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TACOMAWEEKLY NEWS FREE • FRIDAY, MAY 18, 2018

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TopGolf USA proposes entertainment venue for Dome ‘entertainment district’

DELAY IN SHIP CONVERSION, PERMITS CONTINUE TO PLAGUE LNG PLANT

By Andrew Fickes

andrew@tacomaweekly.com RENDERING COURTESY OF PSE

The 8 million gallon liquefied natural gas facility has faced controversy and stumbling blocks since before construction started. By Steve Dunkelberger

P

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

uget Sound Energy’s (PSE) liquefied natural gas plant (LNG), which is under construction on the Tideflats, continues to take shape without a required permit from the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency (PSCAA) at a time when its chief customer, TOTE Maritime, has yet again

delayed the conversion of its Tacoma-to-Alaska container ships to run on the lower-emission fuel. Eyebrows are rising in state and local governments, and among critics, over the delays and the overall viability of the project. PSCAA is requiring PSE fund a ground-to-ship study of the greenhouse gases generated during the process – from the extraction of the fracked natural gas, to the piping of the gas to the facility, to the

City of Tacoma’s vision for a vibrant entertainment district built around the Tacoma Dome has attracted the interest of a potential developer. TopGolf USA, a Delaware-based developer of high-end, state-of-the-art, experiential golf entertainment venues, submitted a proposal on May 8 to the City addressing its plan for the 10.6-acre city-owned site located to the east of the Dome. Topgolf proposes a three-story driving range, featuring more than 170 tables highlighted by a fullservice restaurant and bar, and full-service food and beverage atop a rooftop terrace. The estimated project is in excess of $30 million. Topgolf executives expect the venue would attract more than 500,000 visitors annually and generate to the city and the u See DOME / page A9

process that will then super freeze the gas until it becomes a liquid that could then be used to fuel ships or stored for weather spikes. Industry folks call that “peak shaving.” That review will run into the early months of 2019, a time when the plant was expected to begin operation. The clean air agency also issued the company a notice of violation for starting work on the plant without the agency’s permit. It did not, u See LNG / page A9

PROJECT PEACE FORGES FRUITFUL CONVERSATIONS BETWEEN OFFICERS, YOUTH By Andrew Fickes

andrew@tacomaweekly.com

Lizette Harris, a freshman at UWTacoma, remembers a time growing up on Hilltop when someone in her neighborhood was shot and killed and Tacoma police took forever to respond. From that early age, Harris’ impression of Tacoma police was to fear them and to mistrust them. But starting in her junior year at Life Christian High School, at the invitation of a friend, Harris started to attend Project Peace events at the Tacoma Police Department. Attending those, coupled with more interactions with adult professionals, Harris’ mood about local police began to evolve for the better and she started to feel less uncomfortable around them. “As I grew up, I saw officers as doing good,” said Harris, a person of color. “As I get older and I am having more interactions with adults and other professionals, I’m not seeing (police officers) as a villain.” This positive relationship change between students of color and local law enforcement is a signature goal of Project P.E.A.C.E. (Partnering for Equity and Community Engagement), which was formed in September 2015 following a handful of community discussions between Tacoma police and city leaders

PHOTO COURTESY OF CITY OF TACOMA

Youth and Tacoma police participate in a youth-led discussion held at Mt. Tahoma High School on Feb. 16, 2018.

and concerned citizens. The initiative was inspired by the desire to avoid police violence toward persons of color, similar to what happened in Ferguson, Mo., in August 2014, when Michal Brown, an

18-year-old person of color, was killed by white officers. A culminating event in February 2016 resulted in the release of multiple priorities desired by the community for Project

Peace to accomplish. These included building better relations between students of color and police; more engagement with the broader community; implementing a body camera program to improve policy and oversight; diversifying the police force more when hiring new officers; improving officer awareness of institutional racism, implicit bias, cultural competency, de-escalation and providing mental health trauma and crisis training; and ensuring the wellness and safety of officers. An executive committee was established and met for the first time in July 2016. Hermenia Jackson, a committee member who has been with Project Peace since the beginning, said that while many of the priorities have not been fully realized, this year there has been a concerted push to focus on fostering healthier relations between students of color and police officers. In February of this year, the initiative held its first youth-led discussion, bringing youth and police together, at Mt. Tahoma High School. In March and April the discussions were held at Lincoln and Stadium high schools, respectively. A final discussion for the school year will be held at the end of May at Oakland High School. u See PEACE / page A9

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Two Sections | 24 Pages


Section A • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 18, 2018

Pothole of the Week

SUSPECT LINKED TO 1986 MURDER OF GIRL BY DNA HE PROVIDED POLICE

SOUTH 42ND AND ASOTIN

After appearing on the side of area milk cartons for months and months, we’ve come to the realization that our beloved Percival, the Pothole Pig, is not coming home to us. The celebrated swine has either found a new life somewhere else, or perhaps became a delicious and nutritious part of someone’s breakfast at some point. Whatever the case, we will miss him and be forever in his debt as his dedication to the City of Destiny led to so many nasty potholes being filled. This week, Carter the Crater Gator found another impressive road divot to stretch out in. To be honest, we’ve had a difficult time with this critter. He can’t get over the fact that he’ll always be second-fiddle when compared to Percival, and frankly, he’s been getting a little snarky. While we’ve let him know that his replacement could waddle through the front door of the Tacoma Weekly office at any moment, the toothy sourpuss has countered with his own threat of “pulling a Percival” and disappearing. With this in mind, we are still in the process of trying out new pothole seeking varmints. If you’ve got any ideas, please send them to jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

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PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

Pattie Bastian and her daughter Theresa thank the support of the community and the dedication of the Tacoma Police Department in the decades-long investigation into the murder of Jennifer “Jenni” Bastian in 1986. By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma Police detectives made an arrest in a long-open murder case last week. The arrest came after DNA that Robert D. Washburn provided matched samples collected at the crime scene in 1986. The department had started testing DNA samples from open cases in 2016, thanks to funding from a $200,000 federal grant. The department would send the samples in batches so the lab would not be overwhelmed. Washburn’s sample was in the last batch of 20 DNA swabs the Tacoma Police Department submitted for testing. The samples matched. The estimated probability of DNA he provided matching DNA from a semen stain at the crime scene is one in 57 trillion. Washburn has now been charged with first-degree murder in the death of Jennifer “Jenni” Bastian, a 13-year-old girl who disappeared while riding her bicycle through Point Defiance Park. The effort to test the backlog of DNA samples, which lead to Washburn’s arrest, had been championed by Jennifer Bastian’s mother, Pattie, who continues to volunteer at the police department, where detectives kept her updated about the investigation into her daughter’s murder as the years passed. “Everyone in the community was affected,” Pattie Bastian said, noting that 1,500 people attended the funeral and many of her daughter’s former classmates remain friends today – now with children of their own. “We were overwhelmed with this 32 years ago, and we continued to be overwhelmed to this day.” Jennifer Bastian, a girl who loved kittens, bike rides and softball, had been training for an upcoming trek through the San Juan Islands when she did not return on Aug. 4, 1986. Her body and bicycle were found 24 days later. The Green River Task Force had been called in to assist because of their experience in processing outdoor crime scenes from the trail of bodies Green River Killer Gary Ridgeway had left before his arrest. Investigators concluded that Jennifer Bastian had been sexually assaulted and strangled and that the location of her body

Jennifer Bastian

Robert D. Washburn

had been prepared before she was kidnapped and killed there. Washburn, now 60, had first entered the police files in 1986, when he had reported seeing a suspicious man jogging in Point Defiance during the investigation of another murder, that of 12-year-old Michella Welch. Welch had disappeared March 26, 1986, when she was looking for her younger sisters in Puget Park after returning home to make their lunches. Her sisters had walked to a nearby business to use the restroom. Welch’s body was found in a nearby gulch hours after she was reported missing. She had been sexually assaulted, and her throat had been cut. Washburn had called police months later about seeing a man resembling a composite sketch of Welch’s suspected killer that had been circulated around the region. Jennifer Bastian disappeared four months later. Detectives conducted a follow-up interview with Washburn later that year to gain details about his encounter with the mystery jogger. Washburn then also mentioned smelling a foul odor while jogging along Five Mile Drive at a time when police had closed the park to search for Jennifer Bastian. Time passed without an arrest. Washburn had since moved to Illinois. But the investigation continued. DNA samples collected in Jennifer Bastian’s murder investigation back in 1986 were compared in 2013 to samples of convicted murders and sex offenders in state and federal databases. None matched. But the investigation continued. Detectives then made a list of possible suspects that didn’t already have samples of their DNA in those

databases. Washburn’s name was on the list. He voluntarily gave a sample to the FBI earlier this year that later matched the crime-scene samples. “Our police department will never give up,” Police Chief Don Ramsdell said, noting that a generation of officers continued to investigate and reexamine the case, helped by FBI agents, U.S. Marshalls and a host of other law enforcement agencies. Washburn was arrested by Illinois State Police and Tacoma detectives without incident and is scheduled to return to Tacoma later this month to face trial. “This case was one of the main reasons we formed a cold-case team in 2011 with the Tacoma Police Department and the FBI,” said Prosecutor Mark Lindquist. “We are committed to closure for victims and the community. Justice may be delayed, but it won’t be denied.” Detectives had long believed the assault and murder of Michella Welch and Jennifer Bastian in 1986 were committed by the same man. That changed five years ago, when DNA tests from those crime scenes didn’t match each other. Michella Welch’s murder remains unsolved but is still being investigate. Detectives are also still gathering evidence in Jennifer Bastian’s murder even after the arrest. “This case has been under investigation for 32 years,” said Police spokeswoman Loretta Cool, who knew Jennifer Bastian from their interactions at the YMCA a generation ago. “It is still under investigation.” Anyone with information about either case should call Tacoma police at (253) 591-5968.

SUSPECT EXTRADITED FROM MEXICO PLEADS GUILTY TO MURDER Gabriel Nevarez, 29, pleaded guilty on May 11 to murder in the first degree for the 2007 drive-by shooting that killed Kyle Grinnell, 21. “Pulling this defendant into court took more than nine years and a lot of hard work,” said Prosecutor Mark Lindquist. “It doesn’t matter how long it takes or how far we have to go, we will hold violent criminals accountable and keep our community safe.” During the afternoon of Feb. 21, 2007, Nevarez drove to Grinnell’s

home on South Tyler Street looking to settle an old score with Juan Carlos Ruiz, 19. Nevarez arrived at the home and found Ruiz outside at the top of a stairway. Grinnell was below him about 20 feet away and in the line of fire between Nevarez’s car and Ruiz. When the shooting started, witnesses heard gunfire coming from Nevarez’s car. He was hanging outside the driver’s side window with both hands on a silver .38 caliber revolver, firing toward the victim. Grinnell died at the scene. Ruiz, the

apparent target, was not injured. Nevarez, a U.S. citizen, was taken into custody without incident in February 2016, in Michoacan, Mexico, by the Policía Federal Ministerial, in close coordination with the FBI. Mexican authorities transferred Nevarez to FBI custody in Mexico City. FBI agents then brought Nevarez back to Washington. The case is being handled by Deputy Prosecutor Greg Greer. Sentencing is scheduled for June 29 at 8:30 a.m.


Friday, May 18, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 3

Bulletin Board PUYALLUP RIVER BRIDGE CLOSURE STARTS MAY 21 The City of Tacoma will close the Puyallup River Bridge (located on Puyallup Avenue between Portland Avenue and Milwaukee Way) beginning Monday, May 21. The bridge will be closed to vehicular and pedestrian traffic with an anticipated reopening date in February 2019. Detours in place will direct traffic to the Lincoln Avenue Bridge or to I-5. This project will remove and replace one third of the bridge, starting west of the Puyallup River and extending to the intersection of Portland and Puyallup avenues. When completed, the project will have also added new street lighting, sidewalks, bike lanes, and a new gateway structure. For more information, visit the Puyallup River Bridge page or contact Project Manager Chris Storey at cstorey@cityoftacoma.org, or call (253) 573-2484. PIERCE COLLEGE PUYALLUP NAMES FIFTH PRESIDENT Pierce College Chancellor and CEO Michele L. Johnson, Ph.D., announced on Mon., May 7 that Darrell L. Cain, Ph.D., will be the next president of Pierce College Puyallup. This ends a five-month search process conducted by a 14-member committee of faculty, classified staff, administrators, students and community members. Cain most recently served as vice chancellor for student affairs at Ivy Tech Community College in Indianapolis. He has also Darrell L. Cain served as vice president for academic affairs at Eastfield College in Dallas and was dean for academic affairs at Atlanta Technical College. Cain has also taught part-time throughout his career, currently in the graduate school at University of Maryland University Center (UMUC) and has presented and authored numerous articles. “I look forward to joining the Pierce College family and being part of the Puyallup community,” Cain said. “Pierce College plays an integral role in the community, and I look forward to building and collaborating with all stakeholders. The students, faculty and staff made my decision easy because they showed authentic pride in their college and articulated a vested interest in the success of students.” A first-generation college student, Cain attended Pasadena City College (a community college) and earned a bachelor’s degree from Indiana University Bloomington, and a master’s degree from Ball State University. He earned his Ph.D. in education leadership and policy studies from Virginia Tech University. “Dr. Cain will add his passion about student success to the hard work already taking place at Pierce College,” Johnson said. “His extensive and well-rounded experience and talent will add a new perspective to our leadership team, and his personal story serves as a powerful reminder of the transformative value of community college education and the work that we do.” Cain will join the college on or before August 1. SURVEY UNDERWAY AT WESTERN STATE Surveyors with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) arrived, Monday, May 14 at Western

State Hospital (WSH) to determine whether the facility has been able to make necessary improvements in order to keep $65 million in federal funding. This re-survey is a follow up from the last official visit of CMS in early May 2017 and is a result of a Systems Improvement Agreement (SIA) between the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) and CMS that began in June of 2016. The agency entered into a second SIA in November 2017 – allowing DSHS more time to continue forward progress at the hospital while retaining continued eligibility for federal funding. The SIA was entered into so DSHS could fix systemic operating problems at the hospital and restore the focus on patient treatment and overall safety. During that last, rigorous survey a year ago, WSH was able to show CMS noticeable progress at the hospital, including significant improvements in areas such as active psychiatric treatment. Around 20 surveyors are currently on site at the hospital and they will review processes and procedures of the facility over the next two weeks. More information about the Systems Improvement Agreement is on the DSHS website at www.dshs. wa.gov/bha/division-state-hospitals/systems-improvement-agreement.

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PANTAGES THEATER CLOSED FOR RENOVATIONS As part of the Broadway Center’s Centennial Campaign, Tacoma’s historic Pantages Theater will close for renovation between May 14 and Nov. 14. Broadway Center, BCRA, Korsmo Construction, City of Tacoma and other partners have been working diligently to find the best approach to address the venue’s improvement needs with minimal disruption to the theater and the community arts organizations that use it. New construction approaches and a reorganization of project phasing will allow the venue a shortened closure window than previously anticipated. The Pantages Theater will reopen for the first performance of the 2018-19 season to reveal Tacoma’s crown jewel venue completely renovated and refreshed for future generations. “In terms of safety, accessibility, comfort, and accuracy in restoring period craftsmanship, this will be an exquisite synthesis of old and new–and what’s even more exciting is that our community is so deeply involved,” stated Executive Director David Fischer. The temporary closure for the Pantages Theater includes the following venue improvements: New Seats Perhaps most exciting to modern-day patrons is the total replacement of the Pantages seats. New seats will be historic in appearance, yet contemporary in comfort, with cup holders and varying widths for patron accommodation. Community members interested in supporting the restoration and leaving a legacy are invited to “take a seat in Pantages history” through seat sponsorship. They may name one new theater seat for a gift of $1,000, or two or more seats at $850 each. Nameplates bearing an inscription of the donor’s choosing will be engraved on a plaque affixed to the seat. The estimated life of the new seats is 25 years. Payments may be made over two years. For more information, visit the Pantages Seat Campaign website (broadwaycenter.org/take-your-seat).

PUBLISHER John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com NEWS DESK news@tacomaweekly.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com STAFF WRITERS Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Dave Davison / dave@tacomaweekly.com Andrew Fickes / andrew@tacomaweekly.com SPORTS EDITOR Justin Gimse / jgimse@tacomaweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Chance Pittenger, Josiah Rutledge, Barb Rock COPY EDITING John Larson CARTOONISTS Chris Britt, Milt Priggee PAGINATION Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar, Lisa Lemmer WEB DEVELOPERS Ed Curran, Mike Vendetti PHOTOGRAPHERS Rocky Ross, Bill Bungard ADVERTISING Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com.

SEE MORE BULLETIN BOARD ITEMS ON PAGE A7

UNSOLVED HOMICIDES

Pierce County Sheriff’s detectives need your help to identify the suspects responsible for the murder of 22 year old Wilberth Acala and 19 year old Adrian Valencia-Cuevas. At 5:30 a.m. on Monday, May 14, 2018, victims Wilberth Acala and Adrian Valencia-Cuevas were found deceased inside a white Dodge Charger that was parked in the roadway in the 6200 block of 63rd St. W. in

the City of University Place. Both victims had been shot in the head by unidentified

Fridays at 10:30pm on

suspects who were believed to be seated in the back of the vehicle at the time of the

shooting. Surveillance video captured images of two unidentified male suspects running from the area where the homicide occurred approximately 30 minutes before the victims were discovered. Detectives are looking for information on any suspicious persons or vehicles seen in the area of Alameda Ave. and 56th St./Cirque Dr W. in the hours of 4:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. on Monday, May 14.

1,000

$

Receive up to for information leading to the arrest and charges filed for the person(s) in this case.

Call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) www.TPCrimestoppers.com

All Callers will remain anonymous

6824 19th Street W, #139 • University Place WA 98466


Section A • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 18, 2018

TPU director finalists visit Tacoma By John Larson

jlarson@tacomaweekly.com

The contenders to become the next director of Tacoma Public Utilities were in town this week. Three people with extensive backgrounds in the public utility sector met with government officials, labor and business leaders and members of the general public. They are in the running to replace former Director Bill Gaines, who retired from the position last December. TPU embarked on a nationwide search for his successor. A total of 68 people applied. A search panel narrowed this to 12, and this figure was cut to three in April. Jackie Flowers has been the general manager of Idaho Falls Power for the past 12 years. She began her career as a natural resources manager in 1993. She spent six years as public works director in Sheridan, Wyo. She earned a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. John Hairston is chief administrative officer of Bonneville Power Administration, an organization he joined 28 years ago. Previous roles with BPA have involved power marketing, energy efficiency and project management. He has a bachelor’s degree in economics from Southern University, a master’s in urban studies from Portland State University and a juris doctorate Lewis & Clark College. He also holds the certification of compliance and ethics professional from the Society of Corporate Compliance and Ethics. Nav Otal began her career in cancer research before joining the staff of the City of Bellevue 25 years ago as a budget and rates analyst. She was promoted to assistant budget manager then progressed through the Utilities Department from assistant and deputy director to her current role as director. She has a bachelor’s of science from the University of British Columbia and a master’s of business administration from City University in British Columbia. On May 14 the finalists received a guided tour of TPU assets. That night, they participated in a public meet-andgreet session at the Greater Tacoma Convention Center. On May 15 each finalist faced the full council, spending 10 minutes discussing

Jackie Flowers

John Hairston

Nav Otal

their background and qualifications, followed by questions from the council. Members of the TPU Board were in the audience. “I am excited about Tacoma,” Flowers said of spending 24 hours in town. She mentioned touring Tacoma Rail facilities and noted while she has no experience with railroads, “I am confident I can get up to speed quickly.” “I am a public utilities fan,” she remarked. “It is an awesome responsibility to provide clean water and reliable power.” Asked about the future of Click! Network, Flowers said it should be required to be competitive. Asked if she considered the Internet to be a utility, she replied yes. Asked how she could manage conflict, she touted her ability to gather input from many people. She mentioned her work educating the public on bond measures in Idaho Falls and Sheridan, both of which passed. “Every single person I meet I can learn something from.” Asked about a lack of knowledge of reduced rates for seniors and low-income customers, Flowers said she would reach out to social service agencies to spread the word. Hairston’s priorities include safety of the workforce and community, social and environmental responsibility and community involvement. He mentioned both his parents were teachers in Portland. Many

of his father’s former students would strike up conversations with him, explaining what an influence he had on them. He seeks to do the same in his career. “I think the director of this utility needs to get out in the community.” In regards to Click!, Hairston said the city made a sizable investment in it and should make the most of it. Changes in technology and consumer patterns need to be taken into account. Asked how he would manage conflict, he drew laughter by noting he has four daughters. He said he would hear all the perspectives and put himself in the shoes of others. Programs for the low-income can be promoted by social service agencies, Hairston said. He mentioned one summer where he went out with crews of a public utility district. They were sent to one home to shut off the power and found out the resident was a woman in her 90s. The temperature was about 100 degrees. Hairston said cutting off the elderly customer’s power would be akin to a death sentence. They contacted an agency, which paid the woman’s outstanding bill. Otal’s management philosophy involves preserving public trust, harmonizing competing interests, investing for the long term and championing culture change. She noted she has managed the third-largest department “in a city that has

experienced unprecedented growth.” Otal considers Click! to be a critical asset. “It was very forward thinking when Click! was created.” Language barriers can be why some customers do not utilize assistance programs. In Bellevue, senior centers and social service agencies have been utilized to promote such help. “I look at a utility as one of a community’s greatest assets,” Otal said. “I see huge opportunity here.” Later in the day the finalists appeared before a panel to answer questions. Panelists were selected by the council to represent a cross-section of the community. They were WestRock General Manager Steve Devlin, University Place City Manager Steve Sugg, Puyallup Tribal Councilmember Annette Bryan, Port of Tacoma CEO John Wolfe, Corey Mosesly, director of Family Stability Initiatives with United Way, Alice Phillips, business manager and financial secretary of International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 483 and Citizens for a Healthy Bay Executive Director Melissa Malott. Members of the public who wish to offer their input can fill out a form at bit. ly/tpufinalistfeedback. The TPU Board is scheduled to vote on selecting a candidate on May 23. The council is scheduled to vote on the confirmation of the selection on June 12.

Tiki tenants make their voices heard at city hall rally By Andrew Fickes

andrew@tacomaweekly.com

Since the start of April when Seattle-based CWD Investments LLC purchased the Tiki Apartments on South 12th Street, and subsequently gave tenants living in the 58 units 20 days to vacate, Tacoma has quickly emerged as ground zero for the affordable housing crisis afflicting communities all across Washington. On Tuesday, May 15, the Tiki Tenants Organizing Committee held a tenants’ rights rally outside Tacoma City Hall. The organizing committee rallied to voice their collective opinion of what more needs to be done and enacted by the City of Tacoma concerning tenants’ rights. In a letter addressed to Mayor Victoria Woodards and the Tacoma City Council, the committed pleaded, “While we appreciate the City Council’s swift response to our recent calls for housing justice, we need both immediate and permanent solutions to the ongoing affordable housing and tenant displacement crisis in Tacoma.” Specifically, the committee proposed to Council the creation of a “city-wide renters’ commission with guaranteed representation of those marginalized groups who are most commonly targeted for eviction and displacement.” The committee proposes the commission would be responsible for “promoting robust education on tenants’ rights, providing emergency response to those tenants being displaced, monitor an affordable housing trust fund, oversee the delivery of relocation assistance, and maintain a registration of all rental units (requiring housing quality inspections every five years) and a list of renters’ complaints.” The committee also encouraged Council and the mayor to actively enforce the law forbidding discrimination based on income, race, ethnicity, disability, and more. Specifically, the committee asked that those with prior felony convictions be guaranteed housing. The committee asked the Council’s temporary emergency ordinance allowing tenants 90 days to vacate that sunsets Sept. 30 to be made permanent. It asked that additional provisions be added to a permanent ordinance to include just cause eviction protections for month-tomonth and fixed-term lease tenants; relocation assistance to those tenants who are displaced; and requirements for all developers to build affordable housing through inclusionary zoning citywide. On May 1, City Council allocated $10,000 out of its contingency fund to pay United Way of Pierce County to provide Tiki tenants with housing navigation services. At press time, United Way’s partner, Comprehensive Life Resources, had assisted eight households at the Tiki Apartments with navigating housing resources and finding a new home. Pamela Duncan, human resources manager in City of Tacoma’s Neighborhood and Community Services Department, said the message to tenants is to dial 211

PHOTO BY ANDREW FICKES

Terri Anderson, interim executive director for the Tenants Union of Washington State, encourages City of Tacoma to develop policies that champion tenants’ rights and promote just-cause eviction protections.

to receive housing navigation services. In addition, CLR continues to go door to door at Tiki, connecting with tenants unaware of housing relocation services available to them. As of May 11, 33 units at Tiki were still occupied. “Some folks have already moved out all on their own,” Duncan said. “Some will wait until the last minute. We don’t want that to happen. Our goal is to have everyone out by the end of June and into a permanent home.” Duncan (no relation to Chad Duncan, a principal member of CWD Investments) said city staff is researching the viability of a relocation assistance fund to help those tenants wrongfully evicted. Duncan said city staff will bring recommendations before Council in September before the temporary ordinance sunsets on Sept. 30. At the rally outside City Hall on Tuesday, Terri Anderson, interim executive director of the Tenants Union of Washington State, said the Union wants Governor Jay Inslee to pass a statewide just-cause eviction law that would prohibit no-cause evictions. Currently, state law allows landlords to give only 20-day notice to tenants on a

month-to-month lease, even if they’re current on their rent. Anderson said she hopes cities like Tacoma and Seattle, where the Union is headquartered, will become pioneers in progressive tenants’ rights policies and enact their own just-cause eviction protections. Meanwhile, Donna Seay, who led the rally, and fortunately was able to find new housing after living at Tiki, said she is grateful to be a voice for others. “A lot of (tenants) are afraid to speak out,” Seay said. “I’m happy to help others who are afraid to make their voice heard.” Seay, who was suddenly paralyzed in January due to a lifelong blood clot syndrome, said she lives on $9,200 a year in Social Security income. She said she was able to move back in to where she lived before at Pioneer Human Services on Market Street. She said it’s sad to see money and greed becoming more important in the world than treating human beings with decency. “To see people from the community and the tenants union come out to help us, gives me hope,” Seay said.


Friday, May 18, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 5

EDITORIAL CARTOON BY MILT PRIGGEE • WWW.MILTPRIGGEE.COM

Guest Editorials

Point in Time – 2018 By Connie Ladenburg Every year Pierce County does a Point in Time count of the homeless living in the county. This work is required by the federal office of Housing and Urban Development so communities can qualify for homeless grant funding. This survey does more than count though. It helps to put a face on the homeless. They include not only individuals but also veterans, families, young adults and children. This is surprising to many people. What is also surprising is the cause of today’s homelessness. There are three factors that contribute to homelessness: • Lack of affordable housing, increasing rents, and

evictions

• Job loss, lack of skills and lack of employment or

job opportunities

• Mental illness, health emergency, chronic illness

and substance use.

Between 2012-2017 there has been a 49 percent increase in a one-bedroom rental and yet wages have only increased 4.4 percent during a similar time period. The expected percentage of an individual’s income to be spent on housing costs (rent or mortgage) is 30 percent. Yet 52 percent of Pierce County residents spend more than 30 percent of their income on housing. The situation gets even bleaker from those who make minimum wage. An

individual making minimum wage needs to work 78 hours a week in order to spend 30 percent of his/her income on rent for a one-bedroom apartment. The result is that more and more people are spending a majority of their income on housing costs, leaving less and less for food, clothing, transportation and other everyday living costs. Many people, especially those designated as below middle class, are often a paycheck away from being homeless. Those with health issues are especially vulnerable. For example, those with behavioral health issues often experience gaps in service, which make it difficult to keep a house and a job. Around 75 percent of Pierce County residents can’t access public funded outpatient care for serious behavioral health issues. Further, it is even worse for those who need inpatient care and treatment. In Pierce County we have 2.8 inpatient psychiatric beds, the lowest of urban counties in the State. This year’s Point in Time effort had more than 300 volunteers who spread throughout the county in cities and unincorporated areas. The count focuses on the literally homeless, those who are unsheltered, in shelters, or in transitional housing. The volunteers surveyed people living in encampments and additionally counted through observation those living in encampments who didn’t consent to being surveyed in more detail. Here are the results of this year’s count: • 1,628 individuals are homeless. • 25 percent of those are families with children, 9

percent are veterans and 6 percent are young adults

(age 18-24) or unaccompanied youth (under 18 without guardianship) • 53 percent are in emergency shelters, 1 percent are

in transitional housing, 12 percent sleep in their vehicles and 34 percent sleep outdoors.

Over the past five years, Pierce County has overhauled its homeless crisis response. Providing outreach to encampments helps more people access available resources and makes the camp-to-housing pipeline more efficient. Prioritizing the most vulnerable clients for housing intervention means the people most in need of housing are rapidly rehoused. Supporting and empowering clients to find their own housing solutions ends housing crises quickly and cost-effectively. As we have applied this new approach, we’ve helped more people leave homelessness for permanent housing. In 2017, nearly 50 percent of people who experienced homelessness for at least one day in the county moved into some type of temporary housing. This is good news but we know we have a lot to do. We can’t always control who experiences homelessness, but we can control what happens when someone does. Surveys like the Point in Time homeless count help us keep on top of the issue with current information. We are making progress but the crisis isn’t over for everyone. Connie Ladenburg is a member of the Pierce County Council. See her blogs as https://blog.co.pierce.wa.us/ connieladenburg.

Small cell towers do not belong in Tacoma neighborhoods By Andrea Haug

I am writing to you regarding the installation of 5G small cell towers in the residential areas of our fair city. The rollout of 5G has created uproar in many communities around the nation and the wave has finally hit our home town. What exactly does this all mean? I have to admit, I really didn’t know. I had only seen commercials that talked about how great this new technology is and how fast we would be able to download movies. Sounds amazing, doesn’t it? Who doesn’t like the latest and greatest technology? On April 25, my understanding of the situation changed and not for the better. I learned that the utility pole in the easement of my front yard was slated as a prospective site for one of these small cell towers. I began feverishly researching the subject only to be more and more concerned about our health as a community, our property values, and the overall lack of information given to us by the powers that be both locally and federally. I was very concerned about the fact that all of my neighbors and other people in the community I have spoken with had no clue this was happening! These 5G towers seem harmless enough and don’t seem to clutter up the utility poles more than they already are, but did you know thanks to the 2012 Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act, under Section 6409(a), once a small cell is attached to a pole wireless companies have the right to expand their equipment. In fact, they can expand any number of times. In other words, once a site is built, municipalities have little power to restrict further expansions. This could rapidly affect property values because

not only is there a potential health risk to the people of our community, but now there is a potential for a gigantic eyesore hanging off the pole out front. When given a choice to purchase a home near one of these locations or away from one I guarantee someone will choose the one away. On March 30, the FCC passed an order allowing the installation of these small cell towers without an environmental review. This is both irresponsible and reckless as they themselves are using outdated information from old technologies to create the guidelines for safety we use today. The National Toxicology Program (a division of the U.S. Health and Human Services) is currently conducting a study regarding RF (cell phone) and the effects it had on lab rats and mice. The NTP will not be publishing their findings until fall 2018 (preliminary findings are available now). The FCC will have to revisit their guidelines and make changes if/when the study shows that cells are related to certain types of cancer. Why did an order by the FCC pass before these findings were published? A call to action: Our federal government is failing to protect us as citizens. The next line of defense is our state and local governments. The City of Tacoma needs to protect its citizens and the city needs to amend its ordinances regarding 5G in our town. If Tacoma wants to be responsible they will revisit the topic of 5G in our community. Residential areas should be exempt from the small towers for reasons of both health and property value. If progress is a must, let’s put these towers in business areas where people are only traveling through and not living their lives under it

E-MAIL US YOUR OPINIONS! Tacoma Weekly welcomes your opinions, viewpoints and letters to the editor. You can e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. Please include your name, address and phone number when submitting your letter.

24/7. Our first responders also need to be protected from the RF these towers produce. In Piedmont, Calif., firefighters suffered from dizziness, nausea, and headaches when a small cell tower was put on their station. How can our first responders respond adequately to emergencies if they are suffering from these ailments? No cell tower should be placed on any police, fire, or EMT station. Tacoma needs to better notify all of its citizens regarding these small cell towers. They have not done their due diligence. They have only consulted one independent expert, who of course says there is nothing harmful about this technology. Present the people with both sides of the issue and let the citizens decide. What is the point of having local municipalities if they are just going to sit back and do nothing? Would one of our honorable council members volunteer to put one of these 5G small cell towers outside their family’s home? They cannot use the excuse that the federal government has tied their hands. This didn’t seem to matter when it came to legalizing marijuana or creating sanctuary cities. The only difference here is that defiance might cost them some money. Tacoma does not have a good track record when it comes to making decisions for us or the environment. Here is a chance for the City of Tacoma to do the right thing and proceed with caution. We can lead by example! Let’s not wait until we have a problem. Everyone needs to write and/or call our city council members, state representatives, and our governor and tell them: “No 5G in our neighborhoods!” I would like to thank you for taking the time to read this. Andrea Haug is a Tacoma resident.

CORRECTION In the April 5 story “A proposed opioid treatment site is hotly contested at public hearing,” local resident Dawn Wood was misquoted as saying she is in favor of the facility when in fact she is opposed to it. Tacoma Weekly apologizes for the error.


Section A • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 18, 2018

CANDIDATES ANNOUNCE RUN FOR OFFICE

DEREK SMITH Tacoma Municipal Court Dept. 3 Local attorney Derek Smith announced he will run for the Tacoma Municipal Court. Smith will run for the seat being vacated by Judge Elizabeth “Betsy” Verhey, who announced she will not be seeking re-election. “Running for Tacoma Municipal Court judge will bring together three of my life’s passions: my love for Tacoma, my respect for the law and my commitment to serve others,” said Smith. Smith missed being elected to the court by a narrow margin in 2010, nearly unseating an incumbent judge after running a strong campaign with broad support across the legal profession and the community. “It’s a reality that candidates for local judicial office must fund their own campaigns,” said Smith, “and when I nearly won in 2010 we funded the campaign with $35,000. This time we’ve set aside $100,000 to ensure voters can learn about my qualifications and work in the community.” Smith earned his bachelor’s degree at UC-Davis before graduating Cum Laude from University of Puget Sound/Seattle University School of Law. He spent his early career in the Kent City Attorney’s Office, where he achieved the rank of senior prosecuting attorney in October of 2000. After joining the Seattle City Attorney’s Office in 2002, he worked in both the Criminal Division and as a community precinct liaison with the Seattle Police Department Vice and Narcotics Unit. He is an appointed judge pro tem in the Federal Way, Des Moines, Pacific/Algona, and Kent Municipal Courts. In 2011, he and partner James White founded their own criminal defense firm, The Law Offices of Smith & White, PLLC in downtown Tacoma. Smith and his wife Celesta have two sons, Rowan age 9 and Wyatt age 7. Rowan and Wyatt attend Sherman Elementary School, where Celesta teaches mindfulness to the students. The family attends St. Mark’s Lutheran Church By The Narrows, where Celesta is the Sunday School and Vacation Bible School coordinator. Smith is a certified scuba instructor and an avid reader. 

DAVID OLSON Pierce County Council Veteran, school board member, and banking officer David Olson has announced he will run for Pierce County Council in District 7. Olson brings a balance of public and private sector experience, with 28 years of military service, 23 years of community service, and 13 years of business experience. Retiring from the Navy and settling in Gig Harbor in 2005, Olson has since established himself as a community leader and ally to small business. Supporting his children’s education led him to regular attendance at local school board meetings, which ultimately inspired him to run for office. He is humbled to have been elected by the voters to serve as the Pierce County Charter Review commissioner and twice elected to the Peninsula School Board. Years later, as the last of his children prepare to leave the nest, he says his family still serves as his inspiration for his involvement. “Pierce County is an incredible place to live and raise a family,” Olson says, “though I believe we can still do more to increase economic opportunities, prioritize public

safety, and ensure transparent and responsible use of our tax dollars.” Traffic, the ST3/RTA tax, rising property taxes, and neighborhood safety are issues he believes are impacting the lives of District 7 residents day-to-day. “Every year, people in Pierce County are paying more, and getting less. And they know it.” In addition to the School Board, Olson currently serves as president-elect of the City Club of Tacoma, vice president of the Hilltop Business Association, and on the boards of the Greater Gig Harbor Foundation and World Trade Center Tacoma. Olson is also a member of the Key Peninsula Business Association, Tacoma Transportation Club, and the Gig Harbor Rotary. As a member of the Republican Party, Olson is proud to have a strong list of early endorsements, including Kim Wyman, Washington’s secretary of state. He has also earned the endorsements of State Senator Jan Angel, former County Councilmember and current State Representative Joyce McDonald, State Representative Dick Muri, Gig Harbor Fire Commissioner Zachary Smith and former Pierce County Councilmember Stan Flemming, who once held the same District 7 seat Olson hopes to win in November. Olson will spend the next seven months reaching out to voters to listen and earn their vote. He encourages members of the community to reach out to his campaign to voice their concerns about the district, “especially those who believe it’s time for change,” he said. Voters can read more about Olson on his website, ElectDavidOlson.com, his Facebook page, or find out more by e-mailing David@ElectDavidOlson.com. LIZANNE PADULA Pierce County District Court Judge 3 Longtime attorney Lizanne Padula has announced her candidacy for Pierce County District Court judge position 3. Padula is running for the vacancy created by the recent retirement announcement of the Honorable District Court Judge Frank Dacca. “I am running for District Court judge to help ensure that access to justice is a reality for all citizens in Pierce County,” Padula said. Padula is a former prosecutor, reserve police officer and, for the last 19 years, an attorney in private practice handling both civil and criminal matters. She was twice selected as a Rising Star, twice selected as a Super Lawyer and has earned a “superb” rating with the AVVO legal resource organization.  “As a judge, I will bring the wealth of my legal experiences to make an immediate and significant contribution to the Pierce County District Court. As a pro-tem judge, I hold offenders accountable so that they understand there are serious consequences for their actions,” she said. Padula, 52, is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati College of Law, where she earned her J.D. and the University of Denver, where she earned her undergraduate degree in psychology. A member of the Washington Bar Association, Padula has been active in the legal community and often called upon to instruct other attorneys in continuing legal education. She and her family reside at Point Ruston in Tacoma. JOHN SHEERAN Pierce County District Court, Position 6 Former Felony Division Chief and current Assistant Chief Criminal Deputy John Sheeran has announced his intention to run for Pierce County District Court, position 6. The open seat is currently held by retiring Judge Mag-

gie Ross, and Sheeran is the only candidate to declare so far. Sheeran brings more than 21 years of trial experience prosecuting some of the most serious offenses in our community, including rape, murder, domestic violence, and crimes committed against children. In his various leadership positions, he’s overseen more than 50 attorneys in the criminal division, working to keep our community safe and ensuring the highest ethical standards for the office. In his announcement, Sheeran highlighted his balance of experience including handling appeals cases in front of the Court of Appeals and State Supreme Court. Said Sheeran: “I believe that the people’s court should serve the entire community. While all offenders must be held accountable, the public’s interest can sometimes be better served through treatment and rehabilitation rather than incarceration. That’s why I helped lead the effort in 2014 to establish a dedicated Mental Health Court in Pierce County, and currently oversees the Prosecutor’s Office’s Alternative Courts Team, ensuring that everyone has equal access to justice.” Beyond keeping our community safe in his professional career, Sheeran serves as a West Pierce Fire commissioner and is on the board of Safe Streets. He is a former board member of the Washington Council of Police and Sheriffs and a regular supporter of Lawyers Helping Hungry Children, Walk a Mile in Her Shoes, and Palmer Scholars, among other charitable causes. For more information or to contact Sheeran, call (253) 468-9794, e-mail Info@ElectJohnSheeran.com, or learn more online at www.ElectJohnSheeran.com. DWAYNE CHRISTOPHER Tacoma Municipal Court Judge, Position 3 Tacoma attorney Dwayne Christopher has announced his bid for the Tacoma Municipal Court Judge, position 3. Christopher, 46, is seeking the position currently held by Municipal Court Judge Elizabeth Verhey, who recently announced her decision not to seek reelection this fall. Christopher presents a long history of experience as a pro-tem judge, attorney and civic leader in Tacoma. In addition to his work in private practice, Christopher currently serves as a pro-tem judge in Pierce County District Court. Christopher began his legal career as a judicial assistant for Pierce County Superior Court Judge Brian Tollefson, (retired), and currently has his own law practice in Tacoma. A graduate of Wilson High School in Tacoma, Christopher earned his law degree from the Seattle University School of Law, formerly the University of Puget Sound School of Law, in 1997, after graduating cum laude from Morehouse College in Atlanta. Christopher has a lengthy record of civic and community involvement. He is the president- elect of Palmer Scholars, a high school and college mentor, a recipient of the 2017 United Way Live United Award, and a member of City Club of Tacoma. He is the son of retired educators from Tacoma Public Schools, Cordell and Marva Christopher. He is married to Meesha Christopher, who is currently pursuing her master’s degree in marriage and family therapy. For additional information, contact Christopher at (253) 830-5787 or christopherforjudge@gmail.com.

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Friday, May 18, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 7

Bulletin Board CONTINUED FROM PAGE A3 Seismic and Safety Improvements Structural reinforcements in the plaster and stained glass canopy will preserve the theater’s structure and historic features in the event of seismic activity. The center aisle will be reinstated in the theater’s floorplan, reducing emergency evacuation time by half.   Historic Restoration of Paint and Plaster By conducting forensic research on layers of paint and plaster dating back to the Pantages’ construction in 1918, Jeffrey Greene of EverGreene Architectural created a design plan to restore the Pantages interior to a radically improved and more historically accurate paint palette and plaster texture.   Acoustic Improvements With updated flooring, doors, and seats, the hall will enjoy more resonance and a livelier sound. A new orchestra shell onstage will further enhance acoustic features, leading to a richer sound for music, particularly classical performances.  “These historic beautification efforts will lead to a radically different experience for generations of audience members to come. The result will be an aesthetic and acoustic experience closer to what the theater’s original patrons encountered when inside the grand hall on its opening night in 1918,” said Fischer. Future improvements, once fundraising is complete, will include:

• Remodel of downstairs restrooms • Pantages backstage expansion • Improvements to Theater on the Square, converting

it to an exhibit on civic engagement named in honor of two civic leaders, Babe Lehrer and Dawn Lucien, creating the Lehrer-Lucien Commons.

The remaining scope of construction will be phased over several years with minimal disruption to theater operations. All improvements now, since the initial Pantages restoration in 1983, have been accomplished through partnerships with the City of Tacoma (a public/private partnership with Broadway Center) the State of Washington, and private donors. Individuals interested in contributing to Tacoma’s historic Theater District restoration should contact Director of Philanthropy Stacey Guadnola at (253) 591-5524. Tacoma’s Historic Theater District contributes $24 million annually to downtown’s growing economy. The community treasures its arts scene and the Broadway Center strives to deliver quality programs that reflect the diversity of our region and strengthen the social fabric of our communities. A study by Americans for the Arts found 87 percent of people believe the arts are important to quality of life, and 82 percent believe they are important to local businesses and the economy. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION RECRUITING VOLUNTEER FACILITATORS Make a difference in the life of a family caregiver. The Alzheimer’s Association is currently recruiting local volunteers to facilitate an evening family caregiver support group in Tacoma. Family caregiver support groups provide a consistent and caring place for caregivers to learn, share, and gain emotional support from others who are also on a unique journey of providing care to a person with memory loss. Our chapter-trained volunteers receive excellent training, ongoing support, resources, and continuing education opportunities. Individuals who are often best qualified as support group facilitators include: working or retired social workers, nurse and other healthcare professionals, educators, clergy, counselors, and former family caregivers. Commitment of at least one year is required.  Interested in learning more? Contact Linda Whiteside, director of community support, at 1 (800) 848-7097 or (206) 529-3875 or lwhitesi@alzwa.org. TACOMA POLICE UNION ENDORSES ROBNETT FOR PROSECUTOR Yet another Pierce County law enforcement organization is throwing its support behind Mary Robnett for county prosecutor. The Tacoma Police Union voted to endorse

Robnett in her challenge to incumbent Mark Lindquist. The union, Tacoma Police Local #6, joins the Pierce County Deputy Sheriffs Guild and the Pierce County Corrections and Sergeants Guild in backing her. The Washington State Patrol Troopers Association is also endorsing Robnett. “It’s an honor to earn the Tacoma Police Union’s endorsement,” Robnett said. “Police and prosecutors often work closely together. In my 24 years as a professional prosecutor, I’ve depended upon and really valued the excellent work of our Tacoma police officers and detectives. I appreciate, and am honored by, their support and confidence in me in this race.” CITY SCHEDULES SECOND ROUND OF RAIL CROSSING COMMUNITY MEETINGS The City of Tacoma is holding community meetings regarding rail crossings in the Dome District, Old Town and the West End. This is the second round of meetings being held as part of the city’s efforts to evaluate a number of these rail crossings. At these meetings, information will be presented about the public feedback provided at previous meetings and about potential engineering options that are being evaluated. The dates and locations available for community members to provide input include:

• Tuesday, May 22, 4-6 p.m. at Titlow Lodge, 8425 6th Ave. in Tacoma

• Wednesday, May 23, 4-6 p.m., Old Town Music Society, 2101 N. 30th St. in Tacoma

• Thursday, May 24, 4-6 p.m. at 323 Puyallup Ave. in Tacoma

To view a map showing the general location of the rail crossings being evaluated, or for more information, visit cityoftacoma.org/railcrossings, or contact Project Manager Mark D’Andrea at mdandrea@cityoftacoma. org, or call (253) 591-5518. PLU EARNS MULTIPLE EMMY NOMINATIONS Three Pacific Lutheran University (PLU) student media organizations – MediaLab, the Center for Media Studies, and “Late Knight” – all entities within the University’s School of Arts and Communication, have received a total of four 2018 Emmy Award nominations in three different categories from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Northwest Chapter. MediaLab, PLU’s applied research and multimedia program, earned two nominations in the long-form, nonfiction documentary category for two episodes of a fourpart series titled “A World of Difference,” which explores the shifting cultural landscapes of race, class, immigration status, and gender across North America. Another documentary produced by two individual Center for Media Studies students received one nomination in the long-form, non-fiction category. The production, titled “More Than a Mission: Stemming the Sex Trade in Angeles City,” investigates the plight of young women trapped in the world of human trafficking in The Philippines. The fourth Emmy nod was earned by members of PLU’s student entertainment show, “Late Knight,” for a short-form fiction feature titled “‘Twas The Late Knight Before Christmas.” In response to the MediaLab nominations, Mackenzie Cooper (class of 2018), a two-year member of the organization and a producer on “A World of Difference,” said the recognitions are an incredible honor. “We worked hard to create films that inspire thoughtful and necessary conversations regarding the difficult topics of race, gender, immigration and class,” said Cooper. “This recognition affirms the success of the stories and our ability to tell them.” “A World of Difference” was produced by a team that included Cooper, a communication major, as well as fellow communication majors Joshua Wiersma (2018), director of photography and editor; Julia Grosvenor (2019), story editor; and digital media major Rachel Lovrovich (2018), director and designer. The series contained an original musical soundtrack composed by Dalton Rouse (2018), with narration by Jonathan Spielmann (2018). “A World of Difference” was made possible in part by funding from PLU’s Wang Center for Global Education and PLU’s Diversity, Justice, and Sustainability Fund. For more information about “A World of Difference”

or other MediaLab productions, please visit worldofdifferenceseries.com or https://medialab.plu.edu, or contact Camille Lemke at (303) 570-9989, or via e-mail at lemkecr@plu.edu. The co-producers of “More than a Mission” were Cara Gillespie (2017) and Elise Anderson, (2017), who conceived, wrote, directed, and edited the project. Gillespie and Anderson, both of whom have graduated and begun their professional careers, said they were thrilled that the project resonated with audiences, and achieved their goal of shedding light on an issue often overlooked and under-reported. “It‘s a huge honor to be nominated for an Emmy,” Gillespie said. Working in partnership with the non-governmental organization Wipe Every Tear, Gillespie and Anderson shared the story of one woman who was freed from the sex trade. “More than anything, I’m just struck with the idea that we told her story in a way so that it moved other people as much as it moved us,” said Anderson. “More Than a Mission” was made possible in part by funding from PLU’s Diversity, Justice, and Sustainability Fund and the Center for Media Studies. The students also worked closely with staff members of Wipe Every Tear, as well as staff and faculty from PLU’s Diversity Center, the Center for Media Studies, and the School of Arts and Communication. Sam Ellefson (2019), executive producer and host of “Late Knight,” also expressed gratitude for the Emmy nod received by that show, a late-night style comedy that occurs six times each academic year on the PLU campus. “Our team has been working extremely hard to create a unique and professional show at the collegiate level,” said Ellefson. “It is an honor to be recognized for our hard work and we are excited for what is to come in the future of our program.” “Late Knight” is entirely student-written, student-run, and student-produced. The show features monologues, guest interviews, games, and performances. In addition to Ellefson, other “Late Knight” students recognized are: Natalie Mooney (2019); producer David Smith (2020); talent Riley Dolan (2019) and Collin Geffrey (2018); director/producer Megan Longstaff (2019); makeup and floor management Hallie Harper (2021); camera operator Dina Longstaff (2019;) costumes/crew Eric Zayas (2018); camera operator Elsa Kienberger (2018); and writer Ali Struble (2021). The Emmy winners in all categories will be announced at an awards event on Saturday, June 9 at the Fremont Studios in Seattle. PEACE COMMUNITY CENTER SEEKS GRANT Peace Community Center, a local educational nonprofit that serves Hilltop students from elementary school through a post-secondary degree, is applying for a 21st Century Community Learning Center grant. The program will serve elementary students in Tacoma’s Hilltop neighborhood who attend McCarver Elementary School and are in second through fifth grade. If awarded, the grant will provide funding for 100 students to receive hands-on after-school and summer programming to help students reach their academic and life potential, specifically seeking to help students build academic achievement in reading, math, science, and social-emotional development. If awarded, enrollment into the program will begin in late August or early September of 2018 for the 2018-2019 school year. More information can be found at www.peacecommunitycenter.org. Peace Community Center’s mission is to support and encourage youth historically underrepresented in college to cultivate their academic and leadership talents so that they can gain full access to educational opportunities and reach their full potential. To meet this mission, the Center operates after-school and summer programs for Hilltop students from second grade through post-secondary completion.   UWT TO HOST DISCUSSION ON THREATS TO KILLER WHALES University of Washington-Tacoma is the venue for an event bringing together one of the world’s leading researchers on orcas and an engineer renowned for policy solutions to big problems. “Hope for Orcas: Orca Researcher Ken Balcomb and an Urgent Call to Action” will take place on Thursday, May 17, 5:30-7:30 p.m. SEE MORE BULLETIN BOARD ITEMS ON PAGE A7

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Section A • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 18, 2018

Health department plans to pilot marijuana lockbox program By Andrew Fickes

andrew@tacomaweekly.com

Marijuana is legal in Washington, and likely to stay that way, so the TacomaPierce County Health Department wants to be one small part of a growing effort to keep weed out of the reach of underage youth. Empowered with a grant from the state Department of Health, Tutrecia Baker, program manager for the county health department’s youth prevention initiative, along with her team, plan to begin partnering with prevention-minded cannabis retailers after July 1. “We’re excited about the opportunity to work with retailers,” said Baker. “We will be partnering with a particular store to pilot lockboxes. The conversation we’ll be having will be around safe storage (of marijuana) and the goal is to have that be the community norm.” Baker said that just like parents will lock away their liquor, their prescription drugs, their guns, and their ammo, she said parents should treat marijuana no differently and store that away from children. “We want that to be part of the community agenda,” said Baker. Baker said that fortunately, from community conversations the department has had already, it appears many cannabis prevention retailers are already prevention-

PHOTO COURTESY OF TACOMA-PIERCE COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT

A lockbox similar to the one pictured will be what the county health department will distribute to a marijuana retailer or retailers as part of a pilot program.

minded. She said a pilot program would involve the distribution of lockboxes to a participating retailer, and for that retailer to provide the lockboxes to customers for free. A new law passed in April 2017, sponsored by State Rep. Dan Griffey (R-Shelton), made it legal for counties to distribute marijuana lockboxes to

Bulletin Board CONTINUED FROM PAGE A7 at William W. Philip Hall, University of WashingtonTacoma. This event is free, but RSVP is required at http:// saveourorcas.eventbrite.com. In a talk entitled “Hope for Orcas,” organized by Citizens for a Healthy Bay, Ken Balcomb, the principal investigator and founder of the Center for Whale Research, will share his perspective on the endangered whales and the threat of their imminent extinction. He will be joined by Jim Waddell, civil engineer with Damsense who worked for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for 36 years. Balcomb and Waddell will discuss a range of actions in the Salish Sea and in the Columbia/Snake River system that could improve the outlook for the survival of orcas. “Threats to orca survival have been said to fall into three main categories,” said Balcomb. “Shortage of food – primarily Chinook salmon – is the big one, followed by the accumulation of toxic pollutants in orcas’ fatty tissues, and, a distant last, impairment of living conditions due to boat and ship noise.” “What we don’t yet know about the lives of these animals outweighs what we do know, but we do know enough to feel compelled to save them from extinction,” said Balcomb, “and what we are led to know about solving their endangered predicament is often based on misconceptions.” For example, says Balcomb, it is a misconception that the group of orcas known as Southern resident killer whales lives only in the waters of the Salish Sea, including Puget

Sound. “They currently spend as much as 95 percent of their time outside the Salish Sea,” said Balcomb. He cites evidence from a five-year coastal sighting study his organization reported in 2013, and a NOAA Fisheries study showing some satellite-tagged orcas spent a high proportion of time at the entrance to the Columbia River, searching for food. Waddell, the engineer and retired Army Corps employee, relying on historical and empirical evidence, says the salmon runs all the way up into the Snake River are critical for orca food supply. During the talk, he will highlight information from government agencies that shows why it is immediately feasible to decommission and breach the four hydroelectric and navigation dams in the Snake River, as he outlined in a 2016 Seattle Times op-ed. Melissa Malott, executive director of Citizens for a Healthy Bay, the event’s organizer, says only a united effort by the community will contribute to saving Chinook salmon and the Southern resident whale population. “We’re grateful for this chance to hear from one of the world’s leading experts on this special population of orcas, and look forward to hearing what can be done to prevent their extinction.” In addition to Citizens for a Healthy Bay, the event is cosponsored by the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, Center for Whale Research, Damsense, Friends of the Earth, Orca Network and the Endangered Species Coalition. COUNTY LAUNCHES EXTRA SEAT BELT ENFORCEMENT Ninety-five percent of Washington drivers and passengers use their seat belts, according to a new report from the Washington Traffic Safety Commission. That leaves only five percent of people who might be subject to

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retailers. It was inspired by Mason County, which had a surplus of lockboxes and no legal means to distribute. Surprisingly, so far, no counties have embraced the new law, except for Mason, which in 2017 distributed 350 lockboxes to retailers. Many counties cited a lack of funding attached to the bill that gave no incentive

to counties to purchase and distribute. It’s this law that is enabling the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department to act. On July 1 the department received a $308,758 grant from the state health department, representing the first year in a two-year grant cycle. That grant helped the county department collaborate with more than 30 community partners, including schools, on a community assessment that informed a strategic plan addressing prevention of marijuana use by youth. Starting July 1, 2018, with the help of the second-year grant from the state, Baker’s team will partner with a marijuana retailer or retailers, in addition to rolling out a media campaign, educating community leaders, and providing training around marijuana-use prevention to youth organizations. A previously successful marijuanause prevention program facilitated by the county health department was via a $5,000 grant issued to MultiCare Mary Bridge Hospital in 2017, which enabled Mary Bridge to distribute 70 marijuana lockboxes to parents during healthy-home environmental assessments, and also to staff of Women, Infant, and Children (WIC), the federally-funded supplemental nutrition program. “We look forward to continuing to work with our community partners,” said Baker.

seat belt tickets during the “Click It or Ticket” seat belt enforcement campaign. The May 14 through June 3 extra seat belt enforcement campaign runs through Memorial Day, one of the busiest travel and holiday weekends of the year. According to the report, Pierce County lags behind the state with an observed seat belt use rate of 91.6 percent. More than 150 law enforcement agencies throughout the state will be participating in this 17th annual Click it or Ticket campaign. In Pierce County, the Sumner, Bonney Lake, Fife, Puyallup, University Place, Lakewood, Fircrest, Tacoma and Gig Harbor Police Departments, the Pierce County Sheriff’s Office and the Washington State Patrol will be placing special emphasis on seat belt and proper child restraint use. As well, in conjunction with the Click it or Ticket campaign, a national seat belt enforcement effort called Border to Border will take place on Monday, May 21 from 4-8 p.m. It is a national seat belt awareness event involving states across the U.S. including Washington and Idaho. Washington passed a secondary seat belt law in 1986 and the seat belt use rate that year was 36 percent. In the following years, Washington’s seat belt use rate rose and by 2002 the rate was 82 percent. During 2002, Washington passed a primary seat belt law and the seat belt use rate rose to 92 percent the very next year. The seat belt use rate has remained between 94 to 95 percent for the last several years. During the same time periods, the unrestrained fatality rate decreased dramatically from accounting for 64 percent of all traffic deaths to 18 percent of all traffic deaths. SEE MORE BULLETIN BOARD ITEMS AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM


Friday, May 18, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 9

t LNG

From page A1

however, order the plant to stop construction. A draft of the environmental review is due this fall, with a public comment period to follow and a final report projected by early 2019. Only then will the clean air agency begin the process to issue its emissions permit. The supplemental review of the previous environmental studies adds about a year to the plant’s timeline. TOTE has since announced that the conversion from diesel to LNG of its Midnight Sun and North Star have been pushed back, with both set to be fully converted by late 2021. This is the second conversion delay. One of the two previous ships that were set to swap fuel sources sank, then its sister ship was later scrapped. The delay prompted Washington Utility and Transportation Commissioners, for example, to demand PSE update its plans on how the company will provide natural gas to heat homes and businesses for its two million customers if the plant further falls behind. “PSE assumes that the Tacoma LNG facility will be completed and in operation prior to the 2019 winter season and may be needed to provide gas to meet core customer peak needs as soon as the 2021 winter season,” according to a UTC report. “However, even at this later stage in the project’s development, the project has ongoing and potentially significant permitting issues. Given that the plant is not completed or fully permitted, we agree with staff that the company’s assumption that a not-yet-operational resource will be available comes with some significant risk to the company’s gas supply for core customers. PSE’s next (resource plan) must address what the company will do in the event the LNG plant or pipeline upgrades are significantly delayed or cancelled.” The 8 million gallon capacity plant wasn’t included in PSE natural gas projections until after the company signed a contract with TOTE to provide its ships with LNG. The plant would be the first conversion facility of its kind in the Northwest.   “The LNG plant is no longer a viable peak-shaving supplier or necessarily needed,” said Puyallup Tribal Chairman Bill Sterud. “The UTC is requiring PSE to leverage other resources for power in its long-range plan

t Dome From page A1

region a residual financial impact of $264.5 million over a 10-year period. Topgolf plans to fill more than 475 living-wage jobs, which will include 40 full-time salaried positions. The company is backed by institutional and private investors, which include Callaway Golf Company. It operates 38 golf entertainment venues in the U.S. and three in London. Eleven venues are currently in construction with multiple more in development. Topgolf has global interests in Mexico, Canada, and Australia. Topgolf is a pioneer in a technology-based driving range, which caters to millennial-age golfers craving the physical and social culture missing from traditional golf. According to surveys, more than 50 percent of guests visiting Topgolf’s venues describe themselves as non-golfers. The venues, worldwide, entertain more than 13 million guests annually. “Topgolf’s recreation use would serve as a valued amenity to the area, attracting both residents and tourists alike,” the application to the City stated. “Our brand recog-

because of the uncertainty of the LNG plant’s completion. On top of that, TOTE has pushed back conversion of its two ships to LNG propulsion beyond 2021, more than two years past the original conversion timeline. There is clearly zero urgency to this project, which promises more harmful impacts to our homelands, tribal members and community than benefits or jobs to the region. The environmental review is flawed, and now we have proof that the business plan for this project is also flawed. It’s time to enforce the law and halt construction of this taxpayerfunded and rate-payer funded boondoggle.” The Puyallup Tribe has fought against the plant for years, dating back to challenges of the plant’s environmental review about how the construction activity at the Superfund site could potentially leach toxins into the waterway and threaten the salmon runs. The Tribe and environmental activists have also questioned the safety of having a natural gas plant so close to sea level that is also within earthquake and lahar zones as well as in close proximity to densely populated areas of downtown. “While the Attorney General’s Office does not have a direct role in the siting or permitting of this facility, we are aware of the environmental and legal concerns that have been raised regarding the proposal,” according to e-mails from the Attorney General’s Office. “I want to assure you that our office is actively monitoring actions associated with this project. …. Because this project directly impacts the interests and lands of the Puyallup Tribe and other tribes, it is important that tribal governments are included in the decision-making process in a meaningful role.” Those concerns, and the future of the waterfront in general, prompted the City of Tacoma and Port of Tacoma to start what will likely be a multi-year review of zoning rules on the working waterfront that is known as a subarea plan. That effort will also involve the Puyallup Tribe and Pierce County. PSE, in the meantime, continues to build without all its permits and under the face of fines. “What sort of precedent does that set,” Sightline environmental researcher Tarika Powell said. “They aren’t worried about that fine. It is clear that PSE believes it will be negligible.” She proposed a scenario that the equipment PSE is currently installing does not pass the standard for the clean air agency’s permit only to then receive a waiver to begin operations because the facility is already built.

nition and high repeat customer percentage would serve as a catalyst to other attractions in the vicinity.” Patricia Beard, City of Tacoma’s project lead, said the City is not ready to grant interviews or make formal statements regarding the proposal until the proposal review is further along. “Over the next several days, city staff will be reviewing the proposal to determine whether we need more information or can respond to the proposal as submitted,” said Beard. “Our objective is to make a determination as to whether to negotiate with TopGolf within the next 30 days. We are delighted by TopGolf’s interest in Tacoma.” Bruce Kendall, CEO at the Economic Development Board of Tacoma-Pierce County, stated his organization would be delighted to see a Topgolf venue added to Tacoma’s entertainment options, should the City move forward with the proposal. EDB spokeswoman Jenn Adrien said the venue would add to Tacoma’s and Pierce County’s already burgeoning tourism scene and what is already offered in the region to entice visitors. Jaime Vogt, vice president at Travel Tacoma, said the Dome is already a great draw for visitors and adding more

t Peace From page A1

“I did a lot of research around other (youth-led engagement) models, and worked with Che (Rogers) and Lizette (Harris) to come up with engaging conversations that hit at issues of how police see enforcing,” Jackson said. “Part of the conversation is to get at these differences and call them out. So far, most police officers believe the media is the cause of the negative perception of police in general. People of color have a different perspective— that it’s not just the media, that there is a lived reality.” Che Rogers, a senior at Mt. Tahoma High School, and Harris are coordinating and leading all the youth-led discussions. Harris said, so far, the discussions have been very fruitful. “With these high schoolers, they have a lot of good things to say,” Harris said. “We talk about systematic racism, and because a lot of youth who come to the discussions are minorities, it makes it closer to home.”

development around the Dome would certainly give visitors to the city attending a concert a reason to stay longer. According to Travel Tacoma, travel spending in

Marcus Rogers, a Project Peace committee member and Che Rogers’ father, said discussions are usually held in a small classroom setting to create intimacy between youth and officers. Ice breakers are done first to help youth and officers acclimate to the space. The discussions start with officers in the middle and youth on the outside leading discussion around policing and community and taking notes and jotting down questions. Marcus Rogers said the reverse occurs where youth then are in the middle and officers and community leaders are on the perimeter. “It’s been an interesting growth as we have watched these dialogues,” Marcus Rogers said. “The confidence that (Che and Lizette) have shown has allowed kids to feel a lot more comfortable.” Jackson said overall the discussions have been suc-

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Fines, if any, would then be mediated down to pennies on the dollar rather than the standards being followed. “No company should be able to have that power… That is why it is so important to stop construction,” she said. “This is just being pushed through without adequate explanation and adequate review.” The big question is why is PSE so determined to build a $300 million natural gas conversion plant without all of the required permits and without an immediate need by its chief customer, TOTE. Powell has a theory that involves money. The Australian-based owners of PSE, Macquarie Group Ltd., has reportedly been looking for a buyer to take over the state’s largest utility, after all. The investment group bought PSE’s holding company in 2009 for $3.4 billion. It has since been selling off other utility companies around the nation that it had gathered in the last decade. Any new deal could range between $2 billion and $4 billion depending on the scope of the overall package, according to news reports. A new, $300 million plant, she argues, could help sweeten the deal. “I think they want to have the project to be part of that portfolio,” Powell said. PSE spokesman Grant Rigel said the pending sale of minority shares in the utility and the plant’s construction aren’t related at all. It was always the plan by the shareholding group to have a 10-year investment. “That period of time is coming to a close,” he said, so pondering a sale of those shares is occurring. The plant, he said, is needed to add natural gas capacity to the utility’s system as an insurance against spikes in demand caused by cold snaps or disruptions in the production of natural gas as well as to provide cleaner-burning fuel for ships that are being federally mandated to seek cleaner alternatives. He also noted that construction work at the plant is only underway on the non-emitting portions of the facility. Work to install the conversion equipment itself won’t start until the permit has been issued. PSE is now concentrating on providing all the data for the ground-to-ship emissions review so the study can be done on time and the permit can be issued so the conversion equipment can be installed and the plant can become operational. “We are very hopeful that they make the process as efficient as possible,” Rigel said.

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Tacoma reached $530.7 million in 2017. Certainly a venue like Topgolf would only enhance the growth of more tourism spending in the city and the region.

cessful because it allows officers and youth to gain a different perspective. “I personally want it to go deeper to talk more about institutional racism,” Jackson said. “We need more buyin from officers. We also need it to be authentic enough for youth to have buy-in. We’re moving onto our fourth (discussion at Oakland), and so it’s a work in progress.” Jackson and Marcus Rogers said the desire is to continue with more of these youth-led discussions next school year, with the possibility of adding middle school students. At its next committee meeting at 6 p.m. on June 12 at the Tacoma Police Department, Jackson said the group is hoping to receive an update from the police department related to the progress of the other priorities established by the community back in February of 2016.

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Sports

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, MAY 18, 2018

A T-BIRD SURPRISE MT. TAHOMA EARNS FIRST STATE SOCCER BERTH

SECTION A, PAGE 10

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

(Top) Tacoma slugger Daniel Vogelbach has been nothing short of amazing since being sent down from the Seattle Mariners. The stocky left-hander was named the Pacific Coast League's player of the week for his work during the Rainiers' last road trip. In eight games, Vogelbach batted .429, with nine runs scored, four doubles, five home runs and eight runs batted in. (Middle) Ian Miller skies for the out. (Bottom) Shortstop Zach Vincej is looking to get back into the groove he had early in the season.

F

By Justin Gimse

Rainiers return home within striking distance

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

or the first time in Mt. Tahoma High School history, the T-Birds sent a boys’ soccer team to the state tournament. While not known as much of a soccer powerhouse over the years, the T-Birds have been getting stronger and more talented over the last five years. An exceptional regular season saw Mt. Tahoma finish 12-2-3 and in a prime position to advance out of the district tournament. The only thing standing in the way for the T-Birds was a school with a serious, soccer pedigree. It would be a battle of the birds, as the Peninsula Seahawks rolled across the Narrows Bridge to meet the T-Birds at Harry Lang Stadium on Saturday, May 12. The sun was high and the temperature was perfect for a highenergy match. A solid crowd was in attendance to root on their boys, and the vocal crowd was offered a nail-biter that went down to the final seconds. Goals by seniors Raul Ramirez and Allan Hernandez would prove to be enough for the T-Birds in their 2-1 victory. Peninsula had a second-half goal wiped away due to an offside call that was about as close as a call can be. The referee added five minutes of stoppage time to the end of the match and it seemed as though it as more like 20 minutes. The crowd got louder, with both sides willing their team to a victory, or perhaps that equalizing goal to send the match into overtime. A late Peninsula corner kick dropped right into the middle of the goal box. A T-Bird defender got a foot on the ball to clear it, but the ball ricocheted straight back toward the Mt. Tahoma goal. Luckily, sophomore goalkeeper Josiah Bowie was in between the two, and with both gloves wrapped around the ball, Peninsula’s last, best chance was nullified. Despite finishing second in the 3A Pierce County League, the T-Birds were stuck with nothing better than a fifth-seed to the 3A state tournament. While many leagues and districts play actual mini tournaments to crown a district champion, the 3A West Central District metes out the seeds before hand. For instance, Gig Harbor, as league champions of the South Sound Conference, would be playing for the first seed to state. Meanwhile, Stadium, the 3A PCL champion, was relegated to the second-seed match. Instead of matching up the league champions to decide u See SOCCER / page A13

By Justin Gimse

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

(Top) When Mt. Tahoma Allan Hernandez scored the go-ahead goal for the T-Birds, it would prove to be one of the biggest in school history. The second goal made it 2-1 for Mt. Tahoma over Peninsula, and the score stuck through the end. The victory sent Mt. Tahoma to its first boys' state soccer tournament in school history. (Second-left) Mt. Tahoma goalkeeper Josiah Bowie punches the ball out of danger. Keep an eye on this keeper the next two seasons. He's got the looks of a real leader. (Second-right) T-Birds congratulate senior Raul Ramirez on his goal against Peninsula. (Third-left) Sophomore Theo Prendke's header sailed a little too high. (Third-right) The Wilson Rams and North Thurston put together a physical match, with only one team heading to state in the end. (Bottom) Wilson senior George Costello gets into the North Thurston goalkeeper's grill.

The Tacoma Rainiers may not be lighting up scoreboards and striking fear in the hearts of their rivals, but after 40 games it’s pretty clear that there’s quite a bit of fight in this ball club. After a grueling 13-game road trip, the Rainiers return home to the cozy confines of Cheney Stadium with a better winning percentage than when they left. No matter how you slice it, that’s always good news. With a 7-3 mark over their last 10 games, the Rainiers are well within striking distance of the first-place Fresno Grizzlies. Tacoma is currently 20-20, and tied for second in the Pacific Coast League’s Pacific Northern Divisioin with the Sacramento River Cats. Both clubs trail Fresno (24-16) by just four games in the standings. The Reno Aces (17-23) are currently sitting in the division’s cellar. While a 7-6 mark on their recent road trip was enough to bring renewed hope to the Rainiers’ faithful fans, it’s what lies ahead that should have the folks around these parts a bit excited. Tacoma will play 13 of their next 17 games at Cheney Stadium. If they have plans to keep up with Fresno in the standings, this is going to be a great opportunity. As a matter of fact, if they can catch a little fire at home, they could begin closing the gap between themselves and the Grizzlies. When we last caught up with the Rainiers, they were gearing up for their second game u See RAINIERS / page A13


Friday, May 18, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 11

Sportswatch TACOMA AREA PREP SCORES

UNIVERSITY PREP - 3, VASHON - 2

BOYS’ SOCCER TUESDAY, MAY 8 PUYALLUP - 3, KENTWOOD - 2 CURTIS - 3, KENTLAKE - 2 BEAMER - 5, EMERALD RIDGE - 3 OLYMPIA - 2, FEDERAL WAY - 1 SOUTH KITSAP - 2, DECATUR - 1 FIFE - 3, KINGSTON - 1 FR. PIERCE - 1, PT. ANGELES - 0 N. KITSAP - 1, WASHINGTON - 0 VASHON - 8, COUPEVILLE - 4 CHARLES WRIGHT - 4, KLAHOWYA - 3

FASTPITCH TUESDAY, MAY 8 STADIUM - 11, MT. TAHOMA - 0 SPANAWAY LK - 13, WILSON - 12 BONNEY LAKE - 14, LAKES - 0 BETHEL - 34, LINCOLN - 0 CURTIS - 7, EMERALD RIDGE - 6 BELLARMINE - 4, SUMNER - 1 OLYMPIA - 19, GRAHAM-K - 8 ROGERS - 15, SOUTH KITSAP - 9 FIFE - 7, FORKS - 6 VASHON - 17, SEA. CHRISTIAN - 5

WEDNESDAY, MAY 9 CAPITAL - 2, LINCOLN - 1 BONNEY LAKE - 2, C. KITSAP - 1 HUDSON’S BAY - 4, BETHEL - 0 SHELTON - 4, KELSO - 2

WEDNESDAY, MAY 9 PUYALLUP - 25, GRAHAM-K - 3

THURSDAY, MAY 10 AUBURN RIV. - 2, CURTIS - 1 PUYALLUP - 2, BEAMER - 1 SUMNER - 4, HERITAGE - 1 OLYMPIA - 1, UNION - 0 SOUTH KITSAP - 2, MT. RAINIER - 1 WASHINGTON - 2, PT. ANGELES - 1 VASHON - 1, CHARLES WRIGHT - 0 SATURDAY, MAY 12 STADIUM - 6, SHELTON - 0 MT. TAHOMA - 2, PENINSULA - 1 MTN. VIEW - 1, BONNEY LAKE - 0 NO. THURSTON - 1, WILSON - 0 SUMNER - 2, SOUTH KITSAP - 1 GIG HARBOR - 3, HUDSON’S BAY - 2 EVERGREEN - 2, CAPITAL - 1 FR. PIERCE - 1, HIGHLINE - 0 NO. KITSAP - 2, FIFE - 1 SEQUIM - 2, WASHINGTON - 1 KLAHOWYA - 2, CHARLES WRIGHT - 1 TUESDAY, MAY 15 LAKESIDE - 7, STADIUM - 2 SNOHOMISH - 7, MT. TAHOMA - 2 SUMNER - 2, MOUNT SI - 1 GLACIER PEAK - 2, OLYMPIA - 0 GIG HARBOR - 2, INTERLAKE - 1 FR. PIERCE - 2, EAST VALLEY - 1

THURSDAY, MAY 10 STADIUM - 14, LAKES - 0 BONNEY LAKE - 8, BETHEL - 0 PUYALLUP - 15, OLYMPIA - 0 ROGERS - 1, SUMNER - 1 GIG HARBOR - 5, PENINSULA - 4 YELM - 10, NO. THURSTON - 0 PENINSULA - 13, C. KITSAP - 2 NO. THURSTON - 10, SHELTON - 1 FRIDAY, MAY 11 PUYALLUP - 12, CURTIS - 2 GRAHAM-K - 5, BELLARMINE - 3 SHELTON - 8, C. KITSAP - 5 YELM - 2, GIG HARBOR - 0 NO. THURSTON - 6, PENINSULA - 5 WHITE RIVER - 8, EATONVILLE - 6 MONDAY, MAY 14 WILSON - 12, MT. TAHOMA - 2 ROGERS - 13, YELM - 9 PUYALLUP - 7, MONTESANO - 2 SUMNER - 10, SPANAWAY LK - 0 GIG HARBOR - 6, PT. ANGELES - 4 OLYMPIC - 1, C. KITSAP - 0 FIFE - 7, ORTING - 6 TUESDAY, MAY 15 BONNEY LAKE - 3, AUBURN RIV. - 0 AUBURN - 5, BETHEL - 3 BEAMER - 14, SUMNER - 13 SOUTH KITSAP - 15, EM. RIDGE - 0

BASEBALL TUESDAY, MAY 8 CURTIS - 11, KENTWOOD - 1 PUYALLUP - 6, KENTLAKE - 1 FEDERAL WAY - 5, SO. KITSAP - 4 OLYMPIA - 8, ENUMCLAW - 4 SUMNER - 9, BATTLE GROUND - 2 COUPEVILLE - 10, CH. WRIGHT - 0 WEDNESDAY, MAY 9 WILSON - 6, MTN. VIEW - 4 BONNEY LAKE - 16, BETHEL - 4 KENTRIDGE - 10, CURTIS - 5 SO. KITSAP - 8, OLYMPIA - 4 SKYVIEW - 6, SUMNER - 2 TIMBERLINE - 11, YELM - 5 N. KITSAP - 7, C. KITSAP - 2 STEILACOOM - 10, FR. PIERCE - 0 WHITE RIVER - 5, LINDBERGH - 4 THURSDAY, MAY 10 CH. WRIGHT - 5, CHIMACUM - 0 EV. LUTHERAN - 4, LK. QUINALT - 3 SATURDAY, MAY 12 BONNEY LAKE - 5, WILSON - 2 KELSO - 5, BONNEY LAKE - 2 PUYALLUP - 9, FEDERAL WAY - 1 SO. KITSAP - 3, KENTLAKE - 0 PUYALLUP - 5, TAHOMA - 2 SKYVIEW - 7, SO. KITSAP - 4 GIG HARBOR - 7, SHELTON - 1 CAPITAL - 4, C. KITSAP - 2 KELSO - 3, TIMBERLINE - 2 CAPITAL - 7, GIG HARBOR - 6 SHELTON - 8, C. KITSAP - 5 FIFE - 10, HIGHLINE - 3 WHITE RIVER - 4, OLYMPIC - 2 STEILACOOM - 12, KINGSTON - 2 FIFE - 8, NO. KITSAP - 4 STEILACOOM - 16, WHITE RIVER - 6 CH. WRIGHT - 8, COUPEVILLE - 2 NASELLE - 9, EV. LUTHERAN - 4 MEN’S SOCCER EVERGREEN PREMIER LEAGUE (EPLWA) SATURDAY, MAY 5 WASH. PREMIER - 4, OLYMPIC FORCE - 1 BELLINGHAM UTD. - 1, OLY TOWN - 1

TRI-CITIES ALLIANCE - 3, SPOKANE - 2 VANCOUVER - 2, YAKIMA UTD. - 1 SATURDAY, MAY 12 SPOKANE - 4, BELLINGHAM UTD. - 0 TRI-CITIES - 1, YAKIMA UTD. - 0 SEATTLE STARS - 3, OLYMPIC FORCE - 2 SUNDAY, MAY 13 WASH. PREMIER - 4, VANCOUVER - 0 OLY TOWN - 2, SEATTLE STARS - 1 WOMEN’S SOCCER NORTHWEST PREMIER LEAGUE (NWPL) SATURDAY, MAY 5 WASH. PREMIER - 1, OLYMPIC FORCE - 1 WASH. TIMBERS - 5, YAKIMA UTD. - 0 TWIN CITY UNION - 0, BLACK HILLS FC - 0 SUNDAY, MAY 6 CAPITAL FC - 3, NCW ALLIANCE - 1 SATURDAY, MAY 12 SEATTLE STARS - 3, OLYMPIC FORCE - 0 YAKIMA UTD. - 2, TWIN CITY UNION - 1 CAPITAL FC - 4, BLACK HILLS FC - 0 SUNDAY, MAY 13 WASH. TIMBERS - 3, WASH. PREMIER - 1 COLLEGE BASEBALL FRIDAY, MAY 11 PIERCE COLLEGE - 6, GRAY’S HARBOR - 1 PIERCE COLLEGE - 10, GRAY’S HARBOR - 0 SATURDAY, MAY 12 TACOMA CC - 8, GREEN RIVER CC - 4 TACOMA CC - 10, GREEN RIVER CC - 0 PIERCE COLLEGE - 9, GRAY’S HARBOR - 5 PIERCE COLLEGE - 7, GRAY’S HARBOR - 4 SUNDAY, MAY 13 TACOMA CC - 10, GREEN RIVER CC - 1 TACOMA CC - 10, GREEN RIVER CC - 0

heave was almost five feet further than her previous best and currently stands as the fifth best throw in Division III this season. Christopher Nussbaum clocked a 15:54.98 in the 5,000-meters while Kyle Rapacz finished the 3,000meter steeplechase in 9:36.49. In the field, Erik Swartout tallied a throw of 182’ 2” in the javelin while in the women’s high jump, Lauren Wilson cleared 5’ 1 3/4”. Participants for the 2018 NCAA Division III Championships will be released on May 19 at 9 a.m. (Eastern) on NCAA.com. The 2018 Championships begin on Thursday, May 24, in La Crosse, Wisc.

UNDEFEATED CABRERA-MIOLETTI RETURNS TO BATTLE OF THE BOAT 116

PUYALLUP TRIBAL SNOWBOARDER INKS SPONSORSHIP

After appearing in the Tacoma Weekly, the Puyallup Tribal News, and on KING 5 television, 12-year old Devon Bryan has picked up sponsorships from Bleach of Tacoma and Arbor Snowboards. The Puyallup Tribal member is fresh off a second-place finish at the North American Junior Freeride Championships in the 12-14 age division, with a third-place overall finish for all age groups. Bryan will be spending much of the summer finding snow on other continents.

PLU TO REPRESENT WEST REGION AT NCAA ROWING CHAMPIONSHIPS

The NCAA Division III women’s rowing selection committee released the field for the 2018 NCAA Division III Championships on Monday, May 14, with threetime Northwest Conference champion Pacific Lutheran University one of eight institutions earning a berth to the event held at Nathan Benderson Park in Sarasota, Fla. beginning on Friday, May 25. The Lutes carry the banner for the Pacific Region for the third consecutive season. PLU finished fourth at the NCAA Championships in 2016 before the Lutes’ 1V8+ placed eighth overall at last year’s championships. PLU is joined by Bates College, Ithaca College, Washington College, Wellesley College, Wesleyan University, Williams College, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute. PLU’s NWC champion 1V8+ boat will be in lane four of Heat B with Williams, Ithaca, and Wellesley. The Lute 2V8+ will be in Heat B lane two along with boats from Williams, Wesleyan, and Ithaca. The Lute 2V8+ will hit the water on May 25 at 8:24 a.m. (Eastern Time) with the 1V8+ taking off at 8:48 a.m.

PLU TRACK AND FIELD SETS TWO SCHOOL RECORDS IN PORTLAND

The Pacific Lutheran University men’s and women’s track & field program sent six student-athletes to one last meet before the 2018 NCAA Division III Championships, turning in a strong showing at the Portland Twilight. Machaela Graddy and Brad Hodkinson headlined the weekend, both establishing school records in their respective events on Saturday, May 12. On the track, Hodkinson etched his name atop the record books in the 5,000-meters, crossing the finish as the top Division III competitor at the meet, logging a time of 14 minutes. 25.44 seconds. His time shatters the old school record by more than eight seconds, breaking the previous best of 14:33.86 set by Forrest Griek in 2000. In the field, Graddy shattered a record that had a significantly shorter shelf life, besting her own school record set last weekend after uncorking a throw of 146 feet, two inches, to win the javelin throw. Her winning

Rapidly rising junior lightweight phenom Giovanni Cabrera-Mioletti is heading back to the Emerald Queen Casino. Fresh off the biggest win of his career the undefeated Cabrera-Mioletti will face fellow undefeated fighter Elijah Pierce in a 10-round main event at Battle at the Boat 116 on Tacoma on Saturday, June 9.  “Giovanni has star written all over him,” promoter Brian Halquist said. “I have been promoting boxing for more than three decades and I can honestly say Gio is without question one of the top young talents I have ever seen live, and the scary part is, he is only going to get better.”  Cabrera-Mioletti has been flawless during the early stages of his professional career, posting a perfect 11-0 record. Pierce has been spotless as well, winning all eight of his fights with seven victories coming by way of knockout.  The six-bout card will also feature two additional undefeated fighters on the undercard in Steven Villalobos and Cris Reyes. “This card is chalked full of young, exciting talent,” Halquist said. “Years from you now we will look back on this card and notice just how incredible it was because we expect great things from all four of these undefeated fighters.”  Tickets are available through the EQC box office and all Ticketmaster outlets. Preliminary bouts will start at 8 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m. Cabrera-Mioletti has been on an absolute tear in 2018. In his last fight on March 17 he put away previously undefeated Ray Lampkin, Jr. by second-round TKO in the main event of Battle at the Boat 115. That victory came on the heels of his Jan. 13 triumph over former Global Boxing Union world lightweight champion Tyrone Harris.  Over his last five fights, Cabrera-Mioletti has handed three boxers their first career setback as he also bested former undefeated fighters Roberto Meza and William Hernandez.  Pierce, who fights out of Oklahoma City, is coming off a fourth-round stoppage of Anthony Napunyi on Nov. 4, 2017. That win marks the seventh KO for the 21-yearold Pierce, who is no stranger to handing an undefeated fighter his first loss as well as he did just that one year ago with his unanimous decision over Alejandro Rochin. Pierce also scored a third-round TKO victory over Divante Jones, who entered their Sept. 2, 2017 fight with a record of 9-1.  Highlighting the undercard will be a five-round bout between Villalobos (7-0-1) and Jose Leon (6-2-1). There should be no power shortage in the 156-pound fight as Villalobos has knocked out six opponents he has faced while Leon has registered an equally impressive five victories by way of KO.  In a second five-round bout on the undercard Jorge Linares (3-1-0, 3 KOs) will face Marco Cardenas (6-7-1, 2 KOs) at 139 pounds. Also looking to stay undefeated will be Reyes, who wowed the crowd at Battle at the Boat 115 with his first-round TKO win over Nicholas Credit. Reyes (2-0-0, KO) will square off against Bryce Gonzales (debut) at 139 pounds.  Battle at the Boat 116 will also feature the professional boxing debut of former MMA fighter Brent Knopp. Knopp, who played football at the University of Washington, has a career mixed martial arts record of 8-2 and is a former CageSport light heavyweight champion.  Rounding out the card will be a 122-pound bout between Isaiah Najera (3-3-0, KO) and Sebastian Baltazar (0-1-0).

MAY 17 – JUNE 10 THURSDAY, MAY 17 - FASTPITCH Wilson vs. Gig Harbor Regional Athletic Complex, Lacey - 12 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 17 - FASTPITCH Stadium vs. Shelton Regional Athletic Complex, Lacey - 2 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 17 - BASEBALL Las Vegas vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium - 7:05 p.m. FRIDAY, MAY 18 - BASEBALL TBD vs. Tacoma CC Minnitti Field - 4 p.m. FRIDAY, MAY 18 - WATER POLO Girls - Curtis vs. Ingraham Rogers HS - 6:45 p.m. FRIDAY, MAY 18 - BASEBALL Las Vegas vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium - 7:05 p.m. SATURDAY, MAY 19 - BASEBALL Las Vegas vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium - 5:05 p.m. SUNDAY, MAY 20 - BASEBALL Las Vegas vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium - 1:35 p.m. MONDAY, MAY 21 - BASEBALL El Paso vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium - 6:05 p.m. TUESDAY, MAY 22 - BASEBALL El Paso vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium - 6:05 p.m. WEDNESDAY, MAY 23 - BASEBALL El Paso vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium - 11:35 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 23 - TRACK State Track & Field Meet Mt. Tahoma Stadium - 3:30 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 24 - BASEBALL El Paso vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium - 7:05 p.m. FRIDAY, MAY 25 - TRACK State Track & Field Meet Mt. Tahoma Stadium - 9 a.m. FRIDAY, MAY 25 - SOCCER Sounders Women vs. Thurston SC Starfire Stadium - 5 p.m. FRIDAY, MAY 25 - SOCCER Sounders U23 vs. TSS Rovers Starfire Stadium - 7:30 p.m. SATURDAY, MAY 26 - TRACK State Track & Field Meet Mt. Tahoma Stadium - 9:30 a.m. SATURDAY, MAY 26 - BOYS SOCCER 1A State Championship Match Sunset Stadium, Sumner - 3 p.m. SATURDAY, MAY 26 - BOYS SOCCER 3A State Championship Match Sparks Stadium, Puyallup - 3 p.m. SATURDAY, MAY 26 - BOYS SOCCER 2A State Championship Match Sunset Stadium, Sumner - 5 p.m. SATURDAY, MAY 26 - BOYS SOCCER 4A State Championship Match Sparks Stadium, Puyallup - 5 p.m. SATURDAY, MAY 26 - SOCCER Sounders Women vs. Washington Premier Sunset Stadium - 8 p.m. SUNDAY, MAY 27 - SOCCER Sounders U23 vs. Lane United Sunset Stadium - 2 p.m. WEDNESDAY, MAY 30 - BASEBALL Salt Lake vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium - 7:05 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 31 - BASEBALL Salt Lake vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium - 7:05 p.m. SUNDAY, JUNE 3 - SOCCER Sounders U23 vs. Calgary Foothills Sunset Stadium - 2 p.m. SUNDAY, JUNE 10 - SOCCER Sounders S2 vs. OKC Energy Cheney Stadium - 1:30 p.m.


Section A • Page 12 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 18, 2018

S2 STILL LOOKING FOR SOME MAGIC

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

The Sounders S2 hosted rival Portland Timbers 2 under sun-drenched skies at Cheney Stadium on Saturday, May 12. The two clubs were unwilling to give an inch for the length of regulation, and it looked as though the exciting match would end in a scoreless draw. However, two minutes into stoppage time, Portland found the back of the net and the 1-0 loss left the local boys wondering what they need to do to get over this hump. With a current record of 2-5-1, Sounders S2 is falling further behind the pack for a playoff spot. However, there is still a full summer of matches ahead of us. The crowds have been solid at Cheney so far this season, with announced attendance hitting 4,602 for the Portland match.

UP NEXT AT CHENEY STADIUM SOUNDERS S2 VS. OKC ENERGY SUNDAY, JUNE 10 - 1:30 P.M. SOUNDERS S2 VS. SWOPE PARK THURSDAY, JULY 5, 7 P.M. SOUNDERS S2 VS. RENO 1868 FC SUNDAY, JULY 8, 1:30 P.M.


Friday, May 18, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 13

t Soccer From page A10

upon the first and second seeding to state, the geniuses making up these ridiculous post-season formats penalized high-performing teams, yet again. As the fifth seed out of the six from the district, the T-Birds would be facing a tall task in the first round of the state tournament. Not only would they be hitting the road, but they would also be facing the top-seed from District One. This is what a second-place league finish and a district victory earns you in 2018. The T-Birds were in trouble from the get-go against the Snohomish Panthers. The powerhouse from the north brought their offense to bear on Mt. Tahoma on Tuesday, May 15, dropping the upstart squad from Tacoma by a score of 7-2. Mt. Tahoma finished their best season in school history with a 12-3-3 record. The district opener at Harry Lang Stadium was a showdown between the Wilson Rams and North Thurston. Despite their best efforts, Wilson was unable to find the back of the net. Meanwhile, North Thurston benefited from a ricochet that froze the Wilson keeper and found pay dirt. The 1-0 defeat ended a strong season from Wilson (9-6-2), just one win away from the big dance. The first-round bug hit the Stadium Tigers, yet again. Despite a league championship and second seed out of districts, the Tigers proved to be no match for the Lakeside Lions from Seattle. Stadium trailed

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

Mt. Tahoma sophomore Charly Salgado is one of the bright spots for future T-Bird soccer teams.

3-0 at the half, and would go on to fall by a score of 5-1. It was a bitter finish to an outstanding season for a Stadium squad that finished the season with a 14-2-2 mark. It wasn’t all bad news for local high school soccer teams in the various state tournament openers. Undefeated Franklin Pierce took their 17-0-2 record into the 2A state soccer tournament as the top-seed from the 2A West Central District. The

t Rainiers From page A10

against the El Paso Chihuahuas, on Wednesday, May 9. The Tacoma bats came alive for 14 hits and scored eight runs. Despite committing three errors on the night, the Rainiers were able to hold off a late Chihuahua rally to secure the 8-5 win. Home runs by third baseman Taylor Motter and first baseman Cameron Perkins helped to power the win, with starting pitcher Rob Whalen getting back on track with a fine performance over six innings of work. Whalen earned his fourth win of the season by striking out seven Chihuahuas, while walking just two and yielding just one earned run. The Chihuahuas struck back the following night in a big way. El Paso knocked Tacoma’s Max Povse around for eight earned runs in just two innings of work. After walking seven El Paso batters, the loss dropped Povse to 1-6 on the season. Tacoma designated hitter Daniel Vogelbach notched his fourth home run of the season, with catcher Chris Herrmann blasting his second. Tacoma got the better of El Paso in their series closer

Cardinals earned the top seed after a 1-0 victory over Highline in the district championship match. They can’t seem to make it happen at the local 3A level, but the 2A folks have figured out how to crown a district champion. Hopefully they take note and make some changes next season. The Cardinals hosted the East Valley Knights from Spokane on Tuesday, May

with an 8-3 victory. Motter notched his third home run of the season, with second baseman Gordon Beckham adding his fourth. Starting pitcher Christian Bergman went six innings, striking out five Chihuahuas, while giving up just one earned run. The Rainiers ran into a road block the following night in their series-opener against Sacramento. The River Cats scored all of their runs in the final three innings to take a 6-1 victory. Sacramento’s pitchers held Tacoma to just four hits. However, one of them was Vogelbach’s fifth home run of the season in the first inning. Starting pitcher Roenis Elias pitched 5.2 innings, surrendering three earned runs, while striking out seven River Cats. The teams would play a doubleheader on Sunday, May 13. Tacoma took the opener by a score of 3-2. Herrmann hit a two-run home run in the third inning to put the Rainiers on the board, while Vogelbach notched his sixth home run of the season in the sixth inning. Starting pitcher Ariel Miranda pitched five strong innings, giving up just one earned run, while striking out three Bees. In the second-half of the doubleheader, Tacoma was unable to maintain a tie game going into the bottom of the ninth the following afternoon, and lost 5-4. Vogelbach continued his magic, hitting two home runs in the loss.

15, at Franklin Pierce Stadium. Goals by Gilbert De La Luz and Brayan ValladaresSalvador were all the Cardinals needed in their 2-1 victory. With the win, Franklin Pierce advances to the second round of the 2A tournament, where they will host the winner between R.A. Long and Sehome. Another Franklin Pierce victory would send the Cardinals to the state semifinals at Sunset Stadium in Sumner on Friday, May 25. As of this issue, the Fife Trojans (12-71) had yet to play Bellingham (17-0-1) in their state tournament opener. Switching gears, the Lincoln Abes girls’ tennis team earned their secondstraight 3A PCL league championship. However, the Abes were leapfrogged by the Stadium Tigers in the league tournament on Saturday, May 12. Tacoma will be well represented at the 3A district tournament. In the doubles field, Lincoln’s Sabrina Lay and Emma Nguyen will play for a ticket to the state tournament along with Stadium’s Maggi Murphy and Diana Altman. In addition, Wilson will send Tiffany Shields and Quinn Harris to districts with Stadium earning the first-alternate team with Bianca Ponnekanti and Emma Jacobsen. Lincoln has the second-alternate team wih Kaiya Gunsauls and Kee’oni Tsosie. It was a clean sweep for Tacoma in the singles department. Heading to districts are Stadium’s Cristina Garcia Prieto, Lincoln’s Melina Nguyen, Mt. Tahoma’s Vy Vu, Stadium’s Bella Neff, Lincoln’s Alina Kaminskaya and Mt. Tahoma’s Kaylin Phan. The singles alternates to districts are Lakes’ Geomari Nicolo and Wilson’s Kayla Ente.

Relief pitcher Shawn Armstong was saddled with the loss, giving up the final run of the ball game. On Monday, May 14, the Pacific Coast League announced that Vogelbach was its player of the week. The stocky slugger batted .429 in eight games, with nine runs scored, four doubles, five home runs and eight runs batted in. The lefty looks like he is doing everything in his power to get the call back up to the Seattle Mariners. Tacoma scored runs in five innings of their Monday, May 14, game on their way to an 8-5 victory over Sacramento. Whalen recorded his fifth win of the season, despite giving up five earned runs in his five innings of work. Right fielder Jayson Werth hit his second home run of the season in the fifth inning with two runners on base. The Rainiers would take the series win the following night with another 8-5 victory over the River Cats. Tacoma was assisted by four Sacramento errors. Relief pitcher Lindsey Caughel picked up the win, despite pitching just 1.1 innings. Tacoma returns to action on Thursday, May 17, when they welcome the Las Vegas 51s to Cheney Stadium at 7:05 p.m. It will be the beginning of a four-game series with the boys from “Sin City,” followed by a four-game tilt on Tyler Street against El Paso.

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Tree Hugger’s Corner A guide for those who want to get out there and take action on behalf of the environment and social justice Friday, June 1, 10 a.m. TEMPLE GARDEN WORK PARTY Chùa Phước Huệ Buddhist Temple, 2625 72nd St. E., Tacoma Harvest Pierce County is building a community garden at the Chùa Phước Huệ Buddhist Temple. The garden will be tended by the temple community, visiting nuns, overseen by the resident nun Su Co. Master Gardeners and Harvest Pierce County have had a relationship with this temple for the upkeep of their meditation gardens, and this year they will be building a food garden that will grow medicinal herbs and Southeast Asian food plants. If you come at 9 a.m., you can enjoy tea together before getting started with work. Info: wa-piercecountycd.civicplus.com/FormCenter/ Harvest-5/Temple-Garden-Work-Party-Field-WorkFrid-328

Saturday, June 2, 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. BIRDS, ART AND TRAILS CELEBRATION Oak Tree Park, S. 74th St. and S. Cedar St., Tacoma Kick off June by attending a free familyfriendly celebration of birds, art and trails among native Garry oak trees. This green event will have food, games, activities and community informational booths all day with themed walks through the park at scheduled times. The celebration will start with a bike ride hosted by Kidical Mass. Those who want to ride will meet at 10 a.m. at STAR center with a 2-mile ride travelling along the Flume Line Trail to the event location. Schedule: 10:30 a.m. - dedications and speakers; 11 a.m. - Bird Walk with Tahoma Audubon; 11:30 a.m. - art walk with Clark Weigman; noon- trails walk with

Forever Green Trail. Info: www.facebook.com/pg/KidicalMassTacoma/ events/?ref=page_internal Saturday, June 9, 11 a.m. to noon FREE GARDENING TALKS: HUGELKULTUR Sehmel Homestead Park, 10123 78th Ave. NW, Gig Harbor Watch Washington State University, Pierce County Master Gardener Janice Rudebaugh do a hands-on demo of these German/East European, no-dig raised beds that hold moisture, build fertilizer and maximize surface area. Hugelkultur is a composting process employing raised beds constructed from decaying wood debris and other compostable biomass plant materials. The process helps to improve soil fertility, water retention, and soil warming, thus benefiting plants grown on or near such mounds. Info: county.wsu.edu/pierce/mg


City Life

YOUR TICKET to TACOMA

Changing Scene Theatre Northwest’s production of ‘Bent’ B4

TA C O M A W E E K LY. C O M

FRIDAY, MAY 18, 2018

SECTION B, PAGE 1

IMAGES COURTESY OF JESSICA SPRING AND CHANDLER O’LEARY

Tacoma artist Jessica Spring and Chandler O’Leary just released number 27 in their series of Dead Feminist broadsides. Entitled “Seeding the Vote,” the letterpress print features the legacy of voting rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer.

F

By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

annie Lou Hamer (1917-1977) was one of 20 children born to a family of poor sharecroppers in Sunflower County, Miss. As a voting rights activist and an advocate for community agriculture, she survived assassination attempts and a near fatal police beating. She ran for congress in 1964, saying, “I’m showing the people that a Negro can run for office.” She worked to integrate the Mississippi Democratic Party. Hamer’s catchphrase, “nobody’s free until everybody’s free,” emblazons the latest Dead Feminist broadside – number 27 in the ongoing series of letterpress homages to feminist heroes that are created by the team of Tacoma artists Chandler O’Leary and Jessica Spring. The new broadside, “Seeding the Vote,” was released May 7. Broadsides – poster-like one-sided print products – go all the way back to the beginning of the printing press. Broadsides are distinguished from posters in that the former have a more typographical and literary leaning. They have historically been used to convey political messages and spread ideas to a mass audience. O’Leary and Spring started the Dead Feminist broadside series in 2008 as a fun and interesting way to make commentary on current political and social issues while at the same time celebrating the lives of extraordinary women of the past. First and foremost, however, each of the broadsides is a work of art, carefully planned out, designed by hand and printed with high quality craftsmanship. In the beginning, O’Leary and Spring laid out some ground rules for the project. Each broadside had to feature a quote by a feminist. The feminist must be deceased. The quote had to be related to a current sociocultural issue or event. The whole piece, with the exception of the colophon (the detailed informational portion of the broadside, which tells the story of each particular feminist), has to be hand-drawn. Via the medium of these broadsides, the two artists have been able to highlight issues like detentions of migrant laborers, religious violence, offshore drilling, body image and urban homesteading. They have featured women like Annie Oakley, Tacoma’s own Thea Foss, the Hawaiian Queen Lili’uokalani, golf star Babe Didrikson Zaharias and the Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. The edition size of each broadside varies somewhat, the edition number being a significant feature of each piece. With the newest printing, for example, the edition size of

ONE THE ABLE VIRTUOSO May 18, 7 p.m. St. Luke’s Memorial Episcopal Church, 3615 N. Gove St., Tacoma The folks behind the Salish Sea Early Music Festival are presenting a Spring Baroque Festival, the first installment of which is May 18. Johann Mattheson’s “The Able Virtuoso,” published in Hamburg in 1720, sets the tone for this program of virtuoso trio sonatas inspired by Corelli and the fusion of Italian, French and German styles. Trio sonatas for violin and flute with theorbo (a very long-necked lute) and baroque guitar will feature the talents of Carrie Krause on baroque violin, Jeffrey Cohan on baroque flute and John Lenti on theorbo and baroque guitar. The festival continues with concerts on May 24 and June 11. Info: salishseafestival.org/tacoma

TWO SPRING FAIRY FESTIVAL Saturday, May 19, 11 a.m. Crescent Moon Gifts, 2502 6th Ave., Tacoma The Spring Fairy Festival was created by

165 prints commemorates the Voting Rights Act, which was signed into law in 1965. A portion of the proceeds from each of the broadsides goes to the Dead Feminists Fund, which distributes funds to charity organizations or causes related to each broadside. Thus, a portion of the proceeds from “Seeding the Vote,” will go to Spread the Vote, a nonprofit that helps obtain government-issued photo identification cards to help counter the suppressive voter ID laws that many state legislatures have used to keep minority citizens from voting. “Seeding the Vote” was inspired by the upcoming congressional midterm elections and the need to get out the vote as the most effective way to turn the tide of government sanctioned intolerance, inequality and violence. The broadside’s prominent sunflower motif plays upon Hamer’s place of origin, Sunflower County. The stalks are used to form jail bars, a reference to Hamer’s incarceration for her voting rights activities. Hamer’s full name is placed on the sides of a trio of yellow busses, as a reference to buses that Hamer used in her voter registration drives. They also hearken to the prominent role of the bus in the civil rights struggle. The word “free” is bracketed by a pair of sunflowers, one of which contains a portrait of Hamer. The colophon at the bottom of the broadside gives a biography of Hamer and her work. The Dead Feminist broadsides can be purchased at www.deadfeminists.com. “Seeding the Vote” sells for $40. They sell out rather rapidly, but there are also post card (5 x 8-inches), unlimited versions of each, which can be purchased. In 2016, O’Leary and Spring released a book, “Dead Feminists, Historic Heroines in Living Color,” which featured the broadsides and historical information about each feminist in the series. It covers the first several years of the Dead Feminist broadsides. Spring and O’Leary each run their own letterpress printing shop and have numerous irons in the fire at any given time. The Dead Feminist broadsides are just one of many projects that these busy and talented artists do. Spring is the proprietor of Springtide Press (see

Angela Wehnert, owner of Crescent Moon Gifts. Originally meant to be a fun party for her customers, the event was so well attended and loved that it grew to become an annual festival. The Spring Fairy Festival is a celebration of art, music, performance and community, designed to let people of all ages come together to express and enjoy one another’s creativity. The free event features a wide variety of musicians, dancers, jugglers stilt walkers, artists, craftsmen, readers, healers and all things connected to the fairy realms. Info: springfairyfestival.com

THREE ARMED FORCES DAY CELEBRATION Saturday, May 19, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Heritage Park (next to McChord Field) Joint Base Lewis McChord Joint Base LewisMcChord will open its gates to the public for the base’s annual Armed Forces Day celebration. This year’s annual celebration will

springtidepress.com). She has an MFA from Columbia College Chicago Center for Book and Paper. O’Leary is an illustrator and lettering artist who has a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design. She is the proprietor of Anagram Press. Her charming sketchbook drawings from her travels “Drawn the Road Again,” have been exhibited locally (see drawntheroadagain.com). Many of the Dead Feminist broadsides are in the collections of universities and libraries all over the U.S. The University of Washington, Seattle and the University of Puget Sound both have collections of the entire series to date. While they are first and foremost examples of the best of letterpress art, the Dead Feminist broadsides are also brilliant social commentaries, reflective of our time. By bringing historic movers and shakers to light, they educate us about the great deeds done by women in the past in order to inspire us to undertake similar deeds in our own time. Tacoma is fortunate to count O’Leary and Spring amongst those citizens who contribute so much to the cultural life of our City of Destiny.

take place at Heritage Park on JBLM McChord Field for the first time since becoming a joint base Oct 1, 2010. The Armed Forces Day celebration offers members of the community an opportunity to join JBLM service members in celebrating America’s history, our military heritage and our continued commitment to serving our community. The day will include a volksmarch, sports events, carnival rides, military history, vehicle displays and live entertainment. Info: jblmmwr.com/armedforcesday

FOUR DESTINY CITY FREAKYCON IV Saturday, May 26, 4 p.m. Destiny City Comics, 218 St. Helens Ave., Tacoma Tacoma’s mini-horror con is back for a fourth strike! Avoid admission fees and show off your cosplay abilities at Stadium District’s spookiest post-Crypticon event. The event features the return of special guests, actress Jackie Neyman Jones, director Tonja Atomic, and production crew Skullface Astronaut, fol-

lowed by a special screening of “Manos Returns” at Weird Elephant at The Grand Cinema. Michael Koehler returns with more chilling “Lore of the Lords” lore books. Local horror shock rock industrial band Murder Weapons will have a special promotional table, as seen at Crypticon Seattle. Tacoma Ghost Tours will be there spinning tales of Tacoma’s most terrifying legends. Come in costume and enjoy. Info: destinycitycomics.com

FIVE 80S COSTUME BALL Saturday, May 26, 9 p.m. The Swiss Restaurant and Pub, 1904 Jefferson Ave., Tacoma The 80s was such a fun and rocking decade. The clothes, the hairstyle, and the music! Then rock out the night with “Hairstorm” as they bring you music from your favorite 80s hair rock bands such as Poison, Motley Crue, Whitesnake, Guns N’ Roses, Van Halen and more. $8 Cover. 21 and over. Info: facebook.com/The.Swiss.Tacoma.WA


Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 18, 2018

ART NEWS ROUNDUP MEET LOCAL AUTHOR AT KING’S BOOKS MAY 20

PHOTO COURTESY OF CONNIE HAMPTON CONNALLY

Tacoma author Connie Hampton Connally will be reading from and signing copies of her new novel “The Songs We Hide,” at King’s Books May 20.

On Sunday, May 20, at 2 p.m., Tacoma writer Connie Hampton Connally will give a reading and signing at King’s Books on behalf of her debut novel, “The Songs We Hide.” Because Connally writes about 1950s Hungary with such vivid realism, readers often assume she is Hungarian. While Connally is not of Hungarian descent, she is passionate about the country and its history. Connally’s interest in Hungary’s turbulent past grew out of her love of music. Says Connally, “Through music, I discovered the story of Zoltán Kodály, a 20th-century Hungarian composer who spread music in his nation despite totalitarianism and two world wars. Kodaly’s example gripped me. What would it be like to offer beauty in a milieu of crushing fear?” A Tacoma resident for many years, Connally began researching Hungary, and the tense national narrative coupled with the poignant stories of its people led her to write her debut novel, “The

Songs We Hide.” Connally’s novel has been compared to the award-winning book, “Exit West” by Mohsin Hamid as well as the musical love story, “Once,” because Connally deftly intertwines the theme of love amid political unrest with the passion that is ignited by music. Early reviews for the book have been extremely positive. Foreword Reviews had this to say in their starred review, “Enriching and evocative, Connie Hampton Connally’s historical “The Songs We Hide” is about the redemptive potency of beauty, love and music in post-World War II Hungary…. resounds with grace and poignancy. It is a captivating masterpiece of historical fiction.” You can learn more about the novel and Connally at www.conniehamptonconnally.com. Reading and book signing: Sunday, May 20, 2-4 p.m., King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave., Tacoma Info: (253)-272-8801 or www. kingsbookstore.com/event/connieconnally

NEW CLASSES TO BEGIN AT TACOMA GALLERY Tacoma Gallery, a new art establishment in Tacoma’s Hilltop neighborhood, is dedicated to Tacomathemed art and creative training: art classes and creative strategy for individuals and companies. Two classes, taught by the dynamic and talented artist Jason Sobottka, are about to begin: Design A Character Saturday, May 19 and May 26, 1-4 p.m.

During this two-day class, design and draw your own character suitable for video games, comics, or animation. Illustration and video game design is big business in the Puget Sound area. Drawing is a core skill for this growing job market. This class will focus on how to begin a concept with gestural sketches and add refinements and details and finally concluding with an inked orthographic character sheet. Ages 14-adult. Younger students may attend with a paid, participating chaperone. This class prepares you for the advanced level course: Refine Your Character. $60 tuition, $10 material fee. Paint Your Pet’s Portrait Thursday, May 24 and 31, 5:30-8:30 p.m. During this two-day class, paint your beloved pet, a memorial for a

passed furry friend or a gift for the pet parent in your life – or just learn how to accurately paint any animal. Paint your portrait using tonal underpainting and transparent color glazes (grisaille technique) and learn how to apply convincing fur or scale textures. Students will supply two printed photos of their pet/animal, one of which will be used to transfer the design to the canvas and the other to observe during the painting. The initial painting will be done tonally (black, white and gray) and subtle, transparent colors will be applied on top of the dry tonal painting. The finishing touches will be applied with opaque paint. While you will be painting a beloved animal, you will also be learning traditional oil and acrylic painting techniques. This workshop will use professional-quality acrylic paints with no fumes or solvents. Ages 14 through adult. Younger students may take the class with a paid, participating chaperone. $60 tuition, $15 material fee (or provide your own). Register by e-mailing jason@tacomagallery.com, Visit: www.tacomagallery.com/classes. Tacoma Gallery is located at upstairs at 1120 S. 11th St., #203, Tacoma.

THERE IS STILL TIME TO ENJOY HISTORIC PRESERVATION MONTH

Each May, the City of Tacoma encourages residents from all ages, cultures and neighborhoods to celebrate Historic Preservation Month. All month long, a roster of events has been planned around this year’s theme of “adaptive reuse.” Although the month is more than half way through its course, there is still plenty of time to get out there and celebrate the history of our city on the bay. Here is a list of Historic Preservation Month events yet to take place: Preservation Awards 2018 Friday, May 18, 6-8 p.m., Stewart Middle School, 5010 Pacific Ave. Celebrate this year’s preservation best at the award ceremony, which includes a keynote tour of the new adaptively-reused Stewart Middle School. Awardees include: Residential Renovation award goes to Born-Lindstrom House, 224 N. Yakima. Commercial Renovation award goes to Union Club, 539 Broadway. Commercial Renovation award goes to Wagner Motors, 616 St. Helens. Leadership in Preservation goes to Dana Repp, Fort Nisqually Living History Museum. Organization in Preservation award goes to Earthwise Architectural Salvage. Community Engagement/Events award goes to “Trapped: Escape Fort Nisqually,” Fort Nisqually Living History Museum. Preservation Planning, Policy, or Initiative award goes to Lighthouse Station Properties Stewardship, Points Northeast Historical Society. Landmark Nomination to be Recognized award goes to Point Defiance Lodge, 5717 N. Roberts Garden Rd, Metro Parks Tacoma. Broadening Perspectives award goes to “Dreams that Matter,” exhibit at Tacoma Historical Society. Heritage/Legacy Business award to Johnson Candy Company.

Old Town History Walk Saturday, May 19, Job Carr Cabin Museum, 2350 N. 30th St. Discover Old Town’s natural environment and learn why Job Carr chose this location to build his home. This tour begins at the original Job Carr Cabin marker at the intersection of North Carr and 31st Streets. Queen Victoria’s Birthday Saturday, May 19, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fort Nisqually, Point Defiance Park (see TW Pick of the Week page B6) Press Play Sunday, May 20, noon to 5 p.m., Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave. Explore TOYTOPIA and play all the best games from decades past, including Oregon Trail. Bummed you missed out on the pet rock craze? Fear not, you can make your own! WSHM will be joined by the Children’s Museum of Tacoma and all the fun toy activities you can handle. Children’s Museum members get buy one, get one free admission. Youth Historical Fiction Reading Monday, May 21, 7-9 p.m., Black Kettle Bites & Brew, 744 Market St. Winners of “Bringing Tacoma’s History to Life,” the inaugural youth historical fiction competition, will share their award-winning stories at this public reading, co-sponsored by Creative Colloquy and Write253. Preservation Month Bike Ride Friday, May 25, 5:15-7 p.m., meet at 7 Seas Brewery, 2101 Jefferson St. A bike ride of Tacoma’s adaptively reused bike trails. Preservation and Bike Month social ending at 7 Seas Brewery. For more information visit www. hpmonthtacoma.com.

‘Lettuce 253’ brings the magic of art making to TAM

“Lettuce Part 9” comes to the fabled halls of the Tacoma Art Museum the evening of May 25. In collaboration with the TAM, Lettuce artists will be showcased at their “Unframed” series. Feel the electricity of art as it is being made. Experience “Lettuce 253,” an innovative live art event, featuring local artists as they create using various mediums. Watch the artists, meet the creators, make art and meet new friends. DJ Jayme Dollface Fisher will be spinning vinyl records to get you grooving. Enjoy a cash bar and happy hour bites at TAM Cafe. Come curious, leave inspired. The cost is $10 ($5 members/ students with ID). You can purchase at 2513a.blackbaudhosting. com/2513a/Unframed-Fourth-Fridays25May2018. As a playful pun, “Lettuce” is the beginning of a wonderful sentence

like “Let Us Create!” or “Let Us Connect!” Lettuce is a business devoted to building community in Tacoma by organizing and hosting unique events showcasing live art. Founder Monique Simkova brings a range of complementary talents and experience to the undertaking. Their aim is to provide an experience in which people feel a sense of belonging in the artists’ community, encourage a positive environment through valuing the dignity and respect of everyone and helping people remember how good it feels to create. Live artists for the May 25 edition of “Lettuce” will be: Lourdes Jackson (www.bristellegalerie.com); Kellie Patrice (brownbetty253.com) and Glory Cancro (glorycancro.wordpress. com). For information, visit www.lettuce253.com or www.facebook.com/ events/325531644639536.


Friday, May 18, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

TCC SCULPTORS Culture Corner A GUIDE TO CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS OF TACOMA DEMONSTRATE CREATIVE FREEDOM Current and upcoming exhibitions at the Museum of Glass

Complementary Contrasts: The Glass and Steel Sculptures of Albert Paley

Through Aug. 19 Located in the North and the Viola A. Chihuly Galleries “Complementary Contrasts: The Glass and Steel Sculptures of Albert Paley” highlights the significance of glass in the body of work of celebrated sculptor Albert Paley (American, born 1944). Though best known for his metal sculptures, Paley has incorporated glass in many commissions and creative works for over a decade. These sculptures demonstrate his commitment to innovation and a synthesis of many of the key elements that distinguish his oeuvre. Though glass and steel share similar properties under intense heat, it is the complementary characteristics of the final forms that appeal to Paley. “My work deals with a lot of contrast. Glass pairs beautifully with steel because it creates a dialogue of opposites. The contour, clarity, and color of glass – metal responds to that,” Paley states.

Made at the Museum: Opaque/Pellucid Through Sept. 23 Located in the Grand Hall Drawing from the museum’s visiting artist residency archives, this pop-up exhibition showcases work made with the absence of color, placing emphasis on form, opacity, technique, and concept. The contributing artists include Daniel Clayman, Laura De Santillana, Luke Jerram, Beth Lipman, and Charles Parriott.

Foraging the Hive: Sara Young and Tyler Budge

PHOTO BY DAVE R. DAVISON

James O’Brien’s “Urban Giraffe,” an assemblage of bicycle parts, exemplifies the no holds barred artistic license granted by TCC sculpting instructor Kyle Dillehey. Dillehey’s students consistently exhibit a lack of inhibition in their use of all manner of non-traditional materials in their three dimensional assemblage work.

By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

The school year is drawing to a close and the art galleries of all the local colleges are hosting shows of student art to show off what their pupils have accomplished. This week, I visited the Gallery at Tacoma Community College to have a look at the 2018 TCC Student Art Exhibition. The show is arranged by instructor. Work by students of each TCC art teacher are clustered together – more or less. I have to confess that I have always been put off by work of Kyle Dillehey’s sculpture students. They are generally a bizarre mish-mash of objects that radiate a discord of color and often exhibit shoddy construction. They are not neat, orderly, clean objects. This year is no exception. A case in point is James O’Brien’s “Urban Giraffe.” The titular animal constructed out of bicycle frames and a bicycle seat forms the animal’s head. The whole construction seems made to clash (if not crash) with the neat geometries of the other art in the gallery (paintings, drawings, prints and photographs on square and rectangular surfaces, and symmetrical ceramic vessels). It was while looking at the odd messiness of Wenging Xu’s “Relax Your Teeth,” however, that I had something of a revelation. I had a sensation of raw, creative freedom as the touchstone of Dillehey’s classes. I can almost hear Dillehey telling his students that “the whole world is your studio and you are free to use any material at hand to create without bounds.” This sense of primal, instinctual, gut-level making was inspirational. Dillehey’s students are encouraged to use anything and everything and assemble it however they wish for whatever purpose they wish. “Relax Your Teeth” is a hodgepodge of electronic parts, clumps of moss and objects wrapped in aluminum foil. A pair of chopsticks set on an electronic board indicate that this is all displayed as a meal, but it looks very unappetizing. Wenging Xu also did a glorious abomination called “Spirit,” a wild whirl of red yarn, chicken wire, cotton balls and extruded metal. Again, I had the sense of an unbridled, creative force and imagined what marvels this artist will come up with if this kind of creative freedom is applied steadily over a sustained period of years or decades. I realized that the strange constructions of Dillehey’s students is the beginning of something. He has managed to teach a letting go of conventions and a reimagining of the uses of the all objects that make up such a large component of our consumerist culture. Some of Dillehey’s students take his lessons and seek to apply them in a focused way. Bianca Wiseman, for exam-

ple, made a piece called “Running Out of Time,” in which racing bib numbers from a variety of half-marathons form the background for the display of a pink and white running shoe. The shoe has been cut open to expose an inner diorama: a collage of photos (presumably of the artist) and a trio of little white plastic figurines. A quote from John Bingham, the guru of slow running, reads: “The miracle isn’t that I finished, the miracle is that I had the courage to start.” Stacy Harris’ “Element Head” is poetic. A Styrofoam head has been covered in gold glitter. Moss is used as hair (Dillehey’s love of moss has evidently been transmitted to some of his students.) The top of the head is covered in small lightbulbs. An eye is placed in the forehead. The piece is mounted on a clean slice of log. Next to Harris’s piece is another Styrofoam head: “Self Portrait” by Thao Nguyen. This one has an intricate diorama to examine, a diminutive interior space inside the head. There is a tiny image of Godzilla, jewel-like seashells, a tiny stump table with tiny stump chairs with a tiny vase of tiny flowers. Nested in a little crate is a little book, a journal by the artist. “Top Secret” is written on the cover. Miniature streams of “work zone” ribbon partition off the upper loft of the interior of Nguyen’s head. Black paint has been poured over the exterior and a pink flower is stuck in the mouth. The piece has all the charm and intrigue of a shadow box, the more you look, the more you see in this cranial treasure chest. The presence of that muse of creative vitality, shown by the sculpture students, was my main takeaway from the show, but there are plenty of other students of all the other instructors that have contributed a heaping helping of good work. There are drawings and paintings of students of Melinda Leibers Cox and a row of lovely prints made by students of Marit Berg. Karen Doten’s students have contributed examples from their life drawing and still life sketchbooks. There are examples of graphic design and digital photography by students of Anthony Culang. In addition to sculpture Dillehey also teaches 2D design and old school, dark room photography. The show also includes some great pottery done by students of TCC’s two master potters, Rick Mahaffey and Reid Ozaki. Bernie Short, Daniel Perez and Hilary Ernst, students of Mahaffey, make a fine exhibiting group as do Ozaki’s students Rowena Forde, Jill Rohrbaugh, Irene Hewing and Logan O’Grady. The 2018 TCC Student Art Exhibition runs through June 7. Swing by and catch some inspiration. For more information call (253) 460-4306 or visit www. tacomacc.edu/art.

May 26 through March 2019 Located in the Leonard and Norma Klorfine Foundation Gallery “Foraging the Hive” investigates the similarities between beehives and human creativity. Artists Tyler Budge (American, born 1972) and Sara Young (American, born 1960) began their collaborative project in 2005. The largescale installation, inspired by the innerworkings of the beehive, will speak to the associations with our culture’s obsessive work ethic, the act of collaboration and labor. In conjunction with Pierce County Beekeepers Association, the exhibition will include a working beehive, on display on the plaza outside the museum, and accessible via webcam. Additionally, a bee-friendly garden has been planted near the hive house. Washington State University Master Gardeners assisted in the plant selection and planting process. Visitors will be invited to create their own honeycomb test tube and add to an installation in the museum’s Grand Hall. For more on the Museum of Glass, visit www.museumofglass.org.


Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 18, 2018

CHANGING SCENE THEATRE NORTHWEST STAGES TIMELY PRODUCTION OF ‘BENT’ By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

The Changing Scene Theatre Northwest is running a production of Martin Sherman’s 1979 “Bent,” a story of gay prisoners caught up in the Holocaust. Directed by Pavlina Morris, the Changing Scene production is well acted and is presented with both good humor and pathos. At its inception, “Bent” was a watershed in drama. The mainstreaming of a theatrical drama featuring gay characters, which told the forgotten story of the plight of gays in Nazi concentration camps, was also a milestone in the struggle for gay rights. From the beginning, “Bent” appealed to a wide audience and garnered the support of major talent. Ian McKellen starred in the London premiere in ’79 and Richard Gere starred in the 1980 Broadway production. “Bent” was part and parcel to a time, not that long ago, when the members of the gay community began to assert the right to live their lives free of persecution – out in the open. As a historical drama, the play shed light on a little-known chapter of the Holocaust. It was not only Jews who were rounded up and sent to death camps. Anyone deemed undesirable by the Nazi regime was removed from German society. Gays, gypsies, Jehovah Witnesses, communists, vagrants and criminals in addition to Jewish folks were taken away to the labor camps. “Bent” (the title is a European slang term for homosexuality) starts off in the roaring Berlin of the mid 1930s Weimar Republic. There is a thriving gay subculture centered on a cluster of night clubs. Things change with the “Night of the Long Knives,” a Nazi purge of members from its own ranks including Ernst Rohm, the openly gay leader of the “Brown Shirts,” the Nazi party’s violent street gang. Following that, the gay clubs are closed down and laws forbidding homosexuality are vigorously enforced. In the play, Max (here played by Nick Fitzgerald), a rather promiscuous gay man, ends up in the Dachau labor camp. Although Max is not Jewish, he was able to work a deal – through shocking means – by which he is classified as a Jew. He would rather wear the yellow star of a Jew than the pink triangle that the Nazis used to mark gay prisoners (this is the origin of the pink triangle as a symbol of gay pride). Max has quickly figured out that those who wear the pink triangle are marked out for the most brutal treatment because they

are considered the lowest of the low by the authoritarian regime. In the world of the have-nots, there are still gradations among the despised. Max is assigned the pointless task of moving rocks from one place to another and back again. He realizes that the job is designed to drive him crazy, but he also realizes that it is the best job in the camp because, serving no practical purpose, there is no urgency behind it. Hence, the guards pay little heed to how quickly the work is being done. Max simply needs a friend to talk to in order to keep himself sane and so he makes a bribe in order to have Horst (Corey Thompson), a gay prisoner who had previously helped him, assigned to help in the task. The dialogue between the two men, as they move stones back and forth, is often funny (the play has a stream of dark humor running through it). Remarkably, the two men fall in love and experience intense feelings for one another despite the knife’s edge of existence upon which they stand. At one point Horst says that he is glad that they’re where they are. Despite everything, Horst has found the freedom to love. It is both an irony and a testament to the human spirit that Horst and Max can have an intense love affair without being able to look at each other, let alone touch one another. “Bent” functions on a number of levels. It sheds light on the history of gays under Nazi rule. As a cultural touchstone, “Bent” was part of the process of the assertion of gay rights and the acceptance of gay folks as part of mainstream culture. On the literary level, “Bent” is an engaging story of human perseverance in the face of the direst limitations. Max’s task of moving stones from one place to another for no reason, as well as the theme of finding the freedom to be one’s authentic self, brings to mind the work of the French author and existentialist philosopher Albert Camus. In “The Myth of Sisyphus,” Camus notes that “the gods had condemned Sisyphus to ceaselessly rolling a rock to the top of a mountain, whence the stone would fall back of its own weight. They had thought with some reason that there is no more dreadful punishment than futile and hopeless labor.” Camus is able to imagine this hellish punishment as a means by which the mythical Sisyphus is able to find meaning and liberation. “The struggle itself toward the heights,” says Camus, “is enough to fill a man’s heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy.” A similar process seems to be at

PHOTO COURTESY OF CHANGINS SCENE THEATRE NORTHWEST

(l to r) Horst (Corey Thompson) and Max (Nick Fitzgerald) enjoy some conversation over soup in TCSTN’s production of Martin Sherman’s “Bent.”

work in “Bent.” In the intimate confines of the Dukesbay Theater (508 6th Ave., #10), the production utilizes a very spare set with minimal props. The acting is uniformly good. In addition to the aforementioned Fitzgerald and Thompson, both of whom take their characters through the grim and magical second act in the concentration camp, there are four additional cast members. Jason Quisenberry is especially charming as the dancer Rudy, Max’s boyfriend, through the first act. Joseph Magin gets to show a lot of skin in his stark entry onto the stage. As Wolf, Magin plays one of the gay Nazis who is targeted in the “Night of the Long Knives.” He has spent a drunken night with Max and their conversation the following morning provides much of the humor in the first act. Magin also plays a prison camp guard in the subsequent portions of the play. Eric Cuestas-Thompson plays both the transvestite nightclub owner, Greta, and Max’s Uncle Freddy, a closeted gay man who tries to teach Max survival through leading a double existence. The suave Paul Sobrie plays the Nazi captain, who is chillingly predatory in the way he plays cat and mouse with those who are so unfortunate as to have fallen into his clutches.

One problem with the play is the way that the final scene is handled. The deadly nature of the prison camp fence needs a little more emphasis and more could have been done with sound effects and lighting effects to make clear what is happening. I am not certain that the end will be clear to those unfamiliar with the script. After all of the buildup, Max’s last act of the drama comes across as unnecessarily rushed. It is nice to see community theater fighting back against authoritarian tendencies that have been unleashed in the country. Despite gains in the realm of civil rights, it is still not entirely safe for folks to be openly gay. Intolerance at the top of the power structure has the effect of encouraging intolerance throughout all levels of the social order. It is not enough to struggle for rights. Once won, those rights must be maintained through constant diligence. The beast of prejudice and intolerance is always out there, waiting for ignorance and complacency to cast a shroud beneath which it can gain entry into our midst. This production of “Bent” is part of the diligence needed to remind ourselves to be on our guards. “Bent” runs through May 26. For show times and ticketing information visit bent2018.brownpapertickets.com.

Stand-up comedy alive and well in Tacoma By Lucas Waggoner For Tacoma Weekly

The city of Tacoma has been growing in leaps and bounds. With this progress, one particular area of growth is the standup comedy scene. Stand-up nights and open mic nights have been cropping up all across the city, seemingly becoming as popular and widespread as karaoke and trivia nights. Tacoma can’t seem to quench its desire for laughter. Comedy has been booming across Tacoma. Comedy clubs have had incredible traffic. Tacoma is home to many talented comics: Rusty, Luke Severeid and Rachel Laurendeau to name a few. Rusty (he is one of those show business people that go by only one name) is one of Tacoma’s greatest comedy veterans. He has been performing locally – and toured nationally – for the past 17 years. He got his start in the now defunct Comedy Underground, a comedy bar that used

BRING IT TO BARB

Answering your questions on mental health, relationships and life issues

By Barb Rock DEAR BARB,

My son is almost 40 and I am so disappointed that he has not worked much in the past 15 years. He has had only short parttime jobs or under the table income from side jobs. He has many hobbies and ideas he is trying to turn into businesses but sadly keeps failing. He is not disabled and is smart but seems unmotivated to stick with any job and make a living. My husband and I have helped him often but he seems ungrateful most of the time. He has no savings, no IRA and his inheritance from us is not going to last him very long. If my son does not have a regular job year after year, he will not pay into social security from any paychecks. He will be poor now and poor later when he is old. How does social security calculate your work history and how much can you depend on from

to be located underneath the Big Whiskey Saloon on South 9th Street. He explained that, back then, there were only five or six open mics and comedy competitions in Tacoma. The comedy scene has experienced a drastic uptick in Tacoma since the early 2000s. Rusty explained that “we have been on a massive plateau,” but that “we seem to be on a slow downtick.” Though there aren’t as many new comedians cropping up in Tacoma, there are already around 40 established, regular comics performing locally. Seattle has a far larger number of performers and venues than Tacoma. Despite the overwhelming number of comics and clubs in Seattle, Rusty said that the Tacoma Comedy Club is considered “one of the best on the West Coast.” It is a bustling comedy club that never seems to pause. New events occur nearly every day as local comedians, nationally recognized comedians and amateurs alike take social security? Signed, A Disappointed Mom DEAR MOM, I assure you that you share similar pain as other parents who are facing this very same dilemma. To qualify for Social Security benefits, you earn “credits” through your work - up to four each year. This year, for example, you earn one credit for each $1,320 of wages or selfemployment income. When you’ve earned $5,280, you’ve earned your four credits for the year. Working “under the table” does not accrue any credits for social security however. Most people need 40 credits, earned over their working lifetime. This would require an average of at least 10 years of being gainfully employed, and social security being deducted from your son’s paychecks before retirement age. For disability and survivor’s benefits and young people, they need fewer credits to be eligible. If your son has not earned enough yet to qualify for any type of benefit, social security can’t give him a benefit estimate. If he works and continues to work, they will give him an estimate when he does qualify. Once he has enough work credits, they estimate his benefit amounts using his average earnings over his working lifetime. He can go online once he qualifies. You get nothing if you don’t meet

the stage. Rusty explained that Tacoma audiences “are more down to earth and relaxed,” while “Seattle is more judgmental and on-edge” in regards to content. Tacoma is more blue collar. Consequently, they tend to be more open to more honest and controversial content. This environment allowed Tacoma to produce far edgier and more natural comics on average. It allows comedians to do what Rusty stated was the mark of a true comic: looking “for the things that scare everyone.” Many Tacoma comics confront difficult and contentious content. The comedy scene in Tacoma may not be rapidly expanding at the moment, but it is certainly thriving. There are open mic nights all over the city. Laughter is a business, and Tacoma has tapped into that market opportunity in a major way. Rusty’s 10 Comedy Tips: [1] “If you want to be a comic, book the 40-credit requirement. This is a troubling state of affairs that is all too common. It’s still low-profile as looming catastrophes go, not widely discussed in the media or over our kitchen tables. It’s going to take years’ worth of stories on the evening news, showing the plight of these retirees running out of money before anyone will take notice. What will they do! I have always counseled my clients who have difficulty with teenagers that the two most important characteristics that you can instill in your children is ambition and gratefulness. Both will get you everywhere in life! Ambition creates a drive, an unstoppable sense of determination. By encouraging your son’s passions and interests that may lead to a career or a field of work is wonderful, however if your son’s hobbies or passions cannot generate a paycheck, serious consideration for wage earning should start now. While he is working and earning a living he certainly can entertain any make-believe idea of generating enough revenue to turn a hobby into enough to survive on without needing a supplemental job. The best inventions and ideas have been in the evening or weekends cultivating a hobby into a big paycheck. But there is a risk factor and consequences to calculate. There is an appropriate saying “necessity is the inventor of ambition”. Some just don’t possess this ambition naturally if it is doing something that they dislike, such as

any mic you can.” [2] “All the audience wants is something personal.” [3] “True comics look for the things that scare everyone.” [4] “Comedy is pretty much conning people into liking you.” [5] “It doesn’t matter how many people congratulate you. You will always be critiquing yourself if you are an artist.” [6] “Strippers and comics have the same job. They expose themselves and work the same hours.” [7] “Your reputation is literally everything.” [8] “Almost the entire business is word of mouth until you get big.” [9] “Make them uncomfortable, bring them to your side, then change the idea they have built up.” [10] “Dealing with censorship is on the comedian. Comedians should tell the jokes they want to tell. They shouldn’t be apologetic.” working an uninteresting or dirty or hard job. It’s amazing how quickly they can muster up some ambition when they are weary of just getting by or are really in a bind. Gratefulness can be demonstrated by example. Gratitude strengthens relationships. We notice how someone supports us or is valuable to us. That sense of appreciation extends from both parent to child and child to parent, creating a richly respectful and trusting relationship that flourishes. You are both on the same team. When a parent notices all the qualities in their child with gratefulness, no matter how old, it makes the child work to live up to the parent’s expectations. It’s human nature thing. Have you ever observed someone’s grateful eyes light up after you do something special for them? It literally makes you want to do more for them! Just getting by may be working for your son momentarily. You as a parent should not be doing ANYTHING that would be endorsing the lack of employment. It is an inevitable obligation for your son to accept and stay employed. It’s not too late. Our job as parents is to “prepare our child for the bumpy road, not smooth out the bumpy road for our child”. Barb Rock is a mental health counselor for the House of Matthew Homeward Bound program in Tacoma, and the published author of “Run Your Own Race: Happiness after 50.” Send any questions related to mental health, relationships or life issues to her at BarbRockrocks@yahoo.com.


Friday, May 18, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

SYMPHONY TACOMA FINISHES SEASON WITH AN OPERATIC FLOURISH

TW PICK OF THE WEEK: GFR Productions brings you an evening with Pamela Moore at Louie G’s Pizza (5219 Pacific Hwy. E., Fife). Moore has a new CD coming out, “Behind the Veil,” and she chose Louie G’s as the first CD release party venue. This will be an intimate evening with Moore. You will get a chance to hear the CD live, and to meet Moore in person. Best known as the metal group Queensÿche’s Sister Mary, Moore is a singer and songwriter, mixing hard rock, pop and electronica, and in more recent years has delved into heavy metal. She currently resides in Seattle. Tickets run $20 to $30. For more information visit www.facebook.com/ events/191384548134371/

Friday, May 18

Sunday, May 20

ALEGRE BAKERY AND GELATO: Chloe Wallace (singer/songwriter) 7 p.m.

WAGNER

By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

FILE PHOTO

the strings would run up and down in windy sweeps. Majestic gales of brassy music are interspersed with light and airy moments before more musical swellings and sonic upwelling are called into being by conductor Ioannides, who, with her wand-like baton, was transformed into a Prospero-like figure. There are few composers who understand how to use the richness and the power of low brass like Wagner. The high point of the concert came during “Liebestod” from Wagner’s opera, “Tristan und Isolde.” Hogan returned to the stage, now draped in a purple-gray gown. She performed in character, as Isolde, an Irish princess who is betrothed to a British king, but who is in love with Tristan. In “Liebestod,” Isolde is singing over the body of the dead Tristan. Filled with passion and pathos, Hogan delivered a demonstration of the power of the human voice. She evoked prickly chills as her voice rose to the heights of the hall. I had a vivid realization of the potential of the human body to be trained to function as a musical instrument, far more expressive than any mechanical invention. The performance brought the audience to its feet for a prolonged standing ovation. After that, only something as fantastic at the “Ride of the Valkyres,” the final piece of the evening, could come close to rivaling the penultimate selection. With that, Symphony Tacoma’s 201718 season came to a close. Renovations will soon begin on the Pantages Theater, so the first concert of next season will take place at the Rialto Theater. Symphony Tacoma will return to the Pantages in November. For more on Symphony Tacoma, visit symphonytacoma.org.

In the ornate and spacious interior of Tacoma’s Pantages Theater, on May 12, Symphony Tacoma finished its 2017-18 season in style with a combined choral and symphonic concert that included the powerful vocals of Kelly Cae Hogan, a soprano from the Metropolitan Opera in New York. Music director and conductor of Symphony Tacoma, Sarah Ioannides was like a combination of a dancer and a wizard as she expressively captained the musicians through an evening of sonic wonderment. The evening opened with a performance of the six movements of Francis Poulenc’s “Gloria,” which brought to bear the full orchestra, the Symphony Tacoma Voices and Hogan’s talents. Decked out in a sparkling, creamy gray gown and with eyes catching the lights as brilliantly as her jeweled ring, Hogan sang the Latin text of “Gloria” with sumptuous verbosity. Each movement of the 1959 composition has its own quality and contour, progressing from the rolling buildup of the opening movement, to the festive sweetness on the second movement, “Laudamus Te.” Hogan made her presence felt in the third movement of the piece, “Domine Deus.” The fourth movement was rather short and sweet – consisting of sonic waves punctuated by melodic passages. Hogan came in again during the somber and dissonant fifth movement, “Domine Deus Angus Dei.” During the final movement, the symphony achieved a pipe organ effect at times. The choir and Hogan all played their parts during the final Amen. For my money, the first portion of the concert was just an appetizer for that which followed after the intermission. The second half of the evening featured the works of the great German composer Richard Wagner. Symphony Tacoma performed something of a “greatest hits” selection from Wagner’s oeuvre. The prelude from “Die Meistersinger” (“The Mastersingers”) engages the woodwinds in a pleasant interaction before the brass and the strings engage in a kind of call and response. Those two great streams of music then flow together and build into a great, brassy fanfare. Following that, there was a performance of the overture from “Der fliegende Hollander” (“The Flying Dutchman”). Here, the low brass seemed to brew up storm fronts of music while IOANNIDES

JAZZBONES: Kuinka, Champagne Sunday (indie) 8 p.m. AIRPORT TAVERN: Disposable Zeros, The Northwest Too Tribute, The Warning (rock tribute bands) 9 p.m., $10 DAWSONS: Fingertips (Motown, funk, R&B, blues) 9 p.m. DOYLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE: Luke Stanton Band with Chase Willett (indie, folk, rock) 9 p.m. DUNAGAN BREWING: That Irish Guy! (Celtic) 8 p.m. EMERALD QUEEN CASINO: Kool and the Gang (soul, R&B), 8:30 p.m. EMERALD QUEEN BRIDGE NIGHTCLUB: Chapter 5 (dance tunes), 9 p.m. KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Pamela Moore (singer/songwriter) 8 p.m., AA ODD OTTER: Tara Tinsley (singer/songwriter) 8 p.m. PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, LAGERQUIST CONCERT HALL: South Sound Saxophone Ensemble (classical) 1 p.m. PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, LAGERQUIST CONCERT HALL: PLU Ringers Concert (hand bells) 4:30 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Not My Tempo (rock) 8 p.m. THE SAFE HOUSE: Dogtooth and Nail, Are They Brothers, Stop Don’t Stop, Merchant mariner, Mud on My Bra (punk) 6 p.m., AA SHAKABRAH: Stingy Brim Olde-Time Blues Project (rock, blues) 7 p.m. THE SPAR: Tatoosh (rock) 8 p.m. THE SWISS: Harmonious Funk (funk) 9 p.m. TACOMA ARMORY: Philthy Rich, Prezi, POOh Hefner, YID, Dj J12, Naj the Shooter, Eazy EQ (hip hop) 7 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Joe Machi (comedy) 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m. TACOMA DOME: Chris Young, Kane Brown, Morgan Evans (country) 7:30 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Mojo Madness (rock) 7 p.m.

Monday, May 21

ST. PATRICK CHURCH: Spring Choral Concert (choral) 7 p.m. THE SWISS: Open Mic Night (open mic) 7 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Girls Night Out (comedy) 7:30 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Bartlett on bass (jam) 7 p.m.

Tuesday, May 22

REAL ART TACOMA: Belmont, Young Culture, JV, Food for Wolves, Russian Blue (pop punk) 7:30 p.m. DAWSON’S: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC METRONOME: Open Mic (open mic) 7 p.m. O’MALLEY’S IRISH PUB: Open Mic (open mic) 7:30 p.m. STONEGATE: Blues Jam with Roger Williamson (blues) 8 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: New Talent Tuesday (comedy) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: SOB Band (jam) 7 p.m., NC

Wednesday, May 23

BLACK KETTLE: Open Mic (open mic) 6:30 p.m. DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 8:30 p.m., NC STONEGATE: The Blu Tonez (blues) 8 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Open Mic (comedy) 8 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Subvinyl Jukebox (jam) 7 p.m., NC VINO AQUINO WINERY: Open Mic (open mic) 6 p.m.

Thursday, May 24

BLEU NOTE LOUNGE: Norma Owens (lounge singing) 6 p.m.

THE AGAVES GRILL: Ed Taylor Band (jazz), 6 p.m. DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 8:30 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Chicken Joe and the Fabulous Cocks (rock) 4 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Open Mic with Dustin (rock) 8 p.m. STONEGATE: Power Rock Jam (rock jam) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: The Hodgetwins (comedy) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (rock, blues) 7 p.m.

TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS IS SEEKING AN

EXPERIENCED ADVERTISING

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

PHOTO COURTESY OF SYMPHONY TACOMA

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DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC JOHNNY’S DOCK: Felix (R & B, blues) 5 p.m. SHAKABRAH: Kristen Marlo, Gina Belliveau, Dave Hannon (singer/songwriters) 6 p.m. STONEGATE: Country Music Jam (jam) 5 p.m. THE SWISS: Puget Sound Music for Youth Showcase (jazz) 4 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: The Dope Show (comedy) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Final Notice with Bob Evans (country, rock, bluegrass) 7 p.m.

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

BLACK PANTHER FRIDAY 5/18 FRIDAY NIGHT FRIGHTS ALIEN AT 10:00 PM

AIRPORT TAVERN: Yotam Ben Horin, Zac D and Aaron, Lizzie Franks (acousti-punk) 9 p.m. BLEU NOTE LOUNGE: Michael Hershman (jazz) 7 p.m. DAWSONS: Fingertips (Motown, funk, R&B, blues) 9 p.m. EAGLES SOUTH TACOMA: The Dream Chasers (rock) 7:30 p.m. EMERALD QUEEN BRIDGE NIGHTCLUB: Chapter 5 (dance tunes), 9 p.m. KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Sammy J (R&B, soul, scat, jazz, funk) 9 p.m. LOUIE G’S: Elton John and Billy Joel tribute (pop, rock) 8 p.m., $10-$15, AA MULE TAVERN: Steeltoe Metronome (indie) 9:30 p.m. PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, LAGERQUIST CONCERT HALL: Alex Jones scholarship recital (classical piano) 8 p.m. RIALTO: The Weepies (singer/songwriters) 7:30 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Loose Gravel and New Roads (rock) 8 p.m. THE SAFE HOUSE: Monsters Among Gods, Odissia, Anchor Point, The Accused Ad, I Defy (punk) 6 p.m., AA THE SWISS: HONK! Showcase (Honk music) 9 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Joe Machi (comedy) 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: The Remedy (rock) 7 p.m. THE VALLEY: Dust Mob, Acid Teeth, Good Touch, Cocoon (thrash, punk, hardcore) 8 p.m.

JAZZBONES: Sinatra at the Sands (Sinatra tribute) 6 p.m.

Tacoma Weekly News is seeking an extremely talented sales professional to join our team. The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated self-starter with a proven record of achieving sales goals. They will demonstrate the ability to develop new business and possess excellent time management skills. Additionally, they should be able to manage all aspects of the sales cycle: prospecting, cold calling, setting appointments, performing needs analysis, presentation, negotiation, and closing, all while maintaining a high level of customer service to existing customers. REQUIREMENTS: 2 years of prior sales experience, preferably newspaper, online and special section experience. Must be self motivated, outgoing individual with the ability to work with the public and advertisers in a positive way. Attendance of community events, organizational skills, and attention to detail, negotiation and problem solving. Starting salary depends on qualifications.

PLEASE SUBMIT YOUR RESUME TO: PUBLISHER@TACOMAWEEKLY.COM


Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 18, 2018

Coming Events TOP PICK: QUEEN VICTORIA’S BIRTHDAY Saturday, May 19, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum, Point Defiance Park Step back in time to the reign of Queen Victoria and join in the celebrations of her majesty’s birthday. At noon, bagpipes will announce the start of the traditional tributes to the Queen, including a musket volley, cannon salute and toasts from the fort’s finely dressed gentlemen. At 1 p.m. guests will be treated to a performance by the Chief Leschi Elementary, Puyallup Tribal School Drum and Dance Group. These 4th and 5th graders will share some of their coastal cultural teachings through songs and dances from the Puyallup Tribe. The Tacoma Scottish Country Dancers will be on hand to perform traditional 19th century social dances and teach visitors the steps to favorites like “Strip the Willow.”  Throughout the day, visitors can barter with clerks in the Sale Shop and watch the blacksmiths working at the forge.  The public is invited to join a round of croquet, trundle a hoop, or engage in a spirited game of graces. There will be tea, lemonade, and cookies while supplies last. Event admission is $8-$10, children 3 and younger are free. For more information visit fortnisqually.org or call (253) 404-3970.

‘MY FAIR LADY’ Fri., May 18, 7:30 p.m. Sat., May 19, 7:30 p.m. Sun., May 20, 2 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 Sixth Ave. Lerner and Loewe transform George Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion” into this musical theatre classic. When aristocratic professor Henry Higgins takes in Cockney pupil Eliza Doolittle on a bet, he gets far more than he wagered. Featuring “I Could Have Danced All Night,” “On the Street Where You Live,” “The Rain In Spain.” Price: adult: $31/senior (60+), student, military: $29/child (12 & under): $22/groups of 10+: $27. Info: (253) 565-6867; tmp.org DAVID LIM – ORGANIST Fri., May 18, 12:10-1 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church Tacoma, 310 N. K St. David Lim, organist, plays music of J. S. Bach, Juan Bautista José Cabanilles, Nicolaus Bruhns, Jean-Jacques Grunenwald and George Shearing on the renowned John Brombaugh pipe organ. Price: Donation. Info: (253) 383-1569; ccptacoma.org HONK! SHOWCASE: TACOMA Fri., May 18, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. The Swiss Pub, 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. We’re excited to bring the party down to Tacoma on May 18 for a special Honk! showcase featuring Eight-Bit Brass Band and Neon Brass Party. Ages: 21+. Price: $8. Info: (253) 572-2821; facebook.com/ events/168072033908559 A ROYAL CELEBRATION Sat., May 19, 2-3:30 p.m. Summit Library, 5107 112th St. E. Come dressed to impress and celebrate Prince Harry and Meghan’s wedding. View video clips of the ceremony while enjoying a sweet treat. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3321; piercecountylibrary.org/calendar DISASTERS AND INSURANCE Sat., May 19, 10:30 a.m. Parkland/Spanaway Library, 13718 Pacific Ave. S. Learn about how homeowners and renters insurance may – or may not – cover you and your possessions in the event of a disaster. Know it before you need it. Ages: All ages. Price: Free; no RSVP required. Info: (253) 798-4600; PierceADRC.org EDIBLE GARDENS – FRUITS, NUTS AND BERRIES Sat., May 19, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Metro Parks Tacoma, 4702 S. 19th St. Explore the basics of successful vegetable gardening in the Pacific Northwest from seed to table. These free monthly workshops are held at locations around

Pierce County. Ages: All ages (may not be suitable for very young children). Price: Free, registration required. Info: (253) 798-4133; piercecountywa.org/ediblegardens

BOOK LAUNCH – ‘NANNY PAWS’ Sun., May 20, 3-4:30 p.m. University Book Store, 1754 Pacific Ave. Snacks, prizes, reading and lots of dog gone fun for all. Meet the real Nanny Paws: LaRoo, Wendy’s small standard poodle who inspired the story. Ages: 3 and up. Price: Free. Info: (253) 6924300 LIONS CLUB COMMUNITY FUNDRAISER Sun., May 20, 5-8 p.m. Joeseppi’s Italian Ristorante, 2207 N. Pearl St. Tacoma Centennial Lions are raising money to help those in need in our community. Helping with eyeglasses, hygiene and first aid kits for the homeless. Ages: All ages. Price: Order off menu for food. Info: (253) 752-8876; joeseppis.com PUGET SOUND MUSIC FOR YOUTH SHOWCASE Sun., May 20, 4-8 p.m. The Swiss Pub, 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. Come check out some local youth talent. Puget Sound Music For Youth Association is having a showcase with bands such as Alexander Enger & The Mayors and Area 51 for starters. Ages: All ages until 8:30 p.m. Price: Donation. Info: (253) 572-2821; facebook.com/ events/200255494107690/ BIBLE DISCUSSION – GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MARK Mon., May 21, 1-2 p.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St. Bible discussion – the Gospel according to Mark, led by Pastor Martin Yabroff. No background required. Open discussion and practical applications. Ages: All ages. Price: Donation. Info: (253) 564-4402; saintandrewstacoma.org DROP-IN HELP WITH WORKSOURCE Mon., May 21, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.; 2-4 p.m. Parkland/Spanaway Library, 13718 Pacific Ave. S. WorkSource employment experts help you with your specific questions about all things employment-related: resumes, unemployment claims, job coaching and interview prep. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3304; piercecountylibrary.org/calendar SPRING MUSEUM FUN DAYS – SCAVENGER HUNT Mon., May 21, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Children’s Museum of Tacoma, 1501 Pacific Ave.

I spy with my little eye...a dolphin? Curious to know what other fun and whimsical objects are hiding throughout the Children’s Museum of Tacoma? Come find out as we embrace National Scavenger Hunt Day (celebrated annually on May 24). Ages: Birth-12 years old. Price: Pay as you will. Info: (253) 6276031; playtacoma.org

PLAYDATES: TOYS FROM THE WSHS COLLECTION Tues., May 22, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave. PlayDates celebrates some of the most popular toys in America through a look into the collections of the Washington State Historical Society. Decades of fun are represented through playsets, games, and things that “go.” Ages: All ages. Price: $14 Adult, $11 Seniors/ youth/student/military (with ID), children 0-5 free (WSHS members always free). Info: (253) 272-3500; washingtonhistory.org READ TO A DOG Tues., May 22, 6-7 p.m. Parkland/Spanaway Library, 13718 Pacific Ave. S. Share a book with a furry friend while improving your reading skills. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 5483304; piercecountylibrary. org/calendar TOYTOPIA Tues., May 22, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave. What was your favorite childhood toy? A jump rope, a board game, or Space Invaders? Or was it an Easy Bake Oven or a Slinky? Ages: All ages. Price: $14 adults; $11 seniors, military (with ID), youth/students; ages 0-5 free (admission for Historical Society members is always free). Info: (253) 272-3500; washingtonhistory.org/visit/ wshm/exhibits/toytopia AFTER SCHOOL MOVIE Wed., May 23, 2 p.m. Parkland/Spanaway Library, 13718 Pacific Ave. S. Join us for free popcorn and a screening of “Jumanji” (1995) after early release from school. Ages: Film rated PG. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3304; piercecountylibrary.org/calendar THE MEMORY (ALZHEIMER’S) CAFE Wed., May 23, 3-4:30 p.m. Elmer’s Restaurant, 7427 S. Hosmer St. With Linda McCone, a regular gathering of individuals with memory loss and their caregivers for a meal, conversation and entertainment. Price: Free. Info: (253) 722-5691; lcsnw.org/tacoma/pdf/MemoryCafes.pdf

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

Looking for a relaxed space to work or study? The Learning Lounge has everything you need from laptops to collaborative workspaces and friendly librarians available to guide your research or tackle tech questions. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3321; piercecountylibrary.org/calendar

ARGENTINE TANGO ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS CLASS Wed., May 23, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Backstreet Tango, 3505 S. 14th St. You will learn the basic elements for this wonderful dance by a certified professional instructors. Dancers can start on any Sunday; no need to wait for the start of another series. Ages: 16 years of age and up with guardian. Price: $40 for your first eight classes, first class is complimentary. Info: (253) 3048296; backstreettango.com

‘LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS’ Fri. May 25, 8 p.m. – OPENING NIGHT Sat., May 26, 8 p.m. Sun., May 27, 2 p.m. Lakewood Playhouse, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd., Lakewood  “A Simple Love Story of a Boy, A Girl and a Man-Eating Plant.” The meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn stumbles across a new breed of plant he names “Audrey II” after his coworker crush. This foul-mouthed, R&Bsinging carnivore promises unending fame and fortune to the down and out Krelborn as long as he keeps feeding it, blood. Over time, though, Seymour discovers Audrey II’s out of this world origins and intent towards global domination! A Lakewood Playhouse premiere! Plays through June 23. Special showings at 8 p.m. Thursday, May 31  (pay what you can night) and  8 p.m.  Thursday, June 7  (pay what you can actors’  benefit). Parental Advisory:  This musical comedy is very true to the original film’s macabre sense of humor. The plant will devour many people...and did we mention there is a very, very sadistic dentist? Because he’s a monster, too! Prices:  $30 general admission; $28 military, seniors; $25 students/educators. Info: (253) 588-0042; www.lakewoodplayhouse.org

KNIT TOGETHER Thurs., May 24, 4-5:30 p.m. Parkland/Spanaway Library, 13718 Pacific Ave. S. Come knit or crochet with us. Supplies and instruction provided the first Thursday of the month. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3304; piercecountylibrary.org/calendar SUMMIT OLYMPUS HIGH SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE Thurs., May 24, 6-7 p.m. Summit Olympus High School, 409 Puyallup Ave. Summit Olympus High School invites families and students to take a tour of the school, meet the faculty, have your questions answered, and learn how to enroll a student at a tuitionfree school that will prepare them for success in college and to be thoughtful, contributing members of society. Price: Free. Info: (253) 444-9781; olympus.summitps.org/enroll/ THE LEARNING LOUNGE Thurs., May 24, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Summit Library, 5107 112th St. E.

P S E S Y M P H O N Y T A C O M A Y L B

L E O N A R D B E R N S T E I N N H S E

M H D W D Y Y Y S W U O W N E H R P A N

T E C A E P T C E J O R P G R M R G I T

I Y A D S E C R O F D E M R A I K X C P

K I L E V B O T E A C S C V O G F L Y H R O F W WU R G N L Y D U Y O J O G T O

A H P I X R F Q R X V Q F Q E V K E K S

P T D H O F G B A O N A H A D L B O S J

A E M V B A E D T J I V D K I R A A Z O

R B N F K A Q P F R Y F Q H N F L P Q Q

T E S E C C F B Y E E L F X U G C H D V

M L K E O K X F L M M P C S F O V Z D A

E P Q T L T E J I X X Q Z O B B G A X K

N T M E H B C W G T S Q T I N U I R Q B Q T W U M Q C T I U Y R WW Y C T T Y U

S T N I A S S T U D E N T A R T S H O W

Y R T A V O U S T G H L L G M Z F U S F P Z WW F I M S U S Z X M S V Q X Q C O

L Z B D E Q Z M K E U L S R K X J A D U

We’ve hidden 12 Tacoma Weekly-themed words in this word search. How many can you find? Not sure what you’re looking for? Head over to B5 for the complete word list.

DEAD FEMINISTS How many words can you make out of this phrase?

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.


Friday, May 18, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 7

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PLEASE SUBMIT YOUR RESUME TO: PUBLISHER@TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

www.tacomaweekly.com

Advertising Representatives: • Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com


Section B • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 18, 2018

Notices

Notices IN THE COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS FOR THE PUYALLUP INDIANS RESERVATION, TACOMA WASHINGTON

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Fife Towing, Fife Recovery Service & NW Towing, at 1313 34th Ave E, Fife on 5/24/2018. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130 at 11:00 a.m. Viewing of cars from 10:00-11:00 a.m. Registered Tow Numbers 5009, 5421, 5588. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

Auction Notice

Abandoned Vehicle Lakewood Towing Inc. #5002 9393 Lakeview Ave SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 Ph. 253-582-5080 05222018 Auction 01302018 Date 01/30/2018 5/22/2018 Sign in & View @ 11pm pm Auction Starts @ 2 pm In accordance with RCW 46.55.130 Lakewood Towing Inc. will sell to the highest bidder. See complete listing @ lakewoodtowing.com or SUPERIOR posting at COURT our officeOF

WASHINGTON COUNTY OF PIERCE

NO: 17-4-00994-9 In re the Estate of: DOUGLAS MORGAN KNUDSON Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The Person Representative named below has been appointed and has qualified as personal representative of the above estate. Persons having claims against the deceased must, prior to the time such claims would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, serve their claims on the personal representative or the attorney of record in the address stated below and file an executed copy of the claim with the Clerk of this Court within four (4) months after the date of the filing of the copy of this Notice with the Clerk of the Court, whichever is later or, excepted under those provisions included in RCW 11.40.011 or 11.40.013, the claim will be forever barred. This bar is effective as to claims against both the probate assets and the non-probate assets of the decedent. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with the Clerk of Court: April 20, 2018 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION April 27, 2018 Donald N. Powell Attorney and Counselor at Law818 S. Yakima, 1st Floor Tacoma, Washington 98405-4865 (253) 274-1001 (253) 383-6029 Fax

In the matter of the estate of: Case No: PUY-CV-PR-2017-0136 Gildardo Cruz Ascenscion Vera-Strickler DOB: 11/30/1987 Deceased LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION (AGREED) (COURT CLERK ACTION REQUIRED) THIS MATTER comes before the Court pursuant to an agreed Petition for Letter of Administration. GILDARDO CRUZ ASCENCION VERASTRICKLER of the Puyallup Indian Reservation and County of Pierce, State of Washington, on the 27th day of October, 2017, passed away, leaving at the time of his death personal property subject to probate administration. The Court, having reviewed the Petition, enters an Order appointing RONICE GOFORTH as Administrator of the Estate. NOW, THERFORE, THIS COURT appoints RONICE GOFORTH as Administrator of the Estate of GILDARDO CRUZ ASCENCION VERASTRICKLER. WHEREAS, said Administrator having been duly qualified, this Court authorizes her to administer the Estate according to Puyallup Tribal and other applicable law. WITNESS, the Honorable, JUDGE of our said Court and the seal of said Court hereto affixed this 16th day of January 2018. PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT

TO: Scott Hawkins Case Name: In re: H., S. Case Number: PUY-G-JV-2018-0005 Nature of Case: Guardianship of a Minor Child SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF HEARING PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a petition has been filed asking the Court to appointed the abovenamed Petitioner(s) to be the guardian(s) for H.,S, a minor child under PTC 7.12 (Guardianship of Minors Code). YOU ARE SUMMONED to appear at a guardianship hearing in this Court on the Puyallup Indian Reservation at: DAY: MONDAY DATE: JULY 9, 2018 TIME: 9:00 A.M. LOCATION: 1451 EAST 31st ST., TACOMA, WA 98404 The guardianship hearing is private and closed. Only those persons the Court finds to have a legitimate interest in the proceedings may attend. The Court will hear testimony to determine whether guardianship is in the best interest of the child and the Tribal community. The Court will consider all guardianship reports submitted for review. All parties shall be given the opportunity to contest the factual contents and conclusions of the guardianship reports. Any party may file recommendations regarding the guardianship with the Court at least 10 calendar days before the hearing. You also have the following rights before the Court: The right to be present before the Court; The right to present written and oral testimony; The right to subpoena witnesses; The right to submit relevant evidence to the Court for consideration; The right to counsel at your own expense and effort; the Court has a list of attorneys who are admitted to practice before the Puyallup Tribe; and The right to appeal a final decision in this matter. If you do not appear at the hearing or file a written response to the petition within 20 days from the date of this notice, the Court may enter an order in your absence.   NOTICE PURSUANT TO PTC 4.08.250 – DEFAULT JUDGMENT WHEN A PARTY AGAINST WHOM A JUDGMENT IS SOUGHT FAILS TO APPEAR, PLEAD, OR OTHERWISE DEFEND WITHIN THE TIME ALLOWED, AND THAT IS SHOWN TO THE COURT BY A MOTION AND AFFIDAVIT OR TESTIMONY, THE COURT MAY ENTER AN ORDER OF DEFAULT AND, WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE TO THE PARTY IN DEFAULT, ENTER A JUDGMENT GRANTING THE RELIEF SOUGHT IN THE COMPLAINT. Copies of the Petition and this Summons are available at the Court Clerk’s Office located at 1451 E. 31st St., Tacoma, WA 98404. If you have any questions, please contact the Court Clerk’s Office at (253) 680-5585.

Notices

Volunteers

Superior Court of Washington County of Pierce In re: Marriage | domestic partnership Petitioner EDWARD HINDS NO: 18-3-01349-5 Summons Served by Publication And Respondent YOLANDA RAYNETTE HINDS Summons Served by Publication To Yolanda Raynette Hinds- the other party has asked the Court to End your Marriage or domestic partnership. Name Change Change the name of the Respondent You must respond in writing if you want the court to consider your side Deadline! Your Response must be filed and served within 60 days of the date this summons is published. If you do not file and serve your Response or a Notice of Appearance by the Deadline: *No one has to notify you about other hearings in this case, and * The court may approve the request in the Petition without hearing your side (called a default judgment). Follow these steps: Read the Petition and any other documents that were filed at court with this summons. Those documents explain what the other party is asking for. Fill out a Response on this form FL Divorce 211, Response to Petition about a Marriage. Serve (give) a copy of your Response to the person who filed this Summons at the address below, and to any other parties. You use certified mail with return receipt requested. For more information on how to serve, read Superior Court Civil Rule 5. File your original Response with the court clerk at this address: Superior Court Clerk, Pierce County 930 Tacoma Ave S. Tacoma WA 98402 Lawyer not required: It is a good idea to talk to a lawyer, but you may file and serve your Response without one. Person filing this summons or his/her lawyer fills out below EDWARD HINDS April 5, 2018 The following address 34414 28th Place SW Federal Way WA 98023 Superior Court of Washington, County of Pierce

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF THURSTON FAMILY AND JUVENILE COURT No: 18-7-00220-34

ings for volunteers in our food bank. These positions will be filled on a first come, first served basis. Come volunteer and receive free groceries! El Shaddai Christian Ministries/The Empowerment Center, 4340 Pacific Ave., Tacoma WA 98148. For more information contact us at 253-677-7740.

Volunteer to help an Isolated Elder

Make a difference in someone’s life! Senior Companions and Senior Friends are volunteers whose friendship helps seniors maintain their independence through regular visits and assistance with errands. Senior Companion volunteers must be 55+, low-income and serve 15 hrs/week to receive a tax free stipend. Senior Friend volunteers must be 18+ and serve 2 hrs/month – no stipend. Eligible volunteers will pass a background check and attend training before being matched with an elder needing your help. Call Sarah (253722-5686) or Linda (253722-5691) at Lutheran Community Services for more information & an application

City of Fife Needs You!

We are looking for passionate applicants for open positions on our volunteer Boards and Commissions. Openings are on the Arts Commission, Parks Board, Tree Board and Youth Commission. Applications are accepted year round, but first review will be 3/24/17. Online Application: www. cityoffife.org/getinvolved.

VOLUNTEER ADVOCATES NEEDED FOR RESIDENTS IN LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES

NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE, TWEET LESS CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care has some great ways for you to serve the community and make meaningful connections. Those near the end of life need help with living. If you have 1-4 hours a week to read to someone, listen to their stories, run errands, make phone calls, or welcome people to our hospice facility, then we have several opportunities for you. Join us in the new year for trainings scheduled in January and March. Log onto www.chifranciscan. org and click “hospice and palliative care” in the “our services” tab to learn more. Or call James Bentley at 253538-4649

The Pierce County Long Term Care Ombudsman Program is looking for people who are empathetic, diplomatic, assertive, and skilled communicators to be volunteer ombudsman. As a LTC Ombudsman, you will visit an assisted living community or a skilled nursing community, working to ensure that resident rights are being protected and helping residents resolve problems they are unable to solve on their own. Volunteer ombudsman are trained and certified and dedicate 4 hours a week or 16 hours a month. Ongoing support, case staffing, team-meetings, and trainings are provided each month. For more information please call 253 7983789 or Email Kgavron@ co.pierce.wa.us. Or visit www.co.pierce.wa.us/index.aspx?NID=1302

Wanted: Volunteers for groceries.

Notice and Summons by Publication (Dependency) (SMPB) (Optional Use)

The Empowerment Center currently has a limited number of open-

Pets

Dependency of: TARYN LEE D.O.B.: 02/03/2004

Pet of the Week

To: ANGELINA LEE, Mother A Dependency Petition was filed on March 12, 2018; A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: June 22, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. at Thurston County Family and Juvenile Court, 2801 32nd Avenue SW, Tumwater, Washington 98501. You should be present at this hearing. The hearing will determine if your child is dependent as defined in RCW 13.34.050(5). This begins a judicial process which could result in permanent loss of your parental rights. If you do not appear at the hearing, the court may enter a dependency order in your absence. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, call DSHS at 360-725-6700 or 1-888-822-3541. To view information about your rights, including right to a lawyer, go to HYPERLINK “http:// www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.aspx” www.atg. wa.gov/DPY.aspx. Dated: __________________, by Linda Myhre Enlow, Thurston County Clerk.

Tipped ear, don’t care. Featured Pets Juno and Junett are two shy but sweet girls who will blossom like May flowers in the right home. Previously, the pair lived in an overcrowded cat colony and came to the Humane Society through our Community Cats Program. Now they are ready for homes that will give them time to adjust to a new environment. In return for patience, their new family will be rewarded with a lifetime of love. One-year-old Juno loves full body petting, brushing, and giving you bonks on the leg. Five-year-old Junett likes back petting and treats. They can be adopted separately or together -- as Community Cats, they are used to getting along with each other and other felines. However, they would both do well in calm homes without young children or energetic dogs. If mellow couch time with a kitty friend sounds like your ideal evening, visit today and ask our Greeter if Community Cats Assistant Manager Jay is available. He would be thrilled to show off these sweeties and share their personalities. Juno: #A525841, Junett: #A525302

www.thehumanesociety.org

Call us today to place your classified ad! 253-922-5317 or fill out this form and mail with payment to:

Name: _______________________________ Address: _____________________________

6812 27 Weekly St. W., Tacoma University 304 PuyallupPlace, Ave., #1 WA 98466 Tacoma WA 98421

Category: Ad Copy Here:

_____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________

______________________________________ Phone:_______________________________

Deadline: Tuesday by 12 noon for Thursday publication

.

Cash

30 Words and Under: _____________________ Extra words @ .05: ________________________ Sub Total: _______________________________ x Number of Weeks = _____________________ Total Amount: __________________________

Check

Money Order

Visa/Mastercard

Exp.

Card #

Cost: $15 for 30 words for one week. 5¢ per each additional word. Deadline: Tuesday, 12 noon for Thursday publications. Payment: Required on

Cost: $15 forads 30 at words one week, .05 eachcash, additional Deadline: Tuesday, noon forBring Thursday publications. Required on all Ave. all classified time for of placement. We per accept check,word. money order or Visa/Mastercard. payment to TacomaPayment: Weekly at 304 Puyallup classified ads at time of placement. We accept cash, check, money order or Visa/Mastercard. Bring patent to Tacoma Weekly at 6812 27th St. W. in Tacoma. Email: advertising@tacomaweekly.com University Place. Email: advertising@tacomaweekly.com

3 0 4 P u y a l l u p Av e . , Ta c o m a • 2 5 3 - 9 2 2 - 5 3 1 7 TA C O M A W E E K LY

FIFE FREE PRESS

M I LTO N - E D G E W O O D S I G N A L 6812 27 St. W., University Place, WA 98466U N I V E R S I T Y w w w. t a c o m a w e e k l y. c o m

PLACE PRESS


Friday, May 18, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 9

Classifieds

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

CALL 253.922.5317

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

SERGIO HERNANDEZ Serving the Community Since 1991 Better Properties University Place/Fircrest (253) 431-2308 Sergio@betterproperties.com

FOR SALE 5519 66th Wy SE Lacey, WA 98513

$269,900 3 Beds 1.75 Baths, 1,346 SqFt Year Built 2009

Attractive rambler on a huge corner lot great neighborhood close to schools, community recreation facilities, services, stores & golf course. Home features open concept living with many amenities vaulted ceilings, keyless entry, ceiling fans, oversized breakfast bar, pantry, den/study, all appliances, large trex deck, storage shed, big toy set, completely fenced yard.

Your Go-To North Tacoma Experts and Neighbors

Toner Real Estate Solutions SPECIALIZING IN RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL SALES; & PRIVATE LOANS

CALL TODAY 253-441-5000

Joseph Toner Sharon Benson • Sharonbenson.com Managing Broker CRS, GRI, ABR, SRES, CDPE, ONE 2016 Pierce County Realtor of the Year 253.381.7447 sharon@sharonbenson.com

Kelli Jo Hjalseth • Kellijo.net

Managing Broker CRS, IMS, RMS, CSHP 253.208.9066 Kellijo@windermere.com

TACOMA URBAN DIGS

Designated Broker, Principal Toner Real Estate Solutions 1628 Mildred Street, Suite 202 Tacoma Washington 98465 Joe@JoeToner.com 253.441.5000

REAL ESTATE

Heather Crittendon & Associates Cell: 253-212-8468 Cell: 253-222-4549

hcrittendon@yahoo.com

www.facebook.com/TacomaUrbanDigs Just Listed $345,000 2913 S. 18th St. Tacoma Fabulous 5 bedroom/2bath Tacoma Home Open House Schedule: 5/16 9-12 5/17 3-6 5/19 10-1 5/20 1-4

CONDOS & HOMES APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES

UNIV.TACOMA PL. APARTMENT 3228 S UNION AVE. 7518 41ST ST CT W

UNIV. PLACE DUPONT HOME 2208 GRANDVIEW 2839 MARTIN DR. ST W

1BED BATH 450 SF . 2 CLEAN, BED, 1 1 BATH, 800SF. SPACOZY APARTCIOUS 2ND FLR APT HOME IN MENT IN TACOMA, WITH THE BEAUTIFUL FIRWA-16. PARK EASY ACCESS TO

3 BED 2 BATH 1742 SF. WEL2+ BED 2.5 SF. 2 CUTE AND COME TOBATH THIS1340 3 BED BATH BRIGHT BD 2.5 BATH HOME INCLUDING U.P2 . HOME, W/HARDWOOD A WONDERFUL KITCHEN WITHLEVEL. ALL APLS. FLOORS ON THE MAIN

$625 $1095

FIRCREST TRIPLEX DUPONT 1442 RAINIER DR #1 2205 BOBS HOLLOW LN

$950 $1850

$1450 $1695

DT PUYALLUP TACOMA CONDO

9007 115THAVE ST.#507 E 1501 TACOMA

$1295 $1150

31 BED 2.5 BATH 2274850 SF. 2SF. STORY W/ BED 1 BATH THIS 3 SPACIOUS UPSTAIRS 1 ROOMY 850BEDROOMS, S.F. 1 BEDROOM OPEN LOFT, LANDING AREA IS BATH UNIT INAND QUIET FIRCREST PERFECT WORK STATION. ON THE FOR ENDA OF A TRIPLEX

BED 1BATH 2.5 BATH 1157 SF. REMOD12ELED BED, 700SF. MARCATO CONTOWNHOUSE W/ 2 BEDS DOS ARE IN THE MIDDLE OF ALL THE & 1.5 BATH. NEWER FLOORING, SIGHTS AND SOUNDS OF THE CITY. APPLIANCES, NEWER PAINT.

14406 PACIFIC AVE 3734 1/2 N 28TH STS

5121 PACIFIC 203RD ST. CT. E 8425 AVE.#5,6,8

TACOMA N. TACOMA DUPLEX

$695 $1195

SPANAWAY TACOMA APARTMENT

$1425 $750-1050

3 BED 2.5 BATH 1680 SF. 1 BED, 1 BATH 575 GREAT 1 BED, 1 BATH 756 SF.SF. RENOVATED 0,1,2MUST BED 1 BATH 500-800SF. THIS COMPLEX SEE!! FANTASTIC 2 VALUE IN THIS NICE 1 BED2ND FLOOR OF A STATELY DUPLEX HAS BEEN REMODELED FRESH PAINT, STORY HOME, 3 W/ BEDROOM ROOM UPPER UNIT AVAILABLE 1/2 BLOCK OFF PROCTOR NEW WINDOWS AND PLENTY OF PARKING. 2.5 BATH ON A CORNER LOT. IN THE PACIFIC OAKS APTS.

Park52.com · Park52.com · 253-473-5200 253-473-5200

www .T acoma U rban D igs . com

BUSINESSES OPPORTUNITIES COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS FOR SALE/LEASE

RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109

View pictures, pictures, discounts discounts & & more more properties properties online. View online.

Professional Services ProfessionalManagement Management Services

UNDISCLOSED , WELL-ESTABLISHED LANDSCAPING BUSINESS in Gig Harbor for Sale. $85,000 Cash. Tax return shows substantial increase in sales and net income from previous year. COLLISION CENTER, PORT ORCHARD, SIDNEY AVE. Longtime established, includes Real estate. Price reduced. $900,000. SBA Financing Possible. Price includes business, equipment, several outbuildings. Over 38,000 sq feet of land. Excellent road exposure. Seller Retiring. Call Ed: 253-224-7109 LONG TIME EXISTING PAWN AND GUN SHOP. Same location last 40 years. Same owner last 34 years. Sale is very confidential. Proposed buyers must sign disclosure statement and provide POF or suitable financing prior to location disclosure. Seller prefers cash on SBA financing. Protected area. Business price is $140,000 + Inventory. RE price is $275,000. Contract terms possible OAC. POPULAR TAVERN AND EATERY FOR SALE LOCATED IN THE OLYMPIA AREA. Absentee Seller owns the business and the property (Approx. 57,935 Sq Ft) and the sale rice is $1,600,000 (Business $350,000 and the Real Estate, $1,250,000). This Property Generates a good monthly gross rental income and there is ample room remaining on the property for future development.


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 18, 2018

Kool & the Gang

Brian McKnight

Battle at the Boat 116

May 19, 8:30pm

June 2, 8:30pm

June 9, 7pm

I-5 Showroom $35, $65, $95, $105

I-5 Showroom $35, $40,$65, $60,$95, $90,$105 $95

I-5 Showroom $30, $50, $75, $100

Dane Cook

Kenny “Babyface” Edmonds

George Thorogood and The Destroyers Rock Party Tour

June 16, 8:30pm

June 22, 8:30pm

July 8, 7pm

I-5 Showroom $65, $90, $165, $175

I-5 Showroom $40, $65, $100, $105

I-5 Showroom $35, $55, $80, $85

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 • EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424 You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.

Twa 05 18 18 p01  
Twa 05 18 18 p01  
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