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FREE • Friday, May 19, 2017

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TIGERS SHOCKED

BE C A U S E CO M M U N I T Y MAT T E R S .

PROTESTERS ARRESTED AT LNG SITE

UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND COMMENCEMENT 2017

Mother’s Day graduation brought happy congrats…and rain

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

LNG. Protesters who chained themselves to construction equipment waved to their supporters who were waving signs outside the fence line of the site. By Steve Dunkelberger

S

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

ix protesters connected to the Tacoma Direct Action were arrested Wednesday morning, May 17, after they reportedly chained themselves to construction equipment at the construction site of Puget Sound Energy’s 8 million gallon liquefied natural gas facility at the corner of East 11th Street and Alexander Avenue East on the Tideflats. The protesters were booked into Pierce County Jail on charges of malicious mischief in the first degree, criminal trespass in the first degree and obstruction in the first degree, Tacoma Police Department spokeswoman

Loretta Cool said. All are felonies. They are not being identified because they have not been formally charged for what organizers called acts of non-violent civil disobedience. The incident started around 5:30 a.m. when the protestors allegedly entered the 30-acre construction site and used bike locks to chain themselves to an auger used to drive deep holes into the ground. Crews were not allowed to start work for the day and called police to have the protestors removed from the private property while a few dozen other protests associated with Direct Action Tacoma and RedLine Tacoma waved signs and streamed live video of the arrests on Facebook. The six protesters were removed from the site about 10 a.m. and the protesters See PROTEST / page A11

PHOTOS BY TAMI JACKSON

LOGGERS. (Top) Chance Enyeart stands next to

his mom Jessica Enyeart. To their right is mom Cordelia Nwogu with two her sons Christian and Ogecha. With the umbrella is mother-daughter graduates Cathy Tollefson and daughter Olivia Michaelson. Below them is Nora Seimears holding her toddler, Clara. Also pictured are Vanessa Thompson with daughter Alizah. Far right is mother-to-be Jennifer Thomas. (Bottom) Cordelia Nwogu poses here to celebrate her new occupational therapy degree with her two sons, Christian and Ogechi, and with her husband Raymond.

NEW MURAL WEAVES HISTORY INTO ART Work begins on mural at 7 Seas Brewery building in downtown Tacoma By Daniel Beers For Tacoma Weekly

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE CITY OF TACOMA

WEAVING. Artists work six days a week (weather

permitting) on “Working Forward, Weaving Anew.” When completed, the mural will be one of five works of art along the Prairie Line Trail.

Work has begun on a 19,200-square-foot mural on the 7 Seas Brewery building along Jefferson Avenue in downtown Tacoma. Funded by a Heritage Capital Projects Fund Grant awarded to the city by the Washington State Heritage Society, the mural, “Working Forward, Weaving Anew,” will be one of five artworks to be on display along the Prairie Line Trail. Headed up by artists Esteban Camacho Steffensen and Jessilyn Brinkerhoff, “Working Forward, Weaving Anew’s” theme revolves around the history of production in Tacoma through images of wood and weaving. “Their design includes

By Tami Jackson

a Puyallup basket weaver, clearcutting, furniture making, and a person creating a contemporary artwork,” said Rebecca Solverson, public art specialist for the City of Tacoma. “The team has worked closely with representatives from the Puyallup Tribe to ensure the cultural imagery in their artwork is respectful and accurate.” Because of the Native American subject matter, the team is working with 11 Native artists to help paint the mural. “We are always looking for opportunities to reach out to communities that are underrepresented in our programs through targeted engagement, training, etc.,” said Solverson. “We feel there is a great opportunity to do that here, and also honor the

For Tacoma Weekly

Torrential rains poured as moms and their children posed for pictures on the music building’s steps at the University of Puget Sound (UPS). It was shortly after noon on Sunday, May 14, and the weather could not dampen anyone’s enthusiasm because on this day the moms were graduating with their college degrees and it was Mother's Day besides. Earning a master’s of science degree in occupational therapy were: Jennifer Thomas of Tacoma, Jessica Enyeart of Bremerton, Cordelia Nwogu of Auburn and Nora Seimears of Kent. These four grads still must fulfill fieldwork requirements before they can sit for board examinations and only then, after they pass their boards, can they put their education to work. Also celebrating in graduation robes were Vanessa Thompson from Tacoma, who earned her doctorate in physical therapy, and a mother-daughter team from Tacoma. Mom Cathy Tollefson earned her master's in education while daughter Olivia Michaelson, also from Tacoma, just earned her bachelor’s of arts degree in psychology. According to Thomas, who earned her bachelor's in liberal arts from Eugene, Ore. before coming to Tacoma for her master's education at UPS, all those who marched for their occupational therapy degrees on Mother’s Day had chosen areas in which to specialize. They will all be doing their fieldwork in either a clinic or at a school district. Thomas said she will be doing her field work in hand therapy. While they marched in graduation robes in May, according to Shirley Skeel, media relations director at UPS, their official graduation dates will vary student to student depending on individual schedules, course requirements and time taken off from school. On this day, after they posed for pictures, the graduates walked in caps and gowns between clapping

See MURAL / page A11

See UPS / page A11 FACEBOOK: facebook.com/tacomaweekly

SSFC DROPS SPOKANE

CHANGING SCENE'S “TALKING WITH...”

TIM MEADOWS

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OUR VIEW

The zoning rules and activities on Tacoma Tideflats need a thorough and public review so that all sides have a shared vision of the role the lands play now and into the future. PAGE A6

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Section A • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 19, 2017

I.D. NEEDED OF STRONG-ARMED ROBBERS WHO ASSAULTED EMPLOYEE

Pothole of the Week

By David Rose Washington’s Most Wanted - Q13 Fox

N 10TH BETWEEN L AND M

After so long, we have to assume that Percival our beloved Pothole Pig has simply vanished. However, there are still potholes in the city that need attention, so we simply – and sadly – must hire someone to handle his workload. We decided to give the candidates a trial run to see how they do in the field. This week Carter the Crater Gator gave it another shot by finding a crater that would make Percival proud. But frankly, Carter might just not have the celebrity power to take on such a high-profile role. What are your thoughts? We have other candidates in the works that we might try out: Charles the Chuckhole Chicken and Blighty the Blight-Seeking Beaver, but several people voiced their opinion that a permanent replacement should be one of Percival’s relatives, namely Peyton, who lives in Portland, and Perry, who lives in Parkland. And now a new candidate has entered the running with a resume from Ruddy the Road Rut Reindeer, who is a brother-inlaw of Tacoma Rainiers mascot Rhubarb. Send your thoughts to stevedunkel@tacomaweekly. com.

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Pierce County Sheriff’s detectives are asking for the public’s help to identify three strongarm robbery suspects who stole $1,500 worth of phones at the Metro DAVID ROSE PCS store on 72nd Street East in Tacoma. At 3:45 p.m. on Sunday, April 23, the three men entered the business and walked directly to a display of Apple products. The suspects quickly ripped three iPhones from the display and started to run out of the store. The first suspect exited through the doors, then the second and third suspect assaulted a female store employee as they ran out after the first suspect. The suspects were in and out of the business in 15 seconds. “The scary part is they fled

the store at a high rate of speed and actually ran over a female employee so it doesn't really matter to them if they hurt somebody. That makes this group a little more dangerous than the rest,� said Pierce County Sheriff's Det. Ed Troyer. If you can identify them, Crime Stoppers of Tacoma-Pierce County

will pay you a cash reward of up to $1,000. Call the hot line at 1 (800) 222-TIPS. It is anonymous. This is one of the cases featured this weekend on “Washington’s Most Wanted� airing Friday night at 11 p.m. on Q13 FOX and Saturday night at 9:30 p.m. on JOEtv and 10:30 p.m. on Q13 FOX.

REWARD UP TO $20,000 FOR INFO ON WHEREABOUTS OF ACCUSED TACOMA KILLER By David Rose Washington’s Most Wanted - Q13 Fox

The FBI and Tacoma Police Department are offering a cash reward of up to $20,000 for information leading to the arrest of a suspect wanted in two murders. DAVID ROSE On Feb. 7, 2010, detectives say Santiago “Pucho� Villalba Mederos was looking to retaliate against rival gang members when he encountered 18-year-old Cami Love and her brother Joshua in their car, chased them and fired multiple shots into the vehicle. They were not involved in gang activity and police say he targeted them solely because of the color of their vehicle. Cami was killed and her brother seriously wounded. “He just comes from behind us and gets in the lane next to us, speeds up to us, gets beside us and he just started shooting,� said Joshua. “She wasn’t moving. I grabbed the side of her face and I was like, ‘Cami! Cami!’ She had a blank look on her face.� Mederos was also allegedly involved in the murder of another innocent man on March 25, 2010. Prosecutors say he and other gang members went to collect money from a person they knew. According to investigators, Mederos and other gang members broke into and ran-

Photo taken in 2005

sacked that person's vehicle. Several innocent bystanders observed this situation and confronted the group. A fight ensued during which Mederos allegedly fired a single gunshot toward the bystanders, striking and killing an innocent 25-year-old man. “These crimes that were committed, we don’t forget about them and we seek justice for the victims of these homicides, so it's important for us to find them and bring them back to face the charges,� said FBI Special Agent Terry Postma. Mederos is facing a slew of charges in Pierce County Superior Court including murder in the first degree, attempted murder in the first degree, conspiracy to commit murder in the first degree and murder in the second degree. The FBI believes Mederos may be in Mexico. He speaks English and Spanish. Mederos is known to

have family living in the Las Grutas, Guerrero and Cuernavaca, Morelos areas of Mexico and also has ties to Washington. On Sept. 30, 2016, a federal arrest warrant was issued for Mederos after he was charged with unlawful flight to avoid prosecution. "This has been a lengthy investigation and we believe there are people in the local area who are aware of his whereabouts and we're hoping that this reward will provide incentive for them to come forth with the information that they have," said Postma. If you can help locate Mederos, call the FBI at (206) 622-0460 or Crime Stoppers of Tacoma-Pierce County at 1 (800) 222-TIPS. This is one of the cases being featured this weekend on “Washington's Most Wanted,� Friday night at 11 p.m. on Q13 FOX and Saturday night at 9:30 on JOEtv and 10:30 on Q13 FOX.

Bulletin Board HUNGER WALK/RUN TO PROVIDE DAIRY TO FAMILIES IN NEED Does a stroll through the park sound like a great way to spend your Saturday morning? How about a run on the trails? At the Hunger Walk & 5K Run you can enjoy either of these and help your neighbors in need at the same time. On May 20, Emergency Food Network is hosting the Hunger Walk & 5K Run at Fort Steilacoom Park in Lakewood. Participants in this 37th annual event will walk around Waughop Lake or run through the trees in a chiptimed 5K. Family-friendly activities and live music are also provided at the start/finish line. “The community’s involvement in this event will have a profound impact on our neighbors who need our help,� said Helen McGovern-Pilant, executive director at Emergency Food Network. Throughout the year, EFN distributes a variety of food that is donated by farmers, the government, and community members. However, to ensure there is a reliable source of staple foods available for food pantries, Emergency Food Network also purchases, by the semi-truckload, six staple items including rice, beans, oats, canned fruit, canned vegetables, and a frozen protein. The funding from the Hunger Walk & 5K Run will help Emergency Food Network add dairy to list of items regularly purchased, fulfilling the need for more dairy in the emergency food system. The Hunger Walk & 5K Run was previously hosted by Associated Ministries. At the beginning of this year, they passed the leadership of the event on to Emergency Food Network, however, Associated Ministries is still very involved in the event. Emergency Food Network has seen a great amount of support from local businesses for the Hunger Walk & 5K Run. Event sponsors include Tucci & Sons, Waste Con-

nections, Commencement Bank, Coordinated Care, Pfau Cochran Vertetis Amala, Whole Foods Chambers Bay, and Zack Rosenbloom & Associates. For more information or to register for the Hunger Walk & 5K Run visit www. efoodnet.org.

WSDOT SEEKS INPUT ABOUT SR-16 CONGESTION The Washington State Department of Transportation is encouraging the public to participate in an online survey about travel along State Route 16 as part of a larger congestion study of the corridor. Take the survey at bit. ly/SR16Survey. This study examines traffic congestion along the SR 16 corridor between the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and SR 3 in Gorst. The online survey results will help WSDOT better understand how people use the corridor, their perceptions of transportation needs along the corridor and which transportation issues matter most to them. “As part of the Connecting Washington transportation package, this study will help us determine the best strategies to address the needs of this critical corridor over the next 20 years,â€? said Dennis Engel, WSDOT planning manager. The survey is open until 4 p.m. Friday, May 26. The public will have additional opportunities to offer input on the study at public meetings planned this fall. The final study report will summarize and rank transportation strategies that could include: • Operational improvements • Intelligent transportation system improvements • Transportation demand management strategies • Transit, freight, bicycle or pedestrian improvements • Enhancements to the highway configuration • Use of other tools such as education and enforcement SEE MORE BULLETIN BOARD ITEMS AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM


Friday, May 19, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 3

City, port start talks for Tideflats review

COUNCIL APPOINTS PAULI AT NEW CITY MANAGER By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma City Council and the Port of Tacoma Commission passed separate resolutions last week that outline the process of conducting a multi-year review of planning and zoning rules for the Tideflats known as a subarea plan. The process will cost about $1 million, which will be split between the city and port and include a comprehensive community dialogue about what developments and activities will be allowed in the shipping and manufacturing hub. One difference between the city and port versions of the agreement is who will also be asked to be a partner in the process. The city’s resolution lists the Puyallup Tribe, since much of the land rests within the reservation. The port’s version downgrades the Tribe’s stranding from partner to stakeholder alongside business interests and other owners of land on the Tideflats, under the idea that listing the Tribe as a full partner would go against the land claims settlement of 1988. That landmark agreement outlined how land-use decisions on the Tideflats would be handled through “meaningful consultation” between the port and the sovereign Puyallup Nation. “I am not interested in deviating from the land claims settlement agreement regarding jurisdiction,” Port Commissioner Don Meyer said. The commission also added the Pierce County Council to the roster of partners since the Tideflats have county and regional impacts in terms of jobs and economic activity. Shipping activities on the waterfront provide some 29,000 direct and indirect family-wage jobs and $223 million in state and local taxes. The differences between the resolutions will now have to be negotiated between the city and port for final approval. “I don’t know if we have ever faced this problem before,” Councilmember Ryan Mello said. “I think they are misreading the land claims settlement. This is exactly where the tribe the port and the city need to have meaningful discussion. It’s a no brainer that the tribe should be a co and equal partner.” “The Puyallup Tribe has a long track record of participating in discussions about future developments and plans for what happens on the tideflats, which lies within the reservation boundries,” Tribal Council Chairman Bill Sterud said. “We believe that our voice for the land, waters and air as well as the livelihood of our people and those of our neighbors should be heard as a full and equal partner. We should sit at the table during the discussions regarding the environmental and economic future of our lands. It is not only right for the Tribe but also for the region.” Talks of creating a subarea plan for the Tideflats first started in 2015 and have heated up ever since, particularly after the now-dead plans for the construction

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

PLANS. The City Council and the Port Commission approved separate resolutions to start a subarea plan of the Tideflats that will cost about $1 million and take at least two years.

of what would have been the world’s largest methanol plant that would have converted natural gas to methanol for shipment to China for the manufacturing of plastic. Those plans died last year amid outcries from environmental groups and concerned residents living by the planned facility. Many of those critics have since turned their concerning eyes to Puget Sound Energy’s liquefied natural gas facility, which is starting construction on the Tideflats and finalizing the last remaining permits. Critics work about safety issues with the storage and transportation of its planned 8 million gallons of chilled natural gas so close to residential areas and downtown Tacoma. Those projects raised larger concerns about the future of the Tideflats regarding public safety and environmental stewardship, particularly regarding the manufacturing, storage and transportation of fossil fuels on the Tideflats. The subarea plan is meant to address those issues, but it will take time. Similar plans for the area around the University of Washington Tacoma and Tacoma’s Hilltop neighborhood took about two and a half years each. One for the area around the Tacoma Mall has taken three and half years. A comprehensive look of the Tideflats will likely take upwards of four years. “There are some issues that need to be addressed before then,” Mello said. The council then asked the city’s Planning Commission to begin drafting a list of recommended changes for council consideration that would be in enacted before the subarea planning process is completed. Those recommendations could come in a matter of months. Ultimately, only the City Council will enact the subarea plan since only the city has authority over land-use regulations and zoning rules. “We do not delegate that authority to the port or anyone else,” Mello said. “The council is the final arbiter of the subarea plan. The document is a city document.”

It only took a matter of minutes for the Tacoma City Council to appoint the city’s interim city manager, Elizabeth Pauli, to the permanent position despite never holding a formal interview or community forum like the top three candidates had to face last week. Those interviews apparently didn’t go well PAULI for them since the council failed to select any of them and instead asked Pauli if she would consider taking on the position, a job she didn’t want when the call for applicants spread around the country last March at a cost of $24,500 in consultation fees. That said, she is well known around city hall, having worked at the city for almost two decades, most recently as the city’s chief attorney and then the interim city manager after T.C. Broadnax left to accept a position in Dallas in February. Pauli is the first woman to hold the position of the city’s top administrator. “She has been interviewing for this for the last 12 weeks, and she has performed admirably,” Mayor Marilyn Strickland said. Her appointment came unanimously, albeit oddly, since only Strickland, Councilmembers Anders Ibsen, Lauren Walker Lee and Ryan Mello were in Council Chambers during the vote. Councilmembers Robert Thoms and Marty Campbell participated in the discussion and vote over cell phones. Councilmember Keith Blocker and Joe Lonergan were absent, but Strickland read a prepared a statement Lonergan wrote in support of Pauli before the vote. Pauli’s contract will now be negotiated by city staff. “Over the past 19 years, Elizabeth Pauli has been involved in just about every decision the City of Tacoma has made, and I am excited about the knowledge and skill sets she brings to this position,” said Strickland in a statement. The city manager oversees a staff of more than 2,000 and a biennial budget of more than $1.9 billion, which includes a General Fund budget of $461.2 million. Tacoma has a population of approximately 208,000 residents. Prior to joining the City of Tacoma, Pauli was a partner at the Tacoma-based law firm of McGavick Graves. She is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Law School and also has Bachelor of Science degrees in education and social work from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is a member of the Washington State Bar Association and the Washington State Association of Municipal Attorneys.

BANK ROBBERY

Tacoma Police detectives need your help to identify the suspect responsible for a bank robbery. At 12:22 p.m. on May 1st, 2017, the pictured suspect robbed a Tapco Credit Union located in the 900 block of Tacoma Ave. S. in downtown Tacoma. The suspect walked into the bank and told the teller he was robbing the bank and to give him cash. The suspect kept one hand in his pocket and implied he was armed with a weapon, then took the money and fled the bank on foot.

The suspect is described as a black male in his 50’s, approximately 5’7” tall and 150 lbs., with a scruffy unshaven face and a

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raspy voice. During the robbery he was seen wearing blue jeans, purple gloves, glasses, and a blue denim vest over a black hoodie.

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Section A • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 19, 2017

LIVE FIRE TRAINING HELD FOR WEST PIERCE FIRE AND RESCUE Firefighters hone their skills on a donated house in University Place By Daniel Beers For Tacoma Weekly

West Pierce Fire and Rescue (WPFR) got a chance to do some live fire training on a real house in University Place on May 11. The residents at 326 Oas Dr. W. kindly donated their house to the fire department in an effort to provide an opportunity for firefighters to hone their skills in as real an environment as possible. “Entering a burning building is an extremely hazardous part of a firefighter’s job,” said Jenny Weekes, community and media relations manager for the WPFR. “And while we are dispatched to approximately one fire call per day, obviously not all of them turn out to be a fully involved, working fire. Having the opportunity to go into a controlled environment and practice and hone their skills will only make them ready for the next large scale incident.” Because the WPFR must abide by strict rules and regulations in determining houses fit to practice on, training burns are extremely rare. “Training burns have environmental, demolition and hazardous waste abatement regulations that must be followed,” said Jay Sumerlin, training chief of the WPFR. “This, along with internal requirements, limits the amount of structures that are available to train on.” Sumerlin also noted that residents interested in donating their house for these burns must go through a rigorous process to determine eligibility. “Citizens wishing to donate a home for the fire department to train in have to meet all of the legal requirements that the city or county place on demolition of the structure. In addition, the building will be evaluated by an officer in the Training Division of West Pierce to determine if it meets our requirements to train in. West Pierce will only burn one or two acquired structures per year, depending on budget

and availability of structures.” The May 11 training burn was divided into two shifts throughout the day. The morning shift consisted of members from Engine 23, Engine 31, Ladder 21, Medic 31 and Medic 21. The afternoon training session was of members from Engine 22, Engine 24, Engine 20, Medic 20 and Medic 22. At the end of the training sessions, the fire department safely allowed the house to burn to the ground. During these trainings, firefighters and rescue personnel trained on smooth bore nozzle attacks, low pressure/high volume fog nozzle attacks, ventilation techniques, fire behavior and crew integrity skills. “All of these skills are essential for firefighting,” explained Sumerlin, “and it’s a great opportunity to practice them in a live fire situation, rather than simulated without live fire.” Yet perhaps the most important lesson of all that these training burns teach is firefighter safety. “It is imperative to us that everyone goes home after their shift,” said Weekes. “Trainings like this allow us to train properly and come in contact with scenarios that will prepare firefighters to make sudden decisions on a real fire scene, which could truly be life or death. We appreciate the community’s patience and support as we do this, because we do understand it can disrupt them while we perform a burn like this.” The West Pierce Fire and Rescue District covers 31 square miles and serves more than 90,000 residents. The department ran 15,904 calls in 2016, which is a 2.8 percent increase from 2015. Call volume has also increased 20 percent in the last five years. And with summer just around the corner, the WPFR created a page on their website regarding the rules around outdoor burning here: www. westpierce.org/resources/outdoorburning. There will also be a page dedicated to the rules and regulations of each city in regard to Fourth of July fireworks in the last week of June.

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Friday, May 19, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 5

YOUNG U.P. STUDENT TO SING NATIONAL ANTHEM AT RAINIERS GAME

For Sarah Seevers, singing helps her overcomes the challenges of autism By Jackie Fender jackie@tacomaweekly.com

Young Sarah Seevers is a busy young lady. Already, this 14-year-old Drum Intermediate School student has a resumé that boasts a variety of skills that most would envy. Seevers is a member of the Tacoma Youth Chorus. She is a gold level swimmer with the University Place Aquatic Club swim team, the Sharks. Not only that, but she attends art classes at Studio 27 and she plays the viola. While Sarah manages to be busy with swim, song and school, this summer she plans to attend art and sewing camps and spruce up her babysitting toolbox with first aid and CPR courses. She also happens to be diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). ASD is still a bit of a mystery to many. A diagnosis doesn’t define an individual, and how it is displayed from one person to the next varies, as the diagnosis is a complex disorder that can mean a variety of social and behavioral delays. Sarah falls on the high functioning scale of ASD. To meet her in person she is shy and quiet. She fidgets with the label of her beverage and looks to her parents, Kim, a parish administrator and real estate agent and Curt, a deputy with the Sheriff’s office, for support when talking to a stranger. But when she sings, she shines. Seevers has performed with the TYC for years, now approaching her fourth season. She has belted out Christmas classics solo at Saint Charles and has opened swim club meets with the national anthem. She’s continuing to hone her musical prowess with an upcoming appearance on Memorial Day singing the national anthem and “Amazing Grace,” accompanied by a husband and wife duo of bagpipers, at the New Tacoma Cemetery’s annual gathering to honor and celebrate those who have served in the military. When asked what her favorite song to sing is, she couldn’t pick a favorite but expressed a penchant for the national anthem due to her dad’s military past and his work on the police force. She has another big upcoming appearance singing the national anthem at a Rainiers game on June 27 as a part of their tribute to “sensory awareness.” Sarah’s mom Kim says, “Sarah is a patient at the Seattle Autism Center and

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SEEVERS FAMILY

SING. Sarah Seevers’ mom and dad, Kim and Curt, are her biggest cheerleaders, always encouraging their daughter to go for her dreams – and she’s done them proud.

continues to share her gift of music with others in her community. Part of learning to live with autism is taking part in exposure therapy. Sarah shares her gifts while working to overcome the obstacles of autism through exposure therapy. The national anthem at the Rainiers game will be part of the therapy Sarah is receiving while giving back to her community.” The Seevers strive to provide opportunities for their daughter to engage with her community but stress that they couldn’t do it alone. They go on to say, “This little girl has grown so much. We not only want to acknowledge her accomplishments but recognize the teachers in U.P. who have served her, the UPAC swim coaches, the presi-

dent of New Tacoma Cemetery, the director of Tacoma Youth Chorus and her speech therapist, Diana Dean, the staff at Seattle Autism Center and Mrs. Bishop her counselor at Drum.” This acknowledgement is just one step in “breaking the stigma that surrounds autism,” as Mrs. Seevers puts it. And opening a dialogue about autism and recognizing that support and advocacy can benefit not just Sarah, but others who are diagnosed as well. As for what is in store for Sarah, ultimately, she’d like to make it as a professional singer one day or, as a math lover, teach technology. Her big goal in the more immediate future? “To sing for the Seahawks,” she says with a sly smile.

NEVER PROMISED YOU A RAIN GARDEN FREE CLASSES HELP HOMEOWNERS DEVISE THE BEST GARDEN FOR THEIR HOME’S LANDSCAPE

PHOTO BY TAMI JACKSON

GARDEN. Water Quality Program Director Melissa Buckingham (left) taught Wednesday’s Rain Garden class offered through partnerships with the City of Tacoma and the Pierce County Conservation District. By Tami Jackson For Tacoma Weekly

On Wednesday, May 5, the City sponsored a rain garden class at EnviroHouse. That’s where this reporter learned that not just any homeowner is promised a rain garden because not every landscape can support one. The City of Tacoma offers an exciting array of similar free classes to residents of University Place, Fife and Tacoma. In fact, any Pierce County residents interested in gardening, sustainable yard care and do-it-yourself home projects are invited to search the detailed list of the course offerings, which are regularly being updated at the City of Tacoma website. RAIN GARDEN LESSONS With a rain garden, the desired end result is a more attractive yard with cleaner water entering city drains. That’s according to Pierce County Conservation District's Water Quality Program Director Melissa Buckingham, who taught the May 5 rain garden class. Buckingham said that there are many microbes in healthy rain garden soil that eat pollution. Then she gave even more reasons for installing a rain garden. First, a homeowner might need to divert a yard’s flooding issues. Or perhaps a gardener might just want to tinker in the yard more. Buckingham said the most compelling inspiration for installing a rain garden is the desire to protect sea life in Puget Sound. To that end, Buckingham showed a highly emotional film that’s available online for public viewing at https:// player.vimeo.com/video/20473194. Featured there is videographer and diver Laura James, better known as “Diver Laura” online. In the film, when the camera panned from what looked like a pristine and beautiful Puget Sound envi-

ronment, James narrated that she has seen marine life living on garbage. Then the camera zoomed in on a large storm drain seeping big black clouds of pollution into the salt water and James speculated that plume of grey-black outflow was from particulates made from rubber tires wearing off on the roads above. When the video ended, Buckingham had everybody’s rapt attention and that’s when she began sharing all the planning details involved in starting a rain garden. Turns out, while a rain garden helps filter out the pollution that runs off driveways, rooftops and other impervious surfaces like mature lawns that are so established and thick they do not allow surface water to seep into the soil beneath, rain gardens are not suited for every landscape. Special accommodations must be made for steep slopes, existing soil constitution and the yard’s proximity to major utilities and residences. At the beginning of class, Buckingham gave participants colorful pamphlets and a spiral bound book that gives details how rain gardens must not simply allow for water containment, with necessary inflow and outflow features, but the pond depth must also slope and the deepest aspect might vary according to other current landscape features. Whether a rain garden is even appropriate for a particular yard or not requires much study. That’s where Buckingham and her master gardener colleagues jump in to help homeowners figure it all out. If their services are requested, a homeowner might pay $1,000 or more to have the affiliated contractor come out and dig the pond for the rain garden, but Buckingham and her team will provide their planning expertise with plant buying discounts, and other services for free. Other classes the City of Tacoma will be offering include: • Yard Waste & Worm Bin Composting • Simple Do-It-Yourself Household Repairs & Tools

• Rain Barrels: How to Make & Maintain • Drip Irrigation Basics: DIY • Natural Yard Care for a Water-Smart Landscape • Food Too Good to Waste: Prevention Tips & Tricks • Herb Gardens for Flavor & Fun • Ductless Heat Pump & A/C: Advantages & Incentives • Backyard Chickens: Getting Started • Solar Power: How it Can Work for You • Weeds, Pests, & Non-toxic Solutions • Go Green for Safe Cleaning • Rain Gardens: Plan, Prep, Plant, Maintain • Native Plants to Enhance your Habitat To sign up for any of these courses, residents may register online at www.cityoftacoma.org/cms/one. aspx?objectId=17243.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac offers great resources on-line for local gardeners. At www.almanac.com/gardening/ planting-dates/WA is a beginner gardener’s guide that residents can download for free and the website itself offers a calculator for University Place, Fife, and Tacoma (just type in the city where you want to receive zonerelated planting dates). The Old Farmer’s Almanac also offers a calendar virtual assistant that will send personalized reminders of when to plant what and where and when you should start your harvest. Just submit your e-mail address on the Almanac’s home page. The Internet offers a variety of local resources for gardeners. Tacoma’s complete guide for “How To Make A Worm Farm” Is at www.howtomakeawormfarm.com.


Section A • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 19, 2017

Our View

START OF TIDEFLATS TALKS ISN’T PROMISING It is good to see that the City of Tacoma and the Port of Tacoma have finally recognized the obvious. The zoning rules and activities on the 2,400 acres of Tacoma Tideflats need a thorough and public review so that all sides have a shared vision, or at least an understanding, of the role the lands play in commerce and the environment now and into the future. The Port of Tacoma is turning 100 next year, after all. The City Council and the Port Commission took steps in that direction last week by approving the concept of a sub-area plan by passing separate resolutions after talks of putting the working waterfront under the microscope first bubbled up two years ago. The city’s version of the joint agreement lists the Puyallup Tribe as a partner in the effort since much of the Tideflats fall within the reservation boundaries. The port’s version downgrades the tribe’s role from partner to “stakeholder� in an effort to stem any expansion of tribal input that is not outlined in the 1988 land claims settlement. The port’s version also includes the addition of a new partner, the Pierce County Council. The reasoning, so the theory goes, is that the industrial area of the Tideflats has county-wide impact, so the full County Council should sit at the table when it comes to changing zoning rules for the economic engine of the region that supports 43,000 jobs in the county alone and 113,000 around the state. Sure, that might make sense at first. The Port of Tacoma, however, already has a county-wide reach, since it gets a slice of the property taxes businesses and residents in Pierce County pay every year. Doubling up by having the County Council added to the mix would only further bog down an already lengthy process. That’s particularly true when politics enter the discussion. The sub-area plan will come at a cost of about $1 million, split between the city and the port and take at least two years. Realistically, it will take longer, much longer. Heck, the city’s data diving to create a sub-area plan for the Hilltop neighborhood took two and a half years. Work on a plan for the area around the Tacoma Mall is rapidly entering its fourth year. A sub-area plan for such a critical area for the city and the region will take at least that long, particularly since none of those plans had such organized and vocal critics ready to storm any and all public meetings, forums or open houses related to them. A sub-area plan for the Tideflats is needed, but rest assured there will be fights, legally if not physically, at every step. Tacoma City Councilmember Ryan Mello floated an idea to promote transparency and cool tempers that has merit. The idea is to have the city’s Planning Commission develop a list of future activities that should be immediately, but reasonably, removed from the roster of permissible businesses on the waterfront – coal exports, for example. The move would remove the sense of urgency – born from the methanol plant debacle of last year – and allow reasonable business expansions and activities to continue. An alternative of declaring an all-out building moratorium while the sub-area plan works its way to completion is not practical but certainly an option, particularly in these times when unrest at home leads to upsets at ballot boxes.

TACOMAWEEKLY Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma, WA 98421 PH: (253) 922-5317 FAX: (253) 922-5305 PUBLISHER John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com NEWS DESK news@tacomaweekly.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com STAFF WRITERS Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Larry LaRue / larry@tacomaweekly.com ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com SPORTS EDITOR Justin Gimse / jgimse@tacomaweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Dave Davison, Chance Pittenger, Matt Kite, Daniel Beers, Josh Reisberg, Randy Rutledge, Jackie Fender COPY EDITING John Larson CARTOONISTS Chris Britt, Milt Priggee PAGINATION Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar, Lisa Lemmer WEB DEVELOPER Ed Curran, Miguel Douglas PHOTOGRAPHERS Rocky Ross, Bill Bungard, David Turnipseed ADVERTISING Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Marlene Carrillo-Yeam / marlene@tacomaweekly.com Andrea Jay / andrea@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. For questions or concerns about delivery, please call Josh at (253) 228-1709.

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Guest Editorial

OUR IMPERILED DEMOCRACY

By Mel Gurtov

Ambitious national political leaders invariably face a problem: how to get things done in the face of competing interests and institutional rules. Democratic leaders generally learn how to accommodate those interests, respect the rules, and understand that accountability is the essence of democracy. They work within the system because for all its flaws, the system works. Autocrats regard competing interests and rules of operation with disdain. Impatient to achieve their ends, they bully opponents, limit accountability and transparency, and seek to become the sole source of authority. Donald Trump seems to be leaning toward the latter approach. Trump’s problem, as is now obvious, is that he can’t move his agenda as he had hoped. Being president, he recently said, isn’t so easy. His critics keep reminding him that he hasn’t done much in his first 100 days. He thought he could run the American empire the way he runs the Trump empire – in other words, without backtalk, transparency, or accountability. What is so worrisome is Trump’s notion of where the problem lies. For him, it’s democracy under a constitutional system, which he lately is describing as “archaic.� In an interview with Fox News, Trump expressed disappointment with congressional Republicans, but blamed the constitutional checks and balances for his legislative failures. “It’s a very rough system,� he said. “It’s an archaic system... It’s really a bad thing for the country.� He assails judges who countermand his orders. Imagine, said Jeff Sessions: one judge “sitting on an island in the Pacific� can obstruct the chief executive! The simple fact for Trump is that he can’t automatically get what he wants. The Democrats, the judges, and the press keep standing in his way. And they’re able to do that by relying on “archaic� rules and principles, such as the independence of the judiciary, a free and obstreperous press, and the filibuster. As Trump’s agenda continues to fail, we can expect that he will attack all these institutions even more often and vigorously than before. The theme of the press as “enemy of the people� and publisher of “fake news� will be repeated many times more. Judges in the Ninth Circuit Court and elsewhere who turn back Trump’s assault on immigration will have to be changed, perhaps along with the organization of the court system. The mainstream press will have to be sidelined and when possible silenced. Reince Priebus mentioned the possibility of using libel laws to do

so – and even said the administration is “looking at� changing the First Amendment to legitimize suing the media. The other day, Trump’s reelection committee demanded that its video for showing on CNN display “fake news� when the video came to CNN and other mainstream media. CNN refused, with support from NBC, CBS, and ABC, and the campaign committee shouted “censorship.� These are the sorts of things autocrats do. Trump’s praise (and envy?) of Putin, Xi, el-Sisi, Erdogan, Duterte, and other authoritarian leaders is well known. He may not like certain of their policies, but he admires strongman rule – the way these men “manage� dissent, push through policies, intimidate legislatures and courts. Even Kim Jong-un draws admiration – a “smart cookie� whom he would be “honored� to meet, Trump says, because Kim was able to fend off challenges to his power. It’s a moment ripe for Steve Bannon, who has been out of sight of late but is still lurking around. Some observers see his continuing influence on specific policies, such as immigration and trade. But the bigger threat that Bannon poses is to the American way of governing by power sharing and competing interests. Trump’s frustrations are fodder for Bannon, who would like nothing better than to dismantle the state and concentrate enormous power in the White House. All the above words were written before Trump fired James Comey, the FBI director – a brutal and alarming way to try to scuttle the FBI’s investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Trump and Sessions will now be able to appoint a fellow traveler, so to speak, and while that act will not end Senate and House investigations of Russiagate, it will seriously limit what they can hope to accomplish. Unless the Democrats can find several Republicans who are willing to put full-court pressure on the Justice Department, there will be no independent prosecutor or special panel. So much for checks and balances. Here’s the bottom line: the presidency of Donald J. Trump is repugnant and damaging to the proper functioning of democratic processes. Although we progressives can mock Trump all we want (for now), he continues to undermine our system of government and brings us closer to the pure demagoguery he so admires. We citizens must find ways to stop his grasp for greater power. We need profiles in courage. Mel Gurtov, syndicated by PeaceVoice, is professor emeritus of political science at Portland State University.

SMALL SCHOOL, BIG RESULTS

Summit Olympus provides a high school option for Tacoma families By Greg Ponikvar Executive director at Summit Olympus As a teacher and an administrator at Summit Olympus, Tacoma’s first tuition-free charter public high school, I see the benefits this new public school option gives students on a daily basis. Founding 9th graders more than doubled the national average for growth in reading and tripled the average growth in math, putting Olympus in the top third of schools in the nation in terms of math growth according to the Measure of Academic Progress assessment. Our parents are also finding and seeing the benefits too. Roquesia Williams, a parent of a 10th-grader from Tacoma, tried a few options when she was looking for the right fit for her child’s education, but none felt like the right fit her son. Jim Hamilton, an Olympus parent of a ninthgrader, also was searching for a school for his son that would challenge him academically, be a place that he loved going to every day and would get him thinking about going to college and his passions. Jim and Roquesia share a similar story. Both searching for a school to be the right fit for their child and that would prepare them for success in a four-year college or university. They also wanted their children to grow to be thoughtful, contributing members of society. Hamilton and Williams chose Summit Olympus. Our goal at Summit Olympus is to meet kids where they are because every student has unique needs. We develop a personalized learning plan with each student and their family. Each student can go at their own pace and learn the material at a very deep level, only progressing once they’ve shown competency in a subject. Personalized learning plans also allow teachers to provide the right support to students at the right time so each student is served in the best way possible and reaches his or her maximum potential. In addition, each student is paired with a mentor who helps them set short-term and long-term goals and check in

on weekly progress. My faculty and I are thrilled to be a part of the Tacoma community – a city with a long tradition of championing education options for students. I have been in awe of both the natural beauty of the area and the active community engagement of the people here. Everybody has such passion for their city and a belief that it can constantly be better, combined with a willingness to roll-up their sleeves and do the work to make it so. Our students have greatly benefited from this community spirit. As part of their school year, Summit Olympus students take four electives in two-week Expedition sessions, where they explore new or existing passions such as culinary arts, drama, music, sports, student leadership, photography, and video and film production. We work with community partners in Tacoma to develop these electives. These electives are driven by our community partnerships and student interests – enabling students to explore their passions and get real-world experiences outside of their core subjects. In addition to welcoming students in our learning community and providing them with support, the Summit Olympus faculty works hard to engage families and make them feel like a partner in their child’s education. Supporting and listening to our families helps us ensure that every student succeeds in any path they choose after graduation. Summit Olympus and other charter public schools in Washington state are providing beneficial options for many Tacoma families like Williams’ and Hamilton’s. Our students have achieved gains in academic growth and our school communities are thriving. I invite you to visit our school and observe how we are providing a high quality, personalized education to Tacoma’s students. Summit Olympus is currently enrolling ninth-, 10thand 11th graders for the 2017-18 school year. For more information on attending this charter public school high school, visit http://chooseolympus.summitps.org.


Friday, May 19, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 7

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This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.


Section A • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 19, 2017

Home & Garden AMPERSAND INTERIOR DESIGNS

Taking a whole home approach to give that personal touch By Jackie Fender jackie@tacomaweekly.com

The home is where the heart is, they say, which is why how your home looks and feels can be so important. Your home tells your story; it sets the tone for the goings-on within its doors. It can even affect your mood. Seattle-based Ampersand Interior Design has this in mind when they state their philosophy: “Ampersand is inclusive. A collaboration; the place where two disparate things or ideas meet. Rooted in history, yet evolves to stay current. Timeless personality. Not simply one thing or another. The addition of something extra to create a more well rounded statement. Our ultimate goal is to combine our expertise with your distinct personality to create an environment you love. We view the design process as a collaboration between all members of the household, which can make things a little complicated at times. That’s what we are here for! Let us collaborate with you to create an environment that makes you feel at ease, a space you can show off with pride. Your home should be your refuge. We can help you get there,� according to the website. Owner Alissa Johnson has always had a passion for customer service. “I am new to the scene,� she said. “I recently finished the bachelor of arts program at Bellevue College. I began working in the

design industry a few years ago, for a firm that does both commercial and residential work. It’s always been my dream to have my own business, so I took the leap about a year ago while I was still in school. I had been getting referrals from good friends and family members, so it just felt right.� Among the services offered, Johnson brings her interior decorating prowess to view a home as a whole. She provides consultations, aids in home renovations, furniture selection and even exterior paint color palette. Though located in North Seattle, she provides these services throughout Pierce and King counties. She “loves residentials best because the personal touch is a reflection of themselves (the client). I like to make people feel

comfortable in their own homes.� When providing samples of work, she mentions use of texture, color and contrast and the way these can create an effortless look that has character. “My personal favorite of the bunch is the materials palette. When done right, these set the tone for the design. I love to invoke a specific feeling or vibe in a space by combining different finishes and materials.� Ampersand Interior Designs charges a reasonable hourly fee and offers designer discounts to clients. For more information or to reach out, visit AmpersandInteriorDesign.com. Johnson provides most initial consultations over the phone or via e-mail and hours of operation are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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Friday, May 19, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 9

PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT Supporting the Economic Growth of Our Community

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

Federal, regional, state and local leaders gathered with the Puyallup Tribal Council to officially cut the ribbon on the Tribe’s new state-of-the-art Salish Cancer Center (SCC) in the spring of 2015. Joining in on the event were (back row from left): former Fife Mayor Tim Curtis; former Congressman Norm Dicks and Puyallup Tribal Council Vice-Chairman Larry LaPointe; (front row from left) Puyallup Tribal Council Members Marguerite Edwards and Sylvia Miller; Puyallup Vice-Chairwoman Roleen Hargrove; Senator Maria Cantwell; Puyallup Chairman Bill Sterud; Gov. Jay Inslee; then Lieutenant Governor Brad Owen; Congressman Denny Heck; and Puyallup Tribal Council Members David Bean and Tim Reynon.

The most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians continues to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce County’s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its

own membership, but sharing its wealth among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County. With a payroll of more than 3,100 people who work in the Tribe’s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities – approximately 70 percent of whom are non-Native –

employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits. In 2015 the Tribe spent more than $491 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more.

From sponsoring local charities, non-profit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer or cease to exist, to protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and healthcare, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its destiny as “the generous people,” the meaning of the Tribe’s very name “Puyallup.”

SALISH CANCER CENTER A place where healing begins On April 7, 2015, the ribbon was officially cut at the grand opening of the Salish Cancer Center (SCC). Housed in the Puyallup Tribal Integrative Medicine building in Fife, SCC is a non-profit venture of the Puyallup Tribe and is the first tribally-owned cancer center in Indian Country and the United States. This state-of-the art facility combines conventional cancer treatment (chemotherapy) and integrative oncology (naturopathic medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, Native healers and acupuncture) to create a truly modern oncology practice. As the indigenous keepers of the Puyallup Tribe Indian Reservation, the Puyallup Tribe has a strong ancestral bond with nature and creation, and this is reflected in the type of care SCC patients receive – focusing on the mind, body, and spirit using lifestyle, nutrition and botanical medicine that blends quite well with modern oncology practices and produces a foundation for providing innovative cancer treatment. At the ribbon cutting, Washington Governor Jay Inslee praised Tribal Council Chairman Bill Sterud and the entire Tribal Council for making their vision for SCC a reality. “This is such a delightful day, not just for the Puyallup Nation, but for the state of Washington, because this is a center that is going to embrace health for the entire state of Washington and the Puyallup Nation all at the same time,” he said. “To me, it is a real achievement to

know that the first tribally-owned and operated oncology center in the United States is right here in the Puyallup Nation. This is something for the whole state of Washington to be very proud of.” The SCC care team is delighted to have medical oncologist Dr. Eiko Klimant on board as medical director, as he joined the team just this year. This spring, Dr. Krisstina Gowin, medical oncologist from Mayo Clinic in Arizona, will also be joining the SCC care team. “My goal is to create a meaningful experience for the patient and their caregivers, which includes creating conditions and finding therapies to help assure the best possible outcome for each individual patient,” Dr. Klimant said.

Puyallup Tribal Member David Duenas offered up a Sundance song of sacrifice and honor at the Salish Cancer Center ribbon cutting.

Dr. Klimant was most recently the Medical Director of Integrative Oncology at Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Philadelphia. He is board certified in medical oncology and internal medicine, as well as hospice, palliative medicine and integrative medicine. He has extensive clinical experience in the management of pancreatic, breast, lung and brain cancers. Dr. Klimant is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Medical Association, American Society of Clinical Oncology, American College of Physicians and the Society for Integrative Oncology. He is fluent in English, German and French. At SCC, Dr. Klimant works within a multidisciplinary team to provide patient-centered cancer care. “The integrative care model puts the patient at the center. Patients’ needs are addressed on multiple levels, including innovative scientific cancer treatment, spiritual and psychological support, naturopathic medicine and an individualized nutritional program,” he said. While a cancer diagnosis can be the most frightening thing a person has to face and is often all consuming for patients and their care providers, SCC stands as a mighty protector and healer for those who have been told there is nothing more that can be done. “It’s a battle against this disease, only now our warriors are our doctors, nurses, lab technicians and people who are in the health profession world,” said Puyallup Chairman Bill Sterud. “Our warriors are going to be armed with the best medicine that can be, whether it exists now or down the road. This is not about making money – this is a non-profit organization that’s dedicated to the saving of lives.” Learn more at www.SalishCancerCenter.com.

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.


Section A • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 19, 2017

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

STOP LNG NOW!

KEEP TACOMA BEAUTIFUL

Once upon a time, Tacoma had an ugly reputation for being a dirty city – even giving off its own smell that became notorious as “the aroma of Tacoma.” Adding to this, tourist traffic was low, crime was high and it seemed that Tacoma didn’t matter because Seattle was just a short drive away. This all changed in recent years, as Tacoma has made a stunning comeback and is now one of the most beautiful and livable cities on the West Coast. Tacoma is back on the map and no one wants to return to those dark and dreary days.

ways and the potential for gas truck accidents in our neighborhoods or at the plant. Moreover, we would face potential risks to our health, the environment and our wallets for something PSE has yet to prove utility customers need.

THE HISTORIC DANGERS OF LNG

The construction of an LNG plant would require a large capacity natural gas pipeline to be constructed through the heart of the city of Fife, another booming city that lies right on the Interstate 5 corridor through Pierce County. This should deeply concern local residents considering historic on-site accidents that have occurred involving or related to LNG: r On Oct. 20, 1944 in Cleveland, 128 people died when an East Ohio Natural Gas Company’s LNG tank ruptured and exploded. LNG spilled into the city’s sewer system, vaporized and turned into a gas, which exploded and burned. r On Oct. 6, 1979 in Lusby, MD a pump seal failed at the Cove Point LNG facility, which released natural gas vapors that settled into an electrical conduit. The gas vapors ignited when a worker switched off a circuit breaker, causing an explosion that killed one worker and severely injured another.

The extinction of salmon throughout Puget Sound is upon us.

PUYALLUP TRIBE: “NO LNG!”

Among the most ardent Tacoma boosters is the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, which has been a forward thinking and financially generous leader in keeping Tacoma beautiful. The Tribe’s active protection of this area’s pristine waters, the salmon and all natural resources has benefitted the entire region. The Tribe vigorously opposes the prospect of an LNG plant being sited in the metropolitan Tacoma area. Not only would the plant be placed right on the Tribe’s reservation, it would mar Tacoma’s great scenic beauty, put natural resources at risk and endanger the lives of everyone who lives and works here in the event of a catastrophic LNG accident.

A PLANT WITHOUT A CUSTOMER

r On Jan. 19, 2004 an explosion at Sonatrach LNG facility in Skikda, Algeria killed 27 people and injured 56. Three LNG trains were also destroyed. The massive hydrocarbon gas explosion was ignited when a steam boiler that was part of an LNG liquefaction train exploded near a propane and ethane refrigeration storage site. A report from a U.S. government inspection team cited that a leak of hydrocarbons from the liquefaction process initiated the domino effect of explosions. r On April 7, 2014 a “processing vessel” at a Williams Co. Inc. facility near the small town of Plymouth, Wash., exploded, spraying chunks of shrapnel as heavy as 250 pounds as far as 300 yards. The flying debris pierced the double walls of a 134-foot LNG tank on site, causing leaks. Five workers were injured, and local responders warned that vapors from the leaks could trigger a more devastating, second explosion. A county fire department spokesman said authorities were concerned a second blast could level a 0.75 mile “lethal zone” around the plant.

Puget Sound Energy is in the final permitting stages of the proposed LNG plant even though at this point PSE lacks any customers for LNG. The proposal started after the private utility company landed a contract with Totem Ocean Trailer Express (TOTE) to provide ships with cleanerburning LNG rather than diesel, but TOTE has since put those plans on hold, announcing in a news release that the company does not have an exact date for when it will retrofit its ships to use LNG. In other words, PSE wants to build a plant without a customer.

LNG PUTS AREA RESIDENTS IN JEOPARDY

Also among its plans, PSE wants to form a for-profit subsidiary to handle the commercial sales of LNG to TOTE and other yet-to-be-determined customers while also storing the LNG for its utility customers to use during extreme weather conditions. Transporting LNG for local ratepayers presents the threat, and the inherent risks, of tanker trucks on our road-

A catastrophic LNG explosion could ignite the entire Port of Tacoma.


Friday, May 19, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 11

t UPS From page A1

faculty, also robed, and then marched onward toward the stadium. The ceremony was held in Baker Stadium, where every graduate was handed a physical copy of his or her college degree. Nora Seimears said that, in spite of the fieldwork and board exams ahead, she’s very happy with her cap and gown because the hardest part of earning a master's degree is now behind her. “The fieldwork will be much easier,� she said. Cordelia Nwogu earned her bachelor’s degree in Nigeria and was a science lab tech there. She came to America six years ago and was very glad to earn her occupational therapy degree at UPS, where she celebrated graduation day with her two sons and husband. Jessica Enyeart had previously earned her bachelor's degree in exercise science. To fulfill her new fieldwork requirements for her occupational therapy credentials, she will be working at a skilled nursing facility, and then at a school district across

t Mural From page A1

Native stories that are being told through this artwork.� The mural tells a story that moves chronologically from left to right. “The artistic design is built around a metaphor of indigenous weaving,� said Steffensen and Brinkerhoff, “which winds first through natural landscapes, then deforestation, industry, and finally cultural rebirth.� The mural begins with a life-sized grand cedar tree that stretches to the top of the building. At the base of the tree is a Puyallup woman weaving a basket. “The stalks of the cedar root basket wind from the left to the right as well,� said the head artists. “They become ribbon-like threads, symbols of humankind’s interrelationship with nature, which was more sustainable when practiced by the Puyallup, who only took and used what was necessary for their people.� As the threads move to the right they become wooden planks, a dynamic change in mankind’s relationship with nature as immigrants from Asia and Europe arrive. “These graphic elements show the conflicts inherent in this clash of civilizations and the loss of Native culture,� said Steffensen and Brinkerhoff. “The basket threads transition us to the destruction of the forests, clear cuts and severed trees that represent not only a changing landscape,

PHOTO BY TAMI JACKSON

Mom Nora Seimears poses with her daughter Claira. Seimears earned her bachelor's degree 10 years ago in exercise science. She returned to school to earn her masters in occupational therapy.

the water in central Kitsap. UPS is a national liberal arts college with students enrolled from 47 states and 12 countries. According to Skeel, 682 students graduate this year with most earning their bachelors degrees.

but the destruction of Puyallup culture and Native lands. The ripped treaty floating away with the flying birds and the carved fist in the tree are symbols for these tragedies as well.� Aspects of European design become prevalent in the mural as it moves further right, and ends with a girl weaving a work in progress. “[The girl] represents the weaving of our future, which acknowledges the tragic loss of Native culture, and immigrant sufferings, as they transform into a new integrated story of working together to weave civilization anew,� said the artists. “Her art is a work in progress inspired by a Native design which represents friendship and unity. Above, in the background of this historical human drama, stands the mountain, watching over the forests and people below, while off to the right, the train tracks run into the future.� With the days getting longer and the weather clearing up, Steffensen and Brinkerhoff have the opportunity to devote ample time to a project that has been five years in the making. “The two lead artists are working six days a week,� said Solverson. “The all-Native group of assistants are working on various days, typically with three people working at a time on either Sundays or Thursdays.� Weather permitting, the “Working Forward, Weaving Anew� mural is scheduled to be completed by the end of June of this year.

PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

SIGNS. Protesters associated with Direct Action Tacoma and RedLine Tacoma

pledge to keep protesting the construction of the liquefied natural gas facility on the Tideflats for as long as it takes to stop construction.

t Protest From page A1

on the sidewalk outside the fence line disbursed. No one outside the fenceline was arrested. “This is Tacoma’s Standing Rock,� Puyallup Tribal member Chester Earl said, noting that the increased number and size of dangerous chemical facilities on the Tideflats is alarming many tribal members and nearby residents. “If one of those goes then all of them go.� Tribal member Jim Rideout said he hopes the protests increase in an effort to raise awareness about the rising danger of accidents, explosions and environmental damage on the Tideflats, which are largely within the tribal reservation borders. “The awareness isn’t there,� he said, noting that Wednesday’s protest was his third. “Activism isn’t a job but it has to be done.�

Protests at the site have been increasing in recent weeks as PSE moves forward with construction of the facility as it seeks final permits under legal challenges. The site is projected to provide LNG to TOTE ships sailing between Tacoma and Alaska as well as provide storage for residential and business use during times of extreme weather. Environmental groups have questioned the environmental impact of the facility on the waterway, the safety of an 8 million gallon tank of natural gas being located so close to residential areas and the overall impact of dependence on fossil fuels. “Tacoma City Council, the Port of Tacoma, the state legislators and the Utility and Transportation Board have ignored the voice of the people of Tacoma for over a year,� Redline stated in a release about the protest. “It is patently unjust that the rich and powerful should proceed with a project that will cause harm to our people, our environment, and the greater Salish Sea.�

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Sports STADIUM STUNNED

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017

SECTION A, PAGE 12

TOP-RANKED TIGERS FALL IN FINAL SECONDS

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

LEADERS. With all of the call-ups to the oft-injured Seattle Mariners, as well as a myriad of other roster transactions, Tacoma Rainiers’ fans have had to keep their head on a swivel with all of the new faces coming and going in such a short amount of time this season. Through just 45 games, the Rainiers and their fans have seen an astonishing 108 player transactions take place. At this rate, the team may hit 400 before the year is out, which we're pretty sure would be some sort of record. Tacoma returns home to Cheney Stadium on Tuesday, May 23, for a four-game series.

A LITTLE RAIN WON’T SLOW TACOMA By Josiah Rutledge Tacoma Weekly Correspondent

By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

W

hen it comes to the any sort of sporting endeavor, there is nothing more difficult for a team than running the table for a perfect season and taking home the championship trophy. Many in the business believe a loss or two during the season can be advantageous for a quality team in the postseason. The taste of a loss can often fuel a fire inside and make a squad perform even a little bit better. Then again, it’s pretty awesome to try and make a run at a perfect season. It’s the rarest event in team sports and much like the movie “Highlander,” in the end there can only be one. The most difficult thing dealing with an undefeated regular season is the fact that there is no more room for a stumble, once the postseason arrives. Short of losing in a state championship game, there is arguably nothing more heartbreaking than seeing an undefeated run end in the final moments of an opening-round contest. For the players, coaches and supporters of the previously undefeated Stadium Tigers boys’ soccer team, this was indeed the feeling in the chilly, night air on Tuesday, May 16, at Mt. Tahoma Stadium. The Tigers entered the match at the top of the state 3A rankings and boasted an astounding 17-0 record with the Pierce County League championship title in their pocket. Entering their first-round state tournament matchup against the West Seattle Wildcats, Stadium had outscored their opponents by a total of 83-6. For those deep into soccer statistics, a plus-77 goal differential is flat-out ridiculous and proof positive as to why Stadium was seen as the squad to beat in the 16-team, 3A state tournament field. When the game is remembered down the road, many will recall the final minute in the second overtime. A substitution in the final moments backfired immediately and in the most dramatic way possible. As fans, players and coaches were beginning to expect a penalty kick shootout in u See TIGERS / page A14

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

GUT PUNCHED. (top) Stadium senior Logan Barker makes his move

against Shelton in the 3A district tournament. Barker was taken down in the state tournament first round match on a breakaway, that went uncalled. (mid-left) Stadium freshman Braeden Pryor was one of just five underclassmen to don the Tigers' varsity uniform this season. (mid-right) Senior Collin Kleeberger fights for the ball. (bottom) Stadium sophomore Justin Beardemphl gets his head into the game. Stadium will be hard-pressed to replace the 13 seniors that will be graduating from this 2017 squad.

Though the Rainiers currently sit atop the Pacific Coast League Pacific Northern Division standings, they haven’t been afforded much breathing room, with the Reno Aces hot on their trail, entering their respective weekend series trailing by just half a game. For that reason, this past weekend was critical for Tacoma. They needed a good showing against Round Rock to maintain their advantage over Reno as they head into one of the most grueling portions of their schedule. With days off on May 10 and May 15, the Rainiers got bit of a breather over the past week, but they shouldn’t get used to the rest, as they’re entering a stretch of 27 games in 27 days. The nastiest part of that number being 16 of those games coming on the road. On Tuesday, they began a stretch of 16 games in 15 days with a four-game set crammed into three days against the Omaha Storm Chasers. As fate would have it, the opener was rained out in Omaha, and now the Rainiers are faced with back-to-back doubleheaders on the road. This is going to be no easy task, and will put both teams to the test. After Thursday’s finale in Omaha, they’ll head 135 miles to Des Moines, Iowa to take on the Iowa Cubs in another four-game set (though this time they’ll at least receive a full four days for it). After an early-afternoon “getaway” game in Iowa on Tuesday, May 23, they’ll make the 1,500 mile trek back to Tacoma’s Cheney Stadium for yet another four game set, this time with the Fresno Grizzlies. It will be a quick turnaround for Tacoma as they will then head out back on the road and travel 845 miles to Salt Lake City for a four-game set. On Wednesday, May 31, Tacoma will finally receive a day off. The PCL schedulers didn’t leave much time for a little rest

u See RAINIERS / page A14


Friday, May 19, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 13

Sportswatch BIG OPENING WEEKEND FOR SOUNDERS U23 ARRIVES

The Sounders U23 2017 PDL season kicks off this Friday May 19, at Bonney Lake high school versus the Portland Timbers U23 team at 7:30 p.m. With a quick turnaround, the young guns in green will face the defending NW Division and Western Conference Champion, Calgary Foothills, on Sunday, May 21, at Sunset Stadium in Sumner at 2 p.m. Opening this weekend against perennial powers will be a test for the new look Sounders U23. The Portland Timbers U23 team boasts a great history in both winning games and developing players. Formed in 2008, the Timbers U23 team rattled off 16 straight wins in 2010 to claim the PDL National Championship under then head coach, Jim Rilatt. From that point, the Timbers U23 have helped place players throughout the professional leagues in the United States with Jake Gleason starting as the current Timbers first goalkeeper, and Fatai Alashe, Erik Hurtado, Mark Sherrod, and Erik Miller all plying their trade in Major League Soccer. With a move to Salem, Oregon in a new affiliate structure, the team will be coached by Aaron Lewis in 2017. The Corban College head coach has a history with this team working for the club from 2010-2013. Local standouts Rey Ortiz and Benji Michel from the 2017 WCC Champion Portland Pilots will suit up along with players coming in from Lewis’ network across the country. The top rivalry in Major League Soccer never disappoints at the U23 level and the 2017 addition appears ready for another eventful series. Calgary Foothills took the PDL by storm in 2016 winning the PDL NW Division title as they edged the Sounders U23 in the final game of the regular season. Calgary then dispatched the Sounders U23 team in the PDL playoffs on their way to the 2016 Western Conference championship and a place in the PDL national final game. The Michigan Bucks won the final leaving Calgary with a determination to get back to that game in 2017. Head coach Tommy Wheeldon has brought back Dominic Russo, Kyle Jones, and Dylan Powley for familiarity and he has revamped a roster to again compete in the tough PDL NW Division. The PDL NW Division has won the PDL Western Conference championship for seven years running and shows zero signs of slowing down. Calgary opened the 2017 PDL campaign with two definitive wins over newcomer TSS Rovers to start the year at 2-0. The Sounders U23 will open the 2017 season with many new faces having had seven former Sounders U23 players selected in the 2017 MLS Super Draft. As with each season, the Sounders U23 work to move players on to the higher levels of the game. Joining the 2017 edition are Will Bagrou, Conner Antley, and Airrion Blackstock from Mercer University along with returners in Sounders FC home growns Paul Christensen, Chase Hanson, and Matt Reinikka. The roster is littered with new faces and these players will look to work in the hardened NW Division as they chase the dream of professional soccer. The Sounders U23 will look to get back to winning hardware in 2017. Sounders U23 tickets and more information can be found at www.soundersu23.com.

GAVRONSKI READY FOR NEXT BIG STEP AT BATTLE AT THE BOAT 111

Few fighters have enjoyed more success at Battle at the Boat during the series’ 20 years than Mike Gavronski. The Tacoma native will look to continue his winning ways at the nation’s longest running tribal casino boxing series when he faces Quinton Rankin in the main event of Battle at the Boat 111 at the Emerald Queen Casino on Saturday, June 3. Gavronski will fight for the first time in the light heavyweight division. He brings an impressive record of 22-2-1 with 14 knockouts into the 10-round contest. “Everything has been going great with Mike leading up to this fight,” said Gavronski’s trainer Sam Ditusa. “He’s down in San Antonio training right now. He went down there his last two fights and trains for five weeks. Each time turned out really well. It just basically gets him away from home and allows him to focus completely on boxing.” It’s hard to argue with Ditusa’s assessment as Gavronski looked razor sharp in his last two bouts. Gavronski defeated Thomas Awimbono (25-4-1) in his last bout on Nov. 19, 2016, a win that came on the heels of his triumph over previously undefeated Australian champion Jake Carr on Sept. 10 2016. The victories improved Gavronski’s all-time record at the Emerald Queen Casino to 9-1. “Those two fights were easily the best of Mike’s career,” promoter Brian Halquist said. “He looked like a completely different fighter against Carr and Awimbono. He was quicker and more accurate. He really put on a show and we expect the same type of performance from him on June 3 as he is right on the verge of being ranked among the top 20 in the world.” Fighting out of Charlotte, Rankin is 12-3-2 with 9 KOs. Rankin is 8-1-2 over his last 11 bouts with his only setback coming against undefeated Medzhid Bektemirov (18-0) on June 13, 2016. Rankin is coming off a draw against undefeated Todd Unthank May (10-0) on March 11.

“The opponent pool is really dwindling for Mike,” Ditusa said. “He’s going up a weight class. It’s just getting harder to find opponents for him. He’s fought some very tough fighters and I think Rankin falls right into that category.” Tickets are available through the EQC box office and all Ticketmaster Outlets. Preliminary bouts will start at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m. Battle at the Boat 111 will feature the VIP experience with 3rd Row Seats being discounted to $75 per ticket. All fans seated in the VIP section (rows 1-3) will have an exclusive access point and a dedicated server to help create a true VIP experience. Battle at the Boat 111 is brought to you by Brian Halquist Productions. For more information, please visit www.halquistproductions.com and the Battle at the Boat Facebook page.

TACOMA’S HOT TICKETS MAY 19 – JUNE 11 FRIDAY, MAY 19 – SOCCER Portland U23 vs. Sounders U23 Bonney Lake HS – 7:30 p.m. SATURDAY, MAY 20 - FOOTBALL NW Hurricanes vs. Pierce Cty Bengals Art Crate Stadium - 5 p.m. SUNDAY, MAY 21 - SOCCER Women - Olympic Force vs. WP SSFC Peninsula HS - 2 p.m.

Battle at the Boat 111 Card 10 Round Main Event – 173 pounds Mike Gavronski (22-2-1, 14 KOs) vs. Quinton Rankin (12-3-2, 9 KOs)

SUNDAY, MAY 21 – SOCCER Calgary Foothills vs. Sounders U23 Sunset Stadium, Sumner – 2 p.m.

5 Round Semi-Main Events 170 pounds: Tommy Turner (4-7-0, 3 KOs) vs. Issac Tadeo (8-0-0, 4 KOs) 147 pounds: Andres Reyes (6-2-1, KO) vs. Will Hughes (5-5-0, 3 KOs)

SUNDAY, MAY 21 - SOCCER Olympic Force vs. WP SSFC Peninsula HS - 4:45 p.m.

4 Round Undercard Bouts 177 pounds: Richard Vansiclen (3-0-0, 2 KOs) vs. Justin Milani (1-4-0) 140 pounds: Andre Keys (3-1-0, KO) vs. Ricardo Maldonado (7-6-1, 1 KO) 140 pounds: Niko McFarland (0-3-0) vs. Shae Green (debut)

TACOMA ATHLETIC COMMISSION HONORS TWO LOGGERS

The Tacoma Athletic Commission (TAC) recently honored Hans Fortune ‘17 and Alexis Noren ‘17 during its recent awards banquet. TAC recognized the most outstanding collegiate student-athletes in Tacoma for the 2016-17 academic year. Pierce College, Tacoma Community College, and Pacific Lutheran were also recognized. Fortune, a four-year student-athlete for the football team – received Puget Sound’s Ben Cheney Award for Most Outstanding Male Student-Athlete (2016-17). He broke several Puget Sound football records as a junior last year, and he surpassed his own school records as a senior this year. In the fall of 2016, he was twice named the Northwest Conference Offensive Player of the Week, and he earned Second Team All-Conference by season’s end. Fortune is Puget Sound’s all-time leader in passing yards (6,852), passing touchdowns (58), and total offense (2,833). Fortune was named a CoSIDA Academic AllAmerican following the 2015 season, and he finished his Puget Sound career with the top GPA among graduating male student-athletes. Noren is a four-year letter winner for the women’s basketball team, and she earned Puget Sound’s Alice Bond Award for Most Outstanding Female Student-Athlete (2016-17). Noren made her way into Puget Sound all-time record books, ranking top-10 in career assists (336, 3rd), rebounds (588, 9th), field-goal percentage (.493, t-2nd), and games played (112, t-4th). She also eclipsed 1,000 career points this year. Noren was named to the All-NWC First Team, and earned a D3hoops.com All-West Region honor. During her Logger career, Noren played in 11 postseason games, including four NCAA Tournament games. Following a perfect 16-0 NWC season (2016-17) for Puget Sound’s first outright regular-season conference title, Noren helped lead the Loggers to the second round of the NCAA Tournament for the second time in three years.

PLU’S OVERLAND AND HATLEN EARN ALL-REGION HONORS

Pacific Lutheran University softball studentathletes Anna Overland and Kathryn Hatlen were among the 45 individuals selected to the NCAA Division III All-West Region Softball Team as selected by the National Fastpitch Coaches Association. Overland earned a spot on the Second Team while Hatlen landed Third Team accolades. Overland earns Second Team honors at shortstop after starting all 39 games for the Lutes this spring. The Gig Harbor, Washington native and First Team All-Northwest Conference selection led the team with a .619 slugging percentage and 52 runs scored. Overland additionally boasted a .388 batting average with 43 RBIs, 13 doubles, six home runs, while earning six stolen bases. Hatlen lands a spot on the Third Team as an at-large selection. The Woodinville, Washington native and First Team All-NWC pick started all 39 games for the Lutes, owning a .388 batting average and a .439 on-base percentage. Hatlen drove in 25 RBIs, collected 12 extra base hits, while leading the team with 314 putouts in the field. All-Region players are nominated and selected by NFCA member coaches in each of the eight Division III regions. Each region had a First, Second, and Third Team with each region honoring 45 total student-athletes. PLU (23-16, 16-12 NWC) finished third in the NWC regular season standings before advancing to the championship game of the NWC Tournament, falling 3-2 to host Whitworth University in the final game of the double elimination tournament.

TUESDAY, MAY 23 - BASEBALL Fresno Grizzlies vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium - 6:05 p.m. WEDNESDAY, MAY 24 - BASEBALL Fresno Grizzlies vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium - 11:35 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 25 - TRACK 4A, 3A, 2A State Track Meet Mt. Tahoma Stadium - 3 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 25 - BASEBALL Fresno Grizzlies vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium - 7:05 p.m. FRIDAY, MAY 26 - TRACK 4A, 3A, 2A State Track Meet Mt. Tahoma Stadium - 9 a.m. FRIDAY, MAY 26 - BASEBALL Fresno Grizzlies vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium - 7:05 p.m. SATURDAY, MAY 27 - TRACK 4A, 3A, 2A State Track Meet Mt. Tahoma Stadium - 9:30 a.m. SATURDAY, MAY 27 - SOCCER 1A State Championship Sumner Stadium - 12 p.m. SATURDAY, MAY 27 - SOCCER 3A State Championship Sparks Stadium - 3 p.m. SATURDAY, MAY 27 - SOCCER 2A State Championship Sumner Stadium - 5 p.m. SATURDAY, MAY 27 - SOCCER 4A State Championship Sparks Stadium - 5 p.m. SUNDAY, MAY 28 - SOCCER TSS ROVERS vs. Sounders U23 Starfire Stadium, Tukwila - 2 p.m. MONDAY, JUNE 5 – BASEBALL Reno vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 6:05 p.m. TUESDAY, JUNE 6 – BASEBALL Reno vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 6:05 p.m. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7 – BASEBALL Reno vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 11:35 a.m. THURSDAY, JUNE 8 – BASEBALL Reno vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m. FRIDAY, JUNE 9 – BASEBALL Las Vegas vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m. SATURDAY, JUNE 10 – BASEBALL Las Vegas vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m. SUNDAY, JUNE 11 – BASEBALL Las Vegas vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 1:35 p.m.

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Section A • Page 14 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 19, 2017

t Rainiers From page A12

for the weary however, as they’ll spend the day heading to Fresno, where they’ll kick off a stretch of 11 games in 11 days. A good showing against Round Rock was exactly what they needed before entering that tiresome stretch, and that’s exactly what they got. In a series marred by rain, the Rainiers emerged victorious over the Express in three out of four games. Game one on Thursday, May 11, saw the club smash three homers (Seth Mejias-Brean, Mike Zunino, and Steve Baron each hit one) in just five innings, accounting for five of their eight runs before the game was cut short by rain, after having reached the minimum number of innings to qualify as an official game (five). The rain continued the following evening, causing the game to be postponed. As a result, a doubleheader was scheduled for Saturday, with two seven-inning games on the docket. The Rainiers sent Tyler Cloyd and Rob Whalen to the hill for the two games, and they turned in dramatically different results. Cloyd, a recent signee out of independent baseball who was making his 2017 affiliated debut, wasn’t able to pitch deep into the game, tossing just 3.2 innings, allowing no runs and just two hits while fanning three. Whalen, on the other hand, was able to soak up six innings, but allowed five runs, three walks, and five hits. As one might expect, the fate of the Rainier ball club matched that of their starting pitcher in each instance, as Dan Vogelbach’s four RBI led Tacoma to an 8-1 win in Cloyd’s start (having failed to meet the five-inning minimum, Cloyd was

ineligible for the win, which was given to Nick Hagadone, his first win of the season). On the flip side, the Rainier lineup was unable to scratch across a single run in support of Whalen, falling 5-0 and handing Round Rock’s Tyler Wagner his own first win. The first full game of the series took place Sunday, May 14, with Andrew Moore taking the mound for Tacoma, facing off against Round Rock’s Anthony Bass. Moore turned in his first quality start of the season in just his second start for Tacoma, allowing two runs over six innings while striking out five, and left in line for the win on the back of a two-RBI double by Zunino and solo homers from Tyler Smith and Vogelbach. However, he was unable to lock up his second win in a Rainier uniform, settling for a no-decision when Dean Kiekhefer, who had previously allowed only one run on the year, served up a two-run HR to Ronald Guzman in the top half of the eighth. The Rainiers were able to regain momentum (and the lead) on an RBI triple by Tyler O’Neill, driving in Leonys Martin. They were able to tack on an additional run on a sacrifice fly by DJ Peterson, pushing the lead to 6-4. After recording the final out of the eighth, Ryne Harper stayed on to close out the game in the ninth. He retired all four batters he faced en route to his second win of the season, giving the Rainiers the series win over Round Rock and a 1.5 game lead over Reno in the standings at 23-12. Up with the big club: The Mariners saw yet another starting pitcher hit the disabled list, this time right-hander Ryan Weber, who had begun the season in the Rainiers rotation before he was promoted to help fill in for the other four injured Mariner starters (Felix Hernandez, James Paxton, Drew Smyly and Hisashi Iwakuma). They

t Tigers From page A12

a matter of seconds, West Seattle’s players were still in attack mode, with the ball in the shadow of the Stadium goal. With a minute left in the second overtime, Stadium head coach Raphael Cox made a substitution that was actually rather textbook. He saw a shootout looming and wanted to get the best penalty kickers on the field before time expired, so they would be eligible to kick. Out came senior starting goalkeeper Ryan Naylor, and in came junior Ethan Saarenas, who had been on the chilly sidelines for the entirety of the game. One factor that was obviously not weighed heavily and quickly enough was the fact that West Seattle had a throw-in coming up very deep into the Stadium end of the field. The ball was thrown in to West Seattle’s Alex Coronado, who turned and sent a mid-range blast from the angle. The ball had some strong spin on it, and when it hit Saarenas’ gloves, the ball squirted out, falling just inside the goal line. The throng of Stadium fans fell silent in the stands, stunned by the enormity and swiftness of a dream season’s end. Tears flowed and a few players were inconsolable. It was like watching a full-court buzzer beater in basketball, or a Hail Mary touchdown toss in football for a huge upset victory. It really felt like there was no possible way that what happened, just happened.

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Assem ble! if you like staying informed about local politics, policies, neighborhood issues and trends and also have the drive to tell interesting stories and informative, newsyou-can-use articles, give me a call at 253-922-5317. I might just have a spot for you on my team.

steve dunkelberger, staff writer

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

SURPRISING. Mt. Tahoma senior Manny Gonzalez

gets his foot into the game. The T-Birds put together one of the finest boys' soccer seasons in Mt. Tahoma school history with a 9-6-1 record and added a district victory, before falling to Peninsula with a state berth on the line. Watch out for this program on the rise.

When folks look back at the entirety of the game, they should also remember senior forward Logan Barker being taken down on a clear breakaway. No foul was called. It was going to be Barker versus the goalkeeper,

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except it just didn’t happen. The number of near-misses on the West Seattle goal are too numerous to go into detail. Had the ball spun or bounced a little differently, the Tigers may have entered the final moments of the match holding a 4-1 lead, instead of a 1-1 tie. One thing that should not be forgotten is the sensational goal put in by junior defenseman Kendall Burks. The two-time Tacoma Weekly All-City selection slapped a free kick from nearly 40 yards out. The ball looked as though it was heading outside of the far post, but it began to banana and fell just inside the upper-right corner of the goal. It’s a shame that this is not the goal that will be remembered due to the final moments in the match. While there were several Tacoma-area soccer teams who had a chance to make some noise in the postseason, Stadium was easily everyone’s pick for a possible, or probably, state championship run. When the dust had settled by the end of the first round, all but 1A Charles Wright had been knocked out of the running. Cinderella seasons by Mt. Tahoma and Lincoln came to a close in the district tournament, while regulars such as Bellarmine and Wilson were also tripped up. Even longtime powerhouse Fife was upended in the first round of the 2A tournament. However, there are still some opportunities for Tacoma’s best to make some noise in the postseason. The Stadium and Wilson fastpitch teams take to the fields at Sprinker beginning on Friday, May 19, with state tournament berths on the line. Also the Lincoln girls’ tennis team is back at it again, having went 15-0 during the regular season and looking strong for some state opportunities. Of course, let’s not forget the Lincoln track and field team, nor both Bellarmine golf teams.

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also saw all-star second baseman Robinson Cano hit the disabled list with a quad injury. Jean Segura has remained red hot since his activation from the disabled list, turning in 34 hits in 19 games, including 11 multi-hit games. He currently carries a 14-game hitting streak. The Mariners bullpen has been a source of frustration all season, owning the second worst ERA in the American League. Closer Edwin Diaz has struggled from the ugly combo of walks (5.87 per nine innings), and homers (2.35 per), which have been the primary drivers of an ugly 5.28 ERA. It was announced that Diaz had been removed from the closer role on Tuesday, May 16. Elsewhere on the farm: The Double-A Arkansas Travelers saw a similarly rain-marred weekend series to the Rainiers, with both the first game of their series against Springfield and its replacement the next day canceled due to rain. Coming off an eight-game losing streak, the Travelers have managed to go 2-2 in their last four, leaving them deep in the cellar of the Texas League North Division. Though the team has been scuffling, left fielder Chuck Taylor has remained scorching hot, extending his hitting streak to 17 games. In 28 games this season, Taylor has only gone hitless twice, hitting .333 on the season and .364 during his current hitting streak. After a sizzling stretch, the Class-A Advanced Modesto Nuts have cooled off over the last week, going 3-4 over their last seven games. Gianfranco Wawoe (fourth) and Braden Bishop (fifth) each rank top-five in the California League, while Jordan Cowan ranks seventh. The Single-A Clinton LumberKings have won each of their four, scoring a whopping forty runs in that time frame, led by an impressive .336/.388/.500 slash line by 21-year old center fielder Anthony Jimenez.

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Friday, May 19, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 15

SHOCK SURGE TO FIRST PLACE WPSSFC MARKS FIRST EVER VICTORY OVER SPOKANE

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

FIRST PLACE. (top-left) South Sound FC's Cayman John races for possession

of the ball. (top-middle) Shock captain Micah Wenzel gets a shove in the wrong direction. (top-right) Midfielder Kyle Rivers mixes it up in front of the Spokane Shadow goal. (mid-left) Wenzel, Brandon Madsen and JJ Schmeck celebrate what turned out to be the game winner. (mid-right) Madsen spins away in triumph after getting a foot on the sole goal of the match. (bottom) Veteran Danny Minnitti and John put the pressure on. The 1-0 victory by Washington Premier South Sound FC over the Spokane Shadow was a first for the hometown boys. In their previous six meetings, Spokane was victorious in four matches and tied with the Shock in the other two. Up next for the first place Shock is a road match against the Olympic Force on Sunday, May 21 at Peninsula HS at 4:45 p.m. South Sound FC will return home to the Washington Premier Complex on Saturday, June 3, as they host the Vancouver Victory at 3:30 p.m.

! Wh a t a Feelin ''!

PROFESSIONAL INDOOR SOCCER For tickets call 1-844-STARS-TIME or visit TACOMASTARS.COM

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Section A • Page 16 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 19, 2017

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City Life

Changing Scene Theatre’s ‘Talking With...’

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017

SECTION B, PAGE 1

PHOTOS BY KAT DOLLARHIDE

SUNDAY MORNING FEVER. TMP’s “Sister Act, the Musical” is blessed with a big ensemble that makes for elaborate dance numbers. TMP’s “Sister Act, the Musical” is blessed with a big ensemble that makes for elaborate dance numbers.

TMP’S ‘SISTER ACT’ IS SONICALLY AND SCENICALLY SENSATIONAL ister Act, the Musical” looks like a social experiment to find out what happens when a disco diva and a group of nuns are forced together for a time span sufficient for some form of cultural chemistry to take place. The diva is a talented singer but desires nothing but fame and fortune. The nuns can’t sing, but they find value in lives of selfless spirituality. The result, of course, is that each party gives something to the other. The disco diva teaches the nuns to sing and dance – and in so doing enables them to save their church and stay together. The diva discovers that there is more to life than fame and shiny objects. The exchange is complete. The Tacoma Musical Playhouse production of “Sister Act,” which runs through June 4, is a sassy, silly and sultry excursion into sonic sensations that stimulates the senses with sparkling sights and scintillating sounds. Based on the 1992 musical comedy film starring Whoopi Goldberg, “Sister Act” was made into a Broadway musical in 2011. It has since become a staple of community theater. The basics of the plot are that the aspiring disco singer Deloris Van Cartier (Lanita Hudson) witnesses a murder, goes to the police and is placed in a convent disguised as a nun to keep her safe from her gangster boyfriend Curtis Jackson (Russell Campbell), who committed the murder. Leading lady Hudson gives a strong performance marked by a lush, grainy voice that cuts through like a velvet buzz saw. Deloris’ foil is the Mother Superior of the order (Diane Lee Bozzo), who is opposed to the presence of so worldly a personality as that of the brash Deloris. Bozzo’s operatic surges swell to the rafters in songs like “Here Within These Walls” and “Haven’t Got a Prayer.” Kat Fresh is perfection in the role of the perpetually spritely and adventurous Sister

Mary Patrick and Lark Orvick-Moore gets big laughs with her antics as Sister Mary Lazarus. Maggie Barry is stunning as the shy, novice nun Sister Mary Robert, who is drawn out of her shell under the influence of Deloris. In “The Life I Never Led,” Barry steps up to the plate and hits it out of the musical ball park with a sweet and buttery, yet strong lyrical performance. Campbell is great as the villain. His main tune, “When I Find My Baby,” is both amusing and menacing as he sings about what he’ll do when he finds Deloris after she has gone to the police. Rich humor is provided by two of the villain’s henchmen Joey (John Miller) and Pablo (Mathew Michael.) Isaiah Parker, as the villain’s nephew TJ, is most fun to watch throughout the show. Parker enlivens every scene in which he appears with his joyful and complete habitation of his role. Eddie, the police chief (Duwayne Andrews, Jr.), is smitten with Deloris, whom he had a crush on in high school. Andrews is featured in one of the high points of the show. He undergoes several inventive transformations of persona during his performance of “I Could Be That Guy.” Dale Bowers, as Monsignor O’Hara – the priest turned M.C – is just plain fun to watch. The ensemble cast members all provide backup that leavens this production, which is punctuated by big song and dance numbers. Ashley Koon and Linda Palacios are captivating as Deloris’ backup singers. The elaborate sets, brilliant lighting and bedazzling costumes (that smack of the height of 1970s disco pizzazz) all come together to create a visual spectacle that is a match for the musical feast. The show is marked by moments of visual magic, sprinkled liberally with humor and still manages to be evocative of an emotion response. There are nuns gathered in their pajamas, Mary Roberts’ moments of questioning and growth, dancers with glittering, psychedelic bellbottom pants and a priceless cameo appearance by director Jon Douglas Rake

ONE

TWO

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, VICKY! At noon on Saturday, May 20, Queen Victoria’s 198th birthday will be celebrated at the Fort Nisqually Living History Museum, located at Point Defiance Park, 5400 N. Pearl St. Commemorating the occasion will be bagpipes, a musket volley, a cannon salute and toasts. The Tacoma Scottish Country Dancers will be on hand to perform traditional 19th century social dances and teach visitors the steps to favorites such favorites as “Strip the Willow.” And at 3 p.m. guests will be treated to a performance by the Chief Leschi Elementary, Puyallup Tribal School Drum & Dance Group. The event is free and open to the general public; www. fortnisqually.org.

SENIOR ADVICE Metro Parks Tacoma will host Fifty and Better (FAB) at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 24, at Portland Avenue Community Center, 3513 Portland Ave. Organizers invite high school seniors in transition to adulthood to get tips from experienced seniors on topics such as banking, setting financial goals and paying for college and cars. The program is the last in a series of free workshops held at the center. For more information and to register, call Bonnie Elliser at (253) 278-1475.

By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

“S

THREE FISH FOOD BENEFIT FISH Food Banks of Pierce County invites the public to “Nourish,” which will be held 6 p.m. Friday, May 19, at Hotel Murano’s

DIVA. Lanita Hudson breathes life into the role of Deloris Van Cartier, the would-be disco diva who finds herself sequestered in a convent in TMP’s “Sister Act.”

as the pope. As we wait for the cool, wet weather to change into something more comfortable, TMP’s “Sister Act” provides a warm glow

to carry one through an evening. “Sister Act” runs through June 4. For further information visit www.tmp.org or call (253) 565-6867.

Bicentennial Pavilion, 1320 Broadway Plaza. The dinner and auction is being held in support of the nutritious food provided to tens of thousands of families served by FISH’s seven food bank locations and 10 mobile food bank sites. Music will be provided by Tacoma’s popular Kim Archer Band. Tickets are $65, or $650 for a table of 10; www.fishfoodbanks.org.

gives the audience an in-depth exposé on the people working to save our planet. Speakers are invited to share insights at the facilitated discussion to follow the film. The screening is free to attend, though donations will be accepted; www.meaningfulmovies.org.

FOUR

“MOON OVER BUFFALO” Fading stars George and Charlotte Hay are stuck in Buffalo performing for small audiences with an even smaller company of actors in “Moon Over Buffalo,” which will be performed at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, May 19, at Pacific Lutheran University’s Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, 12180 Park Ave. S. But when word arrives that film director Frank Capra is coming to see their matinee, they will do what they must to leave the small time for the big time. Tickets for this madcap farce are $5 to $18 for the general public, and free for PLU students and kids ages 18 and younger; www.eventbrite.com/e/ moon-over-buffalo-tickets-26286658102.

CLIMATE CHOICE “Time to Choose” is the main attraction at the next Meaningful Movies Tacoma screening which will start at 7 p.m. Friday, May 19, at Center for Spiritual Living, 206 N. J St. In the documentary, Academy Award winning filmmaker Charles Ferguson (“Inside Job,” “No End In Sight”) addresses worldwide climate change challenges and possible solutions. Through interviews with world-renowned entrepreneurs, innovators, and brave individuals living on the front lines of climate change, Ferguson

FIVE


Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 19, 2017

SEATTLE LUMINARIES TURN OUT FOR U2’S “JOSHUA TREE” ANNIVERSARY TOUR

PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD

CAPTIVATING. U2’s performance Sunday in Seattle was enhanced by breathtaking film clips directed by Anton Corbijn, best known for videos he has shot for the band, as well as Joy Division, Depeche Mode, Nirvana and others. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

You know you’re at a huge event when Bill Gates and Eddie Vedder show up. Such is the magnitude of U2’s 30th anniversary stadium tour for “The Joshua Tree,” the iconic, Irish rock quartet’s most celebrated album. The trek made its U.S. debut Sunday at Seattle’s Century Link Field, following its launch the night before in Vancouver, B.C. Gates – the co-founder of Microsoft, aka the richest man on the planet – could be spotted in the stands, milling around with the hoi polloi minutes before the headlining set; and later, Bono (born Paul David Hewson) acknowledged the city’s most famous entrepreneur and philanthropist from the stage. “Next to my wife, Ali, no one has inspired me more in my activism than Bill and Melinda Gates,” the singer said as he set up U2’s signature ballad “One” (for which his One campaign to fight poverty and disease in Africa is named.) Pearl Jam’s Vedder (basically, Seattle’s Bono) made an appearance just before the encore, joining opening act Mumford & Sons in singing backup for “Mothers of the Disappeared,” the poignant final track from “Joshua Tree.” The performances leading up to that crowdpleasing cameo served to highlight just how relevant that album still feels (or rather, feels again) three decades after its release. Its working title was “The Two Americas,” its con-

tent inspired by the band’s travels across the country in the ‘80s and Bono’s outsider view of our reality; and if trickle down economics and U.S. foreign intervention were muses back then, the album’s themes seem to ring especially true against the backdrop of growing unease in Trump’s America. “These songs have a new meaning and a new resonance today that they didn’t have three or four years ago,” guitarist David “The Edge” Evans told Rolling Stone a few months ago, citing the president as a major reason for wanting to revisit the album. (He was referenced just once Sunday using clips from the 1950s, western TV show “Takedown.” In them, a con man named Trump convinces townspeople the world is about to end. His solution: build a wall, of course, a bit of prophecy that still lives on YouTube if you want to look it up.) Before diving into “The Joshua Tree” material, U2 – also drummer Larry Mullen and bassist Adam Clayton – warmed up with a flurry of hits, starting out on a sub-stage that was connected to the main one by a long catwalk. Fans were hooked instantly, of course, with many belting out the lyrics to “Sunday Bloody Sunday” and “In the Name of Love” at full volume. Something seemed off, though: Where were all the expensive gadgets and gawdy spectacle fans were accustomed to seeing at their shows? The big reveal took place once the quartet returned to the main stage. What had seemed like a plain wall – or maybe a veil hiding their best toys - was actually a massive, curvy, 200-foot video screen, reportedly the biggest

ever incorporated into a rock show. In lieu of lasers and pyrotechnics, U2 enhanced its tunes with majestic visuals provided by acclaimed, Dutch director Anton Corbijn. The camera cruised slowly down a sparse desert highway, passing weary travelers during “Where the Streets Have No Name.” Majestic rust-colored mountains were the breathtaking backdrop for “With or Without You.” But perhaps most poignant were the stoic faces that gazed into the camera during the anti-war “Bullet the Blue Sky.” They were of varying ages, races and sexes, but all wore U.S. Army helmets, their expressions conveying a palpable sense of loss. Many of the songs from “Joshua Tree” are familiar classics by now; but among the most powerful performances was “Red Hill Mining Town,” a song U2 had only played live once, the previous night in Vancouver. The band has mixed up the arrangement, with The Edge on keys and a Salvation Army brass band section playing onscreen. The lyrics were inspired by the 1984 National Union of Mineworkers Strike in Great Britain, but they might as well have been about today’s working poor. “Hanging on, you’re all that’s left to hold on to,” went Bono’s heart-rending refrain. U2 also notably performed a new ballad called “The Little Things That Give You Away.” They had wrapped up with that one in Vancouver, but it must have felt a tad anticlimactic in Seattle, prompting a quick huddle. “That was the end, but there’s one more for people who have traveled from all over this city,” Bono said. “Let’s get back to where we started.” The band’s 1980 debut single “I Will Follow” wasn’t on the official set list, but it must be now based on the way that one turned back time, sparking a flurry of pogo-hopping down on the floor. For set list and additional photos visit www.tacomaweekly.com.

Tacoma Armory t June 3rd at 7:30pm

Tickets: 253-591-5894 or broadwaycenter.org


Friday, May 19, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

CHANGING SCENE THEATRE Culture Corner NORTHWEST BRINGS UNIQUE A GUIDE TO CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS OF TACOMA Goings on this Week in Tacoma: WORK TO THE STAGE “The World’s First Long Distance Telephone Line” Through Aug. 30, Tue. thru Fri. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum, 407 S G St, Tacoma, WA 98405

By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

Theater is happening in and around Tacoma. In addition to the established community theaters: Tacoma Little Theatre, Lakewood Playhouse and Tacoma Musical Playhouse, there is Paradise Theatre across the water, in Gig Harbor and – slightly to the north – there is Centerstage! In Federal Way. The theater departments of PLU and UPS produce some great live shows. There are also a number of smaller theatrical groups that are making things happen here on a regular basis. Toy Boat, Dukesbay, New Muses, Working Class Theatre Northwest, Assemblage Theater and Tacoma Actors Repertory Theater all operate in town, putting on shows in intimate little theater spaces. There is also a wonderful group called The Changing Scene Theatre Northwest. Originally based in Bremerton, the theatrical company lost its permanent home in 2009 and has since become a roving troupe, putting on shows at varied venues around the South Sound. Changing Scene is dedicated to bringing new, original or innovative works to the stage. Changing Scene’s latest production, “Talking With…” by the mysterious Jane Martin, is being shown at “the Spire,” TMP’s second space, which is located in a church building at 710 S. Anderson St. (just off 6th Avenue.) “Talking With…” is indeed an innovative piece of theater. It consists of 11, 10-minute monologues delivered by eleven different women. The subject matter of each varies wildly. The show moves along at a steady pace since none of the monologues have enough time to get bogged down (though some veer off into strange territory.) The monologues can be philosophical, political, haunting, poetic or frightening, even. All are absorbing. A strand of humor runs throughout. Director and Founding Manager of Changing Scene Pavlina Morris brings together a talented cast of local actresses for this idiosyncratic theatrical assemblage. Mary L. McDowell gets the whole shebang rolling with “15 Minutes,” a monologue delivered by an actress in a dressing room who discloses her anxiety in the moments before she takes the stage. The piece bounces back and forth between humor and poignancy. Next is Ashley Roy’s rich portrait of a fading rodeo star that laments the ways in which commercialization corrupted what was originally a small-scale, earnest and enjoyable endeavor. Aya Hashigouchi’s rendition of “Scraps,” about a housewife who secretly dresses herself as characters from the Land of Oz is truly spooky. Curtis High School student Madalyn Banouvong captures the magic of the baton twirler – making the audience see that this archetypal fixture of high school and college sporting events is practitioner of an art form (perhaps a dying one) that can have a mystical aspect. (This was one of my

View documents pertaining to the making of long distance telegraph lines and early telephone lines in California. Several California gold mining companies were instrumental in the development of some of the first telegraph and long distance telephone lines west of the Mississippi River. On view are documentary materials that tell the story of the development of the California Telegraph Company and the Ridge Telephone Company, which built the world’s first long distance telephone line. View leases, legal papers, news articles, invoices and other documents that flesh out the story of this crucial period in the development of electronic commications. Info: www.rain.org/~karpeles/taqfrm.html. PHOTO COURTESY OF CHANGING SCENE THEATRE NW

SNAKES. Skye Gibbs portrays an evangelical snake handler.

favorites.) Jill Heinecke – known in Tacoma for numerous roles in community theater including that of Jimmy Deeanne in TLT’s “Second Samuel” – is mesmerizing as a character who tells of the death of her mother. The telling is punctuated by the sound of marbles tossed to the floor and rolling across the wooden stage. Director Morris brings the first act to a close with the silly and slightly sinister “Audition” monologue in which a manic actress tries to blackmail her way into a part. The second act begins with Karen Hauser’s suave and poetic tour of a collection of lamps. This is followed by one of the high points of the show: Sky Gibbs’ well-crafted portrayal of a young, evangelical snake handler who gives an insider’s angle on the peculiar Christian sect of people who handle poisonous snakes as a demonstration of their spirituality. Elizabeth Favreau gives an edge-of-theseat portrait of a woman in labor who is about to give birth to a “non-normal” child. Mary Sheehan’s “French Fries” is a memorable tale of a shopping cart lady who is infatuated with McDonalds; to the extent that she elevates the fast food restaurant to the status of a cathedral. The show closes with “Marks,” in which Shawna Fancher recounts the tale of how an unremarkable woman, jolted by a divorce, went on to live an eventful, unique life; picking up souvenirs along the way. “Talking With…” has been around since 1982. The real name of the playwright is a mystery. Jane Martin is a pseudonym for someone who desires to keep their true identity hidden. This is a delightful piece of theater: it bounces along so swiftly that the audience is left a little bit hungry for more. “The Spire” is also fun to see: a secret hidey hole; an actor’s lair where the alchemy of the stage is conjured before our eyes. “Talking With…” runs through May 27. For schedule and ticket information visit www.tmp.org or call 253-565-6867.

Queen Victoria’s Birthday May 20, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum, 5400 N. Pearl St. in Point Defiance Park, Tacoma, WA 98407 Relive the festive 19th century celebrations surrounding a royal holiday. A merry mood permeates the fort on this occasion. At noon, bagpipes announce the start of the traditional tributes to the queen. The pipes are followed by a musket volley, toasts to the queen, and a cannon salute. Many of the Fort’s ladies and gentlemen will be dressed in their finest, 1850s fashion. Throughout the day, guests can visit with our historical interpreters, join in a game of croquet, learn a few steps from the Tacoma Scottish Country Dancers and, at 3 p.m., enjoy a performance by the Chief Leschi Elementary, Puyallup Tribal School Drum and Dance Group. Event admission is $8-$10, and children 3 and younger are free. For more information visit FortNisqually.org or call (253) 591-5339. Kickoff to Glory Preview Gala May 25, 6 to 8:30 p.m. Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave, Tacoma, WA 98402 Celebrate excellence at the “Kickoff to Glory” gala preview for the multimedia exhibition, “Gridiron Glory: The Best of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.” Get an exclusive first look at the 6,000-square-foot exhibit. See hundreds of iconic artifacts and immerse yourself in the Hall of Fame experience. View rare footage from NFL Films, try on a helmet and hear coach-to-player communication or step inside an authentic instant replay booth to make a tough call. Don’t miss the special Seattle Seahawks tribute section and your chance to snap a selfie with the Super Bowl trophy. Info: www.washingtonhistory.org.


Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 19, 2017

4TH ANNUAL ‘SWIM DEFIANCE’ SET FOR JUNE 3 By Matt Kite mattkite@tacomaweekly.com

Have you ever taken the ferry to Vashon Island and wondered what it would be like to swim there instead? If so, and if you actually have the stamina and skills to navigate the bracing waters of Dalco Passage, you’re in luck: swimmers will be doing just that at the fourth annual Swim Defiance on Saturday, June 3. “We usually get 50 to 60 swimmers,” says Race Director Zena Courtney, who expects a similar turnout at this year’s edition. “This race is not for a beginner swimmer. These athletes usually train three to five days a week for an hour in a pool or by regularly swimming in the Sound.” The event includes two races: an outand-back 5-kilometer course that starts and finishes at Point Defiance and a point-to-point 3K course from Vashon to Point Defiance. Both races finish at Owen Beach. The longer race starts first at 7:10 a.m. near the peak of low tide, while the shorter of the two begins at 8 a.m. and requires a ferry ride to Vashon for the start. Courtney hosts six escorted practice swims in Puget Sound the month before the race to help acclimatize would-be competitors. She lays out the challenges of completing a cold-water open race clearly at the race’s website (swimdefiance.com). “Almost everyone can acclimate to cold water to some degree,” she explains. “It takes the discipline of actually getting into cold water over a series of swims. The unpleasant part of acclimation is that you actually have to continue to get into water that is below your ‘comfortable temperature.’ Cold water baths and showers help some people. A lot of cold water acclimation is mental. Training your mind not to respond to the cold is part of

PHOTO COURTESY SWIM DEFIANCE

BRAVE SOULS. Swimmers wait in the chill waters of Dalco Passage to begin the swim from Vashon Island to Owen Beach.

the process. You can talk yourself through it. Convince yourself it’s not all that bad.” The benefits of such training, Courtney says, remain with you long after the race. And each time you return to cold-water racing, acclimatization takes less time. Landlubbers surprised that anyone would attempt such a feat might be surprised to learn that the local tradition dates back nearly a century. The first such race occurred in 1926, when 13 swimmers braved the open waters on a late September day. According to

a vivid account on TacomaHistory’s website, a crowd of 10,000 people gathered to watch the two-mile race unfold. Alexina Slater, a 15-year-old Stadium High student and the only female participant, grabbed fourth place and danced for the newsreel cameras afterward. Courtney was inspired to bring an aquathlon (an open-water swim followed by a run) to the Tacoma waterfront in 2010 and later, with the help of her swim team, organized Swim Defiance, with the first race occurring

in 2014. Swim Defiance is hosted by Blue Wave Aquatics, a non-profit group, to raise water awareness. “From 2005 to 2014, there were an average of 3,536 fatal unintentional drownings (non-boating related) in the United States— about 10 deaths per day,” Courtney explains. “We take on swimming for adults from every angle. Swimming lessons, swim team, openwater swimming, triathlon training, and triathlon team consultations. We also offer free swim lessons as part of Adult Learn to Swim Month every April. We believe that every adult should be comfortable in the water, whether you are just starting out or have swum since you were a child. Our coaches are passionate about teaching adults how to swim or improve their skills.” Added Courtney, “Swim Defiance also creates awareness and stewardship of our precious resource, water. Blue Wave Aquatics encourages a small carbon footprint, disciplined recycling and beach cleanup at the event.” Not too many newbies venture into the cold water, but the race is ready to ensure safe passage, thanks to help from the Pierce County Fire #13 Marine Rescue Unit, a Tacoma Police race unit, volunteer vessels from the Tacoma Maritime Institute and more than a dozen volunteer kayakers. Three female and two male swimmers this year will compete without a wetsuit. Included among them is King County resident Mike Humphreys, who participated in a two-man relay across the English Channel in 2016. Pamela Kalas won the 3K last year in a time of 42:48.7, nearly six minutes ahead of the next finisher. Matthew Dixon took the 5K in 1:05:28.7. Matt Kite is an avid hiker and masters runner in Tacoma. Check out “3 Minute Hikes,” his hiking channel on YouTube.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: KATY PERRY

Katy Perry is coming back to Tacoma. On Monday, the pop princess announced dates in support of her forthcoming album “Witness,” including a Feb. 3 stop at the Tacoma Dome where she last performed in 2014 (shown.) Tickets for next year’s show go on sale to the general public at 10 a.m. Monday, May 22. Visit www. ticketmaster.com for more details on that and these other upcoming shows, except for where otherwise noted. • Dylan Scott: 7:30 p.m. June 9, Steel Creek American Whiskey Co., $20 to $50; www.ticketfly.com.

• Tacoma Wined up festival with The Happy Sinners, Paris Williams and Squirrel Butter: 2 p.m. June 10, Tacoma Armory, $12 to $75; www. broadwaycenter.org. • Christopher Titus: 7:30 p.m. June 15 to 17, 10:30 p.m. June 16 and

17, Tacoma Comedy Club, $22.50 to $37.50.

• Maxwell: 8 p.m. June 20, Showare Center, Kent, $56 to $96; www. showarecenter.com. • Cedric the Entertainer: 7:30 and 10:30 p.m. June 23 and 24, Tacoma Comedy Club, $45 to $65; www. tacomacomedyclub.com. • Roger Waters “Us + Them”: 8 p.m. June 24, Tacoma Dome, $55 to $199.50. • Bruno Mars: 7:30 p.m. July 24, Tacoma Dome, $45 to $125. • Brian Regan: 8 p.m. July 28, Pantages Theater, $62.50; www. broadwaycenter.org. . • Ed Sheeran: 7:30 p.m. July 29, Tacoma Dome, $36.50 to $86.50 • Kendrick Lamar with Travis Scott

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and DRAM: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 1, Tacoma Dome, $35 to $96.

• Green Day: 7 p.m. Aug. 1, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn, $41.50 to $81.50. • Leroy Bell & His Only Friends: 8 p.m. Aug. 4, Jazzbones, $15-$20; www.ticketfly.com. • Joe Rogan: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 4, Paramount Theatre, Seattle, $39.50 to $65 • Lady Gaga: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 5, Tacoma Dome, $46 to $251. • Matt Braunger: 8 p.m. Aug. 3 to 5, 10:30 p.m. Aug. 4 and 5, Tacoma Comedy Club, $10 to $28; www. tacomacomedyclub.com. • Brew Five Three festival: 1 p.m. Aug. 5, Broadway, between 9th and 11th streets, $10 to $25.

PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD

• Metallica with Avenged Sevenfold and Gojira: 6 p.m. Aug. 9, CenturyLink Field, Seattle, $55.50 to $155.50. • Terri Clark: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 11, Pantages Theater, $29 to $69; www. broadwaycenter.org. • Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers with The Lumineers: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 19, Safeco Field, Seattle, $49 to $149.

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Friday, May 19, 2017 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 5

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;SNLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; STAR MEADOWS RETURNS TO TACOMA

MEADOWS

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRILLSTEIN ENTERTAINMENT

By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

Tim Meadows became a household name during his 1990s tenure on NBCTVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saturday Night Liveâ&#x20AC;? thanks largely to the Ladies Man, his character who gave salacious love advice no one would follow unless theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d just downed a bottle of Corvoisier. Since then, Meadows has popped up in a variety of films and TV shows, from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Storyâ&#x20AC;? to ABC-TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Goldbergs.â&#x20AC;? Next week, though, local fans can see him in person as he headlines five sets at Tacoma Comedy Club, from May 25 to 27; www.tacomacomedyclub.com for ticket info. Recently, we asked him to revisit some of his favorite roles. Tacoma Weekly: The word on the street is that you used to show up in Tacoma from time to time. Do you have ties up here? Tim Meadows: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m familiar with the area, and I liked going up there. I had some friends that I would go up to see quite a bit. But I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been up there a few years now. TW: Part of the reason I was really excited to talk to you is Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve long felt youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re one of the most underrated â&#x20AC;&#x153;SNLâ&#x20AC;? cast members of all time. In that context, what are some of your most underrated bits that you thought might take off in a different way? Meadows: One of my favorite things that I loved doing that never took off was this thing I did with

Adam Sandler called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Captain Jim and Pedro.â&#x20AC;? I was watching late-night television one night, and I saw this movie on the Spanish-language station. There was a captain of this ship, and he was like the Spanish version of a Carey Grant. Then all of a sudden in came this other character that had on your stereotypical sombrero hat, a guy that you would find hanging out in Mexico in the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;30s or something. I just thought, â&#x20AC;&#x153;How did these two characters get together in this movie?â&#x20AC;? We started riffing about the possibilities of those guys and their lives together. The first time we did it, we did it with Kelsey Grammar. The story was that Captain Jim and Pedro were trying to fit into normal life after having been shipwrecked on an island, and they were applying for a job at Foot Locker. TW: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a while, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m starting to remember that one, actually. Meadows: If you get a chance, look it up. It was the weirdest, craziest sketch, and me and Sandler could hardly keep a straight face because we loved doing it so much. TW: How surprised were you when Ladies Man caught on? Meadows: I knew from the very moment we did it in read-through that it was gonna be, if not a popular character, a character that people would imitate. I wrote it with two other guys, Andrew Steele and Dennis McNicholas; and it was just a fun thing for three of us to do every

three or four weeks. We tried not to burn out on it because we genuinely liked laughing at the character when we wrote it. TW: More recently, people see you on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Son of Zorn,â&#x20AC;? which is obviously one of the weirder shows on TV. Take me back to when you heard the pitch and how you got involved. Meadows: Two of the producers were on the set of a movie I was shooting. They called my manager and asked if Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be interested in doing this pilot presentation, which means that we would shoot a few scenes just to show what the animation and real life character would look like together. So I said sure I would do it. I read the script and I thought it was pretty weird and interesting. It was fun to do it. In the beginning I felt like, as an actor, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a good grasp on what I was doing. Then I saw the pilot, and I realized that the more real we were, the funnier it was. Once we got that, we were good. TW: Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your favorite aspect of making that show? Meadows: My favorite aspect of that show was going into work every day and working with Cheryl Hines and Johnny Pemberton and this guy named Dan Lippert who is the stand-in for Zorn; and just working with the writers and the directors. I look forward to going into work every day â&#x20AC;&#x201C; every day. I love Cheryl Hines especially. TW: What else is coming up that you can tell fans about? Meadows: I just shot a pilot for ABC for another TV show thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a spinoff of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Goldbergs.â&#x20AC;? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m waiting to see if thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gonna be another seasons for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zorn.â&#x20AC;? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got my fingers crossed on that. The pilotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Schooled,â&#x20AC;? and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about the school where the Goldbergsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; kids go to school. I play the principal, the same character from â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Goldbergs.â&#x20AC;?

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FRIDAY, MAY 19 PACIFIC BREWING: Tacoma Wonder Boys (bluegrass) 8 p.m., NC, AA G. DONNALSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Bill & Dennyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Little Big Band (jazz, blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Old School Fellas (R&B, dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Afrodisiacs (â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;pop covers) 9 p.m., $10-$15; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Funktion Fridayâ&#x20AC;? with DJ Indica Jones (DJ) 11 p.m., $5 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Modern Day Poets, Limberlost, Darby Picnic (rock, pop) 8 p.m., $10, AA MARKEE (OLD TOWN): Itamare (Brazilian, Latin) 7 p.m., NC, AA NEW FRONTIER: Savannah Fuentes (flamenco) 8 p.m. REAL ART TACOMA: KGRG-FM (89.9) pledge drive with Something Witchy, Dead Lakes, Waking Things, These Young Fools, Cashing in Karma (rock) 7 p.m., $7-$10, AA STONEGATE: Stop Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Stop, The Sky Rained Heroes, Tremor Cats (punk, rock) 8 p.m., $5 TACOMA COMEDY: Robert Hawkins (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $16-$22, 18+ early show UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Fuze Boxx (rock) 8 p.m., NC THE VALLEY: Interpreter, The Fawcetts, Prophets of Addiction (rock) 8 p.m.

SATURDAY, MAY 20

THE VALLEY: Bird Teeth, Punx in the Woods with Carrion Crows, Are They Brothers, Jasey F-ing Kay (punk) 9 p.m., $5 G. DONNALSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Bill & Dennyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Little Big Band (jazz, blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Heart By Heart (Heart tribute) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: The Squirrels, Trees and Timber, The Nards, DJ Melodica (alternative, power-pop) 8 p.m., $10-$15 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC METRONOME: Dain Norman and the Chrysalis Effect (acoustic) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Gender Wizard, Scorn Dog (garage-rock, indie-rock, punk) 9 p.m. REAL ART TACOMA: Coffin Break, C Average, Acid Teeth (punk, alternative) 8 p.m., $8, AA RIALTO: Northwest Sinfonietta presents Mozartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Requiemâ&#x20AC;? with conductor Eric Jacobsen (classical) 7:30 p.m., $20-$50, AA THE SPAR: Olson Brothers (country, rock) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Crossing Crusades, Jericho Hill, Stoic FB, Sun Mother (rock, metal) 7 p.m., $10 TACOMA COMEDY: Robert Hawkins (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $16-$22, 18+ early show TACOMA DOME: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life in Colorâ&#x20AC;? with RL Grime, 3LAU, What So Not, xxx (electronic, DJ) 8 p.m., $59-$89, 18+ UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Exit 88 (classic rock) 5 p.m.

SUNDAY, MAY 21

RIALTO: Tacoma Youth Symphony presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;Concert No. 4: Masqueradeâ&#x20AC;? (classical) 3 p.m., $13$24, AA

DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jazz and blues open mic, 5 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: DJ Relly Rell, DJ Silong (DJ) 9 p.m., $10-$12 REAL ART TACOMA: P.R.O.B.L.E.M.S., Viveka, Stop Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Stop (punk, alternative) 7 p.m., $5, AA NEW FRONTIER: Bluegrass jam, 4 p.m., NC THE SPAR: Daniel Castro Band (blues) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Jazz Avenue Workshop (jazz) 5 p.m.; ed by Ravens , Alicia Roumonada, Cameron Ferguson (rock) 7 p.m. UPS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCHNEEBECK HALL: Symphony Tacoma presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mini Maestros: Peter and the Wolfâ&#x20AC;? (classical) 2:30 p.m., $7-$10, AA

MONDAY, MAY 22

G. DONNALSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jazz and blues open mic, 5 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke (live band karaoke) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Chuck Gay (open mic) 7 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, MAY 23

DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Billy Stoops (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC G. DONNALSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Millhous, Stop Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Stop, Ten Pole Drunk (punk, alternative) 9 p.m., NC METRONOME: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., NC, AA NORTHERN PACIFIC: Stingy Brim Slim (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lefferty (open mic) 8 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY: New Talent Tuesday (comedy) 8 p.m., NC, 18+

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24

DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Lyon Pride Music festival auditions (rock) 8 p.m., $5 NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 8 p.m., NC NORTHERN PACIFIC: Open mic, 7:30 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: Leify Green (open mic) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+

THURSDAY, MAY 25

THE VALLEY: Fang Chia, Thollem (post-rock, experimental) 9 p.m.

DAWSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Rod Cook (blues) 7 p.m., AA JAZZBONES: DJ Pheloneous (DJ) 10 p.m., NC women, $5 men KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Comfort and Call (rock jam) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Tim Meadows (comedy) 8 p.m., $17-$24, 18+ UNCLE SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Jerry Miller (rock, blues) 7 p.m. TACOMA ELKS: Randy Litch (rock, one-man-band) 6:30 p.m., $6-$10

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Seeking Freelance Writer Pierce County Community Newspaper Group (PCCNG) is the premier producer of community newspapers in the Tacoma and Pierce County area. Along with our flagship publication, the Tacoma Weekly, we publish the University Place Press, Fife Free Press, Milton-Edgewood Signal and Puyallup Tribal News. PCCNG is seeking experienced, dependable, community-minded writers. All areas are needed â&#x20AC;&#x201C; news, sports and entertainment. Must be a self-starter capable of following up on assignments and also developing in-depth stories independently in a deadline-driven environment. Photography skills are a big plus, as are copyediting/ proofreading skills (AP style). Will include some evening work and occasional weekend hours. Send cover letter, resume and at least three examples of published work to matt@tacomaweekly.com or via regular mail to PCCNG, 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma WA 98421. Please, no phone calls or walk-ins.


Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 19, 2017

Coming Events TW PICK: ‘GRIDIRON GLORY: THE BEST OF THE PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME’ Preview gala Thurs., May 25, 6 p.m. Exhibit opens Sat., May 27 Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave., Tacoma The Washington State History Museum is presenting a once-ina-lifetime opportunity for many people from our region. The museum is the only museum in the Pacific Northwest that will feature “Gridiron Glory: The Best of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.” Visitors will be immersed in the 125-year history of American football through this 6,000 square foot interactive exhibit, filled with more than 200 iconic artifacts and fun interactives. The exhibit is about more than football, too. it is an inspiring take on excellence, with messages about how individuals stay motivated and succeed: drive, focus, persistence, grit, flexibility, self-confidence, luck, and hard work. The museum will host related events including visits from Seahawks players, discussion panels on professional sports and health, a youth Combine day, and more. Opening day will feature a visit from a wildlife refuge with a hawk and a falcon, birds that inspire sports team identities due to their agility, keen senses, and strength – the “pro athletes” of the air. Free commemorative mini footballs will be given to the first 100 visitors. Ages: All ages. Info: www.washingtonstatehistory.org; (253) 272-3500 ‘SISTER ACT: THE MUSICAL’ Fri., May 19, 7:30 p.m. OPENING NIGHT Sat., May 20, 7:30 p.m. Sun., May 21, 2 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 6th Ave. Enter Deloris Van Cartier, a disco diva whose life takes a surprising turn when she witnesses a murder. Under protective custody, she hides in the one place no one would expect – a convent! Disguised as a nun under the suspicious watch of Mother Superior, Deloris helps her fellow sisters find their voices as she unexpectedly rediscovers her own. A five-time Tony winner and sparkling tribute to the universal power of friendship, sisterhood and music. Ages: All ages Price: Adults $31; senior/ military/students $29; children (12 & under) $22; groups of 10 or more $27. All seating is reserved. Info: (2530 5656867; www.tmp.org FAMILY STEAM DAY Fri., May 19,11 a.m. to 4 p.m. LeMay – America’s Car Museum, 2702 E. D St. Design, build, tinker, and learn together as you explore the world of automobiles and its relation to science, technology, engineering, art and math. Ages: All ages. Price: $10-$18. Info: (253) 7798490; www.americascarmuseum.org KARAOKE WITH DJ NO PANTS Fri., May 19, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Acme Tavern, 1310 Tacoma Ave. S. Sing your heart out with a great crowd, a fun host and a good sound system. Good food and drinks. Ages: 21+ Price: Free. Info: (253) 222-6864 KEVIN PETERSON (PIANO), JANE LEESONJACKSON (FLUTE) Fri., May 19, 12:10-1 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church Tacoma, 310 N. K St. Kevin Peterson, piano, and Jane Leeson-Jackson, flute, play music by Bach, Gloria Swisher, Chopin and Poulenc. Peterson is director of music at Normandy Park United Church of Christ and LeesonJackson is associate principal flute of the Rainier Symphony. Ages: All ages. Price: Donation. Info: (253) 3831569; www.ccptacoma.org NOURISH! DINNER AND AUCTION Fri., May 19, 6-11 p.m. Hotel Murano Bicentennial Pavillion, 1320 Broadway FISH Food Banks of Pierce County invites you to NOURISH!, a dinner and auction in support of the nutritious food provided to tens of thousands of families served by FISH’s seven food bank locations and ten mobile food bank sites. Price: $65 per person/$650 per table. Info: (253) 383-

3164; www.fishfoodbanks. org/events/nourish-2017 AUDITIONS FOR PUGET SOUND YOUTH WIND ENSEMBLE Sat., May 20 and Sun., May 21, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tacoma Community College, Building 19, Room 36, 6501 S. 19th St. Auditions for the 2017-18 season are here. Price: Free. Info: (253) 460-4374; www. psywe.org/audition GUITARA MYSTICA Sat.,May 20, 7-8:30 p.m. 1120 Creative House, 1120 Pacific Ave. Ken Jacobsen and Jeffry Steele perform guitar duets and solos from the 16th, 20th and 21st centuries by Josquin, Harrison, Cage, Bartok, and Steele. Ages: 9 and older. Price: Free will offering. Info: (253) 682-1722 FOOD ADDICTS IN RECOVERY ANONYMOUS Sat., May 20, 8-9:30 a.m. Trinity Lutheran Church, 12115 Park Ave. S. Through shared experience and mutual support, we help each other to recover from the disease of food addiction. Our program of recovery is based on the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous. Price: Free. Info: (253) 3108177; www.foodaddicts.org MOON OVER BUFFALO Sat., May 20, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Pacific Lutheran University – Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, 12180 Park Ave. S. Fading stars George and Charlotte Hay are stuck in Buffalo, New York performing for small audiences with an even smaller company of actors. But when word arrives that film director Frank Capra is coming to see their matinee, George and Charlotte do what they must to leave the small time for the big time. Price: General admission $8, military, 55+ & Alumni $5, PLU & 18 and younger free. Info: (253) 535-7411; www.plu.edu/khp ARGENTINE TANGO DANCE/MILONGA Sun., May 21, 3-5:30 p.m. Backstreet Tango, 3505 S. 14th St. Come join us for an evening of dancing both traditional and contemporary Argentine tango music and social dancing. Ages: 16 and above. Price: $5. Info: (253) 304-8296 SABOR FLAMENCO’S ANNUAL SHOW Sun., May 21, 5-8 p.m. Tacoma Little Theatre, 210 N. I St. Join Marisela Fleites and the Sabor Flamenco performing company for our annual exhibition of new choreographies and old favorites. Ages:

All ages. Price: $10-$20. Info: (253) 209-5112; www. squareup.com/store/saborflamenco OLD ST. PETER’S CHURCH INVITES YOU TO WORSHIP Sun., May 21 10-11 a.m.; 5-5:40 p.m. St. Peter’s Church, 2910 N. Starr St. Tacoma’s first and oldest church St. Peter’s (est. 1873) invites you to experience Holy Communion every Sunday at 10 a.m. (Sunday School). At 5 p.m. we offer Compline services the first and third Sundays and evening prayer all others. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 2724406; www.oldstpeters.org BIBLE DISCUSSION – BOOK OF REVELATION Mon., May 22, 1-2 p.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St. All are welcome for a discussion of the Book of Revelation, led by Pastor Martin Yabroff of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church. No background required. Open discussion and practical applications. Price: Free. Info: (253) 5644402; saintandrewstacoma.org GALLERY – DUENDE Mon. – Fri., 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pacific Lutheran University, 12180 Park Ave. S. Join the Department of Art and Design to celebrate the accomplishments of PLU graduating artists in the culmination of their degree program. Price: Free. Info: (253) 535-7150; www.plu.edu/artd/ news/2017/03/20/duende/ MASTER GARDENER PLANT CLINIC Mon., May 22, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. WSU Pierce County Extension Office, 3602 Pacific Ave. Master Gardeners are available at the Pierce County Extension Office Master Gardener Plant Clinic and Volunteer Office via phone or walk-in to building. Price: Free. Info: (253) 798-7170; extension.wsu.edu TACOMA MOUNTAINEERS Mon., May 22, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Catholic Community Services, 1323 S. Yakima Ave. Tahoma Center Gallery is presenting photographs of cities, shorelines, starlit nights, deserts and mountains and floral still-lifes from the Tacoma branch of the Mountaineers. Price: Free. Info: (253) 502-2617 VEGAN BOOK CLUB Tues., May 23, 7-8:30 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave. Join King’s Vegan Book Club, coordinated by The South Sound Vegan Meetup Group. The book club is open to anyone interested in a vegan diet, vegans and vegan-curious alike. Meets the fourth Tues-

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317. STRETCH & UNWIND CLASS Wed., May 24, 8-8:45 p.m. Lean Body Lifestyles, 711 St Helens Ave., Suite 201 Enhance your body awareness and flexibility, through gentle stretches and relaxation techniques designed to relieve stress and decrease tension. Price: $60 for monthly pass; or $20 for drop-ins. Info: (253) 678-5403; www.leanbodylifestyles.com/events.html

day of every other month. Price: Free. Info: (253) 2728801; www.kingsbookstore. com/event/veganaug LINE DANCING Tues., May 23, 6-8 p.m. Asia Pacific Cultural Center, 4851 South Tacoma Way Beginners and intermediates can get on the dance floor for fun and exercise in this sevenweek program. Beginners meet on Tuesdays, Intermediates on Thursdays. Price: $45 for 7-week session. Info: (253) 3833900; funtimelinedancing.com

BROADWAY FARMERS MARKET Thurs., May 25, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Broadway Farmers Market, 921 Broadway Come for lunch and shop for dinner at the Broadway Farmers Market. Our farmers provide the freshest food around and the most beautiful bouquets for that special someone. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-7077; www. tacomafarmersmarket.com

FRESNO GRIZZLIES AT TACOMA RAINIERS Tues., May 23, 6:05 p.m. Cheney Stadium, 2502 S. Tyler The Rainiers take on the Fresno Grizzlies in this four-game Triple-A series. Price: $7.50-$11.50, not including Ticketmaster fees. Info: (253) 7527707; www.ticketmaster.com ARGENTINE TANGO BEGINNERS CLASS Tues., May 23, 7:30 p.m. Backstreet Tango, 3505 S. 14th St. Join this group for an absolute beginner level class. The studio was built with the sole purpose of teaching only authentic social Argentine tango. You will learn the basic elements for this wonderful dance by a certified professional instructors. Ages: 16 with guardian and up. Price: $10 per class, 8 classes for $40, 10 classes for $70. Info: (253) 304-8296; backstreettango.com

TIM MEADOWS Thurs., May 25, 7:30-9 p.m.; 10:30 p.m. to 12 a.m. Tacoma Comedy Club, 933 Market St. Best known as the second longest running cast member on ‘Saturday Night Live,’ Tim Meadows is arguably most famous for his swingingly smooth character, “The Ladies Man.” Ages: 8 p.m. show 18+ 10:30 p.m. show 21+ Price: $17-$32. Info: (253) 2827203; www.tacomacomedyclub.com/events/16079

CLAW OPEN SWIM Wed., May 24, 7:30 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave. Join the Cartoonist’s League of Absurd Washingtonians for their monthly Open Swim. Participants will draw a word from the fez and incorporate that into their drawing. CLAW meets the fourth Wednesday of every month at King’s Books. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-8801; www.kingsbookstore.com/event

BOXING 101 CLASS Thurs., May 25, 7-7:45 p.m. Lean Body Lifestyles, 711 St Helens Ave, Suite 201 Boxing 101 is a great introduction to the fundamentals of boxing workouts. You’ll learn simple, challenging and fun movements that will improve your physical fitness, clear your mind and release stress. Price: $20 drop-in rate; $60 for a monthly pass. Info: (253) 678-5403; www.leanbodylifestyles.com/events.html

L A V H R Z J O B X P H O Q G W B N E N I S A N T Y I P Y A I W R E W T R E E C L R E U I A W F Q K W D T P R M H L U M

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We’ve hidden 12 Tacoma Weekly-themed words in this word search. How many can you find? Not sure what you’re looking for? Head over to B5 for the complete word list.

FIRE AND RESCUE

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Friday, May 19, 2017 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

CALL 253.922.5317

Classifieds 253.922.5317 www.tacomaweekly.com

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DESIGN

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Allied Electric Service

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Barberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Painting Services Commercial / Residential Painting Licensed Bonded - Insured Danial Barber 253 365-7152 dpbar@msn.com

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All In Carpet cleaning 2 Rooms Plus Stairway $99 3 Rooms Plus Stairway $129

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EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

Fife Towing is looking for experienced tow operators who are hardworking and self motivated. Employment is full time. Pay is DOE. To apply email service@fifetowing. com or visit 1313 34th Ave. E., Fife WA 98424 (253) 922-8784

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DISCRIMINATION Experiencing Workplace Discrimination? Retired City of Tacoma Civil Rights Investigator and City of Destiny Award Winner will provide assistance. Call 253-565-6179. Never a fee for my services.

HOST AN EXCHANGE STUDENT French exchange students are coming this summer through American Discovery (americandiscovery.net/) from July 10 to July 28. Hosting a student is a great way to learn about another culture as well as sharing our own. Host families are needed in the Milton/ Edgewood, Puyallup, Auburn, and Federal Way area. This is an immersion program in which the students spend their time living in your home and becoming part of your family, practicing English, and participating in our daily family activities. An immersion program has no daily or regular classes, group field trips, or other activities requiring the host family to provide transportation for the student. Your family chooses the activities and/or outings that your family will share with your student. The students are typically 15-17 years old and arrive with functional English skills and vocabulary. If you are interested in hosting or learning more, please contact Kathy at 253-394-1799 or Kim at 206/653-5678.

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3ECTION"s0AGEsTACOMAWEEKLYCOMsFriday, May 19, 2017

NOTICES TO: Donna Joseph and Eugene Joseph Case Name: A., A Case Number : PUY-CW-CW-2017-0010 Nature of Case: Child/Family Protection Petition- ADJUDICATORY HEARING SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF HEARING A Child/Family Protection has been filed regarding the above-named child. YOU ARE HERBY SUMMONED to personally appear before the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians for a FORMAL ADJUDICATORY HEARING and date, time and location below: DATE: July 6th , 2017 TIME: 10:00 am LOCATION: 1451 EAST 31ST ST., TACOMA WA 98404 At the formal adjudicatory hearing the petitioner must prove that the allegations raised in the child/family protection petition are more likely true than not and that the best interests of the child will be served by continued Court intervention. The Court will either find the allegations of the child/family protection petition to be true or dismiss the child/family protection petition, unless continued to allow the presentation of further evidence. If you do not respond to the petition within 20 days or appear for the formal adjudicatory hearing, the Court may find you in default and enter a default order of child/family protection and order necessary intervention and appropriate steps you must follow to correct the underlying problem(s). NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.750, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. A copy of the Petition and Advisement of Rights is available at the Court Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office. You may call Puyallup Tribe Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Services for more information about your child. The telephone number is 253-680-5532. DATED this 5 day of May 2017 For more information, please call the Puyallup Tribal Court Clerk at 253-680-5585.

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF GRANT SUMMONS: CASE NUMBER: 15-2-00163-5 URBAN FINANCIAL OF AMERICA, FORMERLY KNOW AS URBAN FINANCIAL GROUP, INC. Vs. ESTATE OF SANTA JIMENEZ, an estate; ESTROBERTO JIMENEZ, an heir; JENARO M. JIMENEZ, an heir; JOSE LOUIS JIMENEZ, an heir; RAUOL JIMENEZ, an heir; UNKNOWN HEIRS SANTA JIMENEZ, heirs; And all other persons, parties, or occupants Unknown claiming any legal or equitable right, Title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property Described in the complaint herein, adverse to Plaintiffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s title, or any cloud on Plaintiffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s title to The Property. Defendants. To: JENARO M. JIMENEZ JR. A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled court by plaintiffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s claim is stated in the written Complaint, a copy of which is served upon you with this Summons. In order to defend against this lawsuit, you must respond to the Complaint by stating your defense in writing, and serve a copy upon the person signing this Summons within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons if served in the State of Washington, or within sixty (60) days if served outside the State of Washington or if you are a United States government defendant, excluding the day of service, or a default judgment may be entered against you without notice. A default judgment may be entered. You may demand that the plaintiff file this lawsuit with the court. If you do so, the demand must be in writing and must be served upon the person signing this Summons. Within 14 days after you served the demand, the plaintiff must file this lawsuit with the court, or the service on theyou of this Summons and Complaint will be void. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be served on time. THIS SUMMONS is issued pursuant to Rule 4 of the Superior Court Civil Rules of the State of Washington. DATED 2/5/2015 Respectfully submitted MALCOLM* CISNEROS, A Law Corporation By: Nathan F. Smith, WSB #43160 Stephen M. Lewis, WSB #47173 Attorneys for Plaintiff MALCOLM * CISNEROS, A Law Corporation 2112 Business Center Drive Irvine, California 92612 Phone: (949) 252-9400 Fax: (949) 252-1032

NOTICES

NOTICES

MOVING SALE

NO. PUY-CS-CS-2017-0016 Summons in a civil action And notice of hearing

NO. PUY-CS-FC-2017-0008 Summons in a civil action And notice of hearing

IN THE PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION TACOMA, WASHINGTON

IN THE PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION TACOMA, WASHINGTON

Elisa Barlet Petitioner,

WSFC Petitioner,

v. Jessica Ann Cayou Respondent,

v. Laura George Respondent,

The petitioner filed a child support (civil) action against you in the above named court.

The petitioner filed a child support (civil) action against you in the above named court.

In order to defend yourself, you must file an answer by stating your defense in writing and filing it with the court and serving a copy on the petitioner within twenty (20) days after the day you received notice of this hearing.

In order to defend yourself, you must file an answer by stating your defense in writing and filing it with the court and serving a copy on the petitioner within twenty (20) days after the day you received notice of this hearing.

If you fail to respond, a DEFAULT JUDGMENT may be entered against you without further notice to you. A default judgment is a judgment granted the Petitioner for what has been asked in the Petition.

If you fail to respond, a DEFAULT JUDGMENT may be entered against you without further notice to you. A default judgment is a judgment granted the Petitioner for what has been asked in the Petition.

This Summons in issued pursuant to Section 7.24.090(4.08.100) of the Puyallup Parental Responsibility Act.

This Summons in issued pursuant to Section 7.24.090(4.08.100) of the Puyallup Parental Responsibility Act.

NOTICE OF HEARING: A hearing on the petition is set for June 28th, 2017 at 9:15 am at the Puyallup Tribal Court.

NOTICE OF HEARING: A hearing on the petition is set for June 28th, 2017 at 9:45 am at the Puyallup Tribal Court.

Dated May 17, 2017 Kasandra Gutierrez Clerk of the Court Puyallup Tribal Court 1451 East 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404 (253) 680-5585

Dated May 17, 2017 Kasandra Gutierrez Clerk of the Court Puyallup Tribal Court 1451 East 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404 (253) 680-5585

NO. PUY-CS-FC-2017-0007 Summons in a civil action And notice of hearing

NO. PUY-CS-FC-2017-0006 Summons in a civil action And notice of hearing

IN THE PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION TACOMA, WASHINGTON

IN THE PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION TACOMA, WASHINGTON

WSFC Petitioner,

WSFC Petitioner,

v. Richard Cayou Respondent,

v. Richard Cayou Respondent,

The petitioner filed a child support (civil) action against you in the above named court.

The petitioner filed a child support (civil) action against you in the above named court.

In order to defend yourself, you must file an answer by stating your defense in writing and filing it with the court and serving a copy on the petitioner within twenty (20) days after the day you received notice of this hearing.

In order to defend yourself, you must file an answer by stating your defense in writing and filing it with the court and serving a copy on the petitioner within twenty (20) days after the day you received notice of this hearing.

If you fail to respond, a DEFAULT JUDGMENT may be entered against you without further notice to you. A default judgment is a judgment granted the Petitioner for what has been asked in the Petition.

If you fail to respond, a DEFAULT JUDGMENT may be entered against you without further notice to you. A default judgment is a judgment granted the Petitioner for what has been asked in the Petition.

This Summons in issued pursuant to Section 7.24.090(4.08.100) of the Puyallup Parental Responsibility Act.

This Summons in issued pursuant to Section 7.24.090(4.08.100) of the Puyallup Parental Responsibility Act.

NOTICE OF HEARING: A hearing on the petition is set for June 28th, 2017 at 9:30 am at the Puyallup Tribal Court.

NOTICE OF HEARING: A hearing on the petition is set for June 28th, 2017 at 9:30 am at the Puyallup Tribal Court.

Dated May 17, 2017 Kasandra Gutierrez Clerk of the Court Puyallup Tribal Court 1451 East 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404 (253) 680-5585

Dated May 17, 2017 Kasandra Gutierrez Clerk of the Court Puyallup Tribal Court 1451 East 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404 (253) 680-5585

NO. PUY-CS-FC-2017-0006 Summons in a civil action And notice of hearing

NO. PUY-CS-FC-2017-0007 Summons in a civil action And notice of hearing

IN THE PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION TACOMA, WASHINGTON

IN THE PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION TACOMA, WASHINGTON

WSFC Petitioner,

WSFC Petitioner,

v. Laura George Respondent,

v. Laura George Respondent,

The petitioner filed a child support (civil) action against you in the above named court.

The petitioner filed a child support (civil) action against you in the above named court.

In order to defend yourself, you must file an answer by stating your defense in writing and filing it with the court and serving a copy on the petitioner within twenty (20) days after the day you received notice of this hearing.

In order to defend yourself, you must file an answer by stating your defense in writing and filing it with the court and serving a copy on the petitioner within twenty (20) days after the day you received notice of this hearing.

If you fail to respond, a DEFAULT JUDGMENT may be entered against you without further notice to you. A default judgment is a judgment granted the Petitioner for what has been asked in the Petition.

If you fail to respond, a DEFAULT JUDGMENT may be entered against you without further notice to you. A default judgment is a judgment granted the Petitioner for what has been asked in the Petition.

This Summons in issued pursuant to Section 7.24.090(4.08.100) of the Puyallup Parental Responsibility Act.

This Summons in issued pursuant to Section 7.24.090(4.08.100) of the Puyallup Parental Responsibility Act.

NOTICE OF HEARING: A hearing on the petition is set for June 28th, 2017 at 9:30 am at the Puyallup Tribal Court.

NOTICE OF HEARING: A hearing on the petition is set for June 28th, 2017 at 9:30 am at the Puyallup Tribal Court.

Dated May 17, 2017 Kasandra Gutierrez Clerk of the Court Puyallup Tribal Court 1451 East 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404 (253) 680-5585

Dated May 17, 2017 Kasandra Gutierrez Clerk of the Court Puyallup Tribal Court 1451 East 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404 (253) 680-5585

Rainier Valley Restaurant and Inn Ashford WA

The Pierce County Long Term Care Ombudsman Program is looking for people who are empathetic, diplomatic, assertive, and skilled communicators to be volunteer ombudsman. As a LTC Ombudsman, you will visit an assisted living community or a skilled nursing community, working to ensure that resident rights are being protected and helping residents resolve problems they are unable to solve on their own. Volunteer ombudsman are trained and certified and dedicate 4 hours a week or 16 hours a month. Ongoing support, case staffing, team-meetings, and trainings are provided each month. For more information please call 253 798-3789 or Email Kgavron@ co.pierce.wa.us. Or visit www.co.pierce.wa.us/ index.aspx?NID=1302

Friday and Saturday May 19th & 20th 9 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5 PM 2307 Gary Court Milton, WA 98354

Auction Notice

Abandoned Vehicle Lakewood Towing Inc. #5002 9393 Lakeview Ave SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 Ph. 253-582-5080 Auction 06012017 Date 06/01/2017 View @ 1 pm Auction Starts @ 2 pm In accordance with RCW 46.55.130 Lakewood Towing Inc. will sell to the highest bidder. See complete listing @ lakewoodtowing.com or posting at our office

Chambers Creek Foundation 10 Year Anniversary Gala and Auction Saturday, June 24 at 5 PM - 11 PM Chambers Bay Pavilion 6320 Grandview Drive W. University Place, WA Come Celebrate Chambers Creek Foundation accomplishments in the last 10 years since the opening of Chambers Bay Golf and the future plans of trails and bridges at the Properties. chambersckfoundation.org

HUGE ANNUAL YARD SALE Lots of Treasures St. Ann Church 7025 S. Park Ave Tacoma June 1st & 2nd 9 - 5 June 3rd 9 - 4

VOLUNTEERS

VOLUNTEERS VOLUNTEER ADVOCATES NEEDED FOR RESIDENTS IN LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES

NOTICES

SPECIAL HABITAT STEWARD TRAINING National Wildlife Federation and Tahoma Audubon Society Partner Up for Educational Workshop Series. Are you interested in creating areas for wildlife? Do you want to do your part to keep Pierce County wild? Now is your chance to become a Habitat Stewardâ&#x201E;˘! National Wildlife Federation and Tahoma Audubon Society are offering a specialized 24hour training program to teach you how to help others create and restore wildlife habitat in backyards, schoolyards, and other community areas. The training will be held on the first four Mondays in May from 6:00-9:00pm at the Adriana Hess Audubon Center (2917 Morrison Rd. W, University Place, WA, 98466). The workshop includes two Saturday field trips on May 6th and 13th. The first trip is in partnership with Tahoma Audubon Society and will be at Morse Preserve to learn

all about bird identification and conservation; the second is in partnership with Northwest Trek Wildlife Park and will include hands-on NatureMapping of the Ohop Creek. Plan on full days. This training is engaging, fun and highly informative and you get to meet and interact with local conservation professionals and other similarly interested folks! Expert speakers from University of Washington, Pierce Conservation District, Woodbrook Nursery, WSU Pierce County Master Gardener Program, Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department and more will present on topics such as: rain gardens, native plants, habitat restoration, pollinators and birds, mushrooms and fungi, and much more! Cost of the training is $30 to cover classroom materials. Note: scholarships are available! No one will be turned down due to lack of funds. We will provide coffee, tea, and snacks at each training session. To register for the training, please visit http://nwftacoma. brownpapertickets.com or contact Sarah Bruemmer at WAHabitatCoordinator@nwf.org or (206) 577-7809.

Wanted: Volunteers for groceries. The Empowerment Center currently has a limited number of openings for volunteers in our food bank. These positions will be filled on a first come, first served basis. Come volunteer and receive free groceries! El Shaddai Christian Ministries/The Empowerment Center, 4340 Pacific Ave., Tacoma WA 98148. For more information contact us at 253-677-7740.

City of Fife Needs You! We are looking for passionate applicants for open positions on our volunteer Boards and Commissions. Openings are on the Arts Commission, Parks Board, Tree Board and Youth Commission. Applications are accepted year round, but first review will be 3/24/17. Online Application: www.cityoffife.org/getinvolved

NEW YEARâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE, TWEET LESS CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care has

some great ways for you to serve the community and make meaningful connections. Those near the end of life need help with living. If you have 1-4 hours a week to read to someone, listen to their stories, run errands, make phone calls, or welcome people to our hospice facility, then we have several opportunities for you. Join us in the new year for trainings scheduled in January and March. Log onto www.chifranciscan. org and click â&#x20AC;&#x153;hospice and palliative careâ&#x20AC;? in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;our servicesâ&#x20AC;? tab to learn more. Or call James Bentley at 253-

538-4649 #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA There are about 2,000 homeless in Tacoma and about 1.000 beds. Many are families with children. Please help #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA to provide some basic necessities. All items donated will go directly to people on the street. PROJECT FEED TACOMA is 100% volunteer. This is a true grass roots organization and they really need your help. For more information and to find more go to www. projectfeedtacoma.org. Can you help with some urgent needs as winter approaches? Here are some suggestions and a huge THANK YOU! Needed: Warm Socks for Men, Women and Children; Warm Hats; Gloves; Peanut Butter and Jam/ Jelly; Crackers, Chips and non-perishable snacks; Individually wrapped granola bars or protein bars; cookies; lotion; lip balm; tampons and sanitary napkins; wipes; soap, shampoo and conditioner; gallon sized freezer bags. A BIG THANKS TO THE COPPER DOOR FOR ALLOWING PROJECT FEED TACOMA TO COLLECT DONATIONS THERE.

Help hard-working families by volunteering with VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance)! Provide free income tax preparation to low and moderate income households. Locations throughout Pierce County. Day, evening and weekend hours available (February to April 2017). Volunteers can serve as tax preparers, quality reviewers, greeters, or interpreters (for non-English speaking or hearing-impaired tax payers). Free training provided. Learn more and apply online at www.VolunteerTaxHelp.org.


Friday, May 19, 2017 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

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TACOMA SPANAWAY TACOMA APT. DUPONT HOME 14406PACIFIC PACIFIC AVE S 5121 ST. CT. E 14406 AVE S #12 2234203RD WALLACE LOOP

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1 BED, 1 BATH GREAT 3 BED, 1 BATH 710575 SF.SF. WONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T LAST VALUE IN THIS NICE 1 BEDLONG !!!! DELIGHTFUL FLOOR 3 ROOM UPPER UNIT TOP AVAILABLE BEDROOM 1 BATHOAKS APARTMENT. IN THE PACIFIC APTS.

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First Time Seller Course May 18th 2017 6:00PM - 7:30PM

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KCornfield@absoluteloans.com

Karicornfield.com

3906 S. 74th St. Tacoma, WA 98409

Sergio Hernandez

Learn about the selling process! This class will teach you what to expect from your real estate agent when you sell your first home. Learn about what it takes to prepare your home for sale, how to improve buyer traffic and what you can do to show your house!

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EATING ESTABLISHMENT WITH BEER & WINE - Same Owners last 9 years, great location, Business price $285,000, terms avail.

ld o s

OFFICE BUILDING WITH 6 SUITES, Close to Wrightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Park, ideal for Attorneys or Professional use. Asking Price $519,000, Terms. Suites are also available for Lease. LONGTIME ESTABLISHED POPULAR price reduction RESTR./LOUNGE ON 6TH AVE. Business for sale. $149,000 $110,000 OR LEASE the space, 3,300 SQ. FT. for $4,000 Month. SUCCESSFUL, LONGTIME ESTABLISHMENT. Manufacturer of Award Ribbons and Rosettes with large wholesale customer base. (Local and out of state business) Business is for sale. $60,000 Plus inventory. NON-FRANCHISE COFFEE SHOP & DELI. Great Location. Business for Sale, $100,000. Ownersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Terms Available.

RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109

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