPZ[YH[PVUVM[OL <::THSS)\ZPULZZ (KTPUPZ[YH[PVU .H[L^H`>LZ[

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0M`V\OH]LHU`X\LZ[PVUZWSLHZLJVU[HJ[[OLJV\Y[ JSLYRZH[ 56;0*,7<9:<(5;;6;90)(3*6+,:,*;065 ;/,*6<9;4(@-05+;/,7(9,5; .<(9+0(569*<:;6+0(505+,-(<3;-69 -(03<9,;69,:765+69(77,(9(;(*6<9; /,(905.;/0:4(@9,:<3;05@6<9*/03+9,5 ),05.73(*,+05(56;/,9/64,(5+;/, 7(9,5;69+,9,+;6*699,*;*,9;(05 796)3,4:

(ZZLZZVYÂťZ;H_7HYJLS5V  ^OPJOPZZ\IQLJ[[V[OH[JLY[HPU+LLKVM;Y\Z[KH[LK +LJLTILYHUKYLJVYKLKVU+LJLTILY (\KP[VYÂťZ-PSL5V7PLYJL *V\U[`>HZOPUN[VUMYVT32)YVHK^H`33* HZ.YHU[VY[V;PJVY;P[SL*VTWHU`HZ;Y\Z[LL [VZLJ\YLHUVISPNH[PVUPUMH]VYVM(TLYPJHU>LZ[ )HURHZ)LULĂ&#x201E;JPHY`HUKHZZ\JJLZZVYPUPU[LYLZ[[V )HURVM;HJVTH

;6!1VZL=PSSHYLHS3P]PUNZ[VU 0U[OL>LSMHYLVM!//+6)! *HZL5\TILY!7<@. @V\HYLOLYLI`Z\TTVULK[VHWWLHYMVYHU0UP[PHS /LHYPUNPU[OL*OPSKYLUÂťZ*V\Y[VM[OL7\`HSS\W ;YPILVM0UKPHUZVU[OL7\`HSS\W0UKPHU9LZLY]H[PVU ^OPJOPZSVJH[LKH[,HZ[ [O:[YLL[;HJVTH >HZOPUN[VU  @V\HYLZ\TTVULK[VHWWLHYMVYHU0UP[PHS/LHYPUNVU [OL[OKH`VM1HU\HY`H[!HT 0M`V\OH]LHU`X\LZ[PVUZWSLHZLJVU[HJ[[OLJV\Y[ JSLYRZH[ 56;0*,7<9:<(5;;6;90)(3*6+,:,*;065 ;/,*6<9;4(@-05+;/,7(9,5; .<(9+0(569*<:;6+0(505+,-(<3;-69 -(03<9,;69,:765+69(77,(9(;(*6<9; /,(905.;/0:4(@9,:<3;05@6<9*/03+9,5 ),05.73(*,+05(56;/,9/64,(5+;/, 7(9,5;69+,9,+;6*699,*;*,9;(05 796)3,4:

II.5VHJ[PVUJVTTLUJLKI`[OL)LULĂ&#x201E;JPHY`VM[OL +LLKVM;Y\Z[PZUV^WLUKPUN[VZLLRZH[PZMHJ[PVU VM[OLVISPNH[PVUZPUHU`*V\Y[I`YLHZVUVM[OL )VYYV^LYÂťZVY.YHU[VYÂťZKLMH\S[VU[OLVISPNH[PVUZ ZLJ\YLKI`[OL+LLKVM;Y\Z[ III.;OLKLMH\S[ZMVY^OPJO[OPZMVYLJSVZ\YLPZTHKL HYLHZMVSSV^Z! -HPS\YL[VWH`^OLUK\L[OLMVSSV^PUNHTV\U[Z which are now in arrears: UNPAID MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST: <UWHPKTVU[OS`WH`TLU[Z!+LJLTILY YLTHPUPUN\UWHPKWHY[PHSWH`TLU[VM   WS\ZWH`TLU[ZVMWYPUJPWHSHUKPU[LYLZ[1HU\HY` [OYV\NO+LJLTILYH[  $46,559.72 each. LATE CHARGES: (JJY\LK3H[L*OHYNLZ$1,585.42 REAL PROPERTY TAXES: +LSPUX\LU[9LHS7YVWLY[`;H_LZMVY[OL`LHY HUKĂ&#x201E;YZ[OHSMVMPUJS\KPUNPU[LYLZ[HUK penalties thereon.* $19,473.22

TOTAL:

$67,618.36

*Together with interest and penalties accrued on the delinquent real property taxes from and after the date of this Notice. IV.;OLZ\TV^PUNVU[OLVISPNH[PVUZLJ\YLKI`[OL +LLKVM;Y\Z[PZ!7YPUJPWHSVM [VNL[OLY ^P[OPU[LYLZ[HZWYV]PKLKPU[OL5V[LMYVT[OL[O KH`VM+LJLTILYHUKZ\JOV[OLYJVZ[ZHUK MLLZHZHYLK\L\UKLY[OL5V[LVYV[OLYPUZ[Y\TLU[ ZLJ\YLKHUKHZHYLWYV]PKLKI`Z[H[\[L V. ;OLHIV]LKLZJYPILKYLHSWYVWLY[`^PSSILZVSK [VZH[PZM`[OLL_WLUZLVMZHSLHUK[OLVISPNH[PVU ZLJ\YLKI`[OL+LLKVM;Y\Z[HZWYV]PKLKI` Z[H[\[L;OLZHSL^PSSILTHKL^P[OV\[^HYYHU[` L_WYLZZVYPTWSPLKYLNHYKPUN[P[SLWVZZLZZPVUVY LUJ\TIYHUJLZVU[OL11[OKH`VMJanuary, 2013. ;OLKLMH\S[ZYLMLYLUJLKPU7HYHNYHWO000T\Z[IL J\YLKI`[OL31stKH`VMDecember, 2012KH`Z ILMVYL[OLZHSLKH[L[VJH\ZLHKPZJVU[PU\HUJL VM[OLZHSL;OLZHSL^PSSILKPZJVU[PU\LKHUK [LYTPUH[LKPMH[HU`[PTLVUVYILMVYL[OL31st day VMDecember, 2012KH`ZILMVYL[OLZHSLKH[L [OLKLMH\S[ZHZZL[MVY[OPU7HYHNYHWO000HYLJ\YLK HUK[OL;Y\Z[LLÂťZMLLZHUKJVZ[ZHYLWHPK;OLZHSL TH`IL[LYTPUH[LKHU`[PTLHM[LY[OL31stKH`VM December, 2012KH`ZILMVYL[OLZHSLKH[L HUKILMVYL[OLZHSLI`[OL)VYYV^LY.YHU[VYHU` .\HYHU[VYVY[OLOVSKLYVMHU`YLJVYKLKQ\UPVYSPLU VYLUJ\TIYHUJLI`WH`PUN[OLLU[PYLWYPUJPWHSHUK PU[LYLZ[ZLJ\YLKI`[OL+LLKVM;Y\Z[WS\ZJVZ[Z MLLZHUKHK]HUJLZPMHU`THKLW\YZ\HU[[V[OL [LYTZVM[OLVISPNH[PVUHUKVY+LLKVM;Y\Z[HUK J\YPUNHSSV[OLYKLMH\S[Z VI.(^YP[[LU5V[PJLVM+LMH\S[^HZ[YHUZTP[[LKI` [OL)LULĂ&#x201E;JPHY`VY;Y\Z[LL[V[OL)VYYV^LY.YHU[VY HUK.\HYHU[VYZH[[OLMVSSV^PUNHKKYLZZLZ! 32)96(+>(@33*)VYYV^LY :[/LSLUZ(]L:\P[L  ;HJVTH>(  +6<.3(:1305,),99@.\HYHU[VY UK:[YLL[*V\Y[5> .PN/HYIVY>(  305,),99@2,55,@733*.\HYHU[VY :[/LSLUZ(]L:\P[L  ;HJVTH>(  +65(3+12,55,@.\HYHU[VY 3LTVSV:OVYL+YP]L 7V\SZIV>(  I`IV[OĂ&#x201E;YZ[JSHZZHUKJLY[PĂ&#x201E;LKTHPSVU[OLZ[ KH`VM1HU\HY`WYVVMVM^OPJOPZPU[OL WVZZLZZPVUVM[OL;Y\Z[LL"HUK[OL^YP[[LU5V[PJL VM+LMH\S[^HZWVZ[LKPUHJVUZWPJ\V\ZWSHJLVU [OLYLHSWYVWLY[`KLZJYPILKPU7HYHNYHWO0HIV]LVU -LIY\HY`HUK[OL;Y\Z[LLOHZWVZZLZZPVUVM WYVVMVMZ\JOWVZ[PUN VII;OL;Y\Z[LL^OVZLUHTLHUKHKKYLZZHYL ZL[MVY[OILSV^^PSSWYV]PKLPU^YP[PUN[VHU`VUL YLX\LZ[PUNP[HZ[H[LTLU[VMHSSJVZ[ZHUKMLLZK\L H[HU`[PTLWYPVY[V[OLZHSL VIII.;OLLMMLJ[VM[OLZHSL^PSSIL[VKLWYP]L[OL .YHU[VYHUKHSS[OVZL^OVOVSKI`[OYV\NOVY \UKLY[OL.YHU[VYVMHSS[OLPYPU[LYLZ[PU[OLHIV]L KLZJYPILKWYVWLY[` IX.(U`VULOH]PUNHU`VIQLJ[PVU[V[OLZHSLVU HU`NYV\UKZ^OH[ZVL]LY^PSSILHMMVYKLKHU VWWVY[\UP[`[VILOLHYKHZ[V[OVZLVIQLJ[PVUZPM [OL`IYPUNHSH^Z\P[[VYLZ[YHPU[OLZHSLW\YZ\HU[ [V9*>-HPS\YL[VIYPUNZ\JOHSH^Z\P[ TH`YLZ\S[PUH^HP]LYVMHU`WYVWLYNYV\UKZMVY PU]HSPKH[PUN[OL;Y\Z[LLÂťZ:HSL X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS ;OLW\YJOHZLYH[[OL[Y\Z[LLÂťZZHSLPZLU[P[SLK [VWVZZLZZPVUVM[OLWYVWLY[`VU[OL[OKH` MVSSV^PUN[OLZHSLHZHNHPUZ[[OLNYHU[VY\UKLY [OLKLLKVM[Y\Z[[OLV^ULYHUKHU`VULOH]PUN HUPU[LYLZ[Q\UPVY[V[OLKLLKVM[Y\Z[PUJS\KPUN VJJ\WHU[Z^OVHYLUV[[LUHU[Z(M[LY[OL[OKH` MVSSV^PUN[OLZHSL[OLW\YJOHZLYOHZ[OLYPNO[[V L]PJ[VJJ\WHU[Z^OVHYLUV[[LUHU[ZI`Z\TTHY` WYVJLLKPUNZ\UKLY*OHW[LY 9*> +(;,+[OPZKH`VM+LJLTILY Philip S. Brooke III, Successor Trustee >LZ[:WYHN\L(]LU\L:\P[L :WVRHUL>( 

NOTICES Looking for Marisa Lee Saenz to serve divorce papers. Please Contact Monique Freymuth, 8296 NW Duryea Rd., Bremerton WA

VOLUNTEERS Help lift people out of poverty by volunteering with VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance)! Provide free income tax preparation to low and moderate income households. Locations throughout Pierce County. Day, evening and weekend hours available. Volunteers can serve as tax preparers, quality reviewers, greeters, or interpreters (for non-English speaking or hearing-impaired tax payers). Free training provided. Contact Amy Allison, amya@associatedministries.org, or apply online at www.VolunteerTaxHelp.org. Get involved with Metro Parks Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Citizen Advisory Councils! The Business & Responsive Agency Council helps district leadership with business planning, Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO VXVWDLQDELOLW\ decisions, revenue development and quality assurance. Monthly meetings focus on issues that affect the future of our park system. Visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/business-volunteer to learn more or call Brett Freshwaters, &KLHI )LQDQFLDO 2IĂ&#x20AC;FHU DW 253.305.1081. Brettf@ tacomaparks.com. Metro Parks Tacoma Special events bring the community together and provide families with affordable fun. Metro Parks Tacoma needs volunteers to help produce memorable events. Visit www.metroparkstacoma. org/volunteer and signXS WR EH QRWLĂ&#x20AC;HG RI VSHcial event service opportunities. To learn more, contact Roxanne Miles, Volunteer Manager, at 253.305.1068. Roxannem@tacomaparks.com.

Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more

information, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@tacomaparks.com or 253.305.1025. Help a Child Improve Reading One-on-one support makes a huge difference in an elementary studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to overcome reading challenges. As a Read2Me Tutor, you can be that person who makes a difference. The Read2Me program at Tacoma Community House is looking for committed volunteer tutors for grades 1-3. Starting in October, we will have sessions at Roosevelt and McCarver Elementary Schools. Call Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or email kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information. Literacy Tutor Tacoma Community House is looking for volunteers to help adults improve their reading, writing, and basic math skills. Training is provided. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer tutor, please contact Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or at kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse.org. We need a Spanish speaking volunteer Tuesday & Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10:30-11:30 AM. Volunteer to help translate for our Latino senior population. Call Portland Ave Community Center 253591-5391 Ask for Bonnie. Leave a message if she isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in she will call you back. Volunteer needed to teach beginning basic computers skills for seniors. One day a week for 1 hour class Tuesday or ThursGD\ Ă H[LEOH IRU FODVV DQ\ time between 10-2 pm. Class will start in midSeptember. Volunteers will need to pass background check. Please call Portland Ave Community Center@ 253-591-5391. Ask for Bonnie or leave a message and she will call you back.


Friday, January 4, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV

Doug Arbogast

EfWbZS`[W>k`UZ Stephanie Lynch

OWNED AND OPERATED

(253) 307-4055 Over 20 Years Real Estate Experience

,ET ME HELP #ALL TODAY

Tired of renting? Jennifer Pacheco Monthly payments Mortgage Officer on a new home Loan NMLS #486264 could be less than 253-926-4131 your rent. Call me www.umpquabank.com/jpacheco jenniferpacheco@umpquabank.com for details!

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Sweet Victorian! 1245 S. Adams $195,000. MLS#403341

723 S. Tyler

HOMES FOR SALE $219,000

Lovingly maintained Victorian on a large fully fenced lot. The charm is evident the minute you step into the entry and see the high ceilings, RSHQVWDLUFDVHDQGEHDXWLIXOĂ&#x20AC;UĂ RRUV0DLQĂ RRUKDVOLYLQJUPGLQLQJ rm., bedroom, full bath, kitchen and utility rm. Upstairs with 2 bedrooms, and a 3/4 bath. Large windows throughout the home provide tons of light! A great location...walk to 6th Ave. and enjoy all it has to offer! Call Pam @253 691-0461 for more details or for a private showing. PAM LINDGREN BETTER PROPERTIES NORTH PROCTOR plindgren@betterproperties.com 253 691.0461

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;I act in your best interest, not mine. You deserve respect from the first time we shake hands to the last.â&#x20AC;?

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Classic Brick home in amazing condition with 3 bedrooms and 1.75 baths. Living rm. with newer pellet stove to keep you warm in the winter months! Retro kitchen w/newer appliances and eating nook, separate dining rm. and beautiful hardwoods!  PDLQ Ă RRU EHGURRPV DQG a full bath. Basement has 1 bedroom and 3/4 bath

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Low interest rates + affordable prices = great investment opportunities.

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ZLWK VSDFH IRU Ă&#x20AC;QLVKLQJ DQ additional rec/family room! Private, fully fenced back yard with mature landscaping and a sprinkler system! Really great house. Come see! MLS# 391728 Call Pam Lindgren 253 691-0461 for more info or for a private showing! Better Properties N. Proctor

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

Timeless,Classic Beauty APPROVED SHORTSALE 6925 Hillgrove Lane SW, $335,000 Timeless, classic beauty w/ upgrades galore, sits on estate like lawn w/ lovely landscaping. W/ 4 bedrooms & 3.5 baths, this gorgeous home beckons you ZFKDUP HDV\Ă RRUSODQ3LFN\RXUPDVWHU EHGURRPRQHRQWKHPDLQĂ RRURUWDNHWKH one upstairs- the choice is yours. Huge 2 car garage w/ additional shop area- very appealing to some; spacious living room, dining room & sweet kitchen appeal to all. Newer windows, heat pump & A/C. Rumored to have once been owned by the Rockefellers... MLS# 224641 Shannon Agent Extraordinaire 253-691-1800 or shannonsells @hotmail.com Better Properties North Proctor

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Enjoy the awe-inspiring view from nearly every room of this incredible home. Each of the 4 bedrooms includes a private bath. You will love the chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream kitchen, bright, airy living spaces and opulent master retreat. Family and friends feel right at home in the separate guest apartment. Indoor pool, sauna, 4-car garage, and too many other features to mention! Visit our website for more information. www.potterypointviewhome.com

FOR RENT

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CRESCENT PARK APARTMENTS

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Summertree Apartments

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Holiday Specials on 1 and 2 bedroom apartments. Welcoming Community in rejuvenated Hilltop neighborhood â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Wonderful large Courtyard. Close to Parks, Schools, Colleges, Jobs. Terrific value 1801 S. 15th Call (253) 272.1722 Summertreeparkapartments.com

If I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell it to you and if I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live in it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t list it. S&S Retail Center & Business Park $1,199,900 14113-14125 Pacific Ave Building SqFt: 22,578 253-752-9742

Discovery Place 6409 6th Ave,Tacoma $2,499,000 28,989 sq ft Mall. Majority Leased 253-752-9742

Chamber Bay Condo $900 4501 Grand Vie Dr W #107 2br 2 bath 253-752-9742

University Place Stratford Heights Apt with garage. 1, 2 or 3 bd Call 253-565-0343

www.REISinvest.com

www.REISinvest.com

6th Ave Commercial Space

Broadway Center 206 Broadway Ave E,Seattle $1,450,000 Small Center 199,881 NOI On Land lease 253 228 0444

Olalla Farm House

$640,000 4417 6th Ave, Tacoma 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

$1395 14637 Starr Rd SE 3br 3 bath 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

Tacoma (253) 752-9742 Kent

u

www.REISinvest.com

Downtown Tacoma Office 3000 to 16,200 Sq Ft. With Parking 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

6th Ave Office/Retail Space 4412 6th Ave Suite 5 600 sq ft 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

www.REISinvest.com

3725 S Orchard St. #2

2br 1 3/4 bath 1100 sqft. 253-752-9742

Lakewood Office Gross Leases. 1290 to 1550 Sq Ft. Good Parking. Prestigious Gravelly Lake Dr. 253-752-9742

Office/Retail Space 3868 Center St 816 sq ft 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

www.REISinvest.com

www.REISinvest.com

$875

Gig Harbor (253) 514-6539

(253) 981-4098

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DuPont (253) 207-5871

Seattle South Lake Union (206) 319-5981

Shannon

Agent Extraordinaire

Phone: 253.691.1800 Fax: 253.761.1150 Email:shannonsells@hotmail.com


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, January 4, 2013

Battle at the Boat 90 Lyfe Jennings

Keith Sweat

January 5, 7pm

January 18, 8:30pm

February 8, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom, $25, $40, $100

I-5 Showroom, $20, $30, $55, $60

I-5 Showroom, $30, $40, $55, $60

Air Supply

Gabriel Iglesias CageSport MMA XXIII

February 14, 8:30pm

February 15, 8:30pm

February 16, 7pm

I-5 Showroom, $30, $40, $60, $65

I-5 Showroom, $40, $60, $80, $85

I-5 Showroom, $35, $55, $100

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices.


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