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Tacoma set for national spotlight following C-SPAN filming PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

LNG. Puyallup Tribe members and environmental

activists protested at the County-City Building during a court hearing for the “Super Six” last Friday. More protests are in the works.

‘TACOMA SUPER SIX’ MOVE FORWARD TOWARD TRIAL PRE-TRIAL HEARING JULY 14 LNG PROTESTS TO INCREASE AS GROUPS UNITE CANOES AND KAYAKTIVISTS TO MAKE VOICES HEARD AT FESTIVAL OF SAIL, NOON, JUNE 17 By Matt Nagle and Steve Dunkelberger matt@tacomaweekly.com / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

GERTIE. A C-SPAN television crew filmed local historian Michael Sullivan as well as other historians and

The “Super Six” protesters are moving toward a trial. This group of environmental activists was arrested on May 17 for chaining themselves to equipment at the construction site of Puget Sound Energy’s 8 million-gallon liquefied natural gas facility at the corner of East 11th Street and Alexander Avenue East on the Tideflats. Sarah Morken, Jake Grote, Marilyn Kimmerling, Irene Morrison, Jeff Johnston and Cynthia Linet originally faced felony charges of malicious mischief in the first degree, criminal trespass in the first degree and obstruction in the first degree, but those felonies were downgraded to misdemeanor charges

the national significance of the “galloping Gertie” history of the Narrows Bridge and the Prairie Line Trail. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

T

acoma’s role in national history is on the way to screens around world after a television crew swung through the city to film segments on the City

of Destiny’s history and how it shaped the nation. Producers and videographers from C-SPAN’s Book TV and American History TV spent last week filming Tacoma’s notable historians and nonfiction authors for segments that will be available online and during special Tacoma weekend of Aug. 5 on

C-SPAN2 and C-SPAN3. The segments about Tacoma are part of C-SPAN’s Cities Tour weekend programming that features cities around the nation as a way to not only promote history and general knowledge of regions of the nation but also let cities tell their stories to people See C-SPAN / page A11

See LNG / page A11

1,770 NEW UWT GRADS READY TO CHANGE THE WORLD

BAG BAN IS JUST WEEKS AWAY

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

LITTER. The plastic bag ban the City Council

approved last summer is going into effect July 12, with city staffers conducting a final information blitz until then. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The end of plastic bags finding their way in bushes and collecting along fences is near. At least that’s the hope. Tacoma City Council approved a ban last summer that would end the distribution of single-use plastic bags that have been routinely handed out at convenience and grocery stores for decades. Bags other than carryout bags, such as produce bags, dry cleaning bags and newspaper bags, will continue to be available for no charge. But the thin plastic bags will otherwise be replaced by paper bags at a cost of See BAG BAN / page A11

PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

DAWG DAY. The University of Washington-Tacoma awarded 1,770 undergraduate and graduate degrees at its 27th annual Commencement on June 14. UWT also awarded its first honorary doctor of humane letters degree to Tacoma businessman and philanthropist William W. Philip for his advocacy for education dating back 25 years to the creation of the campus.

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OUR VIEW

The growing troubles facing the future of the Tideflats is one that could have been avoided if only agreements, pledges and promises has been upheld. PAGE A6

Pothole of the Week....A2 Bulletin Board ............A2

Top 5 Stories ..............A2 Sports ........................A12

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Section A • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 16, 2017

Pothole of the Week

U.S. REP. DENNY HECK RESPONDS TO SHOOTING Washington, D.C. – U.S. Representative Denny Heck (WA-10) released the following statement after the shooting at a baseball field where members of Congress were practicing for the Congressional Baseball Game: “This tragedy hits home, and yet too many communities around the United States know the horror after a mass shooting like this. My colleagues were HECK getting ready for the traditional Congressional Baseball Game where both parties put differences aside and celebrate America’s pastime. My prayers are with everyone on that field and in the

Alexandria community, including the Capitol Police and staff members who were there doing their job. We pray for their speedy recovery and hope they can get back on that baseball field soon. “I commend the quick action of the Capitol Police, they are a constant security presence on Capitol Hill and I am grateful for every single officer who protects us around the clock. Whether a mass shooting takes place at a gay nightclub in Orlando, a baseball field in Alexandria, a Black Lives Matter protest in Dallas, or a grocery store in Tucson, it is an abhorrent assault on our liberty. There is no possible justification for such violence, and it’s truly pathetic that someone would think to commit lethal action towards public servants, law enforcement and innocent people. An attack on them is an attack on all of us and everything it means to be American.�

Bulletin Board

SO. 37TH AND ASOTIN ST. After so long, we have to assume that Percival our beloved Pothole Pig has simply vanished. However, there are still potholes in the city that need attention, so we simply – and sadly – must hire someone to handle his workload. We decided to give the candidates a trial run to see how they do in the field. This week Carter the Crater Gator gave it another shot by finding a crater that would make Percival proud. But frankly, Carter might just not have the celebrity power to take on such a high-profile role. What are your thoughts? We have other candidates in the works that we might try out: Charles the Chuckhole Chicken and Blighty the Blight-Seeking Beaver, but several people voiced their opinion that a permanent replacement should be one of Percival’s relatives, namely Peyton, who lives in Portland, and Perry, who lives in Parkland. And now a new candidate has entered the running with a resume from Ruddy the Road Rut Reindeer, who is a brother-inlaw of Tacoma Rainiers mascot Rhubarb. Send your thoughts to stevedunkel@tacomaweekly. com.

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FESTIVAL OF SAIL RUNS JUNE 15-18 THE '20S ARE ROARING BACK TO TACOMA GUT CHECK TIME 27TH COMMENCEMENT AT UWT TO AWARD 1,770 DEGREES, HONOR LONGTIME ADVOCATE OSBORNE RE-IMAGINES WORK OF DYLAN AT BROADWAY CENTER

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TPU LAUNCHES WOMEN’S RESOURCE GROUP Nearly half of the women who work for Tacoma Public Utilities gathered recently to participate in a new resource group designed to support women in the workplace. Just over a quarter of Tacoma Public Utilities’ employees are female. The group, called Women’s LINC (lead, inspire, connect), aims to help women who work for the utility build their skills, find opportunities for career growth and network with other professionals. Ideally, the group will also help attract more women to the organization and the industry. “A small group of women started meeting informally, and we felt this type of experience might be good for all women who work for TPU,� said Jennifer Laughlin, a Tacoma Water employee and co-architect of the group. Tacoma Public Utilities’ workforce is about 27 percent female, reflecting the traditionally male-dominated roles needed in the organization, such as line electrician, construction worker, engineer and other STEM-related fields. “Our industry has struggled with finding ways to increase the number of females who choose utility-related careers,� said Tacoma Public Utilities Director Bill Gaines. “When I was approached by these employees with their idea, it was immediately clear that we needed to nurture and support their efforts.� At the meeting, Pierce County Auditor Julie Anderson, Emergency Food Network Executive Director Helen McGovern-Pilant and Tacoma Power Section Manager Dolores Stegeman discussed how their careers have developed and what it’s like to serve as a female leader in this community. “These local leaders had great stories to share. They serve as an inspiration to women,� Laughlin said. “We’re looking forward to more events like this and trying to provide resources for women in the utility industry.� TACOMA NURSE NAMED FINALIST IN SEXIEST VEGAN CONTEST PETA is preparing to crown this year’s Sexiest Vegan Next Door – and nurse Daniel Dyviniak beat out hundreds of other entrants from across the nation to advance to the final round of 10 male and 10 female contestants. Visitors to PETA.org can now help PETA select the two lucky winners, one man and one woman, who will each receive a free vacation for two to Maui, Hawaii, courtesy of Humane Travel. Dyviniak went vegan three years ago after an HIVpositive diagnosis prompted him to care deeply about the welfare of others, including animals. Now, he says, his cholesterol levels are low, his liver and kidneys are healthy, his nails are stronger, and his skin is clearer – and he uses his own experience to advocate a healthy, plant-based diet to people newly diagnosed with HIV as a way to combat the damaging side effects of the medication. “As a nurse, Daniel protects the well-being of his patients, and as a compassionate vegan, he not only protects himself but also prevents more than 100 animals a year from being killed for food,� said PETA Executive Vice President Tracy Reiman. “Each one of the finalists in PETA’s contest is a testament to how sexy vegans are – inside and out.� Voting for the finalists to help PETA determine whom it should select as the winners ends at noon on June 21. PETA will select the winners based on several factors, including vote count. See the full contest details here. Winners will be notified and announced on June 28.

ACU HELPS ERASE TACOMA’S SCHOOL LUNCH DEBT America’s Credit Union President and CEO Ken Leonard President heard about Jeff Lew’s Go Fund Me campaign to erase Tacoma’s school lunch debt and knew the credit union had to help. Many Tacoma residents had already heard about Lew’s campaign to erase the Tacoma school lunch debt that started on May 17, and quickly reached enough donations to cover the outstanding school lunch debt. However, Lew didn’t want to stop there – knowing that many families would likely be in the same position this upcoming school year he wanted to ensure there was extra to cover any future debt. That’s when Leonard heard about the efforts on a local radio broadcast. On June 8, Lew visited ACU’s DuPont office to share his efforts to erase the lunch debt of the school districts in Tacoma and the surrounding areas. Inspired by his efforts and willingness to support our local community, ACU donated $7,735 to the campaign to Erase Tacoma’s School Lunch Debt, which helped reach the $30,000 goal. Many children depend on a nutritious lunch to help them through their school day. According to the 2015-16 report by Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction for Washington, 60.6 percent of Tacoma School District students are on free or reduced-price meals. If a child is unable to pay for their meal, a debt is started and families receive an invoice from the school district to pay the debt. Children with an outstanding balance are often shamed for not paying, including having their hot food taken away and replaced with a cold cheese sandwich. According to the School Nutrition Association, 76 percent of America’s school districts have kids with school lunch debt and Tacoma is no different. The total school lunch debt for Tacoma School District was a staggering $20,841. PLOUGH TO PLATE SET FOR JUNE 24 Discover farm to table, 19th century style, at Fort Nisqually Living History Museum’s Plough to Plate on Saturday, June 24, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Throughout the day guests can tour the heritage kitchen garden and poultry house, orchard, and grain patch and learn how these relate to the agricultural history of the Fort. To get in on the act visitors can try churning butter and hauling water with a yoke. The Fort will be filled with living historians bartering in the sale shop, making music on the porch, spinning and weaving in the laborer’s dwelling and working over the forge in the blacksmith’s shop. New this year, kids can participate in an egg and spoon race, a traditional game in the 19th century. A pancake race will be held for adults. This British tradition dates back several centuries and involves participants running a course while flipping a pancake in a frying pan. The highlight of the day is the cooking competition with our period chefs trying their best to impress the judges with flavor and presentation to win the coveted “Golden Skillet� award. Fort cooks will attempt to sway the judges with their use of common Victorian ingredients, cooking techniques and an entertaining story about how they created their tasty dish at Fort Nisqually in the 1850s.They also score points for historical authenticity and the use of produce and herbs from the Fort’s gardens. Judging takes place at 3:30 p.m. Given other events occurring in Point Defiance Park that day, it is recommended that guests enter the park from Mildred Street. Event admission is $8-$10, and children 3 and younger are free. For more information visit fortnisqually.org or call (253) 591-5339. SEE MORE BULLETIN BOARD ITEMS AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM


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Friday, June 16, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 5

EYES of the

TOTEM PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

HISTORY. Downtown Tacoma was all

things history last weekend with the re-premiere screening of the 1927 film by Tacoma's Weaver Studio “Eyes of the Totem” on Friday at the Rialto and historical tours Saturday that ended with a 90th birthday party for the film held in the Pythian Temple. One of the walking tours, led by David Boe, brought out the expert in Tacoma history, including film backers John Carlton, Michael Sullivan and Mick Flaaen, who filmed a documentary “A Totem Tale” about the community effort to save the film.

MONEY MATTERS

NOTED AUTHOR HELPS TRIBAL MEMBERS LEARN HOW TO MANAGE THEIR MONEY By Tami Jackson For Tacoma Weekly

On Saturday, May 20, Florida-based author and professor Cary Siegel visited the Puyallup reservation to speak to tribal youth about ways to develop good money management skills. Later, he spoke to their parents/adults on similar topics but the key message for both groups was about effective ways to managing their money. Standing in front of 18 chairs filled with teenagers in the morning, Siegel said he was glad to be there. Throughout his presentation, he gave away free copies of his book, “Why Didn't They Teach Me This In School?” He said the book was actually just a manuscript that he had written for his own children but now the book is selling 100 copies per day. While he never expected this kind of success when he wrote the book, he said that teachers are now using his book as an education tool. Married for 23 years to the mother of his five children, Siegel said there are two things that married couples fight about: money and children. “Money is one of the greatest tools a person can have,” he said to the student audience and added that they needed to harness the ability to manage it. “The goal,” he said, “is to set up things so you can be successful.” Siegel said schools teach art, math, English and social sciences, but they don’t teach personal finance classes. Yet he said the two most important things people can learn from life are: number one, money management, and number two, life management. Then he began to explain money management in an easy and simple way by listing three rules. “Rule number one: always live below your means,” Siegel said. “Americans? We live like pigs!” He said the U.S. government models what it’s like to be in debt and banks encourage folks to take out loans. Even car commercials tell us to finance a better automobile – so the end result is that we live deeper and deeper in debt. Siegel said even people who are earning $5 million are going bankrupt these days thanks, in part, to the many messages that society gives us about spending more than the income we bring in. Siegel said the second thing that people need to do,

PHOTO BY TAMI JACKSON

Best-selling author of “Why Didn’t They Teach Me This in School?” Cary Siegel presented money management principles to students and their parents at the Puyallup Tribe’s Youth Center.

after always living below your means, is to develop a budget. “It's got to be in writing and you've got to analyze it,” he said. According to Siegel, most people don’t budget because they don’t want to know that their income is less than their expenditures. Yet he said budgeting is imperative to living in financial balance. “You need to see what you have coming in and going out.” When Siegel asked for a volunteer, a 17-year-old named Joshua joined him at the front of the room. Then Siegel handed him $2,000 in cash but Joshua was not allowed to hold on to it for long because Siegel began “charging” Joshua for typical monthly expenditures. He said most people think a $2,000 monthly income is great but when Joshua had to pay him for typical living expenses, the other students could see the money disappearing quite fast. Siegel asked Joshua for $500 rent, then $200 per month

for electric, water, garbage and cable – and don’t forget insurance. He asked Joshua how much he would be paying for furniture and a television set. Then he asked Joshua to give him back money for a car, for car insurance, for fuel and vehicle maintenance. By the time Joshua paid him for food, a clothing allowance, and a smart phone, he was almost out of money. That’s when Siegel told him about the cost of entertainment, of health insurance, and taxes. “You've got to live below your means,” he reiterated again after the $2,000 was back in his own pocket. The third bit of advice that Siegel presented, after living below your means and keeping to a strict budget, was that any time a person gets a raise, or enjoys a little bit of increase, they should save that extra money. To emphasize that point, he asked the audience, “How many of you don’t like doing what other people tell you to do?” All students raised their hands. Then he said: “Know what? That doesn't change when you get older.” Siegel talked about all the stresses adults endure and said that peer pressure does not change from when grownups were teenagers. When murmurs of doubt rustled through the room, he explained the principle of adults feeling pressure to “keep up with the Joneses.” Beyond finances, Siegel taught the teenagers basic ethical lessons about working hard and building relationships with the people they know now because that’s how you network and get opportunities later in life. “Put everything you can into your job because it comes back to you,” he said. Later that day, Siegel presented a very similar lecture to parents. Yet for parents he didn’t just talk about money management, and personal ethics, he also provided tips on how to raise successful children. For that end, he gave advice about instilling a strong work ethic in their children, demanding responsibility from them, and urged them to build core values and passion in their children. Siegel said he encourages parents to get their children involved in extracurricular school activities and in the community. He also said parents should model the behavior they want their children to adopt and to get other respectable members of the community to also encourage that same kind of positive role modeling for the children.

OHM OHM AT THE BEACH

Water not the only fluid thing at Chambers Creek Bay this summer By Tami Jackson For Tacoma Weekly

Grab a yoga mat, water bottle and maybe some sunscreen because plans for a new outdoor yoga class are now flowing toward Chambers Creek Regional Park. Classes will begin the first weekend in July. That means yoga students can practice their kneeling twists in view of McNeil Island and can chant “ohm”while listening to Puget Sound waters hugging the beach. NeSha Thomas-Schadt has been a supervisor for Pierce County Parks & Recreation at Chambers Creek Regional Park since February. Yet as she pondered the attractive meadow below the golf course, with its backdrop of old pilings left over from the industrial era, she had an epiphany. Her enlightened idea was to host outdoor classes down in that meadow that’s closest to the water. Yoga classes, specifically. So she approached Erin Joosse, owner of Source Yoga, to see if she would help make the outdoor yoga classes become big as the mountain pose. Joosse was eager to make the outdoor yoga opportunity happen so together they planned a brand new program called Yoga By The Bay. “I think it’s going to be a really wonderful opportunity for people to just be in their bodies, be outside and enjoy this extraordinary place where we live,”

Joose said. Since Thomas-Schadt did not get inspired with the idea for outdoor yoga until after the Pierce County Parks & Recreation Guide was published, it’s not included in the printed or digital copy. The best way to register for Yoga By The Bay is to call (253) 798-4141 or log on to www.piercecountywa.org/parks and click on “register” then type in “Yoga By The Bay.” You can apply by using this direct link: http://bit.ly/2tdexeN.

A teacher at Source Yoga, Melissa Cotter will present both four-week courses for the full months of July and August. Thomas-Schadt said that each Yoga session will run four Saturdays from 10-11 a.m. and each month's worth of yoga will cost of $60. If it rains, the class will be postponed until the end of the original scheduled sessions with an extra Saturday added to make that rained-out class up. According to Joosse, the yoga will be slow and not intense. Yet folks who want

to participate are encouraged to have some kind of yoga experience tucked into their stretchy workout pants. That’s even while Joosse said that Cotter will be making adaptations in the instruction to accommodate individual ability. More specifically, Cotter will be teaching vinyasa yoga, which Joosse described as “slow and mindful.” Derived from hatha yoga, vinyasa yoga synchronizes the breath with a series of fluid movements and poses. Joose had explored the new site at Chambers Creek Regional Park just recently and exclaimed: “I can’t believe we live here. It’s so beautiful.” She said that Yoga By The Bay presents a wonderful opportunity to celebrate that beauty and said yoga will slow participants down and make them fully present in mind, body and spirit. “This is a beautiful place where we live,” she repeated. Joosse started her business, Source Yoga, in North Tacoma back in 2005. She opened her second studio in University Place in 2011. “At our studio, we have a strong emphasis on mindfulness practice,”Joosse said. Yoga is about moving the body in a way that makes both mind and body completely present. Yoga instructor Melissa Cotter’s profile statement can be found at SourceYogaOnline.com, under the “our mission” tab.


Section A â&#x20AC;˘ Page 6 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, June 16, 2017

Our View

WHEN AN AGREEMENT ISNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T AN AGREEMENT The growing troubles facing the future of the Tacoma Tideflats is one that could have been avoided so many times over the years if only agreements, pledges and promises had been upheld. But they werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. So here we are. And they so far arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going to be followed this time either. The largest battle in the works on the waterfront pits the City of Tacoma against the Port of Tacoma over who will sit at the table during the creation of a sub-area plan for the largely industrialized waterfront that not only is an economic engine of the region, but also a toxic sandbox caused by the industrialization of that very same land over the passing decades of unchecked capitalism and poor decision made in the name of â&#x20AC;&#x153;progress.â&#x20AC;? Tacoma City Council wants the Puyallup Tribe of Indians to share equally in the planning and forecasting of the Tideflatsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; future, not only because most of the land falls within the tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reservation boundaries but because the tribe is a rising economic engine in its own right. The 1989-1990 land claim settlement between the city, the Port and the Puyallups requires that any discussion about developments or decisions regarding the Tideflats must include meaningful consultation with the tribe. It remains the second-largest land claim settlement in U. S. history and was meant to formalize a way for resolving development and planning issues of the critical areas for commerce and international trade. Port of Tacoma now wants to relegate that â&#x20AC;&#x153;meaningful consultationâ&#x20AC;? with the tribe to simply putting them among the ranks of business owners and commerce boosters with interests in growing the Tideflats, looking past the fact that the Puyallups have lived and worked along the waters since before Puget Sound itself formed. But regardless of that fact, any sub-area plan drafted without significant participation by the tribe puts the whole process in legal limbo. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Puyallup Tribe of Indians have and continue to be great stewards of this land. Removing the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s co-equal role in the leadership, scoping, development and future implementation of the plan does not reflect the legally binding agreement,â&#x20AC;? a gathering of more than a dozen environmental groups outlined in an open letter to the City and Port as the two governments negotiate dueling proposals. The city wants the tribe at the table. The port commission wants them out, but wants to include the Pierce County Council, effectively stacking the deck for the pro-development camp at the expense of future generations that will be tasked with paying for cleanups the same way current taxpayers are paying for the environmental sins of past generations. Maybe someday, governments will hold up their part of agreements, but so far, negotiations about who drives the discussion about the future of the Tideflats isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t shaping up to be one of those times.

E-MAIL US YOUR OPINIONS! Tacoma Weekly welcomes your opinions, viewpoints and letters to the editor. You can e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. Please include your name, address and phone number when submitting your letter.

TACOMAWEEKLY Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma, WA 98421 PH: (253) 922-5317 FAX: (253) 922-5305 PUBLISHER John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com NEWS DESK news@tacomaweekly.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com STAFF WRITERS Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Larry LaRue / larry@tacomaweekly.com ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com SPORTS EDITOR Justin Gimse / jgimse@tacomaweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Dave Davison, Chance Pittenger, Matt Kite, Daniel Beers, Randy Rutledge, Jackie Fender COPY EDITING John Larson CARTOONISTS Chris Britt, Milt Priggee PAGINATION Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar, Lisa Lemmer WEB DEVELOPER Ed Curran, Miguel Douglas PHOTOGRAPHERS Rocky Ross, Bill Bungard, David Turnipseed ADVERTISING Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Andrea Jay / andrea@tacomaweekly.com

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Guest Editorial

COUNCIL CANDIDATE STANDS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT AND WORKING CLASS By Sarah Morken Dear fellow Tacomans, my name is Sarah Morken and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m running for Tacoma City Council Position 6. The primary is Aug. 1. This is my first time running for public office. While Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve lived in Tacoma for 15 years, I grew up in Bremerton swimming, crabbing and fishing in the Salish Sea, also known as the Puget Sound. Places I frequented as a child now have signs posted warning about the contaminated water. In my lifetime, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen us go from having abundant starfish, salmon, orcas and sardines, to a situation where these creatures are endangered or close to being endangered. I am a socialist who backs pro-labor, social justice and environmental restoration and protection issues. I am an occupational therapist and a shop steward for United Food and Commercial Workers union local 21 as well as the chair of Tahoma Green Party. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m the only candidate who is treating climate change and environmental threats like the emergencies that they are. On May 17, 2017 I, along with my fellow â&#x20AC;&#x153;Super 6â&#x20AC;? water protectors, was arrested for non-violent civil disobedience at the construction site of Puget Sound Energyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s liquid natural (fracked) gas plant. We took action because the official channels arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t working to protect our community from this dangerous project. Construction at the site, at 1001 E. Alexander Ave. is ongoing, despite public opposition. We were arrested that day and charged with misdemeanor criminal trespass and obstruction of an officer. Our pre-trial is Friday, July 14 at 9 a.m. Community members are asked to come to the Pierce County City Building that day to peacefully show support for us, and opposition to the fracked gas plant. More details will be available before that date, on the Facebook page Tacoma Direct Action. Supporters can also e-mail TacomaDirectAction@gmail.com. We hope charges will be dropped. The Puyallup Tribe is appealing Puget Sound Energyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s permit. The plant would be located right next to a salmon restoration project and it would have gas pipelines running through the reservation. A coalition of community members has voiced concerns to the Tacoma City Council, state legislators, Port of Tacoma, the Health Department and the Utility

and Transportation Board for over a year, but they havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t helped to protect us from this dangerous plan. My job has influenced my commitment to community. Many of my patients are poor and often without homes. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s frustrating to see when their hospitalization actually stems from a lack of access to resources, a societal illness that the hospital alone canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cure. This has led me to volunteer for organizations fighting for economic justice: Occupy Tacoma, South Sound Jobs with Justice, Coalition of Black Trade Unionists and $15 Now Tacoma. In 2015 we won a partial victory: a $2.53 per hour increase in Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s minimum wage. If we want peace we must work for justice. In 2016 I became a volunteer for Justice for Jackie, a campaign for police accountability organized by the family of Jacqueline Slayers, a Puyallup Tribe member who was murdered by Tacoma police officers. I will advocate for community democratic control of policing and public safety. This service is paid for by our taxes, and should be accountable to us. Make Tacoma a sanctuary city. I will advocate for shutting down the Northwest Immigration Detention Center in Tacoma (and everywhere). Let people work. Housing should be a human right. I will advocate for quality public housing, democratically run by the tenants. Look at Salt Lake City, Utah. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve reduced chronic homelessness by more than 90 percent in the last decade by providing publicly funded housing to people in need. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve actually saved money by doing this because it led to decreased use of emergency services. A healthy climate should be a human right. I will advocate for a community climate bill of rights including legal protections for community members to take non-violent direct action against new fossil fuel projects that are a threat to a healthy climate. This would include a publicly funded green jobs program. If elected I will give any salary I make above my current amount to a fund for organizations building the workers movement. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fight for you but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll help my fellow working class fight for ourselves for a humane, equitable, sustainable future for the next seven generations.

THE STATE OF HEALTH CARE IN AMERICA â&#x20AC;ŚAND WHAT WE CAN DO ABOUT IT By Willie Dickerson As I write this, 13 senators are writing a health care bill in response to the House bill that passed this year. That House bill would cut 23 million Americans off from their health insurance. It will destroy Medicaid as we know it, particularly hurting seniors, children and those with disabilities. Those with pre-existing conditions will be priced out of the possibility of insurance. These sad details were reported recently by the Congressional Budget Office. The House passed this bill without waiting for this report. Now senators from Texas, Arkansas, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Kentucky, and Ohio are writing a â&#x20AC;&#x153;softerâ&#x20AC;? version of the House bill. They are writing in secret, so there is no clear indication of what their bill will do to our current health care. Rumors have it being little better than the House bill, on a slower pace to end health insurance for millions and continuing to dismantle Medicaid. The Senate bill canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be voted on before the Congressional Budget Office weighs in. The one thing that is true: we can write, call, or visit our senators and let them know about what we want. Is it affordable health care for all? Then that is what we need

to tell them. Sharing our stories about the difference health care insurance makes in our lives is a good way to start. We can also thank Washington Senators Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell for working hard to make sure all of us have affordable health care. By sharing our stories with the senators, we give them the content they need to speak out about the importance to everyday Americans of having affordable health care. At the same time, we can ask our friends and relatives to do the same. This will be especially helpful if they live in the states named above. The Congressional Management Foundation recently reported their findings in a 12-year study: the most powerful influence on our elected representativesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; decisions is constituent input. That means right now we can help the Senate pass a bill that gives affordable health care to all Americans. So pick up the phone or a pen and letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s speak out, while the writers are still in the process. Willie Dickerson is a former Tacoma resident where he taught school for 16 years (and he still visits family often). Retired now, he is a volunteer with RESULTS (results.org) working to end hunger and the worst aspects of poverty in America and our world.

THE DECLARATION OF PEACE These are self-evident truths: That all humans are a single family living on a fragile and endangered planet whose life support systems must remain intact if we are to survive; That the well-being of the planet and the well-being of humanity are one and the same; That the well-being of each requires the well-being of all â&#x20AC;&#x201C; security is common; That all humans have a natural right to peace and a healthy planet; That all war is a crime against humanity and nature; That any war anywhere degrades the quality of life for all

of us everywhere; That we live at the decisive moment in history when we will choose between break down or breakthrough on a planetary scale; That we here now dedicate our intellectual, spiritual and material resources to the establishment of permanent peace and the conservation of nature, and, That we are fully endowed by our Creator with the wisdom and the ability to achieve these ends. 17 May, 2017 at Tomidhu Cottage, Crathie, Scotland, Kent Drummond Shifferd


Section A • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 16, 2017

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FOGLIGHT AND HUBCAB FROM SUSPECT’S VEHICLE 168th St. E., then is believed to have been run over by an unidentified vehicle that fled the scene. Investigators found a fog lamp and a red and black hubcap near where the victim was found; it is unknown what type of make or model vehicle these parts came from.

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Friday, June 16, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 9

ROLLIN' 253'S SATURDAY NIGHT RETRO SKATE

Now's the time to get down, boogie and learn to skate on wheels of glory

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ROLLIN' 253

FAR OUT MAN! These skaters dressed up to get their groove on at Rollin' 253's Saturday night Retro Skate. By Tami Jackson For Tacoma Weekly

Tacoma is full of secrets and one of them is how three seasons every year the roller skating rink located just one block south of Tacoma Community College on Mildred Street is packed. Rollin’ 253’s General Manager Jerri Turner said up to 150 people will be bumping skates on a typical Saturday night. Yet show up in the summer and you will have lots of room to “feel the funk,” as there is lots of elbow room to do figure eights and otherwise show off your wheels of glory. Turner said that is because in the summer, with sunshine making the days longer and with the warmer temperatures, the rink is abandoned for folks who choose to go to the park. That means the rink is left wide open for anyone who wants to skate without bumping into little kids. Saturday nights are “Retro Skate” night year-round at Rollin’ 253, from 7:30-10:30 p.m. Skaters might show up dressed in leg warmers and wear their hair in a side ponytail. Or they might be wearing plaid polyester suits instead with afro-wigs or permed-looking hair. Point is, they come to skate and to rock the night away to 70s, 80s and 90s music, even if they are just wearing modern clothes such as T-shirt and jeans. In the summer, Rollin’ 253 has more room for

advanced skaters who want to show off the newest aerial spin or for new skaters who do not want to feel like a spaz when they are just learning the basics and want to make ordinary turns without getting floor wax on the pockets of their jean mini-skirts. “Most skating rinks do a Retro Night,” Turner said, “because skating is such a 70s thing.” Yet she also said most other rinks close for the summer months, due to low skater counts. Can you dig it? The rink plays all retro music. We are talking disco, K.T. Oslin's “Eighties Ladies” and Queen’s “We Are the Champions” or “We Will Rock You.” Then There is Kool and the Gang, Prince’s retro music and Michael Jackson’s early work, not to mention Salt-NPepa’s sound and Bon Jovi’s too. "Retro Night is all about the music," Turner said. There is no typical age group. Folks often call the rink to plan nostalgic parties for their 12-year-olds and older folks can really get to feeling déjà vu skating to the oldies as their kids are skating with Madonna gloves and blue eye shadow. At the concessions stand, there is pizza, all-beef hotdogs, macaroni and cheese, chicken tacos, tater tots, popcorn and ice cream. There is also a whole lot of beer. Unlike most rinks, Turner said that Rollin’ 253 offers malted beverages and there are at least 12 different brands of beer offered, including Coors Light, Straw-Ber-Ritas,

Corona, Fat Tire, Heineken, Blue Moon, Budweiser, and whatever other flavors Turner feels like bringing in. Turner said she has worked at Rollin’ 253 for threeand-a-half years but Retro Skate has been going on for five years. According to Turner, these are the other exciting things happening every day at Rollin’ 253: • Tuesday After School Skate 3-6 p.m. • Wednesday Lessons 5-6 p.m. • Wednesday Cheap Skate 6-8 p.m. • Friday Early Skate (public session) 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Friday Private Parties 6-11 p.m. • Lil Skater Public Session 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. • Saturday at the Matinee noon to 4 p.m. (Skate the afternoon away for $8 admission, which includes quad skate rental; $2 in-line rental.) • Saturday Retro Skate 7:30-10:30 p.m. • Sunday Family Skate 1-5 p.m. (Looking for a funfilled afternoon? Come skate with your family. This session offers family-friendly music. $7 admission, $3 quad skate rental or $5 in-line rental.) • Camp Is Back! 12 weeks starting June 12 All sessions are subject to change. See website schedule for details at http://rollin253.com/schedules.

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Section A • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 16, 2017


Friday, June 16, 2017 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section A â&#x20AC;˘ Page 11

t Bag Ban From page A1

at least five cents per bag or reusable bags. City staffers have sent out postcards and mailers to businesses as well as held meetings with business and community groups already and have face-to-face meetings with grocery store managers and shop owners in the works leading up to the ban becoming law. The council has approved the ban with a one-year lag on enforcement to allow business owners and shoppers to prepare for the change by either using up what plastic bags they already had on hand or ponder other options. The ban will be complaint based, so enforcement would only become an issue after a customer complains that a shop is handing out plastic bags or failing to list the cost of a paper bag on receipts after July 12. The business would then get a call informing them of the ban and then a visit with more information if the plastic bags continue to be handed out. A third report of a violation could trigger a $250-a-day fine if a business fails to comply. Listing a per-bag fee on the receipts is meant to remind people about recycling since the fee itself goes back to the business to offset the higher cost of paper bags.

t LNG From page A1

for obstruction and trespass. They were formally arraigned on June 9 amid protests outside the County-City Building. Their pre-trial hearing has been set for July 14. Protests by members of Redline Tacoma, Direct Action Tacoma and Rising Tide Seattle are in the works for every hearing along the process. The six who are facing charges entered the 30-acre construction site and used bike locks to chain themselves to an auger used to drive deep holes into the ground. Construction crews were not allowed to start work for the day, so they called police to have the protestors removed from the private property while a gathering of protesters waved signs and live streamed videos from outside the fence line. Protests at the site have been increasing in recent weeks. PSE is moving forward with construction of the facility as it seeks final permits under legal challenges. The site is projected to provide LNG to TOTE ships sailing between Tacoma and Alaska as well as provide storage for residential and business use during times of extreme weather. Environmental groups and members of the Puyallup Tribe have long questioned the environmental impact of the facility on the waterway, the safety of a natural gas facility being located so close to residential areas and the overall impact of dependence on fossil fuels. WATER PROTECTORS UNITE On June 8, a coalition of more than half a dozen activist groups gathered at the Puyallup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Youth and Community Center to formulate plans on how to turn

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The price signal for the bag does help,â&#x20AC;? Program Specialist Emily Campbell said, noting the practice was adopted from similar ordinance around the world. These cities generally show that plastic bag waste and litter decreases, and reusable shopping bag use increases when a per-bag charge is part of the litter-reduction program. The law affects all retail businesses within the city of Tacoma and follows the same carryout bag restriction already found in 16 other communities in Washington. Low-income residents receiving assistance will not be charged the pass-through fee, nor will customers who bring their own reusable bags. Known as the Bring-Your-Own Bag program, the idea ultimately is to promote reusable bags as much as it is to lower the use of plastic bags. The city estimates 70 million to 100 million disposable checkout bags are used in Tacoma each year. These bags contribute to the waste stream, create unsightly litter, and threaten marine life. The city is currently set to hand out 20,000 reusable bags at booths at community events this summer as well as at social service organizations including food banks, Tacoma Housing Authority, community centers, Tacoma Rescue Mission, and Tacoma Public Libraries. Reusable bags will also be available for pickup from the TacomaFIRST 311 Customer Support Center located on the second floor of the Tacoma Municipal Building.

up the heat in protest against the LNG fracked gas plant. Among those gathered included members of the Puyallup Tribe and other tribes, RedLine Tacoma, Tacoma Direct Action, Climate First Responders, Wiconi Wakan, Raging Grannies, Protectors of the Salish Sea and more. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now, other people are getting involved more than they were, so I think this thing is going to get bigger and make our elected officials and Puget Sound Energy more and more uncomfortable,â&#x20AC;? Morken said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Until there is gas flowing through that thing, we still have a chance to stop it.â&#x20AC;? She also stressed the significance of calling it a â&#x20AC;&#x153;fracked gas plant.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re calling to a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;fracked gas plantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; because so many people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what LNG means. If you say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;liquid natural gasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; it sounds so benign, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really not benign. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re treating this as the environmental emergency that it really is.â&#x20AC;? Morkin said spirits remain high among the Super Six. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any regrets about what we did. I grew up here, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so beautiful with the wildlife and the waterâ&#x20AC;Ś I feel a responsibility to do something to stop these fossil fuel projects from being built. They shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be built anywhere, but here I can do something about it.â&#x20AC;? On May 23, Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland and City Manager Elizabeth Pauli sent a letter to Puyallup Chairman Bill Sterud to formally invite the Tribe to partner with the city on the Tideflats subarea plan as outlined in a resolution the City Council passed on May 9. The resolution also expresses the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interest in beginning the negotiation process for an interlocal agreement to outline the partnership for the subarea planning effort including the respective roles and responsibilities of the City, Port and Puyallup Tribe. In addition, on June 12 a letter was

t C-Span From page A1

outside of their region. The segments, supported by Comcast, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have interviewers asking questions that experts answer more than they allow the experts to tell the stories from start to finish. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In our vision, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the city telling the story,â&#x20AC;? said Coordinating Producer Debbie Lamb. Crews spent months researching the city and lining up interview subjects before parachuting in for a blitz of interviews and filming for a week before hopping to another city. Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interviews on C-SPAN3â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s American History TV included Washington State History Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gwen Whiting, talked about the history of lumber, Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s maritime history, the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Native Americans and inter-

Tips to Remember Reusable Bags t ,FFQSFVTBCMFCBHTCZZPVSEPPSPSJOZPVSWFIJDMF t 5SZLFFQJOHZPVSCBHTJOUIFGSPOUPGUIFDBSXIFSFZPV DBOTFFUIFN t 1MBDFBHSBCUIFCBHTTUJDLZOPUFPOZPVSEBTIPSDBS EPPSIBOEMF t 4NBMMGPMEBCMFCBHTDBOHPJOZPVSQVSTF CSJFGDBTF PS CBDLQBDL PSDBOCFBUUBDIFEUPZPVSLFZDIBJO t .BLFCSJOHTIPQQJOHCBHTUIFmSTUJUFNPOZPVS HSPDFSZMJTU t 5PLFFQSFVTBCMFCBHTDMFBO UIF5BDPNB1JFSDF$PVOUZ )FBMUI%FQBSUNFOUSFDPNNFOETSFVTBCMFCBHTSFNBJO ESZXIFOOPUCFJOHVTFEBOEXBTIFEPODFBXFFLJOIPU XBUFSXJUIEFUFSHFOUBOEESJFEJOUIFESZFS1MBTUJDMJOFE SFVTBCMFCBHTTIPVMECFDMFBOFEXJUIIPUXBUFSBOE TPBQBOEBMMPXFEUPBJSESZCFGPSFTUPSJOH To learn more, visit cityoftacoma.org/ShoppingBags or call (253) 591-5172.

sent to Tacoma City Council and Port of Tacoma Commission in support of the leadership and critical role of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians in the sub area planning process and the urgency to pass an interim regulation that limit fossil fuel exports from the Tideflats. A sub-area plan is a multi-year process that reviews land use rules, zoning codes, development policies and visions for a specific area. The costs of a sub-area plan is estimated to be about $1 million that would be split between the city and the port once an agreement is formalized. Signatures on the tribal inclusion letter were Becky Kelley, president of Washington Environmental Council; Shannon Murphy, President of Washington Conservation Voters; Gregg Small, executive director of Climate Solutions; Dorothy Walker, chair of the Sierra Club Tatoosh of Pierce County; Aaron Ostrom, executive director of Fuse Washington; Eric de Place, policy director of Sightline Institute; Andrea Brewer, chair of Sustainable Tacoma Commission; Laura Skelton, MS, executive director of Washington Physicians for Social Responsibility; Marian Berejikian, executive director of Friends of Pierce County; Rich Stolz, executive director of One America; Alex Ramel, field director of Stand.earth; Taylor Wonhoff, chairperson of Surfrider Foundation South Sound Chapter; Bruce Hoeft, Conservation Committee chair of Tahoma Audubon; and Steven J. Kelly, senior organizer of Pierce County Activist Council. The letter reads in part: â&#x20AC;&#x153;We strongly support the Tacoma City Council for including the Puyallup Tribe of Indians as a co-equal partner in this process and deeply disagree with Port of Tacoma Commissionersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; recent vote to remove the Puyallup Tribe. Since time

national shipping and trade through the city. Historian and professor Michael Sullivan talked about the Prairie Line Trail, the Northern Pacific Railway and the original Tacoma Narrows Bridge. Washington State History Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Emma Smith DeVoe and Susan Roher talked about Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s place in the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suffrage movement and professor Andre Gomez talked about the Chinese expulsion from Tacoma and the current reconciliation efforts. Book TV, on C-SPAN2, will have segments that feature Harold Mossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; autobiography, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fighting for Dreams that ,â&#x20AC;? authors Leon Grunberg and Sarah Mooreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Emerging from Turbulence: Boeing and Stories of the American Workplace Today,â&#x20AC;? Marian Harrisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Racial Disproportionality in Child Welfare,â&#x20AC;? Russell Holterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rails to Paradise a History of the Tacoma Eastern Railroad 1890-1919,â&#x20AC;? Tanya Erzenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;God in Captivity: The Rise of Faith-Based Prison Ministries in the Age of Mass Incarceration,â&#x20AC;? Katherine Bairdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trapped in Mediocrity: Why Our Schools Aren't World-Class and What We Can

immemorial the Puyallup Tribe of Indians have existed on the banks of Commencement Bay and naturally have held explicit vested treaty rights within the Tideflats that sets it apart from being a simple stakeholder. With the Puyallup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Reservation encompassing most of the Tideflats and surrounding area, omitting the Puyallup Tribe of the sub-area planning process would be shortsighted and incomplete. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Additionally, as a significant land owner in the Tideflats the Puyallup Tribe has future development plans that urge the need for their participation. The Puyallup Tribe has large economic interests in the Tideflats as an administrator of a foreign trade zone and one of the top five major employers in the region. The 1989 Land Claim Settlement, a legally binding agreement, compels the City and the Port to consult meaningfully with the Tribe on all matters that relate to major land use decisions, which include the sub-area plan. The Puyallup Tribe of Indians has and continues to be great stewards of this land. Removing the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s co-equal role in the leadership, scoping, development and future implementation of the plan does not reflect the legally binding agreement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our vision is not to be the fossil fuel superhighway of the West Coast. We applaud the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leadership and urge the Port to work with the City and the Puyallup Tribe as co-equals in the sub-area planning process for the Tideflats. At the same time, we ask that all parties work together to urgently put in place interim regulations on fossil fuel exports. These two actions will ensure Tacoma has the full ability to create the future for the Tideflats that best maximize our areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assets and potential. We look forward to your leadership of a visionary, cleaner, healthier and more prosperous Tacoma.â&#x20AC;?

Do About It,â&#x20AC;? and Justin Wadlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trying Home: The Rise and Fall of an Anarchist Utopia on Puget Sound.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had so much to choose from,â&#x20AC;? Lamb said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was amazing.â&#x20AC;? She had heard about the sibling rivalry between Seattle and Tacoma that has created the sense of Tacoma being a younger, grittier suburb of the Emerald City rather than its own city. But her thoughts changed during the visit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel that at all,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a very unique city. You have such a vibrant literary and cultural heritage.â&#x20AC;? The programs C-SPAN produces in Tacoma will air on Book TV on C-SPAN2, Comcast channel 25; and on American History TV on C-SPAN3, Comcast channel 150 and available at c-span.org.

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Sports THE KING

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 16, 2017

SECTION A, PAGE 12

IT’S (STILL) GOOD TO BE MARINER ACE TO MAKE ONE MORE TACOMA START

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

THE BEST. Wilson's Josie Matz won the Tom Names Inspirational Award at the Tacoma Athletic Commission Athlete of the Year event. The four-time All-City selection took home a $5,000 scholarship.

SPOTLIGHT SHINES ON THE BEST AT TAC AWARDS By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

ONE MORE TIME. (top) While he's already cemented his status as a Seattle Mariners' legend, ace pitcher Felix Hernandez has spent a surprising amount of time pitching for the Tacoma Rainier's while rehabilitating his right, throwing shoulder. Hernandez was knocked around in his first Tacoma rehab start on Tuesday, June 6, and was back in the dugout after throwing just two innings. However, the King was on his game during his next start on Sunday, June 11, giving up just one hit and a run in five innings of work to earn his 11th career win for the Rainier's. Felix will return to the mound at Cheney Stadium for one final tune-up on Saturday, June 17 at 7:05 p.m. against Salt Lake City. Tickets are going fast. Tickets for the Triple-A Home Run Derby on July 10 and the Triple-A All-Star Game on July 12 are also still available. Get them while you can. By Josiah Rutledge Tacoma Weekly Correspondent

I

n 2005, the Tacoma Rainiers sent a particularly promising right-hander out to the mound. Though this was just his first start beyond Double-A, the young flamethrower had already made quite the name for himself in baseball circles. Prior to the 2004 season, he had been named the top prospect in the Seattle Mariners organization by Baseball America and was ranked 30th in baseball. At the end of that season, Baseball America named both his fastball and his curveball the best in the Double-A California League. Prior to the 2005 season, he was again considered the best prospect in the Mariners farm system, as well as being ranked as the top pitching prospect in the Major Leagues and the second overall prospect, behind only Joe Mauer of the Twins (a catcher who went on to win three Gold Gloves, five Silver Sluggers, three batting titles and one American League MVP award). Signed less than three years prior at the

tender age of 16, Felix Hernandez had already become one of the most exciting up-and-comers in the game. Those who have followed the Mariners, or the game of baseball as a whole, are aware of what followed in the right-hander’s career. He’s won two ERA titles. He’s received Cy Young votes six times, and MVP votes five times. He won the Cy Young Award in 2010, while finishing as the runnerup twice (to Zack Greinke in 2009 and Corey Kluber in 2014). He is the Mariners’ career leader in wins, earned run average, strikeouts, innings pitched, and games started. His five shutouts in 2012 were the most ever by a Mariner pitcher, and his 2.14 ERA in 2014 was also a Seattle record. He’s starred in memorable Mariners commercials, and his moniker, “King Felix”, even inspired one of the greatest traditions in Safeco Field’s history: the “King’s Court” section in the left-field corner during games he pitches - a sea of screaming fans in yellow shirts who crave only one thing - strikeouts, and lots of them. Hernandez has been more than happy to oblige, racking up just

over 1,200 strikeouts at Safeco Field in his career. So it’s a pretty big deal to have him back in Tacoma, if for only a brief period. While still beloved by Mariners fans, he’s had difficulties over the past two years, both in terms of health (having spent exactly 100 days on the disabled list over the past two seasons at the time of this publication, which is a number that continues to rise with each passing day) and effectiveness (owning a rather un-Felix 3.95 ERA over that span). “That’s not good,” he said of the time spent on the disabled list. “Two straight years on the DL… that’s not good.” On April 26, he began his most recent disabled list stint, having been diagnosed with bursitis in his right (throwing) shoulder. It’s that injury that brings him back to Tacoma by way of a rehab assignment as he works his way back to Seattle. He made his first rehab start Tuesday, on June 6. The results weren’t pretty. He was scheduled to go four innings or 65 pitches, and was pulled after just two innings and 50 pitches after being u See RAINIERS / page A14

Now that the high school year has drawn to a close, the time has come to begin doling out awards and scholarships to the best of the best student-athletes in Pierce County. Around here, no one does this better than the fantastic folks over at the Tacoma Athletic Commission. The brightest converged upon Lemay: America’s Car Museum for the Tacoma Athletic Commission Athletes of the Year Awards on Wednesday, June 14. The Tacoma Athletic Commission is currently celebrating 75 years and it was quite fitting that this year’s group of athletes was among the finest to ever come together for the yearly event. Wilson’s Josie Matz won the $5,000 Tom Names Inspirational Award on the girls’ side, while Franklin Pierce’s Willie Patterson won the same award for the boys’ side. Matz was a four-year Tacoma Weekly AllCity Team selection and rewrote the record book at Wilson High School. While just a freshman, Matz led the Lady Rams all the way to the 3A state basketball semifinals. An all-tournament team nod seemed to put Matz on the map statewide and from that point on, she was considered to be one of the best point guards in the state, regardless of classification. Matz finished her Wilson basketball career as the only player, girl or boy, to ever score more than 1,000 points and dish out 500 assists. Despite tearing her ACL near the end of her junior basketball season, Matz would make a full recovery and led the Lady Rams to a fourth consecutive postseason berth during her tenure. The smooth guard also put in three years with the Wilson varsity soccer team. Matz will be taking her considerable talents to the University of Portland next fall. Patterson was a scoring machine for the Franklin Pierce Cardinals. After leaving Lincoln High School following his junior season, Patterson took over as the signal caller in Parkland and it earned him all-state honors, as well as an MVP award in the 2A South Puget Sound League. Patterson will take his talents to Montana State University next autumn. The biggest award of the year is the $10,000 Scott and Sis Names Athlete of the Year Award. This year the top prizes went to Foster Sarell, an All-American lineman from powerhouse Graham-Kapowsin High School and Jordan Thompson, an All-American soccer phenom from Sumner High School. The $5,000 Clint Names Multi-Sports Excellence Awards went to Caleb Davis of Bonney Lake High School and the fantastic Kendall Bird of White River High School. The $2,500 Stan Naccarato Sports and Civic Betterment Award went to Ian Cash of Eatonville High School. The $2,500 Clay Hunnington Sports Communications award would go to Danny Jackson of Peninsula High School. Lincoln’s James Mwaura was named Athlete of the Year for cross country, and shared the track and field award with MJ Ale of Fife and Caleb Davis of Bonney Lake. Patterson shared the football award with Sarell, Davis and Connor Wedington of Sumner. Foss’ Roberto Gittens was one of four winners for boys’ basketball, along with Life Christian’s Luke Lovelady, Lincoln’s Trevante Anderson and Curtis’ John Moore. On the girls’ side, Matz and Bird shared the award with Bellarmine’s Shalyse Smith and Franklin Pierce’s Alexius Foster. Curtis’ Sam Abbott (recently drafted in the 8th round of the Major League Baseball draft) was named Athlete of the Year for boys’ swimming and diving. Keeping it in University Place, Curtis’ Calhoun Helmberger shared the wrestling award with Brandon Kaylor of Bonney Lake, Josh Franich of Puyallup and Nate Moore of White River. Charles Wright’s Nick Iregui shared the boys’ soccer award with Brayan Torres of Puyallup. The list wouldn’t be complete without the golf awards, and nobody touches the Bellarmine Lions in that category these days. Joe Highsmith took home the award for boys’ golf, while Julia Bordeaux captured the girls’ prize.


Friday, June 16, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 13

Sportswatch NFL STAR AND TACOMA NATIVE DESMOND TRUFANT TO HOST CAMP

Atlanta Falcons Pro Bowl cornerback and Tacoma native Desmond Trufant is bringing back his annual camp, giving local youth a fun opportunity to interact with and learn from NFL players. This free camp will be held Saturday, July 15 from 12 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Woodrow Wilson High in Tacoma. Participants will receive a camp T-shirt, complimentary lunch, and giveaways. All positions are welcome to come learn in this competitive, yet fun environment. The camp will include individual drills, one-on-one competition and seven-on-seven play. Cleats and gloves will be required for all participants. “Each year the goal is to create a fun environment where the kids can come out and work on their football skills,” said Trufant. “I’m very proud of the work my brothers, Marcus and Isaiah, and the Trufant Family Foundation do in Tacoma, and I’m happy to provide an opportunity for the youth in our community.” Confirmed players to attend the third annual Desmond Trufant Competition Camp are: Robert Alford, Atlanta Falcons; Scott Chricton, Minnesota Vikings, Xavier Cooper, Cleveland Browns; Cornelius Edison, Atlanta Falcons; CJ Goodwin, Atlanta Falcons; Jermaine Kearse, Seattle Seahawks; Marcus Peters, Kansas City Chiefs; Brian Poole, Atlanta Falcons. Camp registration is already underway, but there are still limited spots left! Parents can submit their child’s form at www.dtcompetitioncamp.com. Registration is based on a first-come, first-served basis and will close once full.

PHOTO BY KAYLA MEHRING

SOUNDERS WOMEN PICKING UP STEAM WITH TWO-WIN WEEKEND

The Sounders Women traveled to Oregon for a twogame road trip over June 10 and 11 playing FCM Portland on Saturday night, then turning around and playing Westside Metros on Sunday. Both games ended in victories for the surging Sounders Women. The wins come at a good time with the Sounders Women sitting in second place in the WPSL NW Division behind the Issaquah Gunners. The two top teams in the division meet Friday, June 16, which is setting up to be a flyer of a game. On Saturday, June 10, the Sounders Women played at FCM Portland. The Sounders Women would take control early peppering the FCM Portland goal early and often. Nia Gordon found the back of the net first on a feed from Kaycie Tillman. Kate Bennett would then make the score 2-0 after Shea Moyer dished her a quality assist. Gordon then became the playmaker of her own handing Charlotte Williams a ballmaking the game 3-0 with the Sounders Women firmly in control. Tillman would round out the night with a goal after Bennett played her in. Final score on the night was 4-0 in favor of the Sounders Women. With a quick turnaround on Sunday, June 11, the Sounders Women took on Westside Metros in a game that turned out to be tougher than expected. The young Westside team stayed competitive in the game with the Sounders Women looking to put balls in the back of the net. Finally, Williams would add another goal to her weekend to go with the goal she scored the day before. Maddy Schultz played Williams in and the goal would be the difference as the Sounders Women won by a final score of 1-0. By taking all six points on the road this weekend, the Sounders Women move into sole possession of second place in the divisional standings. This Friday, June 16, will bring the first and second place teams together at Issaquah High School at 7 p.m. with the Sounders Women visiting the Issaquah Gunners. Come check out the top teams in the WPSL and the future of women’s soccer. For a complete schedule, information, and tickets, please go to www.sounderswomen.com.

SOUNDERS U23 REBOUND WITH PAYBACK THUMPING OF LANE UNITED

After suffering a tough road loss at Lane United the previous week, the Sounders U23 team returned home on Friday, June 9 to play Lane United in a quick rematch at Sunset Stadium in Sumner. The Sounders U23 team lost 1-4 at Lane United after only surrendering one goal in the previous four matches. The young guns in green took a 3-0 win on Friday night and pulled closer to Calgary Foothills, who lead the Premier Developmental League (PDL) NW Division in points with a record of 5-1. Adam Jones made his presence known early with looks at the Lane United goal. In the 40th minute, Miguel Berry whipped in a cross that Derek Johnson headed back to Jones. Jones buried the shot to put the Sounders U23 squad up 1-0. The score would stay at 1-0 heading into half time. The second half started much as the first half ended with Jones, Berry, Johnson, and Airrion Blackstock peppering the Lane United goal mouth. In the 63rd minute, Jones struck again to take the game to 2-0. Finally, in the 80th minute, Jones intercepted an errant pass and

throttled home a 20-yard bomb to complete his hat trick on the night. The Sounders U23 team went to Salem on Tuesday, June 13 to take on the Portland Timbers U23 team at McCullough Stadium. The Sounders U23 team has played the Timbers U23 team twice with a win and tie so far this season. Sounders U23 tickets and information can be found at www.soundersu23.com.

POINT RUSTON TO HOST WORLD WATER SKI RACING CHAMPIONSHIPS

The world’s fastest water skiers will converge on the Puget Sound this summer for the 20th World Water Ski Racing Championships. It’s all a part of the SunFest Watersports Festival on Saturday, July 29 and Saturday, August 5 at Point Ruston, which is free to attend. The world championships are conducted every two years and was last held in Wellington, New Zealand in 2015. The last time the world championships were conducted in the U.S. was 2003 in Long Beach. This summer, the competition comes to Point Ruston with its panoramic views of the South Puget Sound, the Olympic Mountains and Mount Rainer. “This international event is taking place on our very own shoreline for everyone to enjoy, regardless if you are a water skiing fan or not,” said Phedra Redifer, regional parks attractions manager for Metro Parks. “This event is just a continuation of our collaborative efforts that help us bring such unique and exciting events to Tacoma.” The World Water Ski Racing Championships will showcase 180 high-performance athletes and powerful boats from Australia, Belgium, New Zealand, United Kingdom, Austria, Spain, and the United States. The competition consists of four races held over a 10-day period. Races are circuits between 30 to 60 minutes long. Points are awarded for each race and the worst score is dropped from the total. This sport combines extreme speed, strength, endurance and determination. Fifty international teams will participate in six different classes – men, women and juniors. Each team consists of a driver, observer and skier behind specialized tow boats capable of speeds of more than 100 miles per hour (thanks to custom engines throwing off 1,600 horsepower). Skiers ride on a large, single water ski with the tow rope wrapped around their backs to stabilize them. Along with the World Water Ski Racing Championship, the SunFest Watersports Festival will include a hyperlite wakeboarding event, airchair demonstration, and skydiving demonstrations from world renowned skydiver, Luke Aikins. There will also be local food, live music, beer gardens, a family fun zone, and areas to ‘meet the teams’. The land side portion of the event will be produced by local specialty event planning company, Festivals Inc., which produces large-scale events like the Bite of Seattle and the Taste of Tacoma. SunFest will benefit Ben’s Fund, founded by Seahawks General Manager John Schneider and wife Traci, in partnership with Families for Effective Autism Treatment, which provides financial assistance with services specifically related to autism spectrum disorder treatments. For more information on the World Water Ski Racing Championships or the SunFest Watersports Festival, head to www.wwsrc2017.com.

LINCOLN TO FACE O’DEA AT HUSKY STADIUM FOR EMERALD CITY CLASSIC

The Washington Interscholastic Activities Association (WIAA) announced the matchups for the 2017 WIAA Emerald City Kickoff Classic (ECKC) to be hosted at Husky Stadium on the University of Washington campus, Saturday, Sept. 2. The eight participating teams in the 14th edition of the event will be: Lincoln, Fife, Eastside Catholic, Gonzaga Prep, Kennedy Catholic, O’Dea, Pullman and Seattle Prep. The event will consist of four in-state matchups beginning at 10 a.m. The first matchup of the day will feature Pullman, which qualified for the first round of the WIAA State Playoffs in 2016, and Fife, which will make its second appearance in the Kickoff Classic after debuting in 2008 against Cascade Christian. The second contest will pit Kennedy Catholic against Seattle Prep in a battle between two local teams. Kennedy Catholic was knocked out of the 2015 WIAA Playoffs by eventual champion Bellevue, and was a participant in the second annual ECKC in 2004, defeating Tahoma. Seattle Prep will make its third appearance in the event after winning against Mercer Island in 2011 and falling to Roosevelt in 2013. The 4 p.m. game will include a pair of teams that met in the 2016 3A State Playoffs in O’Dea and Lincoln. O’Dea emerged victorious in the quarterfinal meeting, edging out a 28-20 win before advancing to the State finals and falling in an overtime thriller against Kamiakin. Lincoln is coming off three-straight state appearances and will look to kick off their season in a big way over the holiday weekend. The evening finale will feature a pair of state powerhouses in Gonzaga Prep and Eastside Catholic. Gonzaga Prep is one of the most decorated programs in the 4A division, with 19 state appearances and three WIAA Championships. Eastside Catholic has qualified to 14 playoff appearances and owns two State Championships at the 3A level. Both schools have one previous win in their lone appearance in the Kickoff Classic. Tickets for the event are $15 for adults and $10 for students (with valid ASB card), and seniors. Children under the age of five are free. More information regarding the event and its history can be found on WIAA.com. 2017 Emerald City Kickoff Classic Schedule 10 a.m. – Pullman vs. Fife 1 p.m. – Kennedy Catholic vs. Seattle Prep 4 p.m. – O’Dea vs. Lincoln 7 p.m. – Gonzaga Prep vs. Eastside Catholic

TACOMA’S HOT TICKETS JUNE 17 – JULY 15 SATURDAY, JUNE 17 – SOCCER Yakima United vs. South Sound FC Women Washington Premier Complex – 1 p.m. SATURDAY, JUNE 17 – SOCCER Yakima United vs. South Sound FC Washington Premier Complex – 3:30 p.m. SATURDAY, JUNE 17 – FOOTBALL Kitsap Storm vs. Puyallup Nation Kings Chief Leschi Stadiium – 6 p.m. SATURDAY, JUNE 17 – FOOTBALL Renton Ravens vs. PC Bengals Sunset Stadium, Sumner – 6 p.m. SATURDAY, JUNE 17 – BASEBALL Salt Lake vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m. SUNDAY, JUNE 18 – BASEBALL Salt Lake vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 1:35 p.m. SUNDAY, JUNE 18 – SOCCER NSGSC vs. Sounders Women Starfire Stadium, Tukwila – 7 p.m. MONDAY, JUNE 19 – BASEBALL Salt Lake vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 6:05 p.m. TUESDAY, JUNE 20 – BASEBALL Salt Lake vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 6:05 p.m. MONDAY, JUNE 26 – BASEBALL Las Vegas vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 6:05 p.m. TUESDAY, JUNE 27 – BASEBALL Las Vegas vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 6:05 p.m. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28 – BASEBALL Las Vegas vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m. THURSDAY, JUNE 29 – BASEBALL Las Vegas vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m. FRIDAY, JUNE 30 – BASEBALL Albuquerque vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m. SATURDAY, JULY 1 – BASEBALL Albuquerque vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m. SATURDAY, JULY 1 – BASEBALL TSS FC Rovers vs. Sounders U23 Sunset Stadium, Sumner – 7:30 p.m. SUNDAY, JULY 2 – BASEBALL Albuquerque vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 1:35 p.m. MONDAY, JULY 3 – BASEBALL Albuquerque vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m. FRIDAY, JULY 7 – SOCCER OSA FC vs. Sounders Women – 5 p.m. Sunset Stadium, Sumner – 5 p.m. FRIDAY, JULY 7 – SOCCER Victoria Highlanders vs. Sounders U23 Sunset Stadium, Sumner – 8 p.m. SATURDAY, JULY 8 – SOCCER Twin City Union vs. SSFC Women Washington Premier Complex – 1 p.m. SATURDAY, JULY 8 – SOCCER Olympic Force vs. SSFC Men Washington Premier Complex – 3:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY, JULY 12 – BASEBALL Triple-A All-Star Game Cheney Stadium – 6:05 p.m. SATURDAY, JULY 15 – MMA CageSport MMA Emerald Queen Casino – 7 p.m.

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Section A â&#x20AC;˘ Page 14 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, June 16, 2017

t Rainiers From page A12

knocked around for four hits, two walks, and five earned runs. After the start, he said he physically felt good, and that poor mechanics were to blame for his poor command, diminished velocity, and overall ineffectiveness. There was speculation that we may have seen the last of the dominant version of Felix Hernandez. He had an answer for that in a big way with his second rehab start on Sunday, June 11. Perfect through four innings, he showed better velocity, with his fastball more often in the 90-92 mph range rather than 88-89 mph, as it had been in the previous start, along with a much-improved ability to locate within the strike zone. Though he ran into a bit of trouble in the fifth inning, he looked very much like the Felix of old, fanning five while allowing just one hit over his five frames of work. He was originally scheduled for four innings, but forced manager Pat Listachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hand by running such a low pitch count through four innings that pulling him could have delayed his return to Seattle by not helping to build additional endurance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew I was going to be better today, because it had been awhile since I had been on the mound,â&#x20AC;? Hernandez said after the outing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But last time, you know, I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find myself and was all over the place, but today it was different. I had command of my fastball and all my pitches...I was able to put the ball right where I wanted it, in and out and up and down, curveballs and changeups. I felt

much better than last time.â&#x20AC;? Despite his stated desire to make his next start at the Major League level, Hernandez has been scheduled for a third rehab start with Tacoma, which will take place at Cheney Stadium on Saturday, June 11 at 7:05 p.m. against the Salt Lake Bees. If you want to watch the Mariners great at work without making the trek up to Seattle, this is likely (and hopefully, for the Marinersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sake) your last chance. Beyond just the rough start by Hernandez, the Rainiersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; series against the Reno Aces was close to a nightmare scenario. Entering the series trailing Reno by two games in the standings, they lost the first three games of the series to fall five games back. The pitching staff, including Hernandez, struggled mightily over the course of those three games, allowing 34 runs. It was fitting then, that it was the pitching staff who snapped the funk in the series finale, shutting out the red-hot Aces offense over eleven innings for a walk-off 1-0 victory on Thursday, June 8. Chase de Jong tossed six scoreless innings, but was saddled with a no-decision as he was one-upped by Eric Jokischâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seven shutout frames. Emilio Pagan tossed two perfect innings of relief before turning the ball over to closer Jean Machi in a scoreless game in the top of the ninth. Machi got a quick two outs, but worked himself into a jam by loading the bases, putting the potential go-ahead run on third base. However, he escaped potential by getting Ronnie Freeman to bounce into an inning-ending fielderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choice. After Jonathan Aro worked two scoreless innings, the Rainiers offense finally were able to push a run across the board when

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Mitch Haniger (who, like Hernandez, was on a rehab assignment from Seattle) drew a bases-loaded walk to drive in the winning run. Though they were held scoreless through the first ten innings of play, the Rainier offense didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fail to get on base, as 16 runners reached safely. However, they struggled mightily with runners in scoring position, going just 1-14. Two key things carried over from the walk-off thriller against Reno into the opener against Las Vegas on Friday, June 9. The first was stellar pitching, as Andrew Moore, Ryan Kelly, and Cody Martin combined for the clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second shutout in two days, striking out 13 (including eight by Moore in his 5.1 innings of work). The second was on-base ability, as 15 Rainier batters reached base safely. Luckily for Tacoma, their recent inability to drive in some of those runners didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t carry over. Going 3-8 with men in scoring position and blasting two solo homers, the Rainiers took an early lead with a two-run second inning and five-run third inning and never looked back, earning the win in a 9-0 rout. DJ Peterson had quite the outing the following night, going 4-5 with a two-run homer (his eighth of the year). It was not enough, however, as Mark Lowe took a beating in the sixth inning, allowing an inherited runner to score and allowing three runs of his own to spoil the win for Dillon Overton in the 5-4 loss. Toeing the rubber for Tacoma in the rubber match was none other than Felix Hernandez. As previously discussed, Hernandez was fantastic in his second rehab start, and picked up his first Triple-A win of the season after Jean Machi shut the door with a five-out save. Machi, a 35-year old veteran right-hander and two-time World Series champion, has been nothing short of fantastic for Tacoma this year, owning a 0.44 ERA over 20.1 innings. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been great in his brief call-ups to Seattle as well, allowing just one run over 7.1 innings. Despite the series win against Las Vegas, the Rainiers were unable to gain any ground on Reno in the standings, as the Aces also won their series against Sacramento two games to one. As of press time,

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Tacoma (35-28) currently trails Reno (4025) by four games. Up with the big club: After winning nine out of ten between May 28 and July 7, the Mariners have stumbled a bit over the last week, losing four of their last six. Those struggles came to a head on Tuesday, June 13, as they allowed a whopping 20 runs on 28 hits to the Minnesota Twins, and even resorted to using catcher Carlos Ruiz to pitch the bottom of the eighth. It looks like Felix Hernandezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long-awaited return canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come soon enough. Elsewhere on the farm: The MLB draft began on Monday, June 12, and Mariners fans were given a new crop of youngsters to keep an eye on. Headlining that crop was Evan White, a first baseman out of the University of Kentucky, who the club selected with the 17th pick in the first round. White was named to the AllSoutheastern Conference Second Team twice during his time at Kentucky, and was named to the All-SEC Defensive team three times, including 2016 when he brought home the NCAA Gold Glove award at first base. He was also a member of the 2016 USA Baseball Collegiate National Team. Though White was the first selection the Mariners made, arguably the most exciting was second round pick Sam Carlson. Carlson, a lanky 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;-4â&#x20AC;? highschooler out of Minnesota, was considered by many scouts to be a top-15 prospect in the draft, but fell due to concerns that he might opt to play collegiate baseball at the University of Florida rather than begin his professional career. Though he will likely cost an arm and a leg to sign, Carlson would probably become the top pitching prospect in the Mariners organization. Though it unfortunately wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a pick made by the Mariners, Curtis High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sammy Abbott was selected in the 8th round by the Chicago White Sox. Though Abbott, a multi-sport star who led Curtis to back-to-back state titles in water polo, had signed a letter of intent to continue playing water polo at Long Beach State University, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll now have to reconsider, as the prospect of professional baseball and the signing bonus that comes with it, enters into the picture.

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Friday, June 16, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 15

PUYALLUP NATION KINGS LOOK TO DEFEND TITLES

TIME STARTING TO TICK ON SOUTH SOUND FC

PHOTOS BY KEVIN PETERSEN

BACK AT IT. The Puyallup Nation Kings are not only the two-time defend-

ing champions of the Western Washington Football Alliance, but they are also on the heels of winning not one, but two, national semi-pro/amateur football national championships. True to form, the Kings have started the new 2017 season looking primed and ready to make another run at the big trophies. With a 54-10 win over the Tri-City Rage, a 40-13 victory over the Renton Ravens and a home-opening 19-0 win over the Wenatchee Valley Rams, the Kings have jumped out to a 3-0 record in the expanded WWFA. The Kings will host the Kitsap Storm on Saturday, June 17 at Chief Leschi Stadium at 6 p.m.

! Wh a t a Feelin ''!

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

RESET BUTTON. What began as a promising weekend for Washington Premier's South Sound FC ended with some head shaking when the dust settled. On Saturday, June 10, the Shock headed to east of the mountains to face Yakima United, a team that is always tough on them. A questionable stop by the Yakima goalkeeper on a SSFC penalty kick put the Hoppers in position to sneak out a 2-1 win late. The following day, a fatigued Shock squad couldn't keep at it against a bruising Bellingham United club, falling 2-0. The Shock (3-3) are still in the hunt for the EPLWA title, but there doesn't seem to be much room left for error.

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Section A • Page 16 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 16, 2017

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City Life

Northwest Musings B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 16, 2017

SECTION B, PAGE 1

COMEDY LEGEND CEDRIC THE ENTERTAINER TO BRING NEW MATERIAL TO TACOMA By Ernest A. Jasmin

interview took place on June 8.) Everyone’s talking special, you may see some of the jokes, but they’ve kind about the Bill Maher controversy, and probably no one’s of morphed into new things. There’s also newer things happier about that than Kathy Griffin. Do you think the being worked into the show. controversy is warranted in each case? That is the hard part of what we do as comedians. You edric the Entertainer (born Cedric Kyles) has CEDRIC: I come from that era of comedy where it expect, in normal audiences, people who have never seen been a comedic force since the early ‘90s, was just in the room. You’d perform in front a live audiyou at all, so you want to make sure they have a great from hosting BET’s “Comic View” to being ence. Nobody had phones, nobody taped. You had the time; and then for those who are huge fans, you wanna anointed one of “The Original Kings of Comright to say things that were kind of off-color. You had make sure that they get that new energy edy” by Spike Lee’s concert the room to try a joke that you weren’t sure was gonna that they expect from you, as well. film in 2000, to starring as the lovably work or not. TW: Totally switching gears, I want cranky Eddie in Ice Cube’s “BarberYou go for it sometime. I think Kathy Griffin went for to ask you a hypothetical question I shop” films. it. I think in Bill Maher’s case, he went for it. … asked D.L. Hughley a couple of years “He one of the O.G.s, one of the allWas it offensive? Sure, but it was a joke. You apoloago. Obviously, no one could replace time greats,” Cube (né O’Shea Jackson) gize, it’s over. I think Kathy Griffin went a little long Bernie Mack. But let’s say Spike Lee declares in the intro to “Live from the with hers in making a big deal. Really, what was more wanted to do a sequel to “Original Ville,” last year’s Netflix special. JUNE 23 offensive; the head cut off or her Kings.” Who would you recruit to be The Entertainer will be back in town 7:30 and 10:30 p.m. coming on TV without makeone of the kings? next week to headline Tacoma Comedy JUNE 24 up? My kids are watching CEDRIC: There’s so many worClub on June 23 and 24, and last week 6:00, 8:30 and 11 p.m. this, Kathy Griffin. You’ve thy guys out there that are all kind of he took a few minutes to discuss his new Tacoma Comedy Club, gotta give us warning. doing their thing. When you think about set and the controversies surrounding a 933 Market St. “Kings of Comedy” in this day and couple of his peers. But first ... Tickets are $45 to $65; age, there’s Chris Rock, there’s Dave TACOMA WEEKLY: Let’s get this www.tacomacomedy Chappelle, there’s Kevin Hart - George out of the way. I’ve got a little bone to club.com Lopez. I like a lot of the cool, hot, pick with you. young guys. I like Lil Rel. I like DeRay CEDRIC: Ohhhh s---. Davis. I like Gary Owen. TW: I got excited when your special There’s a lot of guys that are starting to make was called “Live from the Ville,” but you went to the a name for themselves. I don’t know if they wrong Ville. I’m from Louisville. necessarily get the status of king, but there are CEDRIC: (He laughs.) I grew up in a small town people that are worthy to be on that stage called Caruthersville, Missouri. My dad lives in Memand have people see their material. They’re phis, so Nashville ended up being a place I thought he just funny and unique, and great guys. could get to the best. But the whole idea was I wanted Gerard Carmichael is proving to be to be in a “ville.” Louisville is always awesome, though. really strong; Katt Williams if he’s That’s a good town. not in jail. You’d be like, “It’ll TW: Well, you’re coming here now, and I wonder if be a great show, but one of the you have any memories of performing or hanging out in kings is actually locked up this market. I think you were at the Emerald Queen last in a dungeon.” time. TW: A couple of CEDRIC: Yeah, exactly. The Emerald Queen was a your peers got in great show. I remember having Marshawn Lynch’s mom trouble this there. That was great, and you could see where Marweek. (The shawn gets that serious attitude from. I actually went to the game the next day where they played the Green Bay Packers and had that great game, so that was one of the big memories. I always love it up there, man. I shot a small movie (2012’s “Grassroots” where) I played a politician on the Seattle side. I had the opportunity to go out on the waterways on a boat. It’s beautiful country up there, man, (with) good food. That’s what I like about coming up that way. TW: What are you riffing on in your set? CEDRIC: A lot of family stuff that’s going on with me lately. I’ve got a son who’s on his way, supposedly, out of high school; but he doesn’t seem too ambitious about that. TW: Uh oh. CEDRIC: He’s not gonna join the military. He doesn’t really care about college. I don’t know what’s gonna happen with this guy, you know? (He chuckles.) There’s that, and I’ve got a grand baby. (It’s) my first time being a grandfather. (I do) a little Trump stuff, but I’m not beatin’ him up too much. TW: Obviously, you play bigger rooms PHOTO CREDIT: ELTON ANDERSON all the time. Are you shaping up material COMEDY KING Cedric the for a special? Are you planning on shooting Entertainer — best know for one later this year? appearances in “Barbershop” CEDRIC: No, no, I’m probably gonna wait and “The Original Kings of ‘cause my special came out in September for Netflix. Comedy” — will return to Tacoma I’m still in that early stage. I’m still working material June 23 and 24. out and working new material in. If you’ve seen the ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

C

CEDRIC THE ENTERTAINER IN CONCERT

ONE TITUS IS BACK Popular comedian Christopher Titus will tackle the Trump Administration and partisanship when he performs his new routine at Tacoma Comedy Club, 933 Market St. “It’s now called ‘Amerigeddon,’ because that seems like where we’re going,” he joked last week in an interview with Tacoma Weekly. “We’re at the beginning of a Stephen King novel right now.” Performances are scheduled for 7:30 and 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, June 16 and 17. Early shows are open to ages 18 and older, but you have to be 21 to get into the late sets. Tickets are available, with prices ranging from $27.50 to $37.50; www.tacomacomedyclub.com.

TWO WE BARELY KNEW YA, DOZER Organizers at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium have announced that Dozer —

the 3,100-pound walrus that’s made his home there since late last year — will be moving on later this month. We’re sad to see the big guy go, but at least he’ll enjoy the spotlight there for two more weekends, as he is the subject of special Marine Mammal keeper talks that will start at 3 p.m. on June 17, 18, 24 and 25. Dozer was on loan from San Antonio’s Sea World to breed with lovely PDZA residents Joan, Basilla and Kulu. Officials won’t know until fall whether a baby Dozer (or Dozera) is on the way; www.pdza.org.

THREE HOMER FOOD! North-Enders now have an even shorter drive (or walk, even) when they’re craving apple fritters, maple bars and choco-

late cake donuts. That’s because the newest location of Seattle’s Top Pot Doughnuts opened last week at 2724 N. Proctor St. The franchise has been taking over Puget Sound with its yummy, “hand-forged” donuts since 2002; www.toppotdoughnuts.com.

related announcement. “Some ride to work every day, others ride for pleasure, but the riders journey far and wide and they have the stories to prove it. Marymount Motorcycle Week is in honor of those stories, and provides guests the opportunity to get up-closeand-personal with the vintage and specialty bikes.” Admission is free for LeMay members, $15 for non-members; www.lemaymarymount.org.

FOUR

FIVE

VROOM! VROOM! Tacomans can still catch the tail end of the fifth annual Motorcycle Week, which will be celebrated through Sunday, June 18, at the LeMay Family Collection at Marymount Event Center, 325 152nd St. E. “From the street to the track to the trail, there are millions of motorcycling enthusiasts,” reads a

SAIL AWAY The Festival of Sail continues through Sunday, June 18, at Thea Foss Waterway along Dock Street. The event features more than 22 ships, many of which will be open for tours. The charter boat My Girl will also be available for sailing voyages that will depart at 9 and 11 a.m., and 1 and 3 p.m. Multi-day passes are $20 and can be purchased on site. For further details, call Captain Paul at (253) 927-5351 or visit www.festofsailtacoma.com.


Friday, June 16, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

ISSUE #2 OUT NOW!

ADVERTISE IN oUR NEXT ISSUE: 253-922-5317

By Jedidiah Haney

GETTING DUCKY BACK

Recently, I met a parent named John Barclay in Olympia at the state capitol. Over this last legislative session Barclay has been advocating for House Bill 1060, also known as Ducky’s Bill. HB 1060 will help his daughter, who is named River, but her family also knows her as Ducky, to regain a normalcy of life by allowing her to take her medication on school grounds. Her medication, however, is taboo. Ducky has been prescribed medical cannabis by her doctor for her seizures. About three years ago Ducky was diagnosed with generalized epilepsy that has caused her to experience tonic-clonic seizures. Barclay explained that “she also has myoclonic seizures, spatial seizures and partials that are caused by her pharmaceutical medications,” he said “she went from having occasional tonic-clonic seizures to having all types, and more often.” I asked Barclay to tell me how they found medical cannabis. He told me that about a year and a half ago Ducky was in queue for a synthesized CDB trial at Mary Bridge Children's Health Center. Unfortunately, due to complications Ducky had been removed from this trial. Barclay said that is when the doctor mentioned to them that the CBD (cannabidiol) was derived from medical cannabis. Barclay noted that “we were already aware, but just not ‘there’ yet.” He told me that about a week later they got her medical recommendation. Barclay explains that medical cannabis “not only fights her baseline seizures, but also fights the side effects of the pharmaceuticals.” Barclay told to me that Ducky would benefit from school in many ways. School would provide Ducky with age appropriate socialization and the educational pathways that should be provided to all of our youth no matter what their disabilities are. Barclay thinks that “medical cannabis is also helping with her cognitive abilities.” He explains that the pharmaceutical drugs really “fogged her mind.” He continues on telling me that the pharmaceutical drugs “stunted her ability to use and or associate thoughts to words.” Barclay thinks that by having her in school it would stimulate her mind. Barclay notes that “constant talking and describing have helped her maintain her understanding.” Medical cannabis has been improving Ducky’s communication skills. Barclay furthers comments that “it used to be silence from her, but since we have amplified her medical cannabis intake she is building on that and now she has almost fifty phrases.” You would think today in Washington State with all of our progressive cannabis policy on that delivering state qualified medicine to state qualified patients on school

grounds would already have been thought of. However, when Barclay contacted the school district about giving Ducky medicine on school grounds and he said that the school board had some concerns about this activity. So Barclay took action to ensure his little girl has full access to her education. Barclay immediately contacted his State Representative Brian Blake to ask for his help in getting a law passed that would fix this oversight. Representative Blake co-sponsored HB 1060 with Representative Jim Walsh. Representative Blake is quoted saying, “I just want the schools to have the tools to deal with this if they get in

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN BARCLAY

Barclay and daughter Ducky. a situation they get a child that needs this kind of therapy.” I was curious about how else medical cannabis is helping Ducky. Barclay explained that “it also helped with her weight.” Barclay noted that the “pharmaceutical drugs had caused her to lose weight dramatically. She was 48 inches tall and 40 pounds when she stopped eating. When she could walk she was a walking zombie skeleton.” Barclay said that after detoxing Ducky from the pharmaceutical drugs they used medical cannabis to encourage her hunger. Barclay is happy to report that “Ducky is now 50 inches tall and now weighs 65 pounds.” When learning about stories like Ducky’s you learn about the many issues that surround pharmaceutical drugs. Barclay told me that the “anti-seizure pharmaceutical caused seizure as side effects.” Barclay explained that “she began on Keppra and it was useless for her seizures. It actually just gave her the “Keppra rage” and she can be randomly violent.” Barclay explains that he has already her off of two other pharmaceutical and that

“weaning from those was accelerated and she was having a lot of detox seizures.” Barclay told me that he talks to Ducky’s doctors constantly and that the challenge is to go slow to negate side effect seizures while detoxing young Ducky from the pharmaceutical drugs. I made a comment that the pharmaceutical drugs must have failed River, and Barclay responded that “they did more than that.” Barclay said that “River was a brilliant child. She was the top of her class. By kindergarten she was bright as bright could be. Today she can't draw a straight line and only recognizes "R" starts her name, much less even try to think about writing it.” Barclay explains that “I lost her because I trusted traditional medication.” Barclay tells me that he knows that the “information, a lot of it, is still in her mind.” He said “I see sparks of it when the brain remaps from the damage of the seizures and pharmaceuticals.” Barclay continues saying that “school knows they can get her back on track.” Barclay finishes with “I am gonna get her back.” What really impresses me about River’s story is that Barclay is so actively involved in molding the newly overhauled medical cannabis system, so it will work for his little girl. Meanwhile, these efforts will benefit over fifty-seven other medical cannabis children that are on the state’s registry. That is what I appreciate about HB 1060. This bill is about providing these children, ones that have had an unfortunate interruption by disease, safe access to their medicine, which in turn will lead to full access to education along with a more normal life. However, in the process of writing this story the Ducky’s Bill died in the Washington State Senate. The reason we were given was that it had the word marijuana in the bill summary and that turned off a too many politicians. So the plan is to approach the 2018 legislative session with new efforts. If you would like to help us with getting this important bill passed then we ask that you contact your legislative representatives and cast your support for Ducky’s Bill. Together we can all help Barclay get his little Ducky back.

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Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 16, 2017

BOOK ARTISTS EXPLORE NORTHWEST THEMES AT COLLINS MEMORIAL LIBRARY

PHOTOS COURTESY OF PSBA

WORD. (left) Kathy Dickerson’s “Indianola Beach Field Guide” has drift wood covers and a stand made with wood bored by torpedo clams. (right) Patricia Chupa’s “Thuja Plicata”comes with its own house capped by a cedar bark hat. By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

What is a book? The question seems more relevant than ever at this time in which digitalization is overcoming traditional media. The trend allows for an increase in volume of information (even an overwhelming flood,) yet it also threatens to open a dark gap in our civilization. Digital media depend on an energy infrastructure external to the would-be possessor of the information. Digital information is so dependent upon the maintaining of a gigantic network that any break in that network could relegate everything digital into oblivion. Books as physical objects, on the other hand, are self-contained repositories of information. Creators of art books hew to the idea of the book as a tangible presence; a unique object of beauty that contains a variety of stuff. Artist-made books are mystical, magical things that can contain imagery and information while retaining the quality of being a

work of art in and of themselves. Puget Sound Book Artists are holding its seventh annual exhibition at University of Puget Sound’s Collins Memorial Library. The show is free and open to the public and will be on view through July 28. PSBA is an organization comprised of professionals and amateurs from the book, paper and printing arts communities. There are bookbinders, papermakers, printers, book artists, archivists and conservators. The group puts on exhibitions, workshops, lectures and publications dealing with all aspects of the art of the book. This year’s show is a themed exhibition called “Northwest Musings.” The artist-made books in the show all explore some idea of what the Pacific Northwest means to each participant. Many deal with the native flora and fauna, while others explore the topography and the culture, both ancient and modern, of the region. Some explore architecture, transportation, coffee house culture and environmental issues.

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There is a great and inventive array of styles of making books. There are accordion books, flag books, books with woven, piano hinge spines. Double dos-a-dos with slip covers, Jacob’s ladder books, slab-bound books, codices with Coptic stitch binding, books with concertina binding and tomes with drum leaf binding. There are books with driftwood covers and books made with all kinds of paper, much of it hand made. The artist books incorporate buttons, beads, denim, wood gnawed by pine beetles, clam shells, coffee bags, sticks, stones and the list goes on. Each book is a thing made from a great range of materials. The pages have everything from the written word, to fine drawings, prints, collage, embroidery and combinations thereof. Many of the books have textured boxes to contain them. Some even have elaborate containers, like Peter Newland’s miniature travel trailer made to contain his “Travel Musings.” More elaborate still is Patricia Chupa’s “Thuja Plicata,” which has a container that is like a tree trunk topped with a Northwest native-style hat woven from strips of cedar bark. Randi Parkhurst built a miniature tower to contain “InSpired.” Kathy Dickerson’s “Indianola Beach Field Guide” is a set of beautiful little pages in a cover made of driftwood that is set up on a small stand made of driftwood. One of the masterpieces in the show is Chandler O’Leary’s “One Hundred Views of Mount Rainier, at least.” This book consists of a beautiful box with three drawers

equipped with ribbon pulls. Inside are 120 “image flats,” scenes that can be assembled in a diminutive viewing stage so that they create a 3-D image of a particular view of Mount Rainier. This volume leaves one dumbstruck by the amount of work that went into it and the high level of fine craftsmanship required to make it. Each of the little vignettes is utterly charming. O’Leary is certainly a living treasure that Tacoma is fortunate to have. “Northwest Musings” is sure to inspire its viewers to rush home and begin to assemble their own books out of whatever is at hand. The only drawback of this show (an unfortunate necessity) is that all of the artist-made books are housed in glass cases. A book is made to be opened and held and looked thorough. One stands like a poor kid in a candy story, wishing for access to the sweet treasures behind glass. What a pleasure it would be to hold one of these gems, to spend time opening it, exploring all of its pages and meditating on its contents. The show is a tantalizing glimpse into private worlds contained within the leaves and pages of the works of art on display. “Northwest Musings” runs through July 28. A PSBA artist conversation will take place June 22, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. A panel discussion is scheduled for July 19, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Both events take place in room 020 of the Collins Memorial Library. For further information visit www.pugetsound.edu/academics/ academic-resources/collins-memorial-library/ about-collins/artwork-exhibits-in-the-library/ psba-7th-annual-members-exhibition.


Friday, June 16, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

DON’T BLINK - MATTER Culture Corner IS BECOMING MINKA A GUIDE TO CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS OF TACOMA Goings on this Week in Tacoma:

Crafts of the Past: Tatting with Patti Logan June 17, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum, 5400 N. Pearl St. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org/fort-nisqually-living-history-museum The popular Crafts of the Past program returns to Fort Nisqually Living History Museum. Modern practitioners of 19th century artistic traditions share the methods and materials of their work. Each weekend from Memorial Day through Labor Day, a different artist will be “in-residence” at the Fort with demonstrations and displays of their work. Most will also offer guests the opportunity to try the craft themselves. Featured crafts include tatting, blacksmithing, Native American basketry, banjo making, and many more. Patti Logan will demonstrate the ancient tradition of tatting – making knotted lace. Visitors will have the chance to try their hand at tatting with needles, learning to make double stitches and picots. A simple rings-only pattern will be available as a handout. Tatting was popularized in the mid-1800s. Beginning in 1846, Mademoiselle Eleonore Riego de la Branchardiere published numerous books that helped propulgate the practice. During the 19th century, women in North America learned and embellished their clothing, pillowcases, handkerchiefs, made tatted christening bonnets, etc. Logan has been tatting for more than 20 years. She first mastered tatting with a needle, then became accomplished with a shuttle. She now teaches others at Arbutus folk school in Olympia. Free with paid admission.

Festival of Sail June 15 to 18, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Festival of Sail, 705 Dock St. Info: www.fosswaterwayseaport.org

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MATTER

FULL IMMERSION. “Object Lesson” is a collection of ceramics, paintings, and textile art by Nicholas Nyland, the new co-owner of Matter.

In the retail equivalent of ice skating’s double-axel, triple-Salchow, local design store Matter is making a bold leap, changing its name to Minka, and starting its own eponymous product line. “It makes sense,” says Lisa Kinoshita, who co-owns the store with new business and creative partner, Nicholas Nyland. “The store has undergone recent changes, with co-founders Jeff Libby and Adrienne Wicks departing to pursue business in a bigger building that will also house their woodshop. Steve Lawler [another co-founder] is moving his work studio into their space, where he will also have a dedicated showroom for his rePly Furniture.” At Minka, Kinoshita and Nyland will continue to sell the artisanal furnishings, jewelry and craft they are known for - plus new offerings. Kinoshita has designed jewelry under the name Moss + Mineral (originally, Mineral) for 14 years; Nyland is introducing a new housewares and furnishings line called “Object Lesson. The two plan to join forces to produce” a Minka line of “high-quality, artist-designed objects for the home, and to wear. “Our sensibilities really complement each other, it’s exciting,” said Kinoshita. To celebrate, Minka is throwing a Meet the Makers Popup this Saturday, June 17, 4 to 8 p.m. Nyland has activated the upstairs gallery with his high-pop aesthetic: huge, hand-painted floor pillows (think Matisse in Venice), Moroccan throw rugs, primitive candlesticks, and ceramic plates that will light up any table.

He is a fine artist whose work has been shown at Seattle Art Museum, Tacoma Art Museum, Olympic Sculpture Park, and many other venues. He has a showing of 2-D paintings on canvas at Minka, in addition to the painted-pillow seating. Downstairs, Minka welcomes new artists: inside the art vitrine (that’s a fancy name for display case), a dramatic dungeness crab fight is being staged by Tacoma sculptor and public artist, Ed Kroupa. The bronze crab sculptures are extraordinarily detailed, pincers poised for battle. Meet the Makers Popup will also feature one-off jewelry by local designers. Minka’s new wearable art section features architectural metalsmithing by Jennifer Lawrence Bennett; “chunkalicious” ethnographic jewelry by Harriet McNamara; mod, loomed-and-beaded neck rings by Saya Moriyasu; urban jewels by “Best of Seattle Magazine” star, Regina Chang, and a “smattering” of pieces by Kinoshita. One-of-a-kind furniture dominates the main floor - artists include Steve Lawler, Carlos Taylor-Swanson, Splice/Scott Cormier, Scott Neste and James Haskett. Minka has an impressive showing of ceramics by Melissa Balch and Andrew Deem, paintings by Jeremy Mangan, traditional prints by Arts & Crafts Press, and topographic prints by “Tim + April.” Minka is located at 821 Pacific Ave., Tacoma. 253-961-5220. Hours: Friday noon to 5, Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and by appointment. Dave R. Davison, dave@tacomaweekly.com

FASHION STATEMENT. Deerskin and crystal jewelry by Lisa Kinoshita.

The Foss Waterway Seaport, Puget Sound’s maritime heritage, education, and event center, will officially welcome and host Festival of Sail 2017. The Festival of Sail has partnered with the Foss Waterway Seaport to bring more than 22 ships to the Thea Foss Waterway. Many of the vessels will feature dockside and on-board tours along with day sails of Commencement Bay. Passengers on these day sails may be asked to assist in the raising and maneuvering of the ship’s sails or with steering the ship. The Seaport is also pairing up with the charter boat My Girl for daily sailings and guided tours of maritime history and marine life on the waterway and Commencement Bay. Sailings will leave daily June 16, 17 and 18 at 9, 11, 1, 3 p.m., Friday, Saturday and Sunday, on site from the south end of the Foss Waterway Seaport, 705 Dock St. Tickets are $20 and can be purchased on site or from Captain Paul at (253) 927-5351. The Festival will take place on the historic Thea Foss Waterway between the Museum of Glass and Thea’s Park. The Foss Waterway Seaport is at the center of the festivities, and will feature activities for all ages. The Festival of Sail is a ticketed event and tickets can be purchased at: ticketfly.com, festofsailtacoma. com, or by calling 1-877-4FLY-TIX. Parking is not included with event ticket purchase. Please plan your transportation in advance due to expected traffic volumes and limited parking adjacent to the Festival. Dock Street will be limited to north-bound traffic only.


Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 16, 2017

SECOND CYCLE HELPS RIDERS GET READY FOR SUMMER

PHOTOS BY MATT KITE

PEDAL POWER. Hilltop’s 2nd Cycle offers space where locals can learn to do their own maintenance and repairs under the guidance of skilled technicians, like Travis Martin (right.) By Matt Kite mattkite@tacomaweekly.com

Are you a fair weather cyclist? If you like to ride when the roads are dry and the sun is shining, you’re probably just now dusting off your bicycle for the first ride of the year. If so, Travis Martin at Second Cycle in Tacoma’s Hilltop neighborhood has a few words of advice. “Your bike probably needs a general tune-up,” says Martin, a shop operations manager at Second Cycle. “That includes a cleaning. Adjust all your gears. Check your air. Clean and lube your chain. And tighten all your bolts.” Safety should be your top priority, which means wearing a helmet when you ride and outfitting your bicycle with a light. “That’s not just the law,” Martin says, “that’s a good idea. I drive a car and ride a bike. It’s much easier to see cyclists when they have a light on at night.” Martin recommends carrying the following when you ride: a bicycle multi-tool, a tire pump, a spare inner tube and a patch kit. “That way if you run into trouble,” he says, “you can take care of yourself. And we all know Tacoma roads.” Those roads, Martin says, have seen a huge influx of cyclists in the last three years, and those cyclists range from commuters riding to work to families enjoying a leisurely outing. All of them are welcome at Second Cycle, which,

along with selling new and used bikes, parts and accessories, provides an open shop area where people can work on their bikes with varying degrees of supervision. Ten work benches are stocked with tools, rags and bicycle stands – everything you need to make repairs on your bike. The fees are modest for the general public and next to nothing (and sometimes waved) for low-income users, youth under 18 and homeless riders. “The average person who comes in is somebody who uses the shop as their shop,” Martin explains. “They do routine maintenance in the shop because it’s a lot easier to do it here than on their back deck or inside their apartment. If they have questions, we have staff that are available to assist.” If you’re too busy to make the repairs yourself, one of the mechanics at Second Cycle can do them for you at a reasonable rate. But Martin is quick to point out that anyone can learn to become a competent bicycle mechanic. “Ninety percent of it is fairly simple, at least for basic tune-ups,” he says. “We teach people from 7 to 70 how to do it.” Indeed, in addition to the shop in Hilltop, Second Cycle has opened a satellite location at South Tacoma’s iDEA High School (School of Industrial Design, Engineering and Art). As much a community resource as it is a bicycle shop, Second Cycle contributes locally with programs like Earn-A-Bike, which teaches youth how to work on bikes

and rewards them with their own bike at the end of the eight-week course. If you’re ready to get your hands dirty, the first place to start is regular maintenance. Anyone can clean and lubricate their chain or make sure their tires are properly inflated. For the more ambitious, even something as complicated as overhauling the hubs on your wheels is, as Martin describes it, “completely within the realm of the possible.” Martin has seen his share of “creative” repair work over the years. “One time someone brought in a bike at the height of summer and they had used Crisco to lubricate their chain,” he recalls. “Needless to say, it had become ripe. So don’t use Crisco. They make products just for this use, and we have them for sale or use in the open shop area.” Once you’ve got your bike whipped into shape, it’s time to get those legs pumping. Swan Creek Park, Martin’s favorite place to ride in Tacoma, is home to beginning, intermediate and advanced mountain bike trails that feature everything from gently banked turns to challenging jumplines. “Just get out there,” Martin says. “And be aware and be safe.” Matt Kite is an avid hiker and masters runner in Tacoma. Check out “3 Minute Hikes” on his hiking channel on YouTube.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: BUMBERSHOOT Promoter One Reel has released the daily lineups for Seattle’s Bumbershoot festival. Headlining the main stage at Seattle Center over Labor Day weekend will be Flume (Sept. 1), Lorde (Sept. 2,) and Odesza (Sept. 3). Among other big shots performing this year are Weezer, The Roots, Flo Rida, Spoon, Margaret Cho, Big Sean, Solange Knowles, X Ambassadors, Die Antwoord and Todd Barry. Single-day general admission passes are on sale now, with prices staring at $115; and three-day passes will be available soon, starting at $275. Visit www.bumbershoot.org for the full schedule and other details; and visit www.ticketmaster.com to learn more about these other upcoming shows, except for where otherwise noted.

• Cheech & Chong: 8:30 p.m. July 22, Emerald Queen Casino, $35 to $80.

• Tacoma Pride (formerly Out in the Park): noon to 5 p.m. July 8, Pacific Avenue, between 7th and 9th streets, free; www.tacomapride.org.

• Green Day: 7 p.m. Aug. 1, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn, $41.50 to $81.50.

• Art on the Ave: 11 a.m. July 9, Sixth Avenue business district, free; www.on6thave.org/art-onthe-ave.

• Lady Gaga: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 5, POP STAR. New Zealand’s Lorde (aka Ella Marija Lani YelichO’Connor) will headline the main stage at Seattle’s Bumbershoot Tacoma Dome, $46 to $251. festival on Sept. 2. • Brew Five Three: 1 p.m. Aug. 5, • Terri Clark: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 11, Pantages Theater, Broadway, between 9th and 11th streets, $10 to $25. $29 to $69; www.broadwaycenter.org. • Metallica with Avenged Sevenfold and Gojira: 6 • George Thorogood & The Destroyers: 7 p.m. Aug. p.m. Aug. 9, CenturyLink Field, Seattle, $55.50 to 13, Emerald Queen Casino, $35 to $80. $155.50.

• High Valley: 7 p.m. July 12, Steel Creek American Whiskey Co., $9.41 to $50; www.ticketfly.com. • Lynyrd Skynyrd: 8 p.m. July 20, Emerald Queen Casino, $75 to $350.

• Bruno Mars: 7:30 p.m. July 24, Tacoma Dome, $45 to $125. • Brian Regan: 8 p.m. July 28, Pantages Theater, $62.50; www. broadwaycenter.org. . • Ed Sheeran: 7:30 p.m. July 29, Tacoma Dome, $36.50 to $86.50 • Kendrick Lamar with Travis Scott and DRAM: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 1, Tacoma Dome, $35 to $96.

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Friday, June 16, 2017 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

FOREST BEUTEL TO DEBUT NEW SOLO CD AT JAZZBONES

TW PICK OF THE WEEK: LOCAL SINGER-SONGWRITER AND â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE VOICEâ&#x20AC;? ALUMNUS ETHAN TUCKER WILL HEADLINE THE AIRPORT TAVERN AT 9 P.M. ON SATURDAY, JUNE 17, AND HEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SURE TO PERFORM â&#x20AC;&#x153;CRAZY TONIGHT,â&#x20AC;? THAT NEW SINGLE HE RECORDED WITH MICHAEL FRANTI. COVER IS $5; WWW.ETHANTUCKERMUSIC.COM.

FRIDAY, JUNE 16

MONDAY, JUNE 19

TACOMA COMEDY: Christopher Titus (comedy) 7:30, 10:30 p.m., $27.50-$37.50, 18+ early show

PHOTO BY LEE HEATH

SOLO JOINT. Among Forest Beutelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inspirations for his new CD are cats being forced to do unnatural things. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

Inspiration can come from the weirdest places. Just ask Tacoma singersongwriter Forest Beutel, best known for singing and picking banjo for popular bluegrass outfits Barleywine Revue and the Rusty Cleavers. Beutel felt stuck when writing one of the new songs he plans to perform on Friday, June 16, at Jazzbones. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had a verse written,â&#x20AC;? he recalled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But it just wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going anywhere. I hit writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s block. So I took a trip down to Mary Mart and went for a walk.â&#x20AC;? Along the way, he encountered an absurd scene he felt compelled to investigate: some of his neighbors dragging fussy felines around on leashes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They said they were trying to train their indoor cats to be outdoor cats,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just not natural to have a cat on a leash, and these cats just looked miserable. These people were trying to drag them through their yard, and they were falling over. They were stiff-legged, fighting the pull.â&#x20AC;? Beutel knew a good metaphor when he saw one. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It just went right into the song. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a song about the day-to-day hustle, trying to make it in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all kind of cats on leashes.â&#x20AC;? Beutel had his title track; and on Friday heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll unveil material from his new solo disc, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cat on a Leash.â&#x20AC;? He recorded the album in December and January at Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mountain House Studios with some help from familiar friends: Barleywine Revue band mates Kevin Shintaku (also of Rusty Cleavers) and Julie Campbell (Dixie Highway) make appearances on bass and fiddle, respectively. Campbell also sings on album closer, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blues All Night.â&#x20AC;? Making her recorded debut is newcomer Jaynee

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Schmidtke, familiar to many locals from her day job slinging dogs and cold brew at Sixth Avenue hot spot, The Red Hot. Schmidtke sings a duet with Beutel on the ballad â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tie Your Shoes.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not in any bands or anything like that,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good singer, and she wanted to sing this song with me. So it worked out.â&#x20AC;? There is a fair amount of twang on the new album, which opens with the footstomping bluegrass of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cold Ocean Blueâ&#x20AC;? and features banjo prominently throughout; but as on 2014â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;If You Label Me, You Negate Me,â&#x20AC;? Beutel explores a variety of musical styles, from rock to acoustic blues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These songs arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bluegrass songs,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153; A couple of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;em definitely have bluegrass flavor, but thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a decent amount of what I would consider rock nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll songs, some country sounding songs.â&#x20AC;? Among the biggest departures are his remake of Surfaris classic â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wipe

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Outâ&#x20AC;? and an original surf jam called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mason in the Green Room.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;My brotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a surfer, and his name is Mason,â&#x20AC;? Beutel explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about my brother, and when a surfer gets barreled â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which is the ultimate goal â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they call it â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hanginâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; out in the green room.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never done a surf song, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s such a rich culture here in town with the surf music. I listened to a ton of surf and started writing songs.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cat on a Leashâ&#x20AC;? will be available locally at Hi-Voltage and Rocket Records. Fans can also download digital copies from Beutelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s site, www. forestmarekbeutel.com. Adding support Friday night at Jazzbones will be The Stingy Brim OldeTime Blues Project and Kristen Marlo with an 8 p.m. start time. Tickets are available online at www. ticketfly.com with prices ranging from $7 to $10. Visit www.jazzbones.com for further details. I, DANIEL BLAKE (100 MIN, R) Fri 6/16: 2:10, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10, Sat 6/17-Sun 6/18: 11:50 AM, 2:10, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10, Mon 6/19-Tue 6/20: 2:10, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10, Wed 6/21: 2:10, 4:30, 9:15, Thu 6/22: 2:10, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10 PARIS CAN WAIT (92 MIN, PG) Fri 6/16: 2:00, 4:15, 6:30, 8:40, Sat 6/17-Sun 6/18: 11:45 AM, 2:00, 4:15, 6:30, 8:40, Mon 6/19: 2:00, 4:15, 6:30, 8:40, Tue 6/20: 2:00, 4:15, 6:30, Wed 6/21: 4:15, 6:30, 8:40, Thu 6/22: 2:00, 4:15, 6:30, 8:40 MEGAN LEAVEY (116 MIN, PG-13) Fri 6/16-Sat 6/17: 1:15, 3:50, 6:20, 8:50, Sun 6/18: 1:15, 3:50, 8:50, Mon 6/19-Thu 6/22: 1:15, 3:50, 6:20, 8:50 MY COUSIN RACHEL (106 MIN, PG-13) Fri 6/16-Mon 6/19: 1:30, 4:00, 6:35, 9:00, Tue 6/20: 4:00, 9:00, Wed 6/21: 1:30, 4:00, 6:35, 9:00, Thu 6/22: 1:30, 4:00, 9:00 THE WATER HORSE (112 MIN, PG) Sat 6/17: 10:00 AM LOGANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RUN (119 MIN, PG) Sat 6/17: 11:00 SEMI-ICONIC: THE BALLAD OF DICK ROSSETTI (85 MIN, NR) Sun 6/18: 6:30, Tue 6/20: 8:30 NISE: HEART OF MADNESS (105 MIN, NR) Tue 6/20: 1:30, 6:35 THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME (117 MIN, NR) Wed 6/21: 1:45, 6:45 THE BEST DEMOCRACY MONEY CAN BUY (114 MIN, NR) Thu 6/22: 6:30

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AIRPORT TAVERN: Shawn Daddy (reggae) 9 p.m., NC B SHARP COFFEE: Tacoma Community Jazz Band (jazz) 8 p.m., NC, AA G. DONNALSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Bill & Dennyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Little Big Band (jazz, blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Harmonious Funk (funk, soul, R&B covers) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Forest Beutel & Crawdad Holiday, Stingy Brim Olde Time Blues Project, Kristen Marlo (rock, surf, blues, bluegrass) 8 p.m., $7-$10 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Blinded by Color, Skyline, City Scapes (rock) 8 p.m., $10, AA STONEGATE: Subvinyl Jukebox (rock covers) 9 p.m., NC UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Clone-a-Palooza tryouts with Kevin Pfefferle, Taco Ninjas and more (rock) 5 p.m., $10

SATURDAY, JUNE 17

REAL ART TACOMA: Adult Mom, Free Cake for Every Creature, Gender Wizard, Moody (indierock, power-pop) 8 p.m., $6, AA AIRPORT TAVERN: Ethan Tucker (rock, soul, blues) 9 p.m., $5 B SHARP COFFEE: T-Town Blues Revue with Randy Oxford (blues) 8 p.m., NC, AA DOYLEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Velocity (jazz, fusion, funk) 9:30 p.m., NC G. DONNALSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Bill & Dennyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Little Big Band (jazz, blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Vietnamese pop night, 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Swallow (rock) 9 p.m., $5-$7 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Barracuda, All Fired Up (Heart tribute, rock) 8 p.m., $10, AA THE SPAR: Tatoosh (classic rock) 8 p.m. STONEGATE: Soul Spiderz (blues) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Prom Date (â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s covers) 9 p.m., $8 TACOMA COMEDY: Christopher Titus (comedy) 7:30, 10:30 p.m., $27.50-$37.50, 18+ early show THE VALLEY: Wall of Ears, Plat3 (indie-rock, emo, psych-pop) 9 p.m.

G. DONNALSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jim Meck (piano jazz and blues) 5 p.m., NC, AA

B SHARP COFFEE: Creative Colloquy (literary open mic) 7 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke (live band karaoke) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Chuck Gay (open mic) 7 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, JUNE 20

DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Billy Stoops (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC G. DONNALSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tightwad Tuesday) with Homeless Hendrix, Dain Norman, Jay Taylor, Rick Casson (rock, punk) 9 p.m., NC NORTHERN PACIFIC: Stingy Brim Slim (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lefferty (open mic) 8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21

G. DONNALSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA

DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Lyon Pryde festival auditions (rock) 8 p.m., $5 NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 8 p.m., NC NORTHERN PACIFIC: Open mic, 7:30 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: Leify Green (open mic) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+

THURSDAY, JUNE 22

TACOMA COMEDY: Losse/Hamil (comedy) 8 p.m., $10-$16, 18+

SUNDAY, JUNE 18

THE VALLEY: The Hottman Sisters, Western Spyders, Geppettoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Retribution (indie-rock, alternative) 8:30 p.m.

DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jazz and blues open mic, 5 p.m., NC, AA NEW FRONTIER: Bluegrass jam, 4 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: The Dope Show (comedy) 8 p.m., $14.20$24.20, 18+

B SHARP COFFEE: Elliot Turner and the Ground Up Trio (jazz jam) 8 p,.m., NC, AA DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Rod Cook (blues) 7 p.m., AA JAZZBONES: Ladies Night (DJ) 10 p.m., $5 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC REAL ART TACOMA: Tethys, Seren, Vow of Volition, Arotheon, Divitius (metal) 7 p.m., $5, AA STONEGATE: Comfort and Call (rock jam) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA ELKS: Terry West (dance) 6:30 p.m., $6-$10 UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jerry Miller (rock, blues) 7 p.m.

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

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Section B • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 16, 2017

Coming Events TW PICK: IN THE SPIRIT, CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ARTS EXHIBITION Now Open Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave., Tacoma

PHOTO BY DUNCAN PRICE PHOTOGRAPHY

Jennifer Wood, Yup’ik, She’s Always Looking For Mountains, 2017, basswood, plastic straws, LED lights, ribbon, shimmer pigment. 11.5 x 7 x 3.5 inches. ‘THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE’ CLOSING WEEKEND Fri., June 16, 7:30 p.m. Sat., June 17, 7:30 p.m. Sun., June 18, 2 p.m. Tacoma Little Theatre, 210 N. I St., Tacoma Journey into the Wild West, 1890 in this classic story of good versus evil, law versus the gun, one man versus Liberty Valance. A tale of love, hope and revenge set against the vicious backdrop of a lawless society. When a young scholar from New York City travels west in search of a new life, he arrives beaten and half-dead on the dusty streets of Twotrees. Rescued from the plains, the town soon becomes his home. A local girl gives him purpose in a broken land, but is it enough to save him from the vicious outlaw who wants him dead? He must make the choice: to turn and run or to stand for what he believes, to live or to fight; to become the man who shot Liberty Valance. There will be a special “Pay What You Can” performance on Thursday, June 15 – tickets available in person or over the phone. Ages: Recommended for ages 13 and up and contains strong language and violence. Price: $24 adults; $22 seniors 60+/students/military); $20 children 12 and under) Info: www.tacomalittletheatre.com, (253) 272-2281. Group rates are available for 10 or more, and special flex passes for six are only $130. ‘PIRATES OF PENZANCE’ Fri., June 16, 8 p.m. Sat., June 17, 8 p.m. Sun., June 18, 2 p.m. Lakewood Playhouse, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd. SW, Lakewood This production of “The Pirates of Penzance” will place you in the center of a Gilbert and Sullivan’s musical presented with just the right dose of the humor of Monty Python and a dash of Warner Brothers cartoon fun. Gilbert and Sullivan’s hilarious, hopeful farce follows young Frederic, an orphan who has mistakenly been apprenticed to an ineffectual but raucous band of pirates. He disavows the pirates’ way of life and falls for the beautiful Mabel. Frederic’s melodious tones win over the heart of Major General Stanley’s songbird daughter, Mabel, but when the Pirate King discovers General Stanley has lied about being an orphan to keep the pirates from stealing all of his belongings and carrying off his bevy of beautiful daughters, an “ingenious paradox” may prevent. Plays through June 25. Ages: All ages. Info: www.lakewoodplayhouse.org; (253) 588-0042 BEHIND THE BADGE FOUNDATION GOLF TOURNAMENT Fri., June 16, 1:30-11 p.m. Meadow Park Golf Course, 7108 Lakewood Dr. W. Behind the Badge Foundation helps the families of officers who have lost their life, or

This summer marks the Washington State Historical Society’s 12th annual IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts Exhibition. The show is now open and the community is warmly invited to come by and see the 22 works on view by artists from Alaska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Washington, and Canada that include textiles, sculptures, paintings, carvings, and basketry. Most of the works in the show are available for purchase. The People’s Choice awards will be presented at the free IN THE SPIRIT Northwest Native Festival. Mark your calendars for this indoor/outdoor celebration on Saturday, Aug. 19, from 10 a.m. through 5 p.m. The History Museum is co-hosting the festival with Tacoma Art Museum (TAM). Admission to both museums is free. In addition to a Native arts market, the festival includes dance, song, music, food, and a runway fashion show featuring Native designers. On view through Aug. 20. Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on the Third Thursday of each month. Admission: Free for members; $12 for adults, $8 for seniors, students and military veterans with ID, free for children under 5. Patrons with a Washington Quest card can attend for $1 per person or $2 per family. Admission is free after 2 p.m. on the Third Thursday of each month when the museum stays open until 8 p.m. Info: www.washingtonhistory.org; (253) 272-3500 have been seriously injured in the line of duty. This tournament is to help support the foundation. Ages: 21 and older. Price: 500 per team of four. Info: (253) 592-9061 CHRISTOPHER TITUS Fri., June 16, 8-10:30 p.m. Tacoma Comedy Club, 933 Market St. Christopher Titus is one of the most in demand comedians touring today. He is well known for his dark comedy, “Titus,” on Fox. Ages: 8 p.m. show 18+ 10:30 p.m. show 21+ Price: $22.50-$37.50. Info: (253) 282-7203; www. ta c om a co m ed y c lu b. c om / events/13186 FAMILY STEAM DAY Fri., June 16, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. LeMay – America’s Car Museum, 2702 E. D St. Design, build, tinker and learn together as you explore the world of automobiles and its relation to science, technology, engineering, art and math. Ages: All ages. Price: $10-$18. Info: www.americascarmuseum.org; (253) 779-8490 INTRO TO 3D PRINTING Fri., June 16, 4-6 p.m. Parkland/Spanaway Library, 13718 Pacific Ave. S. What is 3D printing, and how does it work? Learn about the technology and see a demo of the library’s 3D printers. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3304; www. piercecountylibrary.org/calendar AMVETS POST #1 OPEN HOUSE Sat., June 17, 1-4 p.m. AmVets Post #1, 5717 S. Tyler St. Open house and membership drive on June 17, 1-4 p.m. Price: First burger and a beer (or soda) for $1. Info: (253) 472-2552; AMVETSWAPost1.org AN AFRICAN AMERICAN ODYSSEY Sat., June 17, 2 p.m. Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave. Northwest Tap Connection returns to the History Museum with another stunning performance. “An African American Odyssey” interprets the economic, social, political, artistic, and racial imprints that have cultivated the black experience in American culture. Ages: All Ages. Price: $5. Info: (253) 272-3500; www.washingtonhistory.org BILINGUAL BLOCK PLAY Sat., June 17, 10-11:30 a.m. Parkland/Spanaway Library, 13718 Pacific Ave. S. Build with blocks and enjoy stories in English and Spanish or Mandarin. Ages: 3-8. Price: Free. Info: (253) 5483304; www.piercecountylibrary.org/calendar

FOOD ADDICTS IN RECOVERY ANONYMOUS Sat., June 17, 8-9:30 p.m. Trinity Lutheran Church, 12115 Park Ave. S. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous is an international fellowship of men and women who have experienced difficulties in life as a result of the way we used to eat. Price: Free. Info: (253) 3108177; www.foodaddicts.org ARGENTINE TANGO DANCE/MILONGA Sun., June 18, 3-5:30 p.m. Backstreet Tango, 3505 S. 14th St. Come enjoy an evening of dancing both traditional and contemporary Argentine tango music and social dancing. Ages: 16 and above. Price: $5. Info: (253) 3048296; backstreettango.com FESTIVAL OF SAIL TACOMA Sun., June 18, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Foss Waterway Seaport, 705 Dock St. The Festival of Sail has partnered with the Foss Waterway Seaport to bring more than 22 tall ships to the Thea Foss Waterway. Many of the vessels will feature dockside and on board tours along with day sails of Commencement Bay. Ages: All ages. Price: Single day pass $9, single-day on board tour pass: $12, Day Sail: $95, Parade of Sail day sail: $150. Info: (253) 272-2750; www. festofsailtacoma.com SOUTH TACOMA FARMERS MARKET Sun., June 18, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. STAR Center, 3873 S. 66th St. This lively Sunday Market, located in the heart of the MetroParks STAR Center and SERA Campus, brings the best of our local harvest to the South Tacoma community. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-7077; www. tacomafarmersmarket.com DROP-IN HELP WITH WORKSOURCE Mon., June 19, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.; 2-4 p.m. Parkland/Spanaway Library, 13718 Pacific Ave. S. WorkSource employment experts help you with your specific questions about all things employment related, resumes, unemployment claims, job coaching and interview prep. Ages: Adults. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3304; www.piercecountylibrary.org/calendar CREATIVE COLLOQUY MONTHLY READING & OPEN MIC Mon., June 19, 7-10 p.m. B Sharp Coffee House, 706 Court C Creative Colloquy invites lovers of the literary and admirers of the craft of storytelling to join us for another night of creative writing performances and open mic. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 257-8226; www.creativecolloquy.com

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF TACOMA: DAILY ACTIVITIES Mon., June 19, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Tacoma, 1501 Pacific Ave. Children of all ages and abilities will be able to explore these science, technology, engineering, and mathematics activities led by a playguide. Ages: Birth to age 10 years. Price: Pay as you will admissions. Info: (253) 6276031; www.playtacoma.org/ calendar

Price: $10-$18; childern 12 and under free. Info: (253) 779-8490; www.americascarmuseum.org WORSHIP AT HISTORIC OLD ST. PETER’S CHURCH Tues., June 20, 10-11 a.m.; 5-5:40 p.m. St. Peter’s Church, 2910 N. Starr St. Tacoma’s first and oldest church, St. Peter’s (est. 1873) invites you to experience Holy Communion every Sunday. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-4406; www.oldstpeters.org

LOCAL ARTIST: TARA THOMAS-SANDERSON Mon., June 19, 4:30-6 p.m. Summit Library, 5107 112th St. E. Enjoy light refreshments and meet local artist Tara Thomas-Sanderson. Her books are delightful, short and easy-toread stories for young readers with bright and beautiful handpainted illustrations. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3321; www.piercecountylibrary.org/calendar

LINE DANCING Tues., June 20, 6-8 p.m. Asia Pacific Cultural Center, 4851 South Tacoma Way Beginners and intermediates can get on the dance floor for fun and exercise in this seven-week program. Beginners meet on Tuesdays, Intermediates on Thursdays. Price: $45 for 7-week session. Info: (253) 383-3900; funtimelinedancing.com EASTSIDE FARMERS MARKET Wed., June 21, 3-6 p.m. Salishan Family Investment Center, 1724 E. 44th St. Discover this little gem of a market in the heart of East Tacoma’s Salishan community. You will find an abundant selection of local fruits, vegetables, flowers, honey and mushrooms. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-7077; www. tacomafarmersmarket.com

ARGENTINE TANGO BEGINNERS CLASS Tues., June 20, 7:30 p.m. Backstreet Tango, 3505 S. 14th St. Join this group for an absolute beginner level class. The studio was built with the sole purpose of teaching only authentic social Argentine tango. Ages: 16 with guardian and up. Price: $10 per class, 8 classes for $40, 10 classes for $70. Info: (253) 304-8296; backstreettango.com

HISTORY HAPPY HOUR TRIVIA NIGHT Wed., June 21, 6-8:30 p.m. The Swiss Pub, 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. Trivia night free and open to the public. Test your knowledge of state and city trivia, prizes. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 5732821; www.facebook.com/ events/430935700610628

SEDUCTIVE SUPERCARS Tues., June 20, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. LeMay – America’s Car Museum, 2702 E. D St. Exotics@ACM – Seductive Supercars will focus on the crème de la crème of exotic cars that embody the world’s best designs, technology and performance. Ages: All ages.

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We’ve hidden 12 Tacoma Weekly-themed words in this word search. How many can you find? Not sure what you’re looking for? Head over to B5 for the complete word list.

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Friday, June 16 2017 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

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Featured Pet Matilda would love to meet you. The five-yearold Mastiff mix is looking for a home where she can get the TLC sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always wanted. As a middle-aged lady, Matilda is somewhat set in her ways and needs a home without small animals or children under age 10. But a benefit of her maturity is her relaxed demeanor â&#x20AC;&#x201D; our resident couch potato would love nothing more than to laze around with her people. Matilda came to the shelter as a stray so not much is known about her previous life, and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d benefit from a family willing to remind her of the basics of leash walking and other finer points. The Mastiff mix does have a medical waiver â&#x20AC;&#x201D; please ask staff for more information about her further treatment plan. We know that in the right home, Matilda will bloom into a beloved and loyal friend. Please come see what she has to offer today. #A516093

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Wanted for immediate employment: Experienced Journeyman Electrician Seeking full time experienced Journeyman Electrician to work on a Federal government facility in Kitsap County (located in Port Orchard). Performs a variety of electrical trade functions such as the installation, maintenance, or repair of equipment for the generation, distribution, or utilization of electric energy. Pay depending on education and experience, plus $4.27 for health and welfare NVS Corporate Services Inc. (956)903-4382x203 (956)621-4256 Fax vcastillo@nvscsi.com

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3ECTION"s0AGEsTACOMAWEEKLYCOMsFriday, June 16, 2017

NOTICES

NOTICES Auction Notice

DANIEL A. BROWN, State Bar No. 155181 THE LAW OFFICES OF LARRY H. PARKER, INC 350 San Antonio Drive Long Beach, California 90807-0948 (562) 427-2044 Fax (562) 490-9855 Attorneys for Plaintiff Henry Garcia SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF KERN CASE NO. BCV-16-102267 COMPLAINT FOR PERSONAL INJUIES HENRY GARCIA; Plaintiff, v.

Abandoned Vehicle Lakewood Towing Inc. #5002 9393 Lakeview Ave SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 Ph. 253-582-5080 Auction 06292017 Date 06/29/2017 Sign in & View @ 12 pm Auction Starts @ 2 pm In accordance with RCW 46.55.130 Lakewood Towing Inc. will sell to the highest bidder. See complete listing @ lakewoodtowing.com or posting at our office

RUI XIE aka RUI RUI; FOX RENT A CAR, INC.; and DOES 1 through 100, Inclusive, Defendants. Plaintiff Henry Garcia alleges: 1. At all times herein mentioned, plaintiff Henry Garcia was is a competent adult residing in the City of Bakersfield, County of Kern, California. 2. At all times herein mentioned, defendant Rui Xie aka Rui Rui was and is a natural person residing in the City of Lakewood, County of Los Angeles, California. 3. Plaintiff Henry Garcia is unsure of the legal capacities of defendant Fox Rent A Car, Inc., whether corporate, dba, partnership, joint venture of otherwise, and will seek leave to amend this complaint at such time as same is discovered or will disclose same through discovery. 4. The true names and capacities of the defendants sued herein as Does 1 through 100, inclusive, are unknown to plaintiff who therefore sues said defendants by such fictitious names. Plaintiff Henry Garcia is informed and believes and thereon alleges that each of the defendants herein designated as a Doe is legally responsible in some manner for the events and happenings herein referred to and caused injury and damages to plaintiff as herein alleged. 5. At all times alleged herein each defendant was the agent and employee of each of his codefendants, and in doing the things herein described was acting within the scope of his authority as such agent and employee. 6. At all times material herein Highway 43 was and is a public highway in the City of Bakersfield, County of Kern, State of California. 7. On or about December 18, 2014, plaintiff Henry Garcia was a passenger in a vehicle on Highway 43 at or near its intersection with7th Standard Road, and at the same time and place defendants, and each of them, so negligently owned, controlled, repaired, entrusted, maintained and operated an automobile as to cause it to, and it did, become involved in an accident or collision, injuring and damaging plaintiff as hereinafter described. 8. At all times set forth herein defendants, and each of them, were the owners of their aforementioned automobile, and at all times herein referred to said vehicle was being used and operated with the knowledge and consent of said owners. 9. As a cause of said conduct of defendants, and each of them, plaintiff sustained personal injuries which caused and will continue to cause pain, discomfort and physical disability to plaintiff, general damage in a amount according to proof which is good faith is believed to be an amount within the jurisdictional limits of this court. 10. As a further cause of said conduct of defendants, and each of them, plaintiff employed and will employ in the future physicians, surgeons and others for examination, treatment and care, and thereby incurred and will incur medical and incidental expense, the exact amount of which is unknown at this time and plaintiff will offer proof thereof at the time of trial. 11. At the time of the described improper conduct of defendants, and each of them, plaintiff Henry Garcia was gainfully employed for compensation, and as a further cause of defendants conduct, and each if them, plaintiff has been and in the future will e deprived of earnings, the exact amount of which is unknown at this time, and plaintiff will offer proof thereof at the time of trial. WHEREFORE, judgment is prayed for against defendants, and each of them, as follows: 1. General damages according to proof; 2. Medical and related expenses, past and future, according to proof; 3. Loss of earnings, past and future, in a sum according to proof; 4. Loss of income from impaired earning capacity, past and future, according to proof; 5. For prejudgment interest pursuant to Civil Code 3291; 6. Costs of suit incurred herein; and 7. For such other relief as may be appropriate. Dated: September 16, 2016 DANIEL A. BROWN, A Member of THE LAW OFFICES OF LARRY H. PARKER, INC. Attorneys for Plaintiff Henry Garcia

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Northwest Towing, at 2025 S 341st Pl, Federal Way on 6/20/2017. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130. at 3:00 p.m. Viewing of cars from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Registered Tow Number 5695. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Fife Towing, Fife Recovery Service & NW Towing, at 1313 34th Ave E, Fife on 6/20/2017. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130 at 9:00 a.m. Viewing of cars from 08:00-09:00 a.m. Registered Tow Numbers 5009, 5421, 5588. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

Chambers Creek Foundation 10 Year Anniversary Gala and Auction Saturday, June 24 at 5 PM - 11 PM Chambers Bay Pavilion 6320 Grandview Drive W. University Place, WA Come Celebrate Chambers Creek Foundation accomplishments in the last 10 years since the opening of Chambers Bay Golf and the future plans of trails and bridges at the Properties. chambersckfoundation.org

VOLUNTEERS Volunteer to help an Isolated Elder Make a difference in someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life! Senior Companions and Senior Friends are volunteers whose friendship helps seniors maintain their independence through regular visits and assistance with errands. Senior Companion volunteers must be 55+, low-income and serve 15 hrs/week to receive a tax free stipend. Senior Friend volunteers must be 18+ and serve 2 hrs/month â&#x20AC;&#x201C; no stipend. Eligible volunteers will pass a background check and attend training before being matched with an elder needing your help. Call Sarah (253-722-5686) or Linda (253-722-5691) at Lutheran Community Services for more information & an application

VOLUNTEER ADVOCATES NEEDED FOR RESIDENTS IN LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES The Pierce County Long Term Care Ombudsman Program is looking for people who are empathetic, diplomatic, assertive, and skilled communicators to be volunteer ombudsman. As a LTC Ombudsman, you will visit an assisted living community or a skilled nursing community, working to ensure that resident rights are being protected and helping residents resolve problems they are unable to solve on their own. Volunteer ombudsman are trained and certified and dedicate 4 hours a week or 16 hours a month. Ongoing support, case staffing, team-meetings, and trainings are provided each month. For more information please call 253 798-3789 or Email Kgavron@co.pierce.wa.us. Or visit www.co.pierce.wa.us/ index.aspx?NID=1302

SPECIAL HABITAT STEWARD TRAINING National Wildlife Federation and Tahoma Audubon Society Partner Up for Educational Workshop Series. Are you interested in creating areas for wildlife? Do you want to do your part to keep Pierce County wild? Now is your chance to become a Habitat Stewardâ&#x201E;˘! National Wildlife Federation and Tahoma Audubon Society are offering a specialized 24hour training program to teach you how to help others create and restore wildlife habitat in backyards, schoolyards, and other community areas. The training will be held on the first four Mondays in May from 6:00-9:00pm at the Adriana Hess Audubon Center (2917 Morrison Rd. W, University Place, WA, 98466). The workshop includes two Saturday field trips on May 6th and 13th. The first trip is in partnership with Tahoma Audubon Society and will be at Morse Preserve to learn all about bird identification and conservation; the second is in partnership with Northwest Trek Wildlife Park and will include hands-on NatureMapping of the Ohop Creek. Plan on full days. This training is engaging, fun and highly informative and you get to meet and interact with local conservation professionals and other similarly interested

VOLUNTEERS

folks! Expert speakers from University of Washington, Pierce Conservation District, Woodbrook Nursery, WSU Pierce County Master Gardener Program, Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department and more will present on topics such as: rain gardens, native plants, habitat restoration, pollinators and birds, mushrooms and fungi, and much more! Cost of the training is $30 to cover classroom materials. Note: scholarships are available! No one will be turned down due to lack of funds. We will provide coffee, tea, and snacks at each training session. To register for the training, please visit http://nwftacoma.brownpapertickets.com or contact Sarah Bruemmer at WAHabitatCoordinator@nwf. org or (206) 577-7809.

Wanted: Volunteers for groceries. The Empowerment Center currently has a limited number of openings for volunteers in our food bank. These positions will be filled on a first come, first served basis. Come volunteer and receive free groceries! El Shaddai Christian Ministries/ The Empowerment Center, 4340 Pacific Ave., Tacoma WA 98148. For more information contact us at 253-677-7740. City of Fife Needs You! We are looking for passionate applicants for open positions on our volunteer Boards and Commissions. Openings are on the Arts Commission, Parks Board, Tree Board and Youth Commission. Applications are accepted year round, but first review will be 3/24/17. Online Application: www.cityoffife.org/getinvolved NEW YEARâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE, TWEET LESS CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care has some great ways for you to serve the community and make meaningful connections. Those near the end of life need help with living. If you have 1-4 hours a week to read to someone, listen to their stories, run errands, make phone calls, or welcome people to our hospice facility, then we have several opportunities for you. Join us in the new year for trainings scheduled in January and March. Log onto www.chifranciscan. org and click â&#x20AC;&#x153;hospice and palliative careâ&#x20AC;? in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;our servicesâ&#x20AC;? tab to learn more. Or call James Bentley at 253538-4649

#PROJECTFEEDTACOMA There are about 2,000 homeless in Tacoma and about 1.000 beds. Many are families with children. Please help #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA to provide some basic necessities. All items donated will go directly to people on the street. PROJECT FEED TACOMA is 100% volunteer. This is a true grass roots organization and they really need your help. For more information and to find more go to www. projectfeedtacoma.org. Can you help with some urgent needs as winter approaches? Here are some suggestions and a huge THANK YOU! Needed: Warm Socks for Men, Women and Children; Warm Hats; Gloves; Peanut Butter and Jam/Jelly; Crackers, Chips and non-perishable snacks; Individually wrapped granola bars or protein bars; cookies; lotion; lip balm; tampons and sanitary napkins; wipes; soap, shampoo and conditioner; gallon sized freezer bags. A BIG THANKS TO THE COPPER DOOR FOR ALLOWING PROJECT FEED TACOMA TO COLLECT DONATIONS THERE. Help hard-working families by volunteering with VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance)! Provide free income tax preparation to low and moderate income households. Locations throughout Pierce County. Day, evening and weekend hours available (February to April 2017). Volunteers can serve as tax preparers, quality reviewers, greeters, or interpreters (for non-English speaking or hearing-impaired tax payers). Free training provided. Learn more and apply online at www.VolunteerTaxHelp.org.

Volunteer meals on Wheels Driver Seeking a volunteer Meals on Wheels Driver. Delivers frozen meals once a week in the Pierce County area, mileage reimbursement. Must have a clean background check, WA driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license, car insurance and food handlers card. Call front desk for more info: 253-2728433

Food Bank Eloiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cooking Pot Food Bank on the Eastside of Tacoma, WA is powered strictly by volunteers. We provide much needed food and other basic household items to people in need on a weekly basis. Being a volunteer driven organization we are always looking for good people who are

interested in donating a few hours of their lives helping make the lives of someone else a little better. Donate as much or as little of your time you want for a wide variety of tasks, there is always plenty to do. If you are looking for a way to be part of something bigger and give a little much needed help to the local community then contact us and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get you started. Please join us in helping to spread a little holiday cheer. Contact 253212-2778.

Help furnish hope to those in need! NW Furniture Bank Volunteers needed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;NWFB helps restore hope, dignity and stability in our community by recycling donated furniture to people in need.â&#x20AC;? Tuesday-Saturday Truck Volunteers Needed9:00 am-2:00 pm. Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at info@ nwfurniturebank.org or call 253-302-3868.

South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www.southsoundoutreach.org.

Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/ nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@ tacomaparks.com or 253.305.1025.

The Tacoma Maritime Institute meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00. Call 253-536-4494

Be a Big Brother! Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG difference in the life of a child. There are several program options to fit your schedule and interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agency-planned activity. For more information, visit www.bbbsps.org or call 206.763.9060.

Call us today to place your classified ad! 253-922-5317 or fill out this form and mail with payment to:

Name: _______________________________ Address: _____________________________

Tacoma Weekly 304 Puyallup Ave., #1 Tacoma WA 98421

Category: Ad Copy Here:

_____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________

______________________________________ Phone:_______________________________

Deadline: Tuesday by 12 noon for Thursday publication

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30 Words and Under: _____________________ Extra words @ .05:________________________ Sub Total: _______________________________ x Number of Weeks = _____________________ Total Amount: __________________________

Cash Check Money Order Visa/Mastercard

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Cost: $15 for 30 words for one week. 5¢ per each additional word. Deadline: Tuesday, 12 noon for Thursday publications. Payment: Required on all classified ads at time of placement. We accept cash, check, money order or Visa/Mastercard. Bring payment to Tacoma Weekly at 304 Puyallup Ave. Tacoma. Email: advertising@tacomaweekly.com

304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma â&#x20AC;˘ 253-922-5317 TA C O M A W E E K LY

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Friday, June 16, 2017 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

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HOME BUYER EDUCATION CLASSES WA State Housing Finance Commission Loan Programs Home Buyer Course Topics t %PXO1BZNFOU"TTJTUBODF1SPHSBNTÂ&#x2030; BOEIPXUPHFUZPVSTIBSF

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%0/05/&&%50#&'*3455*.&)0.&#6:&3 )064&)0-%45)"5&"3/6150 1&3:3 64&8*5)')" 7" $0/7-0"/4 (Loan Specific Criteria applies)

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253-234-GROW

KCornfield@absoluteloans.com

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LONGTIME ESTABLISHED POPULAR price reduction RESTR./LOUNGE ON 6TH AVE. Business for sale. $149,000 $110,000 OR LEASE the space, 3,300 SQ. FT. for $4,000 Month. SUCCESSFUL, LONGTIME ESTABLISHMENT. Manufacturer of Award Ribbons and Rosettes with large wholesale customer base. (Local and out of state business) Business is for sale. $60,000 Plus inventory. NON-FRANCHISE COFFEE SHOP & DELI. Great Location. Business for Sale, $100,000. Ownersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Terms Available.

RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109


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